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Sample records for dissecting structure-function interactions

  1. Arterial elastic fiber structure. Function and potential roles in acute aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, B; Curci, J

    2010-10-01

    The lethality of acute aortic dissection is well recognized. Successful treatment and prevention of aortic dissection is going to be dependent upon an improved understanding of the molecular and physiologic events which predispose to dissection development and propagation. In this review, we will focus on the elastic fiber, one of the critical elements of the aortic wall matrix. Mechanical or functional failure of the elastin in the wall of the aorta likely predisposes to dissection as well as the post-dissection aortic degeneration with aneurysm formation. Insight into the role of the elastin and the elastic fiber in aortic dissection has recently been accelerated by research into the molecular mechanisms associated with hereditary propensity for aortic dissection, such as Marfan syndrome. These studies have implicated both structural and metabolic contributions of alterations in the scaffolding proteins in matrix elastic fibers. In particular, increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activity may play a prominent role in predisposing the aortic wall to dissection. The events which predispose to post-dissection aortic degeneration are somewhat less well defined. However, the loss of the structural integrity of the remaining elastic fibers leaves the wall weaker and prone to dilatation and rupture. It appears likely that the upregulation of several potent proteases, particularly those of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family such as MMP-9, are participating in the subsequent matrix damage. Novel medical treatments based on this pathologic data have been proposed and in some cases have made it to clinical trials. The ongoing study evaluating whether therapeutic inhibition of TGF-β may be useful in reducing the risk of aortic dissection in patients at high risk represents one promising new strategy in the treatment of this deadly disease.

  2. Nuclear effect study on nucleon structure functions, in comparison with antineutrino interactions on neon and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallee, C.

    1984-03-01

    We have studied the nuclear effects on high energy antineutrino charged current interactions by comparing the data which were taken in the Bubble Chamber BEBC filled with Neon and Deuterium. On the one hand, the study of nuclear reinteractions gave us the possibility to estimate the formation time of hadrons. On the other hand, the comparison of structure functions does not show any significant difference between Neon and Deuterium. Though this result does not contradict the effects observed with charged leptons by the EMC and SLAC experiments, it is strongly incompatible with certain theoretical interpretations which implied a stronger effect in antineutrino interactions [fr

  3. Dissecting Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AV Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This journal features articles covering various aspects of dissection. "Biology--The Study of Life" (George Russell) offers students experiments that do not require using invasive procedures. "Animal Cruelty--Behind the Scenes" (Zoe Weil) describes sources of laboratory animals. "Doing without Dissection" (Juliana…

  4. What can we learn from structure functions measured in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisele, F.

    1981-01-01

    The new measurements of structure functions by the CDHS-collaboration are substantially improved compared to published results. It is discussed how much we can learn from these data about QCD and the gluon distribution by the analysis of moments and of the full x-dependence. It is shown that these new data combined with SLAC ed-data are able to separate QCD-effects from higher twist and other possible non perturbative effects within ''reasonable'' assumptions. The presence of non perturbative contributions is required at large x (x larger or equal 5) and low Q 2 only. Their shape and magnitude agree well with popular models of diquark contributions. The analysis results in a value of Λsub(MS-bar) = .2+-.1. (author)

  5. Dissecting Tumor-Stromal Interactions in Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Kang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in breast cancer, affecting more than 70% of late stage cancer patients with severe complications such as fracture, bone pain, and hypercalcemia. The pathogenesis of osteolytic bone metastasis depends on cross-communications between tumor cells and various stromal cells residing in the bone microenvironment. Several growth factor signaling pathways, secreted micro RNAs (miRNAs and exosomes are functional mediators of tumor-stromal interactions in bone metastasis. We developed a functional genomic approach to systemically identified molecular pathways utilized by breast cancer cells to engage the bone stroma in order to generate osteolytic bone metastasis. We showed that elevated expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1 in disseminated breast tumor cells mediates the recruitment of pre-osteoclasts and promotes their differentiation to mature osteoclasts during the bone metastasis formation. Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β is released from bone matrix upon bone destruction, and signals to breast cancer to further enhance their malignancy in developing bone metastasis. We furthered identified Jagged1 as a TGF-β target genes in tumor cells that engaged bone stromal cells through the activation of Notch signaling to provide a positive feedback to promote tumor growth and to activate osteoclast differentiation. Substantially change in miRNA expression was observed in osteoclasts during their differentiation and maturation, which can be exploited as circulating biomarkers of emerging bone metastasis and therapeutic targets for the treatment of bone metastasis. Further research in this direction may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment strategies for bone metastasis.

  6. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R. Gamache

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT. To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1, a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2 that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  7. A measurement of the proton structure functions from neutrino-hydrogen and antineutrino-hydrogen charged-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; O'Neale, S.W.; Hamisi, F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Wainstein, S.; Corrigan, G.; Myatt, G.; Radojicic, D.; Shotton, P.N.; Towers, S.J.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1989-01-01

    Within the framework of the quark-parton model, the quark and anti-quark structure functions of the proton have been measured by fitting them to the distributions of the events in the Bjorken y variable. The data used form the largest sample of neutrino and antineutrino interactions on a pure hydrogen target available, and come from exposures of BEBC to the CERN wide band neutrino and antineutrino beams. It is found that the ratio d ν /u ν of valence quark distributions falls with increasing Bjorken x. In the context of the quark-parton model the results constrain the isospin composition of the accompanying diquark system. Models involving scattering from diquarks are in disagreement with the data. (orig.)

  8. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  9. Prediction and Dissection of Protein-RNA Interactions by Molecular Descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Luonan

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions play crucial roles in numerous biological processes. However, detecting the interactions and binding sites between protein and RNA by traditional experiments is still time consuming and labor costing. Thus, it is of importance to develop bioinformatics methods for predicting protein-RNA interactions and binding sites. Accurate prediction of protein-RNA interactions and recognitions will highly benefit to decipher the interaction mechanisms between protein and RNA, as well as to improve the RNA-related protein engineering and drug design. In this work, we summarize the current bioinformatics strategies of predicting protein-RNA interactions and dissecting protein-RNA interaction mechanisms from local structure binding motifs. In particular, we focus on the feature-based machine learning methods, in which the molecular descriptors of protein and RNA are extracted and integrated as feature vectors of representing the interaction events and recognition residues. In addition, the available methods are classified and compared comprehensively. The molecular descriptors are expected to elucidate the binding mechanisms of protein-RNA interaction and reveal the functional implications from structural complementary perspective.

  10. High-Throughput Dissection of AAV-Host Interactions: The Fast and the Curious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Anne-Kathrin; Grimm, Dirk

    2018-05-18

    Over fifty years after its initial description, Adeno-associated virus (AAV) remains a most exciting but also most elusive study object in basic or applied virology. On the one hand, its simple structure not only facilitates investigations into virus biology, but combined with the availability of numerous natural AAV variants with distinct infection efficiency and specificity also makes AAV a preferred substrate for engineering of gene delivery vectors. On the other hand, it is striking to witness a recent flurry of reports that highlight and partially close persistent gaps in our understanding of AAV virus and vector biology. This is all the more perplexing considering that recombinant AAVs have already been used in >160 clinical trials and recently been commercialized as gene therapeutics. Here, we discuss a reason for these advances in AAV research, namely, the advent and application of powerful high-throughput technology for dissection of AAV-host interactions and optimization of AAV gene therapy vectors. As relevant examples, we focus on the discovery of (i) a "new" cellular AAV receptor, AAVR, (ii) host restriction factors for AAV entry, and (iii) AAV capsid determinants that mediate trafficking through the blood-brain barrier. While (i)/(ii) are prototypes of extra- or intracellular AAV host factors that were identified via high-throughput screenings, (iii) exemplifies the power of molecular evolution to investigate the virus itself. In the future, we anticipate that these and other key technologies will continue to accelerate the dissection of AAV biology and will yield a wealth of new designer viruses for clinical use. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A precise determination of the nucleon structure functions in charged-current interactions on an iron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallage, B.

    1987-01-01

    570 000 neutrino-iron and 370 000 antineutrino-iron charged-current events were obtained from the Wide Band Beam exposure of the CDHS detector at CERN in 1983, at energies ranging from 20 to 400 GeV. These large statistics allowed a precise measurement of the charged-current differential cross-sections and a detailed study of systematic effects. The nucleon structure functions have been determined in the framework of the quark-parton model, in the kinematic range: 0.015 2 2 /c 2 . The longitudinal structure function F L (x) is in good agreement with the QCD predicted shape. Deviations from scale invariance are clearly seen from the functions F 2 and xF 3 . The Q 2 evolution of the valence quark distribution has been compared with the QCD prediction in order to measure the scale parameter Λ. A good agreement is obtained only if the low Q 2 points are removed from the comparison. Our experiment favours a value of Λ between 50 and 250 MeV [fr

  12. Digital dissection and three-dimensional interactive models of limb musculature in the Australian estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada J Klinkhamer

    Full Text Available Digital dissection is a relatively new technique that has enabled scientists to gain a better understanding of vertebrate anatomy. It can be used to rapidly disseminate detailed, three-dimensional information in an easily accessible manner that reduces the need for destructive, traditional dissections. Here we present the results of a digital dissection on the appendicular musculature of the Australian estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus. A better understanding of this until now poorly known system in C. porosus is important, not only because it will expand research into crocodilian locomotion, but because of its potential to inform muscle reconstructions in dinosaur taxa. Muscles of the forelimb and hindlimb are described and three-dimensional interactive models are included based on CT and MRI scans as well as fresh-tissue dissections. Differences in the arrangement of musculature between C. porosus and other groups within the Crocodylia were found. In the forelimb, differences are restricted to a single tendon of origin for triceps longus medialis. For the hindlimb, a reduction in the number of heads of ambiens was noted as well as changes to the location of origin and insertion for iliofibularis and gastrocnemius externus.

  13. Dacron graft as replacement to dissected aorta: A three-dimensional fluid-structure-interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayendiran, R; Nour, B M; Ruimi, A

    2018-02-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a serious medical condition characterized by a tear in the intima, the inner layer of the aortic walls. In such occurrence, blood is being diverted to the media (middle) layer and may result in patient death if not quickly attended. In the case where the diseased portion of the aorta needs to be replaced, one common surgical technique is to use a graft made of Dacron, a synthetic fabric. We investigate the response of a composite human aortic segment-Dacron graft structure subjected to blood flow using the three-dimensional fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) capability in Abaqus. We obtain stress and strain profiles in each of the three layers of the aortic walls as well as in the Dacron graft. Results are compared when elastic and hyperelastic models are used and when isotropy vs. anisotropy is assumed. The more complex case (hyperelastic-anisotropy) is represented by the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model which also accounts for the orientation of the fibers present in the tissues. The fluid flow is taken as Newtonian, incompressible, pulsatile and turbulent. The simulation show that for all the cases, the von Mises stress distribution at aorta-Dacron interface is well below the ultimate strength of the aorta. No significant change in radial displacement at the interface of the two materials due to blood flow is observed. Computation cost is also addressed and results show that the hyperelastic-anisotropic model takes about three times longer to run than the elastic isotropic case. Trade-off between accuracy and computational cost has to be weighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Photon structure function - theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references

  15. High spin structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, H.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis explores deep inelastic scattering of a lepton beam from a polarized nuclear target with spin J=1. After reviewing the formation for spin-1/2, the structure functions for a spin-1 target are defined in terms of the helicity amplitudes for forward compton scattering. A version of the convolution model, which incorporates relativistic and binding energy corrections is used to calculate the structure functions of a neutron target. A simple parameterization of these structure functions is given in terms of a few neutron wave function parameters and the free nucleon structure functions. This allows for an easy comparison of structure functions calculated using different neutron models. (author)

  16. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal–metal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konsolakis, Michalis, E-mail: mkonsol@science.tuc.gr [School of Production Engineering and Management, Technical University of Crete, GR-73100 Chania, Crete (Greece); Ioakeimidis, Zisis [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Western Macedonia, Bakola and Sialvera, GR-50100 Kozani (Greece)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • The surface chemistry of Cu-based catalysts is adjusted by metal-support or metal–metal interactions. • Three series of catalysts, i.e., Cu/REOs, Cu/Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ} and Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2} were prepared. • The local structure of Cu sites is remarkably affected by support or active phase modification. • Useful insights toward the fundamental understanding of Cu-catalyzed reactions are provided. - Abstract: Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal–metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce{sub 1−x}Sm{sub x}O{sub δ}) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu–Co/CeO{sub 2}). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal–metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  17. Surface/structure functionalization of copper-based catalysts by metal-support and/or metal-metal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolakis, Michalis; Ioakeimidis, Zisis

    2014-11-01

    Cu-based catalysts have recently attracted great attention both in catalysis and electro-catalysis fields due to their excellent catalytic performance and low cost. Given that their performance is determined, to a great extent, by Cu sites local environment, considerable efforts have been devoted on the strategic modifications of the electronic and structural properties of Cu sites. In this regard, the feasibility of tuning the local structure of Cu entities by means of metal-support or metal-metal interactions is investigated. More specifically, the physicochemical properties of Cu entities are modified by employing: (i) different oxides (CeO2, La2O3, Sm2O3), or (ii) ceria-based mixed oxides (Ce1-xSmxOδ) as supporting carriers, and (iii) a second metal (Cobalt) adjacent to Cu (bimetallic Cu-Co/CeO2). A characterization study, involving BET, XRD, TPR, and XPS, reveal that significant modifications on structural, redox and electronic properties of Cu sites can be induced by adopting either different oxide carriers or bimetallic complexes. Fundamental insights into the tuning of Cu local environment by metal-support or metal-metal interactions are provided, paving the way for real-life industrial applications.

  18. Structure-function dependence and allopurinol inhibition of ratiosensitizer/nitroreductase interaction: approaches to improving therapeutic rations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raleigh, J.A.; Shum, F.Y.; Koziol, D.R.; Saunders, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity of nitroaromatic radiosensitizers may originate in radiosensitizer/nitroreductase interaction. A study of two mammalian cell nitroreductases, xanthine oxidase and NADH cytochrome c reductase, shows that the efficiency of electron transfer is dependent on sensitizer electron affinity and not lipid solubility. Misonidazole and its demethylated metabolite (RO-05-9963), for example, are equally efficient as electron acceptors from xanthine oxidase. The only exception to the electron affinity correlation is m-nitrobenzamidine hydrochloride xanthine oxidase from its cofactor, xanthine. Allopurinol inhibits electron transfer and might be a useful adjuvant to the nitroreductases in vivo is deduced from the observation that allopurinol significantly alters the serum lifetimes in mice of misonidazole and RO-05-9963

  19. Hadron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.

    1981-03-01

    The x dependence of hadron structure functions is investigated. If quarks can exist in very low mass states (10 MeV for d and u quarks) the pion structure function is predicted to behave like (1-x) and not (1-x) 2 in a x-region around 1. Relativistic and non-relativistic quark bound state pictures of hadrons are considered together with their relation with the Q 2 evolution of structure functions. Good agreement with data is in general obtained

  20. Photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed

  1. Introduction to structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinski, J.

    1996-07-01

    The theory of deep inelastic scattering structure functions is reviewed with an emphasis put on the QCD expectations of their behaviour in the region of small values of Bjorken parameter x. (author). 56 refs

  2. Structure function monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  3. Cell penetrating peptides to dissect host-pathogen protein-protein interactions in Theileria -transformed leukocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Haidar, Malak; de Laté , Perle Latré ; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Langsley, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    One powerful application of cell penetrating peptides is the delivery into cells of molecules that function as specific competitors or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Ablating defined protein-protein interactions is a refined way

  4. Structure-function analysis and genetic interactions of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits of the yeast Sm protein ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwer, Beate; Kruchten, Joshua; Shuman, Stewart

    2016-09-01

    A seven-subunit Sm protein ring forms a core scaffold of the U1, U2, U4, and U5 snRNPs that direct pre-mRNA splicing. Using human snRNP structures to guide mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we gained new insights into structure-function relationships of the SmG, SmE, and SmF subunits. An alanine scan of 19 conserved amino acids of these three proteins, comprising the Sm RNA binding sites or inter-subunit interfaces, revealed that, with the exception of Arg74 in SmF, none are essential for yeast growth. Yet, for SmG, SmE, and SmF, as for many components of the yeast spliceosome, the effects of perturbing protein-RNA and protein-protein interactions are masked by built-in functional redundancies of the splicing machine. For example, tests for genetic interactions with non-Sm splicing factors showed that many benign mutations of SmG, SmE, and SmF (and of SmB and SmD3) were synthetically lethal with null alleles of U2 snRNP subunits Lea1 and Msl1. Tests of pairwise combinations of SmG, SmE, SmF, SmB, and SmD3 alleles highlighted the inherent redundancies within the Sm ring, whereby simultaneous mutations of the RNA binding sites of any two of the Sm subunits are lethal. Our results suggest that six intact RNA binding sites in the Sm ring suffice for function but five sites may not. © 2016 Schwer et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virchaux, M.

    1992-11-01

    The present status of experimental measurements of the nucleon structure functions is reviewed. The results from nearly all deep inelastic experiments are in good mutual agreement. Principles of the analysis of these structure function data in the framework of QCD are described. The specific features of the perturbative QCD predictions are observed in the data. This provides quantitative tests of the validity of QCD as well as determinations of the various parton distributions in the nucleon and some of the most precise measurements of the strong coupling constant αs. The future of this field of experimental physics is sketched

  6. Unpolarized Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy, M.E.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade measurements of unpolarized structure functions with unprecedented precision have significantly advanced our knowledge of nucleon structure. These have for the first time allowed quantitative tests of the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality, and provided a deeper understanding of the transition from hadron to quark degrees of freedom in inclusive scattering. Dedicated Rosenbluth-separation experiments have yielded high-precision transverse and longitudinal structure functions in regions previously unexplored, and new techniques have enabled the first glimpses of the structure of the free neutron, without contamination from nuclear effects.

  7. Defining the Interactions of Cellobiohydrolase with Substrate through Structure Function Studies: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-409

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.

    2013-07-01

    NREL researchers will use their expertise and skilled resources in numerical computational modeling to generate structure-function relationships for improved cellulase variant enzymes to support the development of cellulases with improved performance in biomass conversion.

  8. A multi-angular mass spectrometric view at cyclic nucleotide signaling proteins : Structure/function and protein interactions of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is the two kinases PKA and PKG, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinase respectively. PKA and PKG are studied both at structure/function level as well as at the level of interaction with other proteins in tissue. Our primary methods are all based on mass spectrometry.

  9. Cell penetrating peptides to dissect host-pathogen protein-protein interactions in Theileria -transformed leukocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Haidar, Malak

    2017-09-08

    One powerful application of cell penetrating peptides is the delivery into cells of molecules that function as specific competitors or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Ablating defined protein-protein interactions is a refined way to explore their contribution to a particular cellular phenotype in a given disease context. Cell-penetrating peptides can be synthetically constrained through various chemical modifications that stabilize a given structural fold with the potential to improve competitive binding to specific targets. Theileria-transformed leukocytes display high PKA activity, but PKAis an enzyme that plays key roles in multiple cellular processes; consequently genetic ablation of kinase activity gives rise to a myriad of confounding phenotypes. By contrast, ablation of a specific kinase-substrate interaction has the potential to give more refined information and we illustrate this here by describing how surgically ablating PKA interactions with BAD gives precise information on the type of glycolysis performed by Theileria-transformed leukocytes. In addition, we provide two other examples of how ablating specific protein-protein interactions in Theileria-infected leukocytes leads to precise phenotypes and argue that constrained penetrating peptides have great therapeutic potential to combat infectious diseases in general.

  10. Dissecting Hofmeister Effects: Direct Anion-Amide Interactions Are Weaker than Cation-Amide Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balos, Vasileios; Kim, Heejae; Bonn, Mischa; Hunger, Johannes

    2016-07-04

    Whereas there is increasing evidence for ion-induced protein destabilization through direct ion-protein interactions, the strength of the binding of anions to proteins relative to cation-protein binding has remained elusive. In this work, the rotational mobility of a model amide in aqueous solution was used as a reporter for the interactions of different anions with the amide group. Protein-stabilizing salts such as KCl and KNO3 do not affect the rotational mobility of the amide. Conversely, protein denaturants such as KSCN and KI markedly reduce the orientational freedom of the amide group. Thus these results provide evidence for a direct denaturation mechanism through ion-protein interactions. Comparing the present findings with results for cations shows that in contrast to common belief, anion-amide binding is weaker than cation-amide binding. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Quantifying Wheat Sensitivities to Environmental Constraints to Dissect Genotype × Environment Interactions in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Boris; Bonneau, Julien; Maphosa, Lance; Kovalchuk, Alex; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2017-07-01

    Yield is subject to strong genotype-by-environment (G × E) interactions in the field, especially under abiotic constraints such as soil water deficit (drought [D]) and high temperature (heat [H]). Since environmental conditions show strong fluctuations during the whole crop cycle, geneticists usually do not consider environmental measures as quantitative variables but rather as factors in multienvironment analyses. Based on 11 experiments in a field platform with contrasting temperature and soil water deficit, we determined the periods of sensitivity to drought and heat constraints in wheat ( Triticum aestivum ) and determined the average sensitivities for major yield components. G × E interactions were separated into their underlying components, constitutive genotypic effect (G), G × D, G × H, and G × H × D, and were analyzed for two genotypes, highlighting contrasting responses to heat and drought constraints. We then tested the constitutive and responsive behaviors of two strong quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated previously with yield components. This analysis confirmed the constitutive effect of the chromosome 1B QTL and explained the G × E interaction of the chromosome 3B QTL by a benefit of one allele when temperature rises. In addition to the method itself, which can be applied to other data sets and populations, this study will support the cloning of a major yield QTL on chromosome 3B that is highly dependent on environmental conditions and for which the climatic interaction is now quantified. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Dissecting Fission Yeast Shelterin Interactions via MICro-MS Links Disruption of Shelterin Bridge to Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinqiang Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shelterin, a six-member complex, protects telomeres from nucleolytic attack and regulates their elongation by telomerase. Here, we have developed a strategy, called MICro-MS (Mapping Interfaces via Crosslinking-Mass Spectrometry, that combines crosslinking-mass spectrometry and phylogenetic analysis to identify contact sites within the complex. This strategy allowed identification of separation-of-function mutants of fission yeast Ccq1, Poz1, and Pot1 that selectively disrupt their respective interactions with Tpz1. The various telomere dysregulation phenotypes observed in these mutants further emphasize the critical regulatory roles of Tpz1-centered shelterin interactions in telomere homeostasis. Furthermore, the conservation between fission yeast Tpz1-Pot1 and human TPP1-POT1 interactions led us to map a human melanoma-associated POT1 mutation (A532P to the TPP1-POT1 interface. Diminished TPP1-POT1 interaction caused by hPOT1-A532P may enable unregulated telomere extension, which, in turn, helps cancer cells to achieve replicative immortality. Therefore, our study reveals a connection between shelterin connectivity and tumorigenicity.

  13. Analysis of opto-thermal interaction of porcine stomach tissue with 808-nm laser for endoscopic submucosal dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjun Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD, the narrow gastrointestinal space can cause difficulty in surgical interventions. Tissue ablation apparatuses with high-power CO2 lasers or Nd:YAG lasers have been developed to facilitate endoscopic surgical procedures. We studied the interaction of 808-nm laser light with a porcine stomach tissue, with the aim of developing a therapeutic medical device that can remove lesions at the gastrointestinal wall by irradiating a near-infrared laser light incorporated in an endoscopic system. The perforation depths at the porcine fillet and the stomach tissues linearly increased in the range of 2–8 mm in proportion to the laser energy density of 63.7–382 kJ/cm2. Despite the distinct structural and compositional difference, the variation of the perforation depth between the stomach and the fillet was not found at 808-nm wavelength in our measurement. We further studied the laser–tissue interaction by changing the concentration of the methyl blue solution used conventionally as a submucosal fluidic cushion (SFC in ESD procedures. The temperature of the mucosal layer increased more rapidly at higher concentration of the methyl blue solution, because of enhanced light absorption at the SFC layer. The insertion of the SFC would protect the muscle layer from thermal damage. We confirmed that more effective laser treatment should be enabled by tuning the opto-thermal properties of the SFC. This study can contribute to the optimization of the driving parameters for laser incision techniques as an alternative to conventional surgical interventions.

  14. Dissecting the molecular interactions between wheat and the fungal pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme James Kettles

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Dothideomycete fungus Zymoseptoria tritici (previously known as Mycosphaerella graminicola and Septoria tritici is the causative agent of Septoria tritici leaf blotch (STB disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. In Europe, STB is the most economically damaging disease of wheat, with an estimated ~€1 billion per year in fungicide expenditure directed towards its control. Here, an overview of our current understanding of the molecular events that occur during Z. tritici infection of wheat leaves is presented. On the host side, this includes the contribution of (1 the pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI layer of the plant defence, and (2 major Stb resistance loci to Z. tritici resistance. On the pathogen side of the interaction, we consolidate evidence from recent bioinformatic, transcriptomic and proteomic studies that begin to explain the contribution of Z. tritici effector proteins to the biphasic lifestyle of the fungus. This includes the discovery of chitin-binding proteins in the Z. tritici secretome, which contribute to evasion of immune surveillance by this pathogen, and the possible existence of ‘necrotrophic’ effectors from Z. tritici, which may actively stimulate host recognition in a manner similar to related necrotrophic fungal pathogens. We finish by speculating on how some of these recent fundamental discoveries might be harnessed to help improve resistance to STB in the world’s second largest food crop.

  15. Genetic dissection in a mouse model reveals interactions between carotenoids and lipid metabolism[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Widjaja-Adhi, M. Airanthi K.; Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids affect a rich variety of physiological functions in nature and are beneficial for human health. However, knowledge about their biological action and the consequences of their dietary accumulation in mammals is limited. Progress in this research field is limited by the expeditious metabolism of carotenoids in rodents and the confounding production of apocarotenoid signaling molecules. Herein, we established a mouse model lacking the enzymes responsible for carotenoid catabolism and apocarotenoid production, fed on either a β-carotene- or a zeaxanthin-enriched diet. Applying a genome wide microarray analysis, we assessed the effects of the parent carotenoids on the liver transcriptome. Our analysis documented changes in pathways for liver lipid metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. We biochemically defined these effects, and observed that β-carotene accumulation resulted in an elevation of liver triglycerides and liver cholesterol, while zeaxanthin accumulation increased serum cholesterol levels. We further show that carotenoids were predominantly transported within HDL particles in the serum of mice. Finally, we provide evidence that carotenoid accumulation influenced whole-body respiration and energy expenditure. Thus, we observed that accumulation of parent carotenoids interacts with lipid metabolism and that structurally related carotenoids display distinct biological functions in mammals. PMID:27389691

  16. Genetic dissection in a mouse model reveals interactions between carotenoids and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Widjaja-Adhi, M Airanthi K; Amengual, Jaume; Golczak, Marcin; von Lintig, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Carotenoids affect a rich variety of physiological functions in nature and are beneficial for human health. However, knowledge about their biological action and the consequences of their dietary accumulation in mammals is limited. Progress in this research field is limited by the expeditious metabolism of carotenoids in rodents and the confounding production of apocarotenoid signaling molecules. Herein, we established a mouse model lacking the enzymes responsible for carotenoid catabolism and apocarotenoid production, fed on either a β-carotene- or a zeaxanthin-enriched diet. Applying a genome wide microarray analysis, we assessed the effects of the parent carotenoids on the liver transcriptome. Our analysis documented changes in pathways for liver lipid metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. We biochemically defined these effects, and observed that β-carotene accumulation resulted in an elevation of liver triglycerides and liver cholesterol, while zeaxanthin accumulation increased serum cholesterol levels. We further show that carotenoids were predominantly transported within HDL particles in the serum of mice. Finally, we provide evidence that carotenoid accumulation influenced whole-body respiration and energy expenditure. Thus, we observed that accumulation of parent carotenoids interacts with lipid metabolism and that structurally related carotenoids display distinct biological functions in mammals. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Spin dependent photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.V.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    Spin dependent structure functions of the photon are studied using the operator product expansion. There are new twist-two photon and gluon operators which contribute. The structure functions g 1 and F 3 are calculable in QCD, but differ from their free quark values. The corrections to F 3 are suppressed by 1/log Q 2 . The calculation is an extension of the analysis of Witten for the spin averaged structure functions F 1 and F 2 . (orig.)

  18. Nuclear correlations and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Guoju; Irvine, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    It is argued that the search for a mass number dependence of the nuclear structure function per nucleon is profitably directed to the region of Bjorken scaling variable x > 1. We show that in the convolution model of the nuclear structure function the nuclear momentum distribution and energy spectrum generated by cluster expansion techniques, here realised in the correlated basis function method, invoking tensor correlations and short-range density-dependent repulsions adequately describes the structure function for 12 C in the region x > 1. The results of structure functions for a number of light-, medium- and heavy-mass nuclei are presented. (author)

  19. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  20. Study of quark structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, F.T.; Flaminio, E.; Lai, K.; Metcalf, M.; Wang, L.

    1977-01-01

    The quark structure functions of the proton are determined through a combined analysis of the reactions pN → ll-barX and eN → eX. The valence-quark structure function of the pion is also given by analyzing the πN → μμ-barX data measured by the Branson et al

  1. Calculations of nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal, A.I.

    1990-01-01

    We present a method of calculating deep inelastic nucleon structure functions using bag model wavefunctions. Our method uses the Peierls - Yoccoz projection to form translation invariant bag states. We obtain the correct support for the structure functions and satisfy the positivity requirements for quark and anti-quark distribution functions. (orig.)

  2. Structure functions are not parton probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hoyer, Paul; Sannino, Francesco; Marchal, Nils; Peigne, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    The common view that structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering are determined by the probability of finding quarks and gluons in the target is not correct in gauge theory. We show that gluon exchange between the fast, outgoing partons and target spectators, which is usually assumed to be an irrelevant gauge artifact, affects the leading twist structure functions in a profound way. This observation removes the apparent contradiction between the projectile (eikonal) and target (parton model) views of diffractive and small x B phenomena. The diffractive scattering of the fast outgoing quarks on spectators in the target causes shadowing in the DIS cross section. Thus the depletion of the nuclear structure functions is not intrinsic to the wave function of the nucleus, but is a coherent effect arising from the destructive interference of diffractive channels induced by final state interactions. This is consistent with the Glauber-Gribov interpretation of shadowing as a rescattering effect

  3. Structure functions and correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Lewart, D.S.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1987-01-01

    The static longitudinal structure function S l (k) and the static structure function S(k) of 3 H, 3 He and 4 He nuclei and nuclear matter are calculated using realistic wave functions obtained from Faddeev and variational calculations. In order to study the variation of the structure function with the number of particles in the system we also calculate S(k) of atomic helium liquid drops containing 4, 8, 20, 40, 70, 168 and 240 atoms. Monte Carlo integration is used to calculate the structure functions of finite systems, while those of nuclear matter are calculated with chain summation methods. The behaivior of S(k) and S l (k) at small values of k is discussed. We find that the recent Saclay data on S l (k) of the 3 He nucleus are in agreement with theory. Though the data indicate the the existence of correlations between the two protons in the 3 He nucleus, they are not accurate enough to draw interesting conclusions about the repulsive core in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. The structure functions of atomic helium liquid drops indicate a smooth variation of S(k) with the number of atoms in the drop. The S L (k) of the 4 He nucleus and nuclear matter are very similar for k > 1.5 fm -1 , and it appears plausible that S L (k) of nuclei having A > 3 may not depend significantly on A when k > 1.5 fm -1 . (orig.)

  4. Structure-function analysis of RBP-J-interacting and tubulin-associated (RITA) reveals regions critical for repression of Notch target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaja, Nassif; Yuan, Zhenyu; Oswald, Franz; Kovall, Rhett A

    2017-06-23

    The Notch pathway is a cell-to-cell signaling mechanism that is essential for tissue development and maintenance, and aberrant Notch signaling has been implicated in various cancers, congenital defects, and cardiovascular diseases. Notch signaling activates the expression of target genes, which are regulated by the transcription factor CSL (CBF1/RBP-J, Su(H), Lag-1). CSL interacts with both transcriptional corepressor and coactivator proteins, functioning as both a repressor and activator, respectively. Although Notch activation complexes are relatively well understood at the structural level, less is known about how CSL interacts with corepressors. Recently, a new RBP-J (mammalian CSL ortholog)-interacting protein termed RITA has been identified and shown to export RBP-J out of the nucleus, thereby leading to the down-regulation of Notch target gene expression. However, the molecular details of RBP-J/RITA interactions are unclear. Here, using a combination of biochemical/cellular, structural, and biophysical techniques, we demonstrate that endogenous RBP-J and RITA proteins interact in cells, map the binding regions necessary for RBP-J·RITA complex formation, and determine the X-ray structure of the RBP-J·RITA complex bound to DNA. To validate the structure and glean more insights into function, we tested structure-based RBP-J and RITA mutants with biochemical/cellular assays and isothermal titration calorimetry. Whereas our structural and biophysical studies demonstrate that RITA binds RBP-J similarly to the RAM (RBP-J-associated molecule) domain of Notch, our biochemical and cellular assays suggest that RITA interacts with additional regions in RBP-J. Taken together, these results provide molecular insights into the mechanism of RITA-mediated regulation of Notch signaling, contributing to our understanding of how CSL functions as a transcriptional repressor of Notch target genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the α1 pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Alan; Hidalgo, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Openings of high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, HVA calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1) associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ, and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of HVA calcium channels. PMID:24917826

  6. Structure-function of proteins interacting with the alpha1 pore-forming subunit of high voltage-activated calcium channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan eNeely

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Openings of high-voltage-activated calcium channels lead to a transient increase in calcium concentration that in turn activate a plethora of cellular functions, including muscle contraction, secretion and gene transcription. To coordinate all these responses calcium channels form supramolecular assemblies containing effectors and regulatory proteins that couple calcium influx to the downstream signal cascades and to feedback elements. According to the original biochemical characterization of skeletal muscle Dihydropyridine receptors, high-voltage-activated calcium channels are multi-subunit protein complexes consisting of a pore-forming subunit (α1 associated with four additional polypeptide chains β, α2, δ and γ, often referred to as accessory subunits. Twenty-five years after the first purification of a high-voltage calcium channel, the concept of a flexible stoichiometry to expand the repertoire of mechanisms that regulate calcium channel influx has emerged. Several other proteins have been identified that associate directly with the α1-subunit, including calmodulin and multiple members of the small and large GTPase family. Some of these proteins only interact with a subset of α1-subunits and during specific stages of biogenesis. More strikingly, most of the α1-subunit interacting proteins, such as the β-subunit and small GTPases, regulate both gating and trafficking through a variety of mechanisms. Modulation of channel activity covers almost all biophysical properties of the channel. Likewise, regulation of the number of channels in the plasma membrane is performed by altering the release of the α1-subunit from the endoplasmic reticulum, by reducing its degradation or enhancing its recycling back to the cell surface. In this review, we discuss the structural basis, interplay and functional role of selected proteins that interact with the central pore-forming subunit of high-voltage-activated calcium channels.

  7. Structure/functional aspects of the human riboflavin transporter-3 (SLC52A3): role of the predicted glycosylation and substrate-interacting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Sabui, Subrata; Teafatiller, Trevor; Bohl, Jennifer A; Said, Hamid M

    2017-08-01

    The human riboflavin (RF) transporter-3 (hRFVT-3; product of the SLC52A3 gene) plays an essential role in the intestinal RF absorption process and is expressed exclusively at the apical membrane domain of polarized enterocytes. Previous studies have characterized different physiological/biological aspects of this transporter, but nothing is known about the glycosylation status of the hRFVT-3 protein and role of this modification in its physiology/biology. Additionally, little is known about the residues in the hRFVT-3 protein that interact with the ligand, RF. We addressed these issues using appropriate biochemical/molecular approaches, a protein-docking model, and established intestinal/renal epithelial cells. Our results showed that the hRFVT-3 protein is glycosylated and that glycosylation is important for its function. Mutating the predicted N -glycosylation sites at Asn 94 and Asn 168 led to a significant decrease in RF uptake; it also led to a marked intracellular (in the endoplasmic reticulum, ER) retention of the mutated proteins as shown by live-cell confocal imaging studies. The protein-docking model used in this study has identified a number of putative substrate-interacting sites: Ser 16 , Ile 20 , Trp 24 , Phe 142 , Thr 314 , and Asn 315 Mutating these potential interacting sites was indeed found to lead to a significant inhibition in RF uptake and to intracellular (ER) retention of the mutated proteins (except for the Phe 142 mutant). These results demonstrate that the hRFVT-3 protein is glycosylated and this glycosylation is important for its function and cell surface expression. This study also identified a number of residues in the hRFVT-3 polypeptide that are important for its function/cell surface expression.

  8. Proton and neutron structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rock, S.

    1991-01-01

    New result on charged lepton scattering from hydrogen and deuterium targets by the BCDMS, NMC and SLAC collaborations have greatly increased our knowledge of the structure functions of protons and neutrons. The disagreement between the high energy muon scattering cross sections obtained by the EMC and BCDMS collaborations have been almost completely resolved by comparison with a global analysis of old and new SLAC data and a reanalysis of EMC data. We now have a consistent set of structure functions which covers an approximate range 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 200 (GeV/c) 2 and 0.07 ≤ x ≤ 0.7. The ratio of neutron to proton structure functions decreases with increasing Q 2 for values of x ≥ 0.1. The difference between proton and neutron structure functions approaches zero as x decreases, consistent with the expected √x behavior. (orig.)

  9. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  10. Coincidence: Fortran code for calculation of (e, e'x) differential cross-sections, nuclear structure functions and polarization asymmetry in self-consistent random phase approximation with Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavinato, M.; Marangoni, M.; Saruis, A.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes the COINCIDENCE code written for the IBM 3090/300E computer in Fortran 77 language. The output data of this code are the (e, e'x) threefold differential cross-sections, the nuclear structure functions, the polarization asymmetry and the angular correlation coefficients. In the real photon limit, the output data are the angular distributions for plane polarized incident photons. The code reads from tape the transition matrix elements previously calculated, by in continuum self-consistent RPA (random phase approximation) theory with Skyrme interactions. This code has been used to perform a numerical analysis of coincidence (e, e'x) reactions with polarized electrons on the /sup 16/O nucleous.

  11. Diquarks and nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Savrin, V.I.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1982-01-01

    Formulae for structure functions of the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering are obtained through relativistic wave functions of systems composed of particles with spins 0, 1/2 and 1, 1/2. These wave functions are solutions of covariant two-particle single-time equations describing the nucleon as a system formed out of a quark and a diquark. Diquark is considered as a boson with the spin 0 and 1. The expressions for the nucleon structure functions are obtained by using the matrix elements of the current operator corresponding to the elastic scattering of the photon on a quark and on a diquark [ru

  12. Structure functions and parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olness, F.; Tung, Wu-Ki

    1991-04-01

    Activities of the structure functions and parton distributions group is summarized. The impact of scheme-dependence of parton distributions (especially sea-quarks and gluons) on the quantitative formulation of the QCD parton model is highlighted. Recent progress on the global analysis of parton distributions is summarized. Issues on the proper use of the next-to-leading parton distributions are stressed

  13. Rise in proton structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal-e-Aleem; Rashid, H.; Ali, S.

    1996-08-01

    By the choice of a new scale factor we obtain a good qualitative fit to the HERA data for the proton structure function in the small x region which exhibits double asymptotic scaling. Any scaling violations in the future measurements when made in smaller bins will be of immense value. (author). 19 refs, 6 figs

  14. Structure functions at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, A.De.

    2000-01-01

    Deep recent data and phenomenology on low-x structure functions are discussed inelastic scattering. We will be interested primordially in the regions Q 2 → 0 i.e. the transition from γp to, and x → 10 -4 - 10 -6 i.e. the region of high parton densities

  15. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  16. Structure functions and parton distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-01-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed

  17. Molecular dissection of the interaction between the SH3 domain and the SH2-Kinase Linker region in PTK6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Ie; Jung, Jinwon; Lee, Eun-Saem; Kim, Yong-Chul; Lee, Weontae; Lee, Seung-Taek

    2007-11-03

    PTK6 (also known as Brk) is an intracellular tyrosine kinase that contains SH3, SH2, and tyrosine kinase catalytic (Kinase) domains. The SH3 domain of PTK6 interacts with the N-terminal half of the linker (Linker) region between the SH2 and Kinase domains. Site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance studies showed that a tryptophan residue (Trp44) in the SH3 domain and proline residues in the Linker region, in the order of Pro177, Pro175, and Pro179, contribute to the interaction. The three-dimensional modeled structure of the SH3-Linker complex was in agreement with the biochemical data. Disruption of the intramolecular interaction between the SH3 domain and the Linker region by mutation of Trp44, Pro175, Pro177, and Pro179 markedly increased the catalytic activity of PTK6 in HEK 293 cells. These results demonstrate that Trp44 in the SH3 domain and Pro177, Pro175, and Pro179 in the N-terminal half of the Linker region play important roles in the SH3-Linker interaction to maintain the protein in an inactive conformation along with the phosphorylated Tyr447-SH2 interaction.

  18. The Problems of Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Describes some problems of classroom dissection including the cruelty that animals destined for the laboratory suffer. Discusses the multilevel approach that the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) has developed to address the problems of animal dissection such as offering a dissection hotline, exhibiting at science teacher conferences, and…

  19. Molecular dissection of placental malaria protein VAR2CSA interaction with a chemo-enzymatically synthesized chondroitin sulfate library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiura, Nobuo; Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Shioiri, Tatsuasa

    2016-01-01

    with chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans present in the placental tissue. CS is a linear acidic polysaccharide composed of repeating disaccharide units of d-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine that are modified by sulfate groups at different positions. Previous reports have shown that placental......-adhering IEs were associated with an unusually low sulfated form of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and that a partially sulfated dodecasaccharide is the minimal motif for the interaction. However, the fine molecular structure of this CS chain remains unclear. In this study, we have characterized the CS chain...... that interacts with a recombinant minimal CS-binding region of VAR2CSA (rVAR2) using a CS library of various defined lengths and sulfate compositions. The CS library was chemo-enzymatically synthesized with bacterial chondroitin polymerase and recombinant CS sulfotransferases. We found that C-4 sulfation...

  20. Molecular dissection of placental malaria protein VAR2CSA interaction with a chemo-enzymatically synthesized chondroitin sulfate library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Nobuo; Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Shioiri, Tatsumasa; Gustavsson, Tobias; Watanabe, Hideto; Salanti, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Placental malaria, a serious infection caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum, is characterized by the selective accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the placentas of the pregnant women. Placental adherence is mediated by the malarial VAR2CSA protein, which interacts with chondroitin sulfate (CS) proteoglycans present in the placental tissue. CS is a linear acidic polysaccharide composed of repeating disaccharide units of D-glucuronic acid and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine that are modified by sulfate groups at different positions. Previous reports have shown that placental-adhering IEs were associated with an unusually low sulfated form of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and that a partially sulfated dodecasaccharide is the minimal motif for the interaction. However, the fine molecular structure of this CS chain remains unclear. In this study, we have characterized the CS chain that interacts with a recombinant minimal CS-binding region of VAR2CSA (rVAR2) using a CS library of various defined lengths and sulfate compositions. The CS library was chemo-enzymatically synthesized with bacterial chondroitin polymerase and recombinant CS sulfotransferases. We found that C-4 sulfation of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residue is critical for supporting rVAR2 binding, whereas no other sulfate modifications showed effects. Interaction of rVAR2 with CS is highly correlated with the degree of C-4 sulfation and CS chain length. We confirmed that the minimum structure binding to rVAR2 is a tri-sulfated CSA dodecasaccharide, and found that a highly sulfated CSA eicosasaccharide is a more potent inhibitor of rVAR2 binding than the dodecasaccharides. These results suggest that CSA derivatives may potentially serve as targets in therapeutic strategies against placental malaria.

  1. Plant-herbivore interaction: dissection of the cellular pattern of Tetranychus urticae feeding on the host plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bensoussan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae, is one of the most polyphagous herbivores feeding on cell contents of over 1,100 plant species including more than 150 crops. It is being established as a model for chelicerate herbivores with tools that enable tracking of reciprocal responses in plant-spider mite interactions. However, despite their important pest status and a growing understanding of the molecular basis of interactions with plant hosts, knowledge of the way mites interface with the plant while feeding and the plant damage directly inflicted by mites is lacking. Here, utilizing histology and microscopy methods, we uncovered several key features of T. urticae feeding. By following the stylet path within the plant tissue, we determined that the stylet penetrates the leaf either in between epidermal pavement cells or through a stomatal opening, without damaging the epidermal cellular layer. Our recordings of mite feeding established that duration of the feeding event ranges from several minutes to more than half an hour, during which time mites consume a single mesophyll cell in a pattern that is common to both bean and Arabidopsis plant hosts. In addition, this study determined that leaf chlorotic spots, a common symptom of mite herbivory, do not form as an immediate consequence of mite feeding. Our results establish a cellular context for the plant-spider mite interaction that will support our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and cell signaling associated with spider mite feeding.

  2. Systems Level Dissection of Anaerobic Methane Cycling: Quantitative Measurements of Single Cell Ecophysiology, Genetic Mechanisms, and Microbial Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphan, Victoria [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Tyson, Gene [University of Queensland, Brisbane Australia; Meile, Christof [University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; McGlynn, Shawn [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Yu, Hang [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Chadwick, Grayson [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Marlow, Jeffrey [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Trembath-Reichert, Elizabeth [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Dekas, Anne [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Hettich, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pan, Chongle [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellisman, Mark [University of California San Diego; Hatzenpichler, Roland [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Skennerton, Connor [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Scheller, Silvan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-12-25

    The global biological CH4 cycle is largely controlled through coordinated and often intimate microbial interactions between archaea and bacteria, the majority of which are still unknown or have been only cursorily identified. Members of the methanotrophic archaea, aka ‘ANME’, are believed to play a major role in the cycling of methane in anoxic environments coupled to sulfate, nitrate, and possibly iron and manganese oxides, frequently forming diverse physical and metabolic partnerships with a range of bacteria. The thermodynamic challenges overcome by the ANME and their bacterial partners and corresponding slow rates of growth are common characteristics in anaerobic ecosystems, and, in stark contrast to most cultured microorganisms, this type of energy and resource limited microbial lifestyle is likely the norm in the environment. While we have gained an in-depth systems level understanding of fast-growing, energy-replete microorganisms, comparatively little is known about the dynamics of cell respiration, growth, protein turnover, gene expression, and energy storage in the slow-growing microbial majority. These fundamental properties, combined with the observed metabolic and symbiotic versatility of methanotrophic ANME, make these cooperative microbial systems a relevant (albeit challenging) system to study and for which to develop and optimize culture-independent methodologies, which enable a systems-level understanding of microbial interactions and metabolic networks. We used an integrative systems biology approach to study anaerobic sediment microcosms and methane-oxidizing bioreactors and expanded our understanding of the methanotrophic ANME archaea, their interactions with physically-associated bacteria, ecophysiological characteristics, and underlying genetic basis for cooperative microbial methane-oxidation linked with different terminal electron acceptors. Our approach is inherently multi-disciplinary and multi-scaled, combining transcriptional and

  3. Dissecting the interactions of SERRATE with RNA and DICER-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis microRNA precursor processing

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2013-08-05

    Efficient and precise microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated by the RNaseIII-family enzyme DICER-LIKE 1 (DCL1), double-stranded RNA-binding protein HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 and the zinc-finger (ZnF) domain-containing protein SERRATE (SE). In the present study, we examined primary miRNA precursor (pri-miRNA) processing by highly purified recombinant DCL1 and SE proteins and found that SE is integral to pri-miRNA processing by DCL1. SE stimulates DCL1 cleavage of the pri-miRNA in an ionic strength-dependent manner. SE uses its N-terminal domain to bind to RNA and requires both N-terminal and ZnF domains to bind to DCL1. However, when DCL1 is bound to RNA, the interaction with the ZnF domain of SE becomes indispensible and stimulates the activity of DCL1 without requiring SE binding to RNA. Our results suggest that the interactions among SE, DCL1 and RNA are a potential point for regulating pri-miRNA processing. 2013 The Author(s) 2013.

  4. Photo-cross-linked small-molecule microarrays as chemical genomic tools for dissecting protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Naoki; Asami, Aya; Kawatani, Makoto; Honda, Kaori; Kumashiro, Saori; Takayama, Hiroshi; Simizu, Siro; Amemiya, Tomoyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Hatakeyama, Satoru; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Utata, Rei; Tanaka, Akiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tashiro, Hideo; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2006-12-18

    We have developed a unique photo-cross-linking approach for immobilizing a variety of small molecules in a functional-group-independent manner. Our approach depends on the reactivity of the carbene species generated from trifluoromethylaryldiazirine upon UV irradiation. It was demonstrated in model experiments that the photogenerated carbenes were able to react with every small molecule tested, and they produced multiple conjugates in most cases. It was also found in on-array immobilization experiments that various small molecules were immobilized, and the immobilized small molecules retained their ability to interact with their binding proteins. With this approach, photo-cross-linked microarrays of about 2000 natural products and drugs were constructed. This photo-cross-linked microarray format was found to be useful not merely for ligand screening but also to study the structure-activity relationship, that is, the relationship between the structural motif (or pharmacophore) found in small molecules and its binding affinity toward a protein, by taking advantage of the nonselective nature of the photo-cross-linking process.

  5. Polarized DIS Structure Functions from Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, L.; Guffanti, A.; Piccione, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a parametrization of polarized Deep-Inelastic-Scattering (DIS) structure functions based on Neural Networks. The parametrization provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. As an example we discuss the application of this method to the study of the structure function g 1 p (x,Q 2 )

  6. Structure functions from chiral soliton models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weigel, H.; Reinhardt, H.; Gamberg, L.

    1997-01-01

    We study nucleon structure functions within the bosonized Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model where the nucleon emerges as a chiral soliton. We discuss the model predictions on the Gottfried sum rule for electron-nucleon scattering. A comparison with a low-scale parametrization shows that the model reproduces the gross features of the empirical structure functions. We also compute the leading twist contributions of the polarized structure functions g 1 and g 2 in this model. We compare the model predictions on these structure functions with data from the E143 experiment by GLAP evolving them from the scale characteristic for the NJL-model to the scale of the data

  7. Phenomenology of the electron structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of introducing the electron structure function (ESF) in electron induced processes are demonstrated. Contrary to the photon structure function it is directly measured in such processes. At present energies, a simultaneous analysis of both the electron and the photon structure functions gives an important test of the experimentally applied methods. Estimates of the ESF at LEP momenta are given. At very high momenta contributions from W and Z bosons together with γ-Z interference can be observed. Predictions for the next generation of experiments are given. (orig.)

  8. Structure functions and correlations in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, S.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the results obtained for the static structure function S(k) and the longitudinal structure function S L (k) of 3 H, 3 He and 4 He nuclei and nuclear matter are presented and discussed. The calculations have been performed using realistic wave functions obtained from Faddeev and variational theories. The Monte Carlo method has been used to calculate the structure functions of finite systems, and the FHNC/SOC method for nuclear matter. The results for the 3 He nucleus are in agreement with the recent Saclay data. The results for nuclear matter are compared with the experimental data relative to heavier nuclei, like e.g. 40 Ca

  9. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, F. [Depto de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-900, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.

  10. Virtual reality haptic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erolin, Caroline; Wilkinson, Caroline; Soames, Roger

    2011-12-01

    This project aims to create a three-dimensional digital model of the human hand and wrist which can be virtually 'dissected' through a haptic interface. Tissue properties will be added to the various anatomical structures to replicate a realistic look and feel. The project will explore the role of the medical artist, and investigate cross-discipline collaborations in the field of virtual anatomy. The software will be used to train anatomy students in dissection skills, before experience on a real cadaver. The effectiveness of the software will be evaluated and assessed both quantitatively as well as qualitatively.

  11. Proton structure functions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschinski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Proton structure functions are measured in electron-proton collision through inelastic scattering of virtual photons with virtuality Q on protons; x denotes the momentum fraction carried by the struck parton. Proton structure functions are currently described with excellent accuracy in terms of scale dependent parton distribution functions, defined in terms of collinear factorization and DGLAP evolution in Q. With decreasing x however, parton densities increase and are ultimately expected to saturate. In this regime DGLAP evolution will finally break down and non-linear evolution equations w.r.t x are expected to take over. In the first part of the talk we present recent result on an implementation of physical DGLAP evolution. Unlike the conventional description in terms of parton distribution functions, the former describes directly the Q dependence of the measured structure functions. It is therefore physical insensitive to factorization scheme and scale ambiguities. It therefore provides a more stringent test of DGLAP evolution and eases the manifestation of (non-linear) small x effects. It however requires a precise measurement of both structure functions F 2 and F L , which will be only possible at future facilities, such as an Electron Ion Collider. In the second part we present a recent analysis of the small x region of the combined HERA data on the structure function F 2 . We demonstrate that (linear) next-to-leading order BFKL evolution describes the effective Pomeron intercept, determined from the combined HERA data, once a resummation of collinear enhanced terms is included and the renormalization scale is fixed using the BLM optimal scale setting procedure. We also provide a detailed description of the Q and x dependence of the full structure functions F 2 in the small x region, as measured at HERA. Predictions for the structure function F L are found to be in agreement with the existing HERA data. (paper)

  12. Nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons and the photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, R.G.; Gulkanyan, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of the recombination model of hadron production a self-consistent description of the available data on the inclusive spectra of the nondiffraction photoproduction of vector mesons in the fragmentation region of photons at high energies is obtained. The parameters of parton distribution in the hadron component of a photon are estimated and its structure is compared with the measurements of the photon structure function in γγ-interactions at low Q 2 . 15 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  13. A Geometric Dissection Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 7. A Geometric Dissection Problem. M N Deshpande. Think It Over Volume 7 Issue 7 July 2002 pp 91-91. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/07/0091-0091. Author Affiliations.

  14. Imaging in aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.)

  15. Imaging in aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu-Qing Liu, M D [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). Dept. of Radiology, Fu Wai Hospital and Cardiovascular Inst.

    1996-12-31

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a catastrophic aortic disease. Imaging techniques play an invaluable role in the diagnostic evaluation and management of patients with AD. Major signs of AD with different imaging modalities are described in this article with a pertinent discussion on guidelines for the optimized approach of imaging study (13 refs.).

  16. Mastectomy using ultrasonic dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galatius, Hanne; Okholm, Mette; Hoffmann, Jack

    2003-01-01

    on seroma formation and other complications: 59 patients with operable breast cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, performed in 30 of them with an Ultracision Harmonic scalpel and in 29 with scissors and electrocautery. In all cases a standard level II axillary dissection was performed...

  17. On the twist-2 and twist-3 contributions to the spin-dependent electroweak structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Kochelev, N.

    1997-01-01

    The twist-2 and twist-3 contributions of the polarized deep-inelastic structure functions are calculated both for neutral and charged current interactions using the operator product expansion in lowest order in QCD. The relations between the different structure functions are determined. New integral relations are derived between the twist-2 contributions of the structure functions g 3 (x,Q 2 ) and g 5 (x,Q 2 ) and between combinations of the twist-3 contributions to the structure functions g 2 (x,Q 2 ) and g 3 (x,Q 2 ). The sum rules for polarized deep-inelastic scattering are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  18. Resonance contribution to electromagnetic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, A.L. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The part of the pion and proton electromagnetic structure functions due to direct channel resonances in the virtual Compton amplitude is discussed. After a phenomenological discussion, based on the work of Bloom and Gilman, of resonance production in inelastic electroproduction, the single resonance contribution to the pion and proton structure functions is expressed in terms of transition form factors. Froissart-Gribov representations of the Compton amplitude partial waves are presented and are used to specify the spin dependence of the transition form factors. The dependence of the form factors on momentum transfer and resonance mass is assumed on the basis of the behavior of exclusive resonance electroproduction. The single resonance contributions are summed in the Bjorken limit, and the result exhibits Bjorken scaling. Transverse photons are found to dominate in the Bjorken limit, and the threshold behavior of the resonant part of the structure functions is related to the asymptotic behavior of exclusive form factors at large momentum transfer. The resonant parts of the annihilation structure functions are not in general given by simple analytic continuation in the scaling vari []ble ω' of the electroproduction structure functions. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  19. Effective constraint algebras with structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the result that fluctuations and higher moments of a state, by themselves, do not imply quantum corrections in structure functions of constrained systems. Moment corrections are isolated from other types of quantum effects, such as factor-ordering choices and regularization, by introducing a new condition with two parts: (i) having a direct (or faithful) quantization of the classical structure functions, (ii) free of factor-ordering ambiguities. In particular, it is assumed that the classical constraints can be quantized in an anomaly free way, so that properties of the resulting constraint algebras can be derived. If the two-part condition is not satisfied, effective constraints can still be evaluated, but quantum effects may be stronger. Consequences for canonical quantum gravity, whose structure functions encode space–time structure, are discussed. In particular, deformed algebras found in models of loop quantum gravity provide reliable information even in the Planck regime. (paper)

  20. Boson structure functions from inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jager, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The even /sup 104-110/Pd isotopes and /sup 196/Pt have been investigated at NIKHEF-K by high-resolution inelastic electron scattering. A new IBA-2 calculation has been performed for the Pd isotopes, in which the ratio of the proton and neutron coupling constants is taken from pion scattering. One set of boson structure functions sufficed for the description of the first and second E2-excitations in all Pd isotopes. The data showed no sensitivity for different structure functions for proton and neutron bosons. A preliminary analysis of a number of negative parity states (3/sup -/,5/sup -/ and 7/sup -/), observed in /sup 196/Pt, was performed through the introduction of an f-boson. The first E4-excitation in the palladium isotopes can be reasonably described with a β-structure function, but all other E4-excitations require the introduction of g-boson admixtures

  1. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  2. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.

    1989-07-13

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.).

  3. Vertebral basilar artery dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.A.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Atlas, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Eleven patients (ten male, one female; range, 2-56 years) presented with posterior circulation ischemic symptoms and were evaluated with computed tomography (CT) (eta=11), arteriography (eta=11), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (eta=6). Angiography showed dissection of a vertebral artery (eta=8), a basilar artery (eta=1), or a combination of both (eta=2). On CT and/or MR images, infarctions were demonstrated in ten of 11 cases. Most frequently involved were the thalmus (eta=7), cerebellum (eta=6), occipital lobes (eta=4), and pons (eta=3). The site of infarction did not correlate with the side or site of angiographic abnormality. In six cases evaluated by all modalities, MR imaging showed more extensive and widespread infarction than did CT and also showed whether or not the infarcts were hemorrhagic. MR imaging was able to demonstrate the presence of intramural dissecting hematoma prior to angiography and to indicate whether or not flow was reconstituted on follow-up examination

  4. Cervicocephalic arterial dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Kentaro; Nagata, Izumi

    2008-01-01

    The authors review the clinical and neuroradiological features of cervicocephalic arterial dissection, which is occasionally seen in young adults, with special reference to the differences in the region of occurrence of these lesions between patients in Western countries and Japan. In Western countries, the cervical internal carotid artery is the most common site of occurrence of these lesions; however, in Japan, these lesions have been frequently reported to occure in the intracranial vertebral artery. Most clinical manifestations of cervical arterial dissection are non-hemorrhagic events such as headaches associated with arterial dissection or cerebral ischemia caused by a distal embolism following thrombus formation in the cervical lesion. On the other hand, a subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral infarction are frequently observed in intracranial arterial dissections. Non-invasive procedures, including MR imaging, are useful for demonstrating characteristic features of this condition such as the presence of an intimal flap or a double lumen, and for monitoring the chronological changes in the lesions, which may regress spontaneously. Since the pathological mechanisms underlying the progression and/or the regression of this condition are still unknown, the clinical evidence indicating the optimal therapeutic strategies has not yet been reported. Nevertheless, conservative therapy, including antithrombotic treatment, is widely used for the treatment of non-hemorrhagic lesions, which generally results in good clinical outcomes. Further, surgical intervention is essential for the treatment of lesions with a subarachnoid hemorrhage to prevent fatal rebleeding, and it is also required for the treatment of certain non-hemorrhagic lesions. Recent advancements in surgical procedures, especially endovascular treatments, may therefore be helpful in the management of similar complicated vascular conditions. (author)

  5. Geometrical scaling in charm structure function ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.; Rezaei, B.

    2014-01-01

    By using a Laplace-transform technique, we solve the next-to-leading-order master equation for charm production and derive a compact formula for the ratio R c =F L cc ¯ /F 2 cc ¯ , which is useful for extracting the charm structure function from the reduced charm cross section, in particular, at DESY HERA, at small x. Our results show that this ratio is independent of x at small x. In this method of determining the ratios, we apply geometrical scaling in charm production in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Our analysis shows that the renormalization scales have a sizable impact on the ratio R c at high Q 2 . Our results for the ratio of the charm structure functions are in a good agreement with some phenomenological models

  6. Theoretical analysis of polarized structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, G.; ); Ball, R.D.; Forte, S.; Ridolfi, G.

    1998-01-01

    We review the analysis of polarized structure function data using perturbative QCD and NLO We use the most recent experimental data to obtain updated results for polarized parton distributions, first moments and the strong coupling. We also discuss several theoretical issues involving in this analysis and in the interpretation of its results. Finally, we compare our results with other similar analyses in the recent literature. (author)

  7. Theoretical Analysis of Polarized Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ridolfi, G

    1998-01-01

    We review the analysis of polarized structure function data using perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order. We use the most recent experimental data to obtain updated results for polarized parton distributions, first moments and the strong coupling. We also discuss several theoretical issues involved in this analysis and in the interpretation of its results. Finally, we compare our results with other similar analyses in the recent literature.

  8. Structure functions of electroweak boson and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    1996-01-01

    The QCD structure of the electroweak bosons is reviewed and the lepton structure function is defined and calculated. The leading order splitting functions of electron into quarks are extracted, showing an important contribution from γ-Z interference. Leading logarithmic QCD evolution equations are constructed and solved in the asymptotic region where log 2 behavior of the Parton densities is observed. Possible applications with clear manifestation of ''resolved'' photon and weak bosons are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs

  9. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, M.; Saito, K.; Watanabe, T.; Kumano, S.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to AMD, the 9 Be nucleus consists of two α-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F 2 of 9 Be along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F 2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in 9 Be. It indicates that the anomalous 9 Be result should be explained by a different mechanism from the nuclear binding and Fermi motion. If nuclear-modification slopes d(F 2 A /F 2 D )/dx are shown by the maximum local densities, the 9 Be anomaly can be explained by the AMD picture, namely by the clustering structure, whereas it certainly cannot be described in the simple shell model. This fact suggests that the large nuclear modification in 9 Be should be explained by large densities in the clusters. For example, internal nucleon structure could be modified in the high-density clusters. The clustering aspect of nuclear structure functions is an unexplored topic which is interesting for future investigations.

  10. Bound-state quark and gluon contributions to structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1990-08-01

    One can distinguish two types of contributions to the quark and gluon structure functions of hadrons in quantum chromodynamics: ''intrinsic'' contributions, which are due to the direct scattering on the bound-state constituents, and ''extrinsic'' contributions, which are derived from particles created in the collision. In this talk, I discussed several aspects of deep inelastic structure functions in which the bound-state structure of the proton plays a crucial role: the properties of the intrinsic gluon distribution associated with the proton bound-state wavefunction; the separation of the quark structure function of the proton onto intrinsic ''bound-valence'' and extrinsic ''non-valence'' components which takes into account the Pauli principle; the properties and identification of intrinsic heavy quark structure functions; and a theory of shadowing and anti-shadowing of nuclear structure functions, directly related to quark-nucleon interactions and the gluon saturation phenomenon. 49 refs., 5 figs

  11. Bound-state quark and gluon contributions to structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    One can distinguish two types of contributions to the quark and gluon structure functions of hadrons in quantum chromodynamics: 'intrinsic' contributions, which are due to the direct scattering on the bound-state constituents, and 'extrinsic' contributions, which are derived from particles created in the collision. In this talk, I discuss several aspects of deep inealstic structure functions in which the bound-state structure of the proton plays a crucial role: (1) the properties of the intrinsic gluon distribution associated with the proton bound-state wavefunction; (2) the separation of the quark structure function of the proton into intrinsic 'bound-valence' and extrinsic 'non-valence' components which takes into account the Pauli principle; (3) the properties and identification of intrinsic heavy quark structure functions; and (4) a theory of shadowing and anti-shadowing of nuclear structure functions, directly related to quark-nucleon interactions and the gluon saturation phenomenon. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, F.H.; Young, N.; Soo, Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  13. Summary of the Photon Structure Functions - Measurements at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybycien, M.

    2002-01-01

    The present status of the photon structure functions measurements at LEP is discussed. The short introduction to the kinematics and theoretical framework of the structure functions measurements at LEP is given first. Then follow presentations of the most important measurements, ranging from the QED photon structure function, through the hadronic structure functions of real and virtual photons, and at the end the first measurement of the electron structure function is shown. (author)

  14. Oblique photon expansion of QED structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chahine, C.

    1986-01-01

    In the oblique photon expansion, the collinear part of photon emission is summed up to all orders in perturbation theory. The number of oblique or non-collinear photons is the expansion order. Unlike in perturbation theory, every term of the expansion is both infrared finite and gauge invariant. The zero oblique photon contribution to the electromagnetic structure tensor in QED is computed in detail. The behaviors of the structure functions F1 and F2 are discussed in the soft and ultra-soft limits

  15. The Structure-Function Linkage Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiva, Eyal; Brown, Shoshana; Almonacid, Daniel E; Barber, Alan E; Custer, Ashley F; Hicks, Michael A; Huang, Conrad C; Lauck, Florian; Mashiyama, Susan T; Meng, Elaine C; Mischel, David; Morris, John H; Ojha, Sunil; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Stryke, Doug; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Ferrin, Thomas E; Holliday, Gemma L; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD, http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a manually curated classification resource describing structure-function relationships for functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies. Members of such superfamilies are diverse in their overall reactions yet share a common ancestor and some conserved active site features associated with conserved functional attributes such as a partial reaction. Thus, despite their different functions, members of these superfamilies 'look alike', making them easy to misannotate. To address this complexity and enable rational transfer of functional features to unknowns only for those members for which we have sufficient functional information, we subdivide superfamily members into subgroups using sequence information, and lastly into families, sets of enzymes known to catalyze the same reaction using the same mechanistic strategy. Browsing and searching options in the SFLD provide access to all of these levels. The SFLD offers manually curated as well as automatically classified superfamily sets, both accompanied by search and download options for all hierarchical levels. Additional information includes multiple sequence alignments, tab-separated files of functional and other attributes, and sequence similarity networks. The latter provide a new and intuitively powerful way to visualize functional trends mapped to the context of sequence similarity.

  16. Structure functions of nucleons and nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, Wolfgang; Ito, Takuya [Department of Physics, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan); Cloet, Ian [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle (United States); Thomas, Anthony [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Yazaki, Koichi [RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    We use an effective chiral quark theory to calculate the quark distributions and structure functions of nucleons and nuclei. The description of the single nucleon is based on the Faddeev framework, and nuclear systems are described in the mean field approximation. Particular amphasis is put on the prediction of the polarized EMC effect in nuclei, and on applications to deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Concerning the polarized EMC effect, we discuss the quenching of the quark spin sum in nuclei and its implications for the spin dependent nuclear structure functions, and present results for several nuclei where an experimental observation is feasible. Concerning the case of deep inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering, we estimate the effect of medium modifications of the quark distribution functions on the measured cross sections, and discuss an interesting resolution of the so called NuTeV anomaly. Finally, we discuss extensions of our model to describe fragmentation functions for semi-inclusive processes. The connection between our effective quark model description and the jet model of Field and Feynman is discussed.

  17. Measurement of the nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.A.; Loomis, W.A.; Pipkin, F.M.; Pordes, S.H.; Sessoms, A.L.; Shambroom, W.D.; Tao, C.; Verhey, L.J.; Wilson, R.; Anderson, H.L.; Fine, R.M.; Heisterberg, R.H.; Kinnison, W.W.; Matis, H.S.; Mo, L.W.; Myrianthopoulos, L.C.; Wright, S.C.; Francis, W.R.; Hicks, R.G.; Kirk, T.B.W.; Quirk, T.W.; Bharadwaj, V.K.; Booth, N.E.; Kirkbride, G.I.; Proudfoot, J.; Skuja, A.; Staton, M.A.; Williams, W.S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the inclusive scattering of 96, 147, and 219 GeV muons from hydrogen, and of 147 GeV muons from deuterium. Results are presented for the nucleon structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) [equivalentνW 2 (x,Q 2 )] for 10 2 2 . The value of F 2 rises with Q 2 at small x, and falls with Q 2 at large x, in agreement with the ideas of quantum chromodynamics. An average value of the ratio sigma/sub L//sigma/sub T/ equivalent R = 0.52 +- 0.35 has been obtained for the region 0.003 2 2 . The values of F 2 from this experiment have been combined with those from other charged-lepton scattering experiments to determine moments of the structure functions. The variation with Q 2 of these moments is used to derive values for Λ, taking into account corrections up to second order in α/sub s/. The fit to the data is very good

  18. Automatic Dissection Of Plantlets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, B. G.; Harris, I. P.; Marchant, J. A.; Tillett, R. D.

    1989-03-01

    Micropropagation is a technique used in horticulture for generating a monoclonal colony of plants. A tiny plantlet is cut into several parts, each of which is then replanted. At the moment, the cutting is performed manually. Automating this task would have significant economic benefits. A robot designed to dissect plants would need to be equipped with intelligent visual sensing. This article is concerned with the image acquisition and processing techniques which such a machine might use. A program, which can calculate where to cut a plant with an "open" structure, is presented. This is expressed in the ProVision language, which is described in another article presented at this conference. (Article 1002-65)

  19. Dissecting Candida albicans Infection from the Perspective of C. albicans Virulence and Omics Approaches on Host–Pathogen Interaction: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voon Kin Chin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida bloodstream infections remain the most frequent life-threatening fungal disease, with Candida albicans accounting for 70% to 80% of the Candida isolates recovered from infected patients. In nature, Candida species are part of the normal commensal flora in mammalian hosts. However, they can transform into pathogens once the host immune system is weakened or breached. More recently, mortality attributed to Candida infections has continued to increase due to both inherent and acquired drug resistance in Candida, the inefficacy of the available antifungal drugs, tedious diagnostic procedures, and a rising number of immunocompromised patients. Adoption of animal models, viz. minihosts, mice, and zebrafish, has brought us closer to unraveling the pathogenesis and complexity of Candida infection in human hosts, leading towards the discovery of biomarkers and identification of potential therapeutic agents. In addition, the advancement of omics technologies offers a holistic view of the Candida-host interaction in a non-targeted and non-biased manner. Hence, in this review, we seek to summarize past and present milestone findings on C. albicans virulence, adoption of animal models in the study of C. albicans infection, and the application of omics technologies in the study of Candida–host interaction. A profound understanding of the interaction between host defense and pathogenesis is imperative for better design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies in future.

  20. Measuring structure functions at SSC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfin, J.G.; Owens, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Topics discussed include measuring Λ, tests of QCD using hard scattering processes, and measuring parton distributions. In each case, any opportunities and advantages afforded by the unique features of the SSC are emphasized. The working group on structure functions was charged with investigating two specific questions: (1) How well are the various parton distributions known in the kinematic region relevant to calculations for the SSC. (2) What new information can be learned about parton distributions at the SSC. Especially for this working group, the advantages of having a fixed-target facility at the SSC for the measurement of the parton distributions with multi-TeV leptons, were to be examined. 15 references

  1. Threshold resummation of the structure function FL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moch, S.; Vogt, A.

    2009-02-01

    The behaviour of the quark coefficient function for the longitudinal structure function F L in deepinelastic scattering is investigated for large values of the Bjorken variable x. We combine a highly plausible conjecture on the large-x limit of the physical evolution kernel for this quantity with our explicit three-loop results to derive the coefficients of the three leading large-x logarithms, α s n ln 2n-1-k (1-x), k=1,2,3, to all orders in the strong coupling constant α s . Corresponding results are derived for the non-C F part of the gluon coefficient function suppressed by a factor 1-x, and for the analogous subleading (1-x)ln k (1-x) contributions in the quark case. Our results appear to indicate an obstacle for an exponentiation with a higher logarithmic accuracy. (orig.)

  2. Cine MRI of dissecting aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Hajime

    1991-01-01

    Cine MRI was performed in 25 cases of aortic dissection and comparative study among cine MRI, spin-echo static MRI, contrast-enhanced CT and intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was made. Cine MRI accurately detected aortic dissection. It was most accurate among various diagnostic methods in demonstration of entry site of dissection. Take-off of renal artery and its relation to true and false channels was also accurately demonstrated by cine MRI. The above results suggest that cine MRI can be an important diagnostic modality with almost equal diagnostic quality to those of conventional angiography. However, further technical improvement to shorten the imaging time seems necessary to replace angiography. (author)

  3. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A; Chong, Samantha Y; Slater, Benjamin J; McMahon, David P; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I; Day, Graeme M

    2017-03-30

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  4. Biomedicine: an ontological dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronov, David

    2008-01-01

    Though ubiquitous across the medical social sciences literature, the term "biomedicine" as an analytical concept remains remarkably slippery. It is argued here that this imprecision is due in part to the fact that biomedicine is comprised of three interrelated ontological spheres, each of which frames biomedicine as a distinct subject of investigation. This suggests that, depending upon one's ontological commitment, the meaning of biomedicine will shift. From an empirical perspective, biomedicine takes on the appearance of a scientific enterprise and is defined as a derivative category of Western science more generally. From an interpretive perspective, biomedicine represents a symbolic-cultural expression whose adherence to the principles of scientific objectivity conceals an ideological agenda. From a conceptual perspective, biomedicine represents an expression of social power that reflects structures of power and privilege within capitalist society. No one perspective exists in isolation and so the image of biomedicine from any one presents an incomplete understanding. It is the mutually-conditioning interrelations between these ontological spheres that account for biomedicine's ongoing development. Thus, the ontological dissection of biomedicine that follows, with particular emphasis on the period of its formal crystallization in the latter nineteenth and early twentieth century, is intended to deepen our understanding of biomedicine as an analytical concept across the medical social sciences literature.

  5. Spontaneous Arterial Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Tobias; Caplan, Louis

    2001-09-01

    There is no controlled study for the best treatment or management of cervico-cerebral artery dissection (CAD). Rationale initial empiric treatment in acute CAD to prevent secondary embolism is partial thromboplastin time (PTT)-guided anticoagulation by intravenous heparin followed by anticoagulation with warfarin. Carotid surgery for treatment of CAD is not recommended anymore with the possible exception of persisting severe stenosis of the proximal internal carotid artery (ICA). There could be use of carotid angioplasty by balloon dilatation and stenting in selected cases of severe cerebral hemodynamic impairment by bilateral CAD. Duration of secondary prophylaxis by anticoagulation is best guided by Doppler sonography follow-up, and should be continued until normalization of blood flow or until at least 1 year after the vessel is occluded. There is no evidence that pseudoaneurysms increase the risk for embolic complication, and there is no evidence for surgery or continuation of anticoagulation in patients with pseudoaneurysms. Caution should be recommended for exercises that involve excessive head movements (eg, bungee jumping, trampoline jumping, and chiropractic maneuvers). The patient should be informed that recurrent rate is low in nonfamilial cases. Doppler sonography is a low-cost and high-sensitivity method for patients at risk.

  6. QCD dipole prediction for dis and diffractive structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royon, CH.

    1996-01-01

    The F 2 , F G , R = F L /F T proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture of BFKL dynamics. We get a three parameter fit describing the 1994 H1 proton structure function F 2 data in the low x, moderate Q 2 range. Without any additional parameter, the gluon density and the longitudinal structure functions are predicted. The diffractive dissociation processes are also discussed, and a new prediction for the proton diffractive structure function is obtained. (author)

  7. Photon-photon collisions and photon structure functions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The present knowledge of the structure of the photon based on measurements of photon structure functions is discussed. This review covers recent results on QED structure functions and on the hadronic structure function F/sub 2//sup gamma /. (13 refs).

  8. QCD predictions for weak neutral current structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jimin

    1987-01-01

    Employing the analytic expression (to the next leading order) for non-singlet component of structure function which the author got from QCD theory and putting recent experiment result of neutral current structure function at Q 2 = 11 (GeV/C) 2 as input, the QCD prediction for neutral current structure function of their scaling violation behaviours was given

  9. An approach to the structure function for nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Ming

    1986-01-01

    The structure function for nucleon is discussed by using the method given in a previous paper. The formula are compared with the experimental data from low Q 2 to high Q 2 . The results show that the way that the structure function for nucleon can be obtained from the hadronic wavefunction is a possible approach of investigating structure functions for hadron

  10. QCD dipole predictions for DIS and diffractive structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royon, C.

    1997-01-01

    The proton structure function F 2 , the gluon density F G , and the longitudinal structure function F L are derived in the QCD dipole picture of BFKL dynamics. We use a three parameter fit to describe the 1994 H1 proton structure function F 2 data in the low x, moderate Q 2 range. Without any additional parameter, the gluon density and the longitudinal structure functions are predicted. The diffractive dissociation processes are also discussed within the same framework, and a new prediction for the proton diffractive structure function is obtained

  11. Structure-function relationships of human meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danso, Elvis K; Oinas, Joonas M T; Saarakkala, Simo; Mikkonen, Santtu; Töyräs, Juha; Korhonen, Rami K

    2017-03-01

    Biomechanical properties of human meniscus have been shown to be site-specific. However, it is not known which meniscus constituents at different depths and locations contribute to biomechanical properties obtained from indentation testing. Therefore, we investigated the composition and structure of human meniscus in a site- and depth-dependent manner and their relationships with tissue site-specific biomechanical properties. Elastic and poroelastic properties were analyzed from experimental stress-relaxation and sinusoidal indentation measurements with fibril reinforced poroelastic finite element modeling. Proteoglycan (PG) and collagen contents, as well as the collagen orientation angle, were determined as a function of tissue depth using microscopic and spectroscopic methods, and they were compared with biomechanical properties. For all the measurement sites (anterior, middle and posterior) of lateral and medial menisci (n=26), PG content and collagen orientation angle increased as a function of tissue depth while the collagen content had an initial sharp increase followed by a decrease across tissue depth. The highest values (pmeniscus. This location had also higher (pmeniscus, higher (pmeniscus) significantly higher (pmeniscus modulus and/or nonlinear permeability. This study suggests that nonlinear biomechanical properties of meniscus, caused by the collagen network and fluid, may be strongly influenced by tissue osmotic swelling from the deep meniscus caused by the increased PG content, leading to increased collagen fibril tension. These nonlinear biomechanical properties are suggested to be further amplified by higher collagen content at all tissue depths and superficial collagen fibril orientation. However, these structure-function relationships are suggested to be highly site-specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brachial plexus endoscopic dissection and correlation with open dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, T; Masmejean, E; Bihel, T; Lafosse, L

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder endoscopy is evolving and becoming extra-articular. More and more procedures are taking place in the area of the brachial plexus (BP). We carried out an anatomical study to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the BP and the technique used to dissect and expose the BP endoscopically. Thirteen fresh cadavers were dissected. We first performed an endoscopic dissection of the BP, using classical extra-articular shoulder arthroscopy portals. Through each portal, we dissected as many structures as possible and identified them. We then did an open dissection to corroborate the endoscopic findings and to look for damage to the neighboring structures. In the supraclavicular area, we were able to expose the C5, C6 and C7 roots, and the superior and middle trunks in 11 of 13 specimens through two transtrapezial portals by following the suprascapular nerve. The entire infraclavicular portion of the BP (except the medial cord and its branches) was exposed in 11 of 13 specimens. The approach to the infraclavicular portion of the BP led directly to the lateral and posterior cords, but the axillary artery hid the medial cord. The musculocutaneous nerve was the first nerve encountered when dissecting medially from the anterior aspect of the coracoid process. The axillary nerve was the first nerve encountered when following the anterior border of the subscapularis medially from the posterior aspect of the coracoid process. Knowledge of the endoscopic anatomy of the BP is mandatory to expose and protect this structure while performing advanced arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Copyright © 2015 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. The primate fovea: Structure, function and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Andreas; Syrbe, Steffen; Görner, Katja; Kacza, Johannes; Francke, Mike; Wiedemann, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2018-03-30

    A fovea is a pitted invagination in the inner retinal tissue (fovea interna) that overlies an area of photoreceptors specialized for high acuity vision (fovea externa). Although the shape of the vertebrate fovea varies considerably among the species, there are two basic types. The retina of many predatory fish, reptilians, and birds possess one (or two) convexiclivate fovea(s), while the retina of higher primates contains a concaviclivate fovea. By refraction of the incoming light, the convexiclivate fovea may function as image enlarger, focus indicator, and movement detector. By centrifugal displacement of the inner retinal layers, which increases the transparency of the central foveal tissue (the foveola), the primate fovea interna improves the quality of the image received by the central photoreceptors. In this review, we summarize ‒ with the focus on Müller cells of the human and macaque fovea ‒ data regarding the structure of the primate fovea, discuss various aspects of the optical function of the fovea, and propose a model of foveal development. The "Müller cell cone" of the foveola comprises specialized Müller cells which do not support neuronal activity but may serve optical and structural functions. In addition to the "Müller cell cone", structural stabilization of the foveal morphology may be provided by the 'z-shaped' Müller cells of the fovea walls, via exerting tractional forces onto Henle fibers. The spatial distribution of glial fibrillary acidic protein may suggest that the foveola and the Henle fiber layer are subjects to mechanical stress. During development, the foveal pit is proposed to be formed by a vertical contraction of the centralmost Müller cells. After widening of the foveal pit likely mediated by retracting astrocytes, Henle fibers are formed by horizontal contraction of Müller cell processes in the outer plexiform layer and the centripetal displacement of photoreceptors. A better understanding of the molecular, cellular

  14. Pathogenesis Concept Of Extracranial Dissections In Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavian Ghandehari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dissection of Extracranial Internal Carotid Artery (EICA and Extracranial Vertebral Artery (EVA is an amportant cause of brain infarction with miscellaneous etiologies around the world. Methods: A prospective observational clinical study was conducted in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran between 2008-2016. Diagnosis of brain infarction and TIA was made by stroke neurologist. Detection of EICA and EVA dissections were made by performing CT angiography  and MR angiography  or DSA in the suspected patients. Demographic features, clinical manifestations, territorial involvement, pathophysiology and pathogenesis of dissections were assessed in all of the patients. Pathogenesis of dissections was classified as Idiopathic, Trumatic, Postural and Genetic categories. Results: Twenty eight patients (21 males, 7 females were admitted with extracranial arterial dissection. Mean age of males and females with dissection was 39.81± 4.2 and 35.71±6.1 years respectively. Influence of gender on age of the patients was not significant, p>0.05. Among patients with extracranial dissection only 3.6% had atherosclerosis risk factors and 96.4% had no other cause for brain infarction. 100% of extracranial dissections in males occured in carotid territory, while 28.6% of females had dissection in the EVA. The influence of gender in territory of dissection was significant, p<0.05. Idiopathic dissections and genetic susceptibility was found in 10.7% and 3.6% of extracranial dissections respectively. 53.5% of the patienrs had trumatic pathogenesis for extracranial dissections and 32.1% developed dissection due to special neck  postures. Important details in pathophysiology and pathogenesis of extracranial dissections will be presented in the lecture. Conclusion: Stroke patients with extracranial dissections have characteristic demographic and  territorial involvement. Trumatic pathogenesis is the most frequent cause of dissection in Iran followed by neck

  15. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany); Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg Strasse 1, 30625, Hannover (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  16. Endoluminal treatment of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavan, Ajay; Lotz, Joachim; Galanski, Michael; Oelert, Frank; Haverich, Axel; Karck, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Aortic dissection is most often a catastrophic medical emergency which, if untreated, can be potentially fatal. The intention of therapy in patients with aortic dissection is to prevent aortic rupture or aneurysm formation as well as to relieve branch vessel ischaemia. Patients with aortic dissection are often poor candidates for anaesthesia and surgery and the surgical procedure itself is challenging requiring thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping, blood transfusion as well as prolonged hospital stay in some cases. Operative mortality is especially high in patients with critical mesenteric or renal ischaemia. The past decade has experienced the emergence of a number of interventional radiological or minimally invasive techniques which have significantly improved the management of patients with aortic dissection. These include stent grafting for entry site closure to prevent aneurysmatic widening of the false lumen as well as percutaneous techniques such as balloon fenestration of the intimal flap and aortic true lumen stenting to alleviate branch vessel ischaemia. False lumen thrombosis following entry closure with stent grafts has been observed in 86-100% of patients, whereas percutaneous interventions are able to effectively relieve organ ischaemia in approximately 90% of the cases. In the years to come, it is to be expected that these endoluminal techniques will become the method of choice for treating most type-B dissections and will assist in significantly reducing the number of open surgical procedures required for type-A dissections. The intention of this article is to provide an overview of the current status of these endoluminal techniques based on our own experience as well as on a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  17. Nucleon structure functions, resonance form factors, and duality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovsky, V.V.; Struminsky, B.V.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nucleon structure functions in the resonance region is explored. For form factors that describe resonance production, expressions are obtained that are dependent on the photon virtuality Q 2 , which have a correct threshold behavior, and which take into account available experimental data on resonance decay. Resonance contributions to nucleon structure functions are calculated. The resulting expressions are used to investigate quark-hadron duality in electron-nucleon scattering by taking the example of the structure function F 2

  18. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Qiu, Jianwei; Zhu, Wei

    2001-01-01

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in ...

  19. A possible form of the pion's structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Ming; Huang Tao

    1986-01-01

    The pion's structure function behaviour is discussed by using the Fock state expansion of the hadronic wave function in QCD in this paper. As an example, we employ a model wave function of the Fock state in the light-cone and assume a Regge behaviour of a weight function for higher Fock states, and we get a possible form of the pion's structure function. This form is consistent with experimental data of the pion's structure function

  20. Virtual reality haptic human dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Caroline; Wilkinson, Caroline; Soames, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This project aims to create a three-dimensional digital model of the human hand and wrist which can be virtually 'dissected' through a haptic interface. Tissue properties will be added to the various anatomical structures to replicate a realistic look and feel. The project will explore the role of the medical artist and investigate the cross-discipline collaborations required in the field of virtual anatomy. The software will be used to train anatomy students in dissection skills before experience on a real cadaver. The effectiveness of the software will be evaluated and assessed both quantitatively as well as qualitatively.

  1. Second-order QCD analysis of the photon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Grunberg, G.

    1983-01-01

    The QCD predictions for the photon structure function are reexamined with particular emphasis on the small-x behavior. A simple parametrization of the real photon structure function, free of 1/x singularity, is derived. The structure function is found to be sensitive at small x to the non-perturbatively calculable constant term in the n=2 moment, and we show that the problem of a negative structure function can be solved on the basis of the knowledge of this single non-perturbative parameter. (orig.)

  2. Anaesthesia management of acute aortic dissection type B in Marfan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pregnancy in women with Marfan syndrome (MFS) is linked to approximately a 4.4% risk of acute aortic dissection (AAD). The natural history of pregnancy and the ability to deliver a viable fetus depends on the interaction between the pace of changes in the cardiovascular system and the advancement of pregnancy.

  3. Digital dissection system for medical school anatomy training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Kurt E.; Pawlina, Wojciech; Carmichael, Stephen W.; Korinek, Mark J.; Schroeder, Kathryn K.; Segovis, Colin M.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    As technology advances, new and innovative ways of viewing and visualizing the human body are developed. Medicine has benefited greatly from imaging modalities that provide ways for us to visualize anatomy that cannot be seen without invasive procedures. As long as medical procedures include invasive operations, students of anatomy will benefit from the cadaveric dissection experience. Teaching proper technique for dissection of human cadavers is a challenging task for anatomy educators. Traditional methods, which have not changed significantly for centuries, include the use of textbooks and pictures to show students what a particular dissection specimen should look like. The ability to properly carry out such highly visual and interactive procedures is significantly constrained by these methods. The student receives a single view and has no idea how the procedure was carried out. The Department of Anatomy at Mayo Medical School recently built a new, state-of-the-art teaching laboratory, including data ports and power sources above each dissection table. This feature allows students to access the Mayo intranet from a computer mounted on each table. The vision of the Department of Anatomy is to replace all paper-based resources in the laboratory (dissection manuals, anatomic atlases, etc.) with a more dynamic medium that will direct students in dissection and in learning human anatomy. Part of that vision includes the use of interactive 3-D visualization technology. The Biomedical Imaging Resource (BIR) at Mayo Clinic has developed, in collaboration with the Department of Anatomy, a system for the control and capture of high resolution digital photographic sequences which can be used to create 3-D interactive visualizations of specimen dissections. The primary components of the system include a Kodak DC290 digital camera, a motorized controller rig from Kaidan, a PC, and custom software to synchronize and control the components. For each dissection procedure, the

  4. Animal Rights Activism Threatens Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Constance

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the movement against the use of dissections in science laboratories. Examples of protests across the United States are included. Compared is the plight of using animals in a biology classroom and the demise of the teaching of evolution in some areas. (KR)

  5. Dissecting spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pierre-Olivier; Decarie, Jean-Claude; Crevier, Louis; Weil, Alexander G

    2018-04-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common condition in the pediatric population known to have many causes and presentation patterns. We report from the analysis of 2 cases the existence of a new complication of pediatric hydrocephalus. Naming this entity "dissecting intraparenchymal cerebrospinal fluid collection", we advance a hypothesis regarding its pathophysiology and discuss its clinical implications and management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proton structure function and Bc meson production in γγ collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using nonrelativistic quark model and perturbative QCD the production of B c (B* c ) mesons via resolved-photon interaction in γγ-collisions is studied. It is shown that the resolved-photon contribution via partionic subprocess cγ→B c (B* c )b is very important both near threshold of the B c (B* c )-meson production, where the hadron-like part of the photon structure function dominates, and at large energies, where only the point-like part of the photon structure function give the contribution increased versus energy. 18 refs., 5 figs

  7. QCD analysis of structure functions in terms of Jacobi polynomials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivokhizhin, V.G.; Kurlovich, S.P.; Savin, I.A.; Sidorov, A.V.; Skachkov, N.B.; Sanadze, V.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of QCD-analysis of singlet and nonsinglet structure functions based on their expansion in orthogonal Jacobi polynomials is proposed. An accuracy of the method is studied and its application is demonstrated using the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) obtained by the EMC Collaboration from measurements with an iron target. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of parton distributions and structure functions for the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Charchula, K.; Krawczyk, M.; Levy, A.

    1990-09-01

    A comparative study of the most popular parton parametrizations is presented. The individual parton distributions as well as the F 2 structure function are discussed with a particular emphasis on the low x region, 10 -4 -2 . The predictions of these parametrizations for the F 2 structure function have a wide spread which persists also in the HERA kinematical region. (orig.)

  9. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  10. [Modern treatment of type B dissections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitfod, L.; Baekgaard, N.; Just, S.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid classification is essential in the management of aortic dissections, as Type A dissections require surgery, while the optimal treatment of Type B dissections is controversial. Medical treatment with antihypertensive medication and analgesics has so far been the main treatment of uncomplicated...... Type B dissections, while surgery has been reserved for complications and persistent pain in spite of medical treatment. Endovascular techniques are less invasive than open repair and show promising early results Udgivelsesdato: 2008/9/8...

  11. Type A dissection following endovascular repair of type B dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juszkat, R.; Zabicki, M.; Jemielity, M.; Buczkowski, P.; Urbanowicz, T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: We present a patient, who was treated with thoracic stentgraft implantation, because of acute type B aortic dissection (according to Stanford classification). The endovascular procedure was performed without any complications. Case Report: The patient was discharged in the 3 rd postprocedural day and was transferred to another hospital for further recovery. Nine days after the procedure, the patient was readmitted in cardiogenic shock to the Cardiac Surgery Department. The patient was immediately operated on, after dissection of the ascending aorta and pericardial tamponade had been diagnosed in transthoracic echocardiography. Conclusions: Total replacement of the aortic arch and its ascending part was performed successfully. The surgery was carried out in deep hypothermia with temporary circulatory arrest. The patient was discharged from the Cardiac Surgery Unit 15 days after the surgery, and transferred to another unit for further recovery. (authors)

  12. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  13. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  14. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  15. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm 2 of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4√nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F 2 (x,Q 2 ) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 2 2 /c 2 . We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter Λ/sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references

  16. Structure-function relations in physiology education: Where's the mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E; Gardner, Stephanie M

    2017-06-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such as structure-function relations, selectively neglect mechanisms by not mentioning this term explicitly. We explored how students characterized mechanisms and functions to shed light on how students make sense of these terms. Students characterized mechanisms as 1 ) processes that occur at levels of organization lower than that of functions; and 2 ) as detailed events with many steps involved. We also found that students produced more variability in how they characterized functions compared with mechanisms: students characterized functions in relation to multiple levels of organization and multiple definitions. We interpret these results as evidence that students see mechanisms as holding a more narrow definition than used in the biological sciences, and that students struggle to coordinate and distinguish mechanisms from functions due to cognitive processes germane to learning in many domains. We offer the instructional suggestion that we scaffold student learning by affording students opportunities to relate and also distinguish between these terms so central to understanding physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Dissecting the Structure-Function Relationship of a Fungicidal Peptide Derived from the Constant Region of Human Immunoglobulins

    OpenAIRE

    Ciociola, Tecla; Pertinhez, Thelma A.; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Ferrari, Elena; Gatti, Rita; D'Adda, Tiziana; Spisni, Alberto; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic peptides encompassing sequences related to the complementarity-determining regions of antibodies or derived from their constant region (Fc peptides) were proven to exert differential antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, and/or immunomodulatory activities in vitro and/or in vivo, regardless of the specificity and isotype of the parental antibody. Alanine substitution derivatives of these peptides exhibited unaltered, increased, or decreased candidacidal activities in vitro. The bioac...

  18. Dynamic CT in dissecting aortic aneurysm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Nobuyuki; Matsuoka, Yosuke; Mizuo, Hideyo; Shirato, Hiroki; Irie, Goro

    1985-01-01

    especially about the branching of major vessels Eight cases of aortic dissection were analysed to evaluate detectability of the branching of major vessels from a ture or false lumen, by dynamic CT. Although recognition of the branching is easy when the direct continuity to a dissected lumen is demonstrated, but without visualization of direct continuity or with no information about dissected lumens, it is sometimes difficult or leads us to misdiagnosis. The diagnostic accuracy is 100% when direct continuity to a dissected lumen is demonstrated, or dynamic CT revealed branching pattern distinctly. Dynamic CT is useful for a diagnosis of dissecting aneurysm and branching pattern of major vessels. (author)

  19. Spontaneous Dissection of the Superior Mesenteric Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, Patrick J.; Esther, James B.; Sheldon, Elana L.; Sparks, Steven R.; Brophy, David P.; Oglevie, Steven B.

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) is a rare occurrence, especially when not associated with aortic dissection. Currently, only 28 cases appear to have been reported. Due to the scarcity of cases in the literature, the natural history of isolated, spontaneous SMA dissection is unclear. CT has been reported to be useful for the initial diagnosis of SMA dissection [2-5]. We present two recent cases of spontaneous SMA dissection in which enhanced spiral CT was instrumental in following the disease process and guiding clinical decision making

  20. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.)

  2. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Didactica de las Ciencias Experimentales); Vento, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular)

    1989-10-02

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.).

  3. Deep inelastic singlet structure functions and scaling violation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-zhu, Li; Bing-xun, Hu

    1984-02-01

    The flavour singlet structure functions of deep inelastic scattering processes can yield more decisive tests of QCD than the non-singlet. We give analytical expression for flavour singlet structure functions through analysing the lepton-nucleon deep inelastic scattering processes by means of QCD and using Jacobi polynomials. This expression contains 4 to 5 parameters and shows the changes of the singlet structure functions with x and Q/sup 2/ very well. In QCD leading order, the conclusion is in reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  4. Characterization of technical surfaces by structure function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalms, Michael; Kreis, Thomas; Bergmann, Ralf B.

    2018-03-01

    The structure function is a tool for characterizing technical surfaces that exhibits a number of advantages over Fourierbased analysis methods. So it is optimally suited for analyzing the height distributions of surfaces measured by full-field non-contacting methods. The structure function is thus a useful method to extract global or local criteria like e. g. periodicities, waviness, lay, or roughness to analyze and evaluate technical surfaces. After the definition of line- and area-structure function and offering effective procedures for their calculation this paper presents examples using simulated and measured data of technical surfaces including aircraft parts.

  5. Towards a lattice calculation of the nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Ilgenfritz, M.; Perlt, H.; Rakow, P.; Schierholz, G.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; Schiller, A.

    1994-12-01

    We have initiated a programme to compute the lower moments of the unpolarised and polarised deep inelastic structure functions of the nucleon in the quenched approxiation. We review our progress to date. (orig.)

  6. Nonlinear correction to the longitudinal structure function at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    We computed the longitudinal proton structure function F L , using the nonlinear Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (NLDGLAP) evolution equation approach at small x. For the gluon distribution, the nonlinear effects are related to the longitudinal structure function. As the very small-x behavior of the gluon distribution is obtained by solving the Gribov, Levin, Ryskin, Mueller and Qiu (GLR-MQ) evolution equation with the nonlinear shadowing term incorporated, we show that the strong rise that corresponds to the linear QCD evolution equations can be tamed by screening effects. Consequently, the obtained longitudinal structure function shows a tamed growth at small x. We computed the predictions for all details of the nonlinear longitudinal structure function in the kinematic range where it has been measured by the H1 Collaboration and made comparisons with the computation by Moch, Vermaseren and Vogt at the second order with input data from the MRST QCD fit. (orig.)

  7. Structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-06-26

    The phenomenological expressions for the structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering are proposed and are shown to satisfy the experimental data as well as a number of sum rules.

  8. Photon structure functions at small x in holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Li, Hsiang-nan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the photon structure functions at small Bjorken variable x in the framework of the holographic QCD, assuming dominance of the Pomeron exchange. The quasi-real photon structure functions are expressed as convolution of the Brower–Polchinski–Strassler–Tan (BPST) Pomeron kernel and the known wave functions of the U(1) vector field in the five-dimensional AdS space, in which the involved parameters in the BPST kernel have been fixed in previous studies of the nucleon structure functions. The predicted photon structure functions, as confronted with data, provide a clean test of the BPST kernel. The agreement between theoretical predictions and data is demonstrated, which supports applications of holographic QCD to hadronic processes in the nonperturbative region. Our results are also consistent with those derived from the parton distribution functions of the photon proposed by Glück, Reya, and Schienbein, implying realization of the vector meson dominance in the present model setup.

  9. Experimental investigation of Lagrangian structure functions in turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Lagrangian properties obtained from a particle tracking velocimetry experiment in a turbulent flow at intermediate Reynolds number are presented. Accurate sampling of particle trajectories is essential in order to obtain the Lagrangian structure functions and to measure intermittency at small...

  10. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Peschanski, R.; Wallon, S.; Royon, Ch.

    1996-06-01

    The proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, deep-inelastic proton scattering is related to deep-inelastic onium scattering. A three parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range has been obtained. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. (author)

  11. An introduction about precise measurements of QED γ structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courau, A.

    1989-11-01

    Pure QED processes are theoretically exactly computable. However precise measurements and theoretical expectations of QED γ structure functions within a given experimental acceptance are not so trivial. Yet such a study is quite interesting. It supplies on the one hand a good QED test and, on the other hand, a good exercise for testing the procedure used for the determination of the hadronic γ structure functions

  12. The photon structure function at large Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordier, A.

    1987-01-01

    LEP II offers the unique opportunity to measure the photon structure function over a large Q 2 range up to ∼ 2000 GeV 2 . Two crucial predictions of QCD can be tested in this experiment: the linear rise in log Q 2 as a consequence of asymptotic freedom, and the large renormalization O(1) of the shape of the structure function due to gluon bremsstrahlung, unperturbed by higher-twist effects

  13. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  14. Spontaneous coronary dissection: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Couto, Gustavo J. Ventura; Deslandes, Alexandre de O.; Santos, Paulo César de Souza; Cruz, Alexandre de Araújo; Saraiva, Roberto Santos

    2007-01-01

    O objetivo do trabalho é demonstrar o caso de um homem de 62 anos, com quadro de dissecção coronariana espontânea, localizada em 1/3 inicial de coronária circunflexa esquerda, tratado cirurgicamente com revascularização miocárdica. A operação realizada com sucesso demonstra, nesse caso, ser o único meio possível de cura.The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate the case of a 62-year-old man, with spontaneous coronary dissection of the left circumflex artery, treated surgically by myocardial ...

  15. The triple-pomeron regime and structure function of the pomeron in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at very small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, N.N.; Zakharov, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    We develop the novel description of diffractive deep inelastic scattering based on the technique of lightcone wave functions of multiparton Fock states of the photon. The technique takes advantage of the exact diagonalization of the diffractive S-matrix in the dipole-cross section representation. In this paper we derive properties of the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in the triple-pomeron regime. We demonstrate that the photon-pomeron interactions can be described by the partonic structure function, which satisfies the conventional GLDAP evolution equations. We identify the valence and sea (anti) quark and the valence gluon structure functions of the pomeron. We show how the gluon structure of the pomeron can be described by the constituent gluon wave function. We derive the leading unitarization correction to the rising structure functions at small x and conclude that the unitarized structure function satisfies the linear GLDAP evolution equations. This result holds even when the multipomeron exchanges are included. (orig.)

  16. Renormalized sum rules for structure functions of heavy meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozin, A.G.; Korchemsky, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    We consider the properties of the structure functions of inclusive heavy meson decays B→X c and treat the c quark mass as a free parameter. We show that in two extreme cases of heavy and light c quarks the structure functions of heavy-heavy and heavy-light transitions are given by a Fourier transform of the matrix elements of Wilson lines containing a timelike and a lightlike segment, correspondingly. Using the renormalization properties of Wilson lines we find the dependence of the structure functions on the factorization scale, the structure function of the heavy-heavy transition is renormalized multiplicatively, while that of the heavy-light transition obeys the GLAP-type evolution equation. We propose a generalization of the sum rules for the moments of the structure functions (Bjorken, Voloshin, and the open-quote open-quote third close-quote close-quote sum rules) with a soft exponential factorization cutoff, which correctly incorporates both perturbative and nonperturbative effects. We analyze nonperturbative corrections by first considering infrared renormalon contributions to the Wilson lines. Uncertainties induced by the leading renormalon pole at u=1/2 are exactly canceled by a similar uncertainty in the heavy quark pole mass. The leading nonperturbative corrections associated with the next renormalon at u=1 are parametrized by the matrix element μ π 2 which is proportional to the heavy quark kinetic energy. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Structure functions of hadrons in the QCD effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigetani, Takayuki

    1996-01-01

    We study the structure functions of hadrons with the low energy effective theory of QCD. We try to clarify a link between the low energy effective theory, where non-perturbative dynamics is essential, and the high energy deep inelastic scattering experiment. We calculate the leading twist matrix elements of the structure function at the low energy model scale within the effective theory. Calculated structure functions are evoluted to the high momentum scale with the help of the perturbative QCD, and compared with the experimental data. Through the comparison of the model calculations with the experiment, we discuss how the non-perturbative dynamics of the effective theory is reflected in the deep inelastic phenomena. We first evaluate the structure functions of the pseudoscalar mesons using the NJL model. The resulting structure functions show reasonable agreements with experiments. We study then the quark distribution functions of the nucleon using a covariant quark-diquark model. We calculate three leading twist distribution functions, spin-independent f 1 (x), longitudinal spin distribution g 1 (x), and chiral-odd transversity spin distribution h 1 (x). The results for f 1 (x) and g 1 (x) turn out to be consistent with available experiments because of the strong spin-0 diquark correlation. (author)

  18. Regge behaviour of structure functions and evolution of gluon structure function upto next-to-leading order at low-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamil, U.; Sarma, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    Evolution of gluon structure function from Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) evolution equations upto next-to-leading order at low-x is presented assuming the Regge behaviour of structure functions. We compare our results of gluon structure function with GRV 98 global parameterization and show the compatibility of Regge behaviour of structure functions with PQCD. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Educator & Student Use of & Attitudes toward Dissection & Dissection Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osenkowski, Pamela; Green, Che; Tjaden, Anne; Cunniff, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Animal dissection has been routinely practiced in American biology classrooms for decades. With technological advancements, more states adopting student choice measures, and increased awareness about ethical concerns surrounding dissection, many useful dissection alternatives have been developed. To understand the current use of animal dissection…

  20. Small-x Resummation and HERA Structure Function Data

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Altarelli, Guido; Ball, Richard D.; Forte, Stefano

    2001-01-01

    We apply our systematic NLO small x resummation of singlet splitting functions to the scaling violations of structure functions and compare the results with data. We develop various theoretical tools which are needed in order to relate resummed parton distributions to measurable structure functions, and we present results from a variety of fits to HERA data for the structure functions F_2 and F_L using the resummation. The behaviour of the singlet splitting functions at small x and fixed Q^2 is effectively parametrized as x^{-lambda}. We find that, for lambda small or negative, the resummed description of scaling violations may be phenomenologically as good as or even better than the standard next-to-leading order treatment. However, the best fit gluon density and value of alpha_s can be significantly modified by the resummation.

  1. Structure functions of longitudinal virtual photons at low virtualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioffe, B.L.; Shushpanov, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    The structure functions F L 1 and F L 2 of longitudinal virtual photons at low virtualities are calculated in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) in the zero and first order of ChPT. It is assumed that the virtuality of a target longitudinal photon p 2 is much less than the virtuality of the hard projectile photon Q 2 and both are less than the characteristic ChPT scale. In this approximation the structure functions are determined by the production of two pions in γγ collisions. The numerical results for F L 2 and F L 1 are presented (the upper index refers to the longitudinal polarization of the virtual target photon). The possibilities of measurements of these structure functions are briefly discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ., SA (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Div.; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  3. Photon structure functions with heavy particle mass effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, Tsuneo, E-mail: uematsu@scphys.kyoto-u.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Maskawa Institute for Science and Culture, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kamigamo, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8555 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    In the framework of the perturbative QCD we investigate heavy particle mass effects on the unpolarized and polarized photon structure functions, F{sub 2}{sup γ} and g{sub 1}{sup γ}, respectively. We present our basic formalism to treat heavy particle mass effects to NLO in perturbative QCD. We also study heavy quark effects on the QCD sum rule for the first moment of g{sub 1}{sup γ}, which is related to axial anomaly. The photon structure function in supersymmetric QCD is also briefly discussed.

  4. Quark-hadron duality of nucleon spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.B.

    2005-01-01

    Bloom-Gilman quark-hadron duality of nuclear spin structure function is studied by comparing the integral of g 1 from perturbative QCD prediction in the scaling region to the moment of g 1 in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region is estimated by the parametrization forms of non-resonance background and of resonance contributions. The uncertainties of our calculations due to those parametrization forms are discussed. Moreover, the effect of the Δ(1232)-resonance in the first resonance region and the role of the resonances in the second resonance region are explicitly shown. Elastic peak contribution to the duality is also analyzed. (orig.)

  5. Nucleon structure functions from lattice operator product expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambers, A.J.; Somfleth, K.; Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.

    2017-03-01

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  6. Nucleon Structure Functions from Operator Product Expansion on the Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, A J; Horsley, R; Nakamura, Y; Perlt, H; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Schiller, A; Somfleth, K; Young, R D; Zanotti, J M

    2017-06-16

    Deep-inelastic scattering, in the laboratory and on the lattice, is most instructive for understanding how the nucleon is built from quarks and gluons. The long-term goal is to compute the associated structure functions from first principles. So far this has been limited to model calculations. In this Letter we propose a new method to compute the structure functions directly from the virtual, all-encompassing Compton amplitude, utilizing the operator product expansion. This overcomes issues of renormalization and operator mixing, which so far have hindered lattice calculations of power corrections and higher moments.

  7. Structure functions and particle production in the cumulative region: two different exponentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, M.; Vechernin, V.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of the recently proposed (QCD-based parton model for the cumulative phenomena in the interactions with nuclei two mechanisms for particle production, direct and spectator ones, are analyzed. It is shown that due to final-state interactions the leading terms of the direct mechanism contribution are cancelled and the spectator mechanism is the dominant one. It leads to a smaller slope of the cumulative particle production rates compared to the slope of the nuclear structure function in the cumulative region x ≥ 1, in agreement with the recent experimental data

  8. Medical Students' Attitudinal Changes towards Cadaver Dissection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recently, not only the medical school curriculum but also medical students' attitude towards cadaver-based learning of anatomy has changed. This investigation is therefore designed to analyse students' attitudes towards human cadaveric dissection before and after exposure to dissection. Methods: A ...

  9. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schachner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April. We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200 cm versus 175 (157–191 cm, and heavier (90 (68–125 kg versus 80 (45–110 kg, than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (. Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (. The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853 m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good.

  10. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  11. Beyond Dissection: Innovative Tools for Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Sandra, Ed.

    This catalog lists resources available for classroom use in teaching about anatomy and physiology which are alternatives to dissection. The entries are provided under three main categories: (1) Whole Animal Dissection/Vivisection; (2) Animal Organ or System Anatomy and Physiology; and (3) Other, including animal behavior, biotechnology,…

  12. Quality of life after planned neck dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwae, Shigemichi; Hirayama, Yuji; Komatsu, Hirokazu

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of planned neck dissection (PND) after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on quality of life (QOL) by using a self-administered neck dissection questionnaire and an arm abduction test. Subjects are fourteen patients who had undergone CCRT followed by planned selective neck dissection for the treatment of mesopharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. The findings of the survey were compared with thirty-two patients who had undergone CCRT alone. Patients without PND had better scores on measures of pain, constriction, numbness and appearance of the neck, but had no advantage about arm abduction. After PND, the patients who had dissected dominant hand side had lower satisfaction compared with those who had dissected non-dominant hand side. (author)

  13. [Ultrasound dissection in laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, R; Kern, M; Joosten, U; Hohlbach, G

    1993-01-01

    An ultrasound dissector especially developed for laparoscopic surgery was used during laparoscopic cholecystectomy on 34 patients. The ultrasound power, the volume of suction and irrigation could be determined individually at the generator and activated during the operation with a foot pedal. With the dissector it was possible to fragmentate, emulgate and aspirate simultaneously fat tissue as well as infected edematous structures. The cystic artery and cystic duct, small vessels, lymphatic and connective tissue were not damaged. Therefore this system seems to be excellent for the preparation of Calot's trigonum and blunt dissection of the gallbladder out of its bed, particularly in fatty, acute or chronic infected tissue. No complications were observed within the peri- and postoperative period.

  14. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  15. What can we learn from polarized structure function data?

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano; Ball, Richard D.; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Altarelli, Guido; Forte, Stefano

    1997-04-20

    We summarise the perturbative QCD analysis of the structure function data for g_1 from longitudinally polarized deep inelastic scattering from proton, deuteron and neutron targets, with particular emphasis on testing sum rules, determining helicity fractions, and extracting the strong coupling from both scaling violations and the Bjorken sum rule.

  16. Spin-dependent parton distributions and structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, W.; Ito, T.; Cloet, I.C.; Thomas, A.W.; Yazaki, K.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear parton distributions and structure functions are determined in an effective chiral quark theory. We also discuss an extension of our model to fragmentation functions. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  17. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  18. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Boqiang

    1990-01-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions

  19. Phenomenological structure functions and Gribov-Lipatov relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, D.K.; Misra, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the Giribov-Lipatov relation using the phenomenological forms of the structure function F 2 ep is made. The analysis indicate breakdown of the relation at PETRA energies. Plausible reasons of the breakdown of Gribov-Lipatov relation are discussed together with its phenomenological form. 33 refs., 6 figures. (author)

  20. Perceptions of cadaveric dissection in anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Saima; Nazir, Ghazala; Iram, Samia; Mohammad, Malik; Umair; Qari, Iftikhar Hussain; Mohammad, Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Anatomy professors world over are lamenting about medical students' lack of interest in dissections and its diminishing utilisation in medical studies. The objective of our study was to find out the reasons why some of the Pakistani medical students were avoiding dissections. We conducted this study in 5 medical colleges of Pakistan from Dec 2010-Oct 2011. Questionnaires were prepared and administered to more than 500 Pakistani medical students, at least 6 months after their first cadaver dissecting session. Mostly 1st and 2nd year medical students participated in this study. Around 43% students have actually performed dissections in some form, whereas around 57% had never touched the cadaver. Further evaluation of these results revealed that out of 57% of students, 45% avoided dissection due to bad smell of formaldehyde, 37% due to moral/ethical grounds, 22% due to low motivation and respect of human body, 19.4% due to anxiety, 18.6% due to religious reason, 16% due to fear, asthma and emotional reaction, 9.4% due to toxic chemical, 8.6% due to laziness and 7% due to nightmares. In spite of availability of required number of cadavers in all 5 medical colleges and a clear realisation amongst the students that dissecting cadaver is an effective way of learning anatomy; majority of students were not very keen and had therefore not performed dissection even once.

  1. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Wallon, S.

    1996-06-01

    The F 2 , F G , R=F L /F T proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, we relate deep-inelastic proton scattering to deep-inelastic onium scattering. We get a three-parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range. The ratios F G /F 2 and R are predicted without further adjustment. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. The predictions for F 2 and F G are compatible with next-to-leading DGLAP analysis, while R is expected to be significantly lower at very small x. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of the proton spin structure function g1p

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pussieux, T.

    1994-10-01

    In order to check the Bjorken sum rule and confirm the EMC surprising conclusion on the spin structure of the proton, the measurement of the spin structure function of the proton has been performed by the Spin Muon Collaboration via the polarized muon nucleon deep inelastic scattering. The results of the 1993 run are presented within a kinematical range of 0.003 2 = 10 GeV 2 . The first moment of the polarized spin structure function g 1 p is found to be two standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule. Assuming SU(3) for hyperons β decays, the quark spin contribution to the proton spin is extracted. Combining all available data on proton, neutron and deuton, The Bjorken sum rule is confirmed within 10%. (author). 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering hat HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1995-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x IP , the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x IP , and of Q 2 . The x IP dependence is consistent with the form (1/x IP ) a where a=1.30-±0.80(stat) -0.14 +0.08 (sys) in all bins of βand Q 2 . In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule. (orig.)

  4. A Next-to-Leading Order QCD Analysis of Neutrino - Iron Structure Functions at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, William Glenn [Nevis Labs, Columbia U.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrinoiron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 Ge V. The structure functions $F_2$ and $xF_3$ are compared with the the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives NL0(4) . 2 value of $\\Lambda^{NLO,(4)}_{\\overline MS}$ = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to $\\alpha_s$ ($M^2_z$) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by $xG(x,Q^2_0 = 5 GeV^2$ ) = (2.22±0.34) x ($1-x)^{4.65 \\pm 0.68}$

  5. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  6. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-03-01

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q 2 , the proton structure functions F L and F 2 have been extracted in the region 5 x 10 -4 2 2 . (orig.)

  7. The γ total cross section and the photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, G.

    1986-01-01

    A review on the current experimental status of the photon-photon total hadronic cross section as a function of energy and Q 2 is given in addition to the results obtained for the leptonic and hadronic photon structure functions. The results are discussed in terms of the point-like part of the photon and non-perturbative VDM part. It is shown that the cross section at Q 2 = 0 is well described by VDM derived models

  8. Structure functions and low Q2 physics at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeck, A. de; Klein, M.

    1991-12-01

    Important new insights into the hadron structure are expected from the data which will be collected at the electron-proton storage ring HERA at DESY, Hamburg. In this paper the physics opportunities for cross section related measurements at HERA are reviewed. Emphasis is put on the derivation of the proton structure functions, on the QCD effects expected in the newly accessible low χ region and on almost real photoproduction physics. (orig.)

  9. A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

  10. Determination of the pion and kaon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitkenhead, W.; Barton, D.S.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Busza, W.; Dobrowolski, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Nelson, B.; Rosenson, L.; Toy, W.; Verdier, R.; Votta, L.; Chiaradia, M.T.; DeMarzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Germinario, G.; Guerriero, L.; LaVopa, P.; Maggi, G.; Posa, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.; Waldner, F.; Brenner, A.E.; Carey, D.C.; Elias, J.E.; Garbincius, P.H.; Mikenberg, G.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Meunier, R.; Cutts, D.; Dulude, R.S.; Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Massimo, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Quark structure functions have been extracted from low-p/sub T/ inclusive hadron production data for the pion and kaon with use of the recombination model. n/sup π/=1.0 +- 0.1 and n/sup K/=2.5 +- 0.6 is obtained, where n is the leading (1-x) power of the nonstrange--valence-quark distribution. Both the pion and kaon nonstrange--sea-quark functions have napprox. =3.5

  11. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  12. Detailed measurements of structure functions from nucleons and nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment will study deep inelastic muon nucleon scattering in a wide range of $Q^{2}$(1-200 (GeV/c)$^{2}$) and $x(0.005-0.75)$. The main aims of the experiment are: \\\\\\\\ a) Detailed measurements of the nuclear dependence of the structure function $F_{2}^{A}$, of $R = \\sigma_/\\sigma_{T}$ and of the cross-section for $J/\\psi$ production. They will provide a basis for the understanding of the EMC effect: the modification of quark and gluon distributions due to the nuclear environment. \\\\b) A simultaneous high luminosity measurement of the structure function $F_{2}$ on hydrogen and deuterium. This will provide substantially improved accuracy in the knowledge of the neutron structure function $F_{2}^{n}$, of $F_{2}^{p}-F_{2}^{n}$ and $F_{2}^{n}/F_{2}^{p}$ and their $Q^{2}$ dependence. Furthermore, the data will allow a determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{S}(Q^{2})$ with reduced experimental and theoretical uncertainties as well as of the ratio of the down to up quark distributions in the v...

  13. The gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.G.; Roberts, R.G.

    1990-08-01

    As with all parton distributions in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) the separation of polarised nucleon structure functions into gluon and quark contributions must be specified. We consider a definition of the gluon contribution to polarised nucleon structure functions based on exclusive processes which is explicitly gauge invariant, has no regularisation ambiguities, is insensitive to infrared singularities and can be related to other polarised scattering processes. We discuss the relationship of this gluon definition to others that have recently been used and to the estimates that have been made of the gluon contribution using current algebra and other methods. A quantitative analysis of the structure function g 1 (x,Q 2 ) for polarised deep inelastic scattering is carried out, with the aim of examining the importance of the gluon contribution. Using the positivity of parton distributions the magnitude of Δg(x,Q 2 ) is constrained by a realistic estimate of the unpolarised glue. With the appropriate choice of the hard scattering cross-section, Δσ γg , we find that even with a maximally polarised glue (for x > 0.1), some polarised strange quark contribution is still needed by the data of the EMC. (author)

  14. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  15. Dissecting aortic aneurysm in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ounissi M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA is a rare pathology that may result in fatal outcome. We report follow up of three cases of DAA patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis who were managed conservatively.

  16. Cervical artery dissection following a turbulent flight.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young patients without vascular risk factors and may affect the carotid or vertebral arteries. The risk of spontaneous dissection is higher in those with genetic predisposing factors while other cases may be precipitated by an event involving head or neck movement or associated with direct neck trauma. CASE REPORT: We present the case of a previously well young woman with a history of migraine who developed internal carotid artery dissection following a turbulent short-haul commercial flight while restrained using a seatbelt. DISCUSSION: We propose that repetitive flexion-hyperextension neck movements encountered during the flight were the most likely precipitant of carotid artery dissection in this case and review the therapeutic options available.

  17. Spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulineau, Theresa Marie; Andrews-Jones, Lydia; Van Alstine, William

    2005-09-01

    This report describes 2 cases of spontaneous aortic dissecting hematoma in young Border Collie and Border Collie crossbred dogs. Histology was performed in one of the cases involving an unusual splitting of the elastin present within the wall of the aorta, consistent with elastin dysplasia as described in Marfan syndrome in humans. The first case involved a young purebred Border Collie that died suddenly and the second case involved a Border Collie crossbred dog that died after a 1-month history of seizures. Gross lesions included pericardial tamponade with dissection of the ascending aorta in the former case and thoracic cavity hemorrhage, mediastinal hematoma, and aortic dissection in the latter. Histologic lesions in the case of the Border Collie crossbred dog included a dissecting hematoma of the ascending aorta with elastin dysplasia and right axillary arterial intimal proliferation.

  18. CT diagnosis of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen (47.5%) of 35 patients with acute aortic dissection showed a non-opacified crescent in the aorta on an initial contrast CT. Seven of these 16 patients underwent cineangiography soon after the initial CT, and in all 7 patients, neither an intimal tear nor an intimal flap was obtained. All but one of above 16 patients were followed by CT. Mean duration of follow-up was 9.6 months. In 10 of 15 patients with non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen remained non-opacified until the last examination. Moreover, in 6 of these 10 patients, the false lumen shrunk, and in the other 3, it disappeared completely on follow-up CT. On the other hand, in remaining 5 of these 15 patients who were initially diagnosed to have non-opacified false lumen, the false lumen became opacified and enlarged in size on follow-up CT performed in the first 14 weeks. Moreover, in 4 of these 5 patients, the false lumen became opacified in the only first 6 weeks. No matter how intensive care should be paid at least for the first 6 weeks, it seems that patients with aortic dissection which have non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis in comparison to patients with ordinary aortic dissections which have opacified false lumen. We believe aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen may consist of two type of aortic dissection, one has no intimal tear, the other has some intimal tears and a thrombosed false lumen. In conclusion, CT is the most useful modality in diagnosing acute aortic dissection. The reasons are the incidence of acute aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen was high, patients with non-opacified false lumen had good prognosis, and it was difficult to diagnose aortic dissection with non-opacified false lumen by conventional cineangiography and/or DSA. (author)

  19. Counter Traction Makes Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Easier

    OpenAIRE

    Oyama, Tsuneo

    2012-01-01

    Poor counter traction and poor field of vision make endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) difficult. Good counter traction allows dissections to be performed more quickly and safely. Position change, which utilizes gravity, is the simplest method to create a clear field of vision. It is useful especially for esophageal and colon ESD. The second easiest method is clip with line method. Counter traction made by clip with line accomplishes the creation of a clear field of vision and suitable co...

  20. Deuteron A(Q2) structure function and the neutron electric form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platchkov, S.; Amroun, A.; Auffret, S.; Cavedon, J.M.; Dreux, P.; Duclos, J.; Frois, B.; Goutte, D.; Hachemi, H.; Martino, J.

    1989-01-01

    We present new measurements of the deuteron A(Q 2 ) structure function in the momentum transfer region between 1 and 18 fm -2 . The accuracy of the data ranges from 2% to 6%. We investigate the sensitivity of A(Q 2 ) to the nucleon-nucleon interaction and to the neutron electric form factor G E n . Our analysis shows that below 20 fm -2 G E n can be inferred from these data with a significantly improved accuracy. The model dependence of this analysis is discussed

  1. Recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resnic Frederic S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coronary artery dissection is a rare but well-described cause for myocardial infarction during the post-partum period. Dissection of multiple coronary arteries is even less frequent. Here we present a case of recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissections. This unusual presentation poses unique problems for management. A 35 year-old female, gravida 3 para 2, presented with myocardial infarction 9 weeks and 3 days post-partum. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated left anterior descending (LAD dissection but an otherwise normal coronary anatomy. The lesion was treated with four everolimus eluting stents. Initially the patient made an unremarkable recovery until ventricular fibrillation arrest occurred on the following day. Unsynchronized cardioversion restored a normal sinus rhythm and repeat catheterization revealed new right coronary artery (RCA dissection. A wire was passed distally, but it was unclear whether this was through the true or false lumen and no stents could be placed. However, improvement of distal RCA perfusion was noted on angiogram. Despite failure of interventional therapy the patient was therefore treated conservatively. Early operation after myocardial infarction has a significantly elevated risk of mortality and the initial dissection had occurred within 24 hours. This strategy proved successful as follow-up transthoracic echocardiography after four months demonstrated a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction of 55-60% without regional wall motion abnormalities. The patient remained asymptomatic from a cardiac point of view.

  2. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohara, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Yutaka; Nakamura, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in thirty-one patients with aortic dissection to evaluate its usefulness in diagnosing the site of communicating orifice between the true and false lumens and the presence of retrograde dissection. 1. MRI revealed the site of the entry as a defect in the intimal flap in the images of 12 of 15 patients (80 %). 2. The site of the communicating orifice between the true and false lumens in the abdominal aorta could be determined in six of eight patients (75 %). 3. MRI diagnosis of retrograde dissection was successful in three patients. 4. Cross-sectional analysis of the abdominal aorta based on the location of the true lumen revealed that the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries tended to arise from the true lumen when the latter was situated in the anterior part of the abdominal aorta. The right and left renal arteries arose from the true lumen when it was positioned anterolaterally. In conclusion, MRI was a useful diagnostic method for aortic dissection, especially for determining the site of entry in the thoracic aorta. The changes in signal intensity in the false lumen provided useful information for locating the communicating orifice between the true and false lumens and for diagnosis of retrograde dissection. Cross-sectional analysis of dissection in the abdominal aorta was useful for predicting the branching of the main arteries from the true or false lumen. (author)

  3. The Effect of Animal Dissections on Student Acquisition of Knowledge of and Attitudes toward the Animals Dissected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Terry L.

    A conflict exists over the use of animals in the classroom. One aspect of this use involved the dissection of animals. Animal protection advocates report that dissections constitute abuse of the animals dissected. The advocates state that what is learned by dissection could be more effectively learned by other means. Some science educators state…

  4. Evaluating dissection in the gross anatomy course: Correlation between quality of laboratory dissection and students outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Chika; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy learned by active exploration through dissection has many proven benefits including improvement of anatomic knowledge. Decreased laboratory time may affect the quality of dissection and ultimately lower student performance in anatomy translating to lower knowledge acquisition. The aim of this study was to determine whether the quality of students' dissection in teams correlates with their performance in the gross anatomy course. Quality of dissections for each team enrolled in a gross anatomy course at Mayo Medical School was evaluated biweekly using a five-point rubric based on course learning objectives. Assessment of anatomic knowledge was based on sequential laboratory practice practical examination scores, achievements on daily audience response system (ARS) quizzes, and final practical, written, and National Board of Medical Examiners(®) (NBME(®) ) Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Examinations. Twelve teams comprising 48 students were included in the study. There was a positive correlation between dissection quality and practice practical examination score (R = 0.83) and a negative correlation between dissection quality and ARS quizzes (R = -0.985). Dissection teams with a passing score on their dissection evaluations (>70%) performed better on their final examinations. Based on an end of course survey, students agreed that dissection evaluations should continue to be a part of the course. This study showed that better quality of dissection was associated with higher scores on practice practical examinations, final practical, written, and NBME examinations. The study demonstrated a positive correlation between dissection evaluations, accompanied by formative feedback during the course, and higher scores on final course assessments. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. A Determination of the Neutron Spin Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Emlyn W

    2003-08-18

    The authors report the results of the experiment E142 which measured the spin dependent structure function of the neutron, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, Q{sup 2}). The experiment was carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by measuring an asymmetry in the deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target, at electron energies from 19 to 26 GeV. The structure function was determined over the kinematic range 0.03 < BJorken x < 0.6 and 1.0 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. An evaluation of the integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x,Q{sup 2})dx at fixed Q{sup 2} = 2 (GeV/c){sup 2} yields the final result {Lambda}{sub 1}{sup n} = -0.032 {+-} 0.006 (stat.) {+-} 0.009 (syst.). This result, when combined with the integral of the proton spin structure function measured in other experiments, confirms the fundamental Bjorken sum rule with O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) corrections to within one standard deviation. This is a major success for perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. Some ancillary results include the findings that the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the neutron is violated at the 2 {sigma} level, and that the total contribution of the quarks to the helicity of the nucleon is 0.36 {+-} 0.10. The strange sea polarization is estimated to be small and negative, {Delta}s = -0.07 {+-} 0.04.

  6. Diquark contributions to the nucleon deep inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Leader, E.; Soares, J.

    1990-01-01

    The contributions of diquarks to the nucleon structure functions are discussed in the framework of the parton model and in the most general case of both vector and scalar diquarks inside unpolarized and polarized nucleons. The vector diquark anomalous magnetic moment and the scalar-vector and vector-scalar diquark transitions are also taken into account. The properties of the diquarks and of their form factors, required in order for the resulting scaling violations to be compatible with the observed ones, are discussed. (author)

  7. Structure-function-property-design interplay in biopolymers: spider silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Calculation of hadronic part of photon structure function in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorskij, A.S.; Ioffe, B.L.; Oganesyan, A.G.; Khodzhamiryan, A.Yu.

    1989-01-01

    The photon structure function in QCD in the intermediate region of the Bjorken variable 0.2 2 /2pq, where q 2 is the hard photon virtuality, p is the soft photon momentum) is calculated. It is shown that without introduction of fitting parameters the experimental data can be described in the range 3GeV 2 ≤Q 2 2 /Q 2 =-q 2 /not taking account for the leading logarithmic corrections. It is demonstrated that the corrections proportional to μ ν 2 > to the hard photon scattering amplitude on the longitudinal soft photon and to the Callan-Gross relation vanish. 16 refs.; 6 figs

  9. Higher twist contributions to deep-inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Boettcher, H.

    2008-07-01

    We report on a recent extraction of the higher twist contributions to the deep inelastic structure functions F ep,ed 2 (x,Q 2 ) in the large x region. It is shown that the size of the extracted higher twist contributions is strongly correlated with the higher order corrections applied to the leading twist part. A gradual lowering of the higher twist contributions going from NLO to N 4 LO is observed, where in the latter case only the leading large x terms were considered. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the proton structure functions F{sub L} and F{sub 2} have been extracted in the region 5 x 10{sup -4}

  11. A compilation of structure functions in deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of data on the structure functions F 2 , xF 3 , and R = σ L /σ T from lepton deep-inelastic scattering off protons and nuclei is presented. The relevant experiments at CERN, Fermilab and SLAC from 1985 are covered. All the data in this review can be found in and retrieved from the Durham-RAL HEP Databases (HEPDATA on the RAL and CERN VM systems and on DURPDG VAX/VMS) together with data on a wide variety of other reactions. (author)

  12. Polarized and unpolarized nucleon structure functions from lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Technische Hochschule Aachen; Horsley, R.; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Ilgenfritz, E.M.; Perlt, H.; Rakow, P.; Schierholz, G.; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH; Schiller, A.

    1995-06-01

    We report on a high statistics quenched lattice QCD calculation of the deep-inelastic structure functions F 1 , F 2 , g 1 and g 2 of the proton and neutron. The theoretical basis for the calculation is the operator product expansion. We consider the moments of the leading twist operators up to spin four. Using Wilson fermions the calculation is done for three values of K, and we perform the extrapolation to the chiral limit. The renormalization constants, which lead us from lattice to continuum operators, are calculated in perturbation theory to one loop order. (orig.)

  13. Form factors and structure functions of hadrons in parton model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkonskij, N.Yu.

    1979-01-01

    The hadron charge form factors and their relation to the deep-inelastic lepton-production structure functions in the regions of asymptotically high and small momentum transfer Q 2 are studied. The nucleon and pion charge radii are calculated. The results of calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. The K- and D-meson charge radii are estimated. In the region of asymptotically high Q 2 the possibility of Drell-Yan-West relation violation is analyzed. It is shown, that for pseudoscalar mesons this relation is violated. The relation between the proton and neutron form factor asymptotics is obtained

  14. Values, dissection, and school science: An inquiry into students' construction of meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doster, Elizabeth Christina Tsamas

    pinning is acceptable treatment of a dead animal's body; (5) the interaction of the students with dissection specimens will result in their gaining understanding of the structure and function of the animal's internal anatomical structures; (6) touching, seeing, or smelling the dead body of an animal is not offensive enough to prevent students from learning from it; and (7) dissection as an activity is independent of the experiences the students are familiar with, and how they interpret those experiences.

  15. CLC Chloride Channels and Transporters: Structure, Function, Physiology, and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Thomas J; Pusch, Michael

    2018-07-01

    CLC anion transporters are found in all phyla and form a gene family of eight members in mammals. Two CLC proteins, each of which completely contains an ion translocation parthway, assemble to homo- or heteromeric dimers that sometimes require accessory β-subunits for function. CLC proteins come in two flavors: anion channels and anion/proton exchangers. Structures of these two CLC protein classes are surprisingly similar. Extensive structure-function analysis identified residues involved in ion permeation, anion-proton coupling and gating and led to attractive biophysical models. In mammals, ClC-1, -2, -Ka/-Kb are plasma membrane Cl - channels, whereas ClC-3 through ClC-7 are 2Cl - /H + -exchangers in endolysosomal membranes. Biological roles of CLCs were mostly studied in mammals, but also in plants and model organisms like yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. CLC Cl - channels have roles in the control of electrical excitability, extra- and intracellular ion homeostasis, and transepithelial transport, whereas anion/proton exchangers influence vesicular ion composition and impinge on endocytosis and lysosomal function. The surprisingly diverse roles of CLCs are highlighted by human and mouse disorders elicited by mutations in their genes. These pathologies include neurodegeneration, leukodystrophy, mental retardation, deafness, blindness, myotonia, hyperaldosteronism, renal salt loss, proteinuria, kidney stones, male infertility, and osteopetrosis. In this review, emphasis is laid on biophysical structure-function analysis and on the cell biological and organismal roles of mammalian CLCs and their role in disease.

  16. A compilation of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrmann, T.; Roberts, R.G.; Whalley, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of all the available data on the unpolarized structure functions F 2 and xF 3 , R=(σ L /σ T ), the virtual photon asymmetries A 1 and A 2 and the polarized structure functions g 1 and g 2 , from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei is presented. The relevant experiments at CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC from 1991, the date of our earlier review [1], to the present day are covered. A brief general theoretical introduction is given followed by the data presented both in tabular and graphical form and, for the F 2 and xF 3 data, the predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functions are also displayed. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in and retrieved from the Durham-RAL HEP Databases on the World-Wide-Web (http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA). (author)

  17. Identification and Management of Iatrogenic Aortocoronary Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ping Nie, MD, PhD, FESC, FSCAI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic aortocoronary dissection (IACD is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication during coronary catheterizations. Although the incidence was relatively low, the dissection often leads to procedure failure with increased risk of myocardial infarction and death. IACD is mainly caused by disruption of intima at the ostia of left or right coronary artery during interventional procedures, and appears as luminal filling defects or persistence of contrast (“extraluminal cap” or intimal tear outside the coronary lumen. Dissection could disseminate antegradely and lead to subtotal or total occlusion of the coronary lumen. Similarly, it could extend retrogradely into the sinus of Valsalva and cusp, or even the ascending aorta, aortic arch, or descending aorta, leading to hemodynamic collapse. Early identification and prompt management is crucial to the prognosis of patients with IACD. Immediate bail-out stenting should be performed as rapidly as possible in most cases of severe dissection, even when significant propagation has already occurred. Surgery should only be considered when stenting failed to seal the dissection and the patients had hemodynamic compromise.

  18. Renal Infarction from Type B Aortic Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Tweet

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 69-year-old-female with a medical history of hypertension presented to the emergency department (ED complaining of sudden onset of lower back and abdominal pain. Eight hours prior to presentation she reported turning to grab something on another counter and felt a sudden onset sharp pain in her lower back. She began to notice ill-defined abdominal pain, although she denied any shortness of breath, chest pain, numbness, weakness, or urologic symptoms. Her vital signs on presentation to the ED were temperature 36.5˚C, blood pressure 143/88, heart rate 84, respiratory rate 14, and oxygen saturation 93% on room air. On arrival, the patient was in significant discomfort and was rolling on the bed due to pain. Although she appeared to be in moderate distress she had minimal, if any, tenderness on abdominal exam, and only mild left lower back tenderness to palpation. This disconnect between the patient’s apparent discomfort and the lack of physical exam findings prompted the ordering of a computed tomography angiography (CTA of the abdomen/pelvis with greatest suspicion for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Significant findings: Initial abdominal images demonstrated a dissection flap; therefore, a CTA of the chest was also obtained. These images revealed a Stanford type B aortic dissection beginning just distal to the left subclavian artery and extending to the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery. The right renal artery arose from the true lumen of the dissection while the left renal artery arose from the false lumen. This case is interesting as imaging shows the lack of perfusion to the left kidney, residing in the retroperitoneum, which correlates with her non-descript abdominal and left flank pain. Discussion: Aortic dissection is defined as a tear within the wall of the aorta that allows blood to track between intima and media layers. A dissection is classified as Stanford Type A if it involves any portion of the

  19. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author)

  20. An electronic instructor for gross anatomy dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Eleanor M; Moore, Larry J

    2006-01-01

    Gross anatomy is time consuming to teach and to learn. Because the process of dissection takes up so much student time, assistance in the form of an in-lab instructional DVD program might improve student performance. The DVD could be viewed with a portable device by individual dissection groups at their tables. Groups could dissect at their own pace, with access to step-by-step demonstrations and answers to frequently asked anatomical questions. We created an instructional DVD program demonstrating dissection of the canine ventral neck and thoracic limb. The effect on student exam scores of using the DVD versus not using it was measured in a controlled, two-sample study using incoming first-year veterinary students as volunteers. Volunteers were told the study was of two different dissection methods; the DVD was not specifically mentioned until after the students were separated into two groups (Blue/DVD group and Orange/No DVD group), and then only to volunteers in the Blue group. Except for the DVD, the two groups had the same resources. The difference in scores on an exam given after a single dissection period did not differ sufficiently to conclude that DVD use raised the mean score; however, 73% of the DVD group scored 60% or higher, while only 38% of the No DVD group scored 60% or higher. The difference in mean scores overall was 2.3 points out of a possible 49, suggesting that the DVD helped students, especially those with lower scores, to earn two to three more points than they would have otherwise.

  1. Uncovering the structure-function relationship in spider silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarger, Jeffery L.; Cherry, Brian R.; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2018-03-01

    All spiders produce protein-based biopolymer fibres that we call silk. The most studied of these silks is spider dragline silk, which is very tough and relatively abundant compared with other types of spider silks. Considerable research has been devoted to understanding the relationship between the molecular structure and mechanical properties of spider dragline silks. In this Review, we overview experimental and computational studies that have provided a wealth of detail at the molecular level on the highly conserved repetitive core and terminal regions of spider dragline silk. We also discuss the role of the nanocrystalline β-sheets and amorphous regions in determining the properties of spider silk fibres, endowing them with strength and elasticity. Additionally, we outline imaging techniques and modelling studies that elucidate the importance of the hierarchical structure of silk fibres at the molecular level. These insights into structure-function relationships can guide the reverse engineering of spider silk to enable the production of superior synthetic fibres.

  2. Recent structure function results from neutrino scattering at fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, U.K.; Avvakumov, S.; Barbaro, P. de

    2001-01-01

    We report on the extraction of the structure functions F 2 and ΔxF 3 = xF ν 3 - xF ν -bar 3 from CCFR ν μ -Fe and ν-bar μ -Fe differential cross sections. The extraction is performed in a physics model independent (PMI) way. This first measurement of ΔxF 3 , which is useful in testing models of heavy charm production, is higher than current theoretical predictions. The ratio of the F 2 (PMI) values measured in ν μ , and μ scattering is in agreement (within 5%) with the NLO predictions using massive charm production schemes, thus resolving the long-standing discrepancy between the two sets of data. In addition, measurements of F L (or, equivalently, R) and 2xF 1 are reported in the kinematic region where anomalous nuclear effects in R are observed at HERMES. (author)

  3. Probing spin-1 diquarks in deep inelastic structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredriksson, S.; Jaendel, M.; Larsson, T.

    1983-01-01

    Within the scope of a new diquark model for deep inelastic structure functions presented by us recently we use the existing data on F 1 sup(ep)(x,Q 2 ) to learn about the admixture of spin-1 diquarks in nucleons. It turns out that they are so rare, heavy and extended compared to spin-0 diquarks that they are presumably accidental and not dynamical. Their number and form factors can be understood qualitatively within this picture. Still, the spin-1 diquarks give interesting structures in data and, together with quarks and spin-0 diquarks, carry enough momentum to account for the full nucleon energy. A gluon component is hence not needed in the nucleon. (orig.)

  4. Breast Milk Oligosaccharides: Structure-Function Relationships in the Neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Mills, David A.; German, J. Bruce; Freeman, Samara L.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to providing complete postnatal nutrition, breast milk is a complex biofluid that delivers bioactive components for the growth and development of the intestinal and immune systems. Lactation is a unique opportunity to understand the role of diet in shaping the intestinal environment including the infant microbiome. Of considerable interest is the diversity and abundance of milk glycans that are energetically costly for the mammary gland to produce yet indigestible by infants. Milk glycans comprise free oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. Emerging technological advances are enabling more comprehensive, sensitive, and rapid analyses of these different classes of milk glycans. Understanding the impact of inter- and intraindividual glycan diversity on function is an important step toward interventions aimed at improving health and preventing disease. This review discusses the state of technology for glycan analysis and how specific structure-function knowledge is enhancing our understanding of early nutrition in the neonate. PMID:24850388

  5. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  6. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q 2 dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g 1 (x) and G 2 (x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g 1 (x) and g 2 (x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon

  7. QCD's Partner Needed for Mass Spectra and Parton Structure Functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.S.

    2009-01-01

    as in the case of the hydrogen atom, bound-state wave functions are needed to generate hadronic spectra. For this purpose, in 1971, Feynman and his students wrote down a Lorentz-invariant harmonic oscillator equation. This differential equation has one set of solutions satisfying the Lorentz-covariant boundary condition. This covariant set generates Lorentz-invariant mass spectra with their degeneracies. Furthermore, the Lorentz-covariant wave functions allow us to calculate the valence parton distribution by Lorentz-boosting the quark-model wave function from the hadronic rest frame. However, this boosted wave function does not give an accurate parton distribution. The wave function needs QCD corrections to make a contact with the real world. Likewise, QCD needs the wave function as a starting point for calculating the parton structure function. (author)

  8. Cervical Artery Dissection and Choosing Appropriate Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jonathan T; Hunt, John S; Bruner, David I; Austin, Andrea L

    2017-08-01

    Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young adults. This may result from head and neck trauma; it can also occur spontaneously or secondary to genetic connective tissue or vascular disorders. Neurologic symptoms arise as a result of thromboembolism and hypoperfusion causing cerebral ischemia. We present a case of a previously healthy male who was found to have a cervical internal carotid artery dissection and the decision to use antiplatelet therapy instead of anticoagulation to prevent stroke. Data is lacking regarding the efficacy of one therapy over the other.

  9. Cervical Artery Dissection and Choosing Appropriate Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lau

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cervical artery dissection is a common cause of stroke in young adults. This may result from head and neck trauma; it can also occur spontaneously or secondary to genetic connective tissue or vascular disorders. Neurologic symptoms arise as a result of thromboembolism and hypoperfusion causing cerebral ischemia. We present a case of a previously healthy male who was found to have a cervical internal carotid artery dissection and the decision to use antiplatelet therapy instead of anticoagulation to prevent stroke. Data is lacking regarding the efficacy of one therapy over the other.

  10. Coronary artery dissection following chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Agarwala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chest trauma has a high rate of mortality. Coronary dissection causing myocardial infarction (MI following blunt chest trauma is rare. We describe the case of an anterior MI following blunt chest trauma. A 39-year-old male was received in our hospital following a motorcycle accident. The patient was asymptomatic before the accident. The patient underwent craniotomy for evacuation of hematoma. He developed severe chest pain and an electrocardiogram (ECG revealed anterior ST segment elevation following surgery. Acute coronary event was medically managed; subsequently, coronary angiogram was performed that showed dissection in the left anterior coronary artery, which was stented.

  11. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitation and chronic descending aortic dissection immediately after Cesarean section. Regular follow-up will be needed to monitor the descending aortic dissection.

  12. Quasi-particle excitations and dynamical structure function of trapped Bose-condensates in the WKB approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Csordás, András; Graham, Robert; Szépfalusy, Péter

    1997-01-01

    The Bogoliubov equations of the quasi-particle excitations in a weakly interacting trapped Bose-condensate are solved in the WKB approximation in an isotropic harmonic trap, determining the discrete quasi-particle energies and wave functions by torus (Bohr-Sommerfeld) quantization of the integrable classical quasi-particle dynamics. The results are used to calculate the position and strengths of the peaks in the dynamic structure function which can be observed by off-resonance inelastic light...

  13. Global Distribution of Dissected Duricrust on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, J. F.; Cooper, C. D.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence for dissected duricrust was identified in high resolution MOC images. Analysis of all available images was used to map the global distribution of this terrain. It is apparently restricted to two latitude bands: 30-60 deg. N and 30-60 deg. S.

  14. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer. Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi *. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt. Received 16 October 2012; accepted 7 January 2013. Available online 7 March 2013. KEYWORDS. Breast cancer;. Axillary lymph nodes.

  15. Dissection in Pre-college Education

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukmihci, NC

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the educational and ethical issues surrounding dissection of non-human animals in pre-college education. It argues that this exercise has no benefits to students that could possibly be outweighed by the death of healthy animals killed for this purpose.

  16. Squid Dissection: From Pen to Ink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cindy; Kisiel, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Introduces students to dissection, which is an important part of scientific discovery. Students not only gain an understanding of the anatomy of a squid, but also develop a sense of responsibility and respect for the animal that they are using as a learning tool. (Author/SOE)

  17. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  18. Thrombosed false channel in acute aortic dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alerci, M.; Dore, R.; Kluzer, A.; Digiulio, G.; D'Andrea, F.; De Agostini, A.

    1987-01-01

    Three cases are reported of acute dissection with complete thrombosis of the false channel, which is a very uncommonevent in DeBakey's I and II type aortic dissections. The 3 patients entered hospital because of severe thoracic pain without any ECG sign of myocardial infarction. Emergency CT showed evidence of pericardial effusion suggesting hemopericardium, enlargement of the ascending aorta and a peripheral semilunar filling defect which caused a slight deformation of the true channel. On precontrast scans, only one case showed inward displacement of peripheral calcifications and high-density aortic wall. No tipical signs of aortic dissection were reported, expect in the first patient - where a double contrast filled lumen, separated by an intimal flap was seen. CT findings are individually discussed. It is emphasized that in all patients more than one CT sign was present at a time. The correct evaluation of these signs together with the clinacal data could lead to the right diagnosis of aortic dissection in spite of the lack of a f???

  19. Electrocautery causes more ischemic peritoneal tissue damage than ultrasonic dissection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, R.P.G ten; Wilbers, J.; Goor, H. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimizing peritoneal tissue injury during abdominal surgery has the benefit of reducing postoperative inflammatory response, pain, and adhesion formation. Ultrasonic dissection seems to reduce tissue damage. This study aimed to compare electrocautery and ultrasonic dissection in terms

  20. Acute headache and persistent headache attributed to cervical artery dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Ashina, Messoud; Magyari, Melinda

    2014-01-01

    for Headache or facial or neck pain attributed to cervical carotid or vertebral artery dissection or Headache attributed to intracranial arterial dissection. Six months after dissection five of 19 patients still reported persistent headache attributed to dissection. The study demonstrates that the ICHD......The criteria for headache attributed to cervical artery dissection have been changed in the new third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-III beta). We have retrospectively investigated 19 patients diagnosed from 2001 to 2006 with cervical artery dissection......-III beta criteria for cervical artery dissection are useful for classifying patients at the first encounter. We show for the first time that persistent headache attributed to arterial dissection is frequent....

  1. Local quark-hadron duality of nucleon spin structure functions with target mass corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y.B. . E-mail dongyb@mail.ihep.ac.cn; Chen, D.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Target mass corrections to nucleon spin structure functions are analyzed. Our results show that the corrections are important to the structure functions in a large x region. Moreover, they play a remarkable role to the local quark-hadron duality of the nucleon spin structure functions in three individual inelastic resonance production regions

  2. Dissecting soft radiation with factorization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Iain W.; Tackmann, Frank J.; Waalewijn, Wouter J.; Amsterdam Univ.

    2014-05-01

    An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It can receive contributions from soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in Z+jet and H+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects. We use a QCD factorization theorem to predict the dependence on the jet radius R, jet p T , jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. The nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of R, and the linear R term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event. This degeneracy is broken by the jet p T dependence. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for gg→Hg and gq→Zq, but a negative interference contribution for q anti q→Zg. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

  3. DISSECT: a new mnemonic-based approach to the categorization of aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, M D; Thompson, M; van Sambeek, M; Vermassen, F; Morales, J P

    2013-08-01

    Classification systems for aortic dissection provide important guides to clinical decision-making, but the relevance of traditional categorization schemes is being questioned in an era when endovascular techniques are assuming a growing role in the management of this frequently complex and catastrophic entity. In recognition of the expanding range of interventional therapies now used as alternatives to conventional treatment approaches, the Working Group on Aortic Diseases of the DEFINE Project developed a categorization system that features the specific anatomic and clinical manifestations of the disease process that are most relevant to contemporary decision-making. The DISSECT classification system is a mnemonic-based approach to the evaluation of aortic dissection. It guides clinicians through an assessment of six critical characteristics that facilitate optimal communication of the most salient details that currently influence the selection of a therapeutic option, including those findings that are key when considering an endovascular procedure, but are not taken into account by the DeBakey or Stanford categorization schemes. The six features of aortic dissection include: duration of disease; intimal tear location; size of the dissected aorta; segmental extent of aortic involvement; clinical complications of the dissection, and thrombus within the aortic false lumen. In current clinical practice, endovascular therapy is increasingly considered as an alternative to medical management or open surgical repair in select cases of type B aortic dissection. Currently, endovascular aortic repair is not used for patients with type A aortic dissection, but catheter-based techniques directed at peripheral branch vessel ischemia that may complicate type A dissection are considered valuable adjunctive interventions, when indicated. The use of a new system for categorization of aortic dissection, DISSECT, addresses the shortcomings of well-known established schemes devised

  4. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek Abdel Halim El-Fayoumi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to reduce the probability of later clinical involvement of the axilla and at establishing a sound basis for adjuvant treatment planning axillary dissection is an important operative procedure. So, partial axillary dissection has been applied to decrease the morbidity and postoperative axillary complications.Aim of the work was to study the reliability of partial axillary lymph node dissection in patients with breast carcinoma with clinically negative axilla. Methods: Eighteen patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the other two patients who were fulfilling the criteria for conservative breast surgery underwent lumpectomy. All patients did complete axillary lymph nodes dissection. Intraoperative leveling of the axilla was performed and level I axillary lymph nodes were identified according to their relation to pectoralis minor muscle; then they were subjected to intraoperative pathological examination by frozen section examination followed by complete axillary clearance. Then post operative histopathological examination of the tumor and all lymph nodes was done. Results: By intraoperative pathological examination; five patients (25% were found positive for malignant invasion, while 15 patients (75% were pathologically free. While paraffin section showed six patients (30% with malignant invasion, and 14 patients (70% were pathologically free. There was a false negative rate of 5% in level I axillary lymph nodes by intraoperative pathological examination which was positive for metastasis by paraffin section that revealed microinvasion in one lymph node out of 8 in level I. Only two cases out of 20 were found positive for metastasis in level II and III. Conclusion: Partial axillary lymph node dissection is a minimally invasive, feasible and sufficient technique that can predict the axillary lymph node status. KEYWORDS: Breast cancer, Axillary lymph nodes clearance

  5. Emotional response of undergraduates to cadaver dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisenden, Patricia A; Budke, Katherine J; Klemetson, Chelsea J; Kurtti, Tana R; Patel, Chandi M; Schwantz, Trenda L; Wisenden, Brian D

    2018-03-01

    The most effective way to learn human anatomy is through cadaver dissection. Historically, cadaver dissection has been the provenance of professional schools. Increasingly, cadaver-based courses in human anatomy are shifting to the undergraduate level, which creates both problems and opportunities because of differences between undergraduate and graduate student populations. Anxiety associated with dissecting cadavers can create a barrier to learning, and ultimately, entry into the health and medical sciences for some demographic subpopulations of undergraduates. We surveyed 76 students in 2007 and 51 students in 2009 at four times in the semester to investigate the timing and sociodemographic predictors of anxiety over cadaver dissection. We followed this with a second survey of 44 students in 2014 to test the effect of humanization of cadaver donors (providing information about donor occupation and cause of death) to reduce student anxiety. Students experienced anxiety upon first exposure to cadaver dissection. Female students experienced greater anxiety than male students upon first exposure to cadavers but this effect was short-lived. Self-identified non-white, non-Christian students experienced sustained anxiety throughout the semester, likely because cadaver stress compounded social and financial stressors unique to international students. Humanization was effective in reducing anxiety in non-white, non-Christian students but had the unexpected effect of increasing anxiety in female students. We recommend that humanizing information be offered to students who seek it out, but not forced upon students for whom the information would only add to their stress. Clin. Anat. 31:224-230, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Positive family history of aortic dissection dramatically increases dissection risk in family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Chou, Alan S; Mok, Salvior C M; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Charilaou, Paris; Zafar, Mohammad A; Sieller, Richard S; Tranquilli, Maryann; Rizzo, John A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-08-01

    Although family members of patients with aortic dissection (AoD) are believed to be at higher risk of AoD, the prognostic value of family history (FH) of aortic dissection (FHAD) in family members of patients with AoD has not been studied rigorously. We seek examine how much a positive FHAD increases the risk of developing new aortic dissection (AoD) among first-degree relatives. Patients with AoD at our institution were analyzed for information of FHAD. Positive FHAD referred to that AoD occurred in index patient and one or more first-degree relatives. Negative FHAD was defined as the condition in which only one case of AoD (the index patient) occurred in the family. The age at AoD, exposure years in adulthood before AoD, and annual probability of AoD among first-degree relatives were compared between patients with negative and positive FHADs. FHAD was positive in 32 and negative in 68 among the 100 AoD patients with detailed family history information. Mean age at dissection was 59.9±14.7years. Compared to negative FHAD, patients with positive FHAD dissected at significantly younger age (54.7±16.8 vs 62.4±13.0years, p=0.013), had more AoD events in first-degree relatives (2.3±0.6 vs 1.0±0.0, pfamily members, with a higher annual probability of aortic dissection, a shorter duration of "exposure time" before dissection occurs and a lower mean age at time of dissection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mutants dissecting development and behaviour in drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Adita; Chandrashekaran, Shanti; Sharma, R.P.

    2005-01-01

    We have traced in this paper the progress in Drosophila genetics research from the 1960s, at the IARI, spearheaded by the visionary insight of M. S. Swaminathan. The work started with the study of indirect effect of radiation and the synergistic interaction of physical and chemical mutagens on chromosomal and genetic changes. This paved the way for the study of single gene mutants in dissecting developmental and behavioural processes. New genes discovered by us have been shown to encode conserved cell signalling molecules controlling developmental and behavioural pathways. With the complete sequencing of the Drosophila genome, in the year 2000, mounting evidence for the homology between Drosophila and human genes controlling genetic disorders became available. This has led to the fly becoming an indispensable tool for studying human diseases as well as a model to test for drugs and pharmaceuticals against human diseases and complex behavioural processes. For example wingless in Drosophila belongs to the conserved Wnt gene family and aberrant WNT signalling is linked to a range of human diseases, most notably cancer. Inhibition as well as activation of WNT signalling form the basis of an effective therapy for some cancers as well as several other clinical conditions. Recent experiments have shown that WNTs might also normally participate in self-renewal, proliferation or differentiation of stem cells and altering WNT signalling might be beneficial to the use of stem cells for therapeutic means. Likewise, the stambhA mutant of Drosophila which was discovered for its temperature-dependent paralytic behaviour is the fly homologue of Phospholipase Cβ. Phospholipase C mediated G protein signalling plays a central role in vital processes controlling epilepsy, vision, taste, and olfaction in animals. Proteins of the G-signalling pathway are of intense research interest since many human diseases involve defects in G-protein signalling pathways. In fact, approximately 50

  8. Measurement of the hadronic structure function of the photon

    CERN Document Server

    Affholderbach, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The hadronic structure function of the photon, Fγ 2 , is measured using a data sample of 52.9 pb−1, recorded with the ALEPH detector at the LEP storage ring in 1997. Approximately 2100 single-tag two-photon events at a centre-of-mass energy of √s ≈ 183GeV are selected from this data sample. The data are analysed in the two Q2 ranges from 7 to 24 and from 17 to 200 GeV2 with mean values of 13.7 and 56.5 GeV2 . The measured distributions of kinematic variables are compared to different model predictions, based on the HERWIG and PHOJET Monte Carlo generators. To determine Fγ 2(x,Q2), a two-dimensional unfolding method employing the principle of maximum entropy is used. In addition to the Bjorken variable x, the variable E17 is introduced, denoting the hadronic energy measured in the polar angle range below 17◦ and is also used in the unfolding. The two-dimensional unfolding method significantly reduces the systematic errors compared to one-dimensional methods which is shown by various unfolding tests. ...

  9. Structure functions and intermittency in ionospheric plasma turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dyrud

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the ionospheric E-region is studied by means of numerical and experimental methods. We use the structure functions of the electrostatic potential as a diagnostics of the fluctuations. We demonstrate the inherently intermittent nature of the low level turbulence in the collisional ionospheric plasma by using results for the space-time varying electrostatic potential from two dimensional numerical simulations. An instrumented rocket can not directly detect the one-point potential variation, and most measurements rely on records of potential differences between two probes. With reference to the space observations we demonstrate that the results obtained by potential difference measurements can differ significantly from the one-point results. It was found, in particular, that the intermittency signatures become much weaker, when the proper rocket-probe configuration is implemented. We analyze also signals from an actual ionospheric rocket experiment, and find a reasonably good agreement with the appropriate simulation results, demonstrating again that rocket data, obtained as those analyzed here, are unlikely to give an adequate representation of intermittent features of the low frequency ionospheric plasma turbulence for the given conditions.

  10. Nuclear structure functions at a future electron-ion collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenauer, E. C.; Fazio, S.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Paukkunen, H.; Zurita, P.

    2017-12-01

    The quantitative knowledge of heavy nuclei's partonic structure is currently limited to rather large values of momentum fraction x —robust experimental constraints below x ˜10-2 at low resolution scale Q2 are particularly scarce. This is in sharp contrast to the free proton's structure which has been probed in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) measurements down to x ˜10-5 at perturbative resolution scales. The construction of an electron-ion collider (EIC) with a possibility to operate with a wide variety of nuclei, will allow one to explore the low-x region in much greater detail. In the present paper we simulate the extraction of the nuclear structure functions from measurements of inclusive and charm reduced cross sections at an EIC. The potential constraints are studied by analyzing simulated data directly in a next-to-leading order global fit of nuclear Parton Distribution Functions based on the recent EPPS16 analysis. A special emphasis is placed on studying the impact an EIC would have on extracting the nuclear gluon parton distribution function, the partonic component most prone to nonlinear effects at low Q2. In comparison to the current knowledge, we find that the gluon parton distribution function can be measured at an EIC with significantly reduced uncertainties.

  11. Singlet structure function F_1 in double-logarithmic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolaev, B. I.; Troyan, S. I.

    2018-03-01

    The conventional ways to calculate the perturbative component of the DIS singlet structure function F_1 involve approaches based on BFKL which account for the single-logarithmic contributions accompanying the Born factor 1 / x. In contrast, we account for the double-logarithmic (DL) contributions unrelated to 1 / x and because of that they were disregarded as negligibly small. We calculate the singlet F_1 in the double-logarithmic approximation (DLA) and account at the same time for the running α _s effects. We start with a total resummation of both quark and gluon DL contributions and obtain the explicit expression for F_1 in DLA. Then, applying the saddle-point method, we calculate the small- x asymptotics of F_1, which proves to be of the Regge form with the leading singularity ω _0 = 1.066. Its large value compensates for the lack of the factor 1 / x in the DLA contributions. Therefore, this Reggeon can be identified as a new Pomeron, which can be quite important for the description of all QCD processes involving the vacuum (Pomeron) exchanges at very high energies. We prove that the expression for the small- x asymptotics of F_1 scales: it depends on a single variable Q^2/x^2 only instead of x and Q^2 separately. Finally, we show that the small- x asymptotics reliably represent F_1 at x ≤ 10^{-6}.

  12. The structure functions of the photon at large x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    We derive 'improved' perturbative results in QCD for the structure functions of the photon at large Bjorken x by (a) using a correct phase-space treatment of the leading mass-singularity logarithms and (b) summing the leading logarithms of (1-x) associated with the wave function of the final state. We obtain explicit results in three kinematic regimes: (i) Q 2 low enough for logarithmic QCD corrections to the parton model to be negligible; we estimate that this is the case for all presently realistic values of Q 2 (approx. 2 ). (ii) Q 2 high enough (at fixed x) for the effects of the leading mass-singularity logarithms to be important; we discuss the modifications to Witten's result at large x due to the correct kinematical treatment of the leading logarithms. (iii) Q 2 /s → infinite, where we sum the wave-function logarithms of (1-x); we show that F 2 sup(γ) → finite constant as Q 2 /s → infinite and that there is a close inclusive-exclusive connection in this limit. (orig.)

  13. Lamin B Receptor: Interplay between Structure, Function and Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Nikolakaki

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lamin B receptor (LBR is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane, containing a hydrophilic N-terminal end protruding into the nucleoplasm, eight hydrophobic segments that span the membrane and a short, nucleoplasmic C-terminal tail. Two seemingly unrelated functions have been attributed to LBR. Its N-terminal domain tethers heterochromatin to the nuclear periphery, thus contributing to the shape of interphase nuclear architecture, while its transmembrane domains exhibit sterol reductase activity. Mutations within the transmembrane segments result in defects in cholesterol synthesis and are associated with diseases such as the Pelger–Huët anomaly and Greenberg skeletal dysplasia, whereas no such harmful mutations related to the anchoring properties of LBR have been reported so far. Recent evidence suggests a dynamic regulation of LBR expression levels, structural organization, localization and function, in response to various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying this dynamic behavior have not yet been fully unraveled. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the interplay between the structure, function and localization of LBR, and hint at the interconnection of the two distinct functions of LBR.

  14. A structure-function analysis in patients with prekallikrein deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Antonio; Ferrari, Silvia; Cosi, Elisabetta; Lombardi, Anna Maria

    2017-11-22

    To investigate the structure-function relation in prekallikrein (PK) deficiency. PK is one of the proteins of the contact phase of blood coagulation which at the present time is the object of a revival of interest. All patients with PK deficiency who had been investigated by molecular biology techniques are the object of the present investigation. Details of patients were obtained from personal files and a time-unlimited PubMed search. Only cases with a molecular-biology-based diagnosis were included. Twelve families were included. The total number of missense mutation was 10, together with 3 stop codons and 2 insertions. These mutations involved mainly exons 11 and 14. There were eight proved homozygotes and three compound heterozygotes. In one instance, homozygosity was probable but not proved. In nine cases, the defect was Type I, whereas it was Type II in the remaining three. No bleeding manifestations were present in 11 of the 12 probands. One proband had epistaxis, but she had hypertension. Altogether, four patients had hypertension and one of them had also two myocardial infarctions. Despite the paucity of cases, it was established that the majority of mutations involved the catalytic domain. It is auspicable that future reports of patients with this disorder should include molecular studies. This would certainly contribute to the understanding of the contact phase of blood coagulation.

  15. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute Type II Aortic Dissection with Severe Aortic Regurgitation and Chronic Descending Aortic Dissection in Pregnant Patient with Marfan Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seok-Soo; Jung, Tae-Eun; Lee, Dong Hyup

    2012-01-01

    Aortic dilatation and dissection are severe complications during pregnancy that can be fatal to both the mother and the fetus. The risks of these complications are especially high in pregnant patients with Marfan syndrome; however, incidents of descending aortic dissection are very rare. This case report involves a successful Bentall procedure for and recovery from a rare aortic dissection in a pregnant Marfan patient who developed acute type II aortic dissection with severe aortic regurgitat...

  17. The Spin Structure of the Proton at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Structure Function g2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The spin structure of the nucleon has remained as one of the key points of interest in hadronic physics, which has attracted many efforts from both experimentalists and theorists. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory that describes the strong interaction. It has been verified in the asymptotically free region. However, the non-perturbative confinement of quarks within the nucleon is still not well understood within QCD. In the non-perturbative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory (XPT) provide predictions for the spin structure functions. The neutron spin structure functions, gp1 and gp2 , and the proton spin structure function, gp1, have been measured over a wide kinematic range and compared with the theoretical predictions. However, the proton spin structure function, gp2, remains largely unmeasured. The E08-027 collaboration successfully performed the first measurement of the inclusive electron-proton scattering in the kinematic range 0.02 < Q2 < 0.2 GeV2. The experiment took place in experimental Hall A at Jefferson Lab in 2012. A longitudinally polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 GeV and 3.3 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized NH3 target. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the resonance region to extract the proton spin structure functions g2. The results allow us to obtain the generalized spin polarizabilities γ0 and δLT and test the Burkhardtt-Cottingham (BC) sum rule. Chiral perturbation theory is expected to work in this kinematic range and this measurement of δLT will give a benchmark test to XPT calculations. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E08-027 data analysis.

  18. MPID-T2: a database for sequence-structure-function analyses of pMHC and TR/pMHC structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javed Mohammed; Cheruku, Harish Reddy; Tong, Joo Chuan; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2011-04-15

    Sequence-structure-function information is critical in understanding the mechanism of pMHC and TR/pMHC binding and recognition. A database for sequence-structure-function information on pMHC and TR/pMHC interactions, MHC-Peptide Interaction Database-TR version 2 (MPID-T2), is now available augmented with the latest PDB and IMGT/3Dstructure-DB data, advanced features and new parameters for the analysis of pMHC and TR/pMHC structures. http://biolinfo.org/mpid-t2. shoba.ranganathan@mq.edu.au Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Molecular dissection of Norrie disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, W

    1998-01-01

    Norrie disease (ND) is a severe form of congenital blindness accompanied by mental retardation and/or deafness in at least one third of the patients. This article summarizes advances in the molecular genetic analysis of this disease during the last 13 years, including mapping and cloning of the human gene and the generation and characterization of a mouse model. Genetic linkage studies and physical mapping strategies have assigned the ND locus to the proximal short arm of the human X chromosome. The identification of chromosomal rearrangements in several patients, such as microdeletions, enabled the isolation of the ND gene by a positional cloning approach. Numerous point mutations in this gene have been identified in three distinct clinical entities: (1) ND, (2) familial and sporadic exudative vitreoretinopathy, and (3) retinopathy of prematurity. The gene encodes a relatively small protein, consisting of 133 amino acids. The function of the gene product is yet unknown, although homologies with known proteins and molecular modelling data suggest a role in the regulation of cell interaction or differentiation processes. A mouse model has been generated to shed more light on early pathogenic events involved in ND and allelic disorders. The mouse homologous protein is highly identical (94%) to the human polypeptide. The gene is expressed in the neuronal layers of the mouse retina, the cerebellum and olfactory epithelium. Mutant mice show snowflake-like opacities within the vitreous, dysgenesis of the ganglion cell layer and occasionally degeneration of photoreceptor cells. The mouse phenotype does not include phthisis bulbi and, overall, resembles a mild form of ND. Electrophysiological studies revealed a severely altered electroretinogram b-wave. These results suggest a primary defect in the inner neuronal layers of the retina. Defects in the vitreous and photoreceptor cell layer are most likely secondary effects. Further histological, functional and molecular

  20. Counter traction makes endoscopic submucosal dissection easier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Tsuneo

    2012-11-01

    Poor counter traction and poor field of vision make endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) difficult. Good counter traction allows dissections to be performed more quickly and safely. Position change, which utilizes gravity, is the simplest method to create a clear field of vision. It is useful especially for esophageal and colon ESD. The second easiest method is clip with line method. Counter traction made by clip with line accomplishes the creation of a clear field of vision and suitable counter traction thereby making ESD more efficient and safe. The author published this method in 2002. The name ESD was not established in those days; the name cutting endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) or EMR with hook knife was used. The other traction methods such as external grasping forceps, internal traction, double channel scope, and double scopes method are introduced in this paper. A good strategy for creating counter traction makes ESD easier.

  1. Effective imaging of carotid artery dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Angiography has been the gold standard in the diagnosis of arterial dissection for many years. With recent advances in techniques, particularly in MRI it may be worthy to re-evaluate the imaging methods available in obtaining the most information to maxims the patients' level of management. Assessing the imaging methods used in four patients with clinically suspected carotid artery dissection may reveal the most appropriate clinical pathway in managing these types of patients. In today's economic environment, we are striving for the most cost-effective imaging methods combined with the least invasive and safest. We must also review the cost benefit analysis of CT, angiography (DSA), Doppler Ultrasound and MRI/MRA. It is not within the scope of this paper to argue the merits of each imaging method, but purely to present some of the benefits in using non-invasive techniques if the clinical indications warrant them and they are available. (author)

  2. Clinical analysis of neck dissection patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Katsuro; Takahashi, Sugata

    2008-01-01

    Neck dissection is a highly important surgical procedure in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the head and neck since the control of the nodal disease is highly important in these patients. In this paper, 131 patients (210 necks) treated in our department were analyzed. The most frequent primary lesion site was the oral cavity, followed by larynx, hypopharynx and mesopharynx, and treatment of metastatic nodes was considered important especially in patients with SCC in those regions. As the surgical procedure for neck dissection, (modified) radical neck dissection was chosen for higher N stage cases, although it was also applied to lower N stage cases. Postoperative irradiation was performed for 70% of the patients, and control of the neck was considered good as recurrent neck disease occurred in 8% of the patients, and only 20% of those died of recurrent neck disease. The most common primary site showing cervical recurrence was the oral cavity, and control of neck disease is considered important, especially in patients with SCC of the oral cavity. Patients with ≤number of pN 1 receiving postoperative irradiation, and patients with pN (-) and ≤number of pN 1 without postoperative irradiation showed significantly higher survival rates. Postoperative irradiation should be done for patients with ≥number of pN 2, and follow-up without postoperative treatment should be considered for the cases of ≤number of pN 1. Further consideration of patient selection with regard to the area of dissection and the indication for postoperative irradiation without decreasing the survival rate is needed to further improve the treatment of head and neck SCCs. (author)

  3. Whole vitreous humor dissection for vitreodynamic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Karthik; Kashani, Amir H; Humayun, Mark S

    2015-05-24

    The authors propose an effective technique to isolate whole, intact vitreous core and cortex from post mortem enucleated porcine eyes. While previous studies have shown the results of such dissections, the detailed steps have not been described, precluding researchers outside the field from replicating their methods. Other studies harvest vitreous either through aspiration, which does not maintain the vitreous structure anatomy, or through partial dissection, which only isolates the vitreous core. The proposed method isolates the whole vitreous body, with the vitreous core and cortex intact, while maintaining vitreous anatomy and structural integrity. In this method, a full thickness scleral flap in an enucleated porcine eye is first created and through this, the choroid tissue can be separated from the sclera. The scleral flap is then expanded and the choroid is completely separated from the sclera. Finally the choroid-retina tissue is peeled off the vitreous to leave an isolated intact vitreous body. The proposed vitreous dissection technique can be used to study physical properties of the vitreous humor. In particular, this method has significance for experimental studies involving drug delivery, vitreo-retinal oxygen transport, and intraocular convection.

  4. Acute aortic dissection: be aware of misdiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asteri Theodora

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute aortic dissection (AAD is a life-threatening condition requiring immediate assessment and therapy. A patient suffering from AAD often presents with an insignificant or irrelevant medical history, giving rise to possible misdiagnosis. The aim of this retrospective study is to address the problem of misdiagnosing AD and the different imaging studies used. Methods From January 2000 to December 2004, 49 patients (41 men and 8 women, aged from 18–75 years old presented to the Emergency Department of our hospital for different reasons and finally diagnosed with AAD. Fifteen of those patients suffered from arterial hypertension, one from giant cell arteritis and another patient from Marfan's syndrome. The diagnosis of AAD was made by chest X-ray, contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and coronary angiography. Results Initial misdiagnosis occurred in fifteen patients (31% later found to be suffering from AAD. The misdiagnosis was myocardial infarction in 12 patients and cerebral infarction in another three patients. Conclusion Aortic dissection may present with a variety of clinical manifestations, like syncope, chest pain, anuria, pulse deficits, abdominal pain, back pain, or acute congestive heart failure. Nearly a third of the patients found to be suffering from AD, were initially otherwise diagnosed. Key in the management of acute aortic dissection is to maintain a high level of suspicion for this diagnosis.

  5. Assessment of stent edge dissections by fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ju-Hyun; Ann, Soe Hee; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Nam, Chang-Wook; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Singh, Gillian Balbir; Kim, Hyung Il; Shin, Eun-Seok

    2015-04-15

    Edge dissections after intervention have been studied with imaging techniques, however, functional assessment has not been studied yet. We investigated the relationship between fractional flow reserve (FFR) and the angiographic type of stent edge dissections and tried to assess the use of FFR-guided management for edge dissection. 51 edge dissections assessed by FFR were included in this prospective observational study. FFR was measured for each type of edge dissection and compared with quantitative coronary angiographic findings. Clinical outcomes were evaluated based on FFR measurements. Edge dissections were classified as type A (47.1%; 24/51), type B (41.2%; 21/51), type C (2.0%; 1/51) and type D (9.8%; 5/51). Mean FFR in type A dissection was 0.87 ± 0.09, in type B 0.86 ± 0.07, in type C 0.72 and in type D 0.57 ± 0.08. All type C and D dissections (6/51) had FFR ≤ 0.8 and were treated with additional stents. Among the 45 type A and B dissections, 8 had a FFR ≤ 0.8 (17.8%), and 50% received additional stenting. All dissections with FFR >0.8 were left untreated except one long dissection case. There was no death, myocardial infarction or target lesion revascularization during hospitalization or the follow-up period (median 152 days; IQR 42-352 days). FFR correlates well with an angiographic type of edge dissection. Angiographic findings are sufficient for deciding the treatment of severe dissections such as types C and D, while FFR-guided management may be safe and effective for mild edge dissections such as types A and B. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. MRI and MR angiography of vertebral artery dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascalchi, M.; Bianchi, M.C.; Mangiafico, S.; Ferrito, G.; Puglioli, M.; Marin, E.; Mugnai, S.; Canapicchi, R.; Quilici, N.; Inzitari, D.

    1997-01-01

    A review of 4,500 angiograms yielded 11 patients with dissection of the vertebral arteries who had MRI and (in 4 patients) MR angiography (MRA) in the acute phase of stroke. One patient with incidental discovery at arteriography of asymptomatic vertebral artery dissection and two patients with acute strokes with MRI and MRA findings consistent with vertebral artery dissection were included. Dissection occurred after neck trauma or chiropractic manipulation in 4 patients and was spontaneous in 10. Dissection involved the extracranial vertebral artery in 9 patients, the extra-intracranial junction in 1, and the intracranial artery in 4. MRI demonstrated infarcts in the brain stem, cerebellum, thalamus or temporo-occipital regions in 7 patients with extra- or extra-intracranial dissections and a solitary lateral medullary infarct in 4 patients (3 with intracranial and 1 with extra-intracranial dissection). In 2 patients no brain abnormality related to vertebral artery dissection was found and in one MRI did not show subarachnoid haemorrhage revealed by CT. Intramural dissecting haematoma appeared as crescentic or rounded high signal on T1-weighted images in 10 patients examined 3-20 days after the onset of symptoms. The abnormal vessel stood out in the low signal cerebrospinal fluid in intracranial dissections, whereas it was more difficult to detect in extracranial dissections because of the intermediate-to-high signal of the normal perivascular structures and slow flow proximal and distal to the dissection. In two patients examined within 36 h of the onset, mural thickening was of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal on spin-density and T2-weighted images. MRA showed abrupt stenosis in 2 patients and disappearance of flow signal at and distal to the dissection in 5. Follow-up arteriography, MRI or MRA showed findings consistent with occlusion of the dissected vessel in 6 of 8 patients. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Structure-Function Based Molecular Relationships in Ewing's Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's Sarcoma Oncogene (ews) on chromosome 22q12 is encoding a ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding protein (EWS) with unknown function that is target of tumor-specific chromosomal translocations in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors. A model of transcription complex was proposed in which the heterodimer Rpb4/7 binds to EAD, connecting it to Core RNA Pol II. The DNA-binding domain, provided by EFP, is bound to the promoter. Rpb4/7 binds RNA, stabilizing the transcription complex. The complex Rpb4/7 can stabilize the preinitiation complexes by converting the conformation of RNA Pol II. EWS may change its conformation, so that NTD becomes accessible. Two different mechanisms of interaction between EWS and RNA Pol II are proposed: (I) an intermolecular EWS-EWS interaction between two molecules, pushing conformation from “closed” to “open” state, or (II) an intramolecular interaction inside the molecule of EWS, pushing conformation of the molecule from “closed” to “open” state. The modified forms of EWS may interact with Pol II subunits hsRpb5 and hsRpb7. The EWS and EFPs binding partners are described schematically in a model, an attempt to link the transcription with the splicing. The proposed model helps to understand the functional molecular interactions in cancer, to find new partners and ways to treat cancer. PMID:25688366

  8. Dissecting cross-impact on stock markets: an empirical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaquen, M.; Mastromatteo, I.; Eisler, Z.; Bouchaud, J.-P.

    2017-02-01

    The vast majority of market impact studies assess each product individually, and the interactions between the different order flows are disregarded. This strong approximation may lead to an underestimation of trading costs and possible contagion effects. Transactions in fact mediate a significant part of the correlation between different instruments. In turn, liquidity shares the sectorial structure of market correlations, which can be encoded as a set of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. We introduce a multivariate linear propagator model that successfully describes such a structure, and accounts for a significant fraction of the covariance of stock returns. We dissect the various dynamical mechanisms that contribute to the joint dynamics of assets. We also define two simplified models with substantially less parameters in order to reduce overfitting, and show that they have superior out-of-sample performance.

  9. Structure-Function Relations in Physiology Education: Where's the Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Matthew E.; Gardner, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    Physiology demands systems thinking: reasoning within and between levels of biological organization and across different organ systems. Many physiological mechanisms explain how structures and their properties interact at one level of organization to produce emergent functions at a higher level of organization. Current physiology principles, such…

  10. Longitudinal structure function from logarithmic slopes of F2 at low x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroun, G. R.

    2018-01-01

    Using Laplace transform techniques, I calculate the longitudinal structure function FL(x ,Q2) from the scaling violations of the proton structure function F2(x ,Q2) and make a critical study of this relationship between the structure functions at leading order (LO) up to next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) analysis at small x . Furthermore, I consider heavy quark contributions to the relation between the structure functions, which leads to compact formula for Nf=3 +Heavy . The nonlinear corrections to the longitudinal structure function at LO up to NNLO analysis are shown in the Nf=4 (light quark flavor) based on the nonlinear corrections at R =2 and R =4 GeV-1 . The results are compared with experimental data of the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the range of 6.5 ≤Q2≤800 GeV2 .

  11. Late sequelae of whiplash injury with dissection of cervical arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Vital; Zangger, Peter; Winter, Yaroslav; Oertel, Wolfgang; Kesselring, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The objective of our study was to estimate the incidence of posttraumatic dissections of cervical arteries in patients with whiplash injury acquired in a car accident. We performed a retrospective analysis of medical records of 500 patients with whiplash injury acquired in car accidents between 1996 and 2005 and searched for dissections of cervical arteries occurring within 12 months after injury. Eight cases of cervical arterial dissection occurred within 12 months following whiplash injury. In 7 cases (87.5%), the dissection was complicated by brain infarction. The incidence of posttraumatic dissections after whiplash injuries was much higher than the overall incidence of cervical arterial dissections in the general population (1.6 vs. 0.0041%). The risk of cerebrovascular events was still increased 4-12 months after whiplash injury (0.6 vs. 0.003075% in the general population). There is an increased risk of posttraumatic dissection and cerebrovascular events within 12 months after whiplash injury. Car accident is an important risk factor for arterial dissections. The victims of car accidents should be screened for arterial dissections. The results of this study should be more thoroughly investigated in a prospective trial of car accident victims as a risk factor for arterial dissections. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The virtual photon structure functions and AdS/QCD correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    We study the virtual photons structure functions from gauge/string duality. If the Bjorken variable x is not small, supergravity approximation becomes good in dual string theory. We calculate the virtual photon structure functions at large 't Hooft coupling in a moderate x-region and determine x-behavior of the structure functions. We also show that the Callan-Gross relation F L =0 is satisfied to a good approximation in gravity calculation. (author)

  13. Nucleon deep-inelastic structure functions in a quark model with factorizability assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linkevich, A.D.; Skachkov, N.B.

    1979-01-01

    Formula for structure functions of deep-inelastic electron scattering on nucleon is derived. For this purpose the dynamic model of factorizing quark amplitudes is used. It has been found that with increase of Q 2 transferred pulse square at great values of x kinemastic variable the decrease of structure function values is observed. At x single values the increase of structure function values is found. The comparison With experimental data shows a good agreement of the model with experiment

  14. On the twist-2 contributions to polarized structure functions and new sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.; Kochelev, N.

    1996-03-01

    The twist-2 contributions to the polarized structure functions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering are calculated including the exchange of weak bosons and using both the operator product expansion and the covariant parton model. A new relation between two structure functions leading to a sequence of new sum rules is found. The light quark mass corrections to the structure functions are derived in lowest order QCD. (orig.)

  15. Genetic dissection reveals effects of interaction between high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-15

    Apr 15, 2013 ... Wheat quality is mainly influenced by protein and starch, which are responsible for ... Starch contains two components: amylose and amy- lopectin. .... (Voorrips 2002). The QTL analysis was performed and the main effect QTL.

  16. MR imaging of the entry, the abdominal communicating orifice, and the retrograde dissection in aortic dissections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Mukohara, N.; Nakamura, K.; Sugimura, K.; Kono, M.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging (1.5 T) was performed on 41 patients with aortic dissection. Entries were clearly visualized on the MR images as partial defects of the intimal flap in 18 of 21 patients (85.7%). In eight of ten patients, the locations of abdominal communicating orifices corresponded to the lowest signal intensities of the false lumina. Retrograde disections were diagnosed in all six patients from gradual increases in signal intensities of the false lumina toward the heart. MR imaging was very useful in diagnosing entries of the thoracic aorta, abdominal communicating orifices between true and false lumina, and retrograde dissections

  17. A next-to-leading-order QCD analysis of neutrino-iron structure functions at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seligman, W.G.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 GeV. The structure functions F 2 and xF 3 are compared with the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives value of ΛNLO,(4)/MS = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to α S (M Z 2 ) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by xG(x,Q 0 2 = 5GeV 2 ) = (2.22 ± 0.34) x (1 - x) 4.65±0.68

  18. The g$p\\atop{2}$ Experiment: A Measurement of the Proton's Spin Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, Ryan B. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The E08-027 (g$p\\atop{2}$) experiment measured the spin structure functions of the proton at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Va. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from a transversely and longitudinally polarized solid ammonia target in Hall A, with the polarized NH$_3$ acting as an effective proton target. Focusing on small scattering angle events at the electron energies available at Jefferson Lab, the experiment covered a kinematic phase space of 0.02 GeV$^2$ $< Q^2 <$ 0.20 GeV$^2$ in the proton's resonance region. The spin structure functions, $g_{1}^p(x,Q^2)$ and $g_{2}^p(x,Q^2)$ , are extracted from an inclusive polarized cross section measurement of the electron-proton interaction. Integrated moments of $g_1(x,Q^2)$ are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions made by Chiral Perturbation Theory. The $g_1(x,Q^2)$ results are in agreement with previous measurements, but include a significant increase in statistical precision. The spin structure function contributions to the hyperfine energy levels in the hydrogen atom are also investigated. The $g_2(x,Q^2)$ measured contribution to the hyperfine splitting is the first ever experimental determination of this quantity. The results of this thesis suggest a disagreement of over 100% with previously published model results.

  19. A next-to-leading-order QCD analysis of neutrino-iron structure functions at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, William Glenn [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleon structure functions measured in neutrino-iron and antineutrino-iron charged-current interactions are presented. The data were taken in two high-energy high-statistics runs by the LAB-E detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Structure functions are extracted from a sample of 950,000 neutrino and 170,000 antineutrino events with neutrino energies from 30 to 360 GeV. The structure functions F2 and xF3 are compared with the predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (PQCD). The combined non-singlet and singlet evolution in the context of PQCD gives value of ΛNLO,(4)/MS = 337 ± 28 (exp.) MeV, which corresponds to αS(MZ2) = 0.119 ± 0.002 (exp.) ± 0.004 (theory), and with a gluon distribution given by xG(x,Q02 = 5GeV2) = (2.22 ± 0.34) x (1 - x)4.65±0.68.

  20. The Dictyostelium discoideum cellulose synthase: Structure/function analysis and identification of interacting proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Blanton

    2004-02-19

    OAK-B135 The major accomplishments of this project were: (1) the initial characterization of dcsA, the gene for the putative catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum; (2) the detection of a developmentally regulated event (unidentified, but perhaps a protein modification or association with a protein partner) that is required for cellulose synthase activity (i.e., the dcsA product is necessary, but not sufficient for cellulose synthesis); (3) the continued exploration of the developmental context of cellulose synthesis and DcsA; (4) the isolation of a GFP-DcsA-expressing strain (work in progress); and (5) the identification of Dictyostelium homologues for plant genes whose products play roles in cellulose biosynthesis. Although our progress was slow and many of our results negative, we did develop a number of promising avenues of investigation that can serve as the foundation for future projects.

  1. CT and MR angiographic findings in dissection of cervical vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, J.; Brinkmann, G.; Heuser, K.; Heller, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of CT angiography (CTA) and MR angiography (MRA) for evaluation of dissection in cervical vessels. Material and methods: Dissection of cervical vessels was revealed by conventional angiography in 4 patients (two female, two male) of 30-62 years of age. Dissection was located in the carotid artery (n=3) and in the vertebral artery (n=1). In two patients CTA and in two patients MRA was performed. Results: Diagnosis of dissection was possible by CTA (internal carotid artery: n=2) and by MRA (internal carotid artery and vertebral artery). Imaging of the dissection membrane of the vessel wall was possible in one case with MRA. Conclusion: CT and MR angiography was successful for detection of typical morphology of dissection in all cases. If results in a greater number can be obtained it seems to be conceivable that both methods can be used in primary diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  2. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection following Topical Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition, usually presenting as an acute coronary syndrome, and is often seen in states associated with high systemic estrogen levels such as pregnancy or oral contraceptive use. While topical hormonal replacement therapy may result in increased estrogen levels similar to those documented with oral contraceptive use, there are no reported cases of spontaneous coronary dissection with topical hormonal replacement therapy. We describe a 53-year-old female who developed two spontaneous coronary dissections while on topical hormonal replacement therapy. The patient had no other risk factors for coronary dissection. After withdrawal from topical hormonal therapy, our patient has done well and has not had recurrent coronary artery dissections over a one-year follow-up period. The potential contributory role of topical hormonal therapy as a cause of spontaneous coronary dissection should be recognized.

  3. Aortic dissection. Basic aspects and endovascular management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, Nicolas I; Alviar, Carlos I

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic pathology is complicated by the morbidity associated to the surgical procedure and to the frailty of an elderly and difficult population. Surgical operation in this kind of population frequently bears a significant incidence of death and long-term disability. In an effort to reduce the incidence of negative outcomes, minimally invasive techniques in the form of endovascular stenting have been introduced during the past decade. The technology, originally described by Parodi, and initially designed for its use in abdominal aortic aneurysms, has been adapted for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Furthermore, an improved understanding of the pathophysiology and the natural history of thoracic aortic disease as well as the analysis of the outcomes have facilitated our treatment decisions in terms of the timing for an appropriate intervention. Treatment of thoracic aortic dissection using endovascular Stent is one of the more recent advances in this condition and is receiving increasing attention, as it is a less invasive alternative to an open surgical repair. Although this technology is still innovative, significant improvements have been made lately in the design and deployment of the endovascular Stent-grafts. These prostheses have been increasingly used to treat aneurysms, dissections and traumatic ruptures, as well as giant penetrating ulcers and intramural hematomas of the descending thoracic aorta with good early and mid-term outcomes. The rareness, complexity and severity of the pathology and the theoretically high risk of complications should render the surgeon extremely cautious especially with young patients. Conceptually, the endo luminal treatment in the acute phase seems to be the solution and will probably become a preferred therapy while technical refinement is under way. Worldwide experience is growing and with this a better understanding of the indications and limitations of this innovative therapy will be

  4. Contemporary Management of Acute Type B Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A J; Bicknell, C D

    2016-03-01

    Growing confidence in thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for the management of acute type B aortic dissection has resulted in controversies regarding optimum patient selection and the timing of intervention. In this review a clinical vignette to present a practical perspective on the contemporary management of acute type B dissection (ABAD) in a specialist vascular centre with particular focus on areas of debate is used. This is a narrative clinical review. Aggressive anti-impulse therapy is the cornerstone of management of all patients with ABAD. However, 20-30% of patients develop complicated ABAD defined by the presence of malperfusion syndromes, acute aortic dilatation, dissection extension, or persistent pain and hypotension. These complicated patients typically require intervention, and non-randomised series suggest TEVAR to be an effective alternative to open repair with a lower morbidity. There is considerable interest and controversy surrounding the use of TEVAR in uncomplicated ABAD patients for whom the intervention-free survival at 6 years is less than 50% for patients managed with anti-impulse therapy. Data regarding this question are sparse, but two randomised trials (ADSORB and INSTEAD) both demonstrated a higher rate of favourable aortic remodelling in patients managed with TEVAR than medical therapy alone. However, it is unclear whether this positive remodelling translates into a reduction in long-term mortality sufficient to balance the early perioperative hazards of endografting. Despite increasing adeptness at endovascular stenting, the long-term outcomes of patients with ABAD leave significant room for improvement. In particular, the optimum management of patients with uncomplicated disease is unclear and guidance from trials powered for long-term mortality is awaited. Until then, the principals of management of ABAD remain aggressive medical therapy for all patients, with TEVAR primarily reserved for those who develop complications

  5. Aortic dissection presenting as a febrile disease and atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Blas-Macedo, Jorge; Márquez-Ramírez, Dolores; Gómez-Dominguez, José de Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a cardiovascular emergency. Its main manifestation is severe chest pain, and approximately 50% of patients present with an elevated systemic blood pressure. Rare reported physical findings include a pulsatile sterno-clavicular joint, dysphagia or testicular tenderness. The absence of sudden onset of pain lowers the likelihood of aortic dissection. We describe a patient in whom aortic dissection was accompanied by fever, nightsweats, suprasternal pain and atrial fibrillati...

  6. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Doing Dissections Differently: A Structured, Peer-Assisted Learning Approach to Maximizing Learning in Dissections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emma R.; Davis, Rachel C.; Weller, Renate; Powney, Sonya; Williams, Sarah B.

    2013-01-01

    Areas of difficulty faced by our veterinary medicine students, with respect to their learning in dissection classes, were identified. These challenges were both general adult-learning related and specific to the discipline of anatomy. Our aim was to design, implement, and evaluate a modified reciprocal peer-assisted/team-based learning…

  8. Background Music in the Dissection Laboratory: Impact on Stress Associated with the Dissection Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Emeka G.

    2015-01-01

    Notable challenges, such as mental distress, boredom, negative moods, and attitudes, have been associated with learning in the cadaver dissection laboratory (CDL). The ability of background music (BM) to enhance the cognitive abilities of students is well documented. The present study was designed to investigate the impact of BM in the CDL and on…

  9. On the behaviour of DIS structure function ratio R(x, Q2) at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotikov, A.V.

    1993-01-01

    The behaviour of deep inelastic structure functions is studied at small x in the leading and next-to-leading orders of perturbation theory. The scheme-invariant analysis for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions ratio R(x, Q 2 ), is given. It is found that this ratio tends to zero asymptotically when x -> 0. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig

  10. Gluon structure function for deeply inelastic scattering with nucleus in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala Filho, Alvaro L; Ducati, M.B. Gay [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Levin, Eugene [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation). Theory Dept.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we present the first calculation of the gluon structure function for nucleus in QCD. We discuss the Glauber formula for the gluon structure function and the violation of this simple approach that we anticipate in QCD. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs.

  11. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  12. Do we need dissection in an integrated problem-based learning medical course? Perceptions of first- and second-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A; Eizenberg, Norm

    2007-03-01

    dissection classes were not adequate. Students agreed that dissection deepened their understanding of anatomical structures, provided them with a three-dimensional perspective of structures and helped them recall what they learnt. Although their perception about the importance of dissection changed as they progressed in the course, good anatomy textbooks were perceived as an excellent resource for learning anatomy. Interestingly, innovations used in teaching anatomy, such as interactive multimedia resources, have not replaced students' perceptions about the importance of dissection.

  13. Biology teachers' dissection practices and the influences that lead to their adoption: An exploratory research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Regina Nicole

    The lack of resolution in the on-going animal dissection debate inspired this mixed methods study to identify Connecticut secondary biology teachers' dissection practices and the influences that lead to their adoption. Qualitative findings indicate past experiences, managing objections to dissection, school culture, goals of biology teaching and ethics as major influences on dissection practices with 58.4% (n=7) of the sample dissecting and 41.6% not dissecting (n=5). Quantitative findings reveal gender, standards and curriculum, advantages of dissection and experiences as a student as major influences on dissection practices with 71.9% (n=92) of the sample dissecting and 28.1% (n=36) not dissecting. The study concludes that dissection policies are necessary and imminent in Connecticut school districts. Furthermore, it advises teacher-initiated, qualitative and quantitative assessments to expose disparities between student dissection perspectives and their own, prior to conducting dissection. Finally, it provides suggestions for addressing potential differences including administrative involvement.

  14. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  15. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abdallah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e− data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of s=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  16. Regge analysis of diffractive and leading baryon structure functions from deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, M.; Covolan, R.J.M.; Montanha, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a combined analysis of the H1 data on leading baryon and diffractive structure functions from DIS, which are handled as two components of the same semi-inclusive process. The available structure function data are analyzed in a series of fits in which three main exchanges are taken into account: the Pomeron, Reggeon, and pion. For each of these contributions, Regge factorization of the correspondent structure function is assumed. By this procedure, we extract information about the interface between the diffractive, Pomeron-dominated, region and the leading proton spectrum, which is mostly ruled by secondary exchanges. One of the main results is that the relative Reggeon contribution to the semi-inclusive structure function is much smaller than the one obtained from an analysis of the diffractive structure function alone

  17. Structure function measurements in the deep inelastic muon-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, H.

    1990-03-01

    Measurements of deep inelastic scattering events on a combined copper and deuterium target were performed by the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) using a muon beam at CERN's SPS with energies at 100 GeV and 280 GeV. The data are analysed and compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation and allow the determination of structure functions from both targets. In the light of the present discrepancy between EMC's and BCDMS's structure functions, stringend cuts were applied to the data. The results confirm the EMC structure function measurements on unbound nucleons. The comparison between the copper structure function from this experiment and the NA2 iron structure function shows a trend to lower values at low x Bj . (orig.) [de

  18. Measurement of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} at LEP energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W. [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Nikolsdorfergasse 18, AT-1050 Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allmendinger, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Allport, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. di Milano-Bicocca and INFN-Milano, Piazza della Scienza 3, IT-20126 Milan (Italy); Amapane, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Università di Torino and INFN, Via P. Giuria 1, IT-10125 Turin (Italy); Amato, S. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528 Cidade Univ., Ilha do Fundão, BR-21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anashkin, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Padova and INFN, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35131 Padua (Italy); Andreazza, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN-Milano, Via Celoria 16, IT-20133 Milan (Italy); Andringa, S.; Anjos, N. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Antilogus, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); and others

    2014-10-07

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} has been measured for the first time, using e{sup +}e{sup −} data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √(s)=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup γ} analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  19. The HIVToolbox 2 web system integrates sequence, structure, function and mutation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available There is enormous interest in studying HIV pathogenesis for improving the treatment of patients with HIV infection. HIV infection has become one of the best-studied systems for understanding how a virus can hijack a cell. To help facilitate discovery, we previously built HIVToolbox, a web system for visual data mining. The original HIVToolbox integrated information for HIV protein sequence, structure, functional sites, and sequence conservation. This web system has been used for almost 40,000 searches. We report improvements to HIVToolbox including new functions and workflows, data updates, and updates for ease of use. HIVToolbox2, is an improvement over HIVToolbox with new functions. HIVToolbox2 has new functionalities focused on HIV pathogenesis including drug-binding sites, drug-resistance mutations, and immune epitopes. The integrated, interactive view enables visual mining to generate hypotheses that are not readily revealed by other approaches. Most HIV proteins form multimers, and there are posttranslational modification and protein-protein interaction sites at many of these multimerization interfaces. Analysis of protease drug binding sites reveals an anatomy of drug resistance with different types of drug-resistance mutations regionally localized on the surface of protease. Some of these drug-resistance mutations have a high prevalence in specific HIV-1 M subtypes. Finally, consolidation of Tat functional sites reveals a hotspot region where there appear to be 30 interactions or posttranslational modifications. A cursory analysis with HIVToolbox2 has helped to identify several global patterns for HIV proteins. An initial analysis with this tool identifies homomultimerization of almost all HIV proteins, functional sites that overlap with multimerization sites, a global drug resistance anatomy for HIV protease, and specific distributions of some DRMs in specific HIV M subtypes. HIVToolbox2 is an open-access web application available at

  20. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Alter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods: Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400-13,100] visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8% with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910-1,050] atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion: The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years.

  1. Staphylococcal Immune Evasion Proteins: Structure, Function, and Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koymans, Kirsten J; Vrieling, Manouk; Gorham, Ronald D; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a successful human and animal pathogen. Its pathogenicity is linked to its ability to secrete a large amount of virulence factors. These secreted proteins interfere with many critical components of the immune system, both innate and adaptive, and hamper proper immune functioning. In recent years, numerous studies have been conducted in order to understand the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of evasion molecules with the host immune system. Structural studies have fundamentally contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of action of the individual factors. Furthermore, such studies revealed one of the most striking characteristics of the secreted immune evasion molecules: their conserved structure. Despite high-sequence variability, most immune evasion molecules belong to a small number of structural categories. Another remarkable characteristic is that S. aureus carries most of these virulence factors on mobile genetic elements (MGE) or ex-MGE in its accessory genome. Coevolution of pathogen and host has resulted in immune evasion molecules with a highly host-specific function and prevalence. In this review, we explore how these shared structures and genomic locations relate to function and host specificity. This is discussed in the context of therapeutic options for these immune evasion molecules in infectious as well as in inflammatory diseases.

  2. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Hsp90 Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is essential in eukaryotes. It is required for the activation and stabilization of a wide variety of client proteins and many of them are involved in important cellular pathways. Since Hsp90 affects numerous physiological processes such as signal transduction, intracellular transport, and protein degradation, it became an interesting target for cancer therapy. Structurally, Hsp90 is a flexible dimeric protein composed of three different domains which adopt structurally distinct conformations. ATP binding triggers directionality in these conformational changes and leads to a more compact state. To achieve its function, Hsp90 works together with a large group of cofactors, termed co-chaperones. Co-chaperones form defined binary or ternary complexes with Hsp90, which facilitate the maturation of client proteins. In addition, posttranslational modifications of Hsp90, such as phosphorylation and acetylation, provide another level of regulation. They influence the conformational cycle, co-chaperone interaction, and inter-domain communications. In this review, we discuss the recent progress made in understanding the Hsp90 machinery.

  3. Structure, function, and control of the human musculoskeletal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Murphy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a complex organism, the gross mechanical properties of which are enabled by an interconnected musculoskeletal network controlled by the nervous system. The nature of musculoskeletal interconnection facilitates stability, voluntary movement, and robustness to injury. However, a fundamental understanding of this network and its control by neural systems has remained elusive. Here we address this gap in knowledge by utilizing medical databases and mathematical modeling to reveal the organizational structure, predicted function, and neural control of the musculoskeletal system. We constructed a highly simplified whole-body musculoskeletal network in which single muscles connect to multiple bones via both origin and insertion points. We demonstrated that, using this simplified model, a muscle's role in this network could offer a theoretical prediction of the susceptibility of surrounding components to secondary injury. Finally, we illustrated that sets of muscles cluster into network communities that mimic the organization of control modules in primary motor cortex. This novel formalism for describing interactions between the muscular and skeletal systems serves as a foundation to develop and test therapeutic responses to injury, inspiring future advances in clinical treatments.

  4. RFamide Peptides: Structure, Function, Mechanisms and Pharmaceutical Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Maria; Rathmann, Daniel; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.

    2011-01-01

    Different neuropeptides, all containing a common carboxy-terminal RFamide sequence, have been characterized as ligands of the RFamide peptide receptor family. Currently, five subgroups have been characterized with respect to their N-terminal sequence and hence cover a wide pattern of biological functions, like important neuroendocrine, behavioral, sensory and automatic functions. The RFamide peptide receptor family represents a multiligand/multireceptor system, as many ligands are recognized by several GPCR subtypes within one family. Multireceptor systems are often susceptible to cross-reactions, as their numerous ligands are frequently closely related. In this review we focus on recent results in the field of structure-activity studies as well as mutational exploration of crucial positions within this GPCR system. The review summarizes the reported peptide analogs and recently developed small molecule ligands (agonists and antagonists) to highlight the current understanding of the pharmacophoric elements, required for affinity and activity at the receptor family. Furthermore, we address the biological functions of the ligands and give an overview on their involvement in physiological processes. We provide insights in the knowledge for the design of highly selective ligands for single receptor subtypes to minimize cross-talk and to eliminate effects from interactions within the GPCR system. This will support the drug development of members of the RFamide family.

  5. RFamide Peptides: Structure, Function, Mechanisms and Pharmaceutical Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Findeisen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Different neuropeptides, all containing a common carboxy-terminal RFamide sequence, have been characterized as ligands of the RFamide peptide receptor family. Currently, five subgroups have been characterized with respect to their N-terminal sequence and hence cover a wide pattern of biological functions, like important neuroendocrine, behavioral, sensory and automatic functions. The RFamide peptide receptor family represents a multiligand/multireceptor system, as many ligands are recognized by several GPCR subtypes within one family. Multireceptor systems are often susceptible to cross-reactions, as their numerous ligands are frequently closely related. In this review we focus on recent results in the field of structure-activity studies as well as mutational exploration of crucial positions within this GPCR system. The review summarizes the reported peptide analogs and recently developed small molecule ligands (agonists and antagonists to highlight the current understanding of the pharmacophoric elements, required for affinity and activity at the receptor family. Furthermore, we address the biological functions of the ligands and give an overview on their involvement in physiological processes. We provide insights in the knowledge for the design of highly selective ligands for single receptor subtypes to minimize cross-talk and to eliminate effects from interactions within the GPCR system. This will support the drug development of members of the RFamide family.

  6. Photon structure function fit with the xFitter framework

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), is one of the main constituents of the Standard Model of elementary particle physics. Particularly interesting is the strong coupling constant αs, the only fundamental QCD parameter, which can be only determined by experimental in- vestigations. Therefore, the precise knowledge of αs has been subject of many investigations, using several different methods, like for example the Z- and τ- decays at LEP. The current world average value of αs(mZ) = 0.1172 ± 0.0020, where mZ = 91.1876 GeV denotes the mass of the Z-boson [1]. In terms of QCD, the photon offers particular interesting investigation possibilities, which can be shown by Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) of electrons and photons. Despite the assumption, that the photon is a point-like particle, hadron production can be observed. This is leading to the introduction of structure functions, as for DIS electron-nucleon scattering and can be explained by quantum fluctuations due to Hei...

  7. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody N-glycosylation - Structure, function and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymer, Florian; Beck, Hermann; Rohde, Adelheid; Reusch, Dietmar

    2018-03-01

    Therapeutic antibodies (IgG-type) contain several post-translational modifications (PTMs) whereby introducing a large heterogeneity, both structural and functional, into this class of therapeutics. Of these modifications, glycosylation in the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region is the most heterogeneous PTM, which can affect the stability of the molecule and interactions with Fc-receptors in vivo. Hence, the glycoform distribution can affect the mode of action and have implications for bioactivity, safety and efficacy of the drug. Main topics of the manuscript include: What factors influence the (Fc) glycan pattern in therapeutic antibodies and how can these glycans be characterized? How does structure of the Fc-glycan relate to function and what methods are available to characterize those functions? Although heterogeneous in their scope, the different sections are intended to combine current knowledge on structure-function correlations of IgG glycan structures with regard to Fc (effector) functions, as well as basic aspects and methodologies for their assessment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Highlighting the Structure-Function Relationship of the Brain with the Ising Model and Graph Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of neuroimaging techniques, it becomes feasible to explore the structure-function relationships in the brain. When the brain is not involved in any cognitive task or stimulated by any external output, it preserves important activities which follow well-defined spatial distribution patterns. Understanding the self-organization of the brain from its anatomical structure, it has been recently suggested to model the observed functional pattern from the structure of white matter fiber bundles. Different models which study synchronization (e.g., the Kuramoto model or global dynamics (e.g., the Ising model have shown success in capturing fundamental properties of the brain. In particular, these models can explain the competition between modularity and specialization and the need for integration in the brain. Graphing the functional and structural brain organization supports the model and can also highlight the strategy used to process and organize large amount of information traveling between the different modules. How the flow of information can be prevented or partially destroyed in pathological states, like in severe brain injured patients with disorders of consciousness or by pharmacological induction like in anaesthesia, will also help us to better understand how global or integrated behavior can emerge from local and modular interactions.

  9. Diagnostic imaging of acute aortic dissection; Evaluation of thrombosed type aortic dissection by CT and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohya, Tohru; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    One hundred and nineteen patients with aortic dissection who underwent diagnostic imaging were reviewed and angiographic findings as well as those of CT were analysed. Thirty eight cases (43.1%) had non-contrast opacified false lumen, the type of which we call 'thrombosed type aortic dissection'. A comparative study of the thrombosed type with the patent type of false lumens was made particularly from the stand point of the characteristic diagnostic imagings (CT and angiography). At the same time, the pitfalls of these imagings in thrombosed type aortic dissection were studied. At the onset the average age of thrombosed type was 62.3 years old, while that of the patent type was 57.3. A statistical significance between the two groups was p<0.05. Thrombosed type in all cases was caused by atherosclerosis, whereas patent type was caused by the Marfan's syndrome in 11 cases. Other clinical findings, such as initial symptoms and blood pressure revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Pre-contrast CT in acute thrombosed type aortic dissection showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' in 89.4%. However, in 3 cases with thrombosed type in which the pre-contrast CT showed 'hyperdense crescent sign' contrast-enhanced CT detected no clear evidence of aortic dissection in the same site. This was due to obscurity induced by contrast medium. Angiographic findings of thrombosed type were classified into 3 groups: normal type, stenosed true lumen type and ulcer-like projection type. The incidence of normal type was estimated to be 48.4%, whereas stenosed true lumen type was 24.2% and ulcer-like projection was 27.7%. The present study concluded that thrombosed type is not rare in acute aortic dissection and contrast-enhanced CT as well as pre-contrast CT, is of great value in diagnosing thrombosed type. 'Hyperdense crescent sign' in pre-contrast CT is characteristic of intramural hematoma. (author).

  10. Using systems and structure biology tools to dissect cellular phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floratos, Aris; Honig, Barry; Pe'er, Dana; Califano, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The Center for the Multiscale Analysis of Genetic Networks (MAGNet, http://magnet.c2b2.columbia.edu) was established in 2005, with the mission of providing the biomedical research community with Structural and Systems Biology algorithms and software tools for the dissection of molecular interactions and for the interaction-based elucidation of cellular phenotypes. Over the last 7 years, MAGNet investigators have developed many novel analysis methodologies, which have led to important biological discoveries, including understanding the role of the DNA shape in protein-DNA binding specificity and the discovery of genes causally related to the presentation of malignant phenotypes, including lymphoma, glioma, and melanoma. Software tools implementing these methodologies have been broadly adopted by the research community and are made freely available through geWorkbench, the Center's integrated analysis platform. Additionally, MAGNet has been instrumental in organizing and developing key conferences and meetings focused on the emerging field of systems biology and regulatory genomics, with special focus on cancer-related research.

  11. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-11-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred.

  12. Reaction of Medical Students to Experiences in Dissection Room ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The present study findings show that smell of the dissection room, touch and fear of cadaver were the commonest cause of their symptoms experienced while study in dissection room for the majority of students. Thus, instructors are should give awareness raising education before the commencement of the ...

  13. THE IMPACT OF DIAGNOSTIC DISCREPANCIES IN AORTIC DISSECTION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aortic dissection is uncommon with high mortality rate if untreated. We report a challenging case of long segment aortic dissection in which the dissection type was very difficult to identify due to limitations of the available imaging studies. 66-year-old male presented to us with 3 days history of chest pain and difficulty breathing. He is known to be hypertensive. In the emergency room, patient has systolic blood pressure >190. Chest X-ray showed widening of mediastinum. CT angiography of chest and abdomen showed an acute dissection of the thoracic aorta extending from the mid ascending aorta to the infra-renal aorta suggestive of Stanford type A aortic dissection. Transthoracic and Trans-esophageal echocardiography revealed a partially calcified intimal flap in the distal portion of the arch and in the descending thoracic aorta suggestive of Stanford type B aortic dissection. Medical treatment started, and repeated CT angiography was obtained and it confirmed type B aortic dissection. One week after discharge, patient was readmitted with severe neck pain and difficulty breathing. CT chest without contrast showed grossly stable appearance of type A dissection consistent with the first CT angiography. Cardiothoracic surgery immediately reevaluated the situation and recommended surgical intervention.

  14. Arterial occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Qing Ke; Liu, Wei Dong; Liu, Peng; Li, Xue Yuan; Zhang, Lian Qun; Ma, Long Jia; Ren, Yun Fei; Wu, Ya Ping; Wang, Zhi Gang

    2015-01-01

    Object: To explore the clinical feasibility of employing occlusion to treat basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. Methods: One patient, male and 46 years old, suffered transient numbness and weakness on the right limbs. Cerebral angiography indicated basilar artery dissecting aneurysm. The patient

  15. Intramural Esophageal Dissection after Endoscopy: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ki Tae; Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Jin Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Intramural esophageal dissection (IED) is an uncommon disorder characterized by a separation between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa with or without perforation. IED is usually related with an abrupt increase in intraesophageal pressure, history of recent instrumentation, and a coagulation disorder. We report a case of IED showing extensive dissection into the wall of the stomach, which successfully subsided by conservative treatment.

  16. CrossFit-related cervical internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Albert; Shen, Peter; Lee, Paul; Dahlin, Brian; Waldau, Ben; Nidecker, Anna E; Nundkumar, Anoop; Bobinski, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    CrossFit is a high-intensity strength and conditioning program that has gained popularity over the past decade. Potential injuries associated with CrossFit training have been suggested in past reports. We report three cases of cervical carotid dissection that are associated with CrossFit workouts. Patient 1 suffered a distal cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection near the skull base and a small infarct in Wernicke's area. He was placed on anticoagulation and on follow-up has near complete recovery. Patient 2 suffered a proximal cervical ICA dissection that led to arterial occlusion and recurrent middle cerebral artery territory infarcts and significant neurological sequelae. Patient 3 had a skull base ICA dissection that led to a partial Horner's syndrome but no cerebral infarct. While direct causality cannot be proven, intense CrossFit workouts may have led to the ICA dissections in these patients.

  17. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  18. The ratio of the beauty structure functions Rb=(FLb)/(F2b) at low x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the structure functions F k b (x,Q 2 ) (k=2,L) and the reduced cross section σ r b (x,Q 2 ) for small values of Bjorken's x variable with respect to the hard (Lipatov) pomeron for the gluon distribution and provide a compact formula for the ratio R b that is useful to extract the beauty structure function from the beauty reduced cross section, in particular at DESY HERA. Also we show that the effects of the nonlinear corrections to the gluon distribution tame the behavior of the beauty structure function and the beauty reduced cross section at low x

  19. Immunostaining of dissected zebrafish embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingchun; Xu, Xiaolei

    2012-01-10

    Zebrafish embryo becomes a popular in vivo vertebrate model for studying cardiac development and human heart diseases due to its advantageous embryology and genetics. About 100-200 embryos are readily available every week from a single pair of adult fish. The transparent embryos that develop ex utero make them ideal for assessing cardiac defects. The expression of any gene can be manipulated via morpholino technology or RNA injection. Moreover, forward genetic screens have already generated a list of mutants that affect different perspectives of cardiogenesis. Whole mount immunostaining is an important technique in this animal model to reveal the expression pattern of the targeted protein to a particular tissue. However, high resolution images that can reveal cellular or subcellular structures have been difficult, mainly due to the physical location of the heart and the poor penetration of the antibodies. Here, we present a method to address these bottlenecks by dissecting heart first and then conducting the staining process on the surface of a microscope slide. To prevent the loss of small heart samples and to facilitate solution handling, we restricted the heart samples within a circle on the surface of the microscope slides drawn by an immEdge pen. After the staining, the fluorescence signals can be directly observed by a compound microscope. Our new method significantly improves the penetration for antibodies, since a heart from an embryonic fish only consists of few cell layers. High quality images from intact hearts can be obtained within a much reduced procession time for zebrafish embryos aged from day 2 to day 6. Our method can be potentially extended to stain other organs dissected from either zebrafish or other small animals. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Visualized Experiments

  20. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  1. Structure function of off-mass-shell pions and the calculation of the Sullivan process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakin, C.M.; Sun, W.

    1994-01-01

    We construct a model for the pion (valence) structure function that fits the experimental data obtained in the study of the Drell-Yan process. The model may also be used to calculate the structure function of off-mass-shell pions. We apply our model in the study of deep-inelastic scattering from off-mass-shell pions found in the nucleon and are thus able to resolve a problem encountered in the standard analysis of such processes. The usual analysis is made using the structure function of on-mass-shell pions and requires the use of a soft πNN form factor that is inconsistent with standard nuclear physics phenomenology. The use of our off-mass-shell structure functions allows for a fit to the data for nonperturbative aspects of the nucleon ''sea'' with a pion-nucleon form factor of the standard form

  2. The spin-dependent structure function g1 of the deuteron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueltmann, S.

    1996-01-01

    Results on the spin-dependent structure function g 1 d of the deuteron measured by the Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN are presented. They are based on deep-inelastic scattering of 190 GeV polarized muons off a polarized deuteron target in the kinematic range of 0.003 ≤ x Bj ≤ 0.7 and 1 GeV 2 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 60 GeV 2 . The structure function is found to be negative for small values of x Bj , while the proton structure function g 1 p measured earlier by the SMC is positive over the whole x Bj -range. The Bjorken sum rule is in good agreement with the first moments of the structure functions, while the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule is violated by more than three standard deviations for the deuteron measurement. (author)

  3. Moments of unpolarized nucleon structure functions in chirally improved lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeckeler, Meinulf; Maurer, Thilo; Schaefer, Andreas [University of Regensburg (Germany); Lang, Christian B.; Limmer, Markus [University of Graz (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    We present our results for the lowest moments of unpolarized nucleon structure functions at leading twist. We employ lattice quantum chromodynamics using chirally improved fermions in quenched as well as dynamical simulations.

  4. An estimation of the structure function xF3 in neutrino-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Kenzaburo; Arimoto, Shinsuke; Hoshino, Shigetoshi; Itoh, Nobuhisa; Konno, Toshiharu.

    1981-01-01

    The structure function xF 3 (x, Q 2 ) in the deep-inelastic neutrino-proton scattering was estimated without differentiating with respect to Q 2 in the evolution function. At first, the moment of the non-singlet structure function xF 3 (x, Q 2 ) is defined. Then, the kernel function f(z, Q 2 ) is presented. Finally, the expression for the structure function xF 3 is given. The values of the structure function for various Q 2 are shown in five figures. A peak is seen in each figure, and the highest peak is at about Q 2 = 14GeV 2 . The analysis suggests very small value of xF 3 in small Q 2 region. The kernel function f(x/y, Q 2 ) may be interpreted as the probability of finding a quark of momentum fraction x arising from that of y is quantum chromodynamics. (Kato, T.)

  5. On the behaviour of the hadronic structure functions at x → 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, S.G.; Yesaybegyan, S.B.; Ter-Isaakyan, N.L.

    1977-01-01

    The hadronic structure functions are studied in quarkgluon model (when x=q 2 /2pq → 1, where q is the quark transferred momentum, p is the hadron momentum). For baryon octet the relations between structure functions depending on quark mass are obtained. For LAMBDA and Ψ hyperons strange quark contribution dominates at x → 1. In the case of Σ hyperons the contributions of U and S quarks are nearly of the same order. The average transverse momentum of quark with x approximately 1 turns out to be = 6 msup(2), where m is quark mass. For tne n quark bound state the behaviour of structure functions for odd n and for even n are obtained. The dependence of structure functions on the polarization of the initial particle is also analyzed. It is shown that the Λ hyperon helicity reache 3O % while for the Σ + hyperon this magnitude is equal to 15 %

  6. The photon structure function and hard scattering in two-photon reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolanoski, H.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes experimental results obtained by the CELLO, JADE, PLUTO and TASSO collaborations on the following topics: the structure function of the photon; hard scattering and jet production and exclusive hadron pair production. (orig.)

  7. IV DSA in the diagnosis and follow-up of dissection of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickx, P.; Luska, G.; Laas, J.; Haverich, A.

    1986-05-01

    Intravenous DSA was performed in 53 patients with suspected dissection of the thoracic aorta and in 13 patients following surgery for aortic dissection. In 36 patients, the suspected diagnosis could be excluded definitely and, in 14 cases out of 17, a dissection was correctly diagnosed. All 11 type B dissections were correctly diagnosed. Of six type A dissections, only three were adequately demonstrated by IV DSA. In type B dissections, IV DSA is reliable, but in type A dissection with massive aortic insufficiency or pericardial tamponade the findings are not reliable. In all 13 patients who had surgery for dissection, IV DSA proved suitable for showing the anastomosis and progress of the disease.

  8. Linear estimates of structure functions from deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering data. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikeev, V.B.; Zhigunov, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper concerns the linear estimation of structure functions from muon(electron)-nucleon scattering. The expressions obtained for the structure functions estimate provide correct analysis of the random error and the bias The bias arises because of the finite number of experimental data and the finite resolution of experiment. The approach suggested may become useful for data handling from experiments at HERA. 9 refs

  9. Structure functions of the deuteron with allowance for meson exchange currents within QCD-VMD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The deuteron structure functions A(q 2 ), B(q 2 ) and tensor polarization T 20 (q 2 ) are studied within the QCD-VMD model. It is shown that the calculation of the structure functions with allowance for meson exchange currents does not allow us to improve the agreement with experiment at large transfer momenta where probably other degrees of freedom are to be taken into account. 24 refs.; 6 figs

  10. Structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, Markus H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experiments at RHIC and theoretical considerations indicate that the quark-gluon plasma, present in the fireball of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, might be in a liquid phase. The liquid state can be identified by characteristic correlation and structure functions. Here definitions of the structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma are presented as well as perturbative results. These definitions might be useful for verifying the quark-gluon-plasma liquid in QCD lattice calculations

  11. Regge behaviour of structure function and gluon distribution at low-x in leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a method to find the gluon distribution from the F 2 proton structure function data at low-x assuming the Regge behaviour of the gluon distribution function at this limit. We use the leading order (LO) Altarelli-Parisi (AP) evolution equation in our analysis and compare our result with those of other authors. We also discuss the limitations of the Taylor expansion method in extracting the gluon distribution from the F 2 structure function used by those authors. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of the spin dependent structure functions of proton and neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rith, K.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results from the EMC experiment on the spin dependent structure function g 1 p (x) of the proton are discussed. They suggest that the nucleon spin does not originate from quark spins but rather from angular orbital momentum and gluon contributions. A proposed experiment at HERA is presented which will allow a very accurate measurement of the spin dependent structure functions and their integrals of both proton and neutron and a precise test of the Bjorken sum rule. (orig.)

  13. A next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the spin structure function $g_1$

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067425; Arik, E; Badelek, B; Bardin, G; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; Birsa, R; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bravar, A; Bressan, A; Bültmann, S; Burtin, E; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Deshpande, A A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; von Goeler, E; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Kessler, H J; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Krämer, Dietrich; Krivokhizhin, V G; Kröger, W; Kukhtin, V V; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Marie, F; Martin, A; Martino, J; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Moromisato, J H; Nassalski, J P; Naumann, Lutz; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Ozben, C; Pereira, H; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Piegia, R; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Rijllart, A; Reicherz, G; Roberts, J; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sabo, I; Saborido, J; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Szleper, M; Tessarotto, F; Thers, D; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Willumeit, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K; Zhao, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the presently available data on the spin structure function $g_1$ including the final data from the Spin Muon Collaboration (SMC). We present resu lts for the first moments of the proton, deuteron and neutron structure functions, and determine singlet and non-singlet parton distributions in two factorization schemes. We also test the Bjor ken sum rule and find agreement with the theoretical prediction at the level of 10\\%.

  14. The pion structure function and scale breaking in Drell-Yan processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.

    1979-01-01

    By use of the formalism of QCD, the structure functions of the nucleon and the pion obtained at Q 2 = m 2 sub(psi) is extended to higher values of Q 2 . These structure functions are then used to obtain predictions of scale-breaking effects in Drell-Yan lepton-pair production for both nucleon-nucleon and pion-nucleon cases. A comparison with recent experimental data is also presented. (author)

  15. Nuclear effects in the F3 structure function for finite and asymptotic Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the structure function F 3 which describes the parity violating part of the charged-current neutrino nucleon deep inelastic scattering. Starting from a covariant approach we derive a factorized expression for the nuclear structure function in terms of the nuclear spectral function and off-shell nucleon structure functions valid for arbitrary momentum transfer Q and in the limit of weak nuclear binding, i.e. when a nucleus can be treated as a non-relativistic system. We develop a systematic expansion of nuclear structure functions in terms of a Q -2 series caused by nuclear effects (''nuclear twist'' series). Basing ourselves on this expansion we calculate nuclear corrections to the Gross-Llewellyn-Smith sum rule as well as to higher moments of F 3 . We show that corrections to the GLS sum rule due to nuclear effects cancel out in the Bjorken limit and calculate the corresponding Q -2 correction. Special attention is paid to the discussion of the off-shell effects in the structure functions. A sizable impact of these effects both on the Q 2 and x dependence of nuclear structure functions is found. (orig.)

  16. Pulmonary artery dissection in eight dogs with patent ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scansen, Brian A; Simpson, Elaine M; López-Alvarez, Jordi; Thomas, William P; Bright, Janice M; Eason, Bryan D; Rush, John E; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna; Green, Henry W; Cunningham, Suzanne M; Visser, Lance C; Kent, Agnieszka M; Schober, Karsten E

    2015-06-01

    To describe a series of dogs with pulmonary artery dissection and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Eight dogs. Retrospective case series. Pulmonary artery dissection was diagnosed in 8 dogs, 3 were Weimaraners. Four dogs presented in left-sided congestive heart failure, 4 presented for murmur evaluation and without clinical signs, and 1 presented in right-sided congestive heart failure. In 7 dogs the dissection was first documented concurrent with a diagnosis of uncorrected PDA. In the other dog, with pulmonary valve stenosis and PDA, the dissection was observed on autopsy examination 17 months after balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty and ductal closure. Median age at presentation for the 7 dogs with antemortem diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was 3.5 years (range, 1.5-4 years). Three dogs had the PDA surgically ligated, 2 dogs did not undergo PDA closure, 1 dog failed transcatheter occlusion of the PDA with subsequent surgical ligation, 1 dog underwent successful transcatheter device occlusion of the PDA, and 1 dog had the PDA closed by transcatheter coil delivery 17 months prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection. The 2 dogs that did not have the PDA closed died 1 and 3 years after diagnosis due to heart failure. Pulmonary artery dissection is a potential complication of PDA in dogs, the Weimaraner breed may be at increased risk, presentation is often in mature dogs, and closure of the PDA can be performed and appears to improve outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of patients with dysphasia after a neck dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Junkichi

    2007-01-01

    The most useful modality for treating neck metastasis is a neck dissection. A neck dissection was previously performed as a radical neck dissection. However, disabilities in shoulder movement and swallowing function often occur after this procedure. Recently, a functional neck dissection has therefore been performed in order to avoid such postoperative complications. The current study for dysphasia after a neck dissection investigates patients with primary unknown neck metastasis and neck recurrence after chemoradiation. Eleven cases of dysphasia occurred after a neck dissection between 2003 and 2006. These cases resected the lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XII), or paralysis of these nerves occurred despite their preservation after surgery. Patients with dysphasia underwent rehabilitation to regain their swallowing function. However, rehabilitation was unsuccessful and the patients were thus required to undergo further surgery. A neck dissection with resection of the lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XII) may sometimes result in dysphasia. Consequently, surgery to prevent dysphasia should be performed simultaneously so that timely postoperative therapy can be carried out. (author)

  18. Neurorehabilitation in stroke produced by vertebral artery dissection: case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanescu Ioana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Arterial dissections are a common cause of stroke in the young (mean age 44 to 46 years. Primary lesion is a tear of the arterial intima, which promotes platelet aggregation, thrombus formation, which further produced vessel stenosis / occlusion, distal embolism or vessel wall rupture. Vertebral artery (VA dissection appear most commonly in extracranial segments V2 and V3, and could be spontaneous (with underlying predispositions or triggered by various traumatisms. Clinicaly, VA dissection produces an ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack , preceded by local symptoms such as neck pain or headache. The diagnosis is confirmed by neurovascular imaging. Treatment of symptomatic VA dissections respect indications of treatment in ischemic strokes. Prognosis is mostly favorable in extracranial dissections. We present the case of a left VA dissection in V2 segment, produced by physical effort (swimming, which causes 2 ischemic lesions, one in the territory of the left posterior cerebral artery and the other in the territory of the left posterolateral chorroidal artery. Patient’s treatment included antiplatelet agents, statines, and an adapted physical rehabilitation program. At three months he showed significant clinical improvement with regain of autonomy and partial recanalisation at angio-MRI of the V2 segment of the dissected artery.

  19. Understanding the Structure-Function Relationships of Dendrimers in Environmental and Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    We are living an era wherein nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied in our lives. Dendrimers are special polymeric NPs with unique physiochemical properties, which have been intensely explored for a variety of applications. Current studies on dendrimers are bottlenecked by insufficient understandings of their structure and dynamic behaviors from a molecular level. With primarily computational approaches supplemented by many other experimental technics, this dissertation aims to establish structure-function relationships of dendrimers in environmental and biomedical applications. More specifically, it thoroughly investigates the interactions between dendrimers and different biomolecules including carbon-based NPs, metal-based NPs, and proteins/peptides. Those results not only provide profound knowledge for evaluating the impacts of dendrimers on environmental and biological systems but also facilitate designing next-generation functional polymeric nanomaterials. The dissertation is organized as following. Chapter 1 provides an overview of current progresses on dendrimer studies, where methodology of Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD), my major research tool, is also introduced. Two directions of utilizing dendrimers will be discussed in following chapters. Chapter 2 will focus on environmental applications of dendrimers, where two back-to-back studies are presented. I will start from describing some interesting observations from experiments i.e. dendrimers dispersed model oil molecules. Then, I will reveal why surface chemistries of dendrimers lead to different remediation efficiencies by computational modelings. Finally, I will demonstrate different scenarios of dendrimer-small molecules association. Chapter 3 is centered on dendrimers in the biomedical applications including two subtopics. In the first topic, we will discuss dendrimers as surfactants that modulating the interactions between proteins and NPs. Some fundamental concepts regarding to NPs

  20. Pulmonary Artery Dissection: A Fatal Complication of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare but it is a really life-threatening condition when it happens. Most patients die suddenly from major bleeding or tamponade caused by direct rupture into mediastinum or retrograde into the pericardial sac. What we are reporting is a rare case of a 46-year-old female patient whose pulmonary artery dissection involves both the pulmonary valve and right pulmonary artery. The patient had acute chest pain and severe dyspnea, and the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was confirmed by ultrasonography and CT angiography. Moreover, its etiology, clinical manifestations, and management are also discussed in this article.

  1. Pseudo-dissection of ascending aorta in inferior myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahame K. Goode

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute aortic dissection is a cardiac emergency which can present as inferior myocardial infarction. It has high morbidity and mortality requiring prompt diagnosis and treatment. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging modalities have facilitated the early diagnosis of this condition and in ruling out this potentially catastrophic illness. We report an interesting case of a 57 year- old -man who presented with inferior myocardial infarction requiring thrombolysis and temporary pacing wire for complete heart block. An echocardiogram was highly suspicious of aortic dissection. CT scan confirmed that the malposition of the temporary pacing wire through the aorta mimicked aortic dissection.

  2. Selective neck dissection: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagedar, Nitin A; Gilbert, Ralph W

    2009-01-01

    The management of regional metastatic disease in patients with oral cancer is a topic of controversy. Comprehensive neck dissection has been the mainstay of treatment historically, but clinicians have sought alternatives to limit the morbidity of the classic radical neck dissection. This article will review evidence on the applicability of selective neck dissection in two settings: as primary treatment of the clinically positive neck and as salvage treatment of recurrent neck disease after radiotherapy. In the text, for each article cited we supply the level of evidence thereof according to the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based medicine.

  3. Temporal bone dissection simulator for training pediatric otolaryngology surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Pooneh R.; Sang, Hongqiang; Talari, Hadi F.; Preciado, Diego; Monfaredi, Reza; Reilly, Brian; Arikatla, Sreekanth; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cleary, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    Cochlear implantation is the standard of care for infants born with severe hearing loss. Current guidelines approve the surgical placement of implants as early as 12 months of age. Implantation at a younger age poses a greater surgical challenge since the underdeveloped mastoid tip, along with thin calvarial bone, creates less room for surgical navigation and can result in increased surgical risk. We have been developing a temporal bone dissection simulator based on actual clinical cases for training otolaryngology fellows in this delicate procedure. The simulator system is based on pre-procedure CT (Computed Tomography) images from pediatric infant cases (hospital. The simulator includes: (1) simulation engine to provide the virtual reality of the temporal bone surgery environment, (2) a newly developed haptic interface for holding the surgical drill, (3) an Oculus Rift to provide a microscopic-like view of the temporal bone surgery, and (4) user interface to interact with the simulator through the Oculus Rift and the haptic device. To evaluate the system, we have collected 10 representative CT data sets and segmented the key structures: cochlea, round window, facial nerve, and ossicles. The simulator will present these key structures to the user and warn the user if needed by continuously calculating the distances between the tip of surgical drill and the key structures.

  4. A Genetic Toolkit for Dissecting Dopamine Circuit Function in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The neuromodulator dopamine (DA plays a key role in motor control, motivated behaviors, and higher-order cognitive processes. Dissecting how these DA neural networks tune the activity of local neural circuits to regulate behavior requires tools for manipulating small groups of DA neurons. To address this need, we assembled a genetic toolkit that allows for an exquisite level of control over the DA neural network in Drosophila. To further refine targeting of specific DA neurons, we also created reagents that allow for the conversion of any existing GAL4 line into Split GAL4 or GAL80 lines. We demonstrated how this toolkit can be used with recently developed computational methods to rapidly generate additional reagents for manipulating small subsets or individual DA neurons. Finally, we used the toolkit to reveal a dynamic interaction between a small subset of DA neurons and rearing conditions in a social space behavioral assay. : The rapid analysis of how dopaminergic circuits regulate behavior is limited by the genetic tools available to target and manipulate small numbers of these neurons. Xie et al. present genetic tools in Drosophila that allow rational targeting of sparse dopaminergic neuronal subsets and selective knockdown of dopamine signaling. Keywords: dopamine, genetics, behavior, neural circuits, neuromodulation, Drosophila

  5. Dissection of combinatorial control by the Met4 transcriptional complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Traci A; Jorgensen, Paul; Bognar, Andrew L; Peyraud, Caroline; Thomas, Dominique; Tyers, Mike

    2010-02-01

    Met4 is the transcriptional activator of the sulfur metabolic network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Lacking DNA-binding ability, Met4 must interact with proteins called Met4 cofactors to target promoters for transcription. Two types of DNA-binding cofactors (Cbf1 and Met31/Met32) recruit Met4 to promoters and one cofactor (Met28) stabilizes the DNA-bound Met4 complexes. To dissect this combinatorial system, we systematically deleted each category of cofactor(s) and analyzed Met4-activated transcription on a genome-wide scale. We defined a core regulon for Met4, consisting of 45 target genes. Deletion of both Met31 and Met32 eliminated activation of the core regulon, whereas loss of Met28 or Cbf1 interfered with only a subset of targets that map to distinct sectors of the sulfur metabolic network. These transcriptional dependencies roughly correlated with the presence of Cbf1 promoter motifs. Quantitative analysis of in vivo promoter binding properties indicated varying levels of cooperativity and interdependency exists between members of this combinatorial system. Cbf1 was the only cofactor to remain fully bound to target promoters under all conditions, whereas other factors exhibited different degrees of regulated binding in a promoter-specific fashion. Taken together, Met4 cofactors use a variety of mechanisms to allow differential transcription of target genes in response to various cues.

  6. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanshu Jain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs. SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed.

  7. Dissecting the risky-choice framing effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Peters

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using five variants of the Asian Disease Problem, we dissected the risky-choice framing effect by requiring each participant to provide preference ratings for the full decision problem and also to provide attractiveness ratings for each of the component parts, i.e., the sure-thing option and the risky option. Consistent with previous research, more risky choices were made by respondents receiving negatively framed versions of the decision problems than by those receiving positively framed versions. However, different processes were evident for those scoring high and low on numeracy. Whereas the choices of the less numerate showed a large effect of frame above and beyond any influence of their evaluations of the separate options, the choices of the highly numerate were almost completely accounted for by their attractiveness ratings of the separate options. These results are consistent with an increased tendency of the highly numerate to integrate complex numeric information in the construction of their preferences and a tendency for the less numerate to respond more superficially to non-numeric sources of information.

  8. The ratio of structure functions for the neutron and the proton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballintijn, M.K.

    1994-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the ratio of the structure functions F 2 of the deuteron and the proton. The structure function ratio is measured by the NMC with high precision due to a dedicated target setup. In this thesis the analysis is presented of the data taken in 1989, which were obtained using incident muon energies of 120, 200 and 280 GeV. These data complement the results from earlier measurements performed in 1986 and 1987 which were obtained at 90 and 280 GeV incident muon energy. The newly determined structure function ratio, in a slightly extended range of the scaling parameter x, is compared to the previous one and is found to be in good agreement. All data are combined to give the most accurate determination of the structure function ratio to date. The results are used to determine the dependence of the structure function ratio on the value of Q 2 , the scale at which the nucleon is probed. Finally, the structure function ratios obtained at four different incident muon energies separately, are used to determine the difference R d -R p , where R is the ratio of cross sections for the absorption of longitudinally and transversely polarized virtual photons. The difference in R for the deuteron and the proton is related to differences in the gluon distribution. The result is compatible with a gluon distribution that is identical for the deuteron and the proton. The degree of equality of R d and R p is a measure for the correctness of the procedure to extract structure function ratios. The present result is R d -R p =0.02±0.02 and hence compatible with zero. (orig.)

  9. Measurement of the Hadronic Photon Structure Function at LEP 1 for $Q^{2}$ Values between 9.9 and 284 $GeV^{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Riu, I; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Spagnolo, P; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Prange, G; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    1999-01-01

    Inclusive gamma * gamma interactions to hadronic final states where one scattered electron or positron is detected in the electromagnetic calorimeters have been studied in the LEP 1 data taken by ALEPH from 1991 to 1995. The event sample has been used to measure the hadronic structure function of the photon F/sub 2//sup gamma / in three bins with of 9.9, 20.7 and 284 GeV/sup 2/. (31 refs).

  10. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor prote... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 recep

  11. [Thoracic aortic dissection revealed by systemic cholesterol embolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, L; Paule, P; Héno, P; Morand, J J; Mafart, B; La Folie, T; Varlet, P; Mioulet, D; Fourcade, L

    2006-10-01

    Systemic cholesterol embolism is a rare complication of atherosclerosis, and has various presentations. Arterial catheterisms are a common cause. However, the association with an aortic dissection has been exceptionally reported. We report the observation of a 70 year-old man, with coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Six months before hospitalization, a coronary angioplasty was performed due to recurrent angina. The association of purpuric lesions on the feet, with acute renal failure confirmed cholesterol embolism syndrome. Transoesophageal echocardiography showed a dissection of the descending thoracic aorta associated with complex atheroma. The evolution was marked by the pulpar necrosis of a toe and by a worsening of the renal failure, requiring definitive hemodialysis. Further echographic control highlighted the rupture of the intimal veil of the dissection. Cholesterol embolism syndrome may reveal an aortic dissection in patients without thoracic symptoms. In such cases, transoesophageal echocardiography is a useful and non-invasive examination.

  12. Perception to Cadaver Dissection and Views on Anatomy as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, literature on medical students' perceptions on cadaver dissection and their ... Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at the new school of Medicine, Kenya ... training and counseling to make the experience better for students.

  13. An interesting case report of vertebral artery dissection following polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Acharya

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our report displays select images related to this case report and emphasizes the consideration of routine imaging in head and neck traumatic injuries to diagnose internal carotid and/or vertebral artery dissections much earlier.

  14. An unusual case of uterine cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma with adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ai; Tanaka, Hoshihito; Iwasaki, Sari; Wakui, Yukio; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-08-04

    Cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma is a rare variant of uterine smooth muscle tumor with an unusual growth pattern that shows intramural dissection within uterine myometrium and often a placenta-like appearance in its extrauterine components. We present a unique case of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma with adenomyosis. A 40-year-old Japanese female presented with prolonged menorrhagia and severe anemia. She had a pelvic mass followed-up for 6 years with a diagnosis of leiomyoma. However, increase in tumor size and cystic changes with hemorrhage were found by magnetic resonance imaging, and total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingectomy was performed. Macroscopically, the placenta-like exophytic mass protruding from the posterior uterine wall was composed of multiple nodules containing numerous hemorrhagic cysts. The mass showed continuity as a white multinodular dissecting mass infiltrating the posterolateral myometrium. Microscopically, both extra-and intrauterine portions of the mass were composed of nodules that contained swirled neoplastic smooth muscle cells with marked hyalinized degeneration, as observed in cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyomas of conventional type. In addition, numerous non-neoplastic glands of endometrial type surrounded by abundant endometrium-like stromal cells and non-neoplastic smooth muscle cells were found in the tumor, suggesting that it involved a part of concomitant adenomyosis originating from the nontumoral myometrium. Thus far, over 30 cases of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma have been reported, none of which have described the presence of adenomyosis within the tumor. The present case suggested that cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma might have a unique clinical presentation involving concomitant uterine adenomyosis. It is critical for pathologists, gynecologists, and radiologists to be cognizant of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma variants for timely and appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Spontaneous carotid artery dissection causing a juvenile cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Huebsch, P.; Schindler, E.

    1988-01-01

    The case of a 19-year-old patient is presented who was admitted with aphasia and hemiparesis due to basal ganglia infarction as a result of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery. The difficulties in diagnosing this disease with CT and MRI in the acute stage are demonstrated. Angiography is still imperative in order to ascertain that a carotid dissection has occurred. (orig.) [de

  16. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz Kamacı Şener; Özlem Taşkapılıoğlu; Nermin Kelebek Girgin; Bahattin Hakyemez; Mustafa Bakar; Yakup Tomak

    2012-01-01

    Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  17. Cerebral Ischemia Due to Traumatic Carotid Artery Dissection: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Kamacı Şener

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blunt injury to the neck region may lead to carotid artery dissection and cerebral ischemia. Blunt injury to carotid artery is not frequent but determination of the presence of trauma in the history of stroke patients will provide early diagnosis and treatment of them. In this article, a case with cerebral ischemia resulting from traumatic carotid artery dissection is presented and clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and choice of treatment are discussed in the light of the literature.

  18. Descending thoracic aorta dissection associated with esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of aortic dissection with a malignancy is a rare finding and previous reports are usually those of primary aortic sarcomas. A 45-year-old male presented to us with chest pain and dysphagia for 1 month with a background history of obstructive airway disease and uncontrolled hypertension. In this report we present a case of typical descending aorta dissection with associated esophageal carcinoma.

  19. False coronary dissection with the new Monorail angioplasty balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, E; Cequier, A R; Sabaté, X; Jara, F

    1990-01-01

    During percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, the appearance of persistent staining in the vessel by contrast media suggests coronary dissection. We report seven patients in whom a false image of severe coronary dissection was observed during angioplasty performed with the new Monorail balloon catheter. This image emerges at the moment of balloon inflation, is distally located to the balloon, and disappears with balloon catheter deflation. No complications were associated with the appearance of this image.

  20. Signatures of non-universal large scales in conditional structure functions from various turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, Daniel B; Voth, Greg A; Bewley, Gregory P; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gibert, Mathieu; Xu Haitao; Gylfason, Ármann; Mydlarski, Laurent; Yeung, P K

    2011-01-01

    We present a systematic comparison of conditional structure functions in nine turbulent flows. The flows studied include forced isotropic turbulence simulated on a periodic domain, passive grid wind tunnel turbulence in air and in pressurized SF 6 , active grid wind tunnel turbulence (in both synchronous and random driving modes), the flow between counter-rotating discs, oscillating grid turbulence and the flow in the Lagrangian exploration module (in both constant and random driving modes). We compare longitudinal Eulerian second-order structure functions conditioned on the instantaneous large-scale velocity in each flow to assess the ways in which the large scales affect the small scales in a variety of turbulent flows. Structure functions are shown to have larger values when the large-scale velocity significantly deviates from the mean in most flows, suggesting that dependence on the large scales is typical in many turbulent flows. The effects of the large-scale velocity on the structure functions can be quite strong, with the structure function varying by up to a factor of 2 when the large-scale velocity deviates from the mean by ±2 standard deviations. In several flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are similar at all the length scales we measured, indicating that the large-scale effects are scale independent. In a few flows, the effects of the large-scale velocity are larger on the smallest length scales. (paper)

  1. Gluon structure function of a color dipole in the light-cone limit of lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruenewald, D.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Pirner, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the gluon structure function of a color dipole in near-light-cone SU(2) lattice QCD as a function of x B . The quark and antiquark are external nondynamical degrees of freedom which act as sources of the gluon string configuration defining the dipole. We compute the color dipole matrix element of transversal chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic field operators separated along a direction close to the light cone, the Fourier transform of which is the gluon structure function. As vacuum state in the pure glue sector, we use a variational ground state of the near-light-cone Hamiltonian. We derive a recursion relation for the gluon structure function on the lattice similar to the perturbative Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation. It depends on the number of transversal links assembling the Schwinger string of the dipole. Fixing the mean momentum fraction of the gluons to the 'experimental value' in a proton, we compare our gluon structure function for a dipole state with four links with the next-to-leading-order MRST 2002 and the CTEQ AB-0 parametrizations at Q 2 =1.5 GeV 2 . Within the systematic uncertainty we find rather good agreement. We also discuss the low x B behavior of the gluon structure function in our model calculation.

  2. Effective field theory approach to structure functions at small xBj

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtmann, O.

    2003-01-01

    We relate the structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering to current-current correlation functions in a Euclidean field theory depending on a parameter r. The r-dependent Hamiltonian of the theory is P 0 -(1-r)P 3 , with P 0 the usual Hamiltonian and P 3 the third component of the momentum operator. We show that a small x Bj in the structure functions corresponds to the small r limit of the effective theory. We argue that for r→0 there is a critical regime of the theory where simple scaling relations should hold. We show that in this framework Regge behaviour of the structure functions obtained with the hard pomeron ansatz corresponds to a scaling behaviour of the matrix elements in the effective theory where the intercept of the hard pomeron appears as a critical index. Explicit expressions for various analytic continuations of the structure functions and matrix elements are given as well as path integral representations for the matrix elements in the effective theory. Our aim is to provide a framework for truly non-perturbative calculations of the structure functions at small x Bj for arbitrary Q 2 . (orig.)

  3. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in decaying nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Imtiaz; Lu Zhi-Ming; Liu Yu-Lu

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise evolution of longitudinal and transverse velocity structure functions in a decaying homogeneous and nearly isotropic turbulence is reported for Reynolds numbers Re λ up to 720. First, two theoretical relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are examined in the light of recently derived relations and the results show that the low-order transverse structure functions can be well approximated by longitudinal ones within the sub-inertial range. Reconstruction of fourth-order transverse structure functions with a recently proposed relation by Grauer et al. is comparatively less valid than the relation already proposed by Antonia et al. Secondly, extended self-similarity methods are used to measure the scaling exponents up to order eight and the streamwise evolution of scaling exponents is explored. The scaling exponents of longitudinal structure functions are, at first location, close to Zybin's model, and at the fourth location, close to She—Leveque model. No obvious trend is found for the streamwise evolution of longitudinal scaling exponents, whereas, on the contrary, transverse scaling exponents become slightly smaller with the development of a steamwise direction. Finally, the stremwise variation of the order-dependent isotropy ratio indicates the turbulence at the last location is closer to isotropic than the other three locations. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  4. Intraoperative monitoring of marginal mandibular nerve during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirelli, Giancarlo; Bergamini, Pier Riccardo; Scardoni, Alessandro; Gatto, Annalisa; Boscolo Nata, Francesca; Marcuzzo, Alberto Vito

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of intraoperative nerve integrity monitoring (NIM) to prevent marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. This prospective study compared 36 patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection from July 2014 to March 2015 to a cohort of 35 patients subjected to neck dissection over an identical period of time before the technique was introduced. We also assessed possible correlations between marginal mandibular nerve injuries and other factors, such as anthropometric measurements, presence of clinical neck metastases, type of neck dissection, and site of primary tumor. The incidence of marginal mandibular nerve paralyses was significantly lower among the group of patients undergoing NIM-assisted neck dissection (P = .021). There was no significant difference in the duration of the procedure, and the technique resulted in a limited increase of cost. No other factor seemed to influence the onset of marginal mandibular nerve palsy. In our opinion, NIM is a valuable aid for preventing marginal mandibular nerve injuries during neck dissection. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The outcome of laparoscopic cholecystectomy by ultrasonic dissection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sasi, Walid

    2010-04-01

    Electrocautery remains the main energy form used for dissection in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. However, due to its many risks the search continues for safer and more efficient forms of energy. This chapter assesses the outcomes of dissection using ultrasonic energy as compared to monopolar electrocautery during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Studies included are trials of prospectively randomized adult patients with symptomatic gallstone disease subject either ultrasonic or monopolar electrocautery dissection during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Seven trials were included in this review, with a total patient number of 695 randomized to two dissection methods: 340 in the electrocautery group and 355 in the ultrasonic group. Ultrasonic dissection is shown to be superior to monopolar electrocautery in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Disadvantages include a difficult maneuvering technique and overall cost. Appropriate training programs may be implemented to overcome the first disadvantage, and it might be argued that given the combined cost of factors associated with standard clip and cautery technique, cost issues may be outweighed by the benefits of ultrasonic dissection. However, this necessitates further cost-benefit analysis.

  6. Rare Presentation of Left Lower Lobe Pulmonary Artery Dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Hako

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary arterial dissection with chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension as its major cause is a very rare but life-threatening condition. In most cases the main pulmonary trunk is the affected site usually without involvement of its branches. Segmental or lobar pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare. Case Presentation. We report a unique case of left lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection in a 70-year-old male, with confirmed chronic pulmonary hypertension. To confirm dissection MDCT pulmonary angiography was used. Multiplanar reformation (MPR images in sagittal, coronal, oblique sagittal, and curved projections were generated. This case report presents morphologic CT features of rare chronic left lobar pulmonary artery dissection associated with chronic pulmonary hypertension at a place of localised pulmonary artery calcification. CT pulmonary angiography excluded signs of thromboembolism and potential motion or flow artefacts. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, no case of lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection with flap calcification has been reported yet. CT imaging of the chest is a key diagnostic tool that is able to detect an intimal flap and a false lumen within the pulmonary arterial tree and is preferred in differential diagnosis of rare complications of sustained pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  7. Symptomatic isolated middle cerebral artery dissection: High resolution MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byon, Jung Hee; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To perform high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) and determine clinical features of patients with acute symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) dissection. Thirteen patients with acute symptomatic MCA dissection underwent HRMRI within 3 days after initial clinical onset. They also underwent routine brain MR imaging. HRMRI examinations included time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA), T2-weighted, T1-weighted, proton-density-weighted, and three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences. Conventional angiography and MRA were used as reference standard to establish the diagnosis of MCA dissection. The angiographic findings and HRMRI findings such as intimal flap, double lumen, and intramural hematoma were analyzed in this study. All patients presented cerebral ischemia (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score = 4, range = 0-18). String sign was seen on MRA in seven patients. However, double lumen was seen in all patients on HRMRI by intimal flap. High signal lesion on MPRAGE sequences around the dissection lumen due to intramural hematoma was seen in three patients. HRMRI can be used to easily detect the wall structure of MCA such as the intimal flap and double lumen in patients with acute symptomatic MCA dissection. MPRAGE can detect hemorrhage in false lumen of MCA dissection.

  8. Silent Aortic Dissection Presenting as Transient Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadour, Wadih; Goldwasser, Brian; Biederman, Robert W.; Taffe, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency. Without prompt recognition and treatment, the mortality rate is high. An atypical presentation makes timely diagnosis difficult, especially if the patient is experiencing no characteristic pain. Many patients with aortic dissection are reported to have presented with various neurologic manifestations, but none with only a presentation of transient locked-in syndrome. Herein, we report a case of completely painless aortic dissection in a woman who presented with a transient episode of anarthria, quadriplegia, and preserved consciousness. On physical examination, she had a 40-point difference in blood pressure between her left and right arms, and a loud diastolic murmur. The diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was reached via a combination of radiography, computed tomography, echocardiography, and a high index of clinical suspicion. The patient underwent emergency surgery and ultimately experienced a successful outcome. To our knowledge, this is the 1st report of aortic dissection that presented solely as locked-in syndrome. We suggest that silent aortic dissection be added to the differential diagnosis for transient locked-in syndrome. PMID:18941610

  9. Consumption coagulopathy in acute aortic dissection: principles of management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuyong; Han, Lu; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Zhang, Hongjia; Guan, Xinliang

    2017-06-12

    The effect of acute aortic dissection itself on coagulopathy or surgery-related coagulopathy has never been specifically studied. The aim of the present study was to perioperatively describe consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection. Sixty-six patients with acute type A aortic dissection were enrolled in this study from January 2015 to September 2016. Thirty-six patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms were used as a control group during the same period. Consumption coagulopathy was evaluated using standard laboratory tests, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy at five perioperative time-points. A significant reduction in clotting factors and fibrinogen was observed at the onset of acute aortic dissection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and thromboelastograghy also revealed a persistent systemic activation of the coagulation system and the consumption of clotting factors. In contrast, although platelet counts were consistently low, we did not find that platelet function was more impaired in the acute aortic dissection group than the control group. After surgery, clotting factors and fibrinogen were more impaired than platelet function. Thus, we proposed that hemostatic therapy should focus on the rapid and sufficient supplementation of clotting factors and fibrinogen to improve consumption coagulopathy in patients with acute aortic dissection.

  10. The structure function of the death domain of human IRAK-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangfeng; Nicolaes, Gerry Af; Kruijswijk, Danielle; Versloot, Miranda; van der Poll, Tom; van 't Veer, Cornelis

    2014-12-07

    IRAK-M is an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor signaling that acts by re-directing IRAK-4 activity to TAK1 independent NF-κB activation and by inhibition of IRAK-1/IRAK-2 activity. IRAK-M is expressed in monocytes/macrophages and lung epithelial cells. Lack of IRAK-M in mice greatly improves the resistance to nosocomial pneumonia and lung tumors, which entices IRAK-M as a potential therapeutic target. IRAK-M consists of an N-terminal death domain (DD), a dysfunctional kinase domain and unstructured C-terminal domain. Little is known however on IRAK-M's structure-function relationships. Since death domains provide the important interactions of IRAK-1, IRAK-2 and IRAK-4 molecules, we generated a 3D structure model of the human IRAK-M-DD (residues C5-G119) to guide mutagenesis studies and predict protein-protein interaction points. First we identified the DD residues involved in the endogenous capacity of IRAK-M to activate NF-κB that is displayed upon overexpression in 293T cells. W74 and R97, at distinct interfaces of the IRAK-M-DD, were crucial for this endogenous NF-κB activating capacity, as well as the C-terminal domain (S445-E596) of IRAK-M. Resulting anti-inflammatory A20 and pro-inflammatory IL-8 transcription in 293T cells was W74 dependent, while IL-8 protein expression was dependent on R97 and the TRAF6 binding motif at P478. The IRAK-M-DD W74 and R97 binding interfaces are predicted to interact with opposite sides of IRAK-4-DD's. Secondly we identified DD residues important for the inhibitory action of IRAK-M by stable overexpression of mutants in THP-1 macrophages and H292 lung epithelial cells. IRAK-M inhibited TLR2/4-mediated cytokine production in macrophages in a manner that is largely dependent on W74. R97 was not involved in inhibition of TNF production but was engaged in IL-6 down-regulation by IRAK-M. Protein-interactive residues D19-A23, located in between W74 and R97, were also observed to be crucial for inhibition of TLR2/4 mediated cytokine

  11. Anatomical pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging segmentation for regional structure-function measurements of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Svenningsen, S.; Eddy, R. L.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Sheikh, K. [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada); Fenster, A.; Parraga, G., E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) and x-ray computed-tomography have provided strong evidence of spatially and temporally persistent lung structure-function abnormalities in asthmatics. This has generated a shift in their understanding of lung disease and supports the use of imaging biomarkers as intermediate endpoints of asthma severity and control. In particular, pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI can be used to provide quantitative lung structure-function measurements longitudinally and in response to treatment. However, to translate such biomarkers of asthma, robust methods are required to segment the lung from pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI. Therefore, their objective was to develop a pulmonary {sup 1}H MRI segmentation algorithm to provide regional measurements with the precision and speed required to support clinical studies. Methods: The authors developed a method to segment the left and right lung from {sup 1}H MRI acquired in 20 asthmatics including five well-controlled and 15 severe poorly controlled participants who provided written informed consent to a study protocol approved by Health Canada. Same-day spirometry and plethysmography measurements of lung function and volume were acquired as well as {sup 1}H MRI using a whole-body radiofrequency coil and fast spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence at a fixed lung volume (functional residual capacity + 1 l). We incorporated the left-to-right lung volume proportion prior based on the Potts model and derived a volume-proportion preserved Potts model, which was approximated through convex relaxation and further represented by a dual volume-proportion preserved max-flow model. The max-flow model led to a linear problem with convex and linear equality constraints that implicitly encoded the proportion prior. To implement the algorithm, {sup 1}H MRI was resampled into ∼3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxel space. Two observers placed seeds on each lung and on the background of 20 pulmonary {sup 1}H MR images

  12. Dynamical behavior connection of the gluon distribution and the proton structure function at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    We make a critical study of the relationship between the singlet structure function F 2 S and the gluon distribution G(x,Q 2 ) proposed in the past two decades, which is frequently used to extract the gluon distribution from the proton structure function. We show that a simple relation is not generally valid in the simplest state. We complete this relation by using a Laplace transform method and hard-pomeron behavior at LO and NLO at small x. Our study shows that this relation is dependent on the splitting functions and initial conditions at Q 2 =Q 2 0 and running coupling constant at NLO. The resulting analytic expression allows us to predict the proton structure function with respect to the gluon distributions and to compare the results with H1 data and a QCD analysis fit. Comparisons with other results are made and predictions for the proposed best approach are also provided. (orig.)

  13. Intrinsic polarization of the high energy W-boson structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ralston, J.P.; Olness, F.

    1986-01-01

    Several new issues are presented that are to be incorporated into a consistent treatment of high-energy transverse effective-W boson structure functions. The issues included the numerical importance of the proper choice of scale, and the q 2 evolution of the boson structure functions in an Altarelli-Parisi framework. We investigate a novel effect of the V-A coupling which produces a sizable intrinsic polarization of the W distributions. A preliminary estimate yields a left- to right-helicity structure function ratio W/sub L// + W/sub R/ + ≅ 1 - 21/(1 - x) + 21/(1 - x) 2 . For x ≥ 0.06, there are two lift-handed W + 's for every right-handed one in an unpolarized proton. 11 refs., 2 figs

  14. Leading twist moments of the neutron structure function F_2n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Osipenko; W. Melnitchouk; S. Simula; S. Kulagin; G. Ricco

    2005-10-20

    We perform a global analysis of neutron $F_2^n$ structure function data, obtained by combining proton and deuteron measurements over a large range of kinematics. From these data the lowest moments ($n \\leq 10$) of the leading twist neutron $F_2^n$ structure function are extracted. Particular attention is paid to nuclear effects in the deuteron, which become increasingly important for the higher moments. Our results for the nonsinglet, isovector $p - n$ combination of the leading twist moments are compared with those of available lattice simulations. We also determine the lowest few moments of the higher twist contributions, obtained by subtracting the leading twist from the total structure function, and analyze their isospin dependence.

  15. Unbiased determination of the proton structure function F2p with faithful uncertainty estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Forte, Stefano; Latorre, Jose I.; Rojo, Joan; Piccione, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    We construct a parametrization of the deep-inelastic structure function of the proton F 2 (x,Q 2 ) based on all available experimental information from charged lepton deep-inelastic scattering experiments. The parametrization effectively provides a bias-free determination of the probability measure in the space of structure functions, which retains information on experimental errors and correlations. The result is obtained in the form of a Monte Carlo sample of neural networks trained on an ensemble of replicas of the experimental data. We discuss in detail the techniques required for the construction of bias-free parameterizations of large amounts of structure function data, in view of future applications to the determination of parton distributions based on the same method. (author)

  16. Collinear factorization for deep inelastic scattering structure functions at large Bjorken xB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accardi, Alberto; Qiu, Jian-Wei

    2008-01-01

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2008/07/090 We examine the uncertainty of perturbative QCD factorization for hadron structure functions in deep inelastic scattering at a large value of the Bjorken variable xB. We analyze the target mass correction to the structure functions by using the collinear factorization approach in the momentum space. We express the long distance physics of structure functions and the leading target mass corrections in terms of parton distribution functions with the standard operator definition. We compare our result with existing work on the target mass correction. We also discuss the impact of a final-state jet function on the extraction of parton distributions at large fractional momentum x.

  17. Measurement of the deuteron elastic structure functions up to large momentum transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jager, K. De

    1999-01-01

    The cross section for elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured in JLab experiment 91-026. The deuteron elastic structure functions A(Q 2 ) and B(Q 2 ) have been extracted from this data. The final results for the ''electric'' structure function A(Q 2 ), in the range of 0.7 less than or equal to Q 2 less than or equal to 6.0 (GeV/c) 2 are presented. Preliminary results for the ''magnetic'' structure function B(Q 2 ) are presented in the range of 0.7 less than or equal to Q 2 less than or equal to 1.35 (GeV/c) 2 . These data are compared with theoretical predictions of both meson-nucleon and quark-gluon based models

  18. x- and xi-scaling of the Nuclear Structure Function at Large x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrington, J.; Armstrong, C. S.; Averett, T.; Baker, O. K.; Bever, L. de; Bochna, C. W.; Boeglin, W.; Bray, B.; Carlini, R. D.; Collins, G.; Cothran, C.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Dunne, J. A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Filippone, B. W.; Honegger, A.; Hughes, E. W.; Jensen, J.; Jourdan, J.; Keppel, C. E.; Koltenuk, D. M.; Lindgren, R.; Lung, A.; Mack, D. J.; McCarthy, J.; McKeown, R. D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J. H.; Mkrtchyan, H. G.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Petitjean, T.; Rondon, O.; Sick, I.; Smith, C.; Terburg, B.; Vulcan, W. F.; Wood, S. A.; Yan, C.; Zhao, J.; Zihlmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data are presented for 2 H and Fe targets at an incident electron energy of 4.045 GeV for a range of momentum transfers from Q 2 = 1 to 7 (GeV/c) 2 . Data were taken at Jefferson Laboratory for low values of energy loss, corresponding to values of Bjorken x greater than or near 1. The structure functions do not show scaling in x in this range, where inelastic scattering is not expected to dominate the cross section. The data do show scaling, however, in the Nachtmann variable ξ. This scaling may be the result of Bloom Gilman duality in the nucleon structure function combined with the Fermi motion of the nucleons in the nucleus. The resulting extension of scaling to larger values of ξ opens up the possibility of accessing nuclear structure functions in the high-x region at lower values of Q 2 than previously believed

  19. Once more on the radiative corrections to the nucleon structure functions in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamenov, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    A new representation of the next to leading QCD corrections to the nucleon structure functions is given in terms of parton distributions. All O(α s ) corrections to the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) are included. In contrast to the similar representations in the literature terms of order O(α 2 s ) do not attend in our expressions for the nucleon structure functions taken in the next to leading logarithmic approximation. This result is generalized for any order in α s beyond the LLA. Terms of order O(α n s ) which belong only tot he approximation in consideration are present in such a representation for the structure functions. (author). 11 refs

  20. On the behaviour of non-singlet structure functions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1995-10-01

    The resummation of O(α s l+1 ln 2l x) terms in the evolution kernels of non-singlet combinations of unpolarized and polarized structure functions is investigated. The agreement with complete calculations up to order α s 2 is demonstrated, and the leading small-x contributions to the three-loop non-singlet splitting functions P ± are derived. The additional contributions due to the resummed terms are studied numerically for the most important non-singlet structure functions. They are found to be about 1% or smaller in the kinematical regions accessible at present and in the forseeable future. (orig.)

  1. Next-to leading order analysis of target mass corrections to structure functions and asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, L.T.; Accardi, A.; Hobbs, T.J.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2011-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of target mass corrections (TMCs) to spin-averaged structure functions and asymmetries at next-to-leading order. Several different prescriptions for TMCs are considered, including the operator product expansion, and various approximations to it, collinear factorization, and xi-scaling. We assess the impact of each of these on a number of observables, such as the neutron to proton F 2 structure function ratio, and parity-violating electron scattering asymmetries for protons and deuterons which are sensitive to gamma-Z interference effects. The corrections from higher order radiative and nuclear effects on the parity-violating deuteron asymmetry are also quantified.

  2. Measurement of the proton structure function F2 in ep scattering at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents our first measurement of the F 2 structure function in neutral-current, deep inelastic scattering using the ZEUS detector at HERA, the ep colliding beam facility at DESY. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 24.7 nb -1 . Results are presented for data in a range of Q 2 from 10 GeV 2 to 4700 GeV 2 and Bjorken x down to 3.0x10 -4 . The F 2 structure function increases rapidly as x decreases. (orig.)

  3. Monte Carlo study of four-spinon dynamic structure function in antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si-Lakhal, B.; Abada, A.

    2003-11-01

    Using Monte Carlo integration methods, we describe the behavior of the exact four-s pinon dynamic structure function S 4 in the antiferromagnetic spin 1/2 Heisenberg quantum spin chain as a function of the neutron energy ω and momentum transfer k. We also determine the fourspinon continuum, the extent of the region in the (k, ω) plane outside which S 4 is identically zero. In each case, the behavior of S 4 is shown to be consistent with the four-spinon continuum and compared to the one of the exact two-spinon dynamic structure function S 2 . Overall shape similarity is noted. (author)

  4. Analysis of the proton longitudinal structure function from the gluon distribution function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroun, G.R.; Rezaei, B.

    2012-01-01

    We make a critical, next-to-leading order, study of the relationship between the longitudinal structure function F L and the gluon distribution proposed in Cooper-Sarkar et al. (Z. Phys. C 39:281, 1988; Acta Phys. Pol. B 34:2911 2003), which is frequently used to extract the gluon distribution from the proton longitudinal structure function at small x. The gluon density is obtained by expanding at particular choices of the point of expansion and compared with the hard Pomeron behavior for the gluon density. Comparisons with H1 data are made and predictions for the proposed best approach are also provided. (orig.)

  5. Experimental determination of the π meson structure functions by the Drell-Yan mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.; Bourotte, J.; Mine, P.; Vanderhaghen, R.; Weisz, S.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Decamp, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lefrancois, J.; Crozon, M.; Delpierre, P.; Leray, T.; Maillard, J.; Tilquin, A.; Valentin, J.

    1983-01-01

    We have studied high statistics samples of dimuon events (proportional35,000) produced from πsup(+-) on platinum target in the mass interval 4.2 2 sigma/dx 1 dx 2 to π + and π - data. At 200 GeV, the simultaneous use of π + and π - data allows a separate determination of the valence and sea structure functions of the π. Furthermore, the 150 and 280 GeV data allow an accurate determination of the shape of the valence structure function and give an estimate of its evolution between Q 2 =25 and 50 GeV 2 . (orig.)

  6. Medical Student Dissection of CadaversImproves Performance on Practical Exams, but not Dissection-Relevant Questions in the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Final Exam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Sargent Jones

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We have examined whether cadaver dissection by first year medical students (MIs affected their performance in two test measures: the NBME Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Exam (dissection-relevant questions only, and practical exams given at the end of each major section within the course. The dissections for the entire course were divided into 18 regional dissection units and each student was assigned to dissect one third of the regional units; the other two-thirds of the material was learned from the partner-prosected cadavers. Performance for each student on the exams was then assessed as a function of the regions those students actually dissected. While the results indicated a small performance advantage for MIs answering questions on material they had dissected on the NBME Subject Exam questions relevant to dissection (78-88% of total exam, the results were not statistically significant. However, a similar, small performance advantage on the course practical exams was highly significant.

  7. Spontaneous vertebral dissection: Clinical, conventional angiographic, CT, and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzale, J.M.; Morgenlander, J.C. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Gress, D. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if typical clinical and neuroradiologic patterns exist in patients with spontaneous vertebral artery (VA) dissection. The medical records and neuroradiologic examinations of 14 patients with spontaneous VA dissection were reviewed. The medical records were examined to exclude patients with a history of trauma and to record evidence of a nontratimatic precipitating event ({open_quotes}trivial trauma{close_quotes}) and presence of possible risk factors such as hypertension. All patients under-went conventional angiography, 13 either CT or MRI (II both CT and MRI), and 3 MRA. Conventional arteriograrris were evaluated for dissection site, evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia, luminal stenosis or occlusion, and pseudoaneurysm formation, CT examinations for the presence of infarction or subarachnoid hemorrhage, MR examinations for the presence of infarction or arterial signal abnormality, and MR angiograms for abnormality of the arterial signal column. Seven patients had precipitating events within 24 h of onset of symptoms that may have been causative of dissection and five had hypertension. At catheter angiography, two patients had dissections in two arteries (both VAs in one patient, VA and internal carotid artery in one patient), giving a total of 15 VAs with dissection. Dissection sites included V1 in four patients, V2 in one patient, V3 in three patients, V4 in six patients, and both V3 and V4 in one patient. Luminal stenosis was present in 13 VAs, occlusion in 2, pseudoaneurysm in 1, and evidence of fibromuscular dysplasia in 1. Posterior circulation infarcts were found on CT or MR in five patients. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was found on CT in two patients and by lumbar puncture alone in two patients. Abnormal periarterial signal on MRI was seen in three patients. MRA demonstrated absent VA signal in one patient, pseudoaneurysm in one, and a false-negative examination in one.

  8. Monopolar electrodissection versus cold dissection tonsillectomy among children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, Manal A.; Al-Ammar, Ahmed Y.

    2007-01-01

    To compare cold dissection to monopolar tonsillectomy in terms of operative time, intraoperative bleeding, post operative bleeding. The study included 100 children who underwent tonsillectomy between January 2002 and January 2004. This study was carried out at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Patients were randomly selected to have either the right or left tonsils removed by either technique (cold dissection or monopolar dissection technique). We compared both techniques in each side on the same patient. There was no significant difference in operative time between both sides by either technique, however, when the patients were grouped into 3 minute groups, the result showed that a greater number of patients were operated up on <-3 minutes by diathermy procedure compared to dissection method (44 versus 67) (p=0.0011). Blood loss was minimal with the diathermy technique, averaging 25.37 ml compared to 88.5 for cold dissection tonsillectomy. There was a significant increase in postoperative pain on the first postoperative day in the diathermy group compared to the cold dissection group (27% versus 12%) (p=0.0151). However, there was no significant difference in pain between both sides in the first 24 hours and from the 2nd to 10th postoperative days. Monopolar dissection tonsillectomy is a safe technique. It significantly reduces the operative time and intraoperative blood loss. However, it causes more pain on the 1st postoperative day, while on the rest of the days until the 10th postoperative day, there was no significant difference in pain between two sides. (author)

  9. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early Barrett's neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Cao, Dalhia Thao; Beuvon, Frédéric; Leblanc, Sarah; Terris, Benoit; Camus, Marine; Coriat, Romain; Chaussade, Stanislas; Prat, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The possible benefit of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early neoplasia arising in Barrett's esophagus remains controversial. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of ESD for the treatment of early Barrett's neoplasia. All consecutive patients undergoing ESD for the resection of a visible lesion in a Barrett's esophagus, either suspicious of submucosal infiltration or exceeding 10 mm in size, between February 2012 and January 2015 were prospectively included. The primary endpoint was the rate of curative resection of carcinoma, defined as histologically complete resection of adenocarcinomas without poor histoprognostic factors. Thirty-five patients (36 lesions) with a mean age of 66.2 ± 12 years, a mean ASA score of 2.1 ± 0.7, and a mean C4M6 Barrett's segment were included. The mean procedure time was 191 ± 79 mn, and the mean size of the resected specimen was 51.3 ± 23 mm. En bloc resection rate was 89%. Lesions were 12 ± 15 mm in size, and 81% (29/36) were invasive adenocarcinomas, six of which with submucosal invasion. Although R0 resection of carcinoma was 72.4%, the curative resection rate was 66% (19/29). After a mean follow-up of 12.9 ± 9 months, 16 (45.7%) patients had required additional treatment, among whom nine underwent surgical resection, and seven further endoscopic treatments. Metachronous lesions or recurrence of cancer developed during the follow-up period in 17.2% of the patients. The overall complication rate was 16.7%, including 8.3% perforations, all conservatively managed, and no bleeding. The 30-day mortality was 0%. In this early experience, ESD yielded a moderate curative resection rate in Barrett's neoplasia. At present, improvements are needed if ESD is to replace piecemeal endoscopic mucosal resection in the management of Barrett's neoplasia.

  10. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeier, B.

    2001-01-01

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  11. "And afterwards your body to be given for public dissection": a history of the murderers dissected in Glasgow and the west of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, S S; McLeod, K J; McDonald, S W

    2001-02-01

    Between 1752 and 1832, the bodies of hanged murderers were dissected or gibbeted. During this period, 38 murderers were executed in the West of Scotland. The bodies of at least 23 were dissected in Glasgow. The stories of these murders are recounted. Insight is also given into the attitudes of the public and the anatomists to dissection of executed murderers.

  12. A comparison of retention of anatomical knowledge in an introductory college biology course: Traditional dissection vs. virtual dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeger, Kelli Rae

    Dissection has always played a crucial role in biology and anatomy courses at all levels of education. However, in recent years, ethical concerns, as well as improved technology, have brought to the forefront the issue of whether virtual dissection is as effective or whether it is more effective than traditional dissection. Most prior research indicated the two methods produced equal results. However, none of those studies examined retention of information past the initial test of knowledge. Two groups of college students currently enrolled in an introductory level college biology course were given one hour to complete a frog dissection. One group performed a traditional frog dissection, making cuts in an actual preserved frog specimen with scalpels and scissors. The other group performed a virtual frog dissection, using "The Digital Frog 2" software. Immediately after the dissections were completed, each group was given an examination consisting of questions on actual specimens, pictures generated from the computer software, and illustrations that neither group had seen. Two weeks later, unannounced, the groups took the same exam in order to test retention. The traditional dissection group scored significantly higher on two of the three sections, as well as the total score on the initial exam. However, with the exception of specimen questions (on which the traditional group retained significantly more information), there was no significant difference in the retention from exam 1 to exam 2 between the two groups. These results, along with the majority of prior studies, show that the two methods produce, for the most part, the same end results. Therefore, the decision of which method to employ should be based on the goals and preferences of the instructor(s) and the department. If that department's goals include: Being at the forefront of new technology, increasing time management, increasing student: teacher ratio for economic reasons, and/or ethical issues, then

  13. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvignon, Patricia [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2006-08-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F2 of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g1 and the virtual photon asymmetry A1 at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron (3He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q2) region, 1.0 < Q2 < 4.0 (GeV/c2), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized 3He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the 3He spin structure function g1 and virtual photon asymmetry A1 in the resonance region. A test

  14. Measurement of the 3He Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region: A Test of Quark-Hadron Duality on the Neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricia Solvignon

    2006-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the study of the nucleon structure is the understanding of the transition from partonic degrees of freedom to hadronic degrees of freedom. In 1970, Bloom and Gilman noticed that structure function data taken at SLAC in the resonance region average to the scaling curve of deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Early theoretical interpretations suggested that these two very different regimes can be linked under the condition that the quark-gluon and quark-quark interactions are suppressed. Substantial efforts are ongoing to investigate this phenomenon both experimentally and theoretically. Quark-hadron duality has been confirmed for the unpolarized structure function F 2 of the proton and the deuteron using data from the experimental Hall C at Jefferson Lab (JLab). Indications of duality have been seen for the proton polarized structure function g 1 and the virtual photon asymmetry A 1 at JLab Hall B and HERMES. Because of the different resonance behavior, it is expected that the onset of duality for the neutron will happen at lower momentum transfer than for the proton. Now that precise spin structure data in the DIS region are available at large x, data in the resonance region are greatly needed in order to test duality in spin-dependent structure functions. The goal of experiment E01-012 was to provide such data on the neutron ( 3 He) in the moderate momentum transfer (Q 2 ) region, 1.0 2 2 ), where duality is expected to hold. The experiment ran successfully in early 2003 at Jefferson Lab in Hall B. It was an inclusive measurement of longitudinally polarized electrons scattering from a longitudinally or transversely polarized 3 He target. Asymmetries and cross section differences were measured in order to extract the 3 He spin structure function g 1 and virtual photon asymmetry A 1 in the resonance region. A test of quark-hadron duality has then been performed for the 3 He and neutron structure functions. The study of spin duality for

  15. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  16. Urban ecological stewardship: understanding the structure, function and network of community-based urban land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika s. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based...

  17. Analytical expression for the nonsinglet structure functions at small x in the double logarithmic approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lublinsky, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A simple analytic expression for the nonsinglet structure function f NS is given. The expression is derived from the result of Ermolaev, Manaenkov, and Ryskin obtained by low x resummation of the quark ladder diagrams in the double logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD

  18. Determination of the pion structure function from muon-pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, C.B.; Anderson, K.J.; Coleman, R.N.; Hogan, G.E.; Karhi, K.P.; McDonald, K.T.; Pilcher, J.E.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Sanders, G.H.; Smith, A.J.S.; Thaler, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Data on muon-pair production by pions are used to determine the momentum distribution for valence quarks in the pion. The shape of a nucleon structure function is also obtained and is compared with a calculation based on existing data

  19. Phenomenological study of the nucleon structure functions; Etude phenomenologique des fonctions de structure du nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, M

    1995-05-12

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the deep inelastic scattering. Its purpose is the development of phenomenological models describing experimental results on unpolarized (F{sub 2}) and polarized (g{sub 1}) nucleon structure functions in the wide range of the kinematical domain. Special attention is paid to the small-x behaviour of F{sub 2} and to the link between deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction process. The investigation of the Pomeron in deep inelastic scattering shows that one single Pomeron compatible with the Froissard-Martin limit can account for all the present HERA data. A phenomenological model of the proton structure function is developed, based on a two-component structure including various features expected from both perturbative quantum chromodynamics and non perturbative Regge theory. A link with the photoproduction process is provided. A detailed analysis of the perturbative components, based on the Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution equations is presented. Taking into account the different parton distribution, this approach allows to describe data on proton and neutron structure functions, on deep inelastic neutrino scattering, and to reproduce the gluons distribution extracted by the ZEUS collaboration. The model is applied to the polarized deep inelastic scattering and the axial anomaly effect appearing both in the description of results on the spin dependent structure functions g{sup p,n,d} and in the interpretation of the nucleon spin structure is discussed. (J.S.). 260 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs., 6 appends.

  20. Deep-inelastic structure functions in an approximation to the bag theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    A cavity approximation to the bag theory developed earlier is extended to the treatment of forward virtual Compton scattering. In the Bjorken limit and for small values of ω (ω = vertical-bar2p center-dot q/q 2 vertical-bar) it is argued that the operator nature of the bag boundaries might be ignored. Structure functions are calculated in one and three dimensions. Bjorken scaling is obtained. The model provides a realization of light-cone current algebra and possesses a parton interpretation. The structure functions show a quasielastic peak. The spreading of the structure functions about the peak is associated with confinement. As expected, Regge behavior is not obtained for large ω. The ''momentum sum rule'' is saturated, indicating that the hadron's charged constituents carry all the momentum in this model. νW/subL/ is found to scale and is calculable. Application of the model to the calculation of spin-dependent and chiral-symmetry--violating structure functions is proposed. The nature of the intermediate states in this approximation is discussed. Problems associated with the cavity approximation are also discussed

  1. Structure functions and parton distributions in deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, J.

    1993-08-01

    The possibilities to measure structure functions, to extract parton distributions, and to measure α s and Λ QCD in current and future high energy deep inelastic scattering experiments are reviewed. A comparison is given for experiments at HERA, an ep option at LEP xLHC, and a high energy neutrino experiment. (orig.)

  2. Test of determination of nucleon structure functions in the hypothesis of scalar di-quark existence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavernier, P.; Dugne, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors present the nucleon structure functions that have been obtained in the hypothesis of existence of a scalar di-quark, progressively broken by increasing energy of electromagnetic probe (Stockolm model). Comparisons with other models and experimental results are presented. 20 figs

  3. Comparison of moments from the valence structure function with QCD predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, J.G.H. de; Hansl, T.; Holder, M.; Knobloch, J.; May, J.; Paar, H.P.; Palazzi, P.; Para, A.; Ranjard, F.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Suter, H.; Rueden, W. von; Wahl, H.; Whitaker, S.; Williams, E.G.H.; Eisele, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Lierl, H.; Spahn, G.; Willutzki, H.J.; Dorth, W.; Dydak, F.; Geweniger, C.; Hepp, V.; Tittel, K.; Wotschack, J.; Bloch, P.; Devaux, B.; Loucatos, S.; Maillard, J.; Merlo, J.P.; Peyaud, B.; Rander, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Turlay, R.; Navarria, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    Moments (both ordinary and Nachtmann) of the nucleon valence structure function measured in high Q 2 γFe scattering are presented, supplemented by data from deep inelastic eD scattering. These data seem to agree with QCD predictions for vector gluons. The QCD parameter Λ is found to be of the order 0.5 GeV. (Auth.)

  4. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions G1 and G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Al

    2003-04-02

    The SLAC experiment E155 was a deep-inelastic scattering experiment that scattered polarized electrons off polarized proton and deuteron targets in the effort to measure precisely the proton and deuteron spin structure functions. The nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are important quantities that help test our present models of nucleon structure. Such information can help quantify the constituent contributions to the nucleon spin. The structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and G{sub 1}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 40 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 48.4 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons and deuterons. In addition, the structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.7 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 17 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off transversely polarized protons and deuterons. The measurements of g{sub 1} confirm the Bjorken sum rule and find the net quark polarization to be {Delta}{Sigma} = 0.23 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.6 while g{sub 2} is found to be consistent with the g{sub 2}{sup WW} model.

  5. Experimental study of the photon structure function F2 in the high Q2 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, W.; Cords, D.; Dietrich, G.; Dittmann, P.; Eichler, R.; Felst, R.; Haidt, D.; Krehbiel, H.; Meier, K.; Naroska, B.

    1982-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the process e + e - → e + e - + hadrons, where one of the scattered electron is detected at large angles, with an average Q 2 of 23 GeV 2 . The results are analysed in terms of the photon structure function F 2 and are compared with QCD predictions. (orig.)

  6. Measurement of the proton structure function at HERA using the ZEUS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentvelsen, S.C.M.

    1994-01-01

    In May 1992, the HERA collider produced its first collisions between electrons and protons, at a center-of-mass energy of 295 GeV. The ZEUS experiment, one of the two main detectors at HERA, recorded 24.7 nb -1 of data in the fall of 1992. The analysis of this data, leading to an initial determination of the proton structure function F 2 in the kinematic domain accessible at HERA, is the main subject of this thesis. In the first chapter, a short review of inclusive deep-inelastic-scattering (DIS) is given. We also briefly present the status of pre-HERA fixed target DIS experiments. The second chapter offers a description of the HERA accelerator complex, the luminosity measurement and the ZEUS detector. Chapter three treats the reconstruction of x ans Q 2 from measured quantities. Chapter four describes the selection of the DIS data sample. Chapter five investigates various distributions of the DIS sample in comparison with the Monte Carlo predictions. The Monte Carlo distributions are given for extreme choices of the proton structure function parametrizations. In chapter six, we determine from the x and Q 2 distributions the proton structure function F 2 . A correction is made for the effect of the longitudinal structure function F L . The measured F 2 as a function of x is rising rapidly towards low values of x. (orig.)

  7. Marfan syndrome: pathologic features of aneurysm with dissection and aortic dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Zhuraev

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the pathologic changes in the aortic wall in patients with MFS (three men at the age of 25, 27, 35 years operated on the aneurysm with dissection of the ascending aorta. Morphological changes in the middle of the shell of the aorta in patients with MFS were characterized by severe restructuring with profound irreversible alterative changes in all of its components. The pathological process captured media of the aorta throughout its entire length, not just in the areas of rupture and separation. The main pathomorphological signs of MFS were the focal accumulation of mucoid substances, ribbon-like nuclear-free zones, degenerative changes in smooth muscle cells, the formation of cystic media degeneration cavities, changes in elastic fibers - fragmentation, hyperelastosis, multiplication, thinning and straightening, areas of significant elastolysis. Multiple CMD was detected in all patients with MFS, the changes revealed the same type, but at different stages of the process.

  8. Dissecting the hybridization of oligonucleotides to structured complementary sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracchi, Alessio

    2016-06-01

    When oligonucleotides hybridize to long target molecules, the process is slowed by the secondary structure in the targets. The phenomenon has been analyzed in several previous studies, but many details remain poorly understood. I used a spectrofluorometric strategy, focusing on the formation/breaking of individual base pairs, to study the kinetics of association between a DNA hairpin and >20 complementary oligonucleotides ('antisenses'). Hybridization rates differed by over three orders of magnitude. Association was toehold-mediated, both for antisenses binding to the target's ends and for those designed to interact with the loop. Binding of these latter, besides being consistently slower, was affected to variable, non-uniform extents by the asymmetric loop structure. Divalent metal ions accelerated hybridization, more pronouncedly when nucleation occurred at the loop. Incorporation of locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues in the antisenses substantially improved the kinetics only when LNAs participated to the earliest hybridization steps. The effects of individual LNAs placed along the antisense indicated that the reaction transition state occurred after invading at least the first base pair of the stem. The experimental approach helps dissect hybridization reactions involving structured nucleic acids. Toehold-dependent, nucleation-invasion models appear fully appropriate for describing such reactions. Estimating the stability of nucleation complexes formed at internal toeholds is the major hurdle for the quantitative prediction of hybridization rates. While analyzing the mechanisms of a fundamental biochemical process (hybridization), this work also provides suggestions for the improvement of technologies that rely on such process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    the head and neck induced by a sudden braking event in a commonly experienced non-collision traffic incident. The likely mechanism of injury resulted from interaction between the occupant and the 3-point seat belt. These findings indicate that ICA dissections are substantially more likely to be associated with SAH following head and neck trauma, regardless of the magnitude of the traumatic event or whether an impact was involved.

  10. Contemporary insights into the management of type A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolis, George; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2016-10-01

    Acute Type A Dissection remains a surgical emergency with a relatively high operative mortality despite advances in cardiac surgical techniques and medical management over the past thirty years. In this presentation we will discuss the issues surrounding diagnosis, triage, surgical treatment and perioperative medical management as well as long term surveillance of patients suffering from Acute Type A Dissection and present the literature that supports our management strategies. Expert commentary: The ultimate goal of surgical intervention for patients with Type A Acute Aortic Dissection is an alive patient. A more complicated operation which addresses the root and arch and potentially reduces late complications should be approached with caution since it may increase the operative mortality of the procedure itself. With the recent evolution in endovascular techniques, there is hope that later complications can be reduced without increasing the risk of the primary operation. It remains to be seen whether the improved distal aortic remodeling afforded by a combined open/endovascular approach to Acute Type A Dissection will lead to decreased need for aortic reinterventions and overall long term complications of a residual descending thoracic chronic dissection.

  11. Planned neck dissection for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanai, Nobuhiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Terada, Akihiro; Ozawa, Taijiro; Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Kawakita, Daisuke; Maruo, Takashi; Mikami, Shinnji

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the use of chemoradiotherapy for preserving organs in the treatment of head and neck cancer is increasing. However, there is controversy about advanced neck node management in post-chemoradiation cases. We retrospectively analyzed our 119 cases of chemoradiotherapy for oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer to examine the effectiveness and indications of planned neck dissection. Regional control rate and survival rate were superior in the neck dissection group. If the cases did not achieve complete response (CR) in imaging, planned neck dissection improved the regional control rate significantly. We should perform planned neck dissection immediately rather than 'wait and see' for this persistent disease. However, in the cases achieving radiological CR, it is possible to omit planned neck dissection because of the high salvage rate of neck disease. However, in these cases, careful observation is essential. We clarified that the presence of pathologically positive lymph node is a prognostic factor. For evaluating persistent disease of cervical lymph nodes, positron emission tomography (PET)-CT was the most accurate method of imaging. (author)

  12. Blood groups and acute aortic dissection type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatic, Nikola; Nikolic, Aleksandar; Vukmirovic, Mihailo; Radojevic, Nemanja; Zornic, Nenad; Banzic, Igor; Ilic, Nikola; Kostic, Dusan; Pajovic, Bogdan

    2017-04-01

    Acute aortic type III dissection is one of the most catastrophic events, with in-hospital mortality ranging between 10% and 12%. The majority of patients are treated medically, but complicated dissections, which represent 15% to 20% of cases, require surgical or thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). For the best outcomes adequate blood transfusion support is required. Interest in the relationship between blood type and vascular disease has been established. The aim of our study is to evaluate distribution of blood groups among patients with acute aortic type III dissection and to identify any kind of relationship between blood type and patient's survival. From January 2005 to December 2014, 115 patients with acute aortic type III dissection were enrolled at the Clinic of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery in Belgrade, Serbia and retrospectively analyzed. Patients were separated into two groups. The examination group consisted of patients with a lethal outcome, and the control group consisted of patients who survived. The analysis of the blood groups and RhD typing between groups did not reveal a statistically significant difference ( p = 0.220). Our results indicated no difference between different blood groups and RhD typing with respect to in-hospital mortality of patients with acute aortic dissection type III.

  13. Measuring medical students' motivation to learning anatomy by cadaveric dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman M; Khalil, Mohammed K

    2017-07-01

    Motivation and learning are inter-related. It is well known that motivating learners is clearly a complex endeavor, which can be influenced by the educational program and the learning environment. Limited research has been conducted to examine students' motivation as a method to assess the effectiveness of dissection in medical education. This study aimed to assess and analyze students' motivation following their dissection experience. A 29-item survey was developed based on the Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction model of motivation. Descriptive statistics were undertaken to describe students' motivation to the dissection experience. T-test and ANOVA were used to compare differences in motivational scores between gender and educational characteristics of students. Dissection activities appear to promote students' motivation. Gender difference was statistically significant as males were more motivated by the dissection experience than females. Comparison between students with different knowledge of anatomy was also significantly different. The study is an important step in the motivational design to improve students' motivation to learn. The outcome of this study provides guidance to the selection of specific strategies to increase motivation by generating motivational strategies/tactics to facilitate learning. Anat Sci Educ 10: 363-371. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Anatomy by whole body dissection: a focus group study of students' learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Ramsey-Stewart, George

    2015-01-01

    The social construction of knowledge within medical education is essential for learning. Students' interactions within groups and associated learning artifacts can meaningfully impact learning. Situated cognition theory poses that knowledge, thinking, and learning are located in experience. In recent years, there has been a reported decline in time spent on anatomy by whole body dissection (AWBD) within medical programs. However, teaching by surgeons in AWBD provides unique opportunities for students, promoting a deeper engagement in learning. In this study, we apply situated cognition theory as a conceptual framework to explore students' perceptions of their learning experience within the 2014 iteration of an 8-week elective AWBD course. At the end of the course, all students (n=24) were invited to attend one of three focus groups. Framework analysis was used to code and categorize data into themes. In total, 20/24 (83%) students participated in focus groups. Utilizing situated cognition theory as a conceptual framework, we illustrate students' learning experiences within the AWBD course. Students highlighted opportunities to create and reinforce their own knowledge through active participation in authentic dissection tasks; guidance and clinical context provided by surgeons as supervisors; and the provision of an inclusive learning community. Situated cognition theory offers a valuable lens through which to view students' learning experience in the anatomy dissection course. By doing so, the importance of providing clinical relevance to medical teaching is highlighted. Additionally, the value of having surgeons teach AWBD and the experience they share is illustrated. The team learning course design, with varying teaching methods and frequent assessments, prompting student-student and student-teacher interaction, was also beneficial for student learning.

  15. Chronic dissection of the superior mesenteric artery: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common, A.A.; Pressacco, J.

    1999-01-01

    Acute dissection of the thoracic aorta is a well-recognized, often fatal condition that frequently extends to involve the abdominal aorta and iliac vessels. The ostia of the renal and mesenteric vessels may be compromised, and the resulting visceral ischemia may necessitate surgical intervention. However, visceral perfusion may be restored if blood flow from true to false lumen is re-established or if the false lumen is obliterated, either spontaneously or by surgical or interventional techniques. Isolated dissections of mesenteric, renal, and carotid vessels are rarely reported. These may be spontaneous, related to high blood pressure and underlying disease of the vessel wall, or caused by abdominal trauma or medical intervention, including angiographic procedures. They are usually associated with pain and other signs and symptoms of ischemia in the appropriate territory. We present a case of chronic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection, an incidental angiographic finding, in an asymptomatic patient being evaluated for resection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). (author)

  16. Chronic dissection of the superior mesenteric artery: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Common, A.A.; Pressacco, J. [Univ. of Toronto, St. Michael' s Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-02-01

    Acute dissection of the thoracic aorta is a well-recognized, often fatal condition that frequently extends to involve the abdominal aorta and iliac vessels. The ostia of the renal and mesenteric vessels may be compromised, and the resulting visceral ischemia may necessitate surgical intervention. However, visceral perfusion may be restored if blood flow from true to false lumen is re-established or if the false lumen is obliterated, either spontaneously or by surgical or interventional techniques. Isolated dissections of mesenteric, renal, and carotid vessels are rarely reported. These may be spontaneous, related to high blood pressure and underlying disease of the vessel wall, or caused by abdominal trauma or medical intervention, including angiographic procedures. They are usually associated with pain and other signs and symptoms of ischemia in the appropriate territory. We present a case of chronic superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection, an incidental angiographic finding, in an asymptomatic patient being evaluated for resection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). (author)

  17. Cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma of the uterus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollason Terence P

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma of the uterus is a recently described rare variant of benign uterine leiomyoma. We report a case of cotyledonoid dissecting leiomyoma in a 52 year old woman who presented with menorrhagia and abdominal pain. An ultrasound scan showed a bulky uterus and a cystic heterogenous mass near the left ovary. At hysterectomy, the left broad ligament mass was removed. This was continuous with an ill-defined nodular area in the myometrial fundus. Microscopy revealed a benign smooth muscle proliferation in the myometrium that extended beyond the uterus and into the broad ligament. The lesion appeared to be dissecting the myometrial fibres and showed areas of oedema, hyalinisation and perinodular hydropic change. Cellular atypia, mitoses and coagulative necrosis were absent. The patient is alive and well 18 months after surgery. It is important to recognize this benign and unusual appearing variant of leiomyoma in order to prevent inappropriate treatment.

  18. Pain as the only manifestation of internal carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biousse, V; Woimant, F; Amarenco, P; Touboul, P J; Bousser, M G

    1992-10-01

    Internal carotid artery dissection is a major cause of ischemic stroke in the young. Pain is the leading symptom and is associated with other focal signs such as Horner's syndrome and painful tinnitus or with signs of cerebral or retinal ischemia. We report two patients with angiographically confirmed extracranial internal carotid artery dissection presenting with cephalic pain as the only manifestation. The first patient had a diffuse headache and a latero-cervical pain lasting for 12 days, reminiscent of carotidynia. The second patient experienced an exploding headache suggestive of subarachnoid hemorrhage, which was ruled out by computed tomography of the head and cerebrospinal fluid study. These patients demonstrate that recognition of carotid artery dissection as a cause of carotidynia and headache suggestive of subarachnoid hemorrhage may permit an earlier diagnosis and possibly the prevention of a stroke through the use of anticoagulation.

  19. Blunt apical dissection during anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoub Saif

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meticulous apical dissection during a radical prostatectomy is imperative to achieve desirable pathologic and quality of life outcomes. Findings We describe a novel technique using careful blunt dissection to better delineate the apex of the prostate, providing a simple means to potentially lessen positive surgical margins at the apex and promote better continence and erectile function in men undergoing an anatomic radical prostatectomy. Median operative time and blood loss were 190 minutes and 675 mL, respectively. Only 10 percent of the patients with positive surgical margins were found to have apical positive surgical margins. Ninety-three percent of patients reported no urinary leakage. Conclusion We believe our technique of isolating the DVC with blunt dissection and then ligating and transecting the DVC to be feasible approach that requires larger studies to truly confirm its utility.

  20. Nested dissection on a mesh-connected processor array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worley, P.H.; Schreiber, R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present a parallel implementation of Gaussian elimination without pivoting using the nested dissection ordering for solving Ax=b where A is an N x N symmetric positive definite matrix. If the graph of A is a √N x √N finite element mesh then a parallel complexity of O(√N) can be achieved for Gaussian elimination with the nested dissection ordering. The authors' implementation achieves this parallel complexity on a two dimensional MIMD processor array with N processors and nearest neighbors interconnections. Thus nested dissection is a near optimal algorithm for this problem on this interconnection topology. The parallel implementation on this architecture requires 158√N + O(log/sub 2/(√N)) parallel floating point multiplications. It is faster than a Kung-Leiserson systolic array for banded matrices for N≥961, and faster than a serial implementation for N as small as 9

  1. The birth and evolution of neuroscience through cadaveric dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Karam; Filis, Andreas K; Cohen, Alan R

    2010-09-01

    Although interest in the art of dissection and vivisection has waxed and waned throughout the ages, the past century has seen it accepted as commonplace in medical schools across the country. No other practice in medicine has contributed more to the understanding of neuroanatomy and the neurosciences as dissection of the human cadaver, the origins of which are widely documented to have been in Alexandrian Greece. This article chronicles the fascinating and often controversial use of dissection and vivisection in these fields through the ages, beginning with Herophilus of Alexandria, among the first systematic dissectors in the history of Western medicine. The authors comment on its role in the development of modern neurosurgery and conclude with remarks about use of this educational tool today in the United States.

  2. Free manual of cadaver dissection modifiable by other anatomists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Chung, Min Suk

    2015-06-01

    Even in the rapidly changing field of cadaver dissection, published guide books still play an important role in the anatomy lab. However, commercial manuals with lengthy volumes and inflexible copyrights have several limitations which can be complemented by open-source manuals. Recently, the authors have manufactured and distributed a free electronic dissection manual (anatomy.co.kr), where descriptions are written concisely and images are drawn schematically. Moreover, simplified signs are employed to represent the cadaver viewing angles and manner of dissection. Based on the original files of this manual, other anatomists can revise and utilize the descriptions and figures. We expect many updated versions of our manual to be shared between students all over the world.

  3. Cervical artery dissection: early recognition and stroke prevention [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Rhonda; Kim, Jeremy

    2016-07-22

    Cervical artery dissections involve the carotid or vertebral arteries. Although the overall incidence is low, they remain a common cause of stroke in children, young adults, and trauma patients. Symptoms such as headache, neck pain, and dizziness are commonly seen in the emergency department, but may not be apparent in the obtunded trauma patient. A missed diagnosis of cervical artery dissection can result in devastating neurological sequelae, so emergency clinicians must act quickly to recognize this event and begin treatment as soon as possible while neurological consultation is obtained. This issue reviews the evidence in applying advanced screening criteria and choosing imaging and antithrombotic treatment strategies for patients with cervical artery dissections to reduce the occurrence of ischemic stroke. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  4. Clinical and radiological evaluation in vertebral artery dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Çabalar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, vertebral artery dissection (VAD is reported more frequently as a cause of young cerebrovascular accidents. It can occur spontaneously or following a neck manipulation and trauma. The patients were 3 females (mean age: 35±26 years and 7 males (mean age: 37.71±4.96 years. Only 2 patients described neck trauma. Cerebellar findings were prominent in all cases. On radiological investigation, vascular changes of vertebral arteries were detected bilaterally in 2 cases, right in 5 and left in 3 cases. All the cases were treated with anticoagulant therapy and cured but 1 with sequela. Prognosis of vertebral artery dissection is generally good by early diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we reported clinical and radiological properties of 10 vertebral artery dissection cases.

  5. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncer, M.; Gumrukcuoglu, H.A.; Ekim, H.; Gunes, Y.; Simsek, H.

    2010-01-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a relatively uncommon inherited disease. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is also uncommonly observed, which often occurs in pregnant or post partum women but is rare in men. This report describes a 38 years old man with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who developed SCAD leading to acute inferior myocardial infarction. After emergent appendectomy operation at another hospital, he was immediately transferred to the Cardiology Department of our hospital due to acute myocardial infarction. He emergently underwent coronary angiography which showed a long dissection involving the right coronary. He underwent an emergent CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and he was discharged. According to our knowledge, no case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection associated with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy unrelated to postpartum period or oral contraceptive use has been reported so far. (author)

  6. Spontaneous dissecting aneurysm of the extracranial vertebral artery (20 cases)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiras, J; Marciano, S; Vega Molina, J; Touboul, J; Poirier, B; Bories, J

    1985-07-01

    Spontaneous dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery is an infrequent cause of vertebro basilar ischemic strokes. Previously reported cases concern essentially occlusion of the basilar artery. Only 14 cases of spontaneous dissecting aneurysm concern the extracranial vertebral artery among these eight were angiographically documented. In this study based upon 15 patients (20 dissecting aneurysms), the authors discuss etiological factors, such as hypertension or fibromuscular dysplasia: on clinical findings they insist upon the diagnostic value of preliminary symptoms, cervical pain or posterior headaches; the most frequent angiographic appearance was a long and irregular stenosis of one or two segments of the vertebral artery. The prognosis of these aneurysms most often appears favourable in this group.

  7. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses.

  8. Harmonic dissection versus electrocautery in breast surgery in regional Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyingi, Andrew K; Macdonald, Leigh J; Shugg, Sarah A; Bollard, Ruth C

    2015-05-01

    Harmonic instruments are an alternative tool for surgical dissection. The aim of this study is to evaluate differences in clinical outcomes relating to harmonic dissection when compared with electrocautery in patients undergoing major breast surgery in a regional centre over a 3-year period. Retrospective chart analysis was conducted of 52 patients undergoing major breast surgery for carcinoma or ductal carcinoma in situ by a single surgeon in a regional centre from May 2008 to January 2011. Analysis involved the extraction of qualitative data relating to patient demographics, surgery type and specimen histopathology. Quantitative data were extracted relating to duration of surgery, duration of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) use, length of hospital admission, drainage output and presence of infection, haematoma or seroma. Fifty-two patients underwent major breast surgery; harmonic dissection n = 32 and electrocautery n = 20. The two groups were comparable. There was no significant difference identified relating the outcome measures. The median operative duration was shorter in the harmonic dissection group, however, was not of statistical significance. No significant difference was identified between groups relating to length of inpatient stay, duration of PCA use and total volume wound drainage and total days of drainage. Incidence of seroma and infection in the groups was not significantly different. The harmonic dissection is safe and effective in major breast surgery. The study did not demonstrate any clinical advantage from the use of harmonic dissection in major breast surgery compared with electrocautery, nor was there any difference in the complication rates measured. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Aneurysm and dissection in a patient with syphilitic aortitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pivatto Júnior

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the antibiotic era, aortic aneurysm is a rare complication of syphilis, what makes the diagnostic assumption even more difficult. Nonetheless, this condition should be suspected in patients with aortic aneurysm. Reports of aortic dissection complicating syphilitic aortitis have been distinctly rare in the literature, and their cause-effect relationship has not been definitely established. In this case report, we present a 62-year-old woman with aortic aneurysm and dissection associated with an unexpected diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis.

  10. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Disha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH (Stanford A, DeBakey I. This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively.

  11. Type A chronic aortic dissection with obesity and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana-Ortega, L M; Urso, S; Rodríguez-Pérez, A; Sarmiento, T; Morales, L; Hernanz, G

    2017-12-01

    Aortic dissection is a potentially lethal disease whose incidence in pregnant women can be up to 100 times that of the remaining adult population. In most cases, it presents as typical chest pain. We report the case of a 37yo obese woman diagnosed with chronic type A aortic dissection documented by a radiological finding 10 months after delivery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection after Extracorporeal Shockwave Lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Bakoyiannis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of shockwave lithotripsy is currently the mainstay of treatment in renal calculosis. Several complications including vessel injuries have been implied to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. We report an isolated dissection of the superior mesenteric artery in a 60-year-old male presenting with abdominal pain which occurred three days after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. The patient was treated conservatively and the abdominal pain subsided 24 hours later. The patient's history, the course of his disease, and the timing may suggest a correlation between the dissection and the ESWL.

  13. Some higher moments of deep inelastic structure functions at next-to-next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retey, A.; Vermaseren, J.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    We present the analytic next-to-next-to-leading QCD calculation of some higher moments of deep inelastic structure functions in the leading twist approximation. We give results for the moments N=1,3,5,7,9,11,13 of the structure function F 3 . Similarly we present the moments N=10,12 for the flavour singlet and N=12,14 for the non-singlet structure functions F 2 and F L . We have calculated both the three-loop anomalous dimensions of the corresponding operators and the three-loop coefficient functions of the moments of these structure functions

  14. New COMPASS results on the spin structure function $g_1^p$, and QCD fit

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfert, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS has taken data with a polarised muon beam scattering off a polarised NH 3 target in 2011. The beam energy has been increased to 200 GeV compared to 160 GeV in 2007 and thus, higher values of Q 2 and lower values of x are reached. From these data the longitudinal double spin asymmetry A p 1 and the spin-dependent structure function g p 1 are extracted. The results are used in a NLO QCD fit to the world data to obtain the polarised parton distributions and also to test the Bjorken sum rule, connecting the integral of the non-singlet structure function with the ratio of the weak coupling constants

  15. Covariant boost and structure functions of baryons in Gross-Neveu models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Wieland; Thies, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Baryons in the large N limit of two-dimensional Gross-Neveu models are reconsidered. The time-dependent Dirac-Hartree-Fock approach is used to boost a baryon to any inertial frame and shown to yield the covariant energy-momentum relation. Momentum distributions are computed exactly in arbitrary frames and used to interpolate between the rest frame and the infinite momentum frame, where they are related to structure functions. Effects from the Dirac sea depend sensitively on the occupation fraction of the valence level and the bare fermion mass and do not vanish at infinite momentum. In the case of the kink baryon, they even lead to divergent quark and antiquark structure functions at x=0.

  16. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  17. Study of nuclear effects in the determination of nucleon structure functions with heavy targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuti, A.S.; Bollini, D.; Camporesi, T.

    1984-01-01

    Results of the experiment on deep inelastic scattering of 280 GeV muons on deuterium, nitrogen and iron nuclei are presented. The purpose of the measurements was to compare the Bjorken variable dependence of nucleon structure functions obtained in experiments on different nuclei and also Q 2 -dependence (Q- four-momentum transfer) of structure functions. The results of the experiments do not indicate any Q 2 -dependence of the Fsub(2)sup(Fe)/Fsub(2)sup(Dsub(2)) and Fsub(2)sup(Nsub(2))Fsub(2)sup(Dsub(2)) ratios. These ratios depend linearly on the parameter x: R=a+bx. The parameters of the linear fit for the iron/deuterium ratio are a=1.16+-0.03, b=-0.56+-0.08; and for the. ni;rogen/deuterium ratio, a=1.10+-0.04, anti b=-0.39+-0.09

  18. Particle correlations in the recombination model associated with modified Kuti-Weisskopf structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, E.; Tata, X.

    1982-01-01

    The recombination model associated with modified Kuti-Weisskopf multiquark structure functions is used to analyze particle production by hadronic collisions. The justification of the use of the impulse approximation in these processes and the universal nature of the recombination process are discussed. Single-meson inclusive production in the fragmentation domains of the proton, the pion, and the kaon is used as an input to determine the primitive structure functions. Our parameter-free predictions for low-p/sub T/ multimeson and associated meson-baryon inclusive production are found to be in good agreement with a large amount of recently obtained correlation data. It is pointed out, however, that reactions involving multivalence recombination fall outside the scope of present considerations

  19. Measurement of the photon structure function $F_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    Deep inelastic electron-photon scattering is studied using e+e- data collected by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s_ee} ~ M_{Z^0}. The photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) is explored in a Q^2 range of 1.1 to 6.6 GeV/c^2 at lower x values than ever before. To probe this kinematic region events are selected with a beam electron scattered into one of the OPAL luminosity calorimeters at scattering angles between 27 and 55 mrad. A measurement is presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) at = 1.86 GeV^2 and 3.76 GeV^2 in five logarithmic x bins from 0.0025 to 0.2.

  20. Design and Structure-Function Characterization of 3D Printed Synthetic Porous Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cambre N; Miller, Andrew T; Hollister, Scott J; Guldberg, Robert E; Gall, Ken

    2018-04-01

    3D printing is now adopted for use in a variety of industries and functions. In biomedical engineering, 3D printing has prevailed over more traditional manufacturing methods in tissue engineering due to its high degree of control over both macro- and microarchitecture of porous tissue scaffolds. However, with the improved flexibility in design come new challenges in characterizing the structure-function relationships between various architectures and both mechanical and biological properties in an assortment of clinical applications. Presently, the field of tissue engineering lacks a comprehensive body of literature that is capable of drawing meaningful relationships between the designed structure and resulting function of 3D printed porous biomaterial scaffolds. This work first discusses the role of design on 3D printed porous scaffold function and then reviews characterization of these structure-function relationships for 3D printed synthetic metallic, polymeric, and ceramic biomaterials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Joshua R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ji, Chueng-Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and the $\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $\\chi^2$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Based on the fit results, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  2. From Sequence and Forces to Structure, Function and Evolution of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Mittag, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), which lack persistent structure, are a challenge to structural biology due to the inapplicability of standard methods for characterization of folded proteins as well as their deviation from the dominant structure/function paradigm. Their widespread presence and involvement in biological function, however, has spurred the growing acceptance of the importance of IDPs and the development of new tools for studying their structure, dynamics and function. The interplay of folded and disordered domains or regions for function and the existence of a continuum of protein states with respect to conformational energetics, motional timescales and compactness is shaping a unified understanding of structure-dynamics-disorder/function relationships. On the 20th anniversary of this journal, Structure, we provide a historical perspective on the investigation of IDPs and summarize the sequence features and physical forces that underlie their unique structural, functional and evolutionary properties. PMID:24010708

  3. Study of the hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is studied in the reaction $\\mathrm{e^+e^-} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e^+e^-hadrons}$ at LEP with the L3 detector. The data, collected from 1991 to 1995 at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 91 \\GeV$, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 140~pb$^{-1}$. The photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is measured in the $Q^2$ interval $1.2 \\GeV^2 \\leq Q^2 \\leq 9.0 \\GeV^2$ and the $x$ interval $0.002 < x < 0.2$. $\\FF$ shows a linear growth with $\\ln Q^2$. The value of the slope $\\alpha^{-1}\\mathrm{d}\\FF(Q^2)/\\mathrm{d}\\ln{Q^2}$ is measured to be $0.079 \\pm 0.011 \\pm 0.009$.

  4. A lattice calculation of the nucleon's spin-dependent structure function g2 revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeckeler, M.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Schaefer, A.; Schierholz, G.

    2000-11-01

    Our previous calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g 2 is revisited. The interest in this structure function is to a great extent motivated by the fact that it receives contributions from twist-two as well as from twist-three operators already in leading order of 1/Q 2 thus offering the unique possibility of directly assessing higher-twist effects. In our former calculation the lattice operators were renormalized perturbatively and mixing with lower-dimensional operators was ignored. However, the twist-three operator which gives rise to the matrix element d 2 mixes non-perturbatively with an operator of lower dimension. Taking this effect into account leads to a considerably smaller value of d 2 , which is consistent with the experimental data. (orig.)

  5. Study of the spin structure functions of the nucleon: the E143 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the results of the E143 experiment of deep inelastic scattering of 29 GeV polarized electrons from polarized NH 3 and ND 3 targets, at SLAC. The goal of the experiment is the measurement of the spin structure functions g 1 and g 2 of the nucleon which provide information on its internal spin structure. Experimentally, the structure functions are extracted from the measurement of cross section asymmetries. Our measured values of the first moment of g 1 are two and three standard deviations below the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule predictions, for the proton and for the deuteron, respectively. The Bjoerken sum rule, a QCD fundamental prediction, has been confirmed. We find the quark contribution to the nucleon spin to be around 30 pc. Our results on g 2 are well described by the Wandzura-Wilczek expression. (author) [fr

  6. Anatomical bases of the surgical dissection of the interatrial septum: a morphological and histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filaire, Marc; Nohra, Olivier; Sakka, Laurent; Chadeyras, Jean Baptiste; Da Costa, Valence; Naamee, Adel; Bailly, Patrick; Escande, Georges

    2008-06-01

    The interatrial septum (IAS) can be dissected to resect pulmonary tumors invading the left atrium. The aim of this study was to describe the dissected structures, and to expose the benefits, the limits, and the embryologic reasons of such dissection. We dissected the IAS of 11 fresh, non-embalmed human hearts. The dissected structures were described and the length and depth of the dissection were measured. A histological study was performed in four other fresh hearts to identify and differentiate between dissectible and non-dissectible structures. The dissection was performed through a fatty tissue located between two muscular walls. The depth limit of the IAS dissection was identified as the limbus of the fossa ovalis and the muscular roof of the atria. The section of the latter doubles the depth of the dissection at the level of the upper pulmonary veins. Mean length of the dissected IAS was 77 mm (55-90). Mean depths of the IAS were 41 mm (35-50) at the level of the left upper pulmonary vein, 27 mm (12-35) between the upper and lower pulmonary veins, and 14 mm (8-20) at the level of the left inferior pulmonary vein The surgical dissection of the IAS is performed through the septum secundum that appears as an infold of the atrial wall. The length of the resectable left atrial cuff reaches a mean of 40 mm at the level of the upper pulmonary vein.

  7. Measurement of the nucleon structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering with a wide-band neutrino beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flottmann, T.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the nucleon structure function xF 3 is determined from the inclusive measurement of the deep inelastic neutrino nucleon charged current interaction. The data were taken in the CERN wide band neutrino beam using the detector of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay collaboration. This detector serves at the same time as target, as hadron energy calorimeter and as muon spectrometer. One major aspect of this work was to study the possibility of using high statistics wide band beam data for structure function analysis. The systematic errors specific to this kind of beam are investigated. To obtain the differential cross sections about 100000 neutrino and 75000 antineutrino events in the energy range 20-200 GeV are analysed. The differential cross sections are normalized to the total cross sections, as measured in the narrow band beam by the same collaboration. The calculated structure function xF 3 shows significant deviations from scaling. These scaling violations are compared quantitatively with the predictions of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.) [de

  8. Measurement of the Polarized Structure Function $g_1^p$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, R.D.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.; Ball, Richard D.; Deshpande, Abhay; Forte, Stefano; Hughes, Vernon W.; Lichtenstadt, Jechiel; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1996-01-01

    We present estimates of possible data on spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA, including statistical errors, and discuss systematic uncertainties. We show that these data would shed light on the small x behaviour of the polarized structure function g_1, and would reduce substantially the uncertainty on the determination of the polarized gluon distribution.

  9. Spin structure function measurements with polarized protons and electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Deshpande, A.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.

    1995-01-01

    Useful insights into the spin structure functions of the nucleon can be achieved by measurements of spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA. Such an experiment would be a natural extension of the polarized lepton-nucleon scattering experiments presently carried out at CERN and SLAC. We present here estimates of possible data in the extended kinematic range of HERA and associated statistical errors. (orig.)

  10. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  11. Application of the renormalization group to the study of structure function in the deep inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The transformation law of truncated pertubation theory observables under changes of renormalization scheme is deduced. Based on this, a criticism of the calculus of the moments of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering, obtaining that the A 2 coefficient not renormalization group invariant is done. The PMS criterion is used to optimize the perturbative productions of the moments, truncated to 2nd order. (author) [pt

  12. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  13. Computational modeling of the structure-function relationship in human placental terminal villi.

    OpenAIRE

    Plitman, Mayo R; Olsthoorn, Jason; Charnock-Jones, David Stephen; Burton, Graham James; Oyen, Michelle Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Placental oxygen transport takes place at the final branches of the villous tree and is dictated by the relative arrangement of the maternal and fetal circulations. Modeling techniques have failed to accurately assess the structure-function relationship in the terminal villi due to the geometrical complexity. Three-dimensional blood flow and oxygen transport was modeled in four terminal villi reconstructed from confocal image stacks. The blood flow was analyzed along the center lines of capil...

  14. The exponent λ (x,Q ) of the proton structure function F (x, Q ) at low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from the gluon (g —q¯q) and so the contribution from the quark can be neglected. In the DGLAP formalism an approximate relationship can be obtained between the gluon momentum density G(x,Q2) and the logarithmic slope of the structure function F2(x,Q2). There are several such relations [6–8] available in the literature.

  15. Structure-function relationships in elderly resting-state-networks : influence of age and cognitive performance

    OpenAIRE

    Jockwitz, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the structure-function relationship in cognitive resting state networks in a large population-based elderly sample. The first study characterized the functional connectivity in four cognitive resting state networks with respect to age, gender and cognitive performance: Default Mode Network (DMN), executive, and left and right frontoparietal resting state networks. The second study assessed the structural correlates of the functional reorganization of th...

  16. QCD at low Q2 - a correspondence relation for moments of structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, B.; Schrempp, F.

    1980-01-01

    The precocious validity of QCD predictions in deep inelastic lepton nucleon scattering and e + e - annihilation is interpreted as a signal for an underlying 'correspondence principle' relating perturbative and nonperturbative physics on the Q 2 average. Correspondence relations for nonsinglet moments of deep inelastic structure functions are formulated, discussed and successfully tested against experiment. The relations provide an independent determination of the QCD Λ-parameter from low Q 2 data in perfect agreement with results from large Q 2 analyses. (author)

  17. On the Rise of the Proton Structure Function F_2 Towards Low x

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solovev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement of the derivative (d ln F_2 / d lnx)_(Q^2)= -lambda(x,Q^2) of the proton structure function F_2 is presented in the low x domain of deeply inelastic positron-proton scattering. For 5*10^(-5)=1.5 GeV^2, lambda(x,Q^2) is found to be independent of x and to increase linearly with ln(Q^2).

  18. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tara Holitzki; Richard A. MacKenzie; Tracy N. Wiegner; Karla J. McDermid

    2013-01-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an ‘‘invasive species of concern’’ in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian...

  19. A thermodynamical analysis of the π and K meson valence structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, C.; Pazzi, R.

    1982-01-01

    The π and K meson valance structure functions are analysed in the framework of a thermodynamical model already applied to the nucleon. We obtain a simple expression which reproduces quite well the data for chi > 0.3. The effective temperatures are found to be of the order of 20 MeV for the pion and 65 MeV for the kaon. (orig.)

  20. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2) for 0.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. C. Alexa; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; K. Arundell; L. Auerbach; F. T. Baker; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; W. U. Boeglin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; C. Cavata; C.-C. Chang; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; R. De Leo; A. Deur; N. d'Hose; B. Diederich; J. J. Domingo; M. B. Epstein; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian,; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.-O. Hansen; R. Holmes; M. Holtrop; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; C. Hyde-Wright; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; M. K. Jones; C. Jutier,; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khayat; K. Kino; L. H. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; G. Lavessiere; A. Leone; J. J. LeRose; M. Liang; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey,; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martino; C. J. Martoff; K. McCormick; J. McIntyre; R. L. J. van der Meer; S. Mehrabyan; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G. W. Miller; J. Y. Mougey; S. K. Nanda; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quemener; R. D. Ransome; O. Ravel; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; G. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; A. Saha; T. Saito; A. J. Sarty; A. Serdarevic,; T. Smith; K. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; D. G. Zainea; W-M. Zhang; J. Zhao; Z.-L. Zhou

    1999-01-01

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q 2 ) has been extracted in the range 0.7 2 2 from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics

  1. Structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle provides inspiration for design of new artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yingxin; Zhang, Chi

    2015-03-01

    A variety of actuator technologies have been developed to mimic biological skeletal muscle that generates force in a controlled manner. Force generation process of skeletal muscle involves complicated biophysical and biochemical mechanisms; therefore, it is impossible to replace biological muscle. In biological skeletal muscle tissue, the force generation of a muscle depends not only on the force generation capacity of the muscle fiber, but also on many other important factors, including muscle fiber type, motor unit recruitment, architecture, structure and morphology of skeletal muscle, all of which have significant impact on the force generation of the whole muscle or force transmission from muscle fibers to the tendon. Such factors have often been overlooked, but can be incorporated in artificial muscle design, especially with the discovery of new smart materials and the development of innovative fabrication and manufacturing technologies. A better understanding of the physiology and structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle will therefore benefit the artificial muscle design. In this paper, factors that affect muscle force generation are reviewed. Mathematical models used to model the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle are reviewed and discussed. We hope the review will provide inspiration for the design of a new generation of artificial muscle by incorporating the structure-function relationship of skeletal muscle into the design of artificial muscle.

  2. Scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions in the interplanetary medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions, obtained from the velocity fluctuations measured in the interplanetary space plasma. Using the expression for the energy transfer rate which seems the most relevant in describing the evolution of the pseudo-energy densities in the interplanetary medium, we introduce an energy cascade model derived from a simple fragmentation process, which takes into account the intermittency effect. In the absence and in the presence of the large-scale magnetic field decorrelation effect the model reduces to the fluid and the hydromagnetic p-model, respectively. We show that the scaling exponents of the q-th power of the velocity structure functions, as obtained by the model in the absence of the decorrelation effect, furnishes the best-fit to the data analyzed from the Voyager 2 velocity field measurements at 8.5 AU. Our results allow us to hypothesize a new kind of scale-similarity for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence when the decorrelation effect is at work, related to the fourth-order velocity structure function.

  3. Regression analysis of the structure function for reliability evaluation of continuous-state system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamiz, M.L.; Martinez Miranda, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Technical systems are designed to perform an intended task with an admissible range of efficiency. According to this idea, it is permissible that the system runs among different levels of performance, in addition to complete failure and the perfect functioning one. As a consequence, reliability theory has evolved from binary-state systems to the most general case of continuous-state system, in which the state of the system changes over time through some interval on the real number line. In this context, obtaining an expression for the structure function becomes difficult, compared to the discrete case, with difficulty increasing as the number of components of the system increases. In this work, we propose a method to build a structure function for a continuum system by using multivariate nonparametric regression techniques, in which certain analytical restrictions on the variable of interest must be taken into account. Once the structure function is obtained, some reliability indices of the system are estimated. We illustrate our method via several numerical examples.

  4. Regression analysis of the structure function for reliability evaluation of continuous-state system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamiz, M.L., E-mail: mgamiz@ugr.e [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Martinez Miranda, M.D. [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Technical systems are designed to perform an intended task with an admissible range of efficiency. According to this idea, it is permissible that the system runs among different levels of performance, in addition to complete failure and the perfect functioning one. As a consequence, reliability theory has evolved from binary-state systems to the most general case of continuous-state system, in which the state of the system changes over time through some interval on the real number line. In this context, obtaining an expression for the structure function becomes difficult, compared to the discrete case, with difficulty increasing as the number of components of the system increases. In this work, we propose a method to build a structure function for a continuum system by using multivariate nonparametric regression techniques, in which certain analytical restrictions on the variable of interest must be taken into account. Once the structure function is obtained, some reliability indices of the system are estimated. We illustrate our method via several numerical examples.

  5. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvaskis, Vladas; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Baker, Oliver; Blok, Henk; Bosted, Peter; Boswell, Melissa; Bruell, Antje; Christy, Michael; Cochran, Anthony; Ent, Rolf; Filippone, Bradley; Gasparian, Ashot; Keppel, Cynthia; Kinney, Edward; Lapikas, L.; Lorenzon, Wolfgang; Mack, David; Mammei, Juliette; Martin, J.W.; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Piercey, Rodney; Potterveld, David; Smith, Gregory; Spurlock, Kurt; Van der Steenhoven, Gerard; Stepanyan, Stepan; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Wood, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of the proton and deuteron F2 structure functions are presented. The data, taken at Jefferson Lab Hall C, span the four-momentum transfer range 0:06 < Q2 < 2:8 GeV2, and Bjorken x values from 0.009 to 0.45, thus extending the knowledge of F2 to low values of Q2 at low x. Next-to-next-to-leading order calculations using recent parton distribution functions start to deviate from the data for Q2 < 2 GeV2 at the low and high x-values. Down to the lowest value of Q2, the structure function is in good agreement with a parameterization of F2 based on data that have been taken at much higher values of Q2 or much lower values of x, and which is constrained by data at the photon point. The ratio of the deuteron and proton structure functions at low x remains well described by a logarithmic dependence on Q2 at low Q2.

  6. Customizing Structure-Function Displacements in the Macula for Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Andrew; Chen, Siyuan; Sepulveda, Juan A; McKendrick, Allison M

    2015-09-01

    In the macula, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are displaced from their receptive fields. We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to customize displacements for individual eyes by taking into account macular shape parameters, and determined the likely effect of individual anatomical differences on structure-function mapping in the central visual field. Using the population average model of Drasdo et al. as a starting point, we altered the RGC count in that model based on the ratio of an individual's RGC layer plus inner plexiform layer thickness to the population average on a pointwise basis as a function of eccentricity from the fovea. For 20 adults (age, 24-33; median age, 28) with normal vision, we computed displacements with the original model and our customized approach. We report the variance in displacements among individuals and compare the effects of such displacements on structure-function mapping of the commonly used the 10-2 visual field pattern. As expected, customizing the displacement using individual OCT data made only a small difference on average from the population-based values predicted by the Drasdo et al. model. However, the range between individuals was over 1° at many locations, and closer to 2° at some locations in the superior visual field. Individualizing macular displacement measurements based on OCT data for an individual can result in large spatial shifts in the retinal area corresponding to 10-2 locations, which may be important for clinical structure-function analysis when performed on a local, spatial scale.

  7. Comparing the Structure-Function Relationship at the Macula With Standard Automated Perimetry and Microperimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harsha L; Januwada, Manideepak; Hussain, Raza S M; Pillutla, Lalitha N; Begum, Viquar U; Chaitanya, Aditya; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandra S

    2015-12-01

    To compare the structure-function relationship between ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness measurements using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) and visual sensitivities measured using standard automated perimetry (SAP) and microperimetry (MP) at the macula in glaucoma. In a prospective study, 45 control eyes (29 subjects) and 60 glaucoma eyes (45 patients) underwent visual sensitivity estimation at the macula (central 10°) by SAP and MP, and GCIPL thickness measurement at the macula by SDOCT. Structure-function relationships between GCILP thickness and visual sensitivity loss with SAP and MP at various macular sectors were assessed using the Hood and Kardon model. To compare structure-function relationship with SAP and MP, we calculated the number of data points falling outside the 5th and the 95th percentile values of the Hood and Kardon model with each of the perimeters. The number of points falling outside the 5th and 95th percentile values of the Hood and Kardon model ranged from 28 (superior sector) to 48 (inferonasal sector) with SAP and 33 (superior sector) to 49 (inferonasal sector) with MP. The difference in the number of points falling outside the 5th and 95th percentile values with SAP and MP was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05, χ(2) test) for all the sectors. Visual sensitivity measurements of both SAP and MP demonstrated a similar relationship with the GCIPL measurements of SDOCT at the macula in glaucoma.

  8. A new model for the structure function of integrated water vapor in turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobak, Justin P.; Ruf, Christopher S.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulent fluctuation of integrated water vapor in the troposphere is one of the major noise sources in radio interferometry. Processed integrated water vapor estimates from microwave radiometers colocated with interferometers have been used to set bounds on this uncertainty. The bound has been in the form of a calculated structure function, which is a measure of temporal or spatial decorrelation of fluctuations. In this paper a new model is presented for the estimation of the structure function in the absence of radiometer measurements. Using this model, the structure function can be estimated using measurements or estimates of a limited number of meteorological parameters. These parameters include boundary layer depth, surface heat and humidity fluxes, entrainment humidity flux, average virtual potential temperature in the boundary layer, and geostrophic wind speed. These parameters can be found or estimated from radiosonde and surface eddy correlation system data. The model is based on a framework of turbulence meteorology and provides excellent agreement when compared with state-of-the-art atmospheric turbulence simulations. Results of preliminary comparisons with ground truth show some excellent agreement, as well as some problems. The performance of the new model exceeds that of one current model. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union

  9. Structure-Function Network Mapping and Its Assessment via Persistent Homology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain structure and function is a fundamental problem in network neuroscience. This work deals with the general method of structure-function mapping at the whole-brain level. We formulate the problem as a topological mapping of structure-function connectivity via matrix function, and find a stable solution by exploiting a regularization procedure to cope with large matrices. We introduce a novel measure of network similarity based on persistent homology for assessing the quality of the network mapping, which enables a detailed comparison of network topological changes across all possible thresholds, rather than just at a single, arbitrary threshold that may not be optimal. We demonstrate that our approach can uncover the direct and indirect structural paths for predicting functional connectivity, and our network similarity measure outperforms other currently available methods. We systematically validate our approach with (1) a comparison of regularized vs. non-regularized procedures, (2) a null model of the degree-preserving random rewired structural matrix, (3) different network types (binary vs. weighted matrices), and (4) different brain parcellation schemes (low vs. high resolutions). Finally, we evaluate the scalability of our method with relatively large matrices (2514x2514) of structural and functional connectivity obtained from 12 healthy human subjects measured non-invasively while at rest. Our results reveal a nonlinear structure-function relationship, suggesting that the resting-state functional connectivity depends on direct structural connections, as well as relatively parsimonious indirect connections via polysynaptic pathways. PMID:28046127

  10. QCD coherence in the structure function and associated distributions at small x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesini, G.

    1995-01-01

    We recall the origin of angular ordering in soft parton emission and show that at small x this coherent structure is masked in the structure function while it can be detected in the associated distributions. This is due to the fact that collinear singularities cancel completely in the structure function at fixed transverse momentum for x →0. In this limit the dependence on the hard scale is lost, the angular ordered region becomes equivalent to the multi-Regge region in which all transverse momenta are of the same order, and one derives the BFKL equation. For the associated distributions at small x such a complete cancellation of collinear singularities does not hold in general, thus large singular contributions are neglected if angular ordering is replaced by multi-Regge phase space. The deduction of these features requires an analysis without any collinear approximations which is done by extending to small x the soft gluon factorization techniques typically used in the region of large x. Since the coherent structure of parton emission is the same in the small and large x regions, one can formulate a unified evolution equation for the structure function, a unified coherent branching and jet algorithm which allows the calculation of associated distributions in all x regions. Such a unified formulation, valid for all x, is presented and compared with usual treatments. ((orig.))

  11. Refined algebraic quantisation in a system with nonconstant gauge invariant structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Pascual, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In a previous work [J. Louko and E. Martínez-Pascual, “Constraint rescaling in refined algebraic quantisation: Momentum constraint,” J. Math. Phys. 52, 123504 (2011)], refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) within a family of classically equivalent constrained Hamiltonian systems that are related to each other by rescaling one momentum-type constraint was investigated. In the present work, the first steps to generalise this analysis to cases where more constraints occur are developed. The system under consideration contains two momentum-type constraints, originally abelian, where rescalings of these constraints by a non-vanishing function of the coordinates are allowed. These rescalings induce structure functions at the level of the gauge algebra. Providing a specific parametrised family of real-valued scaling functions, the implementation of the corresponding rescaled quantum momentum-type constraints is performed using RAQ when the gauge algebra: (i) remains abelian and (ii) undergoes into an algebra of a nonunimodular group with nonconstant gauge invariant structure functions. Case (ii) becomes the first example known to the author where an open algebra is handled in refined algebraic quantisation. Challenging issues that arise in the presence of non-gauge invariant structure functions are also addressed

  12. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron gn1(x) spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g n 1 (x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g n 1 (x) structure function integral value on the 0 2 mean value of 2 GeV 2 after some extrapolations. This value is at about two standard deviations away from the theoretical predictions of the Ellis-Jaffe rule. Thanks to the existing experimental results for the proton (E143 experiment), the Bjorken sum rule has been precisely tested and is perfectly compatible with the theoretical value. The results have allowed to estimate the nucleon spin fraction carried by the quarks. (J.S.). 86 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs

  13. Stroke from cercocephalic arterial dissecting in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, Mustafa A.; Al-Jarallah, Ahmed A.; Al-Salman, Mussaad M.; Alorainy, Ibrahim A.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2006-01-01

    Cercocephalic arterial dissecting (CCAD) is an important, but rarely recognized, cause of stroke in children. We describe 3 cases of CCAD who were diagnosed during a study on childhood stroke which included 104 patients. A high index of suspicion and targeted investigations are needed for the diagnosis and management of CCAD in childhood. (author)

  14. Measuring Medical Students' Motivation to Learning Anatomy by Cadaveric Dissection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman M.; Khalil, Mohammed K.

    2017-01-01

    Motivation and learning are inter-related. It is well known that motivating learners is clearly a complex endeavor, which can be influenced by the educational program and the learning environment. Limited research has been conducted to examine students' motivation as a method to assess the effectiveness of dissection in medical education. This…

  15. Acute aortic dissection in patient with suspected pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lešanović Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic dissection is one of the most fatal vascular emergencies. Almost 40% of the patients do not reach hospital in time while more than quarter die in the first 24 hours after the dissection begins. Case Report: A 37-year old man was admitted to our hospital with severe anterior chest pain which had lasted for over a week. Suspected aortic dissection was rapidly confirmed using imaging modalities - MDCT chest scan and TTE, followed by an urgent surgical management - Bentall procedure. MDCT chest scan also discovered adrenal incidentaloma defined as malignant, pheochromocytoma like mass. Due to the critical state of the patient, there was not enough time for further endocrinologic testing. Discussion and conclusion: When treating patients with pheochromocytoma and acute aortic disection, it is crucial to obtain a stable hemodynamic state before the surgery, since they can trigger a severe hypertensive crisis due to high levels of cathecholamines induced chronic vasoconctriction. The most vulnerable periods are the induction of anesthesia and perioperative hemodynamic oscillations, so treating patients with short acting alpha- 1 adrenergic blocking agents preoperatively has proven to be helpful - Phentolamine. Both dissection of aorta and pheochromocytoma present challenges for anesthesiologists and early recognition of symptoms is essential in establishing the diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate.

  16. [Selective neck dissection for treating recurrent branchial anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangsi; Song, Xinhan; Zhang, Siyi; Han, Zhijuan; Luo, Xiaoning; Chen, Shaohua; Zhan, Jiandong

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the role of selective neck dissection in the treatment of recurrent branchial anomalies. The clinical data of 18 patients with recurrent branchial anomalies were retrospectively analyzed. In accordance with the embryologic and anatomic features of branchial anomalies, different types of selective neck dissection were applied. With dissection and protection of important vessels, nerves and other structures, enbloc resection principles were applied to extirpate branchial lesions, scarrings and inflammatory granuloma during the operation. Of all 18 patients, 16 cases were healed with primary healing, 2 cases with local incision infection were healed after dressing changes. A temporary facial nerve paralysis occurred in 1 case with recurrent first branchial cleft fistula postoperatively, and completely recovered 2 months after operation. A postoperative temporary vocal cord paralysis occurred in 1 case with recurrent fourth branchial cleft fistula, and totally recuperated 1 month after operation. No recurrences were found in all 18 cases with a follow-up period of 12-78 months (average 35 months). Selective neck dissection is a safe and effective surgical procedure for the radical treatment of recurrent branchial anomalies.

  17. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, H; Køber, L

    1999-01-01

    to patient characteristics, patient treatment, and prognosis. Primary spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare condition but one that must be considered when young people, especially post partum women, present an acute ischaemic syndrome. Thrombolytic therapy may be a two-edged sword and therefore...

  18. The Influence of Emotion on Students' Performance in Dissection Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstermann, Nina; Grube, Dietmar; Bogeholz, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the issue of how emotions such as disgust influence students' self-efficacy belief in terms of mastering a dissection task and also how these affect their interest in the biology of the heart. Following models of intrinsic motivation and the development of motivation, we expected disgust to negatively impact on students'…

  19. Sentinel Lymph Node Dissection in Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Christensen, Mette Haulund; Oldenbourg, Mette Holmqvist

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) in the treatment of patients with locally recurrent breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 147 patients with locally recurrent breast cancer were included from five different breast surgery departments...

  20. Rembrandt's anatomy lesson of Dr. Deijman of 1656 dissected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, Frank F. A.; Middelkoop, Norbert E.; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    More than 350 years ago, Rembrandt painted Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Deijman. This group portrait, featuring important members of the Amsterdam Guild of Surgeons, belongs to the series of paintings of the guild. Rembrandt's masterpiece is one of the most famous historical images of a dissection of the

  1. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection: complete angiographic resolution without stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Abizaid

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a 49-year-oldwoman is presented. She did not present the classical cardiovascular riskfactors. Etiology and treatment are discussed. She underwent primarypercutaneous coronary intervention of the left anterior descendingartery with no stenting and had complete angiographic resolution.

  2. Clinical characteristics of unruptured vertebral artery dissections presenting with headaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Homare; Mizuniwa, Yoshitaka; Kouno, Takao; Nakayama, Hirofumi; Furuya, Yu; Taguchi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    We reviewed 13 cases of patients with unruptured dissections of the vertebral artery who were treated at our hospital after presenting with headaches. We identified 13 patients who had headache alone at the time of onset and who were diagnosed as having vertebral artery dissection using three-dimensional CT, MRI, MR angiography (MRA), or angiography from November 2007 to October 2009. Primary radiographic investigations showed the 'pearl and string' sign in two cases, dilatation in eight, and the string sign alone in three cases. Following initial conservative treatment, 11 cases exhibited radiographic improvement, but two cases underwent surgical treatment because of progressive vertebral artery dissection. A definitive diagnosis was made using primary investigations in nine cases and dynamic changes on radiographic investigations in four cases. The headache was located posteriorly in all cases, but some patients had mild headaches. Clinicians need to be aware of the possibility of vertebral artery dissection even if the headache is mild at onset. Radiographic investigations are important for a definitive diagnosis and in deciding whether to intervene surgically. (author)

  3. OK-432 sclerotherapy of cervical chylous lymphocele after neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Park, Chan Il

    2008-06-01

    Postoperative cervical chylous lymphoceles are extremely rare circumscribed collections of lymph which are usually treated by drainage or surgical exploration, but rarely by sclerotherapy. We investigated the efficacy of OK-432 (Picibanil, Chungai Pharmaceutical Co., Tokyo, Japan) sclerotherapy in the treatment of cervical lymphocele after neck dissection. Four patients with postoperative lymphocele who could not be cured by repeated percutaneous needle aspiration and pressure dressing were treated with intralesional injection of 0.1-0.2 mg OK-432 after aspiration of fluid. The aspirated fluid was assessed biochemically and cytologically, and regular palpation and ultrasonography/computed tomography were used to evaluate outcomes and recurrences. Two patients with chyle leak during neck dissection had lymphoceles in the left supraclavicular region 3 weeks later. The other two patients had lymphoceles on the right neck 9 and 12 months, respectively, after neck dissection. All aspirated fluids were chylous in origin without tumor cells. OK-432 sclerotherapy scored all four lesions with no major complications except for fever and local pain for several days. No lymphocele recurrences or metastatic cancers were observed in any patient for >1 year after sclerotherapy. Intralesional injection of OK-432 may be a safe and effective alternative to surgical exploration in the treatment of cervical lymphocele after neck dissection.

  4. Deep dissection: motivating students beyond rote learning in veterinary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cake, Martin A

    2006-01-01

    The profusion of descriptive, factual information in veterinary anatomy inevitably creates pressure on students to employ surface learning approaches and "rote learning." This phenomenon may contribute to negative perceptions of the relevance of anatomy as a discipline. Thus, encouraging deep learning outcomes will not only lead to greater satisfaction for both instructors and learners but may have the added effect of raising the profile of and respect for the discipline. Consideration of the literature reveals the broad scope of interventions required to motivate students to go beyond rote learning. While many of these are common to all disciplines (e.g., promoting active learning, making higher-order goals explicit, reducing content in favor of concepts, aligning assessment with outcomes), other factors are peculiar to anatomy, such as the benefits of incorporating clinical tidbits, "living anatomy," the anatomy museum, and dissection classes into a "learning context" that fosters deep approaches. Surprisingly, the 10 interventions discussed focus more on factors contributing to student perceptions of the course than on drastic changes to the anatomy course itself. This is because many traditional anatomy practices, such as dissection and museum-based classes, are eminently compatible with active, student-centered learning strategies and the adoption of deep learning approaches by veterinary students. Thus the key to encouraging, for example, dissection for deep learning ("deep dissection") lies more in student motivation, personal engagement, curriculum structure, and "learning context" than in the nature of the learning activity itself.

  5. Isolated Posterior Cerebral Artery Dissection: Report of Three Cases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Paul M

    2005-01-01

    .... We present three cases of dissection of the P2 segment of the PCA. In two patients, an association with minor axial head trauma was documented, suggesting shearing injury of the PCA as it crosses over the free edge of the tentorium...

  6. Partial axillary dissection in early breast cancer | El-Fayoumi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of later clinical involvement of the axilla and at establishing a sound basis for adjuvant treatment planning axillary dissection is an important operative procedure. ... Methods: Eighteen patients underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the other two patients who were fulfilling the criteria for conservative breast surgery ...

  7. Muscular Variations During Axillary Dissection: A Clinical Study in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle and the coracoid process, without interruption by any type of tendinous fibres. The axillary arch muscle crossed anteriorly over the axillary vein [Figure 1]. The mastectomy along with axillary dissection was completed uneventfully. There was left sided absence of pectoralis major and minor muscles in a 45 years old ...

  8. Circumareolar Incision‑subdermal Tunneling Dissection for Excision ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Excision of multiple fibroadenomas (MF) in separate breast quadrants presents difficulties of number and location of incision(s) and extent of tissue dissection and may be associated with more complications and poorer cosmetic outcome. This is a report of excision of MF in multiple quadrants of the breast using a ...

  9. Genomic dissection and prioritizing of candidate genes of QTL for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic dissection and prioritizing of candidate genes of QTL for regulating spontaneous arthritis on chromosome 1 in mice deficient for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Yanhong Cao, Jifei Zhang, Yan Jiao, Jian Yan, Feng Jiao, XiaoYun Liu, Robert W. Williams, Karen A. Hasty,. John M. Stuart and Weikuan Gu. J. Genet.

  10. Vertebral Artery Dissection Causing Stroke After Trampoline Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casserly, Courtney S; Lim, Rodrick K; Prasad, Asuri Narayan

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report a case of a 4-year-old boy who had been playing on the trampoline and presented to the emergency department (ED) with vomiting and ataxia, and had a vertebral artery dissection with subsequent posterior circulation infarcts. This study is a chart review. The patient presented to the emergency department with a 4-day history of vomiting and gait unsteadiness. A computed tomography scan of his head revealed multiple left cerebellar infarcts. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiogram of his head and neck demonstrated multiple infarcts involving the left cerebellum, bilateral thalami, and left occipital lobe. A computed tomography angiogram confirmed the presence of a left vertebral artery dissection. Vertebral artery dissection is a relatively common cause of stroke in the pediatric age group. Trampoline use has been associated with significant risk of injury to the head and neck. Patients who are small and/or young are most at risk. In this case, minor trauma secondary to trampoline use could be a possible mechanism for vertebral artery dissection and subsequent strokes. The association in this case warrants careful consideration because trampoline use could pose a significant risk to pediatric users.

  11. A Novel Approach to the Dissection of the Human Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, F. Richard; Fabrizio, Philip A.; Shumaker, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The knee is one of the most frequently injured joints of the human body with injuries affecting the general population and the athletic population of many age groups. Dissection procedures for the knee joint typically do not allow unobstructed visualization of the anterior cruciate or posterior cruciate ligaments without sacrificing the collateral…

  12. Neck dissection with harmonic scalpel and electrocautery? A randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Roshan K; Mathiazhagan, Arulalan; Panda, Naresh K

    2017-10-01

    Is the use of harmonic scalpel for neck dissection useful? Literature search did not show a single, prospective, randomised control trial. We intended to study the role of harmonic scalpel in neck dissection and compare it with conventional electrocautery technique for oral cavity carcinoma. 40 patients undergoing selective neck dissection for primary oral cavity malignancy were enrolled in this study. The harmonic scalpel (HS) group consisted of 20 patients, and the electrocautery technique (ET) group comprised of 20 patients. The following variables were examined: intraoperative blood loss, operative time, number of ligatures used, postoperative drain, and postoperative hospital stay. Intraoperative blood loss was found to be significantly reduced in harmonic scalpel group as compared to electrocautery group. However, we found no difference in other parameters like operative time, postop drain, postoperative hospital stay and number of ligatures used between both groups. Harmonic scalpel for neck dissection is associated with significantly lesser intraoperative blood loss as compared to electrocautery. There is no effect on operative time and postoperative hospital stay in both groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Bayesian dissection for genetic architecture of traits associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... model selection technique was used to dissect genetic architecture for traits of interest. A total of 28 main-effect ... nutrition elements for rice growth in natural ecosystems. In general ... All materials were sown on 28. April and ...

  14. Risk of marginal mandibular nerve injury in neck dissection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2012-01-01

    The immediate and permanent frequency of injury to the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve (MMN) after neck dissection has only scarcely been addressed in the medical literature. We investigated the risk of injury in 159 consecutive patients after neck dissection for various reasons...... in level I B and level II A, respectively. In 95 patients with oral cancer 13 (14%) of the cases had malfunction of the lower lip domain 2 weeks after neck dissection in level I B indicating paresis to the MMN. Follow-up analyses 1-2 years after the operation showed permanent paralysis in 4 to 7......% of the cases in whom two of them had the nerve sacrificed for oncologic reasons during the operation. In 18 patients with parotic cancer the corresponding permanent frequency of MMN paralysis was 11.1%. In 46 patients with neck dissection in level II A but not in level I B, no paresis of the MMN was registered...

  15. High‑risk pulmonary embolism in a patient with acute dissecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-07

    Apr 7, 2016 ... Key words: Acute dissection of an aneurysm, anticoagulant therapy, pulmonary ... On admission, the physical examination revealed cyanosis, .... myocardial infarction and type B acute aortic dissection – A case report. Adv.

  16. Dissecting the large-scale galactic conformity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seongu

    2018-01-01

    Galactic conformity is an observed phenomenon that galaxies located in the same region have similar properties such as star formation rate, color, gas fraction, and so on. The conformity was first observed among galaxies within in the same halos (“one-halo conformity”). The one-halo conformity can be readily explained by mutual interactions among galaxies within a halo. Recent observations however further witnessed a puzzling connection among galaxies with no direct interaction. In particular, galaxies located within a sphere of ~5 Mpc radius tend to show similarities, even though the galaxies do not share common halos with each other ("two-halo conformity" or “large-scale conformity”). Using a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation, Illustris, we investigate the physical origin of the two-halo conformity and put forward two scenarios. First, back-splash galaxies are likely responsible for the large-scale conformity. They have evolved into red galaxies due to ram-pressure stripping in a given galaxy cluster and happen to reside now within a ~5 Mpc sphere. Second, galaxies in strong tidal field induced by large-scale structure also seem to give rise to the large-scale conformity. The strong tides suppress star formation in the galaxies. We discuss the importance of the large-scale conformity in the context of galaxy evolution.

  17. Possible extracardiac predictors of aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background According to previous studies, aortic diameter alone seems to be insufficient to predict the event of aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome (MFS). Determining the optimal schedule for preventive aortic root replacement (ARR) aortic growth rate is of importance, as well as family history, however, none of them appear to be decisive. Thus, the aim of this study was to search for potential predictors of aortic dissection in MFS. Methods A Marfan Biobank consisting of 79 MFS patients was established. Thirty-nine MFS patients who underwent ARR were assigned into three groups based on the indication for surgery (dissection, annuloaortic ectasia and prophylactic surgery). The prophylactic surgery group was excluded from the study. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) serum levels were measured by ELISA, relative expression of c-Fos, matrix metalloproteinase 3 and 9 (MMP-3 and −9) were assessed by RT-PCR. Clinical parameters, including anthropometric variables - based on the original Ghent criteria were also analyzed. Results Among patients with aortic dissection, TGF-β serum level was elevated (43.78 ± 6.51 vs. 31.64 ± 4.99 ng/l, p < 0.0001), MMP-3 was up-regulated (Ln2α = 1.87, p = 0.062) and striae atrophicae were more common (92% vs. 41% p = 0.027) compared to the annuloaortic ectasia group. Conclusions We found three easily measurable parameters (striae atrophicae, TGF-β serum level, MMP-3) that may help to predict the risk of aortic dissection in MFS. Based on these findings a new classification of MFS, that is benign or malignant is also proposed, which could be taken into consideration in determining the timing of prophylactic ARR. PMID:24720641

  18. Extracranial vertebral artery rupture likely secondary to "cupping therapy" superimposed on spontaneous dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Young; Huh, Chae Wook; Choi, Chang Hwa; Lee, Jae Il

    2016-12-01

    The extracranial vertebral artery (VA) is vulnerable to dissection and the V3 segment is the most common location for dissection. Dissection accounts for about 2% of all ischemic strokes and can occur after trauma or chiropractic neck maneuvers. We report an extremely rare case of spontaneous extracranial VA dissection presenting with posterior neck hematoma aggravated after cupping therapy, a treatment in traditional Oriental medicine. We treated the patient successfully by endovascular treatment without any complication. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. The VIRTUE Registry of type B thoracic dissections--study design and early results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Endovascular procedures for repair of Type B aortic dissection have become increasingly common and are often considered to be first line therapy for acute complicated dissections. The long term durability of these repairs is largely undefined.......Endovascular procedures for repair of Type B aortic dissection have become increasingly common and are often considered to be first line therapy for acute complicated dissections. The long term durability of these repairs is largely undefined....

  20. Spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks in the framework of nonperturbative QCD and new Regge trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorokhov, A.E.; Kochelev, N.I.

    1991-01-01

    Within the model of QCD vacuum as an instanton liquid the spin-dependent structure functions of sea quarks are obtained. It is shown that the EMC data manages the definition of new Regge trajectory connected with the axial anomaly. The model explains the modern experimental data on the sea quark structure functions. 23 refs.; 3 figs