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Sample records for disseminating evidence-based treatments

  1. Challenges and Successes in Dissemination of Evidence-Based Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress: Lessons Learned From Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foa, Edna B; Gillihan, Seth J; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) poses monumental public health challenges because of its contribution to mental health, physical health, and both interpersonal and social problems. Recent military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan and the multitude of resulting cases of PTSD have highlighted the public health significance of these conditions. There are now psychological treatments that can effectively treat most individuals with PTSD, including active duty military personnel, veterans, and civilians. We begin by reviewing the effectiveness of these treatments, with a focus on prolonged exposure (PE), a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for PTSD. Many studies conducted in independent research labs have demonstrated that PE is highly efficacious in treating PTSD across a wide range of trauma types, survivor characteristics, and cultures. Furthermore, therapists without prior CBT experience can readily learn and implement the treatment successfully. Despite the existence of highly effective treatments like PE, the majority of individuals with PTSD receive treatments of unknown efficacy. Thus, it is crucial to identify the barriers and challenges that must be addressed in order to promote the widespread dissemination of effective treatments for PTSD. In this review, we first discuss some of the major challenges, such as a professional culture that often is antagonistic to evidence-based treatments (EBTs), a lack of clinician training in EBTs, limited effectiveness of commonly used dissemination techniques, and the significant cost associated with effective dissemination models. Next, we review local, national, and international efforts to disseminate PE and similar treatments and illustrate the challenges and successes involved in promoting the adoption of EBTs in mental health systems. We then consider ways in which the barriers discussed earlier can be overcome, as well as the difficulties involved in effecting sustained organizational change in mental health

  2. Visualization studies on evidence-based medicine domain knowledge (series 3): visualization for dissemination of evidence based medicine information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiantong; Yao, Leye; Li, Youping; Clarke, Mike; Gan, Qi; Li, Yifei; Fan, Yi; Gou, Yongchao; Wang, Li

    2011-05-01

    To identify patterns in information sharing between a series of Chinese evidence based medicine (EBM) journals and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, to determine key evidence dissemination areas for EBM and to provide a scientific basis for improving the dissemination of EBM research. Data were collected on citing and cited from the Chinese Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (CJEBM), Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine (JEBMc), Chinese Journal of Evidence Based Pediatrics (CJEBP), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Relationships between citations were visualized. High-frequency key words from these sources were identified, to build a word co-occurrence matrix and to map research subjects. CDSR contains a large collection of information of relevance to EBM and its contents are widely cited across many journals, suggesting a well-developed citation environment. The content and citation of the Chinese journals have been increasing in recent years. However, their citation environments are much less developed, and there is a wide variation in the breadth and strength of their knowledge communication, with the ranking from highest to lowest being CJEBM, JEBMc and CJEBP. The content of CDSR is almost exclusively Cochrane intervention reviews examining the effects of healthcare interventions, so it's contribution to EBM is mostly in disease control and treatment. On the other hand, the Chinese journals on evidence-based medicine and practice focused more on areas such as education and research, design and quality of clinical trials, evidence based policymaking, evidence based clinical practice, tumor treatment, and pediatrics. Knowledge and findings of EBM are widely communicated and disseminated. However, citation environments and range of knowledge communication differ greatly between the journals examined in this study. This finds that Chinese EBM has focused mainly on clinical medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine, pediatrics, tumor

  3. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on ran...

  4. A Community-Based Participatory Research Guided Model for the Dissemination of Evidence-Based Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafield, Rebecca; Hermosura, Andrea Nacapoy; Ing, Claire Townsend; Hughes, Claire K; Palakiko, Donna-Marie; Dillard, Adrienne; Kekauoha, B Puni; Yoshimura, Sheryl R; Gamiao, Shari; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe

    Dissemination is a principle within community-based participatory research (CBPR); however, published research focuses on the dissemination of findings from CBPR projects but less on dissemination of interventions developed through CBPR approaches. To disseminate an evidence-based lifestyle intervention tailored for Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, the PILI 'Ohana Project (POP), an 11-year CBPR initiative, developed an innovative dissemination model. The community-to-community mentoring (CCM) model described in this paper extends the application of CBPR values and principles used in intervention development to intervention dissemination. The CCM model combines a CBPR orientation with the diffusion of innovation theory, the social cognitive theory, and key concepts from community organizing and community building to address the multilevel factors that influence uptake of an evidence-based intervention (EBI). Grounding the model in CBPR principles provides benefits for intervention dissemination and integrates a focus on community benefits and capacity building. By establishing co-equal, mutually beneficial relationships at the core of the CCM model, opportunities are created for building critical consciousness, community capacity, and social capital. More research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this model of intervention dissemination which may enhance diffusion of CBPR interventions and empower communities in the process.

  5. Morphea: Evidence-based recommendations for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Fett

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphea is a rare fibrosing disorder of the skin. Evidence-based treatment strategies in morphea are lacking. This review summarizes the available data on morphea treatment and provides therapeutic strategies based on morphea subtypes. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase from inception until May of 2011 were searched using the key words "morphea" and "morphea treatment." Reference lists of the resultant articles, as well as relevant reviews, were also searched. This review focuses on randomized controlled trials, prospective interventional trials without controls and retrospective reviews with greater than five subjects.

  6. Adopting an Evidence-Based Lifestyle Physical Activity Program: Dissemination Study Design and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Andrea L; Buller, David B; Dearing, James W; Cutter, Gary; Guerra, Michele; Wilcox, Sara; Bettinghaus, Erwin P

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of research studies that have examined academic-commercial partnerships to disseminate evidence-based physical activity programs. Understanding this approach to dissemination is essential because academic-commercial partnerships are increasingly common. Private companies have used dissemination channels and strategies to a degree that academicians have not, and declining resources require academicians to explore these partnerships. PURPOSE: This paper describes a retrospective case-control study design including the methods, demographics, organizational decision-making, implementation rates, and marketing strategy for Active Living Every Day (ALED), an evidence-based lifestyle physical activity program that has been commercially available since 2001. Evidence-based public health promotion programs rely on organizations and targeted sectors to disseminate these programs although relatively little is known about organizational-level and sector-level influences that lead to their adoption and implementation. METHODS: Cases (n=154) were eligible if they had signed an ALED license agreement with Human Kinetics (HK), publisher of the program's textbooks and facilitator manuals, between 2001 and 2008. Two types of controls were matched (2:2:1) and stratified by sector and region. Active controls (Control 1; n=319) were organizations that contacted HK to consider adopting ALED. Passive controls (Control 2; n=328) were organizations that received unsolicited marketing materials and did not initiate contact with HK. We used Diffusion of Innovations Theory (DIT) constructs as the basis for developing the survey of cases and controls. RESULTS: Using the multi-method strategy recommended by Dillman, a total of n=801 cases and controls were surveyed. Most organizations were from the fitness sector followed by medical, nongovernmental, governmental, educational, worksite and other sectors with significantly higher response rates from government

  7. Evidence-based treatment of metabolic myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan LIN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the current treatments and possible adverse reactions of metabolic myopathy, and to develop the best solution for evidence-based treatment.  Methods Taking metabolic myopathy, mitochondrial myopathy, lipid storage myopathy, glycogen storage diseases, endocrine myopathy, drug toxicity myopathy and treatment as search terms, retrieve in databases such as PubMed, Cochrane Library, ClinicalKey database, National Science and Technology Library (NSTL, in order to collect the relevant literature database including clinical guidelines, systematic reviews (SR, randomized controlled trials (RCT, controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis and case study. Jadad Scale was used to evaluate the quality of literature.  Results Twenty-eight related articles were selected, including 6 clinical guidelines, 5 systematic reviews, 10 randomized controlled trials and 7 clinical controlled trials. According to Jadad Scale, 23 articles were evaluated as high-quality literature (≥ 4, and the remaining 5 were evaluated as low-quality literature (< 4. Treatment principles of these clinical trials, efficacy of different therapies and drug safety evaluation suggest that: 1 Acid α-glycosidase (GAA enzyme replacement therapy (ERT is the main treatment for glycogen storage diseases, with taking a high-protein diet, exercising before taking a small amount of fructose orally and reducing the patient's physical activity gradually. 2 Carnitine supplementation is used in the treatment of lipid storage myopathy, with carbohydrate and low fat diet provided before exercise or sports. 3 Patients with mitochondrial myopathy can take coenzyme Q10, vitamin B, vitamin K, vitamin C, etc. Proper aerobic exercise combined with strength training is safe, and it can also enhance the exercise tolerance of patients effectively. 4 The first choice to treat the endocrine myopathy is treating primary affection. 5 Myopathies due to drugs and toxins should

  8. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Antipsychotic Prescribing Guidelines to Nursing Homes: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjia, Jennifer; Field, Terry; Mazor, Kathleen; Lemay, Celeste A; Kanaan, Abir O; Donovan, Jennifer L; Briesacher, Becky A; Peterson, Daniel; Pandolfi, Michelle; Spenard, Ann; Gurwitz, Jerry H

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of efforts to translate and disseminate evidence-based guidelines about atypical antipsychotic use to nursing homes (NHs). Three-arm, cluster randomized trial. NHs. NHs in the state of Connecticut. Evidence-based guidelines for atypical antipsychotic prescribing were translated into a toolkit targeting NH stakeholders, and 42 NHs were recruited and randomized to one of three toolkit dissemination strategies: mailed toolkit delivery (minimal intensity); mailed toolkit delivery with quarterly audit and feedback reports about facility-level antipsychotic prescribing (moderate intensity); and in-person toolkit delivery with academic detailing, on-site behavioral management training, and quarterly audit and feedback reports (high intensity). Outcomes were evaluated using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework. Toolkit awareness of 30% (7/23) of leadership of low-intensity NHs, 54% (19/35) of moderate-intensity NHs, and 82% (18/22) of high-intensity NHs reflected adoption and implementation of the intervention. Highest levels of use and knowledge among direct care staff were reported in high-intensity NHs. Antipsychotic prescribing levels declined during the study period, but there were no statistically significant differences between study arms or from secular trends. RE-AIM indicators suggest some success in disseminating the toolkit and differences in reach, adoption, and implementation according to dissemination strategy but no measurable effect on antipsychotic prescribing trends. Further dissemination to external stakeholders such as psychiatry consultants and hospitals may be needed to influence antipsychotic prescribing for NH residents. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Enhancing access, fidelity, and outcomes in the national dissemination of evidence-based psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E; Cross, Gerald

    2014-10-01

    Replies to comments by H. Holt and L. E. Beutler (see record 2014-40532-003), M. M. Steenkamp and B. Litz (see record 2014-40532-004), and L. R. Greene (see record 2014-40532-006) on the original article by B. E. Karlin and G. Cross (see record 2013-31043-001) on the national dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychotherapies in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs health care system. Karlin and Cross comment on and clarify key issues raised in the commentaries and related aspects of the dissemination and implementation model. At the same time, several of the issues raised in the commentaries are beyond the scope of the original article, including issues related to specific research or the relative effectiveness of psychotherapies, on which there is rich discussion and debate in other contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Consumer engagement and the development, evaluation and dissemination of evidence-based parenting programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Kirby, James N.

    2013-01-01

    A consumer perspective can contribute much to enhancing the “ecological fit” of population level parenting interventions so they meet the needs of parents. This approach involves building relationships with consumer groups and soliciting consumer input into the relevance and acceptability of interventions, clarifying the enablers and barriers to engagement and involvement of parents, and clarifying variables that influence a parent’s program completion. The adoption of a more collaborative approach to working with consumers is important if meaningful population level change in the prevalence of serious social, emotional and behavioral problems in children and young people is to be achieved. Parents seeking assistance for their children’s behavior come from a diverse range of socioeconomic backgrounds, educational levels, cultures and languages. This paper examines consumer engagement strategies that can be employed throughout the process of program development, evaluation, training and dissemination and in “scaling up” the intervention. We argue that a multi-level public health approach to parenting intervention requires a strong consumer perspective to enable interventions to be more responsive to the preferences and needs of families and to ensure improved population reach of interventions. Examples from large scale dissemination trials are used to illustrate how consumer input can result in an increasingly differentiated suite of evidence-based parenting programs. PMID:22440062

  11. Consumer engagement and the development, evaluation, and dissemination of evidence-based parenting programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R; Kirby, James N

    2012-06-01

    A consumer perspective can contribute much to enhancing the "ecological fit" of population-level parenting interventions so they meet the needs of parents. This approach involves building relationships with consumer groups and soliciting consumer input into the relevance and acceptability of interventions, clarifying the enablers and barriers to engagement and involvement of parents, and clarifying variables that influence a parent's program completion. The adoption of a more collaborative approach to working with consumers is important if meaningful population-level change in the prevalence of serious social, emotional, and behavioral problems in children and young people is to be achieved. Parents seeking assistance for their children's behavior come from a diverse range of socioeconomic backgrounds, educational levels, cultures, and languages. This paper examines consumer engagement strategies that can be employed throughout the process of program development, evaluation, training, and dissemination, and in "scaling up" the intervention. We argue that a multilevel public health approach to parenting intervention requires a strong consumer perspective to enable interventions to be more responsive to the preferences and needs of families and to ensure improved population reach of interventions. Examples from large-scale dissemination trials are used to illustrate how consumer input can result in an increasingly differentiated suite of evidence-based parenting programs. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  13. Adaptation and dissemination of an evidence-based obesity prevention intervention: design of a comparative effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Stolley, Melinda L; Blumstein, Lara; Schiffer, Linda; Berbaum, Michael L; McCaffrey, Jennifer; Montoya, Anastasia McGee; Braunschweig, Carol; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2014-07-01

    Low-income youth are at increased risk for excess weight gain. Although evidence-based prevention programs exist, successful adaptation to provide wide dissemination presents a challenge. Hip-Hop to Health (HH) is a school-based obesity prevention intervention that targets primarily preschool children of low-income families. In a large randomized controlled trial, HH was found to be efficacious for prevention of excessive weight gain. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) are USDA-funded nutrition education programs offered to low-income families, and may provide an ideal platform for the wide dissemination of evidence-based obesity prevention programs. A research-practice partnership was established in order to conduct formative research to guide the adaptation and implementation of HH through EFNEP and SNAP-Ed. We present the design and method of a comparative effectiveness trial that will determine the efficacy of HH when delivered by peer educators through these programs compared to the standard EFNEP and SNAP-Ed nutrition education (NE) curriculum. Results from this trial will inform larger scale dissemination. The dissemination of HH through government programs has the potential to increase the reach of efficacious obesity prevention programs that target low-income children and families. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence-based treatment of acute otitis externa | Outhoff | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute otitis externa (AOE), or diffuse inflammation of the external ear canal, causes a range of symptoms, including otalgia, otorrhoea, hearing loss and itching. Despite AOE being common, with a 12-month prevalence of approximately 1%, there is a paucity of evidence-based treatment guidelines. This contributes to a wide ...

  15. Evidence-based investigations and treatments of recurrent pregnancy loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ole B; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Bosch, Ernesto

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of currently used investigations and treatments offered to women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) and, from an evidence-based point of view, to evaluate the usefulness of these interventions. DESIGN: Ten experts on epidemiologic, genetic, anatomic, endocrinologic...

  16. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and…

  17. Diffusion and dissemination of evidence-based dietary srategies for the prevention of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliska, Donna; Robinson, Paula; Armour, Tanya; Ellis, Peter; Brouwers, Melissa; Gauld, Mary; Baldassarre, Fulvia; Raina, Parminder

    2005-01-01

    Objective The purpose was to determine what strategies have been evaluated to disseminate cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of adult healthy diet? Methods A systematic review was conducted. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, Cancer LIT, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists and by contacting technical experts. English-language primary studies were selected if they evaluated the dissemination of healthy diet interventions in individuals, healthcare providers, or institutions. Studies of children or adolescents only were excluded. Results One hundred one articles were retrieved for full text screening. Nine reports of seven distinct studies were included; four were randomized trials, one was a cohort design and three were descriptive studies. Six studies were rated as methodologically weak, and one was rated as moderate. Studies were not meta-analyzed because of heterogeneity, low methodological quality, and incomplete data reporting. No beneficial dissemination strategies were found except one that looks promising, the use of peer educators in the worksite, which led to a short-term increase in fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions and Implications Overall, the quality of the evidence is not strong and is primarily descriptive rather than evaluative. No clear conclusions can be drawn from these data. Controlled studies are needed to evaluate dissemination strategies, and to compare dissemination and diffusion strategies with different messages and different target audiences. PMID:15819991

  18. Diffusion and dissemination of evidence-based dietary srategies for the prevention of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwers Melissa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The purpose was to determine what strategies have been evaluated to disseminate cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of adult healthy diet? Methods A systematic review was conducted. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, Cancer LIT, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists and by contacting technical experts. English-language primary studies were selected if they evaluated the dissemination of healthy diet interventions in individuals, healthcare providers, or institutions. Studies of children or adolescents only were excluded. Results One hundred one articles were retrieved for full text screening. Nine reports of seven distinct studies were included; four were randomized trials, one was a cohort design and three were descriptive studies. Six studies were rated as methodologically weak, and one was rated as moderate. Studies were not meta-analyzed because of heterogeneity, low methodological quality, and incomplete data reporting. No beneficial dissemination strategies were found except one that looks promising, the use of peer educators in the worksite, which led to a short-term increase in fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions and Implications Overall, the quality of the evidence is not strong and is primarily descriptive rather than evaluative. No clear conclusions can be drawn from these data. Controlled studies are needed to evaluate dissemination strategies, and to compare dissemination and diffusion strategies with different messages and different target audiences.

  19. Implementing an evidence-based Tai Ji Quan program in a multicultural setting: A pilot dissemination project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fink

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Falls in older adults are a significant public health issue and a particularly significant health risk in Minnesota. With accumulating research evidence suggesting that falls can be prevented through exercise, there is an increased public health effort among organizations serving older adults to translate and disseminate evidence-based programs into the community. Such efforts, however, face additional challenges if they are implemented in communities with older adults from different cultural backgrounds and languages. This paper briefly describes a pilot community-based dissemination project, including the initiation, implementation, process, and outcomes, of an evidence-based fall prevention (Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance formerly known as Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance through a local Area Agency on Aging in the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area in Minnesota (USA. Overall, the program was successfully implemented resulting in adoption by local community organizations serving Asian and, to a lesser degree, East African non-English speaking older adults. Bilingual community instructors were trained to lead the classes resulting in broad participation and improved physical performance by the older adults targeted for the intervention. The results from this pilot study indicate that Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance can be implemented with positive results in non-English speaking community settings using bilingual leaders.

  20. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... for a clinical trial, and only 5 trials on insulin analogues were performed as double-blinded. Current evidence suggests that CSII treatment results in a significant reduction in HbA1c without inducing more hypoglycaemia. Rapid-acting insulin analogues compared to human soluble insulin provide statistically...

  1. Evidence Base Update for Psychosocial Treatments for Children and Adolescents Exposed to Traumatic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Shannon; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Kerns, Suzanne E. U.; Harrison, Julie P.; Lambert, Hilary K.; Briggs, Ernestine C.; Cox, Julia Revillion; Amaya-Jackson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Child and adolescent trauma exposure is prevalent, with trauma exposure-related symptoms, including posttraumatic stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms often causing substantial impairment. This article updates the evidence base on psychosocial treatments for child and adolescent trauma exposure completed for this journal by Silverman et al. (2008). For this review, we focus on 37 studies conducted during the seven years since the last review. Treatments are grouped by overall treatment family (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy), treatment modality (e.g., individual vs. group), and treatment participants (e.g., child only vs. child and parent). All studies were evaluated for methodological rigor according to Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology evidence-based treatment evaluation criteria (Southam-Gerow & Prinstein, 2014), with cumulative designations for level of support for each treatment family. Individual CBT with parent involvement, individual CBT, and group CBT were deemed well-established; group CBT with parent involvement and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) were deemed probably efficacious; individual integrated therapy for complex trauma and group mind–body skills were deemed possibly efficacious; individual client-centered play therapy, individual mind–body skills, and individual psychoanalysis were deemed experimental; and group creative expressive + CBT was deemed questionable efficacy. Advances in the evidence base, with comparisons to the state of the science at the time of the Silverman et al. (2008) review, are discussed. Finally, we present dissemination and implementation challenges and areas for future research. PMID:27759442

  2. Evaluating the dissemination of Body & Soul, an evidence-based fruit and vegetable intake intervention: challenges for dissemination and implementation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allicock, Marlyn; Campbell, Marci K.; Valle, Carmina G.; Carr, Carol; Resnicow, Ken; Gizlice, Ziya

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether the evidence-based Body & Soul program, when disseminated and implemented without researcher or agency involvement and support, would achieve similar results to earlier efficacy and effectiveness trials. Design Prospective group randomized trial. Setting Churches with predominantly African American membership. Participants A total of 1033 members from the fifteen churches completed baseline surveys. Of these, 562 (54.4%) completed the follow-up survey six months later. Intervention Church-based nutrition program for African Americans that included pastoral involvement, educational activities, church environmental changes, and peer counseling. Main Outcome Measure Daily fruit and vegetable (FV) intake was assessed at pre- and post-test. Analysis Mixed-effects linear models. Results At posttest, there was no statistically significant difference in daily servings of FV between the early intervention group participants compared to control group participants (4.7 vs, 4.4, P=0.38). Process evaluation suggested that added resources such as technical assistance could improve program implementation. Conclusions and Implications The disseminated program may not produce improvements in FV intake equal to those in the earlier efficacy and effectiveness trials, primarily due to lack of program implementation. Program dissemination may not achieve public health impact unless support systems are strengthened for adequate implementation at the church level. PMID:22406012

  3. Evidence-based psychological treatments for late-life anxiety.

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    Ayers, Catherine R; Sorrell, John T; Thorp, Steven R; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2007-03-01

    This project identified evidence-based psychotherapy treatments for anxiety disorders in older adults. The authors conducted a review of the geriatric anxiety treatment outcome literature by using specific coding criteria and identified 17 studies that met criteria for evidence-based treatments (EBTs). These studies reflected samples of adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) or samples with mixed anxiety disorders or symptoms. Evidence was found for efficacy for 4 types of EBTs. Relaxation training, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and, to a lesser extent, supportive therapy and cognitive therapy have support for treating subjective anxiety symptoms and disorders. CBT for late-life GAD has garnered the most consistent support, and relaxation training represents an efficacious, relatively low-cost intervention. The authors provide a review of the strengths and limitations of this research literature, including a discussion of common assessment instruments. Continued investigation of EBTs is needed in clinical geriatric anxiety samples, given the small number of available studies. Future research should examine other therapy models and investigate the effects of psychotherapy on other anxiety disorders, such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder in older adults. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Use of Class Facebook Groups to Disseminate Evidence-Based Study Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina J Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this preliminary project was to determine the effectiveness of college administrators using Facebook® (FB to disseminate information on study methods. Innovation: Eleven study tips in the format of riddles were posted in class FB groups as memes with links that lead to the riddle answers. Between 3.2-39.7% of students clicked on the links that accessed riddle answers. In a survey, 53.8% of respondents found the memes at least somewhat useful and 57.6% reported that they somewhat liked, liked, or liked them a lot. The average score on a study method knowledge assessment increased from 50% to 64%. Critical Analysis: The ratings of usefulness and likeability varied. However, students’ knowledge about the topic increased. Administrators considering using FB to share academic advice should post sparingly, begin posting when groups are initially formed and post early during the academic term. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Note  

  5. Evidence-based evaluation of treatment strategy for multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Meng-qiu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To formulate the best treatment plan for multiple sclerosis (MS patients by evaluating the therapeutic efficacy and side effect of various evidence-based programs. Methods Key words were defined as multiple sclerosis, immunomodulatory therapy and therapy, etc. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang data bases for Scientific Journals in China and National Knowledge Infrastructure for Chinese Scientific Journals Database. Additionally, we applied manual searching and screened out conference paper and academic dissertation, etc, from various references. After that we obtained and evaluated by Jadad scales on systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials and observational study cases about glucocorticoids, plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin, IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod. Results After screening, all seventeen selected resources included systematic reviews 6 articles, randomized controlled trials 7 articles, controlled clinical trials 2 articles, observational study cases 2 articles, among which fifteen articles were proved to be high quality (according to Jadad scoring system, five score 4, six score 5, four score 7, two chapters were judged to be low quality scoring 3. Finally, we summerize that: 1 The first choice of treatment for acute relapses is glucocorticoids and we suggest that plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulin may be tried as an alternative therapy in acute MS relapse, especially in case of contraindications to intravenous methylprednisolone. 2 Immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive treatment (IFN-β, glatiramer acetate, mitoxantrone, natalizumab can be an option to prevent new relapses and progression of disability. 3 Fingolimod is an oral treatment for multiple sclerosis to improve treatment adherence. Conclusion Using evidence-based medicine methods can provide us best clinical evidence on MS treatment.

  6. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Practices for Anxiety Disorders in Wyoming: A Survey of Practicing Psychotherapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipol, Leilani J.; Deacon, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the well-established effectiveness of exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders, therapists have been slow to adopt CBT into their clinical practice. The present study was conducted to examine the utilization of psychotherapy techniques for anxiety disorders among community practitioners in a…

  7. A Comprehensive Approach in Dissemination of Evidence-Based Care for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    with guideline recommendations for the treatment of depression in geriatric patients: findings from the APA practice research network. Am J Geriatr ...obesity is present: Is the patient’s weight being monitored? Have nutrition /exercise been discussed? Axis IV—and other psychosocial and...with guideline recommendations for the treat- ment of depression in geriatric patients: findings from the APA practice research network. Am J Geriatr

  8. A Comprehensive Approach in Dissemination of Evidence Based Care for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    EMDR on an individual outpatient basis B > Recommend 8- 12 sessions for 90 min CT is effective with military and veteran with combat- and...Desensitization and Reprocessing ( EMDR ) is more efficacious for PTSD than control: wait-line, routine care, and active treatment controls A II > Evidence...is inadequate to determine the efficacy of EMDR in the tx of PTSD EMDR compared to ET and CT show mixed results B Page 7 of 7 Key Evidence

  9. Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Harrell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014 using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis’’. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease.

  10. Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments of Pediatric Mental Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Monica S; Hamblin, Rebecca J; Storch, Eric A

    2015-08-01

    With many youth presenting to primary care settings for mental health difficulties, knowledge of the respective evidence-based psychotherapies is imperative in ensuring that these youth receive the appropriate interventions in a timely manner. Most frequently, children present with internalizing and/or externalizing disorders, which cover a broad range of common pediatric mental disorders. Treatments of these disorders generally incorporate cognitive and/or behavioral components, which are derived from theoretical underpinnings and empirical support. Although the interventions share common components, they are distinctive in nature and are further tailored toward the idiosyncratic needs of children and their families. Careful consideration of the apposite intervention and individual needs of youth are pertinent to the effective amelioration of symptomology.

  11. Evidence-based treatment of atopic dermatitis with topical moisturizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Giuseppe; Paternò, Valentina; Cannarella, Rossella; Dinotta, Franco; Lacarrubba, Francesco

    2018-01-24

    Skin barrier restoration represents the mainstay of the treatment of atopic dermatitis and the use of moisturizers is recommended by several international guidelines. The aim of the study was to investigate through an evidence-based medicine analysis the effectiveness and safety of different moisturizing products available for a non-pharmacological treatment of atopic dermatitis. A total of 92 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been identified and analyzed. The results confirm the presence of a reasonable number of studies highlighting moisturizers safety and effectiveness in the treatment of atopic dermatitis by improving disease severity, increasing the time of relapse and reducing the time of flares. Moisturizers containing urea, glycerin or glycyrrhetinic acid seem to show the greater evidence of efficacy being supported by more clinical trials. Among the existing moisturizers, those containing a single agent generally work although the heterogeneity of RCTs does not allow reaching more definitive conclusions. Moisturizers made of a mixture of substances seem to be more effective thanks to the presence of different active substances that may exert a synergistic effect. A meta-analysis of 4 RCTs confirms the efficacy of a medical device containing glycyrrhetinic acid, hyaluronic acid, shea butter, telmesteine, and vitis vinifera in the treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  12. Evidence-Based Treatment of Delirium in Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, William; Alici, Yesne

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is the most common neuropsychiatric complication seen in patients with cancer, and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Increased health care costs, prolonged hospital stays, and long-term cognitive decline are other well-recognized adverse outcomes of delirium. Improved recognition of delirium and early treatment are important in diminishing such morbidity. There has been an increasing number of studies published in the literature over the last 10 years regarding delirium treatment as well as prevention. Antipsychotics, cholinesterase inhibitors, and alpha-2 agonists are the three groups of medications that have been studied in randomized controlled trials in different patient populations. In patients with cancer, the evidence is most clearly supportive of short-term, low-dose use of antipsychotics for controlling the symptoms of delirium, with close monitoring for possible adverse effects, especially in older patients with multiple medical comorbidities. Nonpharmacologic interventions also appear to have a beneficial role in the treatment of patients with cancer who have or are at risk for delirium. This article presents evidence-based recommendations based on the results of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic studies of the treatment and prevention of delirium. PMID:22412123

  13. Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Curriculum for Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Leek, Desiree; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Smokers with mental illness and addictive disorders account for nearly one in two cigarettes sold in the United States and are at high risk for smoking-related deaths and disability. Psychiatry residency programs provide a unique arena for disseminating tobacco treatment guidelines, influencing professional norms, and increasing access to tobacco cessation services among smokers with mental illness. The current study evaluated the Rx for Change in Psychiatry curriculum, developed for psychiatry residency programs and focused on identifying and treating tobacco dependence among individuals with mental illness. Methods The 4-hour curriculum emphasized evidence-based, patient-oriented cessation treatments relevant for all tobacco users, including those not yet ready to quit. The curriculum was informed by comprehensive literature review, consultation with an expert advisory group, faculty interviews, and a focus group with psychiatry residents. This study reports on evaluation of the curriculum in 2005–2006, using a quasi-experimental design, with 55 residents in three psychiatry residency training programs in Northern California. Results The curriculum was associated with improvements in psychiatry residents’ knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and counseling behaviors for treating tobacco use among their patients, with initial changes from pre- to posttraining sustained at 3-months’ follow-up. Residents’ self-reported changes in treating patients’ tobacco use were substantiated through systematic chart review. Conclusion The evidence-based Rx for Change in Psychiatry curriculum is offered as a model tobacco treatment curriculum that can be implemented in psychiatry residency training programs and disseminated widely, thereby effectively reaching a vulnerable and costly population of smokers. PMID:19190293

  14. Economic Evaluation of Active Implementation versus Guideline Dissemination for Evidence-Based Care of Acute Low-Back Pain in a General Practice Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Duncan; French, Simon D.; McKenzie, Joanne E.; O′Connor, Denise A.; Green, Sally E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The development and publication of clinical practice guidelines for acute low-back pain has resulted in evidence-based recommendations that have the potential to improve the quality and safety of care for acute low-back pain. Development and dissemination of guidelines may not, however, be sufficient to produce improvements in clinical practice; further investment in active implementation of guideline recommendations may be required. Further research is required to quantify the trade-off between the additional upfront cost of active implementation of guideline recommendations for low-back pain and any resulting improvements in clinical practice. Methods Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside the IMPLEMENT trial from a health sector perspective to compare active implementation of guideline recommendations via the IMPLEMENT intervention (plus standard dissemination) against standard dissemination alone. Results The base-case analysis suggests that delivery of the IMPLEMENT intervention dominates standard dissemination (less costly and more effective), yielding savings of $135 per x-ray referral avoided (-$462.93/3.43). However, confidence intervals around point estimates for the primary outcome suggest that – irrespective of willingness to pay (WTP) – we cannot be at least 95% confident that the IMPLEMENT intervention differs in value from standard dissemination. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that moving beyond development and dissemination to active implementation entails a significant additional upfront investment that may not be offset by health gains and/or reductions in health service utilization of sufficient magnitude to render active implementation cost-effective. PMID:24146767

  15. Treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism: evidence-based and emerging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Currently there are three well-established treatment options for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD): antithyroid drug therapy with thionamides (ATD), radioactive iodine treatment with (131)I, and thyroid surgery. This article reviews the current evidence so the reader can evaluate advantages...

  16. Evidence-based guideline update: Medical treatment of infantile spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, C.Y.; Mackay, M.T.; Weiss, S.K.; Stephens, D.; Adams-Webber, T.; Ashwal, S.; Snead, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society practice parameter on treatment of infantile spasms in children. Methods: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2002 to 2011 and searches of reference lists of retrieved articles were performed. Sixty-eight articles were selected for detailed review; 26 were included in the analysis. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered classification scheme combining pre-2002 evidence and more recent evidence. Results: There is insufficient evidence to determine whether other forms of corticosteroids are as effective as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. However, low-dose ACTH is probably as effective as high-dose ACTH. ACTH is more effective than vigabatrin (VGB) for short-term treatment of children with infantile spasms (excluding those with tuberous sclerosis complex). There is insufficient evidence to show that other agents and combination therapy are effective for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. Short lag time to treatment leads to better long-term developmental outcome. Successful short-term treatment of cryptogenic infantile spasms with ACTH or prednisolone leads to better long-term developmental outcome than treatment with VGB. Recommendations: Low-dose ACTH should be considered for treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH or VGB may be useful for short-term treatment of infantile spasms, with ACTH considered preferentially over VGB. Hormonal therapy (ACTH or prednisolone) may be considered for use in preference to VGB in infants with cryptogenic infantile spasms, to possibly improve developmental outcome. A shorter lag time to treatment of infantile spasms with either hormonal therapy or VGB possibly improves long-term developmental outcomes. PMID:22689735

  17. Treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence-based overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiers, Ruben; Wiegerinck, Johannes I; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-07-01

    In Achilles tendinopathy, differentiation should be made between paratendinopathy, insertional- and midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Midportion Achilles tendinopathy is clinically characterized by a combination of pain and swelling at the affected site, with impaired performance as an important consequence. The treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy contains both non-surgical and surgical options. Eccentric exercise has shown to be an effective treatment modality. Promising results are demonstrated for extracorporeal shockwave therapy. In terms of the surgical treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy, no definite recommendations can be made. IV.

  18. Relationship of Evidence-Based Practice and Treatments: A Survey of Community Mental Health Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMeo, Michelle A.; Moore, G. Kurt; Lichtenstein, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) are "interventions" that have been proven effective through rigorous research methodologies. Evidence-based practice (EBP), however, refers to a "decision-making process" that integrates the best available research, clinician expertise, and client characteristics. This study examined community mental health service…

  19. [Evidence-based treatment of mentally ill homeless persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Maja; Nordentoft, Merete

    2010-05-31

    A systematic review of the literature shows that it is possible to reduce homelessness among mentally ill homeless persons, partly by offering access to housing and partly by providing intensive care through Assertive Community Treatment. Assertive Community Treatment can, to some extent, decrease psychiatric symptoms and increase quality of life. It is evident that by offering housing, homelessness may be reduced, but the comparison of independent housing and group living did not reveal big differences.

  20. Behavioural Treatments for Tourette Syndrome: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourette syndrome (TS is a disorder characterised by multiple motor and vocal tics and is frequently associated with behavioural problems. Tics are known to be affected by internal factors such as inner tension and external factors such as the surrounding environment. A number of behavioural treatments have been suggested to treat the symptoms of TS, in addition to pharmacotherapy and surgery for the most severe cases. This review compiled all the studies investigating behavioural therapies for TS, briefly describing each technique and assessing the evidence in order to determine which of these appear to be effective. Different behavioural therapies that were used included habit reversal training (HRT, massed negative practice, supportive psychotherapy, exposure with response prevention, self-monitoring, cognitive-behavioural therapy, relaxation therapy, assertiveness training, contingency management, a tension-reduction technique and biofeedback training. Overall, HRT is the best-studied and most widely-used technique and there is sufficient experimental evidence to suggest that it is an effective treatment. Most of the other treatments, however, require further investigation to evaluate their efficacy. Specifically, evidence suggests that exposure with response prevention and self-monitoring are effective, and more research is needed to determine the therapeutic value of the other treatments. As most of the studies investigating behavioural treatments for TS are small-sample or single-case studies, larger randomised controlled trials are advocated.

  1. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Adolescent Substance Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Holly Barrett; Turner, Charles W.

    2008-01-01

    This review synthesized findings from 17 studies since 1998 regarding evaluation of outpatient treatments for adolescent substance abuse. These studies represented systematic design advances in adolescent clinical trial science. The research examined 46 different intervention conditions with a total sample of 2,307 adolescents. The sample included…

  2. Evidence-based treatment of neonatal septicaemia | Ogunlesi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newborn sepsis is managed with a wide range of antibiotics in different parts of the world depending on the spectrum of bacterial aetiologies. Although, there are standard guidelines for the treatment of neonatal sepsis in most parts of the developed world, the situation is a lot different in most parts of the developing world.

  3. Treatment of insufficient lactation is often not evidence-based

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Paul Bryde; Bjerrum, Flemming; Løkkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Breast milk has many advantages over formula for infants in developed and developing countries alike. Despite intentions of breastfeeding, some women develop insufficient lactation. Treatment options traditionally include breastfeeding education and pharmacotherapy. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: An electronic questionnaire regarding treatment of insufficient lactation was sent to all obstetric departments (n = 21) and neonatal wards (n = 17) in Denmark. Three main questions were included which focused on: breastfeeding education for women, use of pharmacotherapy and availability of local...... guidelines. RESULTS: In all, 30 out of a total of 38 departments participated; and among those, 93% offered some form of breastfeeding education. 50% used either metoclopramide or syntocinon to promote lactation. None used domperidone. 73% had a local clinical guideline. 77% offered sessions with a lactation...

  4. Pemphigus vulgaris: an evidence-based treatment update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cathy Y; Murrell, Dedee F

    2015-02-01

    While a variety of intervention options have been described for pemphigus vulgaris, the optimal treatment strategy has not been established. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the literature on the efficacy and safety of interventions for the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Five electronic databases were searched, including The Cochrane Skin Group's Specialized Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), EMBASE, MEDLINE and Latin American and Caribbean Health science Information database (LILACS). Five trial registers as well as reference lists of included RCTs were also searched. Any published randomised controlled trial (RCT) on intervention for pemphigus vulgaris was included, provided the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed with appropriate clinical features, histopathology and immunofluorescence studies. Studies which included forms of pemphigus other than pemphigus vulgaris were excluded. Altogether 18 RCTs were identified including 16 distinct interventions. Included studies were assessed for patient selection, methods of randomisation, blinding, follow-up and selective reporting. Current evidence is incomplete and inconclusive. The interventions which appear promising, but will require further evaluation include adjuvant mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), azathioprine, intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), sulfasalazine and pentoxifylline, infliximab, epidermal growth factor and pimecrolimus. Interventions with inconclusive evidence include high (120-180 mg) versus low (45-60 mg) prednisone dosage, pulsed dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone-cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (DCP), cyclosporine, dapsone, etanercept, acyclovir and tacrolimus. Our review is limited by the small number of high-quality RCTs and variety of outcome measures, precluding the performing of a meta-analysis. The optimal treatment strategy for pemphigus vulgaris remains unclear. Higher quality RCTs are required in the future to re

  5. Alpha particles for treatment of disseminated melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, E.M. [London University (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Invading melanoma spreads to local and unpredictable distant location at the early stages of its development. It is justifiable, therefore, to classify the disease as a systemic disorder. This requires a systemic treatment that reaches all melanoma cells irrespective of whether they are singly dispersed and in circulation or already forming solid tumours of various sizes. Targeted radiotherapy affects directly and selectively cancer cells provided an appropriate radionuclide and its carrier are chosen. Melanoma is a pigmented tumour. Methylene blue (MTB)) accumulates selectively in melanoma cells due to its exceptionally high affinity to melanin. MTB serves, therefore, as a carrier for radionuclides. {sup 211}At-MTB has proved to be particularly effective in treating disseminated melanoma when administered systemically and, at the same time, non-toxic to normal non-pigmented and pigmented organs. (authors)

  6. Alpha particles for treatment of disseminated melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, E.M. [London Univ. (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-15

    Invading melanoma spreads to local and unpredictable distant location at the early stages of its development. It is justifiable, therefore to classify the disease as a systemic disorder. This requires a systemic treatment that reaches all melanoma cells irrespective of whether they are singly dispersed and in circulation or already forming solid tumours of various sizes. Targeted radiotherapy affects directly and selectively cancer cells provided an appropriate radionuclide and its carrier are chosen. Melanoma is a pigmented tumour. Methylene blue (MTB) accumulates selectively in melanoma cells due to its exceptionally high affinity to melanin. MTB serves, therefore, as a carrier for radionuclides. {sup 211}At-MTB has proved to be particularly effective in treating disseminated melanoma when administered systemically and, at the same time, non-toxic to normal non-pigmented and pigmented organs. (author)

  7. Treatment of neuromyelitis optica: an evidence based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system characterized by severe optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, usually with a relapsing course. Aquaporin-4 antibody is positive in a high percentage of NMO patients and it is directed against this water channel richly expressed on foot processes of astrocytes. Due to the severity of NMO attacks and the high risk for disability, treatment should be instituted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed. There is increasing evidence that NMO patients respond differently from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, and, therefore, treatments for MS may not be suitable for NMO. Acute NMO attacks usually are treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroid pulse and plasmapheresis. Maintenance therapy is also required to avoid further attacks and it is based on low-dose oral corticosteroids and non-specific immunosuppressant drugs, like azathioprine and mycophenolate mofetil. New therapy strategies using monoclonal antibodies like rituximab have been tested in NMO, with positive results in open label studies. However, there is no controlled randomized trial to confirm the safety and efficacy for the drugs currently used in NMO.

  8. [Charcoal, cocaine and rattlesnakes: evidence-based treatment of poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaper, A

    2013-10-01

    Since ancient times poisoning has been treated medicinally. Clinical toxicology, in the narrow sense of the term, developed from the foundation of specialized medical treatment units for poisoning and the formation of the first poison information centers in the second half of the twentieth century. Historically, the first poison information centers were often localized at pediatric clinics or departments of internal medicine. It became increasingly more obvious that this pooling of competences made sense. This article gives a general introduction in clinical toxicology and presents the functions and key activities of emergency poison centers. The organisation and work of a poisons centre is demonstrated on the basis of the Poisons Information Center (GIZ) North annual report for 2011. In a short summary the basic principles of clinical toxicology are elucidated: the primary removal of poisons by gastric lavage and administration of activated charcoal, secondary removal of poisons by enhanced elimination using hemodialysis, hemoperfusion, multi-dose activated charcoal and molecular adsorbent recirculating systems (MARS) and the indications for administration of specific antidotes or antivenins (antisera against poisoning by poisonous animals). Gastric lavage is indicated within 1 h after ingestion of a potentially life-threatening dose of a poison. In cases of poisoning with substances which penetrate the central nervous system (CNS) gastric lavage should be performed only after endotracheal intubation due to the risk of aspiration. The basic management of poisoned patients by emergency medicine personnel out of hospital and on the way to hospital is presented. The Bremen list, a compilation of the five antidotes, atropine, 4-dimethylaminophenol (4-DMAP), tolonium chloride, naloxone and activated charcoal for out of hospital treatment by emergency doctors is presented. In all, even questionable cases of poisoning consultation at emergency poison centers is

  9. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Brogan, Paul; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Ozen, Seza; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ravelli, Angelo; Royen-Kerkhof, Annet van; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Bas; Wulffraat, Nico; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-11-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a rare, multisystem and potentially life-threatening autoimmune disorder with significant associated morbidity. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is often based on clinical expertise. SHARE (Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe) was launched to optimise and disseminate management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases like cSLE. Here, we provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of cSLE. In view of extent and complexity of cSLE and its various manifestations, recommendations for lupus nephritis and antiphospholipid syndrome will be published separately. Recommendations were generated using the EULAR (European League Against Rheumatism) standard operating procedure. An expert committee consisting of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric nephrology from across Europe discussed evidence-based recommendations during two consensus meetings. Recommendations were accepted if >80% agreement was reached. A total of 25 recommendations regarding key approaches to diagnosis and treatment of cSLE were made. The recommendations include 11 on diagnosis, 9 on disease monitoring and 5 on general treatment. Topics included: appropriate use of SLE classification criteria, disease activity and damage indices; adequate assessment of autoantibody profiles; secondary macrophage activation syndrome; use of hydroxychloroquine and corticosteroid-sparing regimens; and the importance of addressing poor adherence. Ten recommendations were accepted regarding general diagnostic strategies and treatment indications of neuropsychiatric cSLE. The SHARE recommendations for cSLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations of cSLE have been formulated by an evidence-based consensus process to support uniform, high-quality standards of care for children with cSLE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  10. Evidence-based treatment for mental disorders in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A; Pelham, William E

    2002-04-01

    In the past decade, increased emphasis has been placed on identifying treatments for childhood disorders that are supported by empirical evidence of their effectiveness. This process was spearheaded by an American Psychological Association division 12 task force that identified evidence-based treatments--mostly for disorders of adulthood. Because of the publication of the task force results, other studies have been published that contribute to the knowledge base of evidence-based treatment, and these studies are briefly reviewed. Across evidence-based treatments, common features of effective treatments, such as parent involvement, use of a treatment manual, and the emphasis on generalization of treatment effects to natural settings, are also identified and reviewed.Introduction

  11. Use of evidence-based treatments in substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Croy, Calvin D; Moore, Laurie A; Rieckmann, Traci

    2016-04-01

    Research and health surveillance activities continue to document the substantial disparities in the impacts of substance abuse on the health of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. While Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) hold substantial promise for improving treatment for AI/ANs with substance use problems (as they do for non-AI/ANs), anecdotal reports suggest that their use is limited. In this study, we examine the awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of EBTs in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Data are drawn from the first national survey of tribal substance abuse treatment programs. Clinicians or clinical administrators from 192 programs completed the survey. Participants were queried about their awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of 9 psychosocial and 3 medication EBTs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (82.2%), Motivational Interviewing (68.6%), and Relapse Prevention Therapy (66.8%) were the most commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs; medications for psychiatric comorbidity was the most commonly implemented medication treatment (43.2%). Greater EBT knowledge and use were associated with both program (e.g., funding) and staff (e.g., educational attainment) characteristics. Only two of the commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs (Motivational Interviewing and Relapse Prevention Therapy) were endorsed as culturally appropriate by a majority of programs that had implemented them (55.9% and 58.1%, respectively). EBT knowledge and use is higher in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities than has been previously estimated. However, many users of these EBTs continue to have concerns about their cultural appropriateness, which likely limits their further dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Culturally Responsive Adaptations in Evidence-Based Treatment: The Impact on Client Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janine; Lee, Lisa; Zigarelli, Julia; Nakagawa, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    This study expands the literature on multicultural counseling competencies (MCCs) in school psychology by outlining the relationship between client satisfaction, treatment approaches, and critical clinician variables such as clinician MCC. With growing emphasis on the integration of cultural considerations in evidence-based treatments (EBTs), this…

  13. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview of Evidence-Based Assessment and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Lancaster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a chronic psychological disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic event. This review summarizes the literature on the epidemiology, assessment, and treatment of PTSD. We provide a review of the characteristics of PTSD along with associated risk factors, and describe brief, evidence-based measures that can be used to screen for PTSD and monitor symptom changes over time. In regard to treatment, we highlight commonly used, evidence-based psychotherapies and pharmacotherapies for PTSD. Among psychotherapeutic approaches, evidence-based approaches include cognitive-behavioral therapies (e.g., Prolonged Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. A wide variety of pharmacotherapies have received some level of research support for PTSD symptom alleviation, although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have the largest evidence base to date. However, relapse may occur after the discontinuation of pharmacotherapy, whereas PTSD symptoms typically remain stable or continue to improve after completion of evidence-based psychotherapy. After reviewing treatment recommendations, we conclude by describing critical areas for future research.

  14. Procedures for identifying evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Adriana; Scogin, Forrest

    2007-03-01

    The authors describe the methods used to identify evidence-based psychological treatments for older adults in this contribution to the special section. Coding teams were assembled to review the literature on several problems relevant to mental health and aging. These teams used the manual developed by the Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology (Division 12) of the American Psychological Association that provided definitions of key constructs used in coding. The authors provide an overview of the process followed by the review teams and of some of the issues that emerged to illustrate the steps involved in the coding procedure. Identifying evidence-based treatments is a fundamental aspect of promoting evidence-based practice with older adults; such practice is advocated by most health care disciplines, including psychology. ((c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Adding evidence-based interventions to assertive community treatment : a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, Sjoerd; Jörg, Frederike; Nieboer, Roeline; Wunderink, Lex

    OBJECTIVE: This 24-month study, conducted in The Netherlands, examined the feasibility of enhancing the effectiveness of assertive community treatment (ACT) by adding evidence-based interventions. METHODS: A total of 159 patients were randomly assigned to two ACT teams, one providing standard ACT

  16. Adapting Evidence-Based Mental Health Treatments in Community Settings: Preliminary Results from a Partnership Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Hourigan, Shannon E.; Allin, Robert B., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the application of a university-community partnership model to the problem of adapting evidence-based treatment approaches in a community mental health setting. Background on partnership research is presented, with consideration of methodological and practical issues related to this kind of research. Then, a rationale for…

  17. Clinical and Research Perspectives on Nonspeech Oral Motor Treatments and Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttiah, Nimisha; Georges, Katie; Brackenbury, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the incorporation of research evidence, clinical expertise, and client values in clinical decision making. One case in which these factors conflict is the use of nonspeech oral motor treatments (NSOMTs) for children with developmental speech sound disorders. Critical reviews of the research evidence…

  18. Evaluation of a treatment manual and workshops for disseminating, parent-child interaction therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschell, Amy D; McNeil, Cheryl B; Urquiza, Anthony J; McGrath, Jean M; Zebell, Nancy M; Timmer, Susan G; Porter, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    This study's main purposes were to: (a) evaluate a treatment manual as a dissemination strategy, (b) compare two workshop formats for evidence-based treatment (EBT) training, and (c) provide preliminary data on therapist characteristics potentially associated with successful EBT adoption. Forty-two community-based clinicians were assigned to one of two training groups (didactic or experiential). Behavior observation and self-report data were collected at four time points. Results suggest that reading a treatment manual is useful, but not sufficient. Experiential and didactic training were equally effective in increasing knowledge, skill, and satisfaction; however, after a 2-day training, few participants demonstrated mastery of skills.

  19. Comparison of Evidence-based and Conventional Education Effects on Radiography Assessment before Endodontic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimasadat Miri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evidence-based education has been introduced to dentistry as a new educational tool. However, its effectiveness should be evaluated in different educational topics. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of evidence-based and conventional education on radiography assessment before endodontic treatment. Methods: In this semi-experimental study 75 senior dental students of Kermanshah Dentistry School were enrolled. Demographic information and the results of evaluation were collected using a weblog designed for this purpose. 20 questions were prepared to be answered in 30 minutes. 12 topics were covered in the questionnaire. To analyze the data, the paired sample t-test, Wilcoxon, and Whitney U tests were used. Results: The finding of the present study showed that total scores of the test in both conventional and evidence-based groups significantly improved after education (P=0.005 and P=0.001, respectively. There was a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.047 and evidence-based education showed better results in comparison with conventional one. Conclusion: The present study asserts that evidence-based education can lead to better diagnostic performance of senior dental students and thus can be used as an efficient alternative for conventional education methods in dental schools.

  20. Partnership for Healthier Asians: Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Asian-American Communities Using a Market-Oriented and Multilevel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Karen; Quinn, Michael; Chandrasekar, Edwin; Patel, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the greatest challenges facing health promotion and disease prevention is translating research findings into evidence-based practices (EBP). There is currently a limited research base to inform the design of dissemination action plans, especially within medically underserved communities. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe an innovative study protocol to disseminate colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines in seven Asian subgroups. Methods This study integrated a market-oriented Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model, Diffusion of Innovation Theory, and community-based participatory research approach to create a community-centered dissemination framework. Consumer research, through focus groups and community-wide surveys, was centered on the adopters to ensure a multilevel intervention was well designed and effective. Results Collaboration took place between an academic institution and eight community-based organizations. These groups worked together to conduct thorough consumer research. A sample of 72 Asian Americans participated in 8 focus groups, and differences were noted across ethnic groups. Furthermore, 464 community members participated in an Individual Client Survey. Most participants agreed that early detection of cancer was important (434/464, 93.5%), cancer could happen to anyone (403/464, 86.9%), CRC could be prevented (344/464, 74.1%), and everyone should screen for CRC (389/464, 83.8%). However, 35.8% (166/464) of participants also felt that people were better off not knowing it they had cancer, and 45.5% (211/464) would screen only when they had symptoms. Most participants indicated that they would screen upon their doctor’s recommendation, but half reported that they only saw a doctor when they were sick. Data collection currently is underway for a multilevel intervention (community health advisor and social marketing campaign) and will conclude March 2016. We expect that analysis and results will be available by

  1. Partnership for Healthier Asians: Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Asian-American Communities Using a Market-Oriented and Multilevel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Karen; Quinn, Michael; Chandrasekar, Edwin; Patel, Reena; Lam, Helen

    2016-06-16

    One of the greatest challenges facing health promotion and disease prevention is translating research findings into evidence-based practices (EBP). There is currently a limited research base to inform the design of dissemination action plans, especially within medically underserved communities. The objective of this paper is to describe an innovative study protocol to disseminate colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines in seven Asian subgroups. This study integrated a market-oriented Push-Pull-Infrastructure Model, Diffusion of Innovation Theory, and community-based participatory research approach to create a community-centered dissemination framework. Consumer research, through focus groups and community-wide surveys, was centered on the adopters to ensure a multilevel intervention was well designed and effective. Collaboration took place between an academic institution and eight community-based organizations. These groups worked together to conduct thorough consumer research. A sample of 72 Asian Americans participated in 8 focus groups, and differences were noted across ethnic groups. Furthermore, 464 community members participated in an Individual Client Survey. Most participants agreed that early detection of cancer was important (434/464, 93.5%), cancer could happen to anyone (403/464, 86.9%), CRC could be prevented (344/464, 74.1%), and everyone should screen for CRC (389/464, 83.8%). However, 35.8% (166/464) of participants also felt that people were better off not knowing it they had cancer, and 45.5% (211/464) would screen only when they had symptoms. Most participants indicated that they would screen upon their doctor's recommendation, but half reported that they only saw a doctor when they were sick. Data collection currently is underway for a multilevel intervention (community health advisor and social marketing campaign) and will conclude March 2016. We expect that analysis and results will be available by June 2016. This study outlines a

  2. Evidence-Based Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder: Implementation, Integration, and Stepped Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi-Kain, Lois W; Albert, Elizabeth B; Gunderson, John G

    2016-01-01

    After participating in this activity, learners should be better able to:• Evaluate evidence-based therapies for borderline personality disorder Several manualized psychotherapies for treating borderline personality disorder (BPD) have been validated in randomized, controlled trials. Most of these approaches are highly specialized, offering different formulation of BPD and different mechanisms by which recovery is made possible. Mental health clinicians are challenged by the degree of specialization and clinical resources that these approaches require in their empirically validated adherent forms. While these effective treatments have renewed optimism for the treatment of BPD, clinicians may feel limited in their ability to offer any of them or may integrate an eclectic assortment of features from the different treatments. This article will evaluate four major evidence-based treatments for BPD-dialectical behavioral therapy, mentalization-based treatment, transference-focused psychotherapy, and General Psychiatric Management-and possible modes of implementation in adherent and integrative forms. Models of implementing these diverse treatment approaches will be evaluated, and the potential advantages of combining evidence-based treatments will be discussed, along with some cautionary notes. A proposal for providing stepwise care through assessment of clinical severity will be presented as a means of achieving system-wide changes and greater access to care.

  3. Evidence-based dentistry for planning restorative treatments: barriers and potential solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrashtehfar, K I; Eimar, H; Yassine, R; Abi-Nader, S; Tamimi, F

    2017-11-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) can help provide the best treatment option for every patient, however, its implementation in restorative dentistry is very limited. This study aimed at assessing the barriers preventing the implementation of EBD among dental undergraduate and graduate students in Montreal, and explore possible solutions to overcome these barriers. A cross-sectional survey was conducted by means of a paper format self-administrated questionnaire distributed among dental students. The survey assessed the barriers and potential solutions for implementation of an evidence-based practice. Sixty-one students completed the questionnaire. Forty-one percent of respondents found evidence-based literature to be the most reliable source of information for restorative treatment planning, however, only 16% used it. They considered that finding reliable information was difficult and they sometimes encountered conflicting information when consulting different sources. Dental students had positive attitudes towards the need for better access to evidence-based literature to assist learning and decision making in restorative treatment planning and to improve treatment outcomes. Even for dentists trained in EBD, online searching takes too much time, and even though it can provide information of better quality than personal intuition, it might not be enough to identify the best available evidence. Even though dental students are aware of the importance of EBD in restorative dentistry they rarely apply the concept, mainly due to time constraints. For this reason, implementation of EBD would probably require faster access to evidence-based knowledge. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric antiphospholipid syndrome: the SHARE initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Noortje; de Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian; Kenet, Gili; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza; Pilkington, Clarissa A; Ravelli, Angelo; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Wulffraat, Nico M; Ozen, Seza; Brogan, Paul; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-10-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is rare in children, and evidence-based guidelines are sparse. Consequently, management is mostly based on observational studies and physician's experience, and treatment regimens differ widely. The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) initiative was launched to develop diagnostic and management regimens for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Here, we developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of paediatric APS. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedure. Following a detailed systematic review of the literature, a committee of paediatric rheumatologists and representation of paediatric haematology with expertise in paediatric APS developed recommendations. The literature review yielded 1473 articles, of which 15 were valid and relevant. In total, four recommendations for diagnosis and eight for treatment of paediatric APS (including paediatric Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome) were accepted. Additionally, two recommendations for children born to mothers with APS were accepted. It was agreed that new classification criteria for paediatric APS are necessary, and APS in association with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus should be identified by performing antiphospholipid antibody screening. Treatment recommendations included prevention of thrombotic events, and treatment recommendations for venous and/or arterial thrombotic events. Notably, due to the paucity of studies on paediatric APS, level of evidence and strength of the recommendations is relatively low. The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for paediatric APS, facilitating improvement and uniformity of care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use

  5. Concomitant disseminated histoplasmosis and disseminated tuberculosis after tumor necrosis factor inhibitor treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Oca, Juan E; Villarreal Morales, Martha L; Nieves-Rodriguez, Aracelis; Martínez-Bonilla, Lemuel

    2017-01-13

    Tumor necrosis factor antagonist inhibitors have transformed the approach to patients with severe autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis. Although the therapy can be highly effective, TNF-α inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Here, we report a case of concomitant disseminated histoplasmosis and tuberculosis in a 65-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis treated with TNF-α inhibitor. Both conditions can be found in disseminated form in immunosuppressed hosts, but co-infection is rare with only a few cases having been reported, to our knowledge, all in HIV patients. This case posed a considerable challenge for diagnosis and treatment due to the unusual disseminated co-infection, the overlapping symptoms, and the interactions between medications.

  6. Assessing mental health clinicians' intentions to adopt evidence-based treatments: reliability and validity testing of the evidence-based treatment intentions scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathaniel J

    2016-05-05

    Intentions play a central role in numerous empirically supported theories of behavior and behavior change and have been identified as a potentially important antecedent to successful evidence-based treatment (EBT) implementation. Despite this, few measures of mental health clinicians' EBT intentions exist and available measures have not been subject to thorough psychometric evaluation or testing. This paper evaluates the psychometric properties of the evidence-based treatment intentions (EBTI) scale, a new measure of mental health clinicians' intentions to adopt EBTs. The study evaluates the reliability and validity of inferences made with the EBTI using multi-method, multi-informant criterion variables collected over 12 months from a sample of 197 mental health clinicians delivering services in 13 mental health agencies. Structural, predictive, and discriminant validity evidence is assessed. Findings support the EBTI's factor structure (χ (2) = 3.96, df = 5, p = .556) and internal consistency reliability (α = .80). Predictive validity evidence was provided by robust and significant associations between EBTI scores and clinicians' observer-reported attendance at a voluntary EBT workshop at a 1-month follow-up (OR = 1.92, p a 12-month follow-up (R (2) = .17, p a 12-month follow-up (R (2) = .25, p work climate perceptions of functionality (R (2) = .06, p a practical and theoretically grounded measure of mental health clinicians' EBT intentions. Scores on the EBTI provide a basis for valid inferences regarding mental health clinicians' intentions to adopt EBTs. Discussion focuses on research and practice applications.

  7. Adoption of Evidence-Based Clinical Innovations: The Case of Buprenorphine Use by Opioid Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christina M.; D’Aunno, Thomas A.; Pollack, Harold A.; Friedmann, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations’ technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs’ decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use. PMID:24051897

  8. Adoption of evidence-based clinical innovations: the case of buprenorphine use by opioid treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christina M; D'Aunno, Thomas A; Pollack, Harold A; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-02-01

    This article examines changes from 2005 to 2011 in the use of an evidence-based clinical innovation, buprenorphine use, among a nationally representative sample of opioid treatment programs and identifies characteristics associated with its adoption. We apply a model of the adoption of clinical innovations that focuses on the work needs and characteristics of staff; organizations' technical and social support for the innovation; local market dynamics and competition; and state policies governing the innovation. Results indicate that buprenorphine use increased 24% for detoxification and 47% for maintenance therapy between 2005 and 2011. Buprenorphine use was positively related to reliance on private insurance and availability of state subsidies to cover its cost and inversely related to the percentage of clients who injected opiates, county size, and local availability of methadone. The results indicate that financial incentives and market factors play important roles in opioid treatment programs' decisions to adopt evidence-based clinical innovations such as buprenorphine use.

  9. Current knowledge on evidence-based shockwave treatments for shoulder pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, Daniel; Ramón, Silvia; Guiloff, Leonardo; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal pathologies. Treatment by ESWT (extracorporeal shockwave therapy) has emerged as an alternative when conservative treatment fails in rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, prior to invasive procedures. The clinical efficacy of ESWT in non-calcific tendinopathy remains controversial. The good results in the treatment of rotator cuff calcifications, have led to indications of ESWT being expanded to other shoulder pathologies. We review the current state of indications and evidence based practice. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementing an evidence-based detoxification protocol for alcoholism in a residential addictions treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundio, Albert

    2013-09-01

    Chemical dependency, commonly known as substance abuse and use disorders, continues to plague residents of the United States. Because treatment has expanded beyond the walls of the acute care hospital, advanced practice nurses play a pivotal role in caring for clients addicted to various substances. This article describes how an advanced practice nurse in collaboration with the medical director and a director of nursing at a residential treatment center in southern New Jersey oversaw the development of an evidence-based detoxification treatment protocol for alcohol dependency, emphasizing the critical role of nurses in assuring that clinical practice is rooted in current evidence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evidence - based pharmacological treatment of atopic dermatitis: An expert opinion and new expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold P Oranje

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is one of the most common skin diseases with a complex multifactorial background. The clinical presentation, the aggravating factors and the complications vary according to the age of the patients. Most cases, approximately 60-80%, present for the 1 st time before the age of 12 months. Adult-onset AD has been observed as a special variant. Pruritus is the worst sign of AD, which also often indicates an exacerbation and is considered to be the most annoying symptom of AD. Treatment is preferably started based on the severity of AD. In only 10% of the cases, AD is so severe that systemic treatment is necessary. Systemic treatment including topical wet-wrap treatment is indicated in the worst and recalcitrant cases of AD. Systemic treatment of AD is discussed with regards to the evidence-based efficacy and safety aspects. I prefer wet-wraps as a crisis intervention in severe childhood cases, whereas UV and systemic treatments are the choices in patients older than 10 years. Probiotics are not useful in the treatment. If they have any effect at all it may only be in food-allergic children with AD. Finally, anti-histamines are not effective against pruritus in AD. They are only effective against urticarial flares and in cases with food-allergy. This article consists of an expert opinion on evidence-based pharmacological treatment of AD, but it is not a systemic review.

  12. Multidimensional Family Therapy: Evidence Base for Transdiagnostic Treatment Outcomes, Change Mechanisms, and Implementation in Community Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes the 30+-year evidence base of Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), a comprehensive treatment for youth substance abuse and antisocial behaviors. Findings from four types of MDFT studies are discussed: hybrid efficacy/effectiveness randomized controlled trials, therapy process studies, cost analyses, and implementation trials. This research has evaluated various versions of MDFT. These studies have systematically tested adaptations of MDFT for diverse treatment settings in different care sectors (mental health, substance abuse, juvenile justice, and child welfare), as well as adaptations according to treatment delivery features and client impairment level, including adolescents presenting with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Many published scientific reviews, including meta-analyses, national and international government publications, and evidence-based treatment registries, offer consistent conclusions about the clinical effectiveness of MDFT compared with standard services as well as active treatments. The diverse and continuing MDFT research, the favorable, multi-source independent evaluations, combined with the documented receptivity of youth, parents, community-based clinicians and administrators, and national and international MDFT training programs (U.S.-based organization is MDFT International, www.mdft.org; and Europe-based organization is www.mdft.nl) all support the potential for continued transfer of MDFT to real-world clinical settings. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  13. Community Health Advisors' Participation in a Dissemination and Implementation Study of an Evidence-Based Physical Activity and Healthy Eating Program in a Faith-Based Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Patricia A; Wilcox, Sara; Kinnard, Deborah; Condrasky, Margaret D

    2018-02-09

    Community health advisors (CHAs) have been widely involved in health promotion, but few details on role expectations, retention, and evaluation have been reported. In a dissemination and implementation (D&I) study of an evidence-based healthy eating and physical activity program, 59 churches were randomized to an intervention (n = 39) or control (delayed intervention) (n = 20) condition. In a novel approach, CHAs worked with church committees rather than congregants by providing training (n = 59) and technical assistance (n = 54) to the committees to implement a program focused on structural and policy-level changes to support congregants' behavioral changes. CHA training comprised self-study via electronic training modules, in-person training, and telephone-based training. Evaluation methods were pilot test participants' and CHAs' ratings of their training; observers' ratings of CHAs' church training delivery; church committee members' ratings of the training experience, including CHAs' performance; and data from the TA database to assess CHAs' adherence to the protocol. The main challenge was the early dropout of one CHA and the reduced role of another. CHAs trained 142 intervention and 60 control church committee members in nine sessions; they covered 99% (intervention) and 90% (control) of training content, indicating high fidelity. Observers' scored CHAs' teaching and facilitation skills at 96.7% (intervention) and 80% (control) of the possible score. CHAs completed 92% of intervention and 93% of control TA calls. The great majority of church participants' comments regarding CHAs were positive. This study demonstrates that with training and support, CHAs demonstrate high levels of intervention fidelity, confidence, and competence.

  14. Common Elements Across Evidence-Based Trauma Treatment: Discovery and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia C. Strand

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The social work profession is facing a critical gap in its provision of effective services to an increasingly large number of clients who are affected by trauma. To explore for the presence of common components in evidence-based trauma treatments, a qualitative content analysis of 8 trauma treatment manuals was undertaken. Analysis resulted in the identification of 35 Intervention Objectives and 59 Practice Element codes. These were further organized into nine domains: trauma assessment, safety, engagement, attachment, core treatment interventions, attention to the social context, trauma processing, post trauma growth, and therapist self-care. Future work for the profession may involve synthesizing and integrating what has already been learned, and translating that knowledge into the classroom. Significantly, three domains which stress activities with the client in their social context were found to be common to trauma treatments, including safety promoting activities. Implications for social work education, practice, policy, and research are discussed.

  15. Organizational implementation of evidence-based substance abuse treatment in racial and ethnic minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; He, Amy; Kim, Ahraemi; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated organizational factors associated with the implementation of contingency management treatment (CMT) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in substance abuse treatment (SAT) programs serving racial and ethnic minority communities. Analysis of cross-sectional data collected in 2010-2011 from a random sample of 148 publicly funded SAT programs showed that accepting private insurance was positively associated with CMT and MAT implementation, whereas larger programs were associated with greater implementation of MAT. Supervisorial openness to and expectations about implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) and attributes for change were strongly associated with CMT, whereas the interactions between openness to EBPs and programs that accept private insurance and that are governed by parent organizations were positively associated with MAT. These external expectations and managerial attitudes supported the implementation of psychosocial and pharmacotherapy treatments in SAT. Implications for improving standards of care in minority communities are discussed.

  16. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, Wim

    2012-03-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling using data mainly from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses regarding these randomized controlled trials. The review is restricted to the selection of first and second line pharmacological treatments for smoking, alcohol dependence, opioid dependence, cocaine dependence, cannabis dependence and pathological gambling. It is concluded that great progress has been made in the last three decades and that currently evidence-based pharmacological treatments are available for smoking cessation, alcohol and opioid dependence and pathological gambling. At the same time a series of existing and new pharmacological compounds are being tested in cocaine and cannabis dependence. The review concludes with a summary of additional strategies to increase the effect size of already available pharmacological interventions, including polypharmacy, combining pharmacotherapy with psychotherapy and psychosocial support, and improved patient-treatment matching.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Polzer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, a standardized examination and an evidence-based treatment are missing. Therefore, aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence and develop an algorithm for diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analysis, systematic reviews, or if applicable observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations are given. The Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures, Physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex. Classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance. The squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify such injuries. Stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis, while for unstable ankle sprains conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without carrying possible complications. Early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of re-injury. Supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we here present an applicable and evidence-based step by step decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor’s practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and confidence for the attending physician.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries: development of an evidence-based algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzer, Hans; Kanz, Karl Georg; Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Ockert, Ben; Mutschler, Wolf; Grote, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Acute ankle injuries are among the most common injuries in emergency departments. However, there are still no standardized examination procedures or evidence-based treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study was to systematically search the current literature, classify the evidence, and develop an algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries. We systematically searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database for randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, systematic reviews or, if applicable, observational studies and classified them according to their level of evidence. According to the currently available literature, the following recommendations have been formulated: i) the Ottawa Ankle/Foot Rule should be applied in order to rule out fractures; ii) physical examination is sufficient for diagnosing injuries to the lateral ligament complex; iii) classification into stable and unstable injuries is applicable and of clinical importance; iv) the squeeze-, crossed leg- and external rotation test are indicative for injuries of the syndesmosis; v) magnetic resonance imaging is recommended to verify injuries of the syndesmosis; vi) stable ankle sprains have a good prognosis while for unstable ankle sprains, conservative treatment is at least as effective as operative treatment without the related possible complications; vii) early functional treatment leads to the fastest recovery and the least rate of reinjury; viii) supervised rehabilitation reduces residual symptoms and re-injuries. Taken these recommendations into account, we present an applicable and evidence-based, step by step, decision pathway for the diagnosis and treatment of acute ankle injuries, which can be implemented in any emergency department or doctor's practice. It provides quality assurance for the patient and promotes confidence in the attending physician. PMID:22577506

  19. Development of an evidence-based decision pathway for vestibular schwannoma treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Faina; Valappil, Benita; McAfee, Jacob; Goughnour, Sharon L; Hildrew, Douglas M; McCall, Andrew A; Linkov, Igor; Hirsch, Barry; Snyderman, Carl

    To integrate multiple sources of clinical information with patient feedback to build evidence-based decision support model to facilitate treatment selection for patients suffering from vestibular schwannomas (VS). This was a mixed methods study utilizing focus group and survey methodology to solicit feedback on factors important for making treatment decisions among patients. Two 90-minute focus groups were conducted by an experienced facilitator. Previously diagnosed VS patients were recruited by clinical investigators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). Classical content analysis was used for focus group data analysis. Providers were recruited from practices within the UPMC system and were surveyed using Delphi methods. This information can provide a basis for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) framework to develop a treatment decision support system for patients with VS. Eight themes were derived from these data (focus group + surveys): doctor/health care system, side effects, effectiveness of treatment, anxiety, mortality, family/other people, quality of life, and post-operative symptoms. These data, as well as feedback from physicians were utilized in building a multi-criteria decision model. The study illustrated steps involved in the development of a decision support model that integrates evidence-based data and patient values to select treatment alternatives. Studies focusing on the actual development of the decision support technology for this group of patients are needed, as decisions are highly multifactorial. Such tools have the potential to improve decision making for complex medical problems with alternate treatment pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Limited dissemination of the wastewater treatment plant core resistome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Christian; Albertsen, Mads; Telke, Amar; Ellabaan, Mostafa; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. However, the contribution of the dominant members of the WWTP resistome to resistance in human pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we use a combination of metagenomic functional selections and comprehensive metagenomic sequencing to uncover the dominant genes of the WWTP resistome. We find that this core resistome is unique to the WWTP environment, with WWTP environment. Our data highlight that, despite an abundance of functional resistance genes within WWTPs, only few genes are found in other environments, suggesting that the overall dissemination of the WWTP resistome is comparable to that of the soil resistome. PMID:26419330

  1. The effectiveness of evidence-based treatments for personality disorders when comparing treatment-as-usual and bona fide treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Stephanie L; Moore, Jonathan T; Del Re, A C; Wampold, Bruce E; Baardseth, Timothy P; Nienhuis, Jacob B

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of Study 1 was to examine the relative efficacy of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) when compared to treatment-as-usual (TAU) for adults diagnosed with a personality disorder (PD). The purpose of Study 2 was to investigate the strength of the differences between bona fide psychotherapeutic treatments for PDs. Two separate computerized searches were conducted of: (a) studies that directly compared an EBT with a TAU for treatment of PDs, or (b) studies that compared at least two bona fide treatments for PDs. Meta-analytic methods were used to estimate the effectiveness of the treatments when compared to one another and to model how various confounding variables impacted the results of this comparative research. A total of 30 studies (Study 1; N=1662) were included in the meta-analysis comparing EBTs to TAU. A total of 12 studies (Study 2; N=723) were included in the meta-analysis comparing bona fide treatments. Study 1 found that EBTs were superior to TAU, although the TAU conditions were not comparable in many respects (e.g., not psychotherapy, lacking supervision, lacking training, etc.) to the EBT and there was significant heterogeneity in the effects. Study 2 found that some bona fide treatments were superior to others. © 2013.

  2. Factors associated with faith-based health counselling in the United States: implications for dissemination of evidence-based behavioural medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Elizabeth A; Bopp, Melissa; Webb, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Health counselling is an evidence-based behavioural medicine approach and the most commonly reported form of faith-based health interventions. Yet, no research has explored the factors influencing the implementation of faith-based health counselling. Therefore, this study examined individual, organisational and environmental factors associated with offering/not offering faith-based health counselling programmes within faith-based organisations. A national, internet-based, opt-in, cross-sectional survey of faith leaders (N = 676) was conducted (March-December 2009) to assess faith leaders' demographic information, health status, fatalism, health-related attitudes and normative beliefs, attitudes towards health counselling, institutional and occupational information, and perceptions of parent organisation support for health and wellness interventions. Most faith leaders reported offering some type of health counselling in the past year [n = 424, 62.7%, 95% CI (59.0, 66.3)]. Results of a multivariate logistic regression showed that faith leaders reporting greater proxy efficacy (OR = 1.40, P = 0.002), greater comfort in speaking with church members about health (OR = 1.25, P = 0.005), greater perceived health (OR = 1.27, P = 0.034), and who worked at larger churches (OR ≥ 3.2, P ≤ 0.001) with greater parent organisation support (OR = 1.33, P = 0.002) had significantly higher odds of offering faith-based health counselling. Church size and parent organisation support for faith-based health interventions appear to be important factors in the presence of faith leader health counselling. The content of faith leader health counselling training should aim to increase faith leaders' confidence that church members will successfully change their health behaviours as a result of the health counselling and increase faith leaders' comfort in speaking with church members about health. Future research is needed to examine efficacious and effective dissemination methods such as

  3. Engaging parents in evidence-based treatments in schools: Community perspectives from implementing CBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Pears, Gillian; Baweja, Shilpa; Vona, Pamela; Tang, Jennifer; Kataoka, Sheryl H.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored parent engagement in an evidence-based treatment, the Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Trauma in Schools (CBITS), which was delivered in a school setting. To examine the successes and challenges in engaging parents in this school-based program, we conducted qualitative interviews by phone to obtain data from clinicians, parents, and other school personnel across eleven schools from 3 different regions of the United States. Almost all of these schools served low-income and ethnically diverse communities. We describe general impressions of parent engagement, parent reactions and preferences with regard to CBITS, barriers to parent engagement, and how to overcome barriers from multiple perspectives. Parent engagement across schools varied, with extensive outreach and relatively good parent engagement in CBITS described in some schools, while in other schools, efforts to engage parents were not as consistent. Implications for future efforts to engage parents in school-based treatments are discussed. PMID:24273613

  4. Increased Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Through Oklahoma Hospital System Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuthard, Joy L; Beebe, Laura A; Halstead, LaWanna; Olson, Kimbra D; Roysdon, Jennifer W

    2015-11-01

    Oklahoma hospitals admit approximately 120,000 tobacco users each year, many for diseases resulting from tobacco use. To describe a unique partnership between the Oklahoma Hospital Association and Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust to reach more tobacco users through the implementation of sustainable health system changes within hospitals and clinics to integrate an evidence-based tobacco treatment protocol for all tobacco-using patients. The Oklahoma Hospital Association tobacco-cessation model included (1) identifying all tobacco-using patients; (2) assessing addiction level and readiness to quit; (3) prescribing medications to manage withdrawal while in hospital; and (4) proactively faxing a referral to the Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline for all patients ready to quit. Helpline registration patterns and characteristics of fax-referred hospitalized patients were tracked for the 4 years of the initiative (2009-2013); data were analyzed in 2013. Twenty-one hospitals and 12 clinics participated in the initiative. Fax referrals to the Helpline increased by > 150% in the first year, from about 600 during the year prior to the implementation of the program (July 2009 to June 2010) to 1,581 from Oklahoma Hospital Association facilities alone in the first year following the launch of the initiative. Nearly 5,600 Oklahoma Hospital Association fax referrals were made during the 4-year study period. About 41% of these referrals resulted in Helpline enrollment (n = 2,289). Sustainable, evidence-based tobacco treatment interventions embedded in hospital systems can successfully identify tobacco users and provide effective treatment, including increased proactive Helpline referrals for quit coaching.

  5. The dissemination and implementation of psychological treatments: problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairburn, Christopher G; Wilson, G Terence

    2013-07-01

    Treatment researchers expend their efforts identifying effective treatments, and for whom and how they work, but there are matters over and above these that are of concern when it comes to dissemination and implementation. These include the clinical range of the interventions concerned, the ease with which they can be learned, and their mode of delivery. It is these three topics, as they apply to the psychological treatment of eating disorders, that form the focus of this article. Alongside these considerations, we discuss how modern technology has the potential to transform both treatment and training. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Treatment of anxiety disorders in epilepsy: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mula, Marco

    2013-03-01

    During recent years growing attention has been paid to psychiatric comorbidities in epilepsy. However, anxiety disorders still remain underrecognized and undertreated. This is largely related to the lack of specific screening instruments and the frequent co-occurrence with mood disorders. Data on treatment are insufficient and clinical practice still relies heavily on individual experience. In this article we review evidence-based treatment strategies for primary major anxiety disorders and adapt them to the specific needs of patients with epilepsy. In panic disorder, a combined approach, namely serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is always indicated during the acute phase. Long-term maintenance treatment may include combined therapy or CBT alone depending on individual cases. For generalized anxiety disorders pregabalin has to be considered first choice for short-term and long-term treatment. In social anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder SSRIs, in particular sertraline and paroxetine, can be safely used. Obsessive-compulsive disorder represents a serious condition that needs to be approached in a psychiatric setting. CBT should be considered as the first choice in patients with epilepsy. If drug treatment is needed, epileptologists have to be aware that high-dose antidepressants are appropriate and that SSRIs, in particular sertraline, should be considered first choice. In these patients, careful clinical monitoring is indicated, in selected cases, for potential seizure precipitation and side effects due to pharmacodynamics interactions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Psychotherapies provided for eating disorders by community clinicians: infrequent use of evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ranson, Kristin M; Wallace, Laurel M; Stevenson, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the psychological interventions used for eating disorders (EDs) by community practitioners. Of 573 clinicians we screened across Alberta, 130 (22.7%) had treated EDs; 118 (90.8%) were interviewed. Clinicians reported varied reasons for psychotherapy choice and diverse training experiences; the primary approaches used varied by education and field. The most common primary approach was eclectic (43.2%), followed by cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT; 22.9%). However, self-reported CBT clinicians used specific CBT techniques infrequently. Half of clinicians incorporated addictions-based techniques. These results indicate that ED treatment provided by community clinicians is varied and generally does not align with evidence-based practice guidelines.

  8. Advances in the psychosocial treatment of addiction: the role of technology in the delivery of evidence-based psychosocial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Lisa A; Dallery, Jesse

    2012-06-01

    The clinical community has a growing array of psychosocial interventions with a strong evidence base available for the treatment of SUDs. Considerable opportunity exists for leveraging technology in the delivery of evidence-based interventions to promote widespread reach and impact of evidence-based care. Data from this line of research to date are promising, and underscore the potential public health impact of technology-based therapeutic tools. To fully realize the potential of technology-delivered interventions, several areas of inquiry remain important. First, scientifically sound strategies should be explored to ensure technology-based interventions are optimally designed to produce maximal behavior change. Second, efficient and effective methods should be identified to integrate technology-based interventions into systems of care in a manner that is most responsive to the needs of individual users. Third, payment, privacy, and regulatory systems should be refined and extended to go beyond electronic medical records and telehealth/distance care models, and support the deployment of technology-based systems to enhance the quality, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of care. Fourth, the mechanisms underlying behavior change derived from technology-based treatments should be explicated, including new mechanisms that may be tapped via novel, technology-based tools. Such work will be critical in isolating mechanisms that are useful in predicting treatment response, and in ensuring that key ingredients are present in technology-based interventions as they are made widely available.

  9. A unified protocol for the transdiagnostic psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders: an evidence-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Falk; Salzer, Simone

    2014-06-01

    Although there is evidence for the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy (PDT) in anxiety disorders, results are not yet satisfactory, for example, if rates of remission and response are considered. To address this problem, a unified psychodynamic protocol for anxiety disorders (UPP-ANXIETY) is proposed that integrates the treatment principles of those methods of PDT that have proven to be efficacious in anxiety disorders. In addition, this protocol is transdiagnostic, implying that it is applicable to various forms of anxiety disorders and related disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, panic disorders, avoidant personality disorder). Based on supportive-expressive therapy, the UPP-ANXIETY represents an integrated form of psychodynamic therapy that allows for a flexible use of empirically supported treatment principles. UPP-ANXIETY encompasses the following 9 treatment principles (modules): (1) socializing the patient for psychotherapy, (2) motivating and setting treatment goals, (3) establishing a secure helping alliance, (4) identifying the core conflict underlying anxiety, (5) focusing on the warded-off wish/affect, (6) modifying underlying internalized object relations, (7) changing underlying defenses and avoidance, (8) modifying underlying response of self, and (9) termination and relapse prevention. Some principles are regarded as core components to be used in every treatment (principles 3-8). A unified protocol for the psychodynamic treatment of anxiety disorders has several advantages, that is (1) integrating the most effective treatment principles of empirically supported psychodynamic treatments for anxiety disorders can be expected to further improve the efficacy of PDT; (2) using a unified protocol in efficacy studies has the potential to enhance the evidence-based status of PDT by aggregating the evidence; (3) a unified protocol will facilitate both training in PDT and transfer of research to clinical practice; and (4) thus, a unified

  10. Posttraumatic stress disorder in incarcerated women: A call for evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Holly M; Budescu, Mia; Gillihan, Seth J; Riley, Suzanne; Foa, Edna B

    2015-01-01

    The majority of women who enter the criminal justice system, most of whom are poor and women of color, have suffered from significant lifetime trauma exposure that can lead to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is essential to identify the prevalence of PTSD among this population in order to identify treatment needs. Most studies on PTSD among incarcerated women have focused on PTSD in jailed populations, including women awaiting trial. Using a cross-sectional study design, we estimated the prevalence of PTSD and comorbid physical and mental health conditions in 387 incarcerated women sentenced to a maximum-security prison in the United States. Almost half (44%) of our sample met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Women with moderate to severe PTSD symptoms were more likely to report several comorbid physical and mental health conditions than were women without PTSD. Women with the most severe symptoms were most likely to report receiving mental health treatment in prison; women with moderate to severe symptoms were less likely to report receiving similar mental health care. Our findings add support to the link between PTSD and comorbid physical and mental health conditions and suggest that many women with PTSD are not receiving mental health treatment that is likely to benefit them. Because prison has become the mental health safety net for some of the nation's most vulnerable women, it is imperative that prisons provide evidence-based PTSD treatment during incarceration. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Evidence-based treatment strategies for treatment-resistant bipolar depression: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sienaert, P.; Lambrichts, L.; Dols, A.; De Fruyt, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment resistance in bipolar depression is a common clinical problem that constitutes a major challenge for the treating clinician as there is a paucity of treatment options. The objective of this paper was to review the evidence for treatment options in treatment-resistant bipolar

  12. Intraocular lenses for the treatment of age-related cataracts: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    accommodation and, therefore, offer a continuous range of vision (i.e. near, intermediate and distant vision) without the need for glasses. Purported advantages over multifocal IOLs include the avoidance of haloes and no reduction in contrast sensitivity. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was the first material used in the fabrication of IOLs and has inherent ultraviolet blocking abilities. PMMA IOLs are inflexible, however, and require a larger incision for implantation compared with newer foldable silicone (hydrophobic) and acrylic (hydrophobic or hydrophilic) lenses. IOLs can be further sub-classified as being either aspheric or spheric, blue/violet filtered or non-filtered or 1- or 3-piece. METHODS OF EVIDENCE-BASED ANALYSIS: A literature search was conducted from January 2003 to January 2009 that included OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), The Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment/Centre for Review and Dissemination. Inclusion CriteriaExclusion Criteriaadult patients with age-related cataractssystematic reviews, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) distance visual acuity (best corrected distance visual acuity), near visual acuity (best distance corrected near visual acuity) contrast sensitivity, depth of field, glare, quality of life, visual function, spectacle dependence, posterior capsule opacification.studies with fewer than 20 eyesIOLs for non-age related cataractsIOLs for presbyopiastudies with a mean follow-up reporting insufficient data for analysis COMPARISONS OF INTEREST: The primary comparison of interest was accommodative vs. multifocal vs. monofocal lenses. Secondary comparisons of interest included: tinted vs. non-tinted lensesaspheric vs. spheric lensesmultipiece vs. single piece lensesbiomaterial A (e.g. acrylic) vs. biomaterial B (e.g. silicone) lensessharp vs. round edged lensesThe quality of the studies was

  13. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians? Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review...

  14. Limited dissemination of the wastewater treatment plant core resistome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Albertsen, Mads; Telke, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role in the dissem......Horizontal gene transfer is a major contributor to the evolution of bacterial genomes and can facilitate the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes between environmental reservoirs and potential pathogens. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are believed to play a central role...... in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. However, the contribution of the dominant members of the WWTP resistome to resistance in human pathogens remains poorly understood. Here we use a combination of metagenomic functional selections and comprehensive metagenomic sequencing to uncover the dominant genes...... of the WWTP resistome. We find that this core resistome is unique to the WWTP environment, with WWTP environment. Our data highlight that, despite an abundance of functional resistance genes within WWTPs, only few genes are found in other environments, suggesting...

  15. Withdrawal of immunosuppresive agents in the treatment of disseminated coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, J E; Zoschke, D; Kisch, A L

    1980-04-01

    Disseminated coccidioidomycosis is a systemic fungal infection that causes high mortality in the renal transplatn patient. Cell-mediated immunity, which appears to be the relevant host defense mechanism, is impaired by the immunosupressive agents used to prevent allograft rejection. In the case presented, immunosuppressive therapy was stopped as an adjunct to treatment of this infection. The patient has shown evidence of improvement, and his allograft has continued to function nine months after the withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy and 18 months after the diagnosis. In vitro lymphocyte function studies indicate that the impairment in cell-mediated immunity detected prior to withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy has persisted, probably accounting for allograft survival. Withdrawal of immunosuppressive therapy may prolong survival in renal transplant patients with disseminated coccidioidomycosis. Additionally, depression in cell-mediated immunity associated with the fungal infection itself may be sufficient to prevent allograft rejection in these patients.

  16. Addiction treatment provider attitudes on staff capacity and evidence-based clinical training: results from a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Krull, Ivy; Chassler, Deborah; Weidenfeld, Rachel; de Saxe Zerden, Lisa; Gowler, Rebekah; Lederer, Jaime; Cohen, Alexander; Beltrame, Clelia

    2011-01-01

    This national study of addiction-treatment organizations' implementation of evidence-based practices examines: (1) organizational/leadership factors associated with director (n = 212) attitudes regarding staff resistance to organizational change, and (2) organizational/staff factors associated with staff (n = 312) attitudes regarding evidence-based clinical training. Linear regression analyses, controlling for type of treatment unit, leadership/staff characteristics and organizational readiness to change, identified that directors who perceived their organization needed more guidance and had less staff cohesion and autonomy rated staff resistance to organizational change significantly higher. Staff with higher levels of education and greater agreement that their organization supported change had greater preference for evidence-based trainings. Federal addiction treatment policy should both promote education and training of treatment staff and organizational development of treatment CBOs.  © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  17. Evidence-Base Update of Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weersing, V. Robin; Jeffreys, Megan; Do, Minh-Chau T.; Schwartz, Karen T. G.; Bolano, Carl

    2017-01-01

    Depression in youth is prevalent and disabling and tends to presage a chronic and recurrent course of illness and impairment in adulthood. Clinical trial research in youth depression has a 30 year history, and evidence-based treatment reviews appeared in 1998 and 2008. The current review of 42 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) updates these reviews to include RCTs published between 2008 and 2014 (N = 14) and re-evaluates previously reviewed literature. Given the growing maturity of the field, this review utilized a stringent set of methodological criteria for trial inclusion, most notable for excluding trials based in sub-clinical samples of youth that had been included in previous reviews (N = 12) and including well-designed RCTs with null and negative findings (N = 8). Findings from the current review suggest that evidence for child treatments is notably weaker than for adolescent interventions, with no child treatments achieving well-established status and the evidentiary basis of treatments downgraded from previous reports. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for clinically depressed children appears to be possibly efficacious, with mixed findings across trials. For depressed adolescents, both CBT and Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) are well-established interventions, with evidence of efficacy in multiple trials by independent investigative teams. This positive conclusion is tempered by the small size of the IPT literature (N = 6) and concern that CBT effects may be attenuated in clinically complicated samples and when compared against active control conditions. In conclusion, data on predictors, moderators, and mediators are examined and priorities for future research discussed. PMID:27870579

  18. Narrative exposure therapy: an evidence-based treatment for multiple and complex trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud A. Jongedijk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Narrative exposure therapy (NET is a recently developed, short-term treatment for patients with a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as a result of multiple trauma. NET can be applied very successfully in patients with complex trauma complaints (Jongedijk, 2014; Schauer, Neuner, & Elbert, 2011.An important feature of NET is that trauma processing is never an isolated event but is always embedded in the context of a traumatic event and in the life history as a whole. At the start, the lifeline is laid. The lifeline is made up of a rope, with flowers (happy events, stones (traumatic events, sometimes candles (grief, or recently also sticks for aggressive acts (NET for offenders; see Stenmark, Cuneyt Guzey, Elbert, & Holen, 2014. These symbols are laid down along the rope, in chronological order. Subsequently, in the subsequent therapy sessions the lifeline is processed in chronological order, giving attention to all the important events a person has experienced in his or her life, both the adverse as well as the pleasurable ones. The narration ends with a written testimony.To date, there is good evidence NET is effective in the treatment of PTSD patients, with support from 18 RCTs (N=950. For culturally diverse populations, NET is recommended as the most evidence-based trauma treatment, besides culturally adapted CBT. NET has been investigated in different populations in Africa, Europe, and Asia. In Asia, research has been carried out in Sri Lanka as well as in China. In China, NET was conducted and investigated with survivors of the Sichuan earthquake (Zang, Hunt, & Cox, 2013, 2014. NET is understandable, even appealing and also supportive for patients with multiple trauma. In this presentation, the treatment principles and the practice of NET will be explained.

  19. Nonsurgical nonablative treatment of aging skin: radiofrequency technologies between aggressive marketing and evidence-based efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiyeh, Bishara S; Dibo, Saad A

    2009-05-01

    The gold standard treatment for the many aesthetic aspects of aging has for many years been surgery in its many forms. However, with increasing patient demand for cosmetic rejuvenation and with the strong desire and drive by patients to attain aesthetic enhancement with minimal risk and rapid recovery, there has been a strong surge inspiring the field of nonsurgical skin rejuvenation. Traditionally, most of the nonsurgical methods have centered around those that destroy the epidermis and cause a dermal wound, with resultant dermal collagen remodeling and secondary skin tightening and rhytid improvement. Currently, there is growing interest in a wide range of nonablative interventions that, predictably, are claimed to rejuvenate skin and subcutaneous tissue "safely and effectively." Although several nonablative systems have been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the purpose of skin rejuvenation and despite significant reported improvement in the appearance of signs and symptoms of photoaging by relatively noninvasive means, the clinical results have been generally less than impressive, with most subjects showing only mild improvement. The current review aims at summarizing the various nonablative methods currently in use for skin rejuvenation and to evaluate the evidence-based efficacy of a particular nonablative radiofrequency (NARF) method: monopolar radiofrequency.

  20. Organizational factors influencing implementation of evidence-based practices for integrated treatment in behavioral health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Caroline A; Sommerfeld, David; Willging, Cathleen; Aarons, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. In recent years, New Mexico has prioritized integrated treatment for cooccurring mental health and substance use disorders within its public behavioral health system. This report describes factors likely to be important when implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community agencies. Methods. Our mixed-method research design consisted of observations, semistructured interviews, and surveys undertaken with employees at 14 agencies at baseline and after 18 months. We developed four-agency typologies based on iterative coding and analysis of observations and interviews. We then examined survey data from employees at the four exemplar agencies to validate qualitative findings. Results. Financial resources and strong leadership impacted agency capacity to train providers and implement EBPs. Quantitative analysis of service provider survey responses from these agencies (N = 38) supported qualitative findings and demonstrated significant mean score differences in leadership, organizational climate, and attitudes toward EBPs in anticipated directions. Conclusion. The availability of strong leadership and financial resources were key components to initial implementation success in this study of community agencies in New Mexico. Reliance only on external funding poses risks for sustainment when demoralizing work climates precipitate employee turnover. Strong agency leadership does not always compensate for deficient financial resources in vulnerable communities.

  1. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome: epidemiology, pathophysiology and evidence-based treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, N F; Brady, C M; Creagh, T

    2014-04-01

    Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a chronic debilitating condition that can have a severely negative impact on a patient's quality of life. Its prevalence ranges from 52 to 500/100,000 in females compared to 8-41/100,000 in males, and its incidence is increasing globally. Treatment algorithms are sub-classified into behavioural, pharmacological, intravesical, interventional and surgical therapies. Short-term (i.e. <1 year) cure rates range from 50% to 75% for non-/minimally-invasive therapies, but repeat administration of a therapeutic agent is required. Although definitive surgical intervention is associated with greater long-term cure rates (≥80%); significant short- and long-term adverse effects occur more frequently. Clinicians are likely to experience increasing numbers of patients with IC/PBS as more is understood about its pathophysiology and evolving epidemiology. Therefore urogynaecologists should familiarise themselves with appropriate diagnostic criteria and evidence based therapies to optimise clinical outcomes in this patient cohort. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. LGB-Affirmative Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Social Anxiety: A Case Study Applying Evidence-Based Practice Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kate; Hope, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    Guided by the American Psychological Association's principles of evidence-based practice, this article reviews a single-case treatment outcome study whereby a client characteristic, sexual identity, was integrated into the assessment and treatment of social anxiety symptoms. The case involved a young adult European-American male who presented to a…

  3. Evidence-based review, grade of recommendation, and suggested treatment recommendations for melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilendu Sarma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of melasma is known to be less satisfactory, often incomplete, and relapse is frequent. Although many treatment options are available, they are either known to be unsafe on long-term use or their long-term safety profile is unknown. Patients often use various drugs, even topical steroid-based preparation without any medical supervision for long period of time, making the skin unsuitable for many of the drugs available. Thus, there has been gross disparity among the treating physician about what drugs and what regimen are best suitable for various categories of melasma patients and in different situations. With this background, numerous newer drugs, mostly combinations of some proprietary molecules or even unknown plant extracts, have flooded the market for the management of melasma. Information on efficacy or safety of these products are almost unknown. Studies on Asian people, especially Indian population, are far less commonly available. Therapeutic guideline for use on Indian patients with melasma is almost missing. Extrapolation of data from Caucasian people for use on Asian people may not be scientifically justifiable because Caucasian and Asian people are known to have inherent difference in their response as well as tolerance to the drugs used for melasma. With this background, we have extensively evaluated, following a strict, scientifically designed protocol, all the available studies on melasma management till May 2016 and prepared this document on level of evidence, grade of recommendation and suggested therapeutic guideline for melasma as per the method proposed by Oxford Centre of Evidence-Based Medicine. Various ethical, social, logical, regional, and economic issues in the context of Indian and similar populations were given due importance while preparing the suggested therapeutic recommendation.

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and evidence-based medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic and debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects 9%-23% of the population across the world. The percentage of patients seeking health care related to IBS approaches 12% in primary care practices and is by far the largest subgroup seen in gastroenterology clinics. It has been well documented that these patients exhibit a poorer quality of life and utilize the health care system to a greater degree than patients without this diagnosis. The pathophysiology of IBS is not clear. Many theories have been put forward, but the exact cause of IBS is still uncertain. According to the updated ROME III criteria, IBS is a clinical diagnosis and presents as one of the three predominant subtypes: (1) IBS with constipation (IBS-C); (2) IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D); and (3) mixed IBS (IBS-M); former ROME definitions refer to IBS-M as alternating IBS (IBS-A). Across the IBS subtypes, the presentation of symptoms may vary among patients and change over time. Patients report the most distressing symptoms to be abdominal pain, straining, myalgias, urgency, bloating and feelings of serious illness. The complexity and diversity of IBS presentation makes treatment difficult. Although there are reviews and guidelines for treating IBS, they focus on the efficacy of medications for IBS symptoms using high-priority endpoints, leaving those of lower priority largely unreported. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive evidence-based review of the diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment to guide clinicians diagnosing and treating their patients. PMID:24944467

  5. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, D Scott; Hwang, Steven W; Easa, John E; Resnick, Daniel K; Baisden, Jamie L; Bess, Shay; Cho, Charles H; DePalma, Michael J; Dougherty, Paul; Fernand, Robert; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Lamer, Tim; Lisi, Anthony J; Mazanec, Daniel J; Meagher, Richard J; Nucci, Robert C; Patel, Rakesh D; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Sharma, Anil K; Summers, Jeffrey T; Taleghani, Christopher K; Tontz, William L; Toton, John F

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy is to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of July 2011. The goals of the guideline recommendations are to assist in delivering optimum efficacious treatment and functional recovery from this spinal disorder. To provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists in the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar disc herniation with radiculopathy. Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This guideline is a product of the Lumbar Disc Herniation with Radiculopathy Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group consisted of multidisciplinary spine care specialists trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English-language references found in Medline, Embase (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional evidence-based databases to identify articles. The relevant literature was then independently rated using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final recommendations to answer each clinical question were developed via work group discussion, and grades were assigned to the recommendations using standardized grades of recommendation. In the absence of Level I to IV evidence, work group consensus statements have been developed using a modified nominal group technique, and these statements are clearly identified as such in the guideline

  6. Evidence-based treatments for children with trauma-related psychopathology as a result of childhood maltreatment: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenarts, Laura E. W.; Diehle, Julia; Doreleijers, Theo A. H.; Jansma, Elise P.; Lindauer, Ramón J. L.

    2013-01-01

    This is a systematic review of evidence-based treatments for children exposed to childhood maltreatment. Because exposure to childhood maltreatment has been associated with a broad range of trauma-related psychopathology (e.g., PTSD, anxiety, suicidal ideation, substance abuse) and with aggressive

  7. Uniformity of Evidence-Based Treatments in Practice? Therapist Effects in the Delivery of Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, Kevin M.; Smith, Tracey L.; Wislocki, Andrew P.; Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Various factors contribute to the effective implementation of evidence-based treatments (EBTs). In this study, cognitive processing therapy (CPT) was administered in a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty clinic in which training and supervision were provided following VA implementation guidelines. The…

  8. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders: international comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-11-01

    The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The international comparison demonstrated notable commonalities and differences among these current clinical guidelines. Evidence-based clinical guidelines represent an important step toward the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments into clinical practice. Despite advances in clinical research on eating disorders, a growing body of literature demonstrates that individuals with eating disorders often do not receive an evidence-based treatment for their disorder. Regarding the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments, current guidelines do endorse the main empirically validated treatment approaches with considerable agreement, but additional recommendations are largely inconsistent. An increased evidence base is critical in offering clinically useful and reliable guidance for the treatment of eating disorders. Because developing and updating clinical guidelines is time-consuming and complex, an international coordination of guideline development, for example, across the European Union, would be desirable.

  9. Adapting and implementing an evidence-based treatment with justice-involved adolescents: the example of multidimensional family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Howard A

    2014-09-01

    For over four decades family therapy research and family centered evidence-based therapies for justice-involved youths have played influential roles in changing policies and services for these young people and their families. But research always reveals challenges as well as advances. To be sure, demonstration that an evidence-based therapy yields better outcomes than comparison treatments or services as usual is an accomplishment. But the extraordinary complexity embedded in that assertion feels tiny relative to what we are now learning about the so-called transfer of evidence-based treatments to real world practice settings. Today's family therapy studies continue to assess outcome with diverse samples and presenting problems, but research and funding priorities also include studying particular treatments in nonresearch settings. Does an evidence-based intervention work as well in a community clinic, with clinic personnel? How much of a treatment has to change to be accepted and implemented in a community clinic? Perhaps it is the setting and existing procedures that have to change? And, in those cases, do accommodations to the context compromise outcomes? Thankfully, technology transfer notions gave way to more systemic, dynamic, and frankly, more family therapy-like conceptions of the needed process. Implementation science became the more sensible, as well as the theoretically and empirically stronger overarching framework within which the evidence-based family based therapies now operate. Using the example of Multidimensional Family Therapy, this article discusses treatment development, refinement, and implementation of that adapted approach in a particular clinical context-a sector of the juvenile justice system-juvenile detention. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  10. Guideline summary review: an evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, D Scott; Baisden, Jamie; Mazanec, Daniel J; Patel, Rakesh D; Bess, Robert S; Burton, Douglas; Chutkan, Norman B; Cohen, Bernard A; Crawford, Charles H; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Hwang, Steven W; Kilincer, Cumhur; Myers, Mark E; Park, Paul; Rosolowski, Karie A; Sharma, Anil K; Taleghani, Christopher K; Trammell, Terry R; Vo, Andrew N; Williams, Keith D

    2016-12-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis features evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of June 2013. NASS' guideline on this topic is the only guideline on adult isthmic spondylolisthesis accepted in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Guideline Clearinghouse. The purpose of the guideline is to provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists when making clinical decisions for adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence-based guideline recommendations for diagnosing and treating patients with this condition. This is a guideline summary review. This guideline is the product of the Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Development Committee. The methods used to develop this guideline are detailed in the complete guideline and technical report available on the NASS website. In brief, a multidisciplinary work group of spine care specialists convened to identify clinical questionsto address in the guideline. The literature search strategy was developed in consultation with medical librarians. Upon completion of the systematic literature search, evidence relevant to the clinical questions posed in the guideline was reviewed. Work group members utilized NASS evidentiary table templates to summarize study conclusions, identify study strengths and weaknesses, and assign levels of evidence. Work group members participated in webcasts and in-person recommendation meetings to update and formulate evidence-based recommendations and incorporate expert opinion when

  11. The application of evidence-based nursing in preventing complications occurred after interventional treatment of primary liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Cuirong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical effect of evidence-based nursing in preventing complications occurred after interventional treatment of primary liver cancer. Methods: Fifty-four patients of primary liver cancer who had received hepatic arterial chemo embolization were enrolled in this study. Using evidence-based thinking, the author analyzed the causes of complications occurred after the interventional treatment, formulated scientific nursing countermeasures and adopted foreseeable nursing care. Results: Through timely observation and targeted care, the incidence of complications after interventional treatment was effectively reduced, moreover, the patient's rehabilitation was improved. Conclusion: For the prevention of complications occurred after interventional treatment in patients with primary liver cancer, the evidencebased nursing plays an important role. It can provide scientific guidance to nursing practice, improve the quality and efficiency of nursing and enhance the ability of nurses in solving clinical problems. (J Intervent Radiol, 2010, 19 : 824-826) (authors)

  12. Setting the legal standard of care for treatment and evidence-based medicine: a case study of antenatal corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Lachlan

    2006-11-01

    This article argues that liability for negligent medical treatment should be predicated upon a standard of care reflecting what is medically and scientifically reasonable. Legal science (jurisprudence) and medical science (evidence-based medicine) should be reconciled to improve patient care and outcomes. The use of antenatal corticosteroids in obstetrics during the 1990s illustrates how most jurisprudence for setting the standard of care for treatment is ill equipped to meet the fundamental aims of tort law. The proliferation of evidence-based medical practice provides a unique opportunity for the law to encourage best medical practice when setting the standard of care for treatment. It is argued that, eventually, the law should recognise clinical practice guidelines as the prima facie standard of care for treatment. This will provide legal certainty, appropriate medical practitioner accountability, and ultimately improve patient care and outcomes.

  13. Evidence-based treatments for depression and anxiety versus treatment-as-usual: a meta-analysis of direct comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E; Budge, Stephanie L; Laska, Kevin M; Del Re, A C; Baardseth, Timothy P; Fluckiger, Christoph; Minami, Takuya; Kivlighan, D Martin; Gunn, Wade

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relative efficacy of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) versus treatment-as-usual (TAU) in routine care for anxiety and depression in adults. A computerized search of studies that directly compared an EBT with a TAU was conducted. Meta-analytic methods were used to estimate effectiveness of EBTs relative to TAU and to model how various confounding variables impacted the results of this comparative research. A total of 14 studies were included in the final meta-analysis. There was significant heterogeneity in the TAU conditions, which ranged from unknown and/or minimal mental health treatment to psychotherapeutic interventions provided by trained professionals. Although the effect for EBT vs. TAU was significantly greater than zero, the effect for EBT vs. TAUs that were psychotherapeutic interventions was not statistically different from zero. Heterogeneity of TAU conditions in this meta-analysis highlight the importance of clarifying the research questions being asked when investigating and drawing conclusions from EBT-TAU comparisons. Researchers need to clarify if they are comparing an EBT to psychotherapeutic services in routine care or to minimal mental health services. Extant research on EBT versus TAU reveals that there is insufficient evidence to recommend the transportation of EBTs for anxiety and depression to routine care, particularly when the routine care involves psychotherapeutic services. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissemination of evidence-based body image interventions: A pilot study into the effectiveness of using undergraduate students as interventionists in secondary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma; Jarman, Hannah; McNamara, Alice; Risdon, Holly; Jankowski, Glen

    2015-06-01

    Dissonance-based body image interventions are among the most effective interventions for adolescent girls. However, dissemination of these interventions remains challenging. In addition, the emerging field of positive body image suggests that interventions should promote body appreciation as well as reduce pathology. The current study examines whether undergraduate students can effectively deliver a dissonance-based intervention to secondary school girls. In addition, it examines whether this intervention can increase body appreciation. Sixty-two adolescent girls were randomly allocated to the intervention or control condition. In the intervention group, body dissatisfaction was significantly reduced and body appreciation was significantly improved from pre- to post-intervention. There were no changes in body dissatisfaction or body appreciation in the control group. There was a reduction in thin-ideal internalization for all participants. These preliminary findings suggest that undergraduate students can be effective interventionists for dissonance-based programs in schools and dissonance-based interventions can promote body appreciation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Automatic summarization of MEDLINE citations for evidence-based medical treatment: a topic-oriented evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiszman, Marcelo; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Kilicoglu, Halil; Rindflesch, Thomas C

    2009-10-01

    As the number of electronic biomedical textual resources increases, it becomes harder for physicians to find useful answers at the point of care. Information retrieval applications provide access to databases; however, little research has been done on using automatic summarization to help navigate the documents returned by these systems. After presenting a semantic abstraction automatic summarization system for MEDLINE citations, we concentrate on evaluating its ability to identify useful drug interventions for 53 diseases. The evaluation methodology uses existing sources of evidence-based medicine as surrogates for a physician-annotated reference standard. Mean average precision (MAP) and a clinical usefulness score developed for this study were computed as performance metrics. The automatic summarization system significantly outperformed the baseline in both metrics. The MAP gain was 0.17 (p<0.01) and the increase in the overall score of clinical usefulness was 0.39 (p<0.05).

  16. Evidence-based review of lasers, light sources and photodynamic therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete; Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Background There is a considerable need for effective and safe treatment for acne vulgaris. Objective In a systematic review with an evidence-based approach to assess the effects of optical treatments for acne vulgaris. Methods Original publications of controlled clinical trials were identified...... of 19), which applied blinded response evaluations (12 of 19) and assessed a short-term efficacy up to 12 weeks after treatment (17 of 19). Based on the present best available evidence, we conclude that optical treatments possess the potential to improve inflammatory acne on a short-term basis...... treatments included pain, erythema, oedema, crusting, hyperpigmentation, pustular eruptions and were more intense for treatments combined with ALA or MAL. Conclusion Evidence from controlled clinical trials indicates a short-term efficacy from optical treatments for acne vulgaris with the most consistent...

  17. Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome: Recommendations of Recent Evidence-Based Interdisciplinary Guidelines with Special Emphasis on Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Ablin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Current evidence indicates that there is no single ideal treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS. First choice treatment options remain debatable, especially concerning the importance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM treatments. Methods. Three evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines on FMS in Canada, Germany, and Israel were compared for their first choice and CAM-recommendations. Results. All three guidelines emphasized a patient-tailored approach according to the key symptoms. Aerobic exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy, and multicomponent therapy were first choice treatments. The guidelines differed in the grade of recommendation for drug treatment. Anticonvulsants (gabapentin, pregabalin and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine, milnacipran were strongly recommended by the Canadian and the Israeli guidelines. These drugs received only a weak recommendation by the German guideline. In consideration of CAM-treatments, acupuncture, hypnosis/guided imagery, and Tai Chi were recommended by the German and Israeli guidelines. The Canadian guidelines did not recommend any CAM therapy. Discussion. Recent evidence-based interdisciplinary guidelines concur on the importance of treatment tailored to the individual patient and further emphasize the need of self-management strategies (exercise, and psychological techniques.

  18. Treatment Protocols for Eating Disorders: Clinicians' Attitudes, Concerns, Adherence and Difficulties Delivering Evidence-Based Psychological Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    There are several protocols in existence that guide clinicians in the implementation of effective, evidence-based psychological interventions for eating disorders. These have been made accessible in the form of treatment manuals. However, relatively few clinicians use those protocols, preferring to offer more eclectic or integrative approaches. Following a summary of the research that shows that these evidence-based approaches can be used successfully in routine clinical settings, this review considers why there is such poor uptake of these therapies in such settings. This review focuses on the role of service culture and on clinicians' own attitudes, beliefs and emotions. Possible means of enhancing uptake are considered, but these cannot be considered to be ideal solutions at present.

  19. Evidence-based systematic review: Oropharyngeal dysphagia behavioral treatments. Part V--applications for clinicians and researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler-Hegland, Karen; Frymark, Tobi; Schooling, Tracy; McCabe, Daniel; Ashford, John; Mullen, Robert; Hammond, Carol Smith; Musson, Nan

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) involves the integration of three essential principles: (1) the current best available research, (2) the clinician's experience and expertise, and (3) the patient's values and preferences. This report is the last in a series that presents the culmination of a collaborative effort between the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Department of Veterans Affairs to examine the state of the evidence on seven behavioral swallowing interventions. This article addresses how speech-language pathologists treating individuals with oropharyngeal dysphagia can incorporate EBP into their clinical decision-making process. A fictitious patient scenario is presented and discussed as an example of the clinical application of the findings from the three systematic reviews in this series on evidence for the use of behavioral swallowing interventions. Also, recommendations for researchers studying dysphagia treatment are discussed, with the overall goal of facilitating the generation of a stronger evidence base for clinicians.

  20. Influence networks among substance abuse treatment clinics: implications for the dissemination of innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Quanbeck, Andrew; Maus, Adam; Gustafson, David H; Dearing, James W

    2015-09-01

    Understanding influence networks among substance abuse treatment clinics may speed the diffusion of innovations. The purpose of this study was to describe influence networks in Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon, and Washington and test two expectations, using social network analysis: (1) Social network measures can identify influential clinics; and (2) Within a network, some weakly connected clinics access out-of-network sources of innovative evidence-based practices and can spread these innovations through the network. A survey of 201 clinics in a parent study on quality improvement provided the data. Network measures and sociograms were obtained from adjacency matrixes created by UCINet. We used regression analysis to determine whether network status relates to clinics' adopting innovations. Findings suggest that influential clinics can be identified and that loosely linked clinics were likely to join the study sooner than more influential clinics but were not more likely to have improved outcomes than other organizations. Findings identify the structure of influence networks for SUD treatment organizations and have mixed results on how those structures impacted diffusion of the intervention under study. Further study is necessary to test whether use of knowledge of the network structure will have an effect on the pace and breadth of dissemination of innovations.

  1. Applying new strategies for the national adaptation, updating, and dissemination of trustworthy guidelines: results from the Norwegian adaptation of the Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Annette; Brandt, Linn; Agoritsas, Thomas; Akl, Elie A; Berge, Eivind; Flem Jacobsen, Anne; Granan, Lars-Petter; Halvorsen, Sigrun; Guyatt, Gordon; Vandvik, Per Olav

    2014-09-01

    The Antithrombotic Therapy and the Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th Edition: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines (AT9) represent trustworthy international guidelines for antithrombotic treatment and thromboprophylaxis. We describe major changes to the format and content resulting from applying new strategies for guideline adaptation and dissemination. A Norwegian guideline panel of 46 experts completed a structured and systematic adaptation process, updated the recommendations based on new evidence, and rewrote the recommendations in an electronic multilayered presentation format. We published the adapted guideline using the web-based Making GRADE the Irresistible Choice Guideline Authoring and Publication Platform. We applied a novel presentation format to 333 recommendations from 11 of the 15 management chapters in AT9 and condensed and restructured them into 249 recommendations in a multilayered format. We added additional relevant information, such as 29 best-practice statements about new oral anticoagulants and practical information sections for 121 recommendations. Common reasons for modifications included feasibility of the recommendations in a national context, disagreement with applied baseline risk estimates, and reevaluation of the balance between the benefits and harms of interventions in relation to assumed typical patient preferences and values. The adapted guideline was published and disseminated online in November 2013. New strategies for adapting, updating, and disseminating trustworthy guidelines proved feasible and will provide Norwegian health-care professionals and patients with up-to-date guidance tailored to national circumstances.

  2. Improving access and systems of care for evidence-based childhood obesity treatment: Conference key findings and next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfley, Denise E; Staiano, Amanda E; Altman, Myra; Lindros, Jeanne; Lima, Angela; Hassink, Sandra G; Dietz, William H; Cook, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    To improve systems of care to advance implementation of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for childhood obesity treatment (i.e., clinicians offer/refer children with obesity to intensive, multicomponent behavioral interventions of >25 h over 6 to 12 months to improve weight status) and to expand payment for these services. In July 2015, 43 cross-sector stakeholders attended a conference supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, and The Obesity Society. Plenary sessions presenting scientific evidence and clinical and payment practices were interspersed with breakout sessions to identify consensus recommendations. Consensus recommendations for childhood obesity treatment included: family-based multicomponent behavioral therapy; integrated care model; and multidisciplinary care team. The use of evidence-based protocols, a well-trained healthcare team, medical oversight, and treatment at or above the minimum dose (e.g., >25 h) are critical components to ensure effective delivery of high-quality care and to achieve clinically meaningful weight loss. Approaches to secure reimbursement for evidence-based obesity treatment within payment models were recommended. Continued cross-sector collaboration is crucial to ensure a unified approach to increase payment and access for childhood obesity treatment and to scale up training to ensure quality of care. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  3. Community-Based Addiction Treatment Staff Attitudes about the Usefulness of Evidence-Based Addiction Treatment and CBO Organizational Linkages to Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Lena; Krull, Ivy; Zerden, Lisa de Saxe; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    This national study of community-based addiction-treatment organizations' (CBOs) implementation of evidence-based practices explored CBO Program Directors' (n = 296) and clinical staff (n = 518) attitudes about the usefulness of science-based addiction treatment. Through multivariable regression modeling, the study identified that identical…

  4. Evidence-based primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: a comparative analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, J.; Heijer, C.D.J. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In Europe, most antibiotics for human use are prescribed in primary care. Incorporating resistance data into treatment guidelines could improve appropriate prescribing, increase treatment effectiveness and control the development of resistance. Objectives: This study reviews primary care

  5. An Update on Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Disorders in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are relatively common and serious disorders in adolescents. However, there are few controlled psychosocial intervention studies with this younger population. This review updates a previous Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology review published in 2008. The recommendations in this review were developed after searching the literature including PubMed/Medline and employing the relevant medical subject headings. In addition, the bibliographies of book chapters and treatment guideline articles were reviewed; last, colleagues were asked for suggested additional source materials. Psychosocial treatments examined include family therapy, individual therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive training, and dialectical behavior therapy. Using the most recent Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology methodological review criteria, family treatment-behavior (FT-B) is the only well-established treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Family treatment-systemic and insight oriented individual psychotherapy are probably efficacious treatments for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. There are no well-established treatments for adolescents with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, or avoidant restrictive food intake disorder. Possibly efficacious psychosocial treatments for adolescent bulimia nervosa include FT-B and supportive individual therapy. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy is a possibly efficacious treatment for binge eating disorder. Experimental treatments for adolescent eating disorders include enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, cognitive training, and interpersonal psychotherapy. FT-B is the only well-established treatment for adolescent eating disorders. Additional research examining treatment for eating disorders in youth is warranted.

  6. Training School Psychologists to Conduct Evidence-Based Treatments for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Kevin D.; Arora, Prerna; Funk, Catherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy is an effective approach to the treatment of depressive disorders within schools, due to its demonstrated efficacy, as well as its availability in manualized treatment form. When implemented by therapists with inadequate training, the treatment is often stilted, less engaging for participants, and aimlessly guided…

  7. Evidence-based Danish guidelines for the treatment of Malassezia-related skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Marianne; Arendrup, Maiken C; Svejgaard, Else L; Lindskov, Rune; Foged, Erik K; Saunte, Ditte Marie L

    2015-01-01

    Internationally approved guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Malassezia-related skin diseases are lacking. Therefore, a panel of experts consisting of dermatologists and a microbiologist under the auspices of the Danish Society of Dermatology undertook a data review and compiled guidelines for the diagnostic procedures and management of pityriasis versicolor, seborrhoeic dermatitis and Malassezia folliculitis. Main recommendations in most cases of pityriasis versicolor and seborrhoeic dermatitis include topical treatment which has been shown to be sufficient. As first choice, treatment should be based on topical antifungal medication. A short course of topical corticosteroid or topical calcineurin inhibitors has an anti-inflammatory effect in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Systemic antifungal therapy may be indicated for widespread lesions or lesions refractory to topical treatment. Maintenance therapy is often necessary to prevent relapses. In the treatment of Malassezia folliculitis systemic antifungal treatment is probably more effective than topical treatment but a combination may be favourable.

  8. Treatment staff turnover in organizations implementing evidence-based practices: turnover rates and their association with client outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D; Modisette, Kathryn C; Ihnes, Pamela C; Godley, Susan H

    2012-03-01

    High staff turnover has been described as a problem for the substance use disorder treatment field. This assertion is based primarily on the assumption that staff turnover adversely impacts treatment delivery and effectiveness. This assumption, however, has not been empirically tested. In this study, we computed annualized rates of turnover for treatment staff (N = 249) participating in an evidence-based practice implementation initiative and examined the association between organizational-level rates of staff turnover and client-level outcomes. Annualized rates of staff turnover were 31% for clinicians and 19% for clinical supervisors. In addition, multilevel analyses did not reveal the expected relationship between staff turnover and poorer client-level outcomes. Rather, organizational-level rates of staff turnover were found to have a significant positive association with two measures of treatment effectiveness: less involvement in illegal activity and lower social risk. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-based Danish guidelines for the treatment of Malassezia-related skin diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Marianne; Arendrup, Maiken C; Svejgaard, Else L

    2015-01-01

    Internationally approved guidelines for the diagnosis and management of Malassezia-related skin diseases are lacking. Therefore, a panel of experts consisting of dermatologists and a microbiologist under the auspices of the Danish Society of Dermatology undertook a data review and compiled...... guidelines for the diagnostic procedures and management of pityriasis versicolor, seborrhoeic dermatitis and Malassezia folliculitis. Main recommendations in most cases of pityriasis versicolor and seborrhoeic dermatitis include topical treatment which has been shown to be sufficient. As first choice....... Maintenance therapy is often necessary to prevent relapses. In the treatment of Malassezia folliculitis systemic antifungal treatment is probably more effective than topical treatment but a combination may be favourable....

  10. Guideline summary review: An evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Paul G; Meagher, R J; Lamer, Tim; Tontz, William L; Annaswamy, Thiru M; Cassidy, R Carter; Cho, Charles H; Dougherty, Paul; Easa, John E; Enix, Dennis E; Gunnoe, Bryan A; Jallo, Jack; Julien, Terrence D; Maserati, Matthew B; Nucci, Robert C; O'Toole, John E; Rosolowski, Karie; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Villavicencio, Alan T; Witt, Jens-Peter

    2016-03-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis features evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The guideline updates the 2008 guideline on this topic and is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of May 2013. The NASS guideline on this topic is the only guideline on degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis included in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC). The purpose of this guideline is to provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists when making clinical decisions for patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence-based guideline recommendations for diagnosing and treating patients with this condition. A systematic review of clinical studies relevant to degenerative spondylolisthesis was carried out. This NASS spondyolisthesis guideline is the product of the Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The methods used to develop this guideline are detailed in the complete guideline and technical report available on the NASS website. In brief, a multidisciplinary work group of spine care specialists convened to identify clinical questions to address in the guideline. The literature search strategy was developed in consultation with medical librarians. Upon completion of the systematic literature search, evidence relevant to the clinical questions posed in the guideline was reviewed. Work group members used the NASS evidentiary table templates to summarize study conclusions, identify study strengths and weaknesses, and assign levels of evidence. Work group members

  11. Evidence-based appraisal of the upfront treatment for unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Giuseppe; Lutrino, Stefania Eufemia; Ferrari, Laura; Casagrande, Mariaelena; Bonotto, Marta; Ongaro, Elena; Puglisi, Fabio

    2013-12-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a significant health problem, with around 1 million new cases and 500000 deaths every year worldwide. Over the last two decades, the use of novel therapies and more complex treatment strategies have contributed to progressively increase the median survival of patients with unresectable advanced CRC up to approximately 30 mo. The availability of additional therapeutic options, however, has created new challenges and generated more complicated treatment algorithms. Moreover, several clinically important points are still in debate in first-line, such as the optimal treatment intensity, the most appropriate maintenance strategy, the preferred biologic to be used upfront in patients with KRAS wild-type CRC, and the need for more detailed information on tumor biology. In this moving landscape, this review analyses why the first-line treatment decision is crucial and how the choice may impact on further treatment lines. In addition, it focuses on results of major phase III randomized trials.

  12. DISSEMINATE CYSTICERCOSIS. One-day treatment in a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiyi MK

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient presenting disseminated cysticercosis characterized by neurocysticercosis, subcutaneous, muscular, and cardiac cysticercosis treated with praziquantel during one day RESUMEN: Se comenta el caso de un paciente que presentó cisticercosis diseminada, caracterizada por neurocisticercosis, y cisticercosis subcutánea, muscular y cardiaca, tratada con praziquantel durante un dia.

  13. An evidence-based review of treatment-related determinants of patients' nonadherence to HIV medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Mark J; Petrozzino, Jeffrey J

    2009-11-01

    Patients' adherence to antiretroviral medications is a primary determinant of both the effectiveness of treatment and the clinical course of HIV/AIDS. This empirical review is intended to compare the relative importance of patient and treatment characteristics on nonadherence behavior and the impact of nonadherence on treatment failure. Articles cited in PubMed and published between 2006 and June 2008 (n = 200) were reviewed to select those that address patient or treatment characteristics associated with nonadherence. Twenty-two articles were selected that provided odds ratio or hazard ratio statistics that quantified predictors of patients' level of nonadherence (e.g., 95%). Results were summarized using random effects meta-analytic models. Predictors of nonadherence were divided into four predictive clusters (clinical predictors, comorbid predictors, treatment competence predictors, and dosing predictors). The summary odds ratios (ORs) of nonadherence for each cluster (in order of strength) were treatment competence 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-2.6), clinical predictors 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4-1.8), comorbid predictors 1.6 (95% CI: 1.4-1.8), and dosing predictors 1.5 (95% CI: 1.3-1.7). The effect of nonadherence on treatment failure supported the findings of two prior empirical reviews (OR 2.0, 95% CI: 1.6-2.5). Within dosing predictors, a pill burden of more versus less than 10 pills per day was associated with a much higher odds of nonadherence than twice versus once daily dosing or small differences in the number of types of antiretroviral treatments in a regimen. These results provide insight into the relative importance of various determinants of patient nonadherence that may inform the design of patient educational initiatives and initiatives to simplify treatment regimens.

  14. Evaluation and treatment of functional constipation in infants and children: evidence-based recommendations from ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbers, M M; DiLorenzo, C; Berger, M Y; Faure, C; Langendam, M W; Nurko, S; Staiano, A; Vandenplas, Y; Benninga, M A

    2014-02-01

    Constipation is a pediatric problem commonly encountered by many health care workers in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. To assist medical care providers in the evaluation and management of children with functional constipation, the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition were charged with the task of developing a uniform document of evidence-based guidelines. Nine clinical questions addressing diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic topics were formulated. A systematic literature search was performed from inception to October 2011 using Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and PsychInfo databases. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was applied to evaluate outcomes. For therapeutic questions, quality of evidence was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system. Grading the quality of evidence for the other questions was performed according to the classification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. During 3 consensus meetings, all recommendations were discussed and finalized. The group members voted on each recommendation, using the nominal voting technique. Expert opinion was used where no randomized controlled trials were available to support the recommendation. This evidence-based guideline provides recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of children with functional constipation to standardize and improve their quality of care. In addition, 2 algorithms were developed, one for the infants children. This document is intended to be used in daily practice and as a basis for further clinical research. Large well-designed clinical trials are necessary with regard to diagnostic evaluation and treatment.

  15. Evidence-based treatment of voice and speech disorders in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Leslie A; Ramig, Lorraine O; Fox, Cynthia

    2015-06-01

    Voice and speech impairments are present in nearly 90% of people with Parkinson disease and negatively impact communication and quality of life. This review addresses the efficacy of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) LOUD to improve vocal loudness (as measured by vocal sound pressure level vocSPL) and functional communication in people with Parkinson disease. The underlying physiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease associated with voice and speech changes and the strength of the current treatment evidence are discussed with recommendations for best clinical practice. Two randomized control trials demonstrated that participants who received LSVT LOUD were significantly better on the primary outcome variable of improved vocSPL posttreatment than alternative and no treatment groups. Treatment effects were maintained for up to 2 years. In addition, improvements have been demonstrated in associated outcome variables, including speech rate, monotone, voice quality, speech intelligibility, vocal fold adduction, swallowing, facial expression and neural activation. Advances in technology-supported treatment delivery are enhancing treatment accessibility. Data support the efficacy of LSVT LOUD to increase vocal loudness and functional communication in people with Parkinson disease. Timely intervention is essential for maximizing quality of life for people with Parkinson disease.

  16. Assessment of Evidence Base from Medical Debriefs Data on Space Motion Sickness Incidence and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younker, D.R.; Daniels, V.R.; Boyd, J.L.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    An objective of this data compilation and analysis project is to examine incidence and treatment efficacy of common patho-physiological disturbances during spaceflight. Analysis of medical debriefs data indicated that astronauts used medications to alleviate symptoms of four major ailments for which astronauts received treatment for sleep disturbances, space motion sickness (SMS), pain (headache, back pain) and sinus congestion. In the present data compilation and analysis project on SMS treatment during space missions, subject demographics (gender, age, first-time or repeat flyer), incidence and severity of SMS symptoms and subjective treatment efficacy from 317 crewmember debrief records were examined from STS-1 through STS-89. Preliminary analysis of data revealed that 50% of crew members reported SMS symptoms on at least one flight and 22% never experienced it. In addition, there were 387 medication dosing episodes reported, and promethazine was the most commonly used medication. Results of analysis of symptom check lists, medication use/efficacy and gender and flight record differences in incidence and treatment efficacy will be presented. Evidence gaps for treatment efficacy along with medication use trend analysis will be identified.

  17. Optimum Use of Acute Treatments for Hereditary Angioedema: Evidence-Based Expert Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary

    2018-01-01

    Acute treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency has become available in the last 10 years and has greatly improved patients’ quality of life. Two plasma-derived C1 inhibitors (Berinert and Cinryze), a recombinant C1 inhibitor (Ruconest/Conestat alpha), a kallikrein inhibitor (Ecallantide), and a bradykinin B2 receptor inhibitor (Icatibant) are all effective. Durably good response is maintained over repeated treatments and several years. All currently available prophylactic agents are associated with breakthrough attacks, therefore an acute treatment plan is essential for every patient. Experience has shown that higher doses of C1 inhibitor than previously recommended may be desirable, although only recombinant C1 inhibitor has been subject to full dose–response evaluation. Treatment of early symptoms of an attack, with any licensed therapy, results in milder symptoms, more rapid resolution and shorter duration of attack, compared with later treatment. All therapies have been shown to be well-tolerated, with low risk of serious adverse events. Plasma-derived C1 inhibitors have a reassuring safety record regarding lack of transmission of virus or other infection. Thrombosis has been reported in association with plasma-derived C1 inhibitor in some case series. Ruconest was associated with anaphylaxis in a single rabbit-allergic volunteer, but no further anaphylaxis has been reported in those not allergic to rabbits despite, in a few cases, prior IgE sensitization to rabbit or milk protein. Icatibant is associated with high incidence of local reactions but not with systemic effects. Ecallantide may cause anaphylactoid reactions and is given under supervision. For children and pregnant women, plasma-derived C1 inhibitor has the best evidence of safety and currently remains first-line treatment. PMID:29594115

  18. [Tic suppression is a new evidence-based non-farmacological treatment of chronic tic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Camilla Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Skov, Liselotte; Miranda, Maria J

    2017-03-06

    Chronic tic disorder and Tourette syndrome are both chronic and impairing neurobiological disorders starting in childhood with a prevalence between 0.4 and 1.6%. Traditionally, pharmacological therapies have been first-line treatment but are often associated with adverse effects. Recently behavioural therapy has shown to be effective in treating tics and today both habit reversal (HR) and exposure and response prevention (ERP) are recommended as first-line treatments. HR and ERP are now available for Danish patients. This article describes the evidence and recommendations for both therapies.

  19. Lurasidone for the treatment of bipolar depression: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Rachel; Zorowitz, Sam; Corse, Andrew K; Widge, Alik S; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disease that presents a serious burden to patients' lives as well as health care systems around the world. The essential diagnostic criterion for BD is episodes of mania or hypomania; however, the patients report that the majority of their time is spent in a depressive phase. Current treatment options for this component of BD have yet to achieve satisfactory remission rates. Lurasidone is a drug in the benzisothiazole class approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in June 2013 for the acute treatment of bipolar depression. Its pharmacological profile features high-affinity antagonism at D2, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors; moderate-affinity antagonism at α2C-adrenergic receptors; low- to very low-affinity antagonism at α1A-adrenergic, α2A-adrenergic, H1, M1, and 5-HT2C receptors; and high-affinity partial agonism at 5-HT1A. Preliminary findings from two recent double-blinded clinical trials suggest that lurasidone is efficacious in treating bipolar I depression, with clinical effects manifesting as early as the first 2-3 weeks of treatment (as measured by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness). Its therapeutic benefit appears to be comparable to the current US Food and Drug Administration-indicated treatments: quetiapine and olanzapine-fluoxetine, according to a measure of effect size known as number needed to treat. These studies reported relatively limited extrapyramidal and metabolic side effects as a result of treatment with lurasidone, with the most common side effect being nausea. Safety data drawn from these studies, as well as a more extensive body of schizophrenia research, indicate that in comparison with other atypical antipsychotics, treatment with lurasidone is less likely to result in metabolic side effects such as weight gain or disturbances of serum glucose or lipid levels. Lurasidone holds

  20. Motivational interviewing: an evidence-based approach to counseling helps patients follow treatment recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levensky, Eric Ross; Forcehimes, Alyssa; O'Donohue, William T; Beitz, Kendra

    2007-10-01

    Motivational interviewing is an evidenced-based counseling approach that health care providers can use to help patients adhere to treatment recommendations. It emphasizes using a directive, patient-centered style of interaction to promote behavioral change by helping patients explore and resolve ambivalence. This article will help nurses learn how to use motivational interviewing to encourage patients to adhere to treatment recommendations. The basic theoretical underpinnings, principles, and methods of motivational interviewing are discussed, with an emphasis on acting in accordance with the "spirit" of the approach.

  1. Lurasidone for the treatment of bipolar depression: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Franklin,1 Sam Zorowitz,1 Andrew K Corse,1 Alik S Widge,2 Thilo Deckersbach1 1Division of Neurotherapeutics, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, 2Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: Bipolar disorder (BD is a debilitating and difficult-to-treat psychiatric disease that presents a serious burden to patients’ lives as well as health care systems around the world. The essential diagnostic criterion for BD is episodes of mania or hypomania; however, the patients report that the majority of their time is spent in a depressive phase. Current treatment options for this component of BD have yet to achieve satisfactory remission rates. Lurasidone is a drug in the benzisothiazole class approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in June 2013 for the acute treatment of bipolar depression. Its pharmacological profile features high-affinity antagonism at D2, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors; moderate-affinity antagonism at α2C-adrenergic receptors; low- to very low-affinity antagonism at α1A-adrenergic, α2A-adrenergic, H1, M1, and 5-HT2C receptors; and high-affinity partial agonism at 5-HT1A. Preliminary findings from two recent double-blinded clinical trials suggest that lurasidone is efficacious in treating bipolar I depression, with clinical effects manifesting as early as the first 2–3 weeks of treatment (as measured by the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness. Its therapeutic benefit appears to be comparable to the current US Food and Drug Administration-indicated treatments: quetiapine and olanzapine–fluoxetine, according to a measure of effect size known as number needed to treat. These studies reported relatively limited extrapyramidal and metabolic side effects as a result of treatment with lurasidone, with the most common side

  2. Evidence-Based Behavioral Treatment of Dog Phobia with Young Children: Two Case Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anna C.; Rudy, Brittany M.; Davis, Thompson E., III; Matson, Johnny L.

    2013-01-01

    Specific phobias are among the most common anxiety disorders, especially in children. Unfortunately, a paucity of literature exists regarding the treatment of specific phobia in young children, despite the knowledge that traditional techniques (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT]) may not be practical. Therefore, the purpose of this article…

  3. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes our current knowledge of the pharmacological treatment of substance use disorders and pathological gambling using data mainly from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses regarding these randomized controlled trials. The review is restricted to the selection of first

  4. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Eating Problems and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Pamela K.; Haedt, Alissa

    2008-01-01

    Eating disorders represent a significant source of psychological impairment among adolescents. However, most controlled treatment studies have focused on adult populations. This review provides a synthesis of existing data concerning the efficacy of various psychosocial interventions for eating disorders in adolescent samples. Modes of therapy…

  5. Treatment of chronic pain in older people: Evidence-based choice of strong-acting opioids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ojik, Annette L.; Jansen, Paul A. F.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; van Roon, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of chronic malignant and non-malignant pain, opioids are used as strong analgesics. Frail elderly patients often have multiple comorbidities and use multiple medicines, leading to an increased risk of clinically relevant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. Age-related changes

  6. The treatment of patients with otosclerosis. From expert opinion to evidence-based practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bittermann, A.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Finishing this thesis we summarize the findings from the thesis chapters and conclude that we were able to add usable new information to the otosclerosis field. We took the initiative to aim for a more standardized treatment approach with a step-by-step guideline instruction manual (chapter 2 ).

  7. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical

  8. How Medicaid and Managed Care Can Support Evidence-Based Treatment in North Carolina That is Informed by Adverse Childhood Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    North Carolina has increased the percentage of its clinical workforce that is proficient in evidence-based treatment and adverse childhood experiences-informed care. Medicaid and managed care have contributed through standards and reimbursement that are consistent with treatment costs. Further progress requires a concerted response from payers, policymakers, providers, and families receiving evidence-based treatment. ©2018 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence-based Status of Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment for Patients with Shoulder Pain: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Miao; Ma, Chiyuan; Yan, Shigui

    2016-04-01

    Review the current evidence-based status of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment for patients with shoulder pain based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to provide a comprehensive analysis and a balanced view of the strengths and weaknesses of this treatment. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science were searched up to July 2014, using the Boolean operators as follows: shoulder pain OR painful shoulder AND pulsed radiofrequency). All prospective randomized controlled trials of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain were retrieved. No limitation of the language or publication year existed in our analysis. Five of 114 studies that involved PRF treatment met the inclusion criteria of this review article. These studies compared the clinical outcomes of PRF with those of other treatments such as intra-articular corticosteroid injection and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. All the studies reported improvements in passive range of motion (PROM), visual analog scale (VAS), and Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) in PRF treatment that persisted for at least 12 weeks. In addition, no complications were reported in all trials. The use of PRF treatment for patients with shoulder pain was observed to result in good clinical efficacy for at least 12 weeks with no complication reported. However, it is still unclear from the currently available publications whether PRF is superior to other treatment techniques such as intra-articular corticosteroid and conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  10. [Treatment of degenerative meniscal lesions : From eminence to evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, R; Bernard, M; Scheffler, S; Kopf, S

    2017-10-01

    The treatment of degenerative meniscal lesions has received increased attention since the publication of several Level 1 studies over the last few years. The following review of literature including the consensus statement given by ESSKA reports on the management of patients with degenerative meniscal lesions. The analysis includes the literature of Level 1 to 4 studies and the statement of the consensus group of ESSKA concerning the surgical or conservative management of these patients. Meniscal lesions cause progression in osteoarthritis. Patients presenting a combination of degenerative meniscal lesion and osteoarthritis show inferior clinical outcome. The average clinical outcome after surgical treatment was 70 points based on the Lysholm score. Level 1 studies show no difference in clinical outcome. However, over 30% of these patients require arthroscopy at the second stage after an interval of 3 to 6 months. Patients presenting a flap tear or complaining about mechanical symptoms show poor outcome after conservative treatment. Level 1 studies have focused on very selected patients. These patients do not represent the daily practice of orthopaedic surgeons. The findings of the level 1 studies should, therefore, not be generalized. According to the consensus statement of ESSKA, the treatment of degenerative meniscal lesions should start with conservative management. In the case of persistent symptoms, surgery should be considered after 3 months. In the case of mechanical symptoms, arthroscopy might be indicated earlier. Arthroscopy in advanced osteoarthritic knees is not indicated due to inferior clinical outcome.

  11. Evidence-based analysis of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal breaks and lattice degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, C P

    2000-01-01

    To assess the quality of information in the literature regarding the benefits of prophylactic treatment of asymptomatic retinal tears and lattice degeneration. Asymptomatic retinal breaks occur in approximately 7% of patients over age 40, and lattice degeneration is present in approximately 8% of the general population. Because retinal breaks cause retinal detachment and lattice degeneration is associated with approximately 30% of retinal detachments, prophylactic treatment of these lesions has sometimes been recommended. A panel of vitreoretinal experts performed a literature review of all publications regarding prevention of retinal detachment that have been published in English. These articles were then used to prepare recommendations for patient care in an American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Pattern (PPP). Each recommendation was rated according to: (1) its importance in the care process and (2) the strength of evidence supporting the given recommendation. Most recommendations were rated as A (most important to patient care). Only a single publication was graded as I (providing strong evidence in support of a recommendation), and this was not a prospective trial. Of the few publications rated as II (substantial evidence), most were studies documenting a lack of treatment benefit. Because of an absence of level I and level II studies in the literature, level III (consensus of expert opinion) was the basis for most recommendations in the PPP. The current literature regarding prevention of retinal detachment does not provide sufficient information to support strongly prophylactic treatment of lesions other than symptomatic flap tears. Prospective randomized trials of prophylactic therapy are indicated. Eyes highly predisposed to retinal detachment should be considered for such studies.

  12. Sustained adoption of an evidence-based treatment: a survey of clinicians certified in problem-solving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Rebecca M; Areán, Patricia A; Hegel, Mark T

    2012-01-01

    Training models that incorporate case supervision in addition to didactic instruction appear to be effective in maximizing clinicians' proficiency in evidence-based treatments (EBTs). However, it is unknown the extent to which these models promote sustained adoption of EBTs. We describe the results of an online survey on post-training utilization of an EBT, problem-solving therapy (PST), among 40 clinicians highly trained in PST. Seventy-five percent of the survey's 40 respondents reported that they continued to use PST in their clinical practices. Many PST-trained clinicians reported that they had modified the PST protocol in their clinical practices according to patient characteristics or preferences. Considering these results, we recommend emphasizing patient variability and treatment tailoring throughout the training process as a means for promoting clinicians' sustained adoption of EBTs.

  13. Definition, assessment and treatment of wheezing disorders in preschool children: an evidence-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, P.L.; Baraldi, E.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    There is poor agreement on definitions of different phenotypes of preschool wheezing disorders. The present Task Force proposes to use the terms episodic (viral) wheeze to describe children who wheeze intermittently and are well between episodes, and multiple-trigger wheeze for children who wheeze...... preschool child with recurrent wheeze, but should be discontinued if there is no clear clinical benefit. Large well-designed randomised controlled trials with clear descriptions of patients are needed to improve the present recommendations on the treatment of these common syndromes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10...

  14. [Arthroscopic treatment of chondral lesions of the ankle joint. Evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, M; Jordan, M; Hamborg-Petersen, E

    2016-02-01

    Ankle sprains are the most relevant injuries of the lower extremities and can lead to damage to ligaments and osteochondral lesions. Up to 50 % of patients with a sprained ankle later develop a lesion of the cartilage in the ankle joint or an osteochondral lesion of the talus. This can lead to osteoarthritis of the injured ankle joint. Spontaneous healing is possible in all age groups in cases of a bone bruise in the subchondral bone but in isolated chondral injuries is only useful in pediatric patients. In many cases chondral and osteochondral injuries lead to increasing demarcation of the affected area and can result in progressive degeneration of the joint if not recognized in time. There also exist a certain number of osteochondral changes of the articular surface of the talus without any history of relevant trauma, which are collectively grouped under the term osteochondrosis dissecans. Perfusion disorders are discussed as one of many possible causes of these alterations. Nowadays, chondral and osteochondral defects can be treated earlier due to detection using very sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) techniques. The use of conservative treatment only has a chance of healing in pediatric patients. Conservative measures for adults should only be considered as adjuvant treatment to surgery.Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current literature, this article gives an overview and critical analysis of the current concepts for treatment of chondral and osteochondral injuries and lesions of the talus. With arthroscopic therapy curettage and microfracture of talar lesions are the predominant approaches or retrograde drilling of the defect is another option when the chondral coating is retained. Implantation of autologous chondral cells or homologous juvenile cartilage tissue is also possible with arthroscopic techniques. Osteochondral fractures (flake fracture) are usually performed as a mini-open procedure supported by

  15. The need for evidence based nutritional guidelines for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: acute and long-term following treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Joyce L; Hanson, Sheila J; McArthur, Jennifer A; Mikhailov, Theresa A

    2013-10-31

    High survival rates for pediatric leukemia are very promising. With regard to treatment, children tend to be able to withstand a more aggressive treatment protocol than adults. The differences in both treatment modalities and outcomes between children and adults make extrapolation of adult studies to children inappropriate. The higher success is associated with a significant number of children experiencing nutrition-related adverse effects both in the short and long term after treatment. Specific treatment protocols have been shown to deplete nutrient levels, in particular antioxidants. The optimal nutrition prescription during, after and long-term following cancer treatment is unknown. This review article will provide an overview of the known physiologic processes of pediatric leukemia and how they contribute to the complexity of performing nutritional assessment in this population. It will also discuss known nutrition-related consequences, both short and long term in pediatric leukemia patients. Since specific antioxidants have been shown to be depleted as a consequence of therapy, the role of oxidative stress in the pediatric leukemia population will also be explored. More pediatric studies are needed to develop evidence based therapeutic interventions for nutritional complications of leukemia and its treatment.

  16. Evidence-Based Medicine: The Evaluation and Treatment of Pressure Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Joseph A; Bayer, Lauren R; Orgill, Dennis P

    2017-01-01

    After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Discuss the approach to and rationale for pressure injury management, including specific techniques for prevention and preoperative evaluation. 2. Develop a management algorithm for these wounds that includes operative and nonoperative modalities. 3. Understand how to identify and manage the complications of surgical intervention for pressure injuries, including recurrence. Pressure injuries are a common problem associated with great morbidity and cost, often presenting as complex challenges for plastic surgeons. Although the cause of these wounds is largely prolonged pressure, the true pathogenesis involves many other factors, including friction, shear, moisture, nutrition, and infection. This article outlines a systematic approach to evaluating and staging pressure injuries, and provides strategies for treatment and prevention. Critical to surgical intervention is thorough débridement, including any involved or causative bony tissues, and postoperative management to prevent wound dehiscence and recurrence.

  17. Non-Traditional Systemic Treatments for Diabetic Retinopathy: An
Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Rafael; Ballarini, Stefania; Cunha-Vaz, José; Ji, Linong; Haller, Hermann; Zimmet, Paul; Wong, Tien Y.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid escalation in the global prevalence diabetes, with more than 30% being afflicted with diabetic retinopathy (DR), means it is likely that associated vision-threatening conditions will also rise substantially. This means that new therapeutic approaches need to be found that go beyond the current standards of diabetic care, and which are effective in the early stages of the disease. In recent decades several new pharmacological agents have been investigated for their effectiveness in preventing the appearance and progression of DR or in reversing DR; some with limited success while others appear promising. This up-to-date critical review of non-traditional systemic treatments for DR is based on the published evidence in MEDLINE spanning 1980-December 2014. It discusses a number of therapeutic options, paying particular attention to the mechanisms of action and the clinical evidence for the use of renin-angiotensin system blockade, fenofibrate and calcium dobesilate monohydrate in DR. PMID:25989912

  18. Evidence-based treatment of anxiety and phobia in children and adolescents: current status and effects on the emotional response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thompson E; May, Anna; Whiting, Sara E

    2011-06-01

    Research on treatments for childhood anxiety disorders has increased greatly in recent decades. As a result, it has become increasingly necessary to synthesize the findings of these treatment studies into reviews in order to draw wider conclusions on the efficacy of treatments for childhood anxiety. Previous reviews of this literature have used varying criteria to determine the evidence base. For the current review, stricter criteria consistent with the original Task Force (1995) guidelines were used to select and evaluate studies. Studies were divided by anxiety disorder; however, many studies combine various anxiety disorders in their samples. As a result, these were included in a combined anxiety disorder group. Using more traditional guidelines, studies were assigned a status of well-established, probably efficacious, or experimental based on the available literature and the quality of the studies. While some treatments do meet the criteria for well-established status, it is clear from this examination that gaps remain and replication is necessary to establish many of these treatments as efficacious. In addition, there still appears to be a lack of research on the effects of treatment on the physiological and cognitive aspects of fear and anxiety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Phenytoin and carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia: marketing-based versus evidence-based treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink,1 Michael E Schatman2,31Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Bosch en Duin, the Netherlands; 2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Boston Pain Care, Waltham, MA, USAIntroductionMost review articles support carbamazepine as a first-line pharmacotherapy for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.1–3 However, the empirical support for this recommendation is somewhat suspect. Phenytoin, as the prototype for all anticonvulsants, was already positioned as an analgesic compound 70 years ago. Since these initial findings, the data that have been gathered have supported the use of anticonvulsants as painkillers – from phenytoin up to and including more recent anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Since 1942, a number of papers supported phenytoin’s therapeutic effects in trigeminal neuralgia (Table 1. The introduction of carbamazepine in 1962 by Geigy shifted the interest of neurologists from phenytoin as a treatment for trigeminal neuralgia to carbamazepine, without sound scientific evidence. To date, no convincing randomized controlled trials (RCTs have been published supporting the role of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia, and we could not identify a single study comparing the effects of phenytoin with those of carbamazepine. Accordingly, phenytoin should probably be considered more often as a viable therapy for (treatmentresistant trigeminal neuralgia.

  20. New research on anxiety disorders in the elderly and an update on evidence-based treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreescu, Carmen; Varon, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently encountered in the elderly, but they are largely undetected and untreated. Epidemiological studies indicate a prevalence ranging from 1.2 to 15 %. With the exception of generalized anxiety disorder and agoraphobia, which can often start in late life, most anxiety disorders in older patients are chronic and have their onset earlier in life. Anxiety disorders are an often unrecognized cause of distress, disability, and mortality risk in older adults, and they have been associated with cardiovascular disease, stroke, and cognitive decline. The mechanisms of anxiety in older adults differ from that in younger adults due to age-related neuropathology, as well as the loss and isolation so prominent in late life. Our review intends to provide a comprehensive summary of the most recent research done in the field of anxiety disorders in the elderly. Recent findings in clinical research, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, and neuropsychology are covered. An update on treatment options is discussed, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological alternatives.

  1. [Evidence-based procedures for the treatment of diseases associated with childhood obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, K O

    2013-04-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with cardiovascular events in adulthood. Multidisciplinary conventional obesity treatment programmes may reduce the body mass index standard deviation score at any age. However, over the years they lose their effectiveness especially during childhood. Only one study dealing with adult type 2 diabetic patients could show persistent weight reduction over the period of 4 years. Therefore, these conventional programmes may have short-term but no long-term influence on cardiovascular events. Bariatric surgery in childhood is exclusively performed in cases of morbid obesity. In adults, experience with regard to persistent weight loss has existed for over 20 years now and has reached good therapeutic results in type 2 diabetes. However, randomized and controlled long-term studies as to cardiovascular events and death do not exist. The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study showed a significant decrease of cardiovascular events and death in the bariatric surgery study group compared to the conventional therapy group, but the groups were not randomized. The surgery group was younger and healthier compared to the conservatively treated group. The late start of therapy probably also had an unfavourable influence on cardiovascular events.

  2. Role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of diverticular disease: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissolati, Massimiliano; Orsenigo, Elena; Staudacher, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The clinical spectrum of diverticular disease varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications, such as perforation or bleeding. While the presence of diverticula is common, symptomatic diverticulitis is relatively uncommon, occurring in an estimated 10-30 % of patients. There is continued debate as to whether patients should undergo elective resection for diverticular disease and regarding the role of minimally invasive surgery. Since the first publication on laparoscopic colorectal procedures, the interest in minimally invasive surgery has kept growing. Laparoscopic sigmoid resection with restoration of continuity is currently the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent sigmoid diverticulitis. However, it still remains unclear whether laparoscopy should be recommended also for complicated sigmoid diverticulitis. The potential benefits of reduced pain and analgesic requirements, smaller scars, and shorter hospital stay but longer operative times are appealing to both patients and surgeons. Nevertheless, there many concerns regarding the time and the type of surgery. Although the role of minimally invasive surgery in the treatment of colonic diseases is progressively increased, current randomized controlled trials should demonstrate whether laparoscopic lavage, Hartmann's procedure or resection and anastomosis achieve the best results for patients. This review aimed to analyze the results of laparoscopic colonic resection for patients with uncomplicated and complicated forms of sigmoid diverticular disease and to determine what stages profit from a laparoscopic procedure and whether the approach can be performed with a low complication rate even for patients with complicated forms of the disease.

  3. Factors affecting adherence to evidence-based guidelines in the treatment of URI, sinusitis, and pharyngitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Crocker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sinus infections, sore throats, and upper respiratory tract infections (URI are common reasons patients seek medical care. Well-established treatment guidelines exist for prescribing antibiotics in these clinical scenarios, but are not often followed. Objective: The objective of this study is to determine practice patterns related to prescribing antibiotics for sinusitis, URI, and pharyngitis. The main hypothesis is that attending physicians improve their adherence to antibiotic guidelines with a learner present. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on patients treated for URI, sinusitis, and pharyngitis at an ambulatory faculty practice. The use of relevant ICD-9 codes from January 1, 2008 to January 30, 2012 resulted in 1,548 patient encounters which were reviewed for guideline adherence. Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression was performed for each outcome variable to determine if they influence antibiotic adherence. Variables studied were physician, presence of a learner, BMI, age, gender, day of the week, month, diabetes, immunosuppression, and COPD. Results: Multivariate analysis showed the statistically significant variables were age (p=0.038 for pharyngitis and provider (p=0.013 for URI. There were no significant findings for sinusitis. Guideline adherence was 24% in patients with pharyngitis, 42% in acute sinusitis, 79% in URI, and 57% overall. Conclusion: Guideline adherence varies depending on the treating physician and decreases when treating younger patients with pharyngitis. The presence of a learner did not improve prescribing habits. The reason for these findings remain unclear, but considerations for improvement could include following antibiotic adherence as a quality measure, giving patients handouts educating them about the impact of overprescribing antibiotics, and further education amongst faculty and residents about adhering to nationally recognized guidelines.

  4. Scleroderma and evidence based non-pharmaceutical treatment modalities for digital ulcers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, M E

    2014-10-01

    Digital ulcers are difficult to heal, increasing the chance of infection, gangrene, amputation and limited functional use of hands. They are a complication in scleroderma or systematic sclerosis (SSc) and occur in approximately 50% of patients. This is a systematic review of the evidence supporting the use of non-pharmaceutical therapeutic modalities and their effectiveness to facilitate the healing of chronic digital ulcers in patients with scleroderma. A comprehensive review of computerised databases from 2000-2013: PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, Pedro, OT Seeker, OT Search, OVID, and Proquest as well as manual review of other resources was completed using the following search terms scleroderma or systemic sclerosis and/or digital ulcers, specific modalities (low level laser therapy, electrical stimulation, intermittent compression, ultrasound, vitamin E, myofascial release, wound dressings, iontophoresis, negative pressure therapy, and exercise), chronic wounds, and wound care. English language studies, from 2000 to January 2013, which used therapeutic modalities to facilitate healing of digital ulcers and use healing of the digital ulcer as an outcome measure were reviewed. Of the 403 identified articles, only 11 studies addressed non-pharmaceutical treatment modalities to facilitate healing for digital ulcers. Exercise had no direct effect on healing ulcers. The following studies were positive but have limitations in design and sample size:: hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=2), negative pressure therapy (n=1), intermittent compression (n=27) and acoustic pressure wound healing (n=1). Vitamin E gel showed a significant difference compared to a control group (n=27). Iontophoresis studies have shown that the modality increases blood flow but the results in five different studies are mixed and the application and intensity were inconsistent. No one modality was proven to be the most effective. Larger efficacy studies on treating digital ulcers are needed in order to develop

  5. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  6. Increasing access to evidence-based smoking cessation treatment: effectiveness of a free nicotine patch program among Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Donna; Nguyen, Nam; Peng, Cha-Hui; Chin, Margaret; Chang, Ming-der; Fahs, Marianne

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacotherapy substantially increases smoking cessation rates. However, programs to reduce barriers to this evidence-based treatment may not improve access among high risk immigrant non English speaking populations. This study estimates the effectiveness of a tailored free nicotine patch (NRT) program among Chinese American smokers living in New York City (NYC). Between July 2004 and May 2005 NRT was distributed to 375 smokers through two community-based organizations that serve the Asian American population in NYC. Participants completed an in person baseline survey and a 4-month follow-up telephone survey. Using an intention to treat analysis the abstinence rate at 4 months was 26.7% (100/375). Predictors of cessation included higher levels of self efficacy at baseline, not smoking while using the patch and concern about personal health risks. Distribution through easy to access, culturally competent local community organizations increased the reach of a free nicotine patch program and assisted smokers in quitting.

  7. The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen

    2010-01-01

    on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice, and the objective of this review is to assess the evidence base for manual treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in children and adolescents.Randomized, quasi-randomized and non-randomized clinical...... studies were included if they investigated the effect of manual therapy on musculoskeletal disorders in children and/or adolescents. The MEDLINE and MANTIS databases were searched, and studies published in English, Danish, Swedish or Norwegian were included.Only three studies were identified that in some...... way attempted to look at the effectiveness of manual therapy for children or adolescents with spinal problems, and none of these was a randomized controlled clinical trial. As for the rest of the musculoskeletal system, only one study of temporomandibular disorder was identified.With this review, we...

  8. Evidence-based guideline: treatment of tardive syndromes: report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Fahn, Stanley; Weiner, William J; Gronseth, Gary S; Sullivan, Kelly L; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2013-07-30

    To make evidence-based recommendations regarding management of tardive syndromes (TDS), including tardive dyskinesias (TDD), by addressing 5 questions: 1) Is withdrawal of dopamine receptor blocking agents (DRBAs) an effective TDS treatment? 2) Does switching from typical to atypical DRBAs reduce TDS symptoms? 3) What is the efficacy of pharmacologic agents in treating TDS? 4) Do patients with TDS benefit from chemodenervation with botulinum toxin? 5) Do patients with TDS benefit from surgical therapy? PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane were searched (1966-2011). Articles were classified according to a 4-tiered evidence-rating scheme; recommendations were tied to the evidence. Clonazepam probably improves TDD and ginkgo biloba probably improves TDS (both Level B); both should be considered as treatment. Risperidone may improve TDS but cannot be recommended as treatment because neuroleptics may cause TDS despite masking symptoms. Amantadine and tetrabenazine might be considered as TDS treatment (Level C). Diltiazem should not be considered as TDD treatment (Level B); galantamine and eicosapentaenoic acid may not be considered as treatment (Level C). Data are insufficient to support or refute use of acetazolamide, bromocriptine, thiamine, baclofen, vitamin E, vitamin B6, selegiline, clozapine, olanzapine, melatonin, nifedipine, fluperlapine, sulpiride, flupenthixol, thiopropazate, haloperidol, levetiracetam, quetiapine, ziprasidone, sertindole, aripiprazole, buspirone, yi-gan san, biperiden discontinuation, botulinum toxin type A, electroconvulsive therapy, α-methyldopa, reserpine, and pallidal deep brain stimulation as TDS treatments (Level U). Data are insufficient to support or refute TDS treatment by withdrawing causative agents or switching from typical to atypical DRBA (Level U).

  9. The Molecular Immunology of Mucositis: Implications for Evidence-Based Research in Alternative and Complementary Palliative Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chiappelli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The terms ‘mucositis’ and ‘stomatitis’ are often used interchangeably. Mucositis, however, pertains to pharyngeal-esophago-gastrointestinal inflammation that manifests as red, burn-like sores or ulcerations throughout the mouth. Stomatitis is an inflammation of the oral tissues proper, which can present with or without sores, and is made worse by poor dental hygiene. Mucositis is observed in a variety of immunosuppressed patients, but is most often consequential to cancer therapy. It appears as early as the third day of intervention, and is usually established by Day 7 of treatment. Mucositis increases mortality and morbidity and contributes to rising health care costs. The precise immune components involved in the etiology of mucositis are unclear, but evidence-based research (EBR data has shown that applications of granulocyte–macrophage-colony stimulating factor prevent the onset or the exacerbation of oropharyngeal mucositis. The molecular implications of this observation are discussed from the perspective of future developments of complementary and alternative treatments for this condition. It must be emphasized that this article is meant to be neither a review on mucositis and the various treatments for it, nor a discussion paper on its underlying molecular immunology. It is a statement of the implications of EBR for CAM-based interventions for mucositis. It explores and discusses the specific domain of molecular immunology in the context of mucositis and its direct implications for EBR research in CAM-based treatments for mucositis.

  10. Adapting an evidence-based HIV prevention intervention for pregnant African-American women in substance abuse treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winona Poulton

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Wendee M Wechsberg1, Felicia A Browne1, Winona Poulton1, Rachel Middlesteadt Ellerson1, Ashley Simons-Rudolph1, Deborah Haller2,  1RTI International,* Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA,  *RTI International is a trade name of Research Triangle InstituteAbstract: An adaptation of an evidence-based, woman-focused intervention designed to reduce HIV risk behaviors was conducted for pregnant, African-American women in substance abuse treatment in North Carolina. The intervention adaptation process included focus groups, expert panels, and the filming of women who spoke about their experiences with pregnancy, drug use, sex risk behaviors, HIV testing and treatment, need for substance abuse treatment, violence, and victimization. The assessment instrument was adapted for pregnant women and the intervention was organized into a 4-session PowerPoint presentation, with an additional session if a woman tested positive for HIV. All sessions and assessment instrument were installed on laptop computers for portability in treatment programs. We pilot tested our adaptation with 59 pregnant African-American women who had used an illicit drug within the past year and were enrolled in substance abuse treatment. At baseline, 41% were currently homeless, 76% were unemployed, 90% had not planned their current pregnancy, and approximately 70% reported drug use since finding out about the pregnancy. This sample of participants rated the intervention sessions and were highly satisfied with their experience, resulting in a mean satisfaction score of 6.5 out of 7. Pregnant African-American women who use drugs need substance abuse treatment that they do not currently access. Woman-focused HIV interventions help to address intersecting risk behaviors and need for treatment prevalent among this vulnerable group.Keywords: African-American woman, HIV prevention pregnancy, drug use, violence, sexual

  11. Lay Health Worker Involvement in Evidence-Based Treatment Delivery: A Conceptual Model to Address Disparities in Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Miya L; Lau, Anna S; Miranda, Jeanne

    2018-01-31

    Mobilizing lay health workers (LHWs) to deliver evidence-based treatments (EBTs) is a workforce strategy to address mental health disparities in underserved communities. LHWs can be leveraged to support access to EBTs in a variety of ways, from conducting outreach for EBTs delivered by professional providers to serving as the primary treatment providers. This critical review provides an overview of how LHW-supported or -delivered EBTs have been leveraged in low-, middle-, and high-income countries (HICs). We propose a conceptual model for LHWs to address drivers of service disparities, which relate to the overall supply of the EBTs provided and the demand for these treatments. The review provides illustrative case examples that demonstrate how LHWs have been leveraged globally and domestically to increase access to mental health services. It also discusses challenges and recommendations regarding implementing LHW-supported or -delivered EBTs. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology Volume 14 is May 7, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  12. Does Evidence-Based PTS Treatment Reduce PTS Symptoms and Suicide in Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans Seeking VA Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    the report. Posttraumatic Stress, Cognitive Processing Therapy , Prolonged Exposure Therapy , Evidence Based Therapy , Comparative Effectiveness...many of those with mental health problems do not seek or postpone seeking EBT for PTS, defined here as Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PE) and/or...evidence- based therapies for posttraumatic stress (PTS) applied naturalistically in a clinical setting; factors associated with PTS symptom

  13. Familial disseminated cutaneous glomuvenous malformation: Treatment with polidocanol sclerotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi Jha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomuvenous malformations (GVMs present as asymptomatic multiple pink-to-blue nodules or plaques. Disseminated lesions are rare, representing 10% of all the cases. Familial cases are caused by mutations in the glomulin gene. A young male presented with multiple bluish-to-dusky red-coloured nodules 10-15 in numbers over the trunk, limbs and buttocks since 12 years of age. They ranged in size from 1 to 3 cm, partially to non-compressible and tender on palpation. There was no history of any systemic complaint. His sister and mother had similar lesions but in a limited distribution. Biopsy showed multiple ectatic dilated vascular channels lined by multiple layers of glomus cells consistent with the diagnosis of GVM. The biopsy of the lesions from the mother and sister also showed similar features. Mutation analysis for glomulin gene could not be done because of the unavailability of the facility at our setting. He underwent sclerotherapy with 3% polidocanol every 2 weeks, and there was significant improvement in the lesions after six sessions of sclerotherapy. The patient is under follow-up and there is no recurrence of the lesions over treated sites after 6 months.

  14. Is electroconvulsive therapy an evidence-based treatment for catatonia? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Arnaud; Naudet, Florian; Vaiva, Guillaume; Francis, Andrew; Thomas, Pierre; Amad, Ali

    2017-06-21

    We aimed to review and discuss the evidence-based arguments for the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in the treatment of catatonia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies focusing on the response to ECT in catatonia were selected in PubMed, the Cochrane Library, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov and Current Controlled Trials through October 2016 and qualitatively described. Trials assessing pre-post differences using a catatonia or clinical improvement rating scale were pooled together using a random effect model. Secondary outcomes were adverse effects of anesthesia and seizure. 564 patients from 28 studies were included. RCTs were of low quality and were heterogeneous; therefore, it was not possible to combine their efficacy results. An improvement of catatonic symptoms after ECT treatment was evidenced in ten studies (SMD = -3.14, 95% CI [-3.95; -2.34]). The adverse effects that were reported in seven studies included mental confusion, memory loss, headache, or adverse effects associated with anesthesia. ECT protocols were heterogeneous. The literature consistently describes improvement in catatonic symptoms after ECT. However, the published studies fail to demonstrate efficacy and effectiveness. It is now crucial to design and perform a quality RCT to robustly validate the use of ECT in catatonia.Prospero registration information: PROSPERO 2016: CRD42016041660.

  15. A solid majority remit following evidence-based OCD treatments: a 3-year naturalistic outcome study in pediatric OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Karin; Skarphedinsson, Gudmundur; Skärsäter, Ingela; Haugland, Bente Storm Mowatt; Ivarsson, Tord

    2018-03-03

    This study reports follow-up 2 and 3 years after the initial assessment of a sample of youth with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Participants were 109 children and adolescents, aged 5-17 years, recruited from a specialized, outpatient OCD clinic in Sweden. Patients were treated with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), augmented when indicated by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). In cases where SSRIs were insufficient, augmentation with a second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) was applied. Participants were assessed with the Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS), Children's OCD Impact Scale (COIS), and Children's Depressive Inventory (CDI) at follow-ups 2 and 3 years after baseline assessment. Treatment response was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 15, and remission was defined as CY-BOCS total score ≤ 10. Analyzing the outcomes with linear mixed-effects models (LME) showed a decrease in OCD symptom load from 23 to 6.9 at the 3-year follow-up. Moreover, two of three (66.1%) participants were in remission, and another 19.2% had responded to treatment at the 3-year follow-up. Thus, 85.3% of participants responded to treatment. Moreover, during the follow-up period, participants' psychosocial functioning had significantly improved, and depressive symptoms had significantly decreased. The results suggest that evidence-based treatment for pediatric OCD, following expert consensus guidelines, has long-term positive effects for most children and adolescents diagnosed with OCD. The results also indicate that improvements are maintained over a 3-year period, at least, and that improvement is also found with regard to psychosocial functioning and depressive symptoms.

  16. Direct-to-consumer marketing of evidence-based psychological interventions: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Lauren C; McHugh, R Kathryn; Barlow, David H

    2012-06-01

    The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological interventions (EBPIs) to service provision settings has been a major challenge. Most efforts to disseminate and implement EBPIs have focused on clinicians and clinical systems as the consumers of these treatments and thus have targeted efforts to these groups. An alternative, complementary approach to achieve more widespread utilization of EBPIs is to disseminate directly to patients themselves. The aim of this special section is to explore several direct-to-consumer (i.e., patient) dissemination and education efforts currently underway. This manuscript highlights the rationale for direct-to-patient dissemination strategies as well as the application of marketing science to dissemination efforts. Achieving greater access to EBPIs will require the use of multiple approaches to overcome the many and varied barriers to successful dissemination and implementation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Evidence-Based Treatment Options in Recurrent and/or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassios Argiris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The major development of the past decade in the first-line treatment of recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M SCCHN was the introduction of cetuximab in combination with platinum plus 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy (CT, followed by maintenance cetuximab (the “EXTREME” regimen. This regimen is supported by a phase 3 randomized trial and subsequent observational studies, and it confers well-documented survival benefits, with median survival ranging between approximately 10 and 14 months, overall response rates between 36 and 44%, and disease control rates of over 80%. Furthermore, as indicated by patient-reported outcome measures, the addition of cetuximab to platinum-based CT leads to a significant reduction in pain and problems with social eating and speech. Conversely, until very recently, there has been a lack of evidence-based second-line treatment options, and the therapies that have been available have shown low response rates and poor survival outcomes. Presently, a promising new treatment option in R/M SCCHN has emerged: immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs, which have demonstrated favorable results in second-line clinical trials. Nivolumab and pembrolizumab are the first two ICIs that were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We note that the trials that showed benefit with ICIs included not only patients who previously received ≥1 platinum-based regimens for R/M SCCHN but also patients who experienced recurrence within 6 months after combined modality therapy with a platinum agent for locally advanced disease. In this review, we outline the available clinical and observational evidence for the EXTREME regimen and the initial results from clinical trials for ICIs in patients with R/M SCCHN. We propose that these treatment options can be integrated into a new continuum of care paradigm, with first-line EXTREME regimen followed by second-line ICIs. A number of ongoing clinical trials

  18. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients: the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Douglas E; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S; Spijkervet, Fred K L; Brennan, Michael T

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care. Articles were selected for the time period beginning after 1989, excluding the 1990 NCI monograph articles from the 1989 NIH-sponsored Oral Complications in Cancer Therapy Symposium that was published in 1990. The search included both Medline/PubMed and Embase and was limited to humans. The search was limited to publications in the English language. No abstracts were utilized in the current review. Each article was evaluated by two reviewers. A weighted prevalence was calculated for the prevalence of ORN while incorporating predetermined quality measures. The level of evidence, recommendation grade, and guideline (if possible) were provided for published preventive and management strategies for ORN. A total of 43 articles between 1990 and 2008 were reviewed. The weighted prevalence for ORN included conventional radiotherapy (RT) = 7.4%, intensity modulated RT (IMRT) = 5.1%, chemoradiotherapy (CRT) = 6.8%, and brachytherapy = 5.3%. Hyperbaric oxygen may contribute a role in management of ORN. However, no clear guideline recommendations could be established for the prevention or treatment of ORN based on the literature reviewed. New cancer treatment modalities such as IMRT and concomitant CRT have had minimal effect on prevalence of ORN. No studies to date have systematically addressed impact of ORN on either quality of life or cost of care.

  19. Adopting evidence-based medically assisted treatments in substance abuse treatment organizations: roles of leadership socialization and funding streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Terry C; Davis, Carolyn D; Roman, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the organizational adoption of medically assisted treatments (MAT) for substance use disorders (SUDs) in a representative sample of 555 US for-profit and not-for-profit treatment centers. The study examines organizational adoption of these treatments in an institutionally contested environment that traditionally has valued behavioral treatment, using sociological and resource dependence frameworks. The findings indicate that socialization of leadership, measured by formal clinical education, is related to the adoption of MAT. Funding patterns also affect innovation adoption, with greater adoption associated with higher proportions of earned income from third party fees for services, and less adoption associated with funding from criminal justice sources. These findings may generalize to other social mission-oriented organizations where innovation adoption may be linked to private and public benefit values inherent in the type of socialization of leadership and different patterns of funding support.

  20. The Movement Disorder Society Evidence-Based Medicine Review Update: Treatments for the Non-Motor Symptoms of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppi, Klaus; Weintraub, Daniel; Coelho, Miguel; Perez-Lloret, Santiago; Fox, Susan H.; Katzenschlager, Regina; Hametner, Eva-Maria; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Olivier; Goetz, Christopher G.; Sampaio, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The Movement Disorder Society (MDS) Task Force on Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Review of Treatments for Parkinson's Disease (PD) was first published in 2002 and was updated in 2005 to cover clinical trial data up to January 2004 with the focus on motor symptoms of PD. In this revised version the MDS task force decided it was necessary to extend the review to non-motor symptoms. The objective of this work was to update previous EBM reviews on treatments for PD with a focus on non-motor symptoms. Level-I (randomized controlled trial, RCT) reports of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for the non-motor symptoms of PD, published as full articles in English between January 2002 and December 2010 were reviewed. Criteria for inclusion and ranking followed the original program outline and adhered to EBM methodology. For efficacy conclusions, treatments were designated: efficacious, likely efficacious, unlikely efficacious, non-efficacious, or insufficient evidence. Safety data were catalogued and reviewed. Based on the combined efficacy and safety assessment, Implications for clinical practice were determined using the following designations: clinically useful, possibly useful, investigational, unlikely useful, and not useful. Fifty-four new studies qualified for efficacy review while several other studies covered safety issues. Updated and new efficacy conclusions were made for all indications. The treatments that are efficacious for the management of the different non-motor symptoms are as follows: pramipexole for the treatment of depressive symptoms, clozapine for the treatment of psychosis, rivastigmine for the treatment of dementia, and botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) and BTX-B as well as glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea. The practical implications for these treatments, except for glycopyrrolate, are that they are clinically useful. Since there is insufficient evidence of glycopyrrolate for the treatment of sialorrhea exceeding 1 week, the

  1. No evidence-based restoration without a sound evidence base: a reply to Guldemond et al.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ntshotsho, P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ) of evidence through baseline condition assessment, proper goal setting, sound monitoring of the impacts of the chosen intervention as well as effective dissemination of resulting evidence. To answer the question whether restoration is evidence-based would...

  2. Predicting evidence-based treatment sustainment: results from a longitudinal study of the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sarah B; Han, Bing; Slaughter, Mary E; Godley, Susan H; Garner, Bryan R

    2017-06-13

    Implementation support models are increasingly being used to enhance the delivery of evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in routine care settings. Little is known about the extent to which these models lead to continued EBT use after implementation support ends. Moreover, few empirical studies longitudinally examine the hypothesized factors associated with long-term psychosocial EBT use (i.e., sustainment). In an effort to address this gap, the current study examined sustainment of an EBT called the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA) following the end of implementation support. Between 2006 and 2010, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration awarded 3 years of A-CRA implementation support to 82 community-based organizations around the USA. The extent to which A-CRA was sustained following grant end and the hypothesized factors associated with EBT sustainment were collected using both retrospective and prospective data. We examined the extent to which 10 core treatment elements of A-CRA were sustained and the associations between the extent of A-CRA sustainment and hypothesized factors using a pattern-mixture longitudinal modeling approach. Staff from 76 organizations participated in data collection for a 92.86% response rate. On average, about half of the 10 core treatment elements were sustained following the loss of implementation support. Factors that appeared most important to A-CRA sustainment included characteristics that were related to the outer setting (communication, funding, and partnerships), inner setting (political support, organizational capacity, and supervisor turnover rate), implementation support period (number of clinicians and supervisors certified and employed at support end and number of youth served), and staff perceptions of the intervention (implementation difficulty, relative advantage, and perceived success). Even with multiple years of implementation support, community-based organizations face

  3. Barriers to implementing evidence-based practices in addiction treatment programs: comparing staff reports on Motivational Interviewing, Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach, Assertive Community Treatment, and Cognitive-behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, M; Lundgren, L; Cohen, A; Rose, D; Chassler, D; Beltrame, C; D'Ippolito, M

    2011-11-01

    This qualitative study explored barriers to implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in community-based addiction treatment organizations (CBOs) by comparing staff descriptions of barriers for four EBPs: Motivational Interviewing (MI), Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), Assertive Community Treatment (ACT), and Cognitive-behavioral Therapy (CBT). The CBOs received CSAT/SAMHSA funding from 2003 to 2008 to deliver services using EBPs. Phone interview responses from 172 CBO staff directly involved in EBP implementation were analyzed using content analysis, a method for making inferences and developing themes from the systematic review of participant narratives (Berelson, 1952). Staff described different types of barriers to implementing each EBP. For MI, the majority of barriers involved staff resistance or organizational setting. For A-CRA, the majority of barriers involved specific characteristics of the EBP or client resistance. For CBT, the majority of barriers were associated with client resistance, and for ACT, the majority of barriers were associated with resources. EBP designers, policy makers who support EBP dissemination and funders should include explicit strategies to address such barriers. Addiction programs proposing to use specific EBPs must consider whether their programs have the organizational capacity and community capacity to meet the demands of the EBP selected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The value of local treatment in patients with primary, disseminated, multifocal Ewing sarcoma (PDMES)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeusler, Julia; Ranft, Andreas; Boelling, Tobias; Gosheger, Georg; Braun-Munzinger, Gabriele; Vieth, Volker; Burdach, Stefan; van den Berg, Henk; Juergens, Heribert; Dirksen, Uta

    2010-01-01

    The value of local treatment in patients with primary, disseminated, multifocal Ewing sarcoma (PDMES) was investigated. We analyzed 120 patients registered into the European Ewing Tumor Working Initiative of National Groups (EURO-E.W.I.N.G. 99) trial at the trial center of Muenster from 1998 to

  5. Counselor Attitudes toward and Use of Evidence-Based Practices in Private Substance Use Disorder Treatment Centers: A Comparison of Social Workers and Non-Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bride, Brian E.; Kintzle, Sara; Abraham, Amanda J.; Roman, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that may be associated with variation in social workers' perceptions of effectiveness, perceptions of acceptability, and use of psychosocial evidence-based practices (EBPs) for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUD) in comparison to other SUD counselors who are non-social workers. A national…

  6. Exploring the Impact of Parental Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation on Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions: A Transdiagnostic Approach to Improving Treatment Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliken, Ashley C.; Katz, Lynn Fainsilber

    2013-01-01

    Parenting interventions, particularly those categorized as parent management training (PMT), have a large evidence base supporting their effectiveness with most families who present for treatment of childhood behavior problems. However, data suggest that PMTs are not effective at treating all families who seek services. Parental psychopathology…

  7. Employing Policy and Purchasing Levers to Increase the Use of Evidence-Based Practices in Community-Based Substance Abuse Treatment Settings: Reports from Single State Authorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci R.; Kovas, Anne E.; Cassidy, Elaine F.; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    State public health authorities are critical to the successful implementation of science based addiction treatment practices by community-based providers. The literature to date, however, lacks examples of state level policy strategies that promote evidence-based practices (EBPs). This mixed-methods study documents changes in two critical…

  8. Integrative Families and Systems Treatment: A Middle Path toward Integrating Common and Specific Factors in Evidence-Based Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J. Scott; Solovey, Andrew D.; Grove, David; Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.

    2012-01-01

    A moderate common factors approach is proposed as a synthesis or middle path to integrate common and specific factors in evidence-based approaches to high-risk youth and families. The debate in family therapy between common and specific factors camps is reviewed and followed by suggestions from the literature for synthesis and creative flexibility…

  9. European evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus : The SHARE initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Noortje; De Graeff, Nienke; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Brogan, Paul A.; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian M.; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; Marks, Stephen D; McCann, Liza J.; Ozen, Seza; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ravelli, Angelo; Royen-Kerkhof, Annet Van; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Bas; Wulffraat, Nico; Kamphuis, Sylvia; Beresford, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a rare, multisystem and potentially life-Threatening autoimmune disorder with significant associated morbidity. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is often based on clinical expertise. SHARE (Single Hub and Access point for

  10. Osteoradionecrosis in cancer patients : the evidence base for treatment-dependent frequency, current management strategies, and future studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Douglas E.; Doerr, Wolfgang; Hovan, Allan; Pinto, Andres; Saunders, Debbie; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Brennan, Michael T.

    The purpose of this study is to review the evidence base from 1990 to 2008 to (1) clarify the impact of cancer therapies on prevalence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) in head and neck cancer patients, and to (2) evaluate management strategies and their consequences on quality of life and cost of care.

  11. An evidence-based review on urate-lowering treatments: implications for optimal treatment of chronic hyperuricemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bove M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marilisa Bove, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe Cicero, Maddalena Veronesi, Claudio Borghi Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Several studies suggest that chronic hyperuricemia, the main precursor of gout, is involved in the pathogenesis of different systemic disorders that affect cardiovascular and renal systems, such as hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, chronic heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Recent epidemiological evidence has shown an increasing trend in the prevalence of hyperuricemia and gout in the Western world: a number of population-based studies estimate a prevalence of up to 21% for hyperuricemia and 1%–4% for gout. As such, early detection and careful management of this pathological condition is required, starting from lifestyle changes (mainly based on a diet low in red meat, sugars, and alcoholic beverages, with increased intake of vegetables, water, and vitamin C sources, adding specific drugs to lead serum uric acid (SUA levels under the target value of 7 mg/dL. In particular, nonselective and selective XO inhibitors (allopurinol, oxypurinol, febuxostat reduce SUA levels and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, mainly related to XO overactivity that often causes inflammatory damage to the vascular endothelium. The effect of lowering SUA levels via XO inhibition includes an attenuation of oxidative stress and related endothelial dysfunction that largely contribute to the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the inhibition of XO overactivation seems to be an excellent therapeutic option to limit the harmful effects of excess UA and reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, rapid diagnosis and correct therapy for hyperuricemia may also improve the prevention and/or treatment of serious and multifactorial diseases. The available evidence supports the importance of

  12. Are we really delivering evidence-based treatments for eating disorders? How eating-disordered patients describe their experience of cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdrey, Natasha D; Waller, Glenn

    2015-12-01

    Psychotherapists report routinely not practising evidence-based treatments. However, there is little research examining the content of therapy from the patient perspective. This study examined the self-reported treatment experiences of individuals who had been told that they had received cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for their eating disorder. One hundred and fifty-seven such sufferers (mean age = 25.69 years) were recruited from self-help organisations. Participants completed an online survey assessing demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapy components. The use of evidence-based CBT techniques varied widely, with core elements for the eating disorders (e.g., weighing and food monitoring) used at well below the optimum level, while a number of unevidenced techniques were reported as being used commonly. Cluster analysis showed that participants received different patterns of intervention under the therapist label of 'CBT', with evidence-based CBT being the least common. Therapist age and patient diagnosis were related to the pattern of intervention delivered. It appears that clinicians are not subscribing to a transdiagnostic approach to the treatment of eating disorders. Patient recollections in this study support the conclusion that evidence-based practice is not routinely undertaken with this client group, even when the therapy offered is described as such. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Training Providers in the Use of Evidence-Based Treatments: A Comparison of In-Person and Online Delivery Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallonee, Sybil; Phillips, Jennifer; Holloway, Kevin; Riggs, David

    2018-01-01

    Evidenced-based psychotherapies (EBPs) are primarily disseminated via in-person workshops, which have been shown to be effective in training clinicians. However, there is limited space at these workshops, they occur in limited locations, and the time and money required to travel to these workshops is limiting for many providers. An online virtual…

  14. Use of the evidence base in substance abuse treatment programs for American Indians and Alaska Natives: pursuing quality in the crucible of practice and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novins, Douglas K; Aarons, Gregory A; Conti, Sarah G; Dahlke, Dennis; Daw, Raymond; Fickenscher, Alexandra; Fleming, Candace; Love, Craig; Masis, Kathleen; Spicer, Paul

    2011-06-16

    A variety of forces are now shaping a passionate debate regarding the optimal approaches to improving the quality of substance abuse services for American Indian and Alaska Native communities. While there have been some highly successful efforts to meld the traditions of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes with that of 12-step approaches, some American Indian and Alaska Natives remain profoundly uncomfortable with the dominance of this Euro-American approach to substance abuse treatment in their communities. This longstanding tension has now been complicated by the emergence of a number of evidence-based treatments that, while holding promise for improving treatment for American Indian and Alaska Natives with substance use problems, may conflict with both American Indian and Alaska Native and 12-step healing traditions. We convened a panel of experts from American Indian and Alaska Native communities, substance abuse treatment programs serving these communities, and researchers to discuss and analyze these controversies in preparation for a national study of American Indian and Alaska Native substance abuse services. While the panel identified programs that are using evidence-based treatments, members still voiced concerns about the cultural appropriateness of many evidence-based treatments as well as the lack of guidance on how to adapt them for use with American Indians and Alaska Natives. The panel concluded that the efforts of federal and state policymakers to promote the use of evidence-based treatments are further complicating an already-contentious debate within American Indian and Alaska Native communities on how to provide effective substance abuse services. This external pressure to utilize evidence-based treatments is particularly problematic given American Indian and Alaska Native communities' concerns about protecting their sovereign status. Broadening this conversation beyond its primary focus on the use of evidence-based treatments to other

  15. Effects of a brief education and treatment-planning group on evidence-based PTSD treatment utilization and completion among veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeViva, Jason C; Bassett, Gwendolyn A; Santoro, Gia M; Fenton, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    Veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) presenting for care with Veterans Affairs Health Care System (VA) tend not to engage in evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) despite widespread availability of these treatments. Though there is little evidence that "readiness for treatment" affects treatment choice, many VA providers believe that interventions to increase readiness would be helpful. This naturalistic study examined the effects of a 4-session education/treatment-planning group on treatment choice among veterans in a VA outpatient PTSD treatment program. Treatment choices and completion rates of 114 veterans who received at least 1 session of the group (EG) were compared with those of 68 veterans who did not receive the group and received PTSD program treatment as usual (TAU). TAU and EG cases were matched on gender and service era. Of 114 EG cases, 52 (45.6%) chose to receive EBPs, compared with 10 of 68 TAU cases (14.7%). These rates were significantly different, χ2(1) = 18.1, p < .0001. Among cases choosing EBPs, 52.2% of EG cases completed the EBPs as planned, compared with 60% of TAU cases. These percentages were not significantly different. Among EG cases choosing EBPs, lower likelihood of treatment completion was related to psychiatric medication prescription, presence of PTSD service connection, and higher overall service-connection level. The education/treatment-planning group was associated with higher likelihood of selecting but not completing EBPs for PTSD. The decision to engage in trauma-focused treatment may be a different process from the decision to complete such treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Trajectories of change in anxiety severity and impairment during and after treatment with evidence-based treatment for multiple anxiety disorders in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesch, Jutta M; Golinelli, Daniela; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Sullivan, Greer; Stein, Murray B; Craske, Michelle G; Roy-Byrne, Peter P

    2013-11-01

    Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) is a model for delivering evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care. Compared to usual care, CALM produced greater improvement in anxiety symptoms. However, mean estimates can obscure heterogeneity in treatment response. This study aimed to identify (1) clusters of participants with similar patterns of change in anxiety severity and impairment (trajectory groups); and (2) characteristics that predict trajectory group membership. The CALM randomized controlled effectiveness trial was conducted in 17 primary care clinics in four US cities in 2006-2009. 1,004 English- or Spanish-speaking patients age 18-75 with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder participated. The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale was administered repeatedly to 482 participants randomized to CALM treatment. Group-based trajectory modeling was applied to identify trajectory groups and multinomial logit to predict trajectory group membership. Two predicted trajectories, representing about two-thirds of participants, were below the cut-off for clinically significant anxiety a couple of months after treatment initiation. The predicted trajectory for the majority of remaining participants was below the cut-off by 9 months. A small group of participants did not show consistent improvement. Being sicker at baseline, not working, and reporting less social support were associated with less favorable trajectories. There is heterogeneity in patient response to anxiety treatment. Adverse circumstances appear to hamper treatment response. To what extent anxiety symptoms improve insufficiently because adverse patient circumstances contribute to suboptimal treatment delivery, suboptimal treatment adherence, or suboptimal treatment response requires further investigation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Trajectories of Change in Anxiety Severity and Impairment During and After Treatment with Evidence-Based Treatment for Multiple Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesch, Jutta M.; Golinelli, Daniela; Sherbourne, Cathy D.; Sullivan, Greer; Stein, Murray B.; Craske, Michelle G.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) is a model for delivering evidence-based treatment for anxiety disorders in primary care. Compared to usual care, CALM produced greater improvement in anxiety symptoms. However, mean estimates can obscure heterogeneity in treatment response. This study aimed to identify (1) clusters of participants with similar patterns of change in anxiety severity and impairment (trajectory groups); and (2) characteristics that predict trajectory group membership. Methods The CALM randomized controlled effectiveness trial was conducted in 17 primary care clinics in 4 US cities in 2006–2009. 1,004 English- or Spanish-speaking patients age 18–75 with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and/or posttraumatic stress disorder participated. The Overall Anxiety Severity and Impairment Scale was administered repeatedly to 482 participants randomized to CALM treatment. Group-based trajectory modeling was applied to identify trajectory groups and multinomial logit to predict trajectory group membership. Results Two predicted trajectories, representing about two-thirds of participants, were below the cut-off for clinically significant anxiety a couple of months after treatment initiation. The predicted trajectory for the majority of remaining participants was below by nine months. A small group of participants did not show consistent improvement. Being sicker at baseline, not working, and reporting less social support were associated with less favorable trajectories. Conclusions There is heterogeneity in patient response to anxiety treatment. Adverse circumstances appear to hamper treatment response. To what extent anxiety symptoms improve insufficiently because adverse patient circumstances contribute to suboptimal treatment delivery, suboptimal treatment adherence, or suboptimal treatment response requires further investigation. Clinical Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00347269 PMID:23801589

  18. The future of screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment in adolescent primary care: research directions and dissemination challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼSouza-Li, Lilia; Harris, Sion Kim

    2016-08-01

    Screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) offers a practical, integrated model for addressing substance use in primary care settings. This review provides an update of the research on SBIRT for adolescents in primary care, examines current dissemination challenges and suggests future research directions. A number of brief screening tools for adolescents have been developed and tested relative to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders. Computerized previsit screening promotes standardization and is a more time-efficient alternative to provider interview. The adolescent brief intervention literature is growing, particularly with respect to technology-based tools, but is still limited, with evidence greatest for alcohol, and for motivational enhancement therapy interventions. Increasing SBIRT implementation in pediatric primary care remains a challenge. Using nonphysician behavioral health providers to deliver SBIRT, and embedding a screener and decision support tool in electronic medical record systems are strategies being investigated to promote SBIRT implementation. Substance use begins in adolescence, and pediatric SBIRT could help to achieve a population-level reduction of substance use-related harms. With a growing number of available tools, adolescent SBIRT effectiveness and feasibility are increasing, but more studies are needed to grow its evidence base, and elucidate strategies to increase implementation.

  19. Evidence-based treatment and supervision practices for co-occurring mental and substance use disorders in the criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Roger H; Young, M Scott; Rojas, Elizabeth C; Gorey, Claire M

    2017-07-01

    Over seven million persons in the United States are supervised by the criminal justice system, including many who have co-occurring mental and substance use disorders (CODs). This population is at high risk for recidivism and presents numerous challenges to those working in the justice system. To provide a contemporary review of the existing research and examine key issues and evidence-based treatment and supervision practices related to CODs in the justice system. We reviewed COD research involving offenders that has been conducted over the past 20 years and provide an analysis of key findings. Several empirically supported frameworks are available to guide services for offenders who have CODs, including Integrated Dual Disorders Treatment (IDDT), the Risk-Need-Responsivity (RNR) model, and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Evidence-based services include integrated assessment that addresses both sets of disorders and the risk for criminal recidivism. Although several evidence-based COD interventions have been implemented at different points in the justice system, there remains a significant gap in services for offenders who have CODs. Existing program models include Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT), day reporting centers, specialized community supervision teams, pre- and post-booking diversion programs, and treatment-based courts (e.g., drug courts, mental health courts, COD dockets). Jail-based COD treatment programs provide stabilization of acute symptoms, medication consultation, and triage to community services, while longer-term prison COD programs feature Modified Therapeutic Communities (MTCs). Despite the availability of multiple evidence-based interventions that have been implemented across diverse justice system settings, these services are not sufficiently used to address the scope of treatment and supervision needs among offenders with CODs.

  20. A Case of Disseminated and Fulminant Plasmacytomas That Developed during Bortezomib Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Young Bae

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma is an incurable and slow growing plasma cell neoplasm. The introduction of new drugs has increased the number of treatment options. Bortezomib, the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, has been shown to have a significant antitumor activity in the treatment of relapse/refractory patients with multiple myeloma. Additionally, plasmacytomas have shown significant response to bortezomib. In this case report, we describe a patient who developed disseminated and fulminant extramedullary plasmacytomas during combination chemotherapy treatment with bortezomib within a short period, after having shown clinical improvement.

  1. Lifestyle Behaviours Add to the Armoury of Treatment Options for Panic Disorder: An Evidence-Based Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Rod

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an evidence-based reasoning, focusing on evidence of an Occupational Therapy input to lifestyle behaviour influences on panic disorder that also provides potentially broader application across other mental health problems (MHP). The article begins from the premise that we are all different. It then follows through a sequence of questions, examining incrementally how MHPs are experienced and classified. It analyses the impact of individual sensitivity at different levels of analysis, from genetic and epigenetic individuality, through neurotransmitter and body system sensitivity. Examples are given demonstrating the evidence base behind the logical sequence of investigation. The paper considers the evidence of how everyday routine lifestyle behaviour impacts on occupational function at all levels, and how these behaviours link to individual sensitivity to influence the level of exposure required to elicit symptomatic responses. Occupational Therapists can help patients by adequately assessing individual sensitivity, and through promoting understanding and a sense of control over their own symptoms. It concludes that present clinical guidelines should be expanded to incorporate knowledge of individual sensitivities to environmental exposures and lifestyle behaviours at an early stage. PMID:26095868

  2. Lifestyle Behaviours Add to the Armoury of Treatment Options for Panic Disorder: An Evidence-Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Lambert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an evidence-based reasoning, focusing on evidence of an Occupational Therapy input to lifestyle behaviour influences on panic disorder that also provides potentially broader application across other mental health problems (MHP. The article begins from the premise that we are all different. It then follows through a sequence of questions, examining incrementally how MHPs are experienced and classified. It analyses the impact of individual sensitivity at different levels of analysis, from genetic and epigenetic individuality, through neurotransmitter and body system sensitivity. Examples are given demonstrating the evidence base behind the logical sequence of investigation. The paper considers the evidence of how everyday routine lifestyle behaviour impacts on occupational function at all levels, and how these behaviours link to individual sensitivity to influence the level of exposure required to elicit symptomatic responses. Occupational Therapists can help patients by adequately assessing individual sensitivity, and through promoting understanding and a sense of control over their own symptoms. It concludes that present clinical guidelines should be expanded to incorporate knowledge of individual sensitivities to environmental exposures and lifestyle behaviours at an early stage.

  3. Enduring effects of evidence-based psychotherapies in acute depression and anxiety versus treatment as usual at follow-up – A longitudinal meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Flückiger Christoph; Del Re A. C.; Munder Thomas; Heer Sara S.; Wampold Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This meta analysis examined the enduring efficacy of evidence based psychotherapies (EBP) in com parison to treatment as usual (TAU) by examining effects from termination to follow up for acute anxiety and depression in an adult outpatient population. It was hypothesized that EBPs might extend their efficacy at follow up assessment (Tolin 2010). Method: Longitudinal multilevel meta analyses were conducted that examined the magnitude of difference between EBP and TAU. Targeted (dis...

  4. Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer)--steps towards an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke-Sorensen, H; Malmsjo, M; Rome, P; Hudson, D; Krug, E; Berg, L; Bruhin, A; Caravaggi, C; Chariker, M; Depoorter, M; Dowsett, C; Dunn, R; Duteille, F; Ferreira, F; Francos Martínez, J M; Grudzien, G; Ichioka, S; Ingemansson, R; Jeffery, S; Lee, C; Vig, S; Runkel, N; Martin, R; Smith, J

    2011-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder : A revision of the 2005 guidelines from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Anderson, Ian M.; Nutt, David J.; Allgulander, Christer; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan A.; Christmas, David M.; Davies, Simon; Fineberg, Naomi; Lidbetter, Nicky; Malizia, Andrea; McCrone, Paul; Nabarro, Daniel; O'Neill, Catherine; Scott, Jan; van der Wee, Nic; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    This revision of the 2005 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines for the evidence-based pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders provides an update on key steps in diagnosis and clinical management, including recognition, acute treatment, longer-term treatment, combination

  6. Early diagnosis and successful treatment of disseminated toxoplasmosis after cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Taro; Sumi, Masahiko; Kaiume, Hiroko; Takeda, Wataru; Kirihara, Takehiko; Sato, Keijiro; Ueki, Toshimitsu; Hiroshima, Yuki; Ueno, Mayumi; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Kaneko, Yumi; Hikosaka, Kenji; Norose, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    A 66-year-old woman with refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma underwent cord blood transplantation. Prior to transplantation, a serological test for Toxoplasma gondii-specific IgG antibodies was positive. On day 96, she exhibited fever and dry cough. Chest CT showed diffuse centrilobular ground glass opacities in both lungs. The reactivation of T. gondii was identified by the presence of parasite DNA in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, brain MRI revealed a space occupying lesion in the right occipital lobe. Therefore, disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed. She received pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine from day 99. The lung and brain lesions both showed improvement but the PCR assay for T. gondii DNA in peripheral blood was positive on day 133. On day 146, she developed blurred vision and reduced visual acuity, and a tentative diagnosis of toxoplasmic retinochoroiditis was made based on ophthalmic examination results. As agranulocytosis developed on day 158, we decided to discontinue pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine and the treatment was thus switched to atovaquone. Moreover, we added spiramycin to atovaquone therapy from day 174, and her ocular condition gradually improved. In general, the prognosis of disseminated toxoplasmosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is extremely poor. However, early diagnosis and treatment may contribute to improvement of the fundamentally dismal prognosis of disseminated toxoplasmosis after HSCT.

  7. Provider Training to Screen and Initiate Evidence-Based Pediatric Obesity Treatment in Routine Practice Settings: A Randomized Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolko, Rachel P; Kass, Andrea E; Hayes, Jacqueline F; Levine, Michele D; Garbutt, Jane M; Proctor, Enola K; Wilfley, Denise E

    This randomized pilot trial evaluated two training modalities for first-line, evidence-based pediatric obesity services (screening and goal setting) among nursing students. Participants (N = 63) were randomized to live interactive training or Web-facilitated self-study training. Pretraining, post-training, and 1-month follow-up assessments evaluated training feasibility, acceptability, and impact (knowledge and skill via simulation). Moderator (previous experience) and predictor (content engagement) analyses were conducted. Nearly all participants (98%) completed assessments. Both types of training were acceptable, with higher ratings for live training and participants with previous experience (ps pediatric obesity services. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Disseminated nocardiosis in a patient on infliximab and methylprednisolone for treatment-resistant Sweet's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drone, Elizabeth R; McCrory, Allison L; Lane, Natalie; Fiala, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    A 62-year-old white man with a 10-year history of treatment-refractory Sweet's syndrome was admitted to the hospital with the onset of purpuric lesions. Methylprednisolone and infliximab were administered. Our patient developed disseminated Nocardia infection and eventually succumbed. Opportunistic infections such as Nocardia have been associated with infliximab and other tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. The astute clinician should be aware of the risk of rare opportunistic infections, particularly in patients on TNF-α inhibitors and systemic corticosteroids.

  9. Role of lower half body irradiation (LHBI) in palliative treatment of disseminated skeletal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, R.K.; Baboo, H.A.; Suresh, P.

    1993-01-01

    Half body irradiation (HBI) is a new and simple approach for palliative radiotherapy of disseminated skeletal metastasis. It has very good palliative effect with manageable side effects when given as low dose rate treatment. 15 patients with wide spread bony secondaries were treated with Lower Half body Irradiation (LHBI) at a dose rate of 80-90 c Gy/min at our institute. Pain relief was observed in all patients. Of these 50% cases had significant relief of pain. Performance status improved and dependence on analgesic drugs had also reduced. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  10. Effectiveness of evidence-based treatments of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in children and adolescents: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Deepa; Menard, Chantalle; Neilson, Christine J; Brownell, Marni; Hanlon-Dearman, Ana; Chudley, Albert; Zarychanski, Ryan; Abou-Setta, Ahmed

    2018-03-09

    The aim of this paper is to provide a protocol for a systematic review assessing the effectiveness of evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions with placebo/dummy interventions or usual standards of care in children and adolescents (EBSCO), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library-Wiley), PsycINFO (ProQuest) and Proquest DissertationsandTheses will be searched from inception to March 2017 for relevant citations of published trials using individualised search strategies prepared for database. We will also search the reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings. Two reviewers will independently assess each study against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria and extract data including population characteristics, types and duration of interventions and outcomes from included trials. Internal validity will be assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Primary outcome measures will be improvements in symptoms, including: hyperactivity, impulsivity and attention as measured by standard rating scales. Secondary outcome measures will include improvements in physical and mental health domains, as well as cognitive, behavioural, social and educational skills as measured by rating scales, standardised psychometric tests of IQ and memory, grade repetition, literacy tests and diagnosis of mental health disorder. Ethical approval will not be obtained since it is not required for systematic reviews as there are no concerns regarding patient privacy. The results of this review will be disseminated through publication in a peer-review journal and presented at relevant conferences. CRD42013005996. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Addiction Treatment Within U.S. Correctional Facilities: Bridging the Gap Between Current Practice and Evidence-Based Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Sarah E; Rich, Josiah D

    2015-01-01

    The United States leads the world in creating prisoners. This epidemic of incarceration is largely due to the "War on Drugs," which has resulted in criminalization of the disease of addiction. Half of prisoners have an active substance use disorder yet a minority receives formal treatment. Opioid agonist maintenance is among the most effective treatments for opioid use disorder. Maintenance treatment reduces illicit opioid use, crime, recidivism, and cost, yet few correctional facilities provide this lifesaving treatment. Increased access to opioid agonist maintenance as well as reexamination of drug policy is necessary to address this costly and morbid incarceration epidemic.

  12. INTERFERON BETA IN TREATMENT OF DISSEMINATED SCLEROSIS IN ADOLESCENTS — INFLUENCE ON NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL STATUS AND PAROXYSMAL STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Platonova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated sclerosis is chronic progressive disease of central nervous system, which is characterized by demyelination, degeneration of nerve fibers and polymorphous clinical symptoms. According to literature data, 2–10% of patients have onset of a disease in childhood and adolescence. Frequent clinical symptoms of disseminated sclerosis, especially in adolescents, are paroxysmal states and neuropsychological disorders. Drugs containing interferon beta which are used for immunomodulating treatment, can increase the rate of paroxysmal neuropsychological disorders in patients with disseminated sclerosis. Present study with participation of 78 adolescents analyzed frequency and spectrum of neuropsychological disorders and paroxysmal states in patients 12–17 years old and relation of revealed disorders with a treatment with interferon beta.Key words: adolescents, disseminated sclerosis, interferon beta, treatment, depression, paroxysmal states, anxiety, neuropsychological testing.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:34-39

  13. A review on prevention and treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions - evidence-based methods and emerging technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrand, Fredrik; Twetman, Svante

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances.......The aim of this paper was to update the evidence for primary and secondary prevention (treatment) of white spot lesions (WSL) adjacent to fixed orthodontic appliances....

  14. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... and electronic patient records for diabetes patients, this paper reports research in progress regarding the prospects and pitfalls of evidence-based development....

  15. Advancing Evidence Based Policymaking and Regulation to Ensure ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ? Rapports. Research, capacity-building, advocacy and dissemination by LIRNEasia : advancing evidence-based policymaking and regulation in the emerging Asia-Pacific to ensure greater participation in ICTs (Phase II); final technical report ...

  16. Evidence-based treatment for adult women with child abuse-related Complex PTSD: a quantitative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethy Dorrepaal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Effective first-line treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are well established, but their generalizability to child abuse (CA-related Complex PTSD is largely unknown. Method: A quantitative review of the literature was performed, identifying seven studies, with treatments specifically targeting CA-related PTSD or Complex PTSD, which were meta-analyzed, including variables such as effect size, drop-out, recovery, and improvement rates. Results: Only six studies with one or more cognitive behavior therapy (CBT treatment conditions and one with a present centered therapy condition could be meta-analyzed. Results indicate that CA-related PTSD patients profit with large effect sizes and modest recovery and improvement rates. Treatments which include exposure showed greater effect sizes especially in completers’ analyses, although no differential results were found in recovery and improvement rates. However, results in the subgroup of CA-related Complex PTSD studies were least favorable. Within the Complex PTSD subgroup, no superior effect size was found for exposure, and affect management resulted in more favorable recovery and improvement rates and less drop-out, as compared to exposure, especially in intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion: Limited evidence suggests that predominantly CBT treatments are effective, but do not suffice to achieve satisfactory end states, especially in Complex PTSD populations. Moreover, we propose that future research should focus on direct comparisons between types of treatment for Complex PTSD patients, thereby increasing generalizability of results.

  17. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and following breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha R.; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A.; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna; Boyce, Lindsay; Tripathy, Debu

    2018-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. PMID:28436999

  18. The effectiveness and feasibility of videoconferencing technology to provide evidence-based treatment to rural domestic violence and sexual assault populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassija, Christina; Gray, Matt J

    2011-05-01

    Although evidence-based treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been available for some time, many treatment-seeking trauma survivors are unable to access such services. This is especially the case in remote and rural areas where access to specialists is an exception rather than a rule. Advances in videoconferencing-based technologies are improving rural residents' access to specialized psychological services. However, at present, little is known about the viability and efficacy of providing psychological interventions via distal technologies to individuals who present at rural domestic violence and rape crisis centers. The present study attempts to partially address this void by evaluating, in the context of an uncontrolled trial, the effectiveness and feasibility of providing evidence-based, trauma-focused treatment via videoconferencing to rural survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. Participants in the present study were clients referred to the Wyoming Trauma Telehealth Treatment Clinic (WTTTC) for psychological services via videoconferencing from distal domestic violence and rape crisis centers located in the state of Wyoming. Fifteen female victims of assaultive violence who received at least four sessions of trauma-focused treatment via videoconferencing-based technology at distal rape and domestic violence crisis centers were included in the present study. Participants completed measures of PTSD and depression symptom severity and client satisfaction. Participants evidenced large reductions on measures of PTSD (d = 1.17) and depression (d = 1.24) symptom severity following treatment via videoconferencing. Additionally, participants reported a high degree of satisfaction with videoconferencing-administered services. Results provide evidence in support of videoconferencing as an effective means to provide psychological services to rural domestic violence and sexual assault populations. Clinical implications and avenues

  19. School-based programs aimed at the prevention and treatment of obesity: evidence-based interventions for youth in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, Felipe; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Holub, Christina K; Nagle, Brian J; Arredondo, Elva M; Barquera, Simón; Elder, John P

    2013-09-01

    Rapidly rising childhood obesity rates constitute a public health priority in Latin America which makes it imperative to develop evidence-based strategies. Schools are a promising setting but to date it is unclear how many school-based obesity interventions have been documented in Latin America and what level of evidence can be gathered from such interventions. We performed a systematic review of papers published between 1965 and December 2010. Interventions were considered eligible if they had a school-based component, were done in Latin America, evaluated an obesity related outcome (body mass index [BMI], weight, %body fat, waist circumference, BMI z-score), and compared youth exposed vs not exposed. Ten studies were identified as having a school-based component. Most interventions had a sample of normal and overweight children. The most successful interventions focused on prevention rather than treatment, had longer follow-ups, a multidisciplinary team, and fewer limitations in execution. Three prevention and 2 treatment interventions found sufficient improvements in obesity-related outcomes. We found sufficient evidence to recommend school-based interventions to prevent obesity among youth in Latin America. Evidence-based interventions in the school setting should be promoted as an important component for integrated programs, policies, and monitoring frameworks designed to reverse the childhood obesity in the region. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. European evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset lupus nephritis : The SHARE initiative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, Noortje; De Graeff, Nienke; Marks, Stephen D; Brogan, Paul A.; Avcin, Tadej; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian M.; Kone-Paut, Isabelle; Lahdenne, Pekka; McCann, Liza J.; Özen, Seza; Pilkington, Clarissa A.; Ravelli, Angelo; Van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet; Uziel, Yosef; Vastert, Bas J.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Beresford, Michael W.; Kamphuis, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) occurs in 50%-60% of patients with childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE), leading to significant morbidity. Timely recognition of renal involvement and appropriate treatment are essential to prevent renal damage. The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders : recommendations from the British Association for Psychopharmacology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, DS; Anderson, IM; Nutt, DJ; Bandelow, B; Bond, A; Davidson, JRT; den Boer, JA; Fineberg, NA; Knapp, M; Scott, J; Wittchen, HU

    2005-01-01

    These British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines cover the range and aims of treatment for anxiety disorders. They are based explicitly on the available evidence and are presented as recommendations to aid clinical decision making in primary and secondary medical care. They may also serve

  2. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J; Balneaves, Lynda G; Carlson, Linda E; Cohen, Misha R; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna M; Boyce, Lindsay M; Tripathy, Debu

    2017-05-06

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Open Trial of Family-Based Treatment for Full and Partial Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence: Evidence of Successful Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Walsh, B. Timothy; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel; Jones, Jennifer; Marcus, Sue; Weaver, James; Dobrow, Ilyse

    2007-01-01

    Objective: There is a paucity of evidence-based interventions for anorexia nervosa (AN). An innovative family-based treatment (FBT), developed at the Maudsley Hospital and recently put in manual form, has shown great promise for adolescents with AN. Unlike traditional treatment approaches, which promote sustained autonomy around food, FBT…

  4. If It Works for Pills, Can It Work for Skills? Direct-to-Consumer Social Marketing of Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Robert D; Bayar, Hasan

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of evidence-based psychological treatments (EVPTs) is a scientific success story, but unfortunately the application of these empirically supported procedures has been slow to gain ground in treatment-as-usual settings. This Open Forum commentary argues that direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing, which has worked well in communicating the advantages of various medicines, should perhaps be considered for use in social marketing of EVPTs. DTC marketing of pharmaceuticals is a long-standing advertising strategy in the United States. In fact, DTC marketing of psychotropic medicines is quite a success story. The authors recommend various strategies for using marketing science to devise DTC advertising of EVPTs, discuss previous research on DTC campaigns, and describe initiatives launched in the United Kingdom and Europe to promote EVPTs. Suggestions for evaluating and regulating DTC marketing of EVPTs are included. Finally, the potential for DTC marketing of EVPTs to increase mental health literacy and reduce health disparities is explored.

  5. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  6. Sensor-based evaluation and treatment of nocturnal hypokinesia in Parkinson's disease: An evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Sringean, Jirada; Thanawattano, Chusak

    2016-01-01

    The manifestations of nocturnal movements in Parkinson's disease (PD) are protean, with major disabilities related to nocturnal hypokinesia. While it can be assessed by clinical interviews and screening instruments, these are often inaccurate and prone to recall bias. In light of advances in sensor technology, we explored the use of sensors in the study of nocturnal hypokinesia, by performing a systematic review of the professional literature on this topic. Evidence suggests that nocturnal hypokinesia exists even in patients in the early stages, and PD patients turned significantly less and with much slower speed and acceleration than controls, partly related to low nocturnal dopamine level. We conducted another systematic review to evaluate the evidence of the efficacy of dopaminergic agents in the treatment of nocturnal hypokinesia. Several lines of evidence support the use of long-acting drugs or by continuous administration of short-acting agents to control symptoms. Sensor parameters could be considered as one of the important objective outcomes in future clinical trials investigating potential drugs to treat nocturnal hypokinesia. Physicians should be aware of this technology as it can aid the clinical assessment of nocturnal hypokinesia and enhance the quality of patient care. In addition, the use of sensors currently is being considered for various aspects of research on early diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of PD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An evidence-based review of linezolid for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Richard R; Lemonovich, Tracy L; File, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including community-associated and hospital-associated strains, is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Treatment options have become limited due to the emergence of MRSA strains with decreased sensitivity to vancomycin, which has long been the first-line therapy for serious infections. This has prompted the search for novel antibiotics that are efficacious against MRSA. Linezolid, an oxazolidinone class of antibiotic, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2000 for treatment of MRSA infections. Since then, there have been a multitude of clinical trials and research studies evaluating the effectiveness of linezolid against serious infections, including pneumonia (both community- and hospital-acquired), skin and soft-tissue infections such as diabetic foot ulcers, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, prosthetic devices, and others. The primary aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the clinical evidence for using linezolid to treat MRSA infections, with a focus on recently published studies, including those on nosocomial pneumonia. Other objectives are to analyze the cost-effectiveness of linezolid compared to other agents, and to review the pharmokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid, emphasizing the most current concepts.

  8. An evidence-based review of NX1207 and its potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunit T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Kunit, Lukas LusuardiDepartment of Urology and Andrology, Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Salzburg, AustriaAbstract: In elderly men, benign prostatic hyperplasia is often associated with lower urinary tract symptoms, and its prevalence rises with age. Lower urinary tract symptoms can be very bothersome and lead to a decrease in health-related quality of life. Furthermore, benign prostatic hyperplasia is a progressive disease that can lead to serious complications like acute urinary retention. Medical treatment with α1-blockers or 5α-reductase inhibitors is recommended by the European Association of Urology. On the other hand, there are some new innovations such as NX1207. The aim of this review is to summarize the published data. NX1207 is a new drug that is administered by transrectal intraprostatic injection under ultrasound guidance. The substance leads to prostate volume reduction and symptomatic improvement. However, patient numbers are still low and currently treatment with NX1207 is still experimental.Keywords: BPH, NX 1207, hyperplasia, LUTS, prostate

  9. An evidence-based review of linezolid for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): place in therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Richard R; Lemonovich, Tracy L; File, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including community-associated and hospital-associated strains, is a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. Treatment options have become limited due to the emergence of MRSA strains with decreased sensitivity to vancomycin, which has long been the first-line therapy for serious infections. This has prompted the search for novel antibiotics that are efficacious against MRSA. Linezolid, an oxazolidinone class of antibiotic, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2000 for treatment of MRSA infections. Since then, there have been a multitude of clinical trials and research studies evaluating the effectiveness of linezolid against serious infections, including pneumonia (both community- and hospital-acquired), skin and soft-tissue infections such as diabetic foot ulcers, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, prosthetic devices, and others. The primary aim of this review is to provide an up-to-date evaluation of the clinical evidence for using linezolid to treat MRSA infections, with a focus on recently published studies, including those on nosocomial pneumonia. Other objectives are to analyze the cost-effectiveness of linezolid compared to other agents, and to review the pharmokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid, emphasizing the most current concepts. PMID:23271985

  10. Evidence-Based Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing emphasis on evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP), and as is true in most health care professions, the primary focus of EBPP has been on treatment. Comparatively little attention has been devoted to applying the principles of EBPP to psychological assessment, despite the fact that assessment plays a central role in myriad domains of empirical and applied psychology (e.g., research, forensics, behavioral health, risk management, diagnosis and classification in mental health settings, documentation of neuropsychological impairment and recovery, personnel selection and placement in organizational contexts). This article outlines the central elements of evidence-based psychological assessment (EBPA), using the American Psychological Association's tripartite definition of EBPP as integration of the best available research with clinical expertise in the context of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences. After discussing strategies for conceptualizing and operationalizing evidence-based testing and evidence-based assessment, 6 core skills and 3 meta-skills that underlie proficiency in psychological assessment are described. The integration of patient characteristics, culture, and preferences is discussed in terms of the complex interaction of patient and assessor identities and values throughout the assessment process. A preliminary framework for implementing EBPA is offered, and avenues for continued refinement and growth are described.

  11. Delivery of evidence-based treatment for multiple anxiety disorders in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Byrne, Peter; Craske, Michelle G; Sullivan, Greer; Rose, Raphael D; Edlund, Mark J; Lang, Ariel J; Bystritsky, Alexander; Welch, Stacy Shaw; Chavira, Denise A; Golinelli, Daniela; Campbell-Sills, Laura; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Stein, Murray B

    2010-05-19

    Improving the quality of mental health care requires moving clinical interventions from controlled research settings into real-world practice settings. Although such advances have been made for depression, little work has been performed for anxiety disorders. To determine whether a flexible treatment-delivery model for multiple primary care anxiety disorders (panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders) would be better than usual care (UC). A randomized controlled effectiveness trial of Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) compared with UC in 17 primary care clinics in 4 US cities. Between June 2006 and April 2008, 1004 patients with anxiety disorders (with or without major depression), aged 18 to 75 years, English- or Spanish-speaking, were enrolled and subsequently received treatment for 3 to 12 months. Blinded follow-up assessments at 6, 12, and 18 months after baseline were completed in October 2009. CALM allowed choice of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), medication, or both; included real-time Web-based outcomes monitoring to optimize treatment decisions; and a computer-assisted program to optimize delivery of CBT by nonexpert care managers who also assisted primary care clinicians in promoting adherence and optimizing medications. Twelve-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-12) anxiety and somatic symptoms score. Secondary outcomes included proportion of responders (> or = 50% reduction from pretreatment BSI-12 score) and remitters (total BSI-12 score anxiety symptoms was found (BSI-12 group mean differences of -2.49 [95% confidence interval {CI}, -3.59 to -1.40], -2.63 [95% CI, -3.73 to -1.54], and -1.63 [95% CI, -2.73 to -0.53] at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively). At 12 months, response and remission rates (CALM vs UC) were 63.66% (95% CI, 58.95%-68.37%) vs 44.68% (95% CI, 39.76%-49.59%), and 51.49% (95% CI, 46.60%-56.38%) vs 33.28% (95% CI, 28.62%-37.93%), with a number needed to treat of 5.27 (95% CI, 4

  12. An evidence-based review of ixazomib citrate and its potential in the treatment of newly diagnosed multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offidani M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Massimo Offidani,1 Laura Corvatta,2 Patrizia Caraffa,1 Silvia Gentili,1 Laura Maracci,1 Pietro Leoni1 1Hematology Department, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, 2Division of Medicine, Ospedale Stelluti Scala, Fabriano, Italy Abstract: Proteasome inhibition represents one of the more important therapeutic targets in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM, since by suppressing nuclear factor-κB activity, which promotes myelomagenesis, it makes plasma cells susceptible to proapoptotic signals. Bortezomib, the first proteasome inhibitor approved for MM therapy, has been shown to increase response rate and improve outcome in patients with relapsed/refractory disease and in the frontline setting, particularly when combined with immunomodulatory drugs and alkylating agents. Among second-generation proteasome inhibitors, ixazomib (MLN9708 is the first oral compound to be evaluated for the treatment of MM. Ixazomib has shown improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters compared with bortezomib, in addition to similar efficacy in the control of myeloma growth and prevention of bone loss. Ixazomib was found to overcome bortezomib resistance and to trigger synergistic antimyeloma activity with dexamethasone, lenalidomide, and histone deacetylase inhibitors. Phase I/II studies using ixazomib weekly or twice weekly in relapsed/refractory MM patients suggested antitumor activity of the single agent, but more promising results have been obtained with the combination of ixazomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in newly diagnosed MM. Ixazomib has also been used in systemic amyloidosis as a single agent, showing important activity in this difficult-to-treat plasma-cell dyscrasia. More frequent side effects observed during administration of ixazomib were thrombocytopenia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fatigue, and rash, whereas severe peripheral neuropathy was rare. Here, we review the chemical characteristics of ixazomib, as

  13. Profile of everolimus in the treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capal JK

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Jamie K Capal, David Neal Franz Department of Neurology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is a relatively rare genetic disorder, affecting one in 6,000 births. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus, which have been previously used to prevent solid organ transplant rejection, augment anticancer treatment regimens, and prevent neovascularization of artificial cardiac stents, are now approved for treating TSC-related manifestations, such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas and renal angiomyolipomas. The use of everolimus in treating subependymal giant cell astrocytomas is supported by long-term Phase II and III clinical trials. Seizures are a common feature in TSC, occurring in up to 96% of patients. While mTOR inhibitors currently do not have regulatory approval in treating this manifestation, small clinical studies have demonstrated beneficial outcomes with everolimus. Further evidence from a forthcoming Phase III clinical study may provide additional support for the use of everolimus for this indication. Also, there are no approved treatments for TSC-associated neuropsychiatric disorders, which include intellectual disability, behavioral difficulties, and autism spectrum disorder, but preclinical data and small studies have suggested that some neuropsychiatric symptoms may be improved through mTOR inhibition therapy. More evidence is needed, particularly regarding safety in young infants. This review focuses on the current evidence supporting the use of everolimus in neurologic and neuropsychiatric manifestations of TSC, and the place of everolimus in therapy. Keywords: everolimus, tuberous sclerosis complex, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, seizures, TAND

  14. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  15. Dietary composition in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review to inform evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Lisa J; Ko, Henry; Misso, Marie; Marsh, Kate; Noakes, Manny; Talbot, Mac; Frearson, Meredith; Thondan, Mala; Stepto, Nigel; Teede, Helena J

    2013-04-01

    While lifestyle management is recommended as first-line treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the optimal dietary composition is unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of different diet compositions on anthropometric, reproductive, metabolic, and psychological outcomes in PCOS. A literature search was conducted (Australasian Medical Index, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, PsycInfo, and EBM reviews; most recent search was performed January 19, 2012). Inclusion criteria were women with PCOS not taking anti-obesity medications and all weight-loss or maintenance diets comparing different dietary compositions. Studies were assessed for risk of bias. A total of 4,154 articles were retrieved and six articles from five studies met the a priori selection criteria, with 137 women included. A meta-analysis was not performed due to clinical heterogeneity for factors including participants, dietary intervention composition, duration, and outcomes. There were subtle differences between diets, with greater weight loss for a monounsaturated fat-enriched diet; improved menstrual regularity for a low-glycemic index diet; increased free androgen index for a high-carbohydrate diet; greater reductions in insulin resistance, fibrinogen, total, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol for a low-carbohydrate or low-glycemic index diet; improved quality of life for a low-glycemic index diet; and improved depression and self-esteem for a high-protein diet. Weight loss improved the presentation of PCOS regardless of dietary composition in the majority of studies. Weight loss should be targeted in all overweight women with PCOS through reducing caloric intake in the setting of adequate nutritional intake and healthy food choices irrespective of diet composition. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estrongiloidíase disseminada: diagnóstico e tratamento Disseminated strongyloidiasis: diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Barberi Luna

    2007-12-01

    clinical form of presentation associated with states of severe immunosuppression, as in AIDS, hematological malignancies and in treatment for immunosuppression (especially with high doses of corticosteroids. It usually mimics severe sepsis and still brings a significant challenge related to the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore exceedingly high mortality rates remain unchanged in the past decades. Initially, the diagnosis depends on the clinical suspicion and on the identification of the larva in an organic fluids or tissues. The cutaneous involvement, albeit rare, is typical and can provide an important clue for the diagnostic hypothesis. The emergence of ivermectin for oral use changed significantly the treatment for strongyloidiasis; however, there are still shortcomings for the utilization in critically ill patients. Shock, ileus and hypoperfusion states are associated with difficulties in the absorption that result in erratic systemic levels. Reports of good results with parenteral administration of ivermectin raised the prospect that this therapeutic modality be more effective. However, questions about dosage and safety remain unanswered. The aim of the present article is to review the medical literature on the clinical aspects of disseminated strongyloidiasis. CONTENTS: A systematic review of the literature was performed by searching the PubMed database within the last 30 years. Search terms were: disseminated strongyloidiasis, strongyloides and hyperinfection e ivermectin. CONCLUSIONS: The article highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects emphasizing the importance of the clinical suspicion for the institution of appropriated therapy.

  17. Implications and applications of systematic reviews for evidence-based dentistry and comparative effectiveness research: A sample study on antibiotics for oro-facial cellulitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quyen Bach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comparative effectiveness and efficacy research for analysis and practice (CEERAP was performed to assess the effects of penicillin-based versus erythromycin-based antibiotic treatments in patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs including cellulitis, impetigo, and erysipelas. Because SSTIs, especially orofacial cellulitis, are volatile infectious diseases of a life-threatening nature, research on the most efficacious remedies is necessary. Methods: The stringent bibliome yielded three systematic reviews, which were examined for quality of research synthesis protocol and clinical relevance. Results: The sample size of three, rendered the statistical analyses and cumulative meta-analysis problematic. Conclusion: The systematic review outlined here should aid in increasing clinical awareness, improving patient health literacy, and promoting consensus of the best evidence base (BEB to mitigate the threat of sepsis and potential death caused by cellulitis infections.

  18. Addiction treatment staff perceptions of training as a facilitator or barrier to implementing evidence-based practices: a national qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Melinda; Lundgren, Lena; Amodeo, Maryann; Beltrame, Clelia; Lim, Lynn; Chassler, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative effort examines training-related facilitators and barriers to implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) in 285 community-based addiction treatment organizations (CBOs) nationwide that were funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (SAMHSA/CSAT) to implement EBPs. Using qualitative interviews, the authors explored staff (N = 514) descriptions of training as a facilitator or barrier to implementation. Training-related factors were described 663 times as facilitators (by 440 staff) and 233 times as barriers (by 170 staff). Responses were coded using content analysis. Specific characteristics of the training received, such as access to expert knowledge and quality, as well as ongoing training were described as central facilitating factors to EBP implementation. Key reasons training was perceived as a barrier included the amount of training; the training did not fit current staff and/or organizational needs; the training for some EBPs was perceived to be too demanding; and the difficulty accessing training. Since government funders of addiction treatments require that CBOs implement EBPs and they provide training resources, the quality, flexibility, and accessibility of the available training needs to be promoted throughout the addiction treatment network. Only 17% of CBOs reported that they used the SAMHSA-funded ATTC (Addiction Technology Transfer Center) training centers and 42% used SAMHSA technical assistance. Hence, federally funded resources for training were not always used.

  19. Light and laser treatment modalities for disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Gregory A; Sitenga, Jenna L; Nguyen, Austin Huy; Vaudreuil, Adam; Huerter, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is poorly standardized. The present review seeks to comprehensively discuss the potential for laser and light modalities in the treatment of DSAP. A systematic review of light and laser treatment modalities was conducted to include 26 cases of patients with DSAP. Systematic review resulted in 14 articles to be included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) overall was the least successful treatment modality, with clinical improvement seen in a minority of patients (MAL-PDT: N = 9 patients, 33.3% showed improvement; ALA-PDT: N = 3 patients, 0% improvement; hypericin-PDT: N = 2 patients, 0% improvement) after numerous post-procedural side effects of hyperpigmentation, inflammation, erythema, and discomfort. Overall, in the available reports, PDT demonstrates poor outcomes with greater incidence of side effects. The response rates of DSAP lesions treated with lasers were as follows: (Q-switched ruby lasers: N = 2, 100%; CO 2 laser: N = 1, 100%; PDT and CO 2 combination therapy: N = 2, 0-50%; erbium and neodymium YAG lasers: N = 2, 100%; fractional 1927-nm thulium fiber lasers: N = 2, 100%; Grenz rays: N = 1, 100%; and fractional photothermolysis: N = 2, 100%). The side effects of laser therapy were minimal and included mild erythema, slight hyperpigmentation, and moderate edema. Laser therapy is a promising treatment option for DSAP with an excellent side effect profile. However, higher power studies are required to determine optimal guidelines for laser treatment of DSAP.

  20. Evidence based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2011-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an influential interdisciplinary movement that originated in medicine as evidence-based medicine (EBM) about 1992. EBP is of considerable interest to library and information science (LIS) because it focuses on a thorough documentation of the basis for the decision...... making that is established in research as well as an optimization of every link in documentation and search processes. EBP is based on the philosophical doctrine of empiricism and, therefore, it is subject to the criticism that has been raised against empiricism. The main criticism of EBP...... is that practitioners lose their autonomy, that the understanding of theory and of underlying mechanisms is weakened, and that the concept of evidence is too narrow in the empiricist tradition. In this article, it is suggested that we should speak of “research-based practice” rather than EBP, because this term is open...

  1. Intermittent Dosing of Micafungin Is Effective for Treatment of Experimental Disseminated Candidiasis in Persistently Neutropenic Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraitiene, Ruta; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Hope, William W; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-12-01

    The current standard of treatment of invasive candidiasis with echinocandins requires once-daily therapy. To improve quality of life, reduce costs, and improve outcome, we studied the pharmacokinetics (PK), efficacy, and safety of alternate dosing regimens of micafungin (MFG) for the treatment of experimental subacute disseminated candidiasis. MFG was administered for 12 days starting 24 hours after intravenous inoculation of 1 × 10(3) Candida albicans blastoconidia. Study groups consisted of MFG at 1 mg/kg every 24 hours (MFG1), 2 mg/kg every 48 hours (MFG2), and 3 mg/kg every 72 hours (MFG3), and untreated controls. PK of MFG were determined on day 7 by high-performance liquid chromatography and modeled using nonparametric adaptive grid program. A 2-compartment PK model with volume of the central compartment (Vc), clearance (SCL), and the intercompartmental rate constants Kcp and Kpc was used. The fungal burden in 7 tissues was determined 312 hours after the initiation of therapy. PK of MFG were linear and the parameter means ± SD were Vc = 0.41 ± 0.18 L, Kcp = 2.80 ± 1.55/hour, Kpc = 1.71 ± 0.93/hour, and SCL = 0.16 ± 0.003 L/hour (r(2) = 0.99). The area under the plasma drug concentration - time curve for MFG1, MFG2, and MFG3 was 198.7 ± 19.8, 166.3 ± 36.7, and 192.8 ± 46.2 mg × hour/L, respectively (P = .24). All treatment groups showed significant and comparable resolution of (1→3)-β-D-glucan levels and clearance of C. albicans from liver, spleen, kidney, brain, lung, vitreous humor, and vena cava in comparison to untreated controls (P ≤ .05). There were no differences in hepatic or renal function among study groups. Less fractionated MFG regimens of every 48 and 72 hours are safe and as effective in experimental disseminated candidiasis as once-daily therapy in neutropenic hosts. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  2. START (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment)--an evidence-based screening tool to detect prescribing omissions in elderly patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, P J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescribing encompasses acts of commission i.e. giving drugs that are contraindicated or unsuitable, and acts of omission i.e. failure to prescribe drugs when indicated due to ignorance of evidence base or other irrational basis e.g. ageism. There are considerable published data on the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing; however, there are no recent published data on the prevalence of acts of omission. The aim of this study was to calculate the prevalence of acts of prescribing omission in a population of consecutively hospitalised elderly people. METHODS: A screening tool (screening tool to alert doctors to the right treatment acronym, START), devised from evidence-based prescribing indicators and arranged according to physiological systems was prepared and validated for identifying prescribing omissions in older adults. Data on active medical problems and prescribed medicines were collected in 600 consecutive elderly patients admitted from the community with acute illness to a teaching hospital. On identification of an omitted medication, the patient\\'s medical records were studied to look for a valid reason for the prescribing omission. RESULTS: Using the START list, we found one or more prescribing omissions in 57.9% of patients. In order of prevalence, the most common prescribing omissions were: statins in atherosclerotic disease (26%), warfarin in chronic atrial fibrillation (9.5%), anti-platelet therapy in arterial disease (7.3%) and calcium\\/vitamin D supplementation in symptomatic osteoporosis (6%). CONCLUSION: Failure to prescribe appropriate medicines is a highly prevalent problem among older people presenting to hospital with acute illness. A validated screening tool (START) is one method of systematically identifying appropriate omitted medicines in clinical practice.

  3. Dacarbazine DTIC and carboplatin as an outpatient treatment for disseminated malignant melanoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; Mulder, NH; Van Der Graaf, WTA; Willemse, PHB; Hospers, GAP

    2001-01-01

    Occasionally long-term survival in disseminated melanoma can be obtained through chemotherapy, We treated 22 patients with disseminated melanoma with an outpatient regimen consisting of dacarbazine (DTIC) and carboplatin. Three patients had a complete response lasting 4+, 9 and 9 months (survival

  4. Assessment of demographics, treatment strategies, and evidence-based medicine use among diabetic and non-diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhavik S; Deshpande, Shrikalp S

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate and compare clinical and epidemiological characteristics, treatment strategies, and utilization of evidence-based medicine (EBM) among coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with or without diabetes. Prospective observational cohort study from a tertiary care hospital in India among patients with CAD (myocardial infarction, unstable angina, or chronic stable angina). Data included demographic information, vital signs, personal particulars, risk factors for CAD, treatment strategies, and discharge medications. We evaluated epidemiologic characteristics and treatment strategies for diabetic and non-diabetic patients. Of 1,073 patients who underwent angiography, 960 patients (30% diabetic) had CAD. Proportion of hypertensive patients was higher among diabetic patients (58 vs 35% non-diabetic, P patients received medical management in diabetic vs non-diabetic CAD patients (35 vs 34%, P = 0.091); in diabetics the use of surgical procedure was higher (22 vs 17%, P = 0.0230) than interventional strategy (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, 43 vs 49%, P = 0.0445). Key medications (antiplatelet agents, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)/angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB), beta-blockers, and ahtihyperlipidemic agents) were prescribed in 95, 53/12, 67, and 91% diabetic (n = 252) and 96, 51/8, 67, and 94% non-diabetic (n = 673) patients, respectively on discharge. Clustering of several risk factors at presentation, typically diabetes and hypertension, is common in CAD patients. Though diabetic patients are managed more conservatively, utilization of EBM for diabetic and non-diabetic patients is consistent with the recommendations.

  5. Using YouTube to Disseminate Effective Vaccination Pain Treatment for Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Denise; Wilding, Jodi; Bowman, Amanda; Fuller, Ann; Nicholls, Stuart G.; Pound, Catherine M.; Reszel, Jessica; Sampson, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Background Infant vaccinations are necessary for public health, but are painful, causing distress to the infant and caregivers. Breastfeeding and sucrose effectively reduce infants’ pain during vaccinations, and these strategies are recommended in health care provider (HCP)-targeted education and vaccination pain guidelines. However studies show these strategies are infrequently used. YouTube is a popular medium to publicly share and watch videos, and many consumer posted YouTube videos show distressed infants being vaccinated with no pain treatment. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reach and impact of a consumer-targeted YouTube video demonstrating use of effective pain reduction strategies during infant vaccinations. Methods A brief consumer-targeted video showing two infants being vaccinated was posted onto YouTube on October 2013. One infant was breastfed and another infant received sucrose by mouth before and during the injection. A link to a viewer survey was visible on a banner near the end of the video. An intensive strategically planned knowledge dissemination strategy using the media, social media and messages to professional organizations took place to promote the video. Data analysis of the viewer survey, YouTube analytics of the reach of the video in terms of number of views, country of viewers, and comments relating to the video took place 12 months after the video was posted. Results Twelve months after posting, the video had 65,478views, 68 comments, 245 likes, 17 dislikes, and 90 shares. Average duration of viewer time was 65% of the video. The viewer survey was completed by 156 (0.24%) viewers; 90 (58%) answered as HCPs and 66 (42%) as parents. Survey results showed that the video was persuasive; intent to use or support breastfeeding or sucrose was high in both parents and HCPs after viewing the video. Comments posted were often emotional in nature, and were related to anti-vaccination (n = 26, 38%); effectiveness or positive

  6. Using YouTube to Disseminate Effective Vaccination Pain Treatment for Babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Denise; Wilding, Jodi; Bowman, Amanda; Fuller, Ann; Nicholls, Stuart G; Pound, Catherine M; Reszel, Jessica; Sampson, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Infant vaccinations are necessary for public health, but are painful, causing distress to the infant and caregivers. Breastfeeding and sucrose effectively reduce infants' pain during vaccinations, and these strategies are recommended in health care provider (HCP)-targeted education and vaccination pain guidelines. However studies show these strategies are infrequently used. YouTube is a popular medium to publicly share and watch videos, and many consumer posted YouTube videos show distressed infants being vaccinated with no pain treatment. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reach and impact of a consumer-targeted YouTube video demonstrating use of effective pain reduction strategies during infant vaccinations. A brief consumer-targeted video showing two infants being vaccinated was posted onto YouTube on October 2013. One infant was breastfed and another infant received sucrose by mouth before and during the injection. A link to a viewer survey was visible on a banner near the end of the video. An intensive strategically planned knowledge dissemination strategy using the media, social media and messages to professional organizations took place to promote the video. Data analysis of the viewer survey, YouTube analytics of the reach of the video in terms of number of views, country of viewers, and comments relating to the video took place 12 months after the video was posted. Twelve months after posting, the video had 65,478views, 68 comments, 245 likes, 17 dislikes, and 90 shares. Average duration of viewer time was 65% of the video. The viewer survey was completed by 156 (0.24%) viewers; 90 (58%) answered as HCPs and 66 (42%) as parents. Survey results showed that the video was persuasive; intent to use or support breastfeeding or sucrose was high in both parents and HCPs after viewing the video. Comments posted were often emotional in nature, and were related to anti-vaccination (n = 26, 38%); effectiveness or positive personal experiences (n = 21, 32

  7. Using YouTube to Disseminate Effective Vaccination Pain Treatment for Babies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Harrison

    Full Text Available Infant vaccinations are necessary for public health, but are painful, causing distress to the infant and caregivers. Breastfeeding and sucrose effectively reduce infants' pain during vaccinations, and these strategies are recommended in health care provider (HCP-targeted education and vaccination pain guidelines. However studies show these strategies are infrequently used. YouTube is a popular medium to publicly share and watch videos, and many consumer posted YouTube videos show distressed infants being vaccinated with no pain treatment. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reach and impact of a consumer-targeted YouTube video demonstrating use of effective pain reduction strategies during infant vaccinations.A brief consumer-targeted video showing two infants being vaccinated was posted onto YouTube on October 2013. One infant was breastfed and another infant received sucrose by mouth before and during the injection. A link to a viewer survey was visible on a banner near the end of the video. An intensive strategically planned knowledge dissemination strategy using the media, social media and messages to professional organizations took place to promote the video. Data analysis of the viewer survey, YouTube analytics of the reach of the video in terms of number of views, country of viewers, and comments relating to the video took place 12 months after the video was posted.Twelve months after posting, the video had 65,478views, 68 comments, 245 likes, 17 dislikes, and 90 shares. Average duration of viewer time was 65% of the video. The viewer survey was completed by 156 (0.24% viewers; 90 (58% answered as HCPs and 66 (42% as parents. Survey results showed that the video was persuasive; intent to use or support breastfeeding or sucrose was high in both parents and HCPs after viewing the video. Comments posted were often emotional in nature, and were related to anti-vaccination (n = 26, 38%; effectiveness or positive personal experiences (n

  8. A Single-blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial of How to Implement an Evidence-based Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder [IMPLEMENT]--Effects of Three Different Strategies of Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Christoph; Forrer, Lena; Schnider, Barbara; Bättig, Isabelle; Bodenmann, Guy; Zinbarg, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Despite long-standing calls to disseminate evidence-based treatments for generalized anxiety (GAD), modest progress has been made in the study of how such treatments should be implemented. The primary objective of this study was to test three competing strategies on how to implement a cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for out-patients with GAD (i.e., comparison of one compensation vs. two capitalization models). For our three-arm, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial (implementation of CBT for GAD [IMPLEMENT]), we recruited adults with GAD using advertisements in high-circulation newspapers to participate in a 14-session cognitive behavioral treatment (Mastery of your Anxiety and Worry, MAW-packet). We randomly assigned eligible patients using a full randomization procedure (1:1:1) to three different conditions of implementation: adherence priming (compensation model), which had a systematized focus on patients' individual GAD symptoms and how to compensate for these symptoms within the MAW-packet, and resource priming and supportive resource priming (capitalization model), which had systematized focuses on patients' strengths and abilities and how these strengths can be capitalized within the same packet. In the intention-to-treat population an outcome composite of primary and secondary symptoms-related self-report questionnaires was analyzed based on a hierarchical linear growth model from intake to 6-month follow-up assessment. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02039193) and is closed to new participants. From June 2012 to Nov. 2014, from 411 participants that were screened, 57 eligible participants were recruited and randomly assigned to three conditions. Forty-nine patients (86%) provided outcome data at post-assessment (14% dropout rate). All three conditions showed a highly significant reduction of symptoms over time. However, compared with the adherence priming condition, both resource priming conditions indicated

  9. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... meeting customer needs. We are suggesting that the effects of the use of a system should play a prominent role in the contractual definition of IT projects and that contract fulfilment should be determined on the basis of evidence of these effects. Based on two ongoing studies of home-care management...

  10. Evidence-based guideline: pharmacologic treatment of chorea in Huntington disease: report of the guideline development subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Melissa J; Miyasaki, Janis M

    2012-08-07

    To develop an evidence-based guideline assessing pharmacologic options for treating Huntington disease (HD) chorea. We evaluated available evidence from a structured literature review performed through February 2011. If HD chorea requires treatment, clinicians should prescribe tetrabenazine (up to 100 mg/day), amantadine (300-400 mg/day), or riluzole (200 mg/day) (Level B) for varying degrees of expected benefit. Occurrence of adverse events should be discussed and monitored, particularly depression/suicidality and parkinsonism with tetrabenazine and elevated liver enzymes with riluzole. Clinicians may also prescribe nabilone for modest decreases (1- to Huntington's Disease Rating Scale [UHDRS] chorea score) in HD chorea (Level C), but information is insufficient to recommend long-term use, particularly given abuse potential concerns (Level U). Clinicians should not prescribe riluzole 100 mg/day for moderate (2- to 3-point UHDRS chorea change) in HD chorea. Clinicians may choose not to prescribe coenzyme Q10 (Level B) for moderate improvements in HD chorea. Data are insufficient to make recommendations regarding the use of neuroleptics or donepezil for HD chorea treatment (Level U).

  11. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Sexual functioning after multimodality treatment for disseminated nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanBasten, JP; JonkerPool, G; VanDriel, MF; Sleijfer, DT; Droste, JHJ; VandeWiel, HBM; Molenaar, WM; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We determined sexual functioning after chemotherapy for disseminated nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumor, and evaluated the impact of resection of post-chemotherapy residual retroperitoneal tumor. Materials and Methods: A total of 155 consecutive patients treated with chemotherapy

  13. A longitudinal study of organizational formation, innovation adoption, and dissemination activities within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M; Abraham, Amanda J; Rothrauff, Tanja C; Knudsen, Hannah K

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to conduct trials of promising substance abuse treatment interventions in diverse clinical settings and to disseminate results of these trials. This article focuses on three dimensions of CTN's organizational functioning. First, a longitudinal dataset is used to examine CTN's formation as a network of interorganizational interaction among treatment practitioners and researchers. Data indicate strong relationships of interaction and trust, but a decline in problem-centered interorganizational interaction over time. Second, adoption of buprenorphine and motivational incentives among CTN's affiliated community treatment programs (CTPs) is examined over three waves of data. Although adoption is found to increase with CTPs' CTN participation, there is only modest evidence of widespread penetration and implementation. Third, CTPs' pursuit of the CTN's dissemination goals are examined, indicating that such organizational outreach activities are underway and likely to increase innovation diffusion in the future.

  14. [Is evidence-based assessment fact or fiction? A bibliometric analysis of three German journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Franz; Schüssler, Gerhard; Glaesmer, Heide

    2008-01-01

    Despite the ongoing process for the development and dissemination of empirically supported treatments, little attention has been paid to the development of evidence-based diagnostics. The article aims at evaluating diagnostic procedures and instruments in current clinical research in terms of evidence-based assessment. Volumes 2006 and 2007 of three German psychological journals "Psychotherapeut," "Psychotherapie, Psychosomatik und Medizinische Psychologie," and "Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie" were screened for empirical reports and articles dealing with diagnostic issues. 93 articles were identified and evaluated. Most studies used psychometrically valid and established instruments for assessment. However, diagnostic interviews were relatively scarce, as were multimodal assessments. Measures used for outcome evaluation often lacked evidence of sensitivity to change. Clinical assessment to date does not meet criteria for evidence-based diagnostics. Implications for research and guideline development are discussed.

  15. Global Dissemination of Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: Epidemiology, Genetic Context, Treatment Options, and Detection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Kwang Seung; Kim, Young Bae; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative pathogens poses a serious threat to public health worldwide. In particular, the increasing prevalence of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major source of concern. K. pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) and carbapenemases of the oxacillinase-48 (OXA-48) type have been reported worldwide. New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM) carbapenemases were originally identified in Sweden in 2008 and have spread worldwide rapidly. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of K. pneumoniae producing three carbapenemases (KPCs, NDMs, and OXA-48-like). Although the prevalence of each resistant strain varies geographically, K. pneumoniae producing KPCs, NDMs, and OXA-48-like carbapenemases have become rapidly disseminated. In addition, we used recently published molecular and genetic studies to analyze the mechanisms by which these three carbapenemases, and major K. pneumoniae clones, such as ST258 and ST11, have become globally prevalent. Because carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae are often resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics and many other non-β-lactam molecules, the therapeutic options available to treat infection with these strains are limited to colistin, polymyxin B, fosfomycin, tigecycline, and selected aminoglycosides. Although, combination therapy has been recommended for the treatment of severe carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae infections, the clinical evidence for this strategy is currently limited, and more accurate randomized controlled trials will be required to establish the most effective treatment regimen. Moreover, because rapid and accurate identification of the carbapenemase type found in K. pneumoniae may be difficult to achieve through phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility tests, novel molecular detection techniques are currently being developed. PMID:27379038

  16. Enduring effects of evidence-based psychotherapies in acute depression and anxiety disorders versus treatment as usual at follow-up--a longitudinal meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flückiger, Christoph; Del Re, A C; Munder, Thomas; Heer, Sara; Wampold, Bruce E

    2014-07-01

    This meta-analysis examined the enduring efficacy of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBP) in comparison to treatment as usual (TAU) by examining effects from termination to follow-up for acute anxiety and depression in an adult outpatient population. It was hypothesized that EBPs might extend their efficacy at follow-up assessment (Tolin, 2010). Longitudinal multilevel meta-analyses were conducted that examined the magnitude of difference between EBP and TAU. Targeted (disorder-specific) outcomes were examined, along with dropout rates at follow-up assessments. A total of 15 comparisons (including 30 repeated effect sizes [ES]) were included in this meta-analysis (average of 8.9 month follow-up). Small to moderate ES differences were found to be in favor of EBPs at 0-4 month assessments (Hedges' g=0.40) and up to 12-18 month assessments (g=0.20), indicating no extended efficacy at follow-up. However, the TAU-conditions were heterogeneous, ranging from absence of minimal mental health treatment to legitimate psychotherapeutic interventions provided by trained professionals, the latter of which resulted in smaller ES differences. Furthermore, samples where substance use comorbidities were not actively excluded indicated smaller ES differences. TAU-conditions produced slightly higher dropout rates than EBP-conditions. Findings indicate small and no extended superiority of EBP for acute depression and anxiety disorders in comparison to TAU at follow-up assessment. There are a limited number of studies investigating the transportability and lasting efficacy of EBP compared to TAU, especially to TAU with equivalent conditions between treatment groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrating evidence-based treatments for common mental disorders in routine primary care: feasibility and acceptability of the MANAS intervention in Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sudipto; Chowdhary, Neerja; Pednekar, Sulochana; Cohen, Alex; Andrew, Gracy; Andrew, Gracy; Araya, Ricardo; Simon, Gregory; King, Michael; Telles, Shirley; Verdeli, Helena; Clougherty, Kathleen; Kirkwood, Betty; Patel, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, pose a major public health burden in developing countries. Although these disorders are thought to be best managed in primary care settings, there is a dearth of evidence about how this can be achieved in low resource settings. The MANAS project is an attempt to integrate an evidence based package of treatments into routine public and private primary care settings in Goa, India. Before initiating the trial, we carried out extensive preparatory work, over a period of 15 months, to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the planned intervention. This paper describes the systematic development and evaluation of the intervention through this preparatory phase. The preparatory stage, which was implemented in three phases, utilized quantitative and qualitative methods to inform our understanding of the potential problems and possible solutions in implementing the trial and led to critical modifications of the original intervention plan. Investing in systematic formative work prior to conducting expensive trials of the effectiveness of complex interventions is a useful exercise which potentially improves the likelihood of a positive result of such trials.

  18. Using mixed methods evaluation to assess the feasibility of online clinical training in evidence based interventions: a case study of cognitive behavioural treatment for low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Helen; Hall, Amanda M; Hansen, Zara; Williamson, Esther; Davies, David; Lamb, Sarah E

    2016-06-18

    of strategies were identified to enhance future versions of iBeST such as including more skills practice. Combined quantitative and qualitative data indicated that online training was an acceptable and promising method for providing training in an evidence based complex intervention. With future enhancement, the potential reach of this training method may facilitate evidence-based practice through large scale upskilling of the workforce. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN82203145 (registered prospectively on 03.09.2012).

  19. SU-E-P-09: Compliance With Evidence-Based Treatment Planning DVH Guidelines In An Academic Multi-Site Radiation Oncology Practice Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Souza, W; Zhang, B; Feigenberg, S; Prado, K; Regine, W; D’Souza, G

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the compliance with evidence-based treatment planning organ-at-risk (OAR) guidelines in a single institution with four practice sites. Methods: Two hundred thirteen head and neck cancer patients treated between September 2009 and September 2013 were retrospectively selected. Consensus treatment planning guidelines, including OAR dose constraints, were established based on institutional experience and published data. Data spanned a time period of 2 years prior to (n=112) and 2 years post-enactment (n=101) of the guidelines. We investigated the differences in the frequency with which (1) OARs were contoured and (2) OAR DVH goals were met. Trends in the proportion with OAR contours over time was tested using linear regression. Trends in the proportion of contoured OARs achieving clinical DVH goals were similarly tested. The proportion of patients contoured and meeting DVH goals before and after guidelines was compared using a test of proportions. Results: When the proportion of cases with OAR contours before and after guidelines were compared, we observed an increase from 75% to 87% (p=0.02) for the brainstem, decrease from 97% to 88% (p=0.01) for the cord and increase from 47% to 77% (p<0.001) for the mandible. For the proportion of cases with OAR contours in which clinical goals were met, a significant decrease from 99% to 90% was observed for the cord V48<0.3% (p=0.001). A significant decrease in the proportion of cases with left parotid contours (from 92% to 73% (p=0.03)) was observed over 2 years after guideline enactment and the proportion meeting the clinical DVH goal of V30<50% increased significantly from 36% to 50% (p=0.007) over the 2 years after guidelines. Conclusion: The enactment of OAR planning guidelines resulted in an increase in OAR contour compliance, overall. In cases with OAR contours, there was little to no change in the proportion that met clinical goals

  20. SU-E-P-09: Compliance With Evidence-Based Treatment Planning DVH Guidelines In An Academic Multi-Site Radiation Oncology Practice Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Souza, W; Zhang, B; Feigenberg, S; Prado, K; Regine, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); D’Souza, G [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the compliance with evidence-based treatment planning organ-at-risk (OAR) guidelines in a single institution with four practice sites. Methods: Two hundred thirteen head and neck cancer patients treated between September 2009 and September 2013 were retrospectively selected. Consensus treatment planning guidelines, including OAR dose constraints, were established based on institutional experience and published data. Data spanned a time period of 2 years prior to (n=112) and 2 years post-enactment (n=101) of the guidelines. We investigated the differences in the frequency with which (1) OARs were contoured and (2) OAR DVH goals were met. Trends in the proportion with OAR contours over time was tested using linear regression. Trends in the proportion of contoured OARs achieving clinical DVH goals were similarly tested. The proportion of patients contoured and meeting DVH goals before and after guidelines was compared using a test of proportions. Results: When the proportion of cases with OAR contours before and after guidelines were compared, we observed an increase from 75% to 87% (p=0.02) for the brainstem, decrease from 97% to 88% (p=0.01) for the cord and increase from 47% to 77% (p<0.001) for the mandible. For the proportion of cases with OAR contours in which clinical goals were met, a significant decrease from 99% to 90% was observed for the cord V48<0.3% (p=0.001). A significant decrease in the proportion of cases with left parotid contours (from 92% to 73% (p=0.03)) was observed over 2 years after guideline enactment and the proportion meeting the clinical DVH goal of V30<50% increased significantly from 36% to 50% (p=0.007) over the 2 years after guidelines. Conclusion: The enactment of OAR planning guidelines resulted in an increase in OAR contour compliance, overall. In cases with OAR contours, there was little to no change in the proportion that met clinical goals.

  1. [Use of strong opioids in chronic non-cancer pain in adults. Evidence-based recommendations from the French Society for the Study and Treatment of Pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset, Xavier; Trouvin, Anne-Priscille; Tran, Viet-Thi; Authier, Nicolas; Vergne-Salle, Pascale; Piano, Virginie; Martinez, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    An urgent need is to improve the efficacy and safety of use of strong opioids in chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) through responsible prescription rules supported by scientific evidence. Clinical questions addressing the indication, the benefice, the risk and the precautions were formulated. A task force composed of physicians from several medical specialties involved in managing CNCP was charged to elaborate evidence-based recommendations. A systematic literature search was performed using CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. The approach of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation was applied to evaluate outcomes. We selected 21 meta-analyses and 31 cohort studies for analysis. Fifteen recommendations are provided. Strong opioids are not recommended in fibromyalgia and primary headaches. Strong opioids have been shown to be moderately effective against CNCP due to osteoarthritis of the lower limbs, and for back pain and neuropathic pain. Their introduction is advised only after the failure of first-line treatments, combined with patient care, provided that the patient is made aware of the advantages and risks. It is not advisable to continue strong opioids treatment for longer than three months if no improvement in pain, function or quality of life is observed. It is also recommended not to prescribe doses exceeding 150mg/day morphine equivalent. Misuse risk factors should be investigated before prescription and misuse should be assessed at each renewal. Priority should be given to extended-release forms. It is recommended not to use transmucosal rapid-release forms of fentanyl for the management of CNCP. These recommendations are intended for all doctors needing to prescribe strong opioids in CNCP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence-Based Dentistry in Everyday Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudray, Kiran; Walmsley, Anthony Damien

    2016-12-01

    This article informs readers of a method of implementing evidence-based dentistry in practice. Following these steps, practitioners should be able to use this skill in an efficient manner. The importance of evidence-based dentistry and its relevance to situations encountered in everyday practice is also highlighted. Clinical relevance: This article highlights a series of steps to be followed by practitioners to ensure that treatment provided is supported by the most recent, good quality evidence.

  3. Disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Infection Complicating Intravesical BCG Instillation for the Treatment of Superficial Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzein, Fatehi; Albogami, Nada; Saad, Mustafa; El Tayeb, Nazik; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Elyamany, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) remains a first-line treatment for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Although its use is relatively safe, severe complications such as granulomatous hepatitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonitis, and sepsis occur in few patients. Complications of intravesical instillation of BCG can be local or systemic, with early or late presentation. Here, we report an 88-year-old man who developed fever, rigors, and episodes of syncope following fourth intravesical BCG instillation for the treatment of superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pancytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, ground glass appearance on computerized tomography of the chest scan in addition to multiple bone marrow granulomas, suggested the diagnosis of disseminated BCG infection. All these features recovered on antituberculosis treatment. Our case study highlights the importance of early recognition and prompt treatment of patients with disseminated BCG infection following intravesical instillation. Although isolation of mycobacterium is desirable to make the diagnosis, it is not unusual to have negative smears and cultures and this should not be used to dismiss the possibility of BCG infection.

  4. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    A current ambition in welfare states as diverse as Denmark, the UK, and in the USA is to base political decision making on rigorous research (Cartwright et al 2009; Mulgan 2009; Bason 2010). Sound as this might seem the ambition has nevertheless been problematized by both policy-makers and the re......A current ambition in welfare states as diverse as Denmark, the UK, and in the USA is to base political decision making on rigorous research (Cartwright et al 2009; Mulgan 2009; Bason 2010). Sound as this might seem the ambition has nevertheless been problematized by both policy......-makers and the research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for...... a full account, see Vohnsen 2011). These insights will be relevant for the anthropological researcher of legislative processes who wishes to move beyond a merely discursive approach to the study of policy and politics....

  5. The evidence-based rationale for physical therapy treatment of children, adolescents, and adults diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome/hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbert, Raoul H H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Pacey, Verity; de Wandele, Inge; Smeenk, Sandy; Woinarosky, Nicoleta; Sabo, Stephanie; Scheper, Mark C; Russek, Leslie; Simmonds, Jane V

    2017-03-01

    New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in management of individuals with hypermobility related disorders. However, many physical therapists are not familiar with the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, common clinical presentation, and management. This guideline aims to provide practitioners with the state of the art regarding the assessment and management of children, adolescents, and adults with JHS/hEDS. Due to the complexity of the symptoms in the profile of JHS/hEDS, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is adopted as a central framework whereby the umbrella term of disability is used to encompass functions, activities and participation, as well as environmental and personal factors. The current evidence-based literature regarding the management of JHS/hEDS is limited in size and quality and there is insufficient research exploring the clinical outcomes of a number of interventions. Multicenter randomized controlled trials are warranted to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions for children and adults. Until further multicenter trials are conducted, clinical decision-making should be based on theoretical and the current limited research evidence. For all individuals diagnosed with JHS/hEDS, international consensus and combined efforts to identify risk profiles would create a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms and the potential for optimizing health care for affected individuals. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Professionally applied topical fluoride: evidence-based clinical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    With the dramatic increase in the amount of scientific information available about oral health, an evidence-based approach to oral health care and the practice of dentistry is necessary. There is a need to summarize, critique, and disseminate scientific evidence and to translate the evidence into a practical format that is used easily by dentists. The evidence-based clinical recommendations in this report were developed by an expert panel established by the American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs that evaluated the collective body of scientific evidence on the effectiveness of professionally applied topical fluoride for caries prevention. The recommendations are intended to assist dentists in clinical decision making. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library were searched for systematic reviews and clinical studies of professionally applied topical fluoride-including gel, foam, and varnish-through October 2005. Panelists were selected on the basis of their expertise in the relevant subject matter. The recommendations are stratified by age groups and caries risk and indicate that periodic fluoride treatments should be considered for both children and adults who are at moderate or high risk of developing caries. Included in the clinical recommendations is a summary table that can be used as a chairside resource. The dentist, knowing the patient's health history and vulnerability to oral disease, is in the best position to make treatment decisions in the interest of each patient. These clinical recommendations must be balanced with the practitioner's professional expertise and the individual patient's preferences.

  7. Implementation of evidence-based treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke (QASC): a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sandy; McElduff, Patrick; Ward, Jeanette; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Dale, Simeon; D'Este, Catherine; Drury, Peta; Griffiths, Rhonda; Cheung, N Wah; Quinn, Clare; Evans, Malcolm; Cadilhac, Dominique; Levi, Christopher

    2011-11-12

    We assessed patient outcomes 90 days after hospital admission for stroke following a multidisciplinary intervention targeting evidence-based management of fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction in acute stroke units (ASUs). In the Quality in Acute Stroke Care (QASC) study, a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial, we randomised ASUs (clusters) in New South Wales, Australia, with immediate access to CT and on-site high dependency units, to intervention or control group. Patients were eligible if they spoke English, were aged 18 years or older, had had an ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage, and presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms. Intervention ASUs received treatment protocols to manage fever, hyperglycaemia, and swallowing dysfunction with multidisciplinary team building workshops to address implementation barriers. Control ASUs received only an abridged version of existing guidelines. We recruited pre-intervention and post-intervention patient cohorts to compare 90-day death or dependency (modified Rankin scale [mRS] ≥2), functional dependency (Barthel index), and SF-36 physical and mental component summary scores. Research assistants, the statistician, and patients were masked to trial groups. All analyses were done by intention to treat. This trial is registered at the Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry (ANZCTR), number ACTRN12608000563369. 19 ASUs were randomly assigned to intervention (n=10) or control (n=9). Of 6564 assessed for eligibility, 1696 patients' data were obtained (687 pre-intervention; 1009 post-intervention). Results showed that, irrespective of stroke severity, intervention ASU patients were significantly less likely to be dead or dependent (mRS ≥2) at 90 days than control ASU patients (236 [42%] of 558 patients in the intervention group vs 259 [58%] of 449 in the control group, p=0·002; number needed to treat 6·4; adjusted absolute difference 15·7% [95% CI 5·8-25·4]). They also had a

  8. Evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms related to uncomplicated benign prostatic hyperplasia in Italy: updated summary from AURO.it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarico, Antonio; Fandella, Andrea; Galetti, Caterina; Hurle, Rodolfo; Mazzini, Elisa; Niro, Ciro; Perachino, Massimo; Sanseverino, Roberto; Pappagallo, Giovanni Luigi

    2012-01-01

    these guidelines are evidence based, clinical decisions should also be informed by patients’ clinical and physical circumstances, as well as patients’ preferences and actions. Conclusions: These guidelines are intended to assist physicians and patients in the decision-making process regarding the management of LUTS/BPH, and support the process of continuous improvement of the quality of care and services to patients. PMID:23205056

  9. Currently recommended treatments of childhood constipation are not evidence based: a systematic literature review on the effect of laxative treatment and dietary measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.A.M.; Tabbers, M.M.; Benninga, M.A.; Berger, M.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Constipation is a common complaint in children and early intervention with oral laxatives may improve complete resolution of functional constipation. However, most treatment guidelines are based on reviews of the literature that do not incorporate a quality assessment of the studies.

  10. Currently recommended treatments of childhood constipation are not evidence based : a systematic literature review on the effect of laxative treatment and dietary measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M. A. M.; Tabbers, M. M.; Benninga, M. A.; Berger, M. Y.

    Introduction: Constipation is a common complaint in children and early intervention with oral laxatives may improve complete resolution of functional constipation. However, most treatment guidelines are based on reviews of the literature that do not incorporate a quality assessment of the studies.

  11. Selecting Treatments and Monitoring Outcomes: The Circle of Evidence-Based Practice and Client-Centered Care in Treating a Preschool Child Who Stutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Nan Bernstein

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present clinical forum is to compare how 2 clinicians might select among therapy options for a preschool-aged child who presents with stuttering close to onset. Method: I discuss approaches to full evaluation of the child's profile, advisement of evidence-based practice options open to the family, the need for…

  12. Evidence-based approach to the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa, based on the European guidelines for hidradenitis suppurativa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Gulliver (Wayne P.); C.C. Zouboulis (Christos C.); E.P. Prens (Errol); G.B.E. Jemec (Gregor); T. Tzellos (Thrasivoulos)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by painful, recurrent nodules and abscesses that rupture and lead to sinus tracts and scarring. To date, an evidence-based therapeutic approach has not been the standard of care and this is

  13. School-Based Programs Aimed at the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity: Evidence-Based Interventions for Youth in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, Felipe; Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Holub, Christina K.; Nagle, Brian J.; Arredondo, Elva M.; Barquera, Simon; Elder, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rapidly rising childhood obesity rates constitute a public health priority in Latin America which makes it imperative to develop evidence-based strategies. Schools are a promising setting but to date it is unclear how many school-based obesity interventions have been documented in Latin America and what level of evidence can be…

  14. Evidence-based approach to the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa, based on the European guidelines for hidradenitis suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulliver, Wayne; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Prens, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa/acne inversa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by painful, recurrent nodules and abscesses that rupture and lead to sinus tracts and scarring. To date, an evidence-based therapeutic approach has not been the standard of care and this is likely due...

  15. [Liposomal cytarabine for the treatment of leptomeningeal dissemination of central nervous system tumours in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; García Ariza, Miguel Angel; Cruz, Ofelia; Calvo, Carlota; Fuster, Jose Luis; Salinas, Jose Antonio; Moscardo, Cristina; Portugal, Raquel; Merino, Jose Manuel; Madero, Luis

    2016-11-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination in paediatric central nervous system (CNS) tumours is associated with a poor outcome, and new therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. One of the main difficulties in the treatment of CNS tumours is blood brain barrier penetration. Intrathecal therapy has shown to be effective in several paediatric tumours. The aim of this article is to review the data available on the use of liposomal cytarabine for paediatric patients with leptomeningeal dissemination of CNS tumours, including the pharmacology, administration route, safety and efficacy data. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: Unpacking the black box

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S.

    2013-01-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert c...

  17. Successful Treatment of Refractory Hypoxemia Secondary to Disseminated Histoplasmosis Using Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanta, Brendan T; Tyner, Harmony L; Bohman, John K; Baddour, Larry M

    2016-10-15

    Refractory hypoxemia secondary to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is associated with high mortality. Extracorporeal membraneoxygenation (ECMO) is an accepted strategy for treating refractory hypoxemia in patients with ARDS but is relatively contraindicated in the setting of systemic infections. We present a case of successful ECMO use in a host with refractory hypoxemia secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis with fungemia and discuss our management approach to this difficult patient.

  18. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wattjes, Mike P; Rovira, Àlex; Miller, David

    2015-01-01

    The role of MRI in the assessment of multiple sclerosis (MS) goes far beyond the diagnostic process. MRI techniques can be used as regular monitoring to help stage patients with MS and measure disease progression. MRI can also be used to measure lesion burden, thus providing useful information...... for the prediction of long-term disability. With the introduction of a new generation of immunomodulatory and/or immunosuppressive drugs for the treatment of MS, MRI also makes an important contribution to the monitoring of treatment, and can be used to determine baseline tissue damage and detect subsequent repair....... This use of MRI can help predict treatment response and assess the efficacy and safety of new therapies. In the second part of the MAGNIMS (Magnetic Resonance Imaging in MS) network's guidelines on the use of MRI in MS, we focus on the implementation of this technique in prognostic and monitoring tasks. We...

  19. Successful Control of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation by Recombinant Thrombomodulin during Arsenic Trioxide Treatment in Relapsed Patient with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Shindo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC frequently occurs in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL. With the induction of therapy in APL using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, DIC can be controlled in most cases as ATRA usually shows immediate improvement of the APL. However, arsenic trioxide (ATO which has been used for the treatment of relapse in APL patients has shown to take time to suppress APL cells, therefore the control of DIC in APL with ATO treatment is a major problem. Recently, the recombinant soluble thrombomodulin fragment has received a lot of attention as the novel drug for the treatment of DIC with high efficacy. Here, we present a relapsed patient with APL in whom DIC was successfully and safely controlled by rTM during treatment with ATO.

  20. Disseminated nocardiosis in a patient on infliximab and methylprednisolone for treatment-resistant Sweet′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Drone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old white man with a 10-year history of treatment-refractory Sweet′s syndrome was admitted to the hospital with the onset of purpuric lesions. Methylprednisolone and infliximab were administered. Our patient developed disseminated Nocardia infection and eventually succumbed. Opportunistic infections such as Nocardia have been associated with infliximab and other tumour necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors. The astute clinician should be aware of the risk of rare opportunistic infections, particularly in patients on TNF-α inhibitors and systemic corticosteroids.

  1. Successful treatment of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to histoplasmosis in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, John Fredy; Gómez, Sandra Milena; Moncada, Diana Carolina; Serna, Lina María; Hidrón, Alicia Inés

    2016-04-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis is an uncommon syndrome that results from an uncontrolled activation of macrophages and lymphocytes resulting in the compromise of multiple organs that is potentially fatal without timely treatment. It can be hereditary or a secondary result of infectious processes, neoplasms or autoimmune conditions. We present the case of a patient with HIV/AIDS who developed hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with histoplasmosis and who was successfully treated with amphotericin B, steroids and transitory dialytic support.

  2. COPE for Depressed and Anxious Teens: A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Skills Building Intervention to Increase Access to Timely, Evidence-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Pamela; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    2012-01-01

    TOPIC Evidence–based CBT skills building intervention – COPE -for depressed and anxious teens in brief 30 minute outpatient visits. PURPOSE Based on COPE training workshops, this paper provides an overview of the COPE program, it’s development, theoretical foundation, content of the sessions and lessons learned for best delivery of COPE to individuals and groups in psychiatric settings, primary care settings and schools. SOURCES Published literature and clinical examples CONCLUSION With the COPE program, the advanced practice nurse in busy outpatient practice can provide timely, evidence-based therapy for adolescents and use the full extent of his/her advanced practice nursing knowledge and skills. PMID:23351105

  3. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders: international comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The international comparison demonstrated notable commonalities and differences among these current clinical guidelines. Summary Evidence-based clinical guidelines represent an important step toward the dissemina...

  4. [Disseminated strongyloidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, J P; Thellier, M; Datry, A; Danis, M

    2001-04-28

    ENDEMIC ZONES: Strongyloidiasis is an intestinal parasitosis which is frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. RISK: The "autoinfection" cycle during this helminthiasis explains why the infection can be perpetuated without further exposure to exogenous, infective larvae. Hyperinfection may occur by dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis in immuno-compromised patients, particularly those under corticotherapy. DISSEMINATATED STRONGYLOIDIASIS: Disseminated strongyloidiasis is characterized by severe gastrointestinal and respiratory tract involvement, meningitis, skin rash, or Gram-negative bacteremia. Since disseminated stronglyoidiasis is fatal in 80% of cases it is imperative to diagnose and treat this condition before long-term corticotherapy. Ivermectin is currently recommended because it is effective and well tolerated.

  5. Promoting community practitioners' use of evidence-based approaches to increase breast cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Teal, Randall; Barrett, Nadine; Leighton, Ashely; Steckler, Allan

    2013-07-01

    Many women do not get mammography screenings at the intervals recommended for early detection and treatment of breast cancer. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (Community Guide) recommends a range of evidence-based strategies to improve mammography rates. However, nurses and others working in community-based settings make only limited use of these strategies. We report on a dissemination intervention that partnered the University of North Carolina with the Susan G. Komen Triangle Affiliate to disseminate Community Guide breast cancer screening strategies to community organizations. The intervention was guided by social marketing and diffusion of innovation theory and was designed to provide evidence and support via Komen's existing relationships with grantee organizations. The present study reports the findings from a formative evaluation of the intervention, which included a content analysis of 46 grant applications pre- and post intervention and focus groups with 20 grant recipients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evidence-based dentistry: Future aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Mohindra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, clinical decisions in dentistry have been based on the experience of the dentist. If the given treatment works, it was utilized again, but if the results were disappointing, the procedure was deserted. Evaluating clinical treatment in this fashion is difficult because it is hard to know which factors are important for success and which contribute to failure. This came with the concept of evidence-based approach which facilitates conclusions for clinical practice based on sound research studies.

  7. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for eating disorders : International comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ricarda

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: The current systematic review sought to compare available evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for all specific eating disorders. Recent findings: Nine evidence-based clinical treatment guidelines for eating disorders were located through a systematic search. The

  8. Clinical-economic appropriateness of drug treatments: designing a method that combines evidence-based information and cost assessments to construct league tables accounting for the potential number of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messori, Andrea; Santarlasci, Benedetta; Trippoli, Sabrina; Vaiani, Monica; Vacca, Franca; Brutti, M Chiara

    2004-11-01

    This paper presents a method to assess drug treatment appropriateness, based on an original combination of economic analysis, pharmacoepidemiological techniques and evidence-based information. This method generates an index of clinical-economic appropriateness for the treatment under examination, by comparing the theoretically expected health gain (EHG) to the yearly national expenditure (EXPEND) on that drug and the amount of health that is thought to be gained in the 'real' patients (RHG). This paper reviews all the analyses conducted so far using this method, and discusses their main results. The primary aim of this article is to suggest a ranking approach for allocating the drug budgets of national health systems.

  9. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...... practice. By investments in education, applied research, and The Cochrane Collaboration, evidence-based medicine may form a stronger basis for clinical practice.......Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may......, and single clinics. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to improve this situation. Guidelines for Good Clinical (Research) Practice, conduct of more trials as multicentre trials, The Consort Statement, and The Cochrane Collaboration may all help in the application of the best research evidence in clinical...

  10. Evidence-Based Literacy Support: The "Literacy Octopus" Trial. Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Pippa; Rabiasz, Adam; Roy, Palak; Harland, Jennie; Styles, Ben; Fowler, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    The Evidence-based Literacy Support-"Literacy Octopus" Trial tested a range of dissemination interventions and resources, all of which aimed to engage schools in using evidence-based materials to improve teaching and learning in Key Stage 2 literacy. Four delivery partners provided interventions. These included light-touch,…

  11. Evidence-based radiology: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, Francesco; Di Leo, Giovanni; Hunink, Myriam G.; Gilbert, Fiona J.; Krestin, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this principle in the European radiological community. Starting from Sackett's definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM's limitations. Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis on the need to shift from the demonstration of the increasing ability to see more and better, to the demonstration of a significant change in treatment planning or, at best, of a significant gain in patient outcome. The ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) principle is thought as a dimension of EBR while EBR is proposed as part of the core curriculum of radiology residency. Moreover, we describe the process of health technology assessment in radiology with reference to the six-level scale of hierarchy of studies on diagnostic tests, the main sources of bias in studies on diagnostic performance, and levels of evidence and degrees of recommendations according to the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (Oxford, UK) as well as the approach proposed by the GRADE working group. Problems and opportunities offered by evidence-based guidelines in radiology are considered. Finally, we suggest nine points to be actioned by the ESR in order to promote EBR. Radiology will benefit greatly from the improvement in practice that will result from adopting this more rigorous approach to all aspects of our work. (orig.)

  12. [New challenges in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: thinking and practice from evidence-based medicine to precision medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    With the development of tumor molecular diagnosis and the administration of targeted drugs, cancer treatment has gradually entered a new era of precision medicine. The diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a full embodiment of the concept of precision medicine, but there are still many problems needed to be solved in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of GIST (such as the correlation between the gene mutation and prognosis, the treatment strategy of wild type GIST and the drug resistance phenomenon).

  13. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    practice. These were: failure in implementing, lack of understanding on the part of colleagues, commitment to traditional obsolete methods of treatment, discrepancy between some of the existing standards of diagnosis and treatment and principles of evidence-based medicine.To the question: «Are there any end products after listening to the seminar?» 67% of the respondents answered in affirmative. The end products were mainly marked by the publication of articles and abstracts, including international publications, and participation in the working group on the revision and development of clinical protocols. Barriers to implementation of Evidence-Based Medicine in education and practice are lack of funding to provide access to reliable sources of information, websites; outdated research methodology skills in medical education, lack of skills in critical evaluation of medical information; tradition of authoritarian relationships, use of past experience stencils; failure to comply with continuing education programs ("from training to professional development"). Knowledge of Evidence-Based Medicine, skills to perform searches for scientific data, to evaluate their validity and to transform scientific data into practical solutions are necessary for health workers in their daily activities. This culture needs to be rooted in modern medical education.

  14. Theory- and evidence-based Intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a model for assessment and intervention is presented. This model explains how to perform theory- and evidence-based as well as practice-based assessment and intervention. The assessment model applies a holistic approach to treatment planning which includes recognition of the influe......In this paper, a model for assessment and intervention is presented. This model explains how to perform theory- and evidence-based as well as practice-based assessment and intervention. The assessment model applies a holistic approach to treatment planning which includes recognition...... of the influence of community, school, peers, famely and the functional and structural domains of personality at the behavioural, psenomenological, intra-psychic and biophysical level in a dialectical process. One important aspect of the theoretical basis for presentation of this model is that the child...

  15. Study protocol for the randomised controlled trial: combined multimarker screening and randomised patient treatment with ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Neil; Wright, David; Rolnik, Daniel L; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Poon, Liona C

    2016-06-28

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) affects 2-3% of all pregnancies and is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prophylactic use of low-dose aspirin in women at risk for PE may substantially reduce the prevalence of the disease. Effective screening for PE requiring delivery before 37 weeks (preterm PE) can be provided by a combination of maternal factors, uterine artery Doppler, mean arterial pressure, maternal serum pregnancy-associated plasma protein A and placental growth factor at 11-13 weeks' gestation, with a detection rate of 75% at a false-positive rate of 10%. We present a protocol (V.6, date 25 January 2016) for the ASpirin for evidence-based PREeclampsia prevention (ASPRE) trial, which is a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial (RCT) that uses an effective PE screening programme to determine whether low-dose aspirin given to women from 11 to 13 weeks' gestation will reduce the incidence of preterm PE. All eligible women attending for their first trimester scan will be invited to participate in the screening study for preterm PE. Those found to be at high risk of developing preterm PE will be invited to participate in the RCT. Further scans will be conducted for assessment of fetal growth and biomarkers. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes will be collected and analysed. The first enrolment for the pilot study was in April 2014. As of April 2016, 26 670 women have been screened and 1760 recruited to the RCT. The study is registered on the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry. ISRCTN13633058. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Dissemination of veterinary antibiotics and corresponding resistance genes from a concentrated swine feedlot along the waste treatment paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Ben, Weiwei; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu; Qiang, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Swine feedlots are an important pollution source of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to the environment. This study investigated the dissemination of two classes of commonly-used veterinary antibiotics, namely, tetracyclines (TCs) and sulfonamides (SAs), and their corresponding ARGs along the waste treatment paths from a concentrated swine feedlot located in Beijing, China. The highest total TC and total SA concentrations detected were 166.7mgkg(-1) and 64.5μgkg(-1) in swine manure as well as 388.7 and 7.56μgL(-1) in swine wastewater, respectively. Fourteen tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPP), efflux proteins (EFP) and enzymatic inactivation proteins, three sulfonamide resistance genes (SRGs), and two integrase genes were detected along the waste treatment paths with detection frequencies of 33.3-75.0%. The relative abundances of target ARGs ranged from 2.74×10(-6) to 1.19. The antibiotics and ARGs generally declined along both waste treatment paths, but their degree of reduction was more significant along the manure treatment path. The RPP TRGs dominated in the upstream samples and then decreased continuously along both waste treatment paths, whilst the EFP TRGs and SRGs maintained relatively stable. Strong correlations between antibiotic concentrations and ARGs were observed among both manure and wastewater samples. In addition, seasonal temperature, and integrase genes, moisture content and nutrient level of tested samples could all impact the relative abundances of ARGs along the swine waste treatment paths. This study helps understand the evolution and spread of ARGs from swine feedlots to the environment as well as assess the environmental risk arising from swine waste treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence-Based IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based IT development aims at developing a new commercial contract model for IT projects where the cus-tomers payment is dependent on measurable effects of using the vendors system. The idea is to establish a strategic part-nership in which customer and IT vendor share the responsi-bility...

  18. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  19. Anatomy of an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, David B.; Taymans, Juliana M.

    2016-01-01

    An analysis was conducted of the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) research evidence base on the effectiveness of replicable education interventions. Most interventions were found to have little or no support from technically adequate research studies, and intervention effect sizes were of questionable magnitude to meet education policy goals. These…

  20. Disseminated cytomegalovirus infection complicating active treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: an emerging problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, N; Belmont, H M

    2017-04-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often require immunosuppression to induce remission of active disease exacerbations. Over the past two decades, treatment modalities for this condition have emerged leading to improved morbidity from disease related outcomes. However, as a result, infection risks and patterns have changed, leading to higher rates of opportunistic infections among this population. We report four cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in patients with SLE who received immunosuppressive therapy, including pulse steroids, antimetabolites such as mycophenolate mofetil, and alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide. We propose that given the rise in prevalence of CMV, there is a need for appropriate screening for this opportunistic pathogen and studies to determine the risks and benefits of prophylactic or preemptive treatment for this virus.

  1. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program

    OpenAIRE

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T. Ron; Jones, Brinn E.; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (interventio...

  2. Magnetic Resonance–Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance–guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. Objectives The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients’ eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. Methods A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. Results The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no

  3. Magnetic Resonance-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (MRgHIFU) Treatment of Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids: An Evidence-Based Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pron, G

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) is a noninvasive uterine-preserving treatment alternative to hysterectomy for women with symptomatic uterine leiomyomas (fibroids). Uterine fibroids commonly occur, have a broad impact on women's health and lifestyle, continue to be the main indication for hysterectomy, and represent a costly public health burden. The objectives of the analysis were to evaluate patients' eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids and the technical success, safety, effectiveness, and durability of this treatment. The review also compared the safety and effectiveness of MRgHIFU with other minimally invasive uterine-preserving treatments and surgeries for uterine fibroids. A literature search was performed on March 27, 2014, using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 2000, to March 27, 2014. The evidence review identified 2 systematic reviews, 2 RCTs, 45 cohort study reports, and 19 case reports involving HIFU treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. Eligibility for MRgHIFU treatment was variable, ranging from 14% to 74%. In clinical cohort studies involving 1,594 patients, 26 major complications (1.6%) were reported. MRgHIFU resulted in statistically and clinically significant reductions in fibroid-related symptoms in studies conducted in 10 countries, although few involved follow-up longer than 1 year. Retreatment rates following MRgHIFU were higher in early clinical studies involving regulated restrictions in the extent of fibroid ablation than in later reports involving near-complete ablation. Emergent interventions, however, were rare. Although a desire for fertility was an exclusion criteria for treatment, spontaneous term pregnancies did occur following HIFU. There were no randomized trials comparing MRgHIFU and

  4. Assessment: symptomatic treatment for muscle cramps (an evidence-based review): report of the therapeutics and technology assessment subcommittee of the American academy of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, Hans D; Khan, Ahmir H; So, Yuen T

    2010-02-23

    A Food and Drug Administration advisory in 2006 warned against the off-label use of quinine sulfate and its derivatives in the treatment of muscle cramps. Physicians are faced with a difficult scenario in choosing a treatment regimen for patients with muscle cramps. This American Academy of Neurology assessment systematically reviews the available evidence on the symptomatic treatment of muscle cramps. A total of 563 potential articles were reviewed, of which 24 met the inclusion criteria of prospective trials evaluating the efficacy of a particular treatment on muscle cramps as a primary or secondary outcome. There are Class I studies showing the efficacy of quinine derivatives for treatment of muscle cramps. However, the benefit is modest and there are adverse effects from published prospective trials as well as case reports. There is one Class II study each to support the use of Naftidrofuryl, vitamin B complex, lidocaine, and diltiazem in the treatment of muscle cramps. Although likely effective (Level A), quinine derivatives should be avoided for routine use in the management of muscle cramps because of the potential of toxicity, but in select patients they can be considered for an individual therapeutic trial once potential side effects are taken into account. Vitamin B complex, Naftidrofuryl, and calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem are possibly effective and may be considered in the management of muscle cramps (Level C). Further studies are needed to identify agents that are effective and safe for the treatment of muscle cramps.

  5. Can Scholarly Communication be Evidence Based? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2010-12-01

    disseminate their work, the role of research funding bodies that use public funds, the added value brought to the work by publishers, the role of peer reviewers, the economics of various models, and simply what works best.Research has been done on many of these issuesii and much of that work has then been critically appraised and debated post-publication on mailing listsiii and social networking media such as blogs.ivThe BMJ is one scholarly publication that has committed itself to becoming an “evidence based publisher” and is carrying out research on aspects of scholarly publishing to help guide their processes (Schroter, n.d.. Research on scholarly communication is a hot topic indeed; and for librarians, an area of information overload if there ever was one. How to sort out the good from the bad; the research that is high quality from that which is biased?At this point in time, it is my view that the research does not yet provide a definitive answer for how libraries should approach new models of scholarly communication. We are in the middle of a debate, in the middle of a surge of research, and an ever-changing lens in which we view and approach this topic. But evidence based practice has always been about more than just research – it considers what is needed by our users, and is guided by our professional judgement. Putting those elements together allows us to sort through the research and make informed decisions about our approach to collections, and how we do liaison work. For anyone looking for a research idea, there are certainly a couple of systematic reviews possible on these issues that would benefit practitioners immensely.The decision to start EBLIP was not an evidence based one. It was based in a desire to give the topic a home for discussion, and that in order to facilitate discussion, the widest audience possible must be reached. Hence, barriers such as cost needed to be reduced, and the decision to be open access was made. This was a decision based on

  6. Review paper: epidemiology, evidence-based medicine, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin-Ling; Griffiths, Sian

    2009-07-01

    This article reviews the relation between evidence-based medicine and epidemiology and the recent evolution of the former. The meaning of evidence and the international efforts to collect, summarize, and disseminate findings from scientific research that are relevant for medical decision making are discussed. Evidence, current resources, and people's values, all play a role in making evidence-based medical decisions. This also has important implications for public health practice. However, decision making differs considerably between clinical care of individual patients and public health decision and policies that normally apply to populations. Although more closely related to epidemiology than clinical medicine, public health should also adopt a more systematic approach to evidence-based practice.

  7. Protocol to disseminate a hospital-site controlled intervention using audit and feedback to implement guidelines concerning inappropriate treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautner, Barbara W; Prasad, Pooja; Grigoryan, Larissa; Hysong, Sylvia J; Kramer, Jennifer R; Rajan, Suja; Petersen, Nancy J; Rosen, Tracey; Drekonja, Dimitri M; Graber, Christopher; Patel, Payal; Lichtenberger, Paola; Gauthier, Timothy P; Wiseman, Steve; Jones, Makoto; Sales, Anne; Krein, Sarah; Naik, Aanand Dinkar

    2018-01-19

    Antimicrobial stewardship to combat the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has become a national priority. This project focuses on reducing inappropriate use of antimicrobials for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a very common condition that leads to antimicrobial overuse in acute and long-term care. We previously conducted a successful intervention, entitled "Kicking Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection (CAUTI): the No Knee-Jerk Antibiotics Campaign," to decrease guideline-discordant ordering of urine cultures and antibiotics for ASB. The current objective is to facilitate implementation of a scalable version of the Kicking CAUTI campaign across four geographically diverse Veterans Health Administration facilities while assessing what aspects of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention are essential to success and sustainability. This project uses an interrupted time series design with four control sites. The two main intervention tools are (1) an evidence-based algorithm that distills the guidelines into a streamlined clinical pathway and (2) case-based audit and feedback to train clinicians to use the algorithm. Our conceptual framework for the development and implementation of this intervention draws on May's General Theory of Implementation. The intervention is directed at providers in acute and long-term care, and the goal is to reduce inappropriate screening for and treatment of ASB in all patients and residents, not just those with urinary catheters. The start-up for each facility consists of centrally-led phone calls with local site champions and baseline surveys. Case-based audit and feedback will begin at a given site after the start-up period and continue for 12 months, followed by a sustainability assessment. In addition to the clinical outcomes, we will explore the relationship between the dose of the intervention and clinical outcomes. This project moves from a proof-of-concept effectiveness study to implementation involving

  8. The religion of evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    , and discusses autism spectrum disorders and EBP. The chapter concludes that, based on last sixty years of the development of music therapy as a recognized and relevant intervention, there is no doubt that the honeymoon period is over, and EBP is here to stay. Despite examples of attrition in music therapy......This chapter begins by outlining the challenges of preparing a chapter on evidence-based practice (EBP) to underpin the use of music as a therapeutic tool in treatment, in the overall frame of music, health, and wellbeing. It then reviews the terminology of EBP and evidence-based medicine...... practice as health, education, and social services tighten their belts and the demand on their resources grows, there is increasing interest in the value of music for health and wellbeing, despite even less ‘hard’ evidence that it is effective against illness and disability....

  9. Evidence-based hypnotherapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive hypnotherapy (CH) is a comprehensive evidence-based hypnotherapy for clinical depression. This article describes the major components of CH, which integrate hypnosis with cognitive-behavior therapy as the latter provides an effective host theory for the assimilation of empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various theoretical models of psychotherapy and psychopathology. CH meets criteria for an assimilative model of psychotherapy, which is considered to be an efficacious model of psychotherapy integration. The major components of CH for depression are described in sufficient detail to allow replication, verification, and validation of the techniques delineated. CH for depression provides a template that clinicians and investigators can utilize to study the additive effects of hypnosis in the management of other psychological or medical disorders. Evidence-based hypnotherapy and research are encouraged; such a movement is necessary if clinical hypnosis is to integrate into mainstream psychotherapy.

  10. Validity and clinical utility of the DSM-5 severity specifier for bulimia nervosa: results from a multisite sample of patients who received evidence-based treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakanalis, Antonios; Bartoli, Francesco; Caslini, Manuela; Crocamo, Cristina; Zanetti, Maria Assunta; Riva, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    A new "severity specifier" for bulimia nervosa (BN), based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviours (IWCBs), was added to the DSM-5 as a means of documenting heterogeneity and variability in the severity of the disorder. Yet, evidence for its validity in clinical populations, including prognostic significance for treatment outcome, is currently lacking. Existing data from 281 treatment-seeking patients with DSM-5 BN, who received the best available treatment for their disorder (manual-based cognitive behavioural therapy; CBT) in an outpatient setting, were re-analysed to examine whether these patients subgrouped based on the DSM-5 severity levels would show meaningful and consistent differences on (a) a range of clinical variables assessed at pre-treatment and (b) post-treatment abstinence from IWCBs. Results highlight that the mild, moderate, severe, and extreme severity groups were statistically distinguishable on 22 variables assessed at pre-treatment regarding eating disorder pathological features, maintenance factors of BN, associated (current) and lifetime psychopathology, social maladjustment and illness-specific functional impairment, and abstinence outcome. Mood intolerance, a maintenance factor of BN but external to eating disorder pathological features (typically addressed within CBT), emerged as the primary clinical variable distinguishing the severity groups showing a differential treatment response. Overall, the findings speak to the concurrent and predictive validity of the new DSM-5 severity criterion for BN and are important because a common benchmark informing patients, clinicians, and researchers about severity of the disorder and allowing severity fluctuation and patient's progress to be tracked does not exist so far. Implications for future research are outlined.

  11. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Predictive Biomarkers in the Treatment of Non- Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinton, Cindy [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Ellis, Peter M., E-mail: peter.ellis@jcc.hhsc.ca [Juravinski Cancer Centre, 699 Concession, St Hamilton, Hamilton, ON L8V 5C2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, McMaster University Hamilton, ON L8S 4L8 (Canada)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to improvements in patient survival and quality of life. It is unclear whether molecular abnormalities associated with NSCLC cell survival, growth and proliferation are useful in predicting treatment benefit. We conducted a systematic review to establish which biomarkers contribute meaningfully to the management of NSCLC. A team of researchers searched PubMed and conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, IASLC, USCAP) using MESH terms for NSCLC and randomized trials (RCT), plus keywords for variables of interest. Evidence from multiple RCTs confirmed that histologic subtype is prognostic for survival and predictive of treatment efficacy and/or toxicity in NSCLC. Likewise, activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC and should be assessed routinely. No biomarkers to date reliably predict response to anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapies. There are inconsistent data on the role of ERCC1, BRCA, Beta tubulin III, RRM1, K-RAS, or TP-53 in treatment decisions. These tests should not be routinely used in selecting treatment at this time, whereas EML4/ALK translocations predict responses to specific targeted agents, the optimal assessment of this molecular abnormality has yet to be established. Personalized care of patients with NSCLC based on biomarkers is increasingly important to both clinical practice and research.

  12. Evidence-based management reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovner, Anthony R; Rundall, Thomas G

    2006-01-01

    Reports of medical mistakes have splashed across newspapers and magazines in the United States. At the same time, instances of overuse, underuse, and misuse of management tactics and strategies receive far less attention. The sense of urgency associated with improving the quality of medical care does not exist with respect to improving the quality of management decision making. A more evidence-based approach would improve the competence of the decision-makers and their motivation to use more scientific methods when making a decision. The authors of this article consider a study of 68 U.S. health services managers that found a low level of evidence-based management behaviors. From the findings, four strategies are suggested to increase health systems managers' use of research evidence to improve decision making: focusing evidence-based decision making on strategically important issues, developing committees and other structures to diffuse management research throughout the organization, building a management culture that values research, and training managers in the competencies required to apply research evidence to health services management decisions. To aid the manager in understanding and applying an evidenced-based approach to decision making, the article provides practical tools, techniques, and resources for immediate use.

  13. [The Jena Anxiety Monitoring List (JAMoL) - a tool for the evidence-based treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas Stephan; Freytag, Antje; Breitbart, Jörg; Teismann, Tobias; Schöne, Elisabeth; Blank, Wolfgang; Schelle, Mercedes; Vollmar, Horst Christian; Margraf, Jürgen; Gensichen, Jochen

    2018-04-01

    Behavior therapy-oriented methods are recommended for treating anxiety disorders in primary care. The treatment of patients with long-term conditions can be improved by case management and structured clinical monitoring. The present paper describes the rationale, design and application of the 'Jena Anxiety Monitoring List' (JAMoL), a monitoring tool for the treatment of patients with panic disorder, with or without agoraphobia, in primary care. JAMoL's design was based on established clinical measures, the rationale of exposure-based anxiety treatment, and research on family practice-based case management. After piloting, the JAMoL was used in the clinical study 'Jena-PARADISE' (ISRCTN64669297), where non-physician practice staff monitored patients with panic disorder by telephone. Using semi-structured interviews in concomitant studies, study participants were asked about the instrument's functionality. The JAMoL assesses the severity of anxiety symptoms (6 items) as well as the patient's adherence to therapy (4 items) and fosters the case management-related information exchange (3 items). An integrated traffic light scheme facilitates the evaluation of monitoring results. Within the clinical study, non-physician practice staff carried out a total of 1,525 JAMoL-supported monitoring calls on 177 patients from 30 primary care practices (median calls per patient: 10 [interquartile range, 9-10]). Qualitative analyses revealed that most practice teams and patients rated the JAMoL as a practicable and treatment-relevant tool. The JAMoL enables primary care practice teams to continuously monitor anxiety symptoms and treatment adherence in patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Within the behavior therapy-oriented treatment program 'Jena-PARADISE', the JAMoL constitutes an important case management tool. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  14. Evidence-based management of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Ariane L

    2017-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is relevant to the rheumatologist because it may signify an underlying connective tissue disease and also because it can be very challenging to treat, especially when it has progressed to digital ulceration or critical ischaemia. This review article discusses diagnosis (does this patient have an underlying connective tissue disease?), including the role for nailfold capillaroscopy, and treatment. Management of 'uncomplicated' RP is first described and then treatment of RP complicated by progression to digital ulceration or critical ischaemia, highlighting recent advances (including phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibition, and endothelin 1 receptor antagonism) and the evidence base underpinning these. Possible future therapies are briefly discussed.

  15. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. An Evidence-Based Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Emergency Department (ED) Providers Improves Skills and Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Emergency Departments (EDs) offer an opportunity to improve the care of patients with at-risk and dependent drinking by teaching staff to screen, perform brief intervention and refer to treatment (SBIRT). We describe here the implementation at 14 Academic EDs of a structured SBIRT curriculum to determine if this learning experience…

  17. Is the Comparison between Exercise and Pharmacologic Treatment of Depression in the Clinical Practice Guideline of the American College of Physicians Evidence-Based?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Netz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Major depression disorder is most commonly treated with antidepressants. However, due to their side effects clinicians seek non-pharmacologic options, and one of these is exercise. The literature on the benefits of exercise for depression is extensive. Nevertheless, two recent reviews focusing on antidepressants vs. other therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines recommended mainly antidepressants, excluding exercise as a viable choice for treatment of depression. The aim of this perspective is to analyze the literature exploring the reasons for this discrepancy. Two categories of publications were examined: randomized controlled trials (RCTs and meta-analyses or systematic reviews. Based on this reassessment, RCTs comparing exercise to antidepressants reported that exercise and antidepressants were equally effective. RCTs comparing exercise combined with antidepressants to antidepressants only reported a significant improvement in depression following exercise as an adjunctive treatment. Almost all the reviews examining exercise vs. other treatments of depression, including antidepressants, support the use of exercise in the treatment of depression, at least as an adjunctive therapy. The two reviews examining pharmacologic vs. non-pharmacologic therapies as a basis for clinical practice guidelines examined limited evidence on exercise vs. antidepressants. In addition, it is possible that academics and health care practitioners are skeptical of viewing exercise as medicine. Maybe, there is a reluctance to accept that changes in lifestyle as opposed to pharmacological treatment can alter biological mechanisms. Longitudinal studies are needed for assessing the effectiveness of exercise in real clinical settings, as well as studies exploring dose-response relationship between exercise and depression.

  18. What are the effects of providing evidence-based information on eating disorders and their treatments? A randomized controlled trial in a symptomatic community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Phillipa; Mond, Jonathan; Paxton, Susan; Rodgers, Bryan; Darby, Anita; Owen, Cathy

    2007-11-01

    We hypothesize that a reason for the infrequent uptake of treatments by people with eating disorders is poor knowledge about treatments and outcomes for eating disorders (ED-Mental Health Literacy; ED-MHL). Our aim was to test putative health benefits of a brief ED-MHL intervention. In a community-based two-phase survey, 122 young women (mean age 28.5 SD 6.3 years) with ED symptoms meeting DSM-IV criteria for clinical severity were randomized to receive either a brief ED-MHL intervention (comprising information about efficacious treatments, reputable self-help books and where to go for further information and/or services) or information about local mental health services only. All were given feedback on their scores on measures of ED symptoms and quality of life. ED-MHL, ED symptoms and health-related quality of life were assessed prior to the intervention and at 6- and 12-month follow-up. One hundred and two participants (84%) completed follow-up at 12 months. Symptomatic improvement and changes in specific aspects of ED-MHL, namely, less pessimism about how difficult EDs are to treat and improved recognition and knowledge, as well as increased help seeking, were observed in both groups. Differences between groups were uncommon but compared with control participants, those in the intervention group had improved health-related quality of life. A brief community-based intervention aimed to improve knowledge and beliefs about EDs and their treatments may be a valuable first step in improving health-related outcomes for people with ED, but more research is needed.

  19. Implications and applications of systematic reviews for evidence-based dentistry and comparative effectiveness research: A sample study on antibiotics for oro-facial cellulitis treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Quyen Bach; Vandan Kasar; Francesco Chiappelli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Comparative effectiveness and efficacy research for analysis and practice (CEERAP) was performed to assess the effects of penicillin-based versus erythromycin-based antibiotic treatments in patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) including cellulitis, impetigo, and erysipelas. Because SSTIs, especially orofacial cellulitis, are volatile infectious diseases of a life-threatening nature, research on the most efficacious remedies is necessary. Methods: The stringent b...

  20. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix 1. The Evidence Base for Diabetes Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rhys Williams, William Herman, Ann-Louise Kinmonth...

  1. Translating research into practice: the role of provider-based research networks in the diffusion of an evidence-based colon cancer treatment innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, William R; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Wu, Yang; Qaqish, Bahjat; Sanoff, Hanna K; Goldberg, Richard M; Weiner, Bryan J

    2012-08-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs)--collaborative research partnerships between academic centers and community-based practitioners--are a promising model for accelerating the translation of research into practice; however, empirical evidence of accelerated translation is limited. Oxaliplatin in adjuvant combination chemotherapy is an innovation with clinical trial-proven survival benefit compared with prior therapies. The goal of this study is to examine the diffusion of oxaliplatin into community practice, and whether affiliation with the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP)--a nationwide cancer-focused PBRN--is associated with accelerated innovation adoption. This retrospective observational study used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare and NCI CCOP data to examine Medicare participants with stage III colon cancer initiating treatment in 2003 through 2006, the years surrounding oxaliplatin's Food and Drug Administration approval. A fixed-effects analysis examined chemotherapy use among patients treated outside academic centers at CCOP-affiliated practices compared with non-CCOP practices. Two-group modeling controlled for multiple levels of clustering, year of chemotherapy initiation, tumor characteristics, patient age, race, comorbidity, Medicaid dual-eligibility status, and education. Of 4055 community patients, 35% received 5-fluoruracil, 20% received oxaliplatin, 7% received another chemotherapy, and 38% received no chemotherapy. Twenty-five percent of CCOP patients received oxaliplatin, compared with 19% of non-CCOP patients. In multivariable analysis, CCOP exposure was associated with higher odds of receiving guideline-concordant treatment in general, and oxaliplatin specifically. These findings contribute to a growing set of evidence linking PBRNs with a greater probability of receiving treatment innovations and high-quality cancer care, with implications for clinical and research

  2. Eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of adults with partial-onset epilepsy: an evidence-based review of efficacy, safety and place in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Simona; Brigo, Francesco; Cagnetti, Claudia; Verrotti, Alberto; Zaccara, Gaetano; Silvestrini, Mauro

    2018-01-01

    Up to 30% of the patients diagnosed with epilepsy will continue suffering from seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic drugs, either in monotherapy or polytherapy. Hence, there remains the need to develop new effective and well-tolerated therapies. The objective of this article was to review the evidence for the efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) as adjunctive treatment in adult patients with focal onset seizures. ESL is the newest, third-generation, single enantiomer member of the dibenzazepine family. Following oral administration, ESL is rapidly and extensively metabolized by hepatic first-pass hydrolysis to the active metabolite eslicarbazepine, which has linear, dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and low potential for drug-drug interactions. Eslicarbazepine works as a competitive blocker of the voltage gated sodium channels; unlike carbamazepine (CBZ) and oxcarbazepine (OXC), it has a lower affinity for the resting state of the channels, and reduces their availability by selectively enhancing slow inactivation. Efficacy and safety of ESL have been assessed in four randomized, Phase III clinical trials: the median relative reduction in standardized seizure frequency was 33.4% and 37.8% in the ESL 800 and 1,200 mg daily dose groups, and the responder rates were 33.8% and 43.1%, respectively. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) increased with raising the dosage (ESL 400 mg: 63.8%, ESL 800 mg: 67.0%, ESL 1,200 mg: 73.1%). The TEAEs were generally mild to moderate in intensity, and the most common were dizziness, somnolence, headache and nausea. Open-label studies confirmed the findings from the pivotal trials and demonstrated sustained therapeutic effect of ESL over time and improvement of tolerability profile in patients switching from OXC/CBZ. No unexpected safety signals emerged over >5 years of follow-up. Once-daily adjunctive ESL at the doses of 800 and 1,200 mg was effective to reduce the seizure frequency and

  3. The role of self-help in the treatment of mild anxiety disorders in young people: an evidence-based review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradford S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Debra Rickwood1,2, Sally Bradford31Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation, North Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaAbstract: Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health problems experienced by young people, and even mild anxiety can significantly limit social, emotional, and cognitive development into adulthood. It is, therefore, essential that anxiety is treated as early and effectively as possible. Young people are unlikely, however, to seek professional treatment for their problems, increasing their chance of serious long-term problems such as impaired peer relations and low self-esteem. The barriers young people face to accessing services are well documented, and self-help resources may provide an alternative option to respond to early manifestations of anxiety disorders. This article reviews the potential benefits of self-help treatments for anxiety and the evidence for their effectiveness. Despite using inclusive review criteria, only six relevant studies were found. The results of these studies show that there is some evidence for the use of self-help interventions for anxiety in young people, but like the research with adult populations, the overall quality of the studies is poor and there is need for further and more rigorous research.Keywords: adolescent, young adult, children, mental disorder, self-administered, bibliotherapy, therapist-guided

  4. The evidence-based rationale for physical therapy treatment of children, adolescents, and adults diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome/hypermobile Ehlers Danlos syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbert, Raoul H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Pacey, Verity

    2017-01-01

    New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role in managem......New insights into the phenotype of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (JHS) and Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome-hypermobile type (hEDS) have raised many issues in relation to classification, diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Within the multidisciplinary team, physical therapy plays a central role...... in management of individuals with hypermobility related disorders. However, many physical therapists are not familiar with the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, common clinical presentation, and management. This guideline aims to provide practitioners with the state of the art regarding the assessment...... randomized controlled trials are warranted to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions for children and adults. Until further multicenter trials are conducted, clinical decision-making should be based on theoretical and the current limited research evidence. For all individuals diagnosed...

  5. Culturally adapted cognitive-behavior therapy: integrating sexual, spiritual, and family identities in an evidence-based treatment of a depressed Latino adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarté-Vélez, Yovanska; Bernal, Guillermo; Bonilla, Karen

    2010-08-01

    The article described and illustrated how a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) can maintain fidelity to a treatment protocol while allowing for considerable flexibility to address a patient's values, preferences, and context. A manual-based CBT was used with a gay Latino adolescent regarding his sexual identity, family values, and spiritual ideas. The adolescent suffered from a major depression disorder and identified himself as gay and Christian within a conservative and machista Puerto Rican family. CBT promoted personal acceptance and active questioning of homophobic thoughts in a climate of family respect. CBT enabled identity formation and integration, central to the development of a sexual identity for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth, with remission of the patient's depression and better family outcomes.

  6. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brölmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based

  7. 'Cosmetic boob jobs' or evidence-based breast surgery: an interpretive policy analysis of the rationing of 'low value' treatments in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jill; Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2014-09-20

    In England the National Health Service (NHS) is not allowed to impose 'blanket bans' on treatments, but local commissioners produce lists of 'low value' procedures that they will normally not fund. Breast surgery is one example. However, evidence suggests that some breast surgery is clinically effective, with significant health gain. National guidelines indicate the circumstances under which breast surgery should be made available on the NHS, but there is widespread variation in their implementation.The purpose of this study was to explore the work practices of 'individual funding request' (IFR) panels, as they considered 'one-off' funding requests for breast surgery; examine how the notion of 'value' is dialogically constructed, and how decisions about who is deserving of NHS funding and who is not are accomplished in practice. We undertook ethnographic exploration of three IFR panels. We extracted all (22) breast surgery cases considered by these panels from our data set and progressively focused on three case discussions, one from each panel, covering the three main breast procedures.We undertook a microanalysis of the talk and texts arising from these cases, within a conceptual framework of interpretive policy analysis. Through an exploration of the symbolic artefacts (language, objects and acts) that are significant carriers of policy meaning, we identified the ways in which IFR panels create their own 'interpretive communities', within which deliberations about the funding of breast surgery are differently framed, and local decisions come to be justified. In particular, we demonstrated how each decision was contingent on [a] the evaluative accent given to certain words, [b] the work that documentary objects achieve in foregrounding particular concerns, and [c] the act of categorising. Meaning was constructed dialogically through local interaction and broader socio-cultural discourses about breasts and 'cosmetic' surgery. Despite the appeal of calls to tackle

  8. Beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, nitrate-hydralazine, diuretics, aldosterone antagonist, ivabradine, devices and digoxin (BANDAID(2) ): an evidence-based mnemonic for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, N; Fulcher, J; Keech, A

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure causes significant morbidity and mortality, with recognised underutilisation rates of guideline-based therapies. Our aim was to review current evidence for heart failure treatments and derive a mnemonic summarising best practice, which might assist physicians in patient care. Treatments were identified for review from multinational society guidelines and recent randomised trials, with a primary aim of examining their effects in systolic heart failure patients on mortality, hospitalisation rates and symptoms. Secondary aims were to consider other clinical benefits. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using a structured keyword strategy and the retrieved articles were evaluated methodically to produce an optimised reference list for each treatment. We devised the mnemonic BANDAID (2) , standing for beta-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, nitrate-hydralazine (or potentially neprilysin inhibitor), diuretics, aldosterone antagonist, ivabradine, devices (automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator, cardiac resynchronisation therapy or both) and digoxin as a representation of treatments with strong evidence for their use in systolic heart failure. Treatment with omega-3 fatty acids, statins or anti-thrombotic therapies has limited benefits in a general heart failure population. Adoption of this mnemonic for current evidence-based treatments for heart failure may help improve prescribing rates and patient outcomes in this debilitating, high mortality condition. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  9. An evidence based alcohol screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) curriculum for emergency department (ED) providers improves skills and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Edward; Bernstein, Judith; Feldman, James; Fernandez, William; Hagan, Melissa; Mitchell, Patricia; Safi, Clara; Woolard, Robert; Mello, Mike; Baird, Janette; Lee, Christina; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Broderick, Kerry; Laperrier, Kathryn A; Kellermann, Arthur; Wald, Marlena M; Taylor, Robert E; Walton, Kim; Grant-Ervin, Michelle; Rollinson, Denise; Edwards, David; Chan, Theodore; Davis, Dan; Buchanan Marshall, Jean; Aseltine, Robert; James, Amy; Schilling, Elizabeth; Abu-Hasaballah, Khamis; Baumann, Brigitte M; Boudreaux, Edwin D; Maio, Ronald F; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Murrell, Teresa; Doezema, David; Anglin, Deirdre; Eliassen, Adriana; Martin, Marcus; Pines, Jesse; Buchanan, Leslie; Turner, James; D'Onofrio, Gail; Degutis, Linda C; Owens, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Emergency Departments (EDs) offer an opportunity to improve the care of patients with at-risk and dependent drinking by teaching staff to screen, perform brief intervention and refer to treatment (SBIRT). We describe here the implementation at 14 Academic EDs of a structured SBIRT curriculum to determine if this learning experience improves provider beliefs and practices. ED faculty, residents, nurses, physician extenders, social workers, and Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) were surveyed prior to participating in either a two hour interactive workshops with case simulations, or a web-based program (www.ed.bmc.org/sbirt). A pre-post repeated measures design assessed changes in provider beliefs and practices at three and 12 months post-exposure. Among 402 ED providers, 74% reported SBIRT skills all improved significantly over baseline. Gains decreased somewhat at 12 months, but remained above baseline. Length of time in practice was positively associated with SBIRT utilization, controlling for gender, race and type of profession. Persistent barriers included time limitations and lack of referral resources. ED providers respond favorably to SBIRT. Changes in utilization were substantial at three months post-exposure to a standardized curriculum, but less apparent after 12 months. Booster sessions, trained assistants and infrastructure supports may be needed to sustain changes over the longer term.

  10. Consultation as an implementation strategy for evidence-based practices across multiple contexts: unpacking the black box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Erum; Gleacher, Alissa; Beidas, Rinad S

    2013-11-01

    There is great interest in the dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices for children across schools and community mental health settings. A growing body of literature suggests that the use of one-time workshops as a training tool is ineffective in influencing therapist behavior and patient outcomes and that ongoing expert consultation and coaching is critical to actual uptake and quality implementation. Yet, we have very limited understanding of how expert consultation fits into the larger implementation support system, or the most effective consultation strategies. This commentary reviews the literature on consultation in child mental health, and proposes a set of core consultation functions, processes, and outcomes that should be further studied in the implementation of evidence-based practices for children.

  11. The evidence-based paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Many occupational therapy practitioners consider evidence-based practice (EBP) to be the means by which occupational therapy can prove the validity of its services and thus support the legitimacy of our profession. The unquestioned acceptance of EBP as the way to establish credibility concerns me; unchallenged acceptance of any idea concerns me. Do practitioners accept EBP as the paradigm for guiding occupational therapy practice and research solely because it is presented as what we must do? I believe that practitioners must examine the implications for our profession of accepting EBP without question. In this article, I review EBP, present criticisms and concerns voiced by other professions and, finally, examine the implications of adopting an EBP perspective that replaces theory-directed practice. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  12. Evidence-based treatment of allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawankar, R.; Fokkens, W.

    2001-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is an extremely common disease worldwide, affecting 10% to 50% of the population. An increasing prevalence of allergic rhinitis over the past decades and its frequent association with asthma have raised concerns about treating the disease appropriately. New knowledge of the

  13. Evidence-based recommendations for GERD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Ann Marie

    2013-08-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common presentation in primary care. New research findings have implications for the diagnosis and management of GERD. The purpose of this article is to synthesize current research related to the diagnosis and management of GERD in adults and to make practice recommendations.

  14. CAGS and ACS evidence based reviews in surgery. Is a diverting loop ileostomy and colonic lavage an alternative to colectomy for the treatment of severe Clostridium difficile-associated disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carl J; Boutros, Marylise; Morris, Andrew; Divino, Celia M

    2014-06-01

    The term “evidence-based medicine” was first coined by Sackett and colleagues as “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.”1 The key to practising evidencebased medicine is applying the best current knowledge to decisions in individual patients. Medical knowledge is continually and rapidly expanding. For clinicians to practise evidence-based medicine, they must have the skills to read and interpret the medical literature so that they can determine the validity, reliability, credibility and utility of individual articles. These skills are known as critical appraisal skills, and they require some knowledge of biostatistics, clinical epidemiology, decision analysis and economics, and clinical knowledge. Evidence Based Reviews in Surgery (EBRS) is a program jointly sponsored by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS). The primary objective of EBRS is to help practising surgeons improve their critical appraisal skills. During the academic year, 8 clinical articles are chosen for review and discussion. They are selected for their clinical relevance to general surgeons and because they cover a spectrum of issues im -port ant to surgeons, including causation or risk factors for disease, natural history or prognosis of disease, how to quantify disease, diagnostic tests, early diagnosis and the effectiveness of treatment. A methodological article guides the reader in critical appraisal of the clinical article. Methodological and clinical reviews of the article are performed by experts in the relevant areas and posted on the EBRS website, where they are archived indefinitely. In addition, a listserv allows participants to discuss the monthly article. Surgeons who participate in the monthly packages can obtain Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Maintenance of Certification credits and/or continuing medical

  15. A review of selected dental literature on evidence-based treatment planning for dental implants: report of the Committee on Research in Fixed Prosthodontics of the Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Melanie R; Vermilyea, Stanley G

    2004-11-01

    This literature review summarizes research with the aim of providing dentists with evidence-based guidelines to apply when planning treatment with osseointegrated implants. Peer-reviewed literature published in the English language between 1969 and 2003 was reviewed using Medline and hand searches. Topics reviewed include systemic host factors such as age, gender, various medical conditions, and patient habits, local host factors involving the quantity and quality of bone and soft tissue, presence of present or past infection and occlusion, prosthetic design factors, including the number and arrangement of implants, size and coatings of implants, cantilevers and connections to natural teeth, and methods to improve outcomes of implant treatment in each category. The review demonstrated that there is no systemic factor or habit that is an absolute contraindication to the placement of osseointegrated implants in the adult patient, although cessation of smoking can improve outcome significantly. The most important local patient factor for successful treatment is the quality and quantity of bone available at the implant site. Specific design criteria are provided, including guidelines for spacing of implants, size, materials, occlusion, and fit. Limitations in the current body of knowledge are identified, and directions for future research are suggested.

  16. Social media, evidence-based tweeting, and JCEHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricich, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Medical practice and medical journals must adapt to a constantly changing environment, in which social media plays an ever-increasing role. Social media platforms such as Twitter can provide an opportunity to disseminate information in innovative ways. The concept of evidence-based tweeting is introduced, especially as "tweeting the meeting" continues to expand within medical conferences and other venues important for continuing education for health care providers. Future social media strategies for the journal are outlined. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  17. Lessons Learned from A System-Wide Evidence-Based Practice Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    military nurses that provide a higher quality and safer care for our warfighters and their families. Key words: evidence-based practice, EBP, EBP...Practice Program Implementation presented at/published to 2017 Triservice Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice Dissemination Course, Ellicott...S9 MOW CRD Graduate Health Sciences Education (GHSE) (SGS O&M); SGS R&D; Tri-Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP): Defense Medical Research

  18. Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine for Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM. Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go.

  19. Evidence based practice readiness: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Jessica D; Welton, John M

    2018-01-15

    To analyse and define the concept "evidence based practice readiness" in nurses. Evidence based practice readiness is a term commonly used in health literature, but without a clear understanding of what readiness means. Concept analysis is needed to define the meaning of evidence based practice readiness. A concept analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's method to clarify the defining attributes of evidence based practice readiness as well as antecedents and consequences. A Boolean search of PubMed and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature was conducted and limited to those published after the year 2000. Eleven articles met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Evidence based practice readiness incorporates personal and organisational readiness. Antecedents include the ability to recognize the need for evidence based practice, ability to access and interpret evidence based practice, and a supportive environment. The concept analysis demonstrates the complexity of the concept and its implications for nursing practice. The four pillars of evidence based practice readiness: nursing, training, equipping and leadership support are necessary to achieve evidence based practice readiness. Nurse managers are in the position to address all elements of evidence based practice readiness. Creating an environment that fosters evidence based practice can improve patient outcomes, decreased health care cost, increase nurses' job satisfaction and decrease nursing turnover. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder in Adults—An Update for 2012: Practice Parameters with an Evidence-Based Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Rowley, James A.; Zak, Rochelle S.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Rosenberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed to update the previous AASM practice parameters on the treatments, both dopaminergic and other, of RLS and PLMD. A considerable amount of literature has been published since these previous reviews were performed, necessitating an update of the corresponding practice parameters. Therapies with a STANDARD level of recommendation include pramipexole and ropinirole. Therapies with a GUIDELINE level of recommendation include levodopa with dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, opioids, gabapentin enacarbil, and cabergoline (which has additional caveats for use). Therapies with an OPTION level of recommendation include carbamazepine, gabapentin, pregabalin, clonidine, and for patients with low ferritin levels, iron supplementation. The committee recommends a STANDARD AGAINST the use of pergolide because of the risks of heart valve damage. Therapies for RLS secondary to ESRD, neuropathy, and superficial venous insufficiency are discussed. Lastly, therapies for PLMD are reviewed. However, it should be mentioned that because PLMD therapy typically mimics RLS therapy, the primary focus of this review is therapy for idiopathic RLS. Citation: Aurora RN; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Rowley JA: Zak RS; Casey KR; Lamm CI; Tracy SL; Rosenberg RS. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults—an update for 2012: practice parameters with an evidence-based systematic review and meta-analyses. SLEEP 2012;35(8):1039-1062. PMID:22851801

  1. A Hybrid III stepped wedge cluster randomized trial testing an implementation strategy to facilitate the use of an evidence-based practice in VA Homeless Primary Care Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Molly M; Gabrielian, Sonya; Byrne, Thomas; McCullough, Megan B; Smith, Jeffery L; Taylor, Thom J; O'Toole, Tom P; Kane, Vincent; Yakovchenko, Vera; McInnes, D Keith; Smelson, David A

    2017-04-04

    Homeless veterans often have multiple health care and psychosocial needs, including assistance with access to housing and health care, as well as support for ongoing treatment engagement. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) developed specialized Homeless Patient Alignment Care Teams (HPACT) with the goal of offering an integrated, "one-stop program" to address housing and health care needs of homeless veterans. However, while 70% of HPACT's veteran enrollees have co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, HPACT does not have a uniform, embedded treatment protocol for this subpopulation. One wraparound intervention designed to address the needs of homeless veterans with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders which is suitable to be integrated into HPACT clinic sites is the evidence-based practice called Maintaining Independence and Sobriety through Systems Integration, Outreach, and Networking-Veterans Edition, or MISSION-Vet. Despite the promise of MISSION-Vet within HPACT clinics, implementation of an evidence-based intervention within a busy program like HPACT can be difficult. The current study is being undertaken to identify an appropriate implementation strategy for MISSION-Vet within HPACT. The study will test the implementation platform called Facilitation and compared to implementation as usual (IU). The aims of this study are as follows: (1) Compare the extent to which IU or Facilitation strategies achieve fidelity to the MISSION-Vet intervention as delivered by HPACT homeless provider staff. (2) Compare the effects of Facilitation and IU strategies on the National HPACT Performance Measures. (3) Compare the effects of IU and Facilitation on the permanent housing status. (4) Identify and describe key stakeholders' (patients, providers, staff) experiences with, and perspectives on, the barriers to, and facilitators of implementing MISSION. Type III Hybrid modified stepped wedge implementation comparing IU to Facilitation

  2. Disseminated histoplasmosis in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, C M; Navarrete, M; Carrillo, J M; Mora, L; Carranza, A

    1999-12-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis usually occurs in immunocompromised patients who reside in Histoplasma capsulatum-endemic regions. It has also been described in immunocompetent infants after exposure to a large inoculum of the pathogen resulting in case fatality rates of 40 to 50%. From 1983 through 1996 all infants with documented disseminated histoplasmosis were treated with amphotericin B followed by daily ketoconazole for 3 months. Immunologic workups were performed at the time of diagnosis and at 4 to 6 weeks of therapy. Surviving patients were followed for at least 1 year. Time to resolution of signs and symptoms was recorded, as were complications. We managed 40 patients with disseminated histoplasmosis. The age in months at diagnosis was 15.3+/-10.2 (mean +/- SD), and 24 were male. All patients were from endemic regions and they presented with fever, spleen and/or liver enlargement and hematologic abnormalities. Diagnosis was made by histology and culture of bone marrow, spleen, lymph node, bronchoalveolar or liver samples. Twenty patients presented with T cell deficiency that resolved at 4 to 6 weeks of therapy in all of the retested patients, and 10 of 12 tested patients had hyperglobulinemia that resolved. Thirty-five (88%) patients were cured by treatment; 4 died and 1 relapsed. Disseminated histoplasmosis should be considered in infants from endemic areas who present with fever, hepatosplenomegaly and hematologic abnormalities. These patients develop transient hyperglobulinemia and T cell deficiency that resolve with treatment. Treatment with amphotericin B followed by an oral azole for 3 months is effective in most patients.

  3. The Price per Prospective Consumer of Providing Therapist Training and Consultation in Seven Evidence-Based Treatments within a Large Public Behavioral Health System: An Example Cost-Analysis Metric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie H. Okamura

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePublic-sector behavioral health systems seeking to implement evidence-based treatments (EBTs may face challenges selecting EBTs given their limited resources. This study describes and illustrates one method to calculate cost related to training and consultation to assist system-level decisions about which EBTs to select.MethodsTraining, consultation, and indirect labor costs were calculated for seven commonly implemented EBTs. Using extant literature, we then estimated the diagnoses and populations for which each EBT was indicated. Diagnostic and demographic information from Medicaid claims data were obtained from a large behavioral health payer organization and used to estimate the number of covered people with whom the EBT could be used and to calculate implementation-associated costs per consumer.ResultsFindings suggest substantial cost to therapists and service systems related to EBT training and consultation. Training and consultation costs varied by EBT, from Dialectical Behavior Therapy at $238.07 to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy at $0.18 per potential consumer served. Total cost did not correspond with the number of prospective consumers served by an EBT.ConclusionA cost-metric that accounts for the prospective recipients of a given EBT within a given population may provide insight into how systems should prioritize training efforts. Future policy should consider the financial burden of EBT implementation in relation to the context of the population being served and begin a dialog in creating incentives for EBT use.

  4. Chronic constipation: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Lawrence; Riutta, Taylor; Kotecha, Jyoti; Rosser, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition seen in family practice among the elderly and women. There is no consensus regarding its exact definition, and it may be interpreted differently by physicians and patients. Physicians prescribe various treatments, and patients often adopt different over-the-counter remedies. Chronic constipation is either caused by slow colonic transit or pelvic floor dysfunction, and treatment differs accordingly. To update our knowledge of chronic constipation and its etiology and best-evidence treatment, information was synthesized from articles published in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Levels of evidence and recommendations were made according to the Strength of Recommendation taxonomy. The standard advice of increasing dietary fibers, fluids, and exercise for relieving chronic constipation will only benefit patients with true deficiency. Biofeedback works best for constipation caused by pelvic floor dysfunction. Pharmacological agents increase bulk or water content in the bowel lumen or aim to stimulate bowel movements. Novel classes of compounds have emerged for treating chronic constipation, with promising clinical trial data. Finally, the link between senna abuse and colon cancer remains unsupported. Chronic constipation should be managed according to its etiology and guided by the best evidence-based treatment.

  5. Successful Treatment of Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Disease in an HIV-Infected Child with a Linezolid-Containing Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srđan Roglić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Upon HIV infection diagnosis, an 8-month-old boy was transferred for evaluation of worsening respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP was diagnosed; the boy also had a nonhealing ulcer at the site of vaccination with Statens Serum Institut (Danish strain Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine and associated axillary lymphadenopathy. PCP treatment resulted in weaning from mechanical ventilation. Antimycobacterial treatment was immediately attempted but was discontinued because of hepatotoxicity. Over several months, he developed splenic lesions and then disseminated skin and cystic bone lesions. M. bovis was repeatedly cultured from both skin and bone lesions despite various multidrug antimycobacterial regimens which included linezolid. Eventually, treatment with a regimen of rifabutin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and linezolid led to definitive cure. Clinicians should consider a linezolid-containing regimen for treatment of severe disseminated BCG infection, especially if other drug regimens have failed. Although drug toxicity is a particular concern for young children, this patient received linezolid for 13 months without serious toxicity. This case also highlights the need for universal screening among pregnant women to prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Finally, routine immunization with BCG vaccine at birth should be questioned in countries with low and declining burden of tuberculosis.

  6. Training Methods to Improve Evidence-Based Medicine Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ozyigit

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based medicine (EBM is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. It is estimated that only 15% of medical interventions is evidence-based. Increasing demand, new technological developments, malpractice legislations, a very speed increase in knowledge and knowledge sources push the physicians forward for EBM, but at the same time increase load of physicians by giving them the responsibility to improve their skills. Clinical maneuvers are needed more, as the number of clinical trials and observational studies increase. However, many of the physicians, who are in front row of patient care do not use this increasing evidence. There are several examples related to different training methods in order to improve skills of physicians for evidence based practice. There are many training methods to improve EBM skills and these trainings might be given during medical school, during residency or as continuous trainings to the actual practitioners in the field. It is important to discuss these different training methods in our country as well and encourage dissemination of feasible and effective methods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(3.000: 245-254

  7. Identifying Elementary School Student Opinion Leaders for Engagement in Evidence-Based Program Adaptation and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiger, Christopher J.; Gibson, Jennifer E.; Passarelli, Rebecca E.; Flaspohler, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-based programs, such as bullying prevention, often demonstrate disappointing outcomes when widely disseminated. Engaging opinion leaders--those individuals whom others emulate and go to for advice--in the process of adaptation and implementation may improve outcomes. However, opinion leaders have the most influence on individuals who are…

  8. Population-Based Provider Engagement in Delivery of Evidence-Based Parenting Interventions: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Cheri J.; Prinz, Ronald J.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Population-wide interventions do not often address parenting, and relatively little is known about large scale dissemination of evidence-based parenting interventions. Most parenting interventions are not designed to reach the majority of parents in a geographic area or to influence prevalence rates for a problem, nor do they take full advantage…

  9. An audience research study to disseminate evidence about comprehensive state mental health parity legislation to US State policymakers: protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purtle, Jonathan; Lê-Scherban, Félice; Shattuck, Paul; Proctor, Enola K; Brownson, Ross C

    2017-06-26

    A large proportion of the US population has limited access to mental health treatments because insurance providers limit the utilization of mental health services in ways that are more restrictive than for physical health services. Comprehensive state mental health parity legislation (C-SMHPL) is an evidence-based policy intervention that enhances mental health insurance coverage and improves access to care. Implementation of C-SMHPL, however, is limited. State policymakers have the exclusive authority to implement C-SMHPL, but sparse guidance exists to inform the design of strategies to disseminate evidence about C-SMHPL, and more broadly, evidence-based treatments and mental illness, to this audience. The aims of this exploratory audience research study are to (1) characterize US State policymakers' knowledge and attitudes about C-SMHPL and identify individual- and state-level attributes associated with support for C-SMHPL; and (2) integrate quantitative and qualitative data to develop a conceptual framework to disseminate evidence about C-SMHPL, evidence-based treatments, and mental illness to US State policymakers. The study uses a multi-level (policymaker, state), mixed method (QUAN→qual) approach and is guided by Kingdon's Multiple Streams Framework, adapted to incorporate constructs from Aarons' Model of Evidence-Based Implementation in Public Sectors. A multi-modal survey (telephone, post-mail, e-mail) of 600 US State policymakers (500 legislative, 100 administrative) will be conducted and responses will be linked to state-level variables. The survey will span domains such as support for C-SMHPL, knowledge and attitudes about C-SMHPL and evidence-based treatments, mental illness stigma, and research dissemination preferences. State-level variables will measure factors associated with C-SMHPL implementation, such as economic climate and political environment. Multi-level regression will determine the relative strength of individual- and state

  10. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garattini, Silvio; Jakobsen, Janus C; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    was considered through literature searches combined with personal files. Treatments should generally not be chosen based only on evidence from observational studies or single randomised clinical trials. Systematic reviews with meta-analysis of all identifiable randomised clinical trials with Grading...... of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) assessment represent the highest level of evidence. Even though systematic reviews are trust worthier than other types of evidence, all levels of the evidence hierarchy are under threats from systematic errors (bias); design errors (abuse of surrogate...

  11. Prevention and Treatment of Smoking and Tobacco Use During Pregnancy in Selected Indigenous Communities in High-Income Countries of the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Gillian S; Lim, Ling Li; Mattes, Joerg

    2017-10-01

    Tobacco smoking during pregnancy is the most important modifiable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes and long-term health complications for mother and baby. Tobacco use during pregnancy has decreased in high-income countries but not in Indigenous women in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and Canada. This evidence-based review focuses on tobacco use among Indigenous pregnant women in high-income countries that share a history of European colonization. Indigenous women are more likely to use tobacco because of socioeconomic disadvantage, social norms, and poor access to culturally appropriate tobacco cessation support. Complications arising from tobacco smoking during pregnancy, such as low birth weight, prematurity, perinatal death, and sudden infant death syndrome, are much higher in Indigenous populations. Effective approaches to cessation in pregnant nonindigenous women involves behavioral counseling, with or without nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Higher nicotine metabolism during pregnancy and poor adherence may affect therapeutic levels of NRT. Only two randomized trials were conducted among Indigenous women: neither found a statistically significant difference in cessation rates between the treatment and comparison arms. Considerations should be given to (1) whole life course approaches to reduce tobacco use in Indigenous women, (2) prohibiting tobacco promotion and reducing access to alcohol for minors to prevent smoking initiation in Indigenous youth, and (3) training health-care professionals in culturally appropriate smoking cessation care to improve access to services. It is critical to ensure acceptability and feasibility of study designs, consult with the relevant Indigenous communities, and preempt implementation challenges. Research is needed into the effect of reducing or stopping smoking during pregnancy when using NRT on subsequent maternal and infant outcomes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  12. The Science, and Art, of Program Dissemination: Strategies, Successes, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this special issue is to provide readers with a greater awareness of the processes involved in dissemination, as well as existing supports that help disseminate and sustain evidence-based interventions. Although dissemination research is limited in most disciplines, it is particularly lacking in the social science field. Many…

  13. Decision making in advanced otosclerosis: an evidence-based strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkus, P.; van Loon, M.C.; Smit, C.F.G.M.; Smits, J.C.M.; de Cock, A.F.C.; Hensen, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: To propose an evidence-based strategy for the management of patients with advanced otosclerosis accompanied by severe to profound hearing loss. Study Design: Systematic review of the literature and development of treatment guidelines. Methods: A systematic review was conducted

  14. Evidence-based Dental Practice: Part I. Formulating Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is an approach to oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinically relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences.

  15. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopayian Kevork

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC". Discussion Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. Summary All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  16. Sicily statement on evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Martin; Summerskill, William; Glasziou, Paul; Cartabellotta, Antonino; Martin, Janet; Hopayian, Kevork; Porzsolt, Franz; Burls, Amanda; Osborne, James

    2005-01-05

    A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP) exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and a curriculum that outlines the minimum requirements for training health professionals in EBP. This consensus statement is based on current literature and incorporating the experience of delegates attending the 2003 Conference of Evidence-Based Health Care Teachers and Developers ("Signposting the future of EBHC"). Evidence-Based Practice has evolved in both scope and definition. Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) requires that decisions about health care are based on the best available, current, valid and relevant evidence. These decisions should be made by those receiving care, informed by the tacit and explicit knowledge of those providing care, within the context of available resources. Health care professionals must be able to gain, assess, apply and integrate new knowledge and have the ability to adapt to changing circumstances throughout their professional life. Curricula to deliver these aptitudes need to be grounded in the five-step model of EBP, and informed by ongoing research. Core assessment tools for each of the steps should continue to be developed, validated, and made freely available. All health care professionals need to understand the principles of EBP, recognise EBP in action, implement evidence-based policies, and have a critical attitude to their own practice and to evidence. Without these skills, professionals and organisations will find it difficult to provide 'best practice'.

  17. The evidence base for diabetes care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Williams, D. R. R. (David Robert Rhys)

    2002-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. Evidence-Based Definition and Classification: A Commentary . . . . . . Steve O'Rahilly 37 PART II: PREVENTION OF DIABETES 4. Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes...

  18. Delusions of Disseminated Fungosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Gassiep

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Delusional infestation is a rare monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis according to The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013. It can be a primary disorder or associated with an underlying psychological or physical disorder. It commonly presents as delusional parasitosis, and less than 1% may be fungi related. We present this case as it is a rare presentation of a rare condition. Case Presentation. Our patient is a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a 7-year history of delusional infestation manifested as a disseminated fungal infection. He had previously been reviewed by multiple physicians for the same with no systemic illness diagnosed. After multiple reviews and thorough investigation we diagnosed him with a likely delusional disorder. As is common with this patient cohort he refused psychiatric review or antipsychotic medication. Conclusion. A delusion of a disseminated fungal infestation is a rare condition. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as these patients often refuse to believe the investigation results and diagnosis. Furthermore, they either refuse or are noncompliant with treatment. Multidisciplinary outpatient evaluation may be the best way to allay patient fears and improve treatment compliance.

  19. Evidence Based Education: un quadro storico

    OpenAIRE

    Giuliano Vivanet

    2013-01-01

    Nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, nel pensiero pedagogico anglosassone, si è affermata una cultura dell’evidenza cui ci si riferisce con l’espressione “evidence based education” (EBE). Secondo tale prospettiva, le decisioni in ambito educativo dovrebbero essere assunte sulla base delle conoscenze che la ricerca empirica offre in merito alla minore o maggiore efficacia delle differenti opzioni didattiche. Si tratta di un approccio (denominato “evidence based practice”) che ha origine in ambito m...

  20. Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

  1. Direct-to-Consumer Marketing: A Complementary Approach to Traditional Dissemination and implementation Efforts for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sara J.

    2014-01-01

    The overall chasm between those who need treatment for mental health and substance abuse (M/SU) and those who receive effective treatment consists of two, interrelated gaps: the research-to-practice gap and the treatment gap. Prior efforts to disseminate evidence-based practice (EBP) for M/SU have predominantly targeted the research-to-practice gap, by focusing efforts toward treatment providers. This article introduces direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing that targets patients and caregivers as a complementary approach to existing dissemination efforts. Specific issues discussed include: rationale for DTC marketing based on the concept of push versus pull marketing; overview of key stakeholders involved in DTC marketing; and description of the Marketing Mix planning framework. The applicability of these issues to the dissemination of EBP for M/SU is discussed. PMID:25937710

  2. Direct-to-Consumer Marketing: A Complementary Approach to Traditional Dissemination and implementation Efforts for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sara J

    2015-03-01

    The overall chasm between those who need treatment for mental health and substance abuse (M/SU) and those who receive effective treatment consists of two, interrelated gaps: the research-to-practice gap and the treatment gap. Prior efforts to disseminate evidence-based practice (EBP) for M/SU have predominantly targeted the research-to-practice gap, by focusing efforts toward treatment providers. This article introduces direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing that targets patients and caregivers as a complementary approach to existing dissemination efforts. Specific issues discussed include: rationale for DTC marketing based on the concept of push versus pull marketing; overview of key stakeholders involved in DTC marketing; and description of the Marketing Mix planning framework. The applicability of these issues to the dissemination of EBP for M/SU is discussed.

  3. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Remah M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG, American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM, Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG. Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians.

  4. Evidence-based management: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sam K

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a review of evidence-based management (EBM), exploring whether management activities within healthcare have been, or can be, subject to the same scientific framework as clinical practice. The evidence-based approach was initially examined, noting the hierarchy of evidence ranging from randomized control trials to clinical anecdote. The literature varied in its degree of criticism of this approach; the most common concern referring to the assumed superiority of positivism. However, evidence-based practice was generally accepted as the best way forward. Stewart (1998) offered the only detailed exposition of EBM, outlining a necessary 'attitude of mind' both for EBM and for the creation of a research culture. However, the term 'clinical effectiveness' emerged as a possible replacement buzz-word for EBM (McClarey 1998). The term appears to encompass the sentiments of the evidence-based approach, but with a concomitant concern for economic factors. In this paper the author has examined the divide between those who viewed EBM as an activity for managers to make their own practice accountable and those who believed it to be a facilitative practice to help clinicians with evidence-based practice. Most papers acknowledged the limited research base for management activities within the health service and offered some explanation such as government policy constraints and lack of time. Nevertheless, the overall emphasis is that ideally there should be a management culture firmly based in evidence.

  5. Evidence-based lifestyle interventions for obesity and Type 2 diabetes: The Look AHEAD intensive lifestyle intervention as exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Delia Smith; Coulon, Sandra M; Monroe, Courtney M; Wilson, Dawn K

    2016-10-01

    The majority of individuals with Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are overweight or obese, and this excess adiposity negatively impacts cardiovascular risk and contributes to challenges in disease management. Treatment of obesity by behavioral lifestyle intervention, within the context of diabetes, produces broad and clinically meaningful health improvements, and recent studies demonstrate long-term sustained weight management success with behavioral lifestyle interventions. Details of the Look AHEAD intensive lifestyle intervention are provided as an exemplar approach to the secondary prevention of T2D and obesity. The presence of behavior change expertise in the development and delivery of evidence-based behavioral weight control is discussed, and issues of adaptation and dissemination are raised, with a model to guide these important steps provided. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. [Necessity to adopt and disseminate therapeutic schemes for the treatment of American tegumentary leishmaniasis in Paraná].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, U; Spinoza, R P; La Salvia Filho, V; Guilherme, A L; Lima, A P; Junqueira, G M; Misuta, N M; Nerilo Sobrinho, A; de Lima, E M

    1991-01-01

    American cutaneous leishmaniasis has shown an endemic character in areas of North-North-west Paraná State, which were populated in 40's, where residual forests persist with intense modifications. The infection has been found mainly in males, but was found also in females and children and in many individuals of a same family. 513 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis notified to SUCAM by clinical diagnosis were investigated. Treatment was begun with Glucantime at State Health Centers or at SUCAM. Of 513 treated patients 260 (50.67%) were considered clinically cured. The remaining 253 (49.33%) abandoned treatment. The quantity of Glucantime supplied to the patients varied from 10 vials to more than 200, with or without intervals during the treatment. Two hundred and seventeen (85.46%) patients among 260 received from 10 to 75 vials. The occurrence of leishmaniasis in 163 (31.75%) women and in 34 (6.62%) children, of both sexes, up to 10 years old, suggests domiciliary transmission. It's not known if the 253 (49.33%) individuals who abandoned the treatment recovered. This high number shows the necessity of better knowledge of the consequences that can occur due to incomplete treatment.

  7. Evaluation of family treatment models for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James

    2011-07-01

    Interest in the effectiveness of family interventions for eating disorders has increased over the past 5 years. This review considers the theoretical justification and current evidence base for the use of family treatments for eating disorders in children and adolescents. Family-based treatment is the best studied treatment. It has the strongest evidence base for effectiveness for anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Family-based treatment can be delivered in several formats and doses, and preliminary data suggest it can be disseminated by training and manuals. There is a more limited evidence base demonstrating the usefulness of family interventions for bulimia nervosa in adolescents. The implications of the findings of this review are that family interventions are the current first-line treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa and promising for adolescent bulimia nervosa. Pilot studies suggest that family interventions can be disseminated in diverse clinical settings.

  8. Hormophysa triquerta polyphenol, an elixir that deters CXCR4- and COX2-dependent dissemination destiny of treatment-resistant pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindan, Sheeja; Ramraj, Satishkumar; Kandasamy, Kathiresan; Thirugnanasambandan, Somasundaram S; Somasundaram, Dinesh Babu; Herman, Terence S; Aravindan, Natarajan

    2017-01-24

    Therapy-resistant pancreatic cancer (PC) cells play a crucial role in tumor relapse, recurrence, and metastasis. Recently, we showed the anti-PC potential of an array of seaweed polyphenols and identified efficient drug deliverables. Herein, we investigated the benefit of one such deliverable, Hormophysa triquerta polyphenol (HT-EA), in regulating the dissemination physiognomy of therapy-resistant PC cells in vitro,and residual PC in vivo. Human PC cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), with/without HT-EA pre-treatment were examined for the alterations in the tumor invasion/metastasis (TIM) transcriptome (93 genes, QPCR-profiling). Utilizing a mouse model of residual PC, we investigated the benefit of HT-EA in the translation regulation of crucial TIM targets (TMA-IHC). Radiation activated 30, 50, 15, and 38 TIM molecules in surviving Panc-1, Panc-3.27, BxPC3, and MiaPaCa-2 cells. Of these, 15, 44, 12, and 26 molecules were suppressed with HT-EA pre-treatment. CXCR4 and COX2 exhibited cell-line-independent increases after IR, and was completely suppressed with HT-EA, across all PC cells. HT-EA treatment resulted in translational repression of IR-induced CXCR4, COX2, β-catenin, MMP9, Ki-67, BAPX, PhPT-1, MEGF10, and GRB10 in residual PC. Muting CXCR4 or COX2 regulated the migration/invasion potential of IR-surviving cells, while forced expression of CXCR4 or COX2 significantly increased migration/invasion capabilities of PC cells. Further, treatment with HT-EA significantly inhibited IR-induced and CXCR4/COX2 forced expression-induced PC cell migration/invasion. This study (i) documents the TIM blueprint in therapy-resistant PC cells, (ii) defines the role of CXCR4 and COX2 in induced metastatic potential, and (iii) recognizes the potential of HT-EA in deterring the CXCR4/COX2-dependent dissemination destiny of therapy-resistant residual PC cells.

  9. Barriers to the dissemination of four harm reduction strategies: a survey of addiction treatment providers in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham John A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A sample of service providers at addictions agencies' in Ontario were interviewed by telephone to assess attitudes toward, anticipated internal and external barriers to implementing, and expected benefits of four harm reduction strategies: needle exchange, moderate drinking goals, methadone treatment, and provision of free condoms to clients. Respondents were also asked to define harm reduction, list its most important elements, and describe what they find most troubling and most appealing about harm reduction. Attitudes toward harm reduction in general and the services provided at each agency were also assessed. Results indicated that the service providers surveyed had positive attitudes toward each of the four harm reduction strategies and harm reduction in general, and the majority of respondents were aware of the benefits associated with each strategy. Almost all of the agencies surveyed allowed for moderate drinking outcomes in the treatment of alcohol problems, and most agencies provided free condoms to clients. In terms of barriers, anticipated negative community reaction to needle exchange, methadone treatment, and free condoms was a major concern for the majority of respondents. Lack of staff, of funding, or anticipated staff resistance were also cited as potential barriers to introducing these strategies. In the case of methadone maintenance, the unavailability of a qualified physician was listed as the primary constraint. Implications for future efforts directed at encouraging the adoption of these strategies and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  10. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #741

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) request asks for information relating to funding for virtual schools. The EBE Request Desk was asked to provide a scan of states for information on how they fund virtual schools and what the current funding levels are (most current year for which such data is available). This paper provides answers to this…

  11. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #510

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) request focused on research-supported vocabulary interventions for middle elementary students. Limited vocabulary is an important factor in underachievement of children in disadvantaged homes. Children with larger vocabularies find reading easier, read more widely, and do better in school (Lubliner & Smetana,…

  12. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #359

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) response describes characteristics of graduation coach initiatives in three states (Georgia, Alabama, and California). Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Southeast has received over 19 requests for information on various initiatives, programs or research related to improving graduation rates. For example, the…

  13. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #798

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Evidence Based Education (EBE) #555 was in response to the request "Is there any new compelling research for turning around low-performing schools?" The articles included in that document are on target, but include articles through 2009. This EBE Request seeks to provide an updated review of recent research (2009-present) regarding school…

  14. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #555

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) Request seeks to provide an overview of recent research regarding school improvement and reform with special concentration on turning around chronically low-performing schools. The response is divided into four main sections: Research on Effective Methods for Turning Around Low-Performing Schools, Frameworks for…

  15. Evidence-based care and the curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winning, T.; Needleman, I.; Rohlin, M.; Carrassi, A.; Chadwick, B.; Eaton, K.; Hardwick, K.; Ivancakova, R.; Jallaludin, R.L.; Johnsen, D.; Kim, J.G.; Lekkas, D.; Li, D.; Onisei, D.; Pissiotis, A.; Reynolds, P.; Tonni, I.; Vanobbergen, J.; Vassileva, R.; Virtanen, J.; Wesselink, P.R.; Wilson, N.

    2008-01-01

    An evidence-based (EB) approach has been a significant driver in reforming healthcare over the past two decades. This change has extended across a broad range of health professions, including oral healthcare. A key element in achieving an EB approach to oral healthcare is educating our

  16. Evidence-based management of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Colleen

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is a potential life-threatening oncologic emergency. Early recognition and prompt intervention can decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines Committee updated its recommendations in 2012, outlining specific evidence-based interventions to manage sepsis.

  17. Pilot projects in Evidence Based Policy Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreugdenhil, H.S.I.; Ker Rault, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In Evidence Based Policy Making, pilot projects have been recognized as important tools to develop ‘evidence’ of policy innovations. This paper presents a theoretical and empirical study of three water management pilot projects in the Rhine basin to deepen understanding of how they can contri-bute

  18. Evidence-based practice within nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laville, Martine; Segrestin, Berenice; Alligier, Maud

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based clinical research poses special barriers in the field of nutrition. The present review summarises the main barriers to research in the field of nutrition that are not common to all randomised clinical trials or trials on rare diseases and highlights opportunities for im...

  19. Evidence-Based Special Education in the Context of Scarce Evidence-Based Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are supported as generally effective for populations of learners by bodies of high-quality and experimental research and, when aligned with stakeholder values and practical needs, should be prioritized for implementation. However, evidence-based practices are not currently available for all learner types in all…

  20. Consumer engagement and the development, evaluation and dissemination of evidence-based parenting programs

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Kirby, James N.

    2011-01-01

    A consumer perspective can contribute much to enhancing the “ecological fit” of population level parenting interventions so they meet the needs of parents. This approach involves building relationships with consumer groups and soliciting consumer input into the relevance and acceptability of interventions, clarifying the enablers and barriers to engagement and involvement of parents, and clarifying variables that influence a parent’s program completion. The adoption of a more collaborative ap...

  1. Consumer Engagement and the Development, Evaluation, and Dissemination of Evidence-Based Parenting Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Kirby, James N.

    2012-01-01

    A consumer perspective can contribute much to enhancing the "ecological fit" of population-level parenting interventions so they meet the needs of parents. This approach involves building relationships with consumer groups and soliciting consumer input into the relevance and acceptability of interventions, clarifying the enablers and barriers to…

  2. [Acute bronchiolitis: evaluation of evidence-based therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinón-Torres, F; Rodríguez Núñez, A; Martinón Sánchez, J M

    2001-10-01

    Bronchiolitis is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants and produces significant morbidity. Limited progress has been made in the treatment of this disease and, in many cases, the therapy employed is controversial and mainly based on general recommendations and not on evidence-based strategies. This report uses evidence-based methodology to provide a critical review of the data available on the treatment of acute bronchiolitis (understood as the first episode of respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis in a previously healthy infant). After this analysis, we conclude that the only justifiable therapeutic interventions in these patients are supportive treatment, nebulized epinephrine and mechanical ventilation. Other therapies such us physiotherapy, nebulization, heliox, anticholinergics or exogenous surfactant, among others, require further randomized controlled trials to determine their utility. No evidence supports the routine use of corticosteroids, beta-adrenergic drugs, antibiotics, immunoglobulins, interferon, vitamin A or ribavirin in these patients. Finally, we consider that a national consensus review for the implementation of evidence-based clinical practical guidelines on the management of acute bronchiolitis would be of great interest.

  3. Use of Evidence-Based Practice and Barriers to Utilize Research in Rural Social Work Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mingun

    2016-01-01

    In this study the author explores the level of use of evidence-based practice and the extent of barriers to research utilization in rural practice settings. Ninety-one social work field instructors from the rural areas of Southeast Ohio reported moderate use of evidence-based practice in their treatment process. The majority of field instructors also identified significant barriers to research utilization in practice. In addition, the use of evidence-based practice was associated with barriers to utilize research in the areas of field instructors' characteristics, organizational settings and limits, and communication. Implications include suggestions for enhancing evidence-based practice in rural settings.

  4. [The historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare and clinical nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jung-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) emphasizes the integration of the best research evidence with patient values, specialist suggestions, and clinical circumstances during the process of clinical decision-making. EBHC is a recognized core competency in modern healthcare. Nursing is a professional discipline of empirical science that thrives in an environment marked by advances in knowledge and technology in medicine as well as in nursing. Clinical nurses must elevate their skills and professional qualifications, provide efficient and quality health services, and promote their proficiency in EBHC. The Institute of Medicine in the United States indicates that evidence-based research results often fail to disseminate efficiently to clinical decision makers. This problem highlights the importance of better promoting the evidence-based healthcare fundamentals and competencies to frontline clinical nurses. This article describes the historical background and present development of evidence-based healthcare from the perspective of modern clinical nursing in light of the importance of evidence-based healthcare in clinical nursing; describes the factors associated with evidence-based healthcare promotion; and suggests strategies and policies that may improve the promotion and application of EBHC in clinical settings. The authors hope that this paper provides a reference for efforts to improve clinical nursing in the realms of EBHC training, promotion, and application.

  5. Dissemination Strategy Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Kjems, Jørgen; Farinetti, Laura

    This report describes the dissemination and exploitation strategy for project Virtual Campus Hub (EU FP7 contract RI-283746). The project duration is October 2011-13 and the dissemination and exploitation plan will be revised continuously during the project’s lifecycle.......This report describes the dissemination and exploitation strategy for project Virtual Campus Hub (EU FP7 contract RI-283746). The project duration is October 2011-13 and the dissemination and exploitation plan will be revised continuously during the project’s lifecycle....

  6. Increased levels of multiresistant bacteria and resistance genes after wastewater treatment and their dissemination into Lake Geneva, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine eCzekalski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, very little is known about the fate and perseverance of multiresistant bacteria and their resistance genes in natural aquatic environments. Treated, but partly also untreated sewage of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland is discharged into Vidy bay (Lake Geneva resulting in high levels of contamination in this part of the lake. In the present work we have studied the prevalence of multiresistant bacteria and resistance genes in the wastewater stream of Lausanne. Samples from hospital and municipal raw sewage, treated effluent from Lausanne’s wastewater treatment plant (WTP as well as lake water and sediment samples obtained close to the WTP outlet pipe and a remote site close to a drinking water pump were evaluated for the prevalence of multiresistant bacteria. Selected isolates were identified (16S rRNA gene fragment sequencing and characterized with regards to further resistances, resistance genes, and plasmids. Mostly, studies investigating this issue have relied on cultivation-based approaches. However, the limitations of these tools are well known, in particular for environmental microbial communities, and cultivation-independent molecular tools should be applied in parallel in order to take non-culturable organisms into account. Here we directly quantified the sulfonamide resistance genes sul1 and sul2 from environmental DNA extracts using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR. Hospital sewage contained the highest load of multiresistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. Wastewater treatment reduced the total bacterial load but evidence for selection of extremely multiresistant strains and accumulation of resistance genes was observed. Our data clearly indicated pollution of sediments with antibiotic resistance genes in the vicinity of the WTP outlet. The potential of lakes as reservoirs of multiresistant bacteria and potential risks are discussed.

  7. Evidence-based evaluation of therapeutic measures for sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Juan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side effects of various treatment for sleep disorders in order to provide the best therapeutic regimen for the evidence-based treatment of sleep disorders. Methods Sleep disorder, insomnia, restless legs syndrome or RLS, obstructive sleep apnea or OSA, narcolepsy, REM behaviour disorder or RBD, treatment or therapy were used as retrieval words. Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect were used for retrieval, and manual searching was also used. Related clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, randomized controlled clinical trials, retrospective case analysis, case-observation studies and reviews were collected and evaluated by Jadad Scale. Results Forty related articles were selected as following: 6 clinical guidelines, 12 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 2 retrospective case analysis, 1 case-observation study and 14 reviews. Thirty-three were of high quality, while 7 were of low quality with score. According to the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy and side effects of various therapies, it is suggested as following: 1 insomnia is the most common in sleep disorders; the treatment methods of insomnia mainly include drug therapy and cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT; the two kinds of therapy have their own advantages and disadvantages, and the combination therapy of drugs and CBT is the best treatment plan. 2 The first-line treatment of primary RLS is dopamine agonists and anti-seizure drugs; however, the treatment of secondary RLS is mainly etiologic treatment. 3 The main treatments of OSAS are nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, oral orthotics and surgery, and nCPAP is the first-line treatments. 4 The medication of narcolepsy is mainly modafinil, hydroxy butyric acid sodium and antidepressants, and the specific choosingshould accord to clinical classifications. 5 The main treatments of RBD include general treatments such as avoiding triggers, insuring the

  8. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Amy M.; Bergman, R. Lindsay; Piacentini, John; McGuire, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%–2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight) are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress. PMID:27594793

  9. Authoritative knowledge, evidence-based medicine, and behavioral pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennell, J H

    1999-12-01

    Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious and judicious use of current best knowledge in making decisions about the care of individual patients, often from well-designed, randomized, controlled trials. Authoritative medicine is the traditional approach to learning and practicing medicine, but no one authority has comprehensive scientific knowledge. Archie Cochrane proposed that every medical specialty should compile a list of all of the randomized, controlled trials within its field to be available for those who wish to know what treatments are effective. This was done first for obstetrics by a group collecting and critically analyzing all of the randomized trials and then indicating procedures every mother should have and those that no mother should have. Support during labor was used as an example. Similar groups are now active in almost all specialties, with information available on the Internet in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Developmental-behavioral pediatrics should be part of this movement to evidence-based medicine.

  10. Evidence-Based Assessment of Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Rapp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is a neuropsychiatric illness that often develops in childhood, affects 1%–2% of the population, and causes significant impairment across the lifespan. The first step in identifying and treating OCD is a thorough evidence-based assessment. This paper reviews the administration pragmatics, psychometric properties, and limitations of commonly used assessment measures for adults and youths with OCD. This includes diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom severity scales, self-report measures, and parent/child measures. Additionally, adjunctive measures that assess important related factors (ie, impairment, family accommodation, and insight are also discussed. This paper concludes with recommendations for an evidence-based assessment based on individualized assessment goals that include generating an OCD diagnosis, determining symptom severity, and monitoring treatment progress.

  11. Evidence Based Education: un quadro storico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vivanet

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nel corso dell’ultimo decennio, nel pensiero pedagogico anglosassone, si è affermata una cultura dell’evidenza cui ci si riferisce con l’espressione “evidence based education” (EBE. Secondo tale prospettiva, le decisioni in ambito educativo dovrebbero essere assunte sulla base delle conoscenze che la ricerca empirica offre in merito alla minore o maggiore efficacia delle differenti opzioni didattiche. Si tratta di un approccio (denominato “evidence based practice” che ha origine in ambito medico e che in seguito ha trovato applicazione in differenti domini delle scienze sociali. L’autore presenta un quadro introduttivo all’EBE, dando conto delle sue origini e dei differenti significati di cui è portatrice.

  12. Creative teaching an evidence-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sale, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    This book contains an evidence-based pedagogic guide to enable any motivated teaching/training professional to be able to teach effectively and creatively. It firstly summarises the extensive research field on human psychological functioning relating to learning and how this can be fully utilised in the design and facilitation of quality learning experiences. It then demonstrates what creativity actually 'looks like' in terms of teaching practices, modelling the underpinning processes of creative learning design and how to apply these in lesson planning. The book, having established an evidence-based and pedagogically driven approach to creative learning design, extensively focuses on key challenges facing teaching professionals today. These include utilising information technologies in blended learning formats, differentiating instruction, and developing self-directed learners who can think well. The main purpose of the book is to demystify what it means to teach creatively, explicitly demonstrating the pr...

  13. [Looking for evidence-based medical informatics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    e-Health is experiencing a difficult time. On the one side, the forecast is for a bright digital health future created by precision medicine and smart devices. On the other hand, most large scale e-health projects struggle to make a difference and are often controversial. Both futures fail because they are not evidence-based. Medical informatics should follow the example of evidence-based medicine, i.e. conduct rigorous research that gives us evidence to solve real world problems, synthesise that evidence and then apply it strictly. We already have the tools for creating a different universe. What we need is evidence, will, a culture of learning, and hard work.

  14. Evidence-Based Advances in Reptile Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A; Perry, Sean M

    2017-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine allows veterinarians to practice high-quality medicine, because the basis for all decision making is quantitative, objective, and reproducible. Case reports and case series are limited in their scope and application. Cross-sectional studies, likewise, cannot provide answers to specific variable testing with a temporal application. It is essential for the reptile specialty to expand into case-control studies, cohort studies, and experimental/intervention studies. Unfortunately, much of the reptile literature remains limited to descriptive studies. This article reviews current evidence-based topics in reptile medicine and shares how everyone practicing in the field can contribute to improving this specialty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Professionalism and evidence-based practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2015-01-01

    The idea of evidence- based practice is influential in public welfare services, including education. The idea is controversial, however, not least because it involves a poten tial redefinition of the relation ship between knowledge, authority and professionalism. This is discussed based on a study...... of evidence- based methods in Danish pre-school education and care. The management sees the use of these methods as strengthening pre- school teacher professionalism, but the actual practices in the day-careinstitutions are ambiguous. In some cases, using the methods becomes an end in itself and tends...... to displace important educational objectives. In other cases, the methods are reflectively adjusted to a given context. Used in this way only, evid ence-based practice and methodology is a valuable resource for professional practice in education. From such a perspective, at least some types of research based...

  16. Evidence-based pathology: umbilical cord coiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, T Y

    2010-12-01

    The generation of a pathology test result must be based on criteria that are proven to be acceptably reproducible and clinically relevant to be evidence-based. This review de-constructs the umbilical cord coiling index to illustrate how it can stray from being evidence-based. Publications related to umbilical cord coiling were retrieved and analysed with regard to how the umbilical coiling index was calculated, abnormal coiling was defined and reference ranges were constructed. Errors and other influences that can occur with the measurement of the length of the umbilical cord or of the number of coils can compromise the generation of the coiling index. Definitions of abnormal coiling are not consistent in the literature. Reference ranges defining hypocoiling or hypercoiling have not taken those potential errors or the possible effect of gestational age into account. Even the way numerical test results in anatomical pathology are generated, as illustrated by the umbilical coiling index, warrants a critical analysis into its evidence base to ensure that they are reproducible or free from errors.

  17. Evidence-based librarianship: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, J D

    2000-10-01

    To demonstrate how the core characteristics of both evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based health care (EBHC) can be adapted to health sciences librarianship. Narrative review essay involving development of a conceptual framework. The author describes the central features of EBM and EBHC. Following each description of a central feature, the author then suggests ways that this feature applies to health sciences librarianship. First, the decision-making processes of EBM and EBHC are compatible with health sciences librarianship. Second, the EBM and EBHC values of favoring rigorously produced scientific evidence in decision making are congruent with the core values of librarianship. Third, the hierarchical levels of evidence can be applied to librarianship with some modifications. Library researchers currently favor descriptive-survey and case-study methods over systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other higher levels of evidence. The library literature nevertheless contains diverse examples of randomized controlled trials, controlled-comparison studies, and cohort studies conducted by health sciences librarians. Health sciences librarians are confronted with making many practical decisions. Evidence-based librarianship offers a decision-making framework, which integrates the best available research evidence. By employing this framework and the higher levels of research evidence it promotes, health sciences librarians can lay the foundation for more collaborative and scientific endeavors.

  18. Surviving or thriving: quality assurance mechanisms to promote innovation in the development of evidence-based parenting interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew R; Kirby, James N

    2015-04-01

    Parenting interventions have the potential to make a significant impact to the prevention and treatment of major social and mental health problems of children. However, parenting interventions fail to do so because program developers pay insufficient attention to the broader ecological context that influences the adoption and implementation of evidence-based interventions. This context includes the professional and scientific community, end users, consumers, and broader sociopolitical environment within which parenting services are delivered. This paper presents an iterative stage model of quality assurance steps to guide ongoing research and development particularly those related to program innovations including theory building, intervention development, pilot testing, efficacy and effectiveness trials, program refinement, dissemination, and planning for implementation and political advocacy. The key challenges associated with each phase of the research and development process are identified. Stronger consumer participation throughout the entire process from initial program design to wider community dissemination is an important, but an often ignored part of the process. Specific quality assurance mechanisms are discussed that increase accountability, professional, and consumer confidence in an intervention and the evidence supporting its efficacy.

  19. Dissemination and use of a participatory ergonomics guide for workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerd, Dwayne; King, Trevor; Keown, Kiera; Slack, Tesha; Cole, Donald C; Irvin, Emma; Amick, Benjamin C; Bigelow, Philip

    2016-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) result in lost-time injury claims and lost productivity worldwide, placing a substantial burden on workers and workplaces. Participatory ergonomics (PE) is a popular approach to reducing MSDs; however, there are challenges to implementing PE programmes. Using evidence to overcome challenges may be helpful but the impacts of doing so are unknown. We sought to disseminate an evidence-based PE tool and to describe its use. An easy-to-use, evidence-based PE Guide was disseminated to workplace parties, who were surveyed about using the tool. The greatest barrier to using the tool was a lack of time. Reported tool use included for training purposes, sharing and integrating the tool into existing programmes. New actions related to tool use included training, defining team responsibilities and suggesting programme implementation steps. Evidence-based tools could help ergonomists overcome some challenges involved in implementing injury reduction programmes such as PE. Practitioner Summary Practitioners experience challenges implementing programmes to reduce the burden of MSDs in workplaces. Implementing participatory interventions requires multiple workplace parties to be 'on-board'. Disseminating and using evidence-based guides may help to overcome these challenges. Using evidence-based tools may help ergonomics practitioners implement PE programmes.

  20. Disseminated histoplasmosis in an 'immunocompetent' child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rare case of severe disseminated histoplasmosis in a 7-year-old boy with apparently normal immune function is described. Current recommendations for diagnostic investigations, monitoring and the treatment of this disease with amphotericin B and itraconazole are reviewed.

  1. [Severe pre-eclampsia. An evidence-based practice proposal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Pérez-Caballero, P; Verdeguer-Ribes, S; Vila-Montañés, M

    2013-01-01

    There are several treatment proposals for the obstetric patient with pre-eclampsia, but there is limited evidence on the adequacy of standard treatment. International healthcare organisations recommend that hospitals or anaesthesia departments have written guidelines, protocols or recommendations for dealing with common or severe situations. We propose evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of pre-eclampsia. A literature review was performed using several sources, bibliography databases, recommendations made by specialist societies, and reviews. Four anaesthesiologists reviewed the references selected, in order to design clinical questions (these were obtained from recent pre-eclampsia review articles). Consensus of at least 3 out of 4 experts was required. The Oxford criteria for evidence were chosen to classify the scientific articles, and the Jadad score was applied to the final articles selected. A total of 50 clinical questions were designed and answered. These were classified into: general questions, influence of the type of delivery, pre-anaesthesia evaluation, peripartum treatment (including analgesia and anaesthesia), eclampsia, post-delivery period, and intensive care and transport. Most of the responses showed low scientific evidence. Evidence-based recommendations for severe pre-eclampsia treatment were provided with special emphasis on the anaesthesiologist point of view. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence Based Practice: Science? Or Art? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Koufogiannakis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP is a strategy to bridge research and practice. Generally EBLIP is seen as a movement to encourage and give practitioners the means to incorporate research into their practice, where it previously may have been lacking. The widely accepted definition of EBLIP (Booth, 2000 stresses three aspects that contribute to a practice that is evidence based: 1 "the best available evidence;" 2 "moderated by user needs and preferences;" 3 "applied to improve the quality of professional judgements." The area that the EBLIP movement has focused on is how to create and understand the best available research evidence. CE courses, critical appraisal checklists, and many articles have been written to address a need for librarian education in this area, and it seems that strides have been made.But very little in the EBLIP literature talks about how we make professional judgements, or moderate evidence based on our user needs and preferences. Likewise, how do we make good evidence based decisions when our evidence base is weak. These things seem to be elements we just take for granted or can’t translate into words. It is in keeping with tacit knowledge that librarians just seem to have or acquire skills with education and on the job experience. Tacit knowledge is "knowledge that is not easily articulated, and frequently involves knowledge of how to do things. We can infer its existence only by observing behaviour and determining that this sort of knowledge is a precondition for effective performance" (Patel, Arocha, & Kaufman, 1999, p.78. It is something that is difficult to translate into an article or guideline for how we work. I think of this area as the "art" of evidence based practice. And the art is crucial to being an evidence based practitioner.Science = systematized knowledge, explicit research, methodological examination, investigation, dataArt = professional knowledge of your craft, intuition

  3. 'Literacy Octopus' Dissemination Trial: Evaluation Report and Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Pippa; Rabiasz, Adam; Styles, Ben

    2017-01-01

    The "'Literacy Octopus' Dissemination Trial" aimed to test the impact on pupil outcomes of disseminating research summaries and evidence-based resources to schools. The materials aimed to support teaching and learning of Key Stage 2 literacy and were created by leading organisations with experience of engaging schools in evidence use.…

  4. Dissemination and Exploitation Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio; Fransson, Torsten

    of Technology in Sweden, Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. The project is partially funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme (project no. RI-283746). This report describes the final dissemination and exploitation strategy...... for project Virtual Campus Hub. A preliminary dissemination and exploitation plan was setup early in the project as described in the deliverable D6.1 Dissemination strategy paper - preliminary version. The plan has been revised on a monthly basis during the project’s lifecycle in connection with the virtual...

  5. Reinventing Mpowerment for black men: long-term community implementation of an evidence-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin Lin; Forney, Jason C; Hubbard, Peter; Camacho, Lizeth M

    2012-03-01

    Although research on the dissemination of evidence-based programs to community providers has rapidly grown, research describing implementation of evidence-based efforts remains a central need. Insight on implementation may aid in developing approaches to assisting organizations to use a variety of evidence-based practices effectively and to improve the design of programs that can and will be used faithfully. This mixed-method case study provides a descriptive account of the implementation of an evidence-based program designed principally for white gay and bisexual young men, the Mpowerment Project, in the 4th and 5th years after its initial adoption by an organization serving black gay and bisexual men. We identify factors that have shaped how the program has evolved and is currently operated. The case study results highlight how the dynamic interaction of practice-based experiences, skills, relationships, local context, and practitioner judgments about the relevance and credibility of evidence for specific actions propel the reinvention of evidence-based program procedures. Implications for research and practice are provided.

  6. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evidence-Based Advances in Ferret Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh; Chassang, Lucile; Zoller, Graham

    2017-09-01

    This literature review covers approximately 35 years of veterinary medicine. This article develops the current state of knowledge in pet ferret medicine regarding the most common diseases according to evidence-based data and gives insight into further axis of research. Literature review was conducted through identification of keywords (title + ferret) with Web-based database searching. To appreciate the methodological quality and the level of evidence of each article included in the review, full-text versions were reviewed and questions addressed in the articles were formulated. Analysis of the articles' content was performed by the authors, and relevant clinical information was extracted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Managing and reviewing evidence-based changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Helen; Price, Lynda

    Nurses lead many projects to manage change aimed at improving patient safety and care. This two-part series offers practical guidance on how to bring about an evidence-based change in practice, and how to demonstrate the success, or otherwise, of that change. Part 2 is concerned with discovering why the practice is falling short, how to implement improvements and measure the effect of the changes. It also highlights ways in which nurses can use their work as part of the revalidation process.

  9. Evidence-Based Medicine: Breast Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the key decisions in patient evaluation for cosmetic breast augmentation. 2. Cite key decisions in preoperative planning. 3. Discuss the risks and complications, and key patient education points in breast augmentation. Breast augmentation remains one of the most popular procedures in plastic surgery. The integral information necessary for proper patient selection, preoperative assessment, and surgical approaches are discussed. Current data regarding long term safety and complications are presented to guide the plastic surgeon to an evidence-based approach to the patient seeking breast enhancement to obtain optimal results.

  10. The value of gynecologic cancer follow-up: evidence-based ignorance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Henrik; Jensen, Mette B; Kilsmark, Jannie

    2010-01-01

    To explore the extent of evidence-based data and cost-utility of follow-up after primary treatment of endometrial and ovarian cancer, addressing perspectives of technology, organization, economics, and patients....

  11. Controversies in multiple myeloma: Evidence-based update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Inhye E; Mailankody, Sham

    2016-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved 10 new drugs for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) over the last two decades. The influx of new anti-myeloma agents with high efficacy and acceptable tolerability add complexity to the clinical decision-making process. First, treatment of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) remains investigational to date, although a randomized trial showed a survival gain in high-risk patients receiving lenalidomide. Second, in newly diagnosed MM, the majority of contemporary induction regimens have been studied in single-arm trials or compared to an older regimen, which complicates evidence-based treatment selection. Third, the role of consolidation chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) needs to be revisited in the context of highly effective agents, as newer regimens- such as carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone-are able to achieve extremely deep responses equivalent to or exceeding those seen after conventional induction and ASCT. Fourth, risks and benefits of maintenance therapy should also be redefined and individualized, as long-term survival and safety data accumulate. Here we selected four clinical settings where controversies exist, reviewed evidences behind conflicting treatment strategies, and asked myeloma experts to discuss evidence-based recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards evidence-based medical education in Saudi medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFaris, Eiad; Abdulgader, Abdelgalil; Alkhenizan, Abdullah

    2006-01-01

    (EBME) [corrected] is an attitude of mind that entails the creation of a culture in which teachers think critically about what they are doing, look at the best evidence available and on this basis, make decisions about their teaching practice, and subsequently, undertake the necessary revision and change. More medical schools have opened in Saudi Arabia in the last few years than have existed over the last three decades. Currently, the education of health professionals is based on assumption and traditions and rarely on research findings. Medical teaching has evolved from being opinion-based to evidence-based and the art of teaching is rapidly becoming the 'science' of teaching. The need for evidence in our teaching and medical education practices is as important as it is in assessing a new therapy. This approach to education is not only associated with better results in terms of better learning, from the side of the students (the consumers), but also has a wider impact on patient care and the community. Moreover, in this age of accountability, litigations and quality assurance, the need for BEME becomes greater. Some suggestions to implement BEME in Saudi Arabia have been put forward and these are the training of medical education professionals in the use the existing information systems, and disseminating information through the creation of a BEME journal (secondary publication) that publishes a critically appraised summary of medical education articles that are both valid and of immediate clinical use.

  13. United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime International Network of Drug Dependence Treatment and Rehabilitation Resource Centres: Treatnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomas-Rossello, Juana; Rawson, Richard A.; Zarza, Maria J.; Bellows, Anne; Busse, Anja; Saenz, Elizabeth; Freese, Thomas; Shawkey, Mansour; Carise, Deni; Ali, Robert; Ling, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Key to the dissemination of evidence-based addiction treatments is the exchange of experiences and mutual support among treatment practitioners, as well as the availability of accurate addiction training materials and effective trainers. To address the shortage of such resources, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) created…

  14. Evolution of diffusion and dissemination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearing, James W

    2008-01-01

    The article provides a review and considers how the diffusion of innovations Research paradigm has changed, and offers suggestions for the further development of this theory of social change. Main emphases of diffusion Research studies are compared over time, with special attention to applications of diffusion theory-based concepts as types of dissemination science. A considerable degree of paradigmatic evolution is observed. The classical diffusion model focused on adopter innovativeness, individuals as the locus of decision, communication channels, and adoption as the primary outcome measures in post hoc observational study designs. The diffusion systems in question were centralized, with fidelity of implementation often assumed. Current dissemination Research and practice is better characterized by tests of interventions that operationalize one or more diffusion theory-based concepts and concepts from other change approaches, involve complex organizations as the units of adoption, and focus on implementation issues. Foment characterizes dissemination and implementation Research, Reflecting both its interdisciplinary Roots and the imperative of spreading evidence-based innovations as a basis for a new paradigm of translational studies of dissemination science.

  15. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015.

  16. Radiographers' preconditions for evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Liikanen, Eeva

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is essential in today's health care, but its establishment requires several preconditions from individuals and organizations (e.g. knowledge, understanding, attitudes, abilities, self-confidence, support, and resources). Previous studies suggest that radiographers do generate and use evidence in their work, but evidence-based radiography (EBR) is not yet used routinely as established practice, especially in terms of research utilization. This paper aims to describe radiographers' preconditions for EBR, and their participation in research activities. Main focus is on research utilization. Using an electronic questionnaire developed for this study, a survey was conducted: data collected from Finnish radiographers and radiotherapists (N = 438) were analysed both statistically and qualitatively. The final response rate was 39%. The results suggest radiographers' preconditions for EBR to consist of knowledge of research, significance of research activities, research-orientated way of working, and support. In addition, adequate resourcing is essential. Reading scientific journals, participation in research activities, a higher degree of education, and senior post seem to be significant promoters of EBR and research utilization. The results support the notion that EBR, and especially research utilization, are not yet well-established in Finland, and radiographers' viewpoints concerning the role and significance of research evidence and research activities still seem to vary.

  17. Advances in evidence-based cancer adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chunlei; Li, Ruilei; Song, Xin; Qin, Shukui

    2017-04-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has been developed in cancer treatment by transferring/infusing immune cells into cancer patients, which are able to recognize, target, and destroy tumor cells. Recently, sipuleucel-T and genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) show a great potential to control metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and hematologic malignancies in clinic. This review summarized some of the major evidence-based ACT and the challenges to improve cell quality and reduce the side effects in the field. This review also provided future research directions to make sure ACT widely available in clinic.

  18. Evidence-based medicine in rapidly changing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeder, Torben Veith

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is not a randomised controlled trial (RCT), but EBM seeks to apply evidence gained from scientific methods - which could be RCT - to daily medical practice. Any surgical treatment reflects a certain development technically as well as skills based. The procedure may....... Special considerations should be given in rapidly developing fields. If started too early the resulting comparison will likely turn out to be irrelevant because the new technology is not fully developed, not mastered or the device may have undergone major modifications rendering the results obsolete...

  19. Disposition Kinetics of Taxanes in Peritoneal Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken'ichi Miyamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of cancers in the abdominal cavity, such as peritoneal dissemination, is difficult, but in principle intraperitoneal administration of anticancer drugs is expected to be preferable to systemic administration. Taxane anticancer drugs are used to treat gastric cancer patients with peritoneal dissemination. They are administered as micellar preparations, Taxol and Taxotere, which consist of paclitaxel in Cremophor EL (crEL and docetaxel in Polysorbate-80 (PS-80, respectively. In this paper we review the disposition kinetics of taxane anticancer drugs after intraperitoneal administration in peritoneal dissemination patients and animal models and also discuss the effect of the surfactant vehicle on the behavior of taxanes.

  20. Evidence-based ethics? On evidence-based practice and the "empirical turn" from normative bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Maya J

    2005-11-08

    The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the normative resolution of moral problems in a pluralistic society. While "evidence-based" is typically read in medicine and other life and social sciences as the empirically-adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means for increasing certainty, I propose that the evidence-based movement in fact gains consensus by displacing normative discourse with aggregate or statistically-derived empirical evidence as the "bottom line". Therefore, along with wavering on the fact/value distinction, evidence-based ethics threatens bioethics' normative mandate. The appeal of the evidence-based approach is that it offers a means of negotiating the demands of moral pluralism. Rather than appealing to explicit values that are likely not shared by all, "the evidence" is proposed to adjudicate between competing claims. Quantified measures are notably more "neutral" and democratic than liberal markers like "species normal functioning". Yet the positivist notion that claims stand or fall in light of the evidence is untenable; furthermore, the legacy of positivism entails the quieting of empirically non-verifiable (or at least non-falsifiable) considerations like moral claims and judgments. As a result, evidence-based ethics proposes to operate with the implicit normativity that accompanies the production and presentation of all biomedical and scientific facts unchecked. The "empirical turn" in bioethics signals a need for reconsideration of the methods used

  1. Evidence-based guideline update: medical treatment of infantile spasms. Report of the Guideline Development Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology and the Practice Committee of the Child Neurology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, C Y; Mackay, M T; Weiss, S K; Stephens, D; Adams-Webber, T; Ashwal, S; Snead, O C

    2012-06-12

    To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society practice parameter on treatment of infantile spasms in children. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2002 to 2011 and searches of reference lists of retrieved articles were performed. Sixty-eight articles were selected for detailed review; 26 were included in the analysis. RECOMMENDATIONS were based on a 4-tiered classification scheme combining pre-2002 evidence and more recent evidence. There is insufficient evidence to determine whether other forms of corticosteroids are as effective as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. However, low-dose ACTH is probably as effective as high-dose ACTH. ACTH is more effective than vigabatrin (VGB) for short-term treatment of children with infantile spasms (excluding those with tuberous sclerosis complex). There is insufficient evidence to show that other agents and combination therapy are effective for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. Short lag time to treatment leads to better long-term developmental outcome. Successful short-term treatment of cryptogenic infantile spasms with ACTH or prednisolone leads to better long-term developmental outcome than treatment with VGB. Low-dose ACTH should be considered for treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH or VGB may be useful for short-term treatment of infantile spasms, with ACTH considered preferentially over VGB. Hormonal therapy (ACTH or prednisolone) may be considered for use in preference to VGB in infants with cryptogenic infantile spasms, to possibly improve developmental outcome. A shorter lag time to treatment of infantile spasms with either hormonal therapy or VGB possibly improves long-term developmental outcomes.

  2. Brief report: Creating a culture of evidence-based practice and nursing research in a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Kristen L; Brandt, Patricia; Brytus, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practice and nursing research are fundamental to the profession of nursing. However, enculturating these processes into daily nursing practice presents challenges. In an effort to identify these challenges specific to our organization's nursing division, the Barriers to Nursing Research survey was distributed to staff nurses (n=239) to assess barriers in utilizing evidence-based practice and research in their daily practice. Based on these findings, our Evidence-Based Practice/Research Council developed a dissemination plan to be implemented over a 1 year time period that provided staff resources to implement evidence-based practice and nursing research. Upon completion of the year long implementation period, the same Barriers to Nursing Research survey was redistributed to staff (n=157). Pre and post survey results were compared for significance. Outcomes included an increase in projects, nurse driven research, and national presentations and publications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  4. Evidence-Based Education in Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Shepard P; Chung, Kevin C; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2015-08-01

    Educational reforms in resident training have historically been driven by reports from medical societies and organizations. Although educational initiatives are well intended, they are rarely supported by robust evidence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently introduced competency-based training, a form of outcomes-based education that has been used successfully in nonmedical professional vocations. This initiative has promise to advance the quality of resident education, but questions remain regarding implementation within plastic surgery. In particular, how will competency-based training impact patient outcomes, and will the methodologies used to assess competencies (i.e., milestones) be accurate and validated by literature? This report investigates resident educational reform and the need for more evidence-based educational initiatives in plastic surgery training.

  5. Evidence-based policymaking: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Nortje

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The process of facilitating the uptake of evidence, for example, scientific research findings, into the policymaking process is multifaceted and thus complex. It is therefore important for scientists to understand this process in order to influence it more effectively. Similarly, policymakers need to understand the complexities of the scientific process to improve their interaction with the scientific sphere. This literature review addresses those factors that influence the uptake of scientific evidence into policymaking, the barriers to using science in policymaking, as well as recommendations for improved science–policymaking interaction. A visual diagram of the gears of a car is used to convey the message of the complexities around the engagement between science and policymaking. It is concluded that the issue of evidence-based policymaking remains unresolved and questions for future research on the science–policy interface are raised.

  6. Evidence-based neuroethics for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric; Bell, Emily; Di Pietro, Nina C; Wade, Lucie; Illes, Judy

    2011-03-01

    Many neurodevelopmental disorders affect early brain development in ways that are still poorly understood; yet, these disorders can place an enormous toll on patients, families, and society as a whole and affect all aspects of daily living for patients and their families. We describe a pragmatic, evidence-based framework for engaging in empiric ethics inquiry for a large consortium of researchers in neurodevelopmental disorders and provide relevant case studies of pragmatic neuroethics. The 3 neurodevelopmental disorders that are at the focus of our research, cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), bring unique and intersecting challenges of translating ethically research into clinical care for children and neonates. We identify and discuss challenges related to health care delivery in CP; neonatal neurological decision making; alternative therapies; and identity, integrity, and personhood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ethical reflections on Evidence Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corrao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND According to Potter’s point of view, medical ethics is the science of survival, a bridge between humanistic and scientific culture. The working out of judgements on right or wrong referred to the human being are studied by this science. Methodological quality is fundamental in clinical research, and several technical issues are of paramount importance in trying to answer to the final question “what is the true, the right thing?”. We know they are essential aspects as in medical ethics as in evidence based practice. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of this paper is to talk about relationships and implications between ethical issues and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. DISCUSSION EBM represents a new paradigm that introduces new concepts to guide medical-decision making and health-care planning. Its principles are deeply rooted in clinical research methodology since information are derived from sound studies of strong quality. Health-care professionals have to deal with methodological concepts for critical appraisal of literature and implementation of evidences in clinical practice and healthcare planning. The central role of EBM in medical ethics is obvious, but a risk could be possible. The shift from Hippocratic point of view to community-centred one could lose sight of the centrality of the patient. CONCLUSION Both EBM principles and the needs to adequately response to economic restrictions urge a balance between individual and community ethics. All this has to represent an opportunity to place the patient at the centre of medical action considering at the same time community ethics as systemic aim, but without forgetting the risk that economic restrictions push towards veterinary ethics where herd is central and individual needs do not exist.

  8. [Managing constipation in the elderly: an evidence-based approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chen; Yen, Miaofen; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2010-08-01

    Constipation is a common problem afflicting the elderly. When elderly patients complain of constipation to their healthcare providers, they are typically prescribed laxatives rather than given a clinical examination to explore the specific causes. This approach not only does not resolve the long-term problem of constipation, but may also lead to further complications (e.g., constipation alternating with diarrhea, abdominal distention, poor appetite, and ileus). Effective management of constipation in the elderly should in many cases be tailored to the symptoms and conditions of individual patients rather than simply applying evidence-based treatment. There is a lack of consistency amongst specialists on how best to deal with the problem of constipation. The aim of this article was to explore evidence-based management approaches to constipation in the elderly. A definition of constipation is given and relevant causes are first given. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment approaches are then introduced with regard to effective approaches to conducting physical examinations, assessing patient medical history, and performing laboratory tests. In addition, this article also developed a constipation protocol as a reference tool in the clinical management of constipation in the elderly. The authors hope results can help reduce the problem of constipation in the elderly population.

  9. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  10. Vitiligo: concise evidence based guidelines on diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawkrodger, David J; Ormerod, Anthony D; Shaw, Lindsay; Mauri-Sole, Inma; Whitton, Maxine E; Watts, M Jane; Anstey, Alex V; Ingham, Jane; Young, Katharine

    2010-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common disease that causes a great degree of psychological distress. In its classical forms it is easily recognised and diagnosed. This review provides an evidence based outline of the management of vitiligo, particularly with the non-specialist in mind. Treatments for vitiligo are generally unsatisfactory. The initial approach to a patient who is thought to have vitiligo is to make a definite diagnosis, offer psychological support, and suggest supportive treatments such as the use of camouflage cosmetics and sunscreens, or in some cases after discussion the option of no treatment. Active therapies open to the non-specialist, after an explanation of potential side effects, include the topical use of potent or highly potent steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for a defined period of time (usually 2 months), following which an assessment is made to establish whether or not there has been a response. Patients whose condition is difficult to diagnose, unresponsive to straightforward treatments, or is causing psychological distress, are usually referred to a dermatologist. Specialist dermatology units have at their disposal phototherapy, either narrow band ultraviolet B or in some cases photochemotherapy, which is the most effective treatment presently available and can be considered for symmetrical types of vitiligo. Depigmenting treatments and possibly surgical approaches may be appropriate for vitiligo in selected cases. There is no evidence that presently available systemic treatments are helpful and safe in vitiligo. There is a need for further research into the causes of vitiligo, and into discovering better treatments.

  11. Collaborating across services to advance evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Deborah J; Richard, Maggie L; Ceniceros, Xochitl; Blaize, Kelli

    2010-01-01

    Military medical treatment facilities offer a unique environment in which to develop a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP). Distinctive issues arise in the context of changed patient care demographics because of a war-injured population. These issues offer an opportunity to enhance the quality of care through the use and adaptation of research findings in this special nursing environment. In addition, the colocation of two military medical centers offers the prospect of collaborative efforts to create a regional culture for nursing EBP. The purposes of this study were to describe the processes of a collaborative project to train nurses in EBP and to share resources in developing and implementing evidence-based clinical nursing guidelines in two large military medical centers in the Northeastern United States and to discuss the collective efforts of nurse researchers, leadership, advanced practice nurses, and staff nurses in each hospital to facilitate the EBP process. A description of the organizational structure and the climate for EBP of each facility is provided followed by discussion of training efforts and the inculcation of an organizational culture for EBP. Contextual barriers and facilitators were encountered throughout the project. The two nurse researchers leading the projects were able to overcome the barriers and capitalize on opportunities to promote EBP. Three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines were developed at each facility and are currently in various stages of implementation. Despite the barriers, EBP continues to be at the forefront of military nursing practice in the U.S. National Capital Region. Clear communication and regular meetings were essential to the success of the collaborative project within and between the two military hospitals. Military-specific barriers to EBP included high team attrition and turnover because of the war mission and the usual high staff turnover at military hospitals. Military facilitators included a

  12. Epistemologic inquiries in evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Guyatt, Gordon H; Ashcroft, Richard E

    2009-04-01

    Since the term "evidence-based medicine" (EBM) first appeared in the scientific literature in 1991, the concept has had considerable influence in many parts of the world. Most professional societies, the public,and funding agencies have accepted EBM with remarkable enthusiasm. The concept of evidence-based practice is now applied in management, education, criminology, and social work. Yet, EBM has attracted controversy: its critics allege that EBM uses a narrow concept of evidence and a naive conception of the relationships between evidence, theory, and practice. They also contend that EBM presents itself as a radical restructuring of medical knowledge that discredits more traditional ways of knowing in medicine, largely in the interests of people with a particular investment in the enterprise of large-scale clinical trials. Because EBM proposes aspecific relationship between theory, evidence, and knowledge, its theoretical basis can be understood as an epistemological system. Undertaking epistemological inquiry is important because the adoption of a particular epistemological view defines how science is conducted. In this paper, we challenge this critical view of EBM by examining how EBM fits into broad epistemological debates within the philosophy of science. We consider how EBM relates to some classical debates regarding the nature of science and knowledge. We investigate EBM from the perspective of major epistemological theories (logical-positivism/inductivism, deductivism/falsificationism/theory-ladeness of observations, explanationism/holism, instrumentalism, underdetermination theory by evidence). We first explore the relationship between evidence and knowledge and discuss philosophical support for the main way that evidence is used in medicine: (1) in the philosophical tradition that "rational thinkers respect their evidence," we show that EBM refers to making medical decisions that are consistent with evidence, (2) as a reliable sign, symptom, or mark to

  13. Information provision in medical libraries: An evidence based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examined information provision in special libraries such as medical libraries. It provides an overview of evidence based practice as a concept for information provision by librarians. It specifically proffers meaning to the term evidence as used in evidence based practice and to evidence based medicine from where ...

  14. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Sherri L.; Townsend, Julie S.; Puckett, Mary C.; Rim, Sun Hee

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions...

  15. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  16. [Impact of diffusion of the methodology of evidence-based nursing through Facebook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillán García, Azucena

    2013-05-01

    Evaluate the impact of diffusion of the contents of the blog "Evidence-Based Nursing" through Facebook. Cross-sectional study carried out via a web link to the online survey (previously tested) to a population of 2132 Facebook profiles that had a "friendship" with the profile studied. The survey had 8 items and a descriptive study of variables was conducted using SPSS 19. 75.9% of the sample has a Facebook profile of a personal character and 94.1% of cases are interested in evidence-based practices. 55.6% of the sample knows the blog, plus 46.5% answered that they read it occasionally, compared with 17.1% who does regularly and 35.7% who say they do not read it. Of all readers, 75.75% say they have improved their knowledge in terms of evidence-based practice after reading it. 88% said they did not follow the blog by other means or social network and in the case that they did, the most used are Google Reader, and Twitter Networked Blogs. Reading the contents of this blog improve the knowledge about evidence-based practices of the "friends" of the social profile, as they themselves relate. The adequacy of the social profile as a dissemination tool is successful as it is necessary to investigate in depth the functioning of social networks.

  17. ‘Cosmetic boob jobs’ or evidence-based breast surgery: an interpretive policy analysis of the rationing of ‘low value’ treatments in the English National Health Service

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jill; Swinglehurst, Deborah; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In England the National Health Service (NHS) is not allowed to impose 'blanket bans' on treatments, but local commissioners produce lists of 'low value' procedures that they will normally not fund. Breast surgery is one example. However, evidence suggests that some breast surgery is clinically effective, with significant health gain. National guidelines indicate the circumstances under which breast surgery should be made available on the NHS, but there is widespread variation in t...

  18. How to teach evidence-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Pamela; Moyer, Virginia

    2003-06-01

    Learning to practice EBM provides physicians with the tools needed to overcome some of the common barriers they face when trying to use the medical literature to solve patient problems. It does require a change in attitude and behavior and is likely to be met with some resistance. Understanding the learners' stage of behavior change is likely to facilitate educational intervention. Behavior change does not occur unless physicians are convinced of the benefits of practicing EBM. Easy access to evidence-based summaries facilitates the use of high-quality evidence. Developing the ability to access information from the medical literature, critically appraising it, and applying it to patient care requires skills that need to be taught. Most practicing physicians were not taught these skills in medical school. Excellent resources are available from which to learn and teach EBM. Multiple exposures using a variety of formats are most effective. Finally, a tool to evaluate the acquisition of knowledge and skills needed to practice EBM recently has been validated. Despite ongoing challenges, learning and teaching EBM has never been easier and each year brings new and better tools to help practitioners and educators use the best available evidence. Box 2 lists suggestions for getting started.

  19. Effectiveness of Evidence-Based Asthma Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Suzanne; Bailey, Ryan; Jaffee, Katy; Markus, Anne; Gerstein, Maya; Stevens, David M; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J; Mitchell, Herman

    2017-06-01

    Researchers often struggle with the gap between efficacy and effectiveness in clinical research. To bridge this gap, the Community Healthcare for Asthma Management and Prevention of Symptoms (CHAMPS) study adapted an efficacious, randomized controlled trial that resulted in evidence-based asthma interventions in community health centers. Children (aged 5-12 years; N = 590) with moderate to severe asthma were enrolled from 3 intervention and 3 geographically/capacity-matched control sites in high-risk, low-income communities located in Arizona, Michigan, and Puerto Rico. The asthma intervention was tailored to the participant's allergen sensitivity and exposure, and it comprised 4 visits over the course of 1 year. Study visits were documented and monitored prospectively via electronic data capture. Asthma symptoms and health care utilization were evaluated at baseline, and at 6 and 12 months. A total of 314 intervention children and 276 control children were enrolled in the study. Allergen sensitivity testing (96%) and home environmental assessments (89%) were performed on the majority of intervention children. Overall study activity completion (eg, intervention visits, clinical assessments) was 70%. Overall and individual site participant symptom days in the previous 4 weeks were significantly reduced compared with control findings (control, change of -2.28; intervention, change of -3.27; difference, -0.99; P asthma in these high-need populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Evidence Based Practice Outside the Box (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available I love food. I love cooking, baking, testing, and eating. I read about food preparation, food facts, and food service. Over the years I’ve developed my fair share of knowledge about cooking and I’m a decent cook, but I’m no chef. I guess I’m what you’d call a “foodie”. However, I have the good fortune to have a friend who is a chef and owns one of the best, and certainly the most innovative, restaurants in town. During this summer I hosted a cooking class in my home for my family with my chef friend as instructor. The Tex-Mex barbecue theme was a big hit (you can contact me for recipes, if you like, but much more fascinating was the explanation of the science behind the cooking. It turns out that there is a term for this: molecular gastronomy. Another term, and hence the genesis of my “Eureka!” moment of the summer, is evidence based cooking. Good cooking is not just following a recipe (not all of which are evidence based but at its best is the culmination of heaps of tested information regarding why and how chemical and environmental factors work together to result in a gastronomical delight. For example, will brining or marinating a pork chop make it moister? And, if brining, what temperature should the water be, how long should it soak, and how much salt is needed? Why does pounding meat increase its tenderness? What will keep guacamole from browning better – the pit or lime juice? What does baking soda do in a chocolate cake? Eggs or no eggs in fresh pasta? Like most librarians, I tend not to take information at face value. I want to know where information comes from and whether or not it is valid, based on specific factors. I’ve come to notice that evidence based, or evidence informed, practice is everywhere and has a tremendous impact on our lives. Why do you rotate the tires on your car? Evidence shows that the front tires wear more quickly (think about all those 3-pointturns, the braking, etc and therefore

  1. Vitamin B12 and cognitive function: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    B12 have been associated with neurocognitive disorders. This evidence-based analysis assessed the usefulness of serum vitamin B12 testing as it relates to brain function. This review found very low quality evidence that suggests a connection between high plasma homocysteine levels (a by-product of B vitamin metabolism in the body) and the onset of dementia. Moderate quality of evidence indicates treatment with vitamin B12 does not improve brain function. Moderate quality of evidence also indicates treatment using oral vitamin B12 supplements is as effective as injections of vitamin B12.

  2. Developing an evidence-based fall prevention curriculum for community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Julie A; Shubert, Tiffany E; Smith, Matthew Lee; Rosemond, Cherie A; Howell, Doris A; Beaudoin, Christopher E; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    This perspective paper describes processes in the development of an evidence-based fall prevention curriculum for community health workers/promotores (CHW/P) that highlights the development of the curriculum and addresses: (1) the need and rationale for involving CHW/P in fall prevention; (2) involvement of CHW/P and content experts in the curriculum development; (3) best practices utilized in the curriculum development and training implementation; and (4) next steps for dissemination and utilization of the CHW/P fall prevention curriculum. The project team of CHW/P and content experts developed, pilot tested, and revised bilingual in-person training modules about fall prevention among older adults. The curriculum incorporated the following major themes: (1) fall risk factors and strategies to reduce/prevent falls; (2) communication strategies to reduce risk of falling and strategies for developing fall prevention plans; and (3) health behavior change theories utilized to prevent and reduce falls. Three separate fall prevention modules were developed for CHW/P and CHW/P Instructors to be used during in-person trainings. Module development incorporated a five-step process: (1) conduct informal focus groups with CHW/P to inform content development; (2) develop three in-person modules in English and Spanish with input from content experts; (3) pilot-test the modules with CHW/P; (4) refine and finalize modules based on pilot-test feedback; and (5) submit modules for approval of continuing education units. This project contributes to the existing evidence-based literature by examining the role of CHW/P in fall prevention among older adults. By including evidence-based communication strategies such as message tailoring, the curriculum design allows CHW/P to personalize the information for individuals, which can result in an effective dissemination of a curriculum that is evidence-based and culturally appropriate.

  3. Adaptation of evidence-based surgical wound care algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Yeon; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to adapt a surgical wound care algorithm that is used to provide evidence-based surgical wound care in a critical care unit. This study used, the 'ADAPTE process', an international clinical practice guideline development method. The 'Bonnie Sue wound care algorithm' was used as a draft for the new algorithm. A content validity index (CVI) targeting 135 critical care nurses was conducted. A 5-point Likert scale was applied to the CVI test using a statistical criterion of .75. A surgical wound care algorithm comprised 9 components: wound assessment, infection control, necrotic tissue management, wound classification by exudates and depths, dressing selection, consideration of systemic factors, wound expected outcome, reevaluate non-healing wounds, and special treatment for non-healing wounds. All of the CVI tests were ≥.75. Compared to existing wound care guidelines, the new wound care algorithm provides precise wound assessment, reliabilities of wound care, expands applicability of wound care to critically ill patients, and provides evidence and strength of recommendations. The new surgical wound care algorithm will contribute to the advancement of evidence-based nursing care, and its use is expected as a nursing intervention in critical care.

  4. An evidence-based review: distracted driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, Luis E; Aronow, Kathy V; Macleod, Jana; Bard, Michael; Salzman, Steven; Greene, Wendy; Haider, Adil; Schupper, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Cell phone use and texting are prevalent within society and have thus pervaded the driving population. This technology is a growing concern within the confines of distracted driving, as all diversions from attention to the road have been shown to increase the risk of crashes. Adolescent, inexperienced drivers, who have the greatest prevalence of texting while driving, are at a particularly higher risk of crashes because of distraction. Members of the Injury Control Violence Prevention Committee of the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma performed a PubMed search of articles related to distracted driving and cell phone use as a distractor of driving between 2000 and 2013. A total of 19 articles were found to merit inclusion as evidence in the evidence-based review. These articles provided evidence regarding the relationship between distracted driving and crashes, cell phone use contributing to automobile accidents, and/or the relationship between driver experience and automobile accidents. (Adjust methods/results sections to the number of articles that correctly corresponds to the number of references, as well as the methodology for reference inclusion.) Based on the evidence reviewed, we can recommend the following. All drivers should minimize all in-vehicle distractions while on the road. All drivers should not text or use any touch messaging system (including the use of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter) while driving. Younger, inexperienced drivers should especially not use cell phones, texting, or any touch messaging system while driving because they pose an increased risk for death and injury caused by distractions while driving.

  5. Dissemination 2.0: closing the gap between knowledge and practice with new media and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jay M; Mays, Darren; Kreuter, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Despite substantial investments in public health and clinical research at the national level, and significant advancements in these areas of science, few evidence-based programs and services are rapidly implemented in health care or public health practice as a result of failures of dissemination. A significant gap in current processes to disseminate and implement effective programs relates to the lack of systems and infrastructure to facilitate distribution of scientific research products to potential end users, including clinicians and other practitioners. In this article, the authors assert that Web 2.0 technologies can be leveraged to enhance dissemination efforts and increase the implementation of evidence-based programs and services in everyday practice. The authors describe the research-to-practice delivery process and highlight gaps in the supply chain necessary to translate research findings into evidence-based practice. The authors critically evaluate the 4 most prominent strategies currently used to promote dissemination and implementation of research evidence in practice, and they detail how each can be improved by leveraging Web 2.0 technologies to enhance dissemination of research evidence. Last, the authors provide examples and suggestions for capitalizing on Web 2.0 technologies to enhance dissemination efforts and ensure that evidence-based research products reach intended end users and are implemented in clinical practice.

  6. Training Teachers to use Evidence-Based Practices for Autism: Examining Procedural Implementation fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Reed, Sarah; Lee, Ember; Reisinger, Erica M; Connell, James E; Mandell, David S

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which public school teachers implemented evidence-based interventions for students with autism in the way these practices were designed. Evidence-based practices for students with autism are rarely incorporated into community settings, and little is known about the quality of implementation. An indicator of intervention quality is procedural implementation fidelity (the degree to which a treatment is implemented as prescribed). Procedural fidelity likely affects student outcomes. This project examined procedural implementation fidelity of three evidence-based practices used in a randomized trial of a comprehensive program for students with autism in partnership with a large, urban school district. Results indicate that teachers in public school special education classrooms can learn to implement evidence-based strategies; however they require extensive training, coaching, and time to reach and maintain moderate procedural implementation fidelity. Procedural fidelity over time, and across intervention strategies is examined.

  7. Essential articles on collaborative care models for the treatment of psychiatric disorders in medical settings: a publication by the academy of psychosomatic medicine research and evidence-based practice committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C; Niazi, Shehzad K; Rundell, James R; Sharpe, Michael; Katon, Wayne J

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative care interventions for psychiatric disorders combine several components integrated into the medical setting: (1) systematic psychiatric assessment, (2) use of a nonphysician care manager to perform longitudinal symptom monitoring, treatment interventions, and care coordination, and (3) specialist-provided stepped-care recommendations. Collaborative care interventions have now been evaluated in a wide spectrum of care settings and offer great promise as a way of increasing quality of patient care, improving health of populations, and reducing health care costs. A systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed for publications between January 1970 and May 2013 to identify articles describing collaborative care and related interventions. Identified articles were then evaluated independently by multiple reviewers for quality and importance; additional articles were identified by searching reference lists and through recommendations of senior content-matter experts. The articles considered to be both of high quality and most important were then placed into categories and annotated reviews performed. Over 600 articles were identified of which 67 were selected for annotated review. The results reported in these articles indicate that collaborative care interventions for psychiatric disorders have been consistently successful in improving key outcomes in both research and clinical intervention studies; cost analyses also suggest that this model is cost effective. Collaborative care models for psychiatric disorders are likely to serve an increasingly large role in health care given their effect on patient and population outcomes and their focus on integration of care. © 2014 Published by Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine on behalf of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

  8. Culturally adapting an evidence-based parenting intervention for Latino immigrants: the need to integrate fidelity and cultural relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Cardona, Jose Ruben; Domenech-Rodriguez, Melanie; Forgatch, Marion; Sullivan, Cris; Bybee, Deborah; Holtrop, Kendal; Escobar-Chew, Ana Rocio; Tams, Lisa; Dates, Brian; Bernal, Guillermo

    2012-03-01

    Latinos constitute the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. However, the cultural adaptation and dissemination of evidence-based parenting interventions among Latino populations continues to be scarce despite extensive research that demonstrates the long-term positive effects of these interventions. The purpose of this article is threefold: (1) justify the importance of cultural adaptation research as a key strategy to disseminate efficacious interventions among Latinos, (2) describe the initial steps of a program of prevention research with Latino immigrants aimed at culturally adapting an evidence-based intervention informed by parent management training principles, and (3) discuss implications for advancing cultural adaptation prevention practice and research, based on the initial feasibility and cultural acceptability findings of the current investigation. © FPI, Inc.

  9. Overview of the Evidence Base for Family Interventions in Child Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neha; Sargent, John

    2015-07-01

    This article provides updated information about evidence-based family interventions for child and adolescent mental health issues. The article reviews randomized controlled trials for family-based interventions carried out over the last 15 years. The studies were selected from an evidence-based clearinghouse search for family therapy, and specific child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. It is hoped this review guides clinical treatment and encourages clinicians to consider family involvement in treatment. This is specifically necessary when there is a limited response to psychopharmacologic and individual or group psychotherapy treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Acute gastroenteritis: evidence-based management of pediatric patients [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, KeriAnne; Pade, Kathryn H

    2018-02-01

    Although most cases of acute gastroenteritis require minimal medical intervention, severe dehydration and hypoglycemia may develop in cases of prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. The mainstay of treatment for mild-to-moderately dehydrated patients with acute gastroenteritis should be oral rehydration solution. Antiemetics allow for improved tolerance of oral rehydration solution, and, when used appropriately, can decrease the need for intravenous fluids and hospitalization. This issue reviews the common etiologies of acute gastroenteritis, discusses more-severe conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis, and provides evidence-based recommendations for management of acute gastroenteritis in patients with mild-to-moderate dehydration, severe dehydration, and hypoglycemia. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  11. Evidence-based therapy relationships: research conclusions and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    In this closing article of the special issue, we present the conclusions and recommendations of the interdivisional task force on evidence-based therapy relationships. The work was based on a series of meta-analyses conducted on the effectiveness of various relationship elements and methods of treatment adaptation. A panel of experts concluded that several relationship elements were demonstrably effective (alliance in individual psychotherapy, alliance in youth psychotherapy, alliance in family therapy, cohesion in group therapy, empathy, collecting client feedback) while others were probably effective (goal consensus, collaboration, positive regard). Three other relationship elements (congruence/genuineness, repairing alliance ruptures, and managing countertransference) were deemed promising but had insufficient evidence to conclude that they were effective. Multiple recommendations for practice, training, research, and policy are advanced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Evidence Based Management as a Tool for Special Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Fisher

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ To examine the evidence based management literature, as an example of evidence based practice, and determine how applicable evidence based management might be in the special library environment. Methods ‐ Recent general management literature and the subject‐focused literature of evidence based management were reviewed; likewise recent library/information science management literature and the subject‐focused literature of evidence based librarianshipwere reviewed to identify relevant examples of the introduction and use of evidence based practice in organizations. Searches were conducted in major business/management databases, major library/information science databases, and relevant Web sites, blogs and wikis. Citation searches on key articles and follow‐up searches on cited references were also conducted. Analysis of the retrieved literature was conducted to find similarities and/or differences between the management literature and the library/information scienceliterature, especially as it related to special libraries.Results ‐ The barriers to introducing evidence based management into most organizations were found to apply to many special libraries and are similar to issues involved with evidence based practice in librarianship in general. Despite these barriers, a set of resources to assist special librarians in accessing research‐based information to help them use principles of evidence based management is identified.Conclusion ‐ While most special librarians are faced with a number of barriers to using evidence based management, resources do exist to help overcome these obstacles.

  13. Multi-year school-based implementation and student outcomes of an evidence-based risk reduction intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bo; Stanton, Bonita; Deveaux, Lynette; Lunn, Sonja; Rolle, Glenda; Adderley, Richard; Poitier, Maxwell; Koci, Veronica; Marshall, Sharon; Gomez, Perry

    2017-01-01

    Background Intervention effects observed in efficacy trials are rarely replicated when the interventions are broadly disseminated, underscoring the need for more information about factors influencing real-life implementation and program impact. Using data from the ongoing national implementation of an evidence-based HIV prevention program [Focus on Youth in The Caribbean (FOYC)] in The Bahamas, this study examines factors influencing teachers? patterns of implementation, the impact of teacher...

  14. Acute disseminated cutaneous candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, P H; Chan, H L; Lee, Y S; Wong, H B

    1988-10-01

    Acute disseminated candidiasis is a serious and difficult problem often seen in immunocompromised states. Appearance of a characteristic skin eruption is helpful in the diagnostic. We report below a case report of an eight year old girl with aplastic anemia who had received multiple courses of antibiotics. A profuse monomorphic papular nodular eruption subsequently appeared on the face, palms and soles. Candida tropicalis was identified from the skin biopsy taken from one such lesion.

  15. Disseminated malignant melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Kaushal

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man had multiple asymptomatic, nodular lesions on the trunk, extremities and the face for 3 months. He also had left facial palsy with severe headache and vomiting. There were no other systemic or constitutional symptoms. Skin biopsy from a nodular lesion showed features of malignant melanoma, confirmed by Fontana Masson and S-100 protein staining. A diagnosis of disseminated malignant melanoma was made and the patient was treated symptomatically. The patient died in 4 months.

  16. A Squandered Opportunity?: A Review of SAMHSA's National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices for Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin J.; Zhang, Sheldon X.; Farabee, David

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the push for evidence-based programs has taken on unprecedented prominence in the fields of substance abuse and correctional treatment as a key determinant for intervention funding. The National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP), managed and funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services…

  17. Post-wildfire seeding in forests of the western United States: An evidence-based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna Peppin; Peter Z. Fule; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Jan L. Beyers; Molly E. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species. We conducted an evidence-based review to examine the effectiveness and effects of post-wildfire seeding treatments on soil stabilization, non-...

  18. Transporting Evidence-Based Therapy for Adolescent Depression to the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Heather L.; Gudmundsen, Gretchen R.; Shirk, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the Adolescent Mood Project (Project AMP), a study transporting an evidence-based, cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for adolescent depression from the university lab setting to a school-based setting. Extant research on the psychosocial treatment of adolescent depression is reviewed and rationale for transporting evidence…

  19. Why evidence-based medicine failed in patient care and medicine-based evidence will succeed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Ralph I; Singer, Burton H

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has succeeded in strengthening the evidence base for population medicine. Where EBM has failed is in answering the practicing doctor's question of what a likely outcome would be when a given treatment is administered to a particular patient with her own distinctive biological and biographical (life experience) profile. We propose Medicine-based evidence (MBE), based on the profiles of individual patients, as the evidence base for individualized or personalized medicine. MBE will build an archive of patient profiles using data from all study types and data sources, and will include both clinical and socio-behavioral information. The clinician seeking guidance for the management of an individual patient will start with the patient's longitudinal profile and find approximate matches in the archive that describes how similar patients responded to a contemplated treatment and alternative treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Decision-to-Implement Worksheet for Evidence-based Interventions: From the WWAMI Region Practice and Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karin; Tuzzio, Leah; Renz, Anne; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Parchman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Health-related scientific discoveries are often not applied in clinical settings after publication, even when recommended by a trusted journal or professional association. This article describes an assessment tool we developed for use by primary care clinicians and practice administrators to evaluate whether to implement recommended evidence-based interventions in their practices. We used dissemination and implementation theory to develop a worksheet to guide decision making about whether interventions are suitable for implementation in primary care practice settings. We tested the tool by analyzing how members of a primary care practice-based research network rated 4 evidence-based interventions. The median likelihood of implementation ranged from 2 to 3.5 on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Raters' level of agreement with statements about 3 intervention characteristics was associated (P evidence-based interventions are suitable to adopt or adapt to meet their needs. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  1. Evidence-based pharmacotherapy of eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Martine F; Bissada, Hany; Spettigue, Wendy

    2012-03-01

    The objective was to review scientific evidence for efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in adults or children with an eating disorder (ED). We conducted a computer search for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1960 and May 2010 for treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge-eating disorder (BED). For drugs for which no RCT was found, open trials or case reports were retrieved. Clinically relevant RCTs in the treatment of AN have used atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and zinc supplementation. Olanzapine demonstrated an adjunctive effect for in-patient treatment of underweight AN patients, and fluoxetine helped prevent relapse in weight-restored AN patients in 1/2 studies. For treatment of BN, controlled studies have used SSRIs, other antidepressants, and mood stabilizers. In 9/11 studies, pharmacotherapy yielded a statistically significant although moderate reduction in binge/purge frequency, and some additional benefits. For BED, RCTs have been conducted using SSRIs and one serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), mood stabilizers, and anti-obesity medications. In 11/12 studies, there was a statistically significant albeit limited effect of medication. Meta-analyses on efficacy of pharmacotherapy for BN and BED support moderate effect sizes for medication, but generally low recovery rates. Treatment resistance is an inherent feature of AN, where treatment should focus on renourishment plus psychotherapy. For BN and BED, combined treatment with pharmacotherapy and cognitive behaviour therapy has been more effective than either alone. Data on the long-term efficacy of pharmacotherapy for EDs are scarce. Short- and long-term pharmacotherapy of EDs still remains a challenge for the clinician.

  2. Reduction of inequalities in health: assessing evidence-based tools

    OpenAIRE

    Shea Beverley; Hatcher-Roberts Jan; Robinson Vivian; Jacobsen Mary; Kristjansson Elizabeth; Mhatre Sharmila; Andersson Neil; O'Connor Annette; Tugwell Peter; Francis Daniel; Beardmore Jil; Wells George A; Losos Joe

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The reduction of health inequalities is a focus of many national and international health organisations. The need for pragmatic evidence-based approaches has led to the development of a number of evidence-based equity initiatives. This paper describes a new program that focuses upon evidence- based tools, which are useful for policy initiatives that reduce inequities. Methods This paper is based on a presentation that was given at the "Regional Consultation on Policy Tools...

  3. Information literacy for evidence-based practice in perianesthesia nurses: readiness for evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jacqueline

    2010-04-01

    Information literacy, the recognition of information required, and the development of skills for locating, evaluating, and effectively using relevant evidence is needed for evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this study was to examine perianesthesia nurses' perception of searching skills and access to evidence sources. The design was a descriptive, exploratory survey. The sample consisted of ASPAN members (n = 64) and nonmembers (n = 64). The Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice instrument was used. Findings were that ASPAN members read more journal articles, were more proficient with computers, and used Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) more frequently than nonmembers. The three top barriers to use of research were: lack of understanding of organization or structure of electronic databases, lack of skills to critique and/or synthesize the literature, and difficulty in accessing research materials. In conclusion, education is needed for critiquing literature and understanding electronic databases and research articles to promote EBP in perianesthesia areas. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Cellulite: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Krueger, Nils; Sadick, Neil S

    2015-08-01

    Cellulite is a multifactorial condition that is present in 80-90 % of post-pubertal women. Despite its high prevalence, it remains a major cosmetic concern for women. A wide range of products and treatments for cellulite reduction is available; however, no systematic review has been performed so far to evaluate the efficacy of the available treatment options for cellulite. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatments for cellulite reduction. This systematic review followed the PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Only original articles in English or German reporting data on the efficacy of cellulite treatments from in vivo human studies were considered. In total, 67 articles were analyzed for the following information: therapy, presence of a control group, randomization, blinding, sample size, description of statistical methods, results, and level of evidence. Most of the evaluated studies, including laser- and light-based modalities, radiofrequency, and others had important methodological flaws; some did not use cellulite severity as an endpoint or did not provide sufficient statistical analyses. Of the 67 studies analyzed in this review, only 19 were placebo-controlled studies with randomization. Some evidence for potential benefit was only seen for acoustic wave therapy (AWT) and the 1440 nm Nd:YAG minimally invasive laser. This article provides a systematic evaluation of the scientific evidence of the efficacy of treatment for cellulite reduction. No clear evidence of good efficacy could be identified in any of the evaluated cellulite treatments.

  5. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . Antiphospholipid syndrome. Antiphospholipid antibodies are commonly encountered in. SLE patients and are associated with a 50% risk of thrombo embolism.[12] Despite the lack of evidence for primary prevention of thombosis and ...

  6. Evidence-based treatment of neonatal septicaemia | Ogunlesi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sepsis is a major cause of newborn death world wide but the burden is heaviest in the developing parts of the world where the incidence of newborn sepsis is highest. Newborn sepsis is managed with a wide range of antibiotics in different parts of the world depending on the spectrum of bacterial aetiologies. Although ...

  7. Treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy: an evidence-based overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, Ruben; Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2016-01-01

    In Achilles tendinopathy, differentiation should be made between paratendinopathy, insertional- and midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Midportion Achilles tendinopathy is clinically characterized by a combination of pain and swelling at the affected site, with impaired performance as an important

  8. Evidence-based treatment of atopic eczema in general practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    CLINICAL FEATURES. Acute eczema is characterised by red, itchy skin and often by vesicles that ooze serum ... Atopic eczema is a common chronic condition characterised by dry, itchy skin associated with flares and remissions. .... synthetic immune modulator with cyclosporin-like effects) in. AE.The study by Reitamo and.

  9. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk of congenital heart block in infants. ↓ Number and severity of lupus flares. TG = triglycerides; VLDL = very lowdensity lipoproteins; TC = total cholesterol; .... immunosuppressive therapy, whereas ischaemic events may require anticoagulation. Moreover, SLE is a wellknown risk factor for depres sion, anxiety and fatigue ...

  10. Evidence-based treatments for the asymptomatic HIV- positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banzi

    The absolute risk reduction (ARR) was. 11% which translates to a number needed to treat (NNT) of 9 (95%. CI 7 - 14). In other words, using this regimen one needs to treat on average only 9 HIV-positive preg- nant mothers to prevent 1 infant from getting AIDS. Even when shorter regimens were used several. RCTs22-24.

  11. Evidence-based treatment of acute otitis externa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    its management, especially in general practice.1,5 In particular, there appears to be confusion over the ... between the use of eardrops and recurrent disease, but a definite increase in the incidence of recurrent .... Pabla L, Jindal M, Latif K. The management of otitis externa in UK general practice. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol.

  12. Evidence-based treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcomes for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have improved during the last two decades as our understanding of the disease expands. In particular, the importance of antimalarial therapy for addressing and preventing a host of complications in SLE has emerged. Furthermore, evidence is mounting that ...

  13. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  14. Indonesia knowledge dissemination: a snapshot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The educational progress of a country or educational institution is measured through the implementation of knowledge dissemination. Evidence of knowledge dissemination has carried out be in form of the type of published document, which is based on the databases of the index of scientific publications: Scopus. This paper expresses a simple form of knowledge dissemination based on document type. Although the growth of knowledge dissemination does not have the same pattern based on the appearance of document types, the general implementation is almost the same. However, maximum effort needs to be done by PTN-bh to support Indonesia knowledge dissemination.

  15. Evidence Based Conservative Management of Patello-femoral Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is defined as pain surrounding the patella when sitting with bent knees for prolonged periods of time or when performing activities like ascending or descending stairs, squatting or   athletic activities. Patella dislocation is not included in PFPS.     Purpose:   This review analyzes the evidence based conservative management of PFPS.   Methods:   A Cochrane Library search related to PFPS was performed until 18 January 2014. The key words were: patellofemoral pain syndrome. Eight papers were found, of which three were reviewed because they were focused   on the topic of the article. We also searched the PubMed using the following keywords: evidence based conservative   management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Twelve articles were found, of which seven were reviewed because   they were focused on the topic of the article. Overall ten articles were analyzed.     Results:   Different treatments can be tried for PFPS, including pharmacotherapy, therapeutic ultrasound, exercise therapy, and taping and braces.     Conclusions:   Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may reduce pain in the short term, but pain does not improve after three months. Therapeutic ultrasound appears not to have a clinically important effect on pain relief for   patients with PFPS. The evidence that exercise therapy is more effective in treating PFPS than no exercise is limited   with respect to pain reduction, and conflicting with respect to functional improvement. No significant difference has   been found between taping and non-taping. The role of knee braces is still controversial. More well-designed studies are needed.    

  16. Evidence Based Conservative Management of Patello-femoral Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carlos Rodriguez-Merchan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is defined as pain surrounding the patella when sitting with bent knees for prolonged periods of time or when performing activities like ascending or descending stairs, squatting or   athletic activities. Patella dislocation is not included in PFPS.     Purpose:   This review analyzes the evidence based conservative management of PFPS.   Methods:   A Cochrane Library search related to PFPS was performed until 18 January 2014. The key words were: patellofemoral pain syndrome. Eight papers were found, of which three were reviewed because they were focused   on the topic of the article. We also searched the PubMed using the following keywords: evidence based conservative   management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Twelve articles were found, of which seven were reviewed because   they were focused on the topic of the article. Overall ten articles were analyzed.     Results:   Different treatments can be tried for PFPS, including pharmacotherapy, therapeutic ultrasound, exercise therapy, and taping and braces.     Conclusions:   Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs may reduce pain in the short term, but pain does not improve after three months. Therapeutic ultrasound appears not to have a clinically important effect on pain relief for   patients with PFPS. The evidence that exercise therapy is more effective in treating PFPS than no exercise is limited   with respect to pain reduction, and conflicting with respect to functional improvement. No significant difference has   been found between taping and non-taping. The role of knee braces is still controversial. More well-designed studies are needed.

  17. Evidence-based standard care of malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinoda, Jun; Yano, Hirohito; Sakai, Noboru

    2004-01-01

    The amount of scientific evidence regarding therapy for primary cases of glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma is small compared with that for malignant tumors in other organs, and recommended therapeutic strategies derived from this evidence are not diverse. Evidence-based standard care of these tumors is very limited. At this moment, the benchmark treatment for these malignant gliomas is gross resection of the tumor bulk followed by local external beam radiotherapy (50-60 Gy) in combination with nitrosourea-based chemotherapy. Additional stereotactic radiosurgery or other strategies for localized therapeutic boosting have also been recommended. However, the clinical outcomes obtained through these standard treatments are unfortunately not always satisfactory. Novel therapeutic strategies for malignant gliomas are expected to develop and we hope that some scientific evidence would emerge from clinical trials using these novel strategies. New scientific evidence for practical and novel treatments appropriate for patients with malignant gliomas may come to be available as the evaluation of patients' quality of life is used as an end point for the analysis of clinical results, in addition to the commonly used survival analysis. (author)

  18. 60: EVIDENCE-BASED NURSING IN THE WOUND BED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilnezhad, Mahdieh; Rasooli, Alehe Seyyed; Sedghivash, Saba; Vatani, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims Pressure sores are areas of tissue in the elderly or patients who can no independently change their situation happening pressure sores significant financial burden on health care systems impose a negative impact on quality of life and their frequency. Change the status of patients in hospitals or long-term care for the prevention of pressure ulcers is a common strategy. Methods We searched the data base in COCHRANE, MEDLIBE, GOOGLE SCHOLAR, PUBMED, and UP TO DATE with keywords evidence base and nursing bed sore following evidence obtained: Results The study Qinhongzhang et al. (2015) called massage therapy to prevent bed sores showed that currently there is no credible study that shows that massage therapy can help to prevent bed sores. Study Brigidgillespie et al. (2014) “The movement to preven pressure sores showed that the movement of the patient from position 30 degrees every 3 hours instead of the standard 90 degrees every 6 hours to waste energy and time nurses a significant impact on the evolution of the treatment of patients. Chichfengchen study et al. (2014) as phototherapy for the treatment of pressure ulcers showed that the group treated with ultraviolet radiation completing the treatment period shorter than the control group (p=0.003). Conclusion According to findings from the EBN seen, non-drug, non-invasive nursing interventions can have a preventive effect on pressure sores.

  19. WHY IS THE CENTER OF EVIDENCE-BASED DERMATOLOGY RELEVANT TO INDIAN DERMATOLOGY?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN), and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knoweldge only has value if it is shared and used. PMID:20101305

  20. An Overview of Evidence-Based Program Registers (EBPRs) for Behavioral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Jason T.; Schröter, Daniela C.; Magura, Stephen; Means, Stephanie N.; Coryn, Chris L.S.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluations of behavioral health interventions have identified many that are potentially effective. However, clinicians and other decision makers typically lack the time and ability to effectively search and synthesize the relevant research literature. In response to this opportunity, and to increasing policy and funding pressures for the use of evidence-based practices, a number of “what works” websites have emerged to assist decision makers in selecting interventions with the highest probability of benefit. However, these registers as a whole are not well understood. This article, which represents phase one of a concurrent mixed methods study, presents a review of the scopes, structures, dissemination strategies, uses, and challenges faced by evidence-based registers in the behavioral health disciplines. The major findings of this study show that in general, registers of evidence-based practices are able, to a degree, to identify the most effective practices and meet the needs of decision makers. However, much needs to be done to improve the ability of the registers to fully realize their purpose. PMID:25450777

  1. Thrombocytopenia and disseminated histoplasmosis in immunocompetent adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kutkut, Issa; Vater, Laura; Goldman, Mitchell; Czader, Magdalena; Swenberg, Jessica; Fulkerson, Zachary; Mehta, Rakesh

    2017-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Disseminated histoplasmosis among immunocompetent patients is rare, but may be associated with clinically significant refractory thrombocytopenia. Platelet counts often return to normal levels following antifungal therapy. Therefore, the most important management of this refractory thrombocytopenia is the recognition and treatment of histoplasmosis infection.

  2. A clinically integrated curriculum in evidence-based medicine for just-in-time learning through on-the-job training: the EU-EBM project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppus, Sjors F. P. J.; Emparanza, Jose I.; Hadley, Julie; Kulier, Regina; Weinbrenner, Susanne; Arvanitis, Theodoros N.; Burls, Amanda; Cabello, Juan B.; Decsi, Tamas; Horvath, Andrea R.; Kaczor, Marcin; Zanrei, Gianni; Pierer, Karin; Stawiarz, Katarzyna; Kunz, Regina; Mol, Ben W. J.; Khan, Khalid S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the last years key stake holders in the healthcare sector have increasingly recognised evidence based medicine (EBM) as a means to improving the quality of healthcare. However, there is considerable uncertainty about the best way to disseminate basic knowledge of EBM. As a result,

  3. Evidence-based management for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Dadelszen, Peter; Menzies, Jennifer; Gilgoff, Sarah; Xie, Fang; Douglas, M Joanne; Sawchuck, Diane; Magee, Laura A

    2007-05-01

    This review reflects both the variable presentation and the systemic nature of preeclampsia. Recommendations for the comprehensive evaluation and management of organ dysfunction associated with pre-eclampsia are included. The main points in the review are that: (1) Preeclampsia is a systemic disorder that may affect many organ systems. (2) For preeclampsia remote from term (management improves perinatal outcomes, but requires obsessive surveillance to mitigate maternal risks and is a "package." (3) Initial assessment and ongoing surveillance of women with preeclampsia should include assessment of all vulnerable maternal organs as well as of the fetus. (4) Initiate antihypertensive drug treatment immediately if sBP >160 mmHg or dBP more than 110 mmHg, or if sBP 140-159 mmHg and/or dBP 85-109 mmHg (prepregnancy renal disease or diabetes). (5) The treatment of nonsevere pregnancy hypertension should include a treatment goal of dBP 80-105 mmHg (depending on practitioner preference), with one of the following agents, Methyldopa, Labetalol, Nifedipine, or, with special indications (renal or cardiac diseases), diuretics. (6) Drugs to avoid: angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; angiotensin II receptor antagonists; and atenolol. (7) For the acute management of severe hypertension, initially reduce dBP by 10 mmHg and maintain the blood pressure at or below that level with either Nifedipine or Labetalol. (8) For both prophylaxis against and treatment of eclampsia, MgSO4 (4 g IV stat, then 1 g/hr). (9) For recurrent seizures, MgSO4 (2g IV stat, then increase to 1.5 g/hr). (10) Total fluid intake should not exceed 80 ml/hr; tolerate urine outputs as low as 10 ml/hr. (11) Early-onset and/or severe preeclampsia predict later cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; it would seem prudent to offer such women screening and lipid lowering interventions.

  4. Scaling up evidence-based practices for children and families in New York State: toward evidence-based policies on implementation for state mental health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Olin, S Serene; Horwitz, Sarah; McKay, Mary; Cleek, Andrew; Gleacher, Alissa; Lewandowski, Eric; Nadeem, Erum; Acri, Mary; Chor, Ka Ho Brian; Kuppinger, Anne; Burton, Geraldine; Weiss, Dara; Frank, Samantha; Finnerty, Molly; Bradbury, Donna M; Woodlock, Kristin M; Hogan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of innovations is widely considered the sine qua non for system improvement. At least two dozen states are rolling out evidence-based mental health practices targeted at children and families using trainings, consultations, webinars, and learning collaboratives to improve quality and outcomes. In New York State (NYS) a group of researchers, policymakers, providers, and family support specialists have worked in partnership since 2002 to redesign and evaluate the children's mental health system. Five system strategies driven by empirically based practices and organized within a state-supported infrastructure have been used in the child and family service system with more than 2,000 providers: (a) business practices, (b) use of health information technologies in quality improvement, (c) specific clinical interventions targeted at common childhood disorders, (d) parent activation, and (e) quality indicator development. The NYS system has provided a laboratory for naturalistic experiments. We describe these initiatives, key findings and challenges, lessons learned for scaling, and implications for creating evidence-based implementation policies in state systems.

  5. Personalizing Research: Special Educators' Awareness of Evidence-Based Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckert, Mary; Mastropieri, Margo A.; Scruggs, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Although evidence-based practices are considered critical to student success, a research-to-practice gap exists. This qualitative study examined practicing special education teachers' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practices. Special education teachers were interviewed and their classroom practices examined. Major themes emerged and…

  6. Illicit Drugs, Policing and the Evidence-Based Policy Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alison; Lancaster, Kari

    2013-01-01

    The mantra of evidence-based policy (EBP) suggests that endeavours to implement evidence-based policing will produce better outcomes. However there is dissonance between the rhetoric of EBP and the actuality of policing policy. This disjuncture is critically analysed using the case study of illicit drugs policing. The dissonance may be ameliorated…

  7. Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five…

  8. Evidence-based doceren in het hoger onderwijs met ICT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, Ellen; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Van den Berg, E., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). Evidence-based doceren in het hoger onderwijs met ICT [Evidence based teaching in higher education with ICT]. In L. A. Plugge (Ed.), WTR Trendrapport 2012 De Bakens verzetten (pp. 1-10). Utrecht, Nederland: Stichting SURF.

  9. Semantic Representation of Evidence-based Clinical Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Zhisheng; Harmelen, Frank Van

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based Clinical Guidelines (EbCGs) are that the document or recommendation has been created using the best clinical research findings of the highest value to aid in the delivery of optimum clinical care to patients. In this paper, we propose a lightweight formal-ism of evidence-based

  10. Evidence-based Diagnostics: Adult Septic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Everett, Worth W.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acutely swollen or painful joints are common complaints in the emergency department (ED). Septic arthritis in adults is a challenging diagnosis, but prompt differentiation of a bacterial etiology is crucial to minimize morbidity and mortality. Objectives The objective was to perform a systematic review describing the diagnostic characteristics of history, physical examination, and bedside laboratory tests for nongonococcal septic arthritis. A secondary objective was to quantify test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity, as well as best-evidence diagnostic and treatment risks and anticipated benefits from appropriate therapy. Methods Two electronic search engines (PUBMED and EMBASE) were used in conjunction with a selected bibliography and scientific abstract hand search. Inclusion criteria included adult trials of patients presenting with monoarticular complaints if they reported sufficient detail to reconstruct partial or complete 2 × 2 contingency tables for experimental diagnostic test characteristics using an acceptable criterion standard. Evidence was rated by two investigators using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). When more than one similarly designed trial existed for a diagnostic test, meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Interval likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed when possible. To illustrate one method to quantify theoretical points in the probability of disease whereby clinicians might cease testing altogether and either withhold treatment (test threshold) or initiate definitive therapy in lieu of further diagnostics (treatment threshold), an interactive spreadsheet was designed and sample calculations were provided based on research estimates of diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic risk, and therapeutic risk/benefits. Results The prevalence of nongonococcal septic arthritis in ED patients with a single acutely painful joint is approximately 27

  11. Teaching evidence based practice to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mo-Kyung; Bliquez, Rebecca

    Considering the heightened importance of evidence-based practice in healthcare settings, incorporating evidence-based practice into the nursing curriculum, especially in baccalaureate programs is essential because this is a first step to prepare students for their professional role as an RN, and the undergraduate nursing students are the ones who will spend the most time with patients at their bedside providing direct care. Teaching evidence-based practice at the undergraduate level, however, can be challenging. Creative and enjoyable teaching strategies are instrumental in order to promote students' engagement and learning about evidence-based practice. This paper describes useful strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in an undergraduate nursing research course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks.

  13. Dissemination of Drinking Water Contamination Data to Consumers: A Systematic Review of Impact on Consumer Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Patricia J.; Cabral, Christie; Colford, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Drinking water contaminated by chemicals or pathogens is a major public health threat in the developing world. Responses to this threat often require water consumers (households or communities) to improve their own management or treatment of water. One approach hypothesized to increase such positive behaviors is increasing knowledge of the risks of unsafe water through the dissemination of water contamination data. This paper reviews the evidence for this approach in changing behavior and subsequent health outcomes. Methods/Principal Findings A systematic review was conducted for studies where results of tests for contaminants in drinking water were disseminated to populations whose water supply posed a known health risk. Studies of any design were included where data were available from a contemporaneous comparison or control group. Using multiple sources >14,000 documents were located. Six studies met inclusion criteria (four of arsenic contamination and two of microbiological contamination). Meta-analysis was not possible in most cases due to heterogeneity of outcomes and study designs. Outcomes included water quality, change of water source, treatment of water, knowledge of contamination, and urinary arsenic. Source switching was most frequently reported: of 5 reporting studies 4 report significantly higher rates of switching (26–72%) among those who received a positive test result and a pooled risk difference was calculate for 2 studies (RD = 0.43 [CI0.4.0–0.46] 6–12 months post intervention) suggesting 43% more of those with unsafe wells switched source compared to those with safe wells. Strength of evidence is low since the comparison is between non-equivalent groups. Two studies concerning fecal contamination reported non-significant increases in point-of-use water treatment. Conclusion Despite the publication of some large cohort studies and some encouraging results the evidence base to support dissemination of contamination data to

  14. Dissemination of drinking water contamination data to consumers: a systematic review of impact on consumer behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Lucas

    Full Text Available Drinking water contaminated by chemicals or pathogens is a major public health threat in the developing world. Responses to this threat often require water consumers (households or communities to improve their own management or treatment of water. One approach hypothesized to increase such positive behaviors is increasing knowledge of the risks of unsafe water through the dissemination of water contamination data. This paper reviews the evidence for this approach in changing behavior and subsequent health outcomes.A systematic review was conducted for studies where results of tests for contaminants in drinking water were disseminated to populations whose water supply posed a known health risk. Studies of any design were included where data were available from a contemporaneous comparison or control group. Using multiple sources >14,000 documents were located. Six studies met inclusion criteria (four of arsenic contamination and two of microbiological contamination. Meta-analysis was not possible in most cases due to heterogeneity of outcomes and study designs. Outcomes included water quality, change of water source, treatment of water, knowledge of contamination, and urinary arsenic. Source switching was most frequently reported: of 5 reporting studies 4 report significantly higher rates of switching (26-72% among those who received a positive test result and a pooled risk difference was calculate for 2 studies (RD = 0.43 [CI0.4.0-0.46] 6-12 months post intervention suggesting 43% more of those with unsafe wells switched source compared to those with safe wells. Strength of evidence is low since the comparison is between non-equivalent groups. Two studies concerning fecal contamination reported non-significant increases in point-of-use water treatment.Despite the publication of some large cohort studies and some encouraging results the evidence base to support dissemination of contamination data to improve water management is currently

  15. School Librarianship and Evidence Based Practice: Progress, Perspectives, and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross J. Todd

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This paper provides an overview of progress and developments surrounding evidence based practice in school librarianship, and seeks to provide a picture of current thinking about evidence based practice as it relates to the field. It addresses current issues and challenges facing the adoption of evidence based practice in school librarianship.Methods – The paper is based on a narrative review of a small but growing body of literature on evidence based practice in school librarianship, set within a broader perspective of evidence based education. In addition, it presents the outcomes of a collaborative process of input from 200 school libraries leaders collected at a School Library summit in 2007 specifically to address the emerging arena of evidence based practice in this field.Results – A holistic model of evidence based practice for school libraries is presented, centering on three integrated dimensions of evidence: evidence for practice, evidence in practice, and evidence of practice.Conclusion – The paper identifies key challenges ahead if evidence based school librarianship is to develop further. These include: building research credibility within the broader educational environment; the need for ongoing review and evaluation of the diverse body of research in education, librarianship and allied fields to make quality evidence available in ways that can enable practicing school librarians to build a culture of evidence based practice; development of tools, strategies, and exemplars to use to facilitate evidence based decision-making; and, ensuring that the many and diverse advances in education and librarianship become part of the practice of school librarianship.

  16. Probiotics and mastitis: evidence-based marketing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Griffin, Laura; Cullinane, Meabh; Garland, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer health benefits on the host. Scientists have isolated various strains of Lactobacilli from human milk (such as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius), and the presence of these organisms is thought to be protective against breast infections, or mastitis. Trials of probiotics for treating mastitis in dairy cows have had mixed results: some successful and others unsuccessful. To date, only one trial of probiotics to treat mastitis in women and one trial to prevent mastitis have been published. Although trials of probiotics to prevent mastitis in breastfeeding women are still in progress, health professionals in Australia are receiving marketing of these products. High quality randomised controlled trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of probiotics for the prevention and/or treatment of mastitis.

  17. Proposal of a holistic model to support local-level evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahtahmasebi, Said; Villa, Luis; Nielsen, Helen; Graham-Smith, Hilary

    2010-08-03

    In response to a central drive for evidence-based practice, there have been many research support schemes, setups, and other practices concentrating on facilitating access to external research, such as the Centre for Evidence Based Healthcare Aotearoa, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Very little attention has been paid to supporting internal research in terms of local evidence and internal research capabilities. The whole evidence-based practice movement has alienated internal decision makers and, thus, very little progress has been made in the context of evidence informing local policy formation. Health and social policies are made centrally based on dubious claims and often evidence is sought after implementation. For example, on record, most health care practitioners appear to agree with the causal link between depression and mental illness (sometimes qualified with other social factors) with suicide; off the record, even some psychiatrists doubt that such a link is applicable to the population as a whole. Therefore, be it through misplaced loyalty or a lack of support for internal researchers/decision makers, local evidence informing local decision making may have been ignored in favour of external evidence. In this paper, we present a practical holistic model to support local evidence-based decision making. This approach is more relevant in light of a new approach to primary health care of "local knowledge" complementing external evidence. One possible outcome would be to network with other regional programmes around the world to share information and identify "best" practices, such as the "Stop Youth Suicide Campaign" (www.stopyouthsuicide.com).

  18. Proposal of a Holistic Model to Support Local-Level Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Shahtahmasebi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to a central drive for evidence-based practice, there have been many research support schemes, setups, and other practices concentrating on facilitating access to external research, such as the Centre for Evidence Based Healthcare Aotearoa, the Cochrane Collaboration, and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Very little attention has been paid to supporting internal research in terms of local evidence and internal research capabilities. The whole evidence-based practice movement has alienated internal decision makers and, thus, very little progress has been made in the context of evidence informing local policy formation. Health and social policies are made centrally based on dubious claims and often evidence is sought after implementation. For example, on record, most health care practitioners appear to agree with the causal link between depression and mental illness (sometimes qualified with other social factors with suicide; off the record, even some psychiatrists doubt that such a link is applicable to the population as a whole. Therefore, be it through misplaced loyalty or a lack of support for internal researchers/decision makers, local evidence informing local decision making may have been ignored in favour of external evidence. In this paper, we present a practical holistic model to support local evidence-based decision making. This approach is more relevant in light of a new approach to primary health care of “local knowledge” complementing external evidence. One possible outcome would be to network with other regional programmes around the world to share information and identify “best” practices, such as the “Stop Youth Suicide Campaign”(www.stopyouthsuicide.com.

  19. Open access of evidence-based publications: the case of the orthopedic and musculoskeletal literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2015-11-01

    The open access model, where researchers can publish their work and make it freely available to the whole medical community, is gaining ground over the traditional type of publication. However, fees are to be paid by either the authors or their institutions. The purpose of this paper is to assess the proportion and type of open access evidence-based articles in the form of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the field of musculoskeletal disorders and orthopedic surgery. PubMed database was searched and the results showed a maximal number of hits for low back pain and total hip arthroplasty. We demonstrated that despite a 10-fold increase in the number of evidence-based publications in the past 10 years, the rate of free systematic reviews in the general biomedical literature did not change for the last two decades. In addition, the average percentage of free open access systematic reviews and meta-analyses for the commonest painful musculoskeletal conditions and orthopedic procedures was 20% and 18%, respectively. Those results were significantly lower than those of the systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the remaining biomedical research. Such findings could indicate a divergence between the efforts engaged at promoting evidence-based principles and those at disseminating evidence-based findings in the field of musculoskeletal disease and trauma. The high processing fee is thought to be a major limitation when considering open access model for publication. © 2015 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Expert consensus v. evidence-based approaches in the revision of the DSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S; Solomon, M

    2016-08-01

    The development of DSM-III through DSM-5 has relied heavily on expert consensus. In this essay, we provide an historical and critical perspective on this process. Over the last 40 years, medicine has struggled to find appropriate methods for summarizing research results and making clinical recommendations. When such recommendations are issued by authorized organizations, they can have widespread influence (i.e. DSM-III and its successors). In the 1970s, expert consensus conferences, led by the NIH, reviewed research about controversial medical issues and successfully disseminated results. However, these consensus conferences struggled with aggregating the complex available evidence. In the 1990s, the rise of evidence-based medicine cast doubt on the reliability of expert consensus. Since then, medicine has increasingly relied on systematic reviews, as developed by the evidence-based medicine movement, and advocated for their early incorporation in expert consensus efforts. With the partial exception of DSM-IV, such systematic evidence-based reviews have not been consistently integrated into the development of the DSMs, leaving their development out of step with the larger medical field. Like the recommendations made for the NIH consensus conferences, we argue that the DSM process should be modified to require systematic evidence-based reviews before Work Groups make their assessments. Our suggestions - which would require leadership and additional resources to set standards for appropriate evidence hierarchies, carry out systematic reviews, and upgrade the group process - should improve the objectivity of the DSM, increase the validity of its results, and improve the reception of any changes in nosology.