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Sample records for dispersion field study

  1. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  2. Field studies of HT oxidation and dispersion in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.; Ogram, G.L.; Spencer, F.S.; Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON

    1988-10-01

    A tracer quantity of 3.54 TBq tritiated hydrogen (HT) was released into the atmosphere at a Chalk River, Ontario field site to determine the behaviour of HT in the environment. The primary objective was to establish the oxidation rate of HT to tritiated water (HTO) in air, soil and vegetation compartments. HTO/HT atmospheric concentration ratios observed during the release ranged from 0.14 x 10 -4 at 5 m to 7.0 x 10 -4 at 400 m distance from the release point indicating an effective oxidation rate of about 1.5% h -1 . Gas phase oxidation in the atmosphere would be less than this effective rate. Results confirm that surface soils play the dominant role in converting HT to HTO. Soil HT deposition velocities were between 2.7 x 10 -4 and 11 x 10 -4 m s -1 for an open field of varied composition, and between 3.3 x 10 -4 and 12 x 10 -4 m s -1 for a conifer forest. Soil HTO loss rates were initially 1 to 3 % h -1 averaged over the first 24 h after release. Vegetation tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) resulted from uptake of soil HTO and exchange with atmospheric HTO vapour. Upper limit HT deposition velocities to vegetation measured as TFWT in 5 species were 0.23 x 10 -7 to 6 x 10 -7 m s -1 expressed on a leaf area basis. TFWT loss rates were 5.2 to 8.1 % h -1 from about 12 to 48 h after release with low activity rain and 0.42 to 0.56 % h -1 from about 48 to 335 h. Vegetation organically-bound tritium/TFWT specific activity ratios (Bq g -1 H) were about 0.1 initially, increasing to 16 after 113 days as TFWT specific activity declined more rapidly than that of OBT. The effective HT oxidation rate, deposition velocities and HTO loss rates were in good agreement with a 1986 HT field release and previous laboratory experiments

  3. Study on the wind field and pollutant dispersion in street canyons using a stable numerical method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ji-Yang; Leung, Dennis Y C

    2005-01-01

    A stable finite element method for the time dependent Navier-Stokes equations was used for studying the wind flow and pollutant dispersion within street canyons. A three-step fractional method was used to solve the velocity field and the pressure field separately from the governing equations. The Streamline Upwind Petrov-Galerkin (SUPG) method was used to get stable numerical results. Numerical oscillation was minimized and satisfactory results can be obtained for flows at high Reynolds numbers. Simulating the flow over a square cylinder within a wide range of Reynolds numbers validates the wind field model. The Strouhal numbers obtained from the numerical simulation had a good agreement with those obtained from experiment. The wind field model developed in the present study is applied to simulate more complex flow phenomena in street canyons with two different building configurations. The results indicated that the flow at rooftop of buildings might not be assumed parallel to the ground as some numerical modelers did. A counter-clockwise rotating vortex may be found in street canyons with an inflow from the left to right. In addition, increasing building height can increase velocity fluctuations in the street canyon under certain circumstances, which facilitate pollutant dispersion. At high Reynolds numbers, the flow regimes in street canyons do not change with inflow velocity.

  4. Marine Radioactivity Studies in the Suez Canal, Part II: Field Experiments and a Modelling Study of Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, J. M.; Abdel-Aal, M. M.; Al-Gamal, S. A.; Abdel-Hay, F. A.; Zahar, H. M.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper we take advantage of the two field tracing experiments carried out under the IAEA project EGY/07/002, to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal. The experiments were accomplished by using rhodamine B as a tracer, and water samples were measured by luminescence spectrometry. The presence of natural luminescent particles in the canal waters limited the use of some field data. During experiments, water levels, velocities, wind and other physical parameters were recorded to supply appropriate information for the modelling work. From this data set, the hydrodynamics of the studied area has been reasonably described. We apply a 1-D-Gaussian and 2-D modelling approaches to predict the position and the spatial shape of the plume. The use of different formulations for dispersion coefficients is studied. These dispersion coefficients are then applied in a 2-D-hydrodynamic and dispersion model for the Bitter Lake to investigate different scenarios of accidental discharges.

  5. Field studies of HT oxidation and dispersion in the environment. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The environmental dispersion and oxidation of a controlled atmospheric release of tritiated hydrogen (HT) was studied in a pilot-scale field experiment. This study was designed to test procedures and obtain preliminary results for planning a more intensive experiment to determine the environmental behaviour of HT with emphasis on the processes leading to the appearance of HTO in the atmosphere, ie., conversion, deposition and resuspension. Field observations led to the following conclusions: 1) no evidence was found for the rapid conversion of HT to HTO in the atmosphere, 2) observations support the hypothesis that the dominant process giving rise to the observed HTO in air was HT oxidation in the soil by microbial action followed by resuspension of HTO, 3) HT deposition velocities to soil ranged between 0.041 cm/s and 0.13 cm/s, consistent with previous chamber measurements, 4) the rate of HTO loss from soil, averaged over 21 days, was less than 1% per hour, and 5) vegetation HTO concentrations initially increased with time then by 48 hours decreased exponentially at a rate similar to soils. These results will be validated and extended by the intensive experiment scheduled for June, 1987

  6. Field studies of transport and dispersion of atmospheric tracers in nocturnal drainage flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gudiksen; Gilbert J. Ferber; Malcolm M. Fowler; Wynn L. Eberhard; Michael A. Fosberg; William R. Knuth

    1984-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were carried out as part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program to evaluate pollutant transport and dispersion characteristics of nocturnal drainage flows within a valley in northern California. The results indicate that the degree of interaction of the drainage flows with the larger scale regional flows are...

  7. Split-field FDTD method for oblique incidence study of periodic dispersive metallic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baida, F I; Belkhir, A

    2009-08-15

    The study of periodic structures illuminated by a normally incident plane wave is a simple task that can be numerically simulated by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. On the contrary, for off-normal incidence, a widely modified algorithm must be developed in order to bypass the frequency dependence appearing in the periodic boundary conditions. After recently implementing this FDTD algorithm for pure dielectric materials, we here extend it to the study of metallic structures where dispersion can be described by analytical models. The accuracy of our code is demonstrated through comparisons with already-published results in the case of 1D and 3D structures.

  8. A study on atmospheric dispersion around Kalpakkam coastal site using a non-hydrostatic model and comparison with field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamima, P.; Lakshminarasimhan, J.; Venkatesan, R.

    2002-01-01

    Study of the sea breeze characteristics and Thermal Internal Boundary Layer (TIBL) is very important to understand the dispersion characteristics of air pollutants near coastal area. In the present paper, dispersion characteristics near Kalpakkam coastal area are studied and discussed by simulating sea breeze characteristics and TIBL using a non-hydrostatic mesoscale model in its two dimensional form. The model is run with surface physics, simplified radiation physics and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) closure scheme for diffusion. A joint meteorological field experiment was carried out by IITM-Pune at Kalpakkam by deploying state of art sensors and tether balloon systems for observing the height profiles of meteorological parameters. The data taken from the field experiment is used here to compare the simulations. Results shows that the onset of sea breeze is one hour before as observed from the field experiment. Slight difference is also seen in wind speed and temperature. Spatial variation of the dispersion pattern could be understood from the simulated TKE profile. From the study, it is shown that the model gives only a over all picture of the real scenario and successful simulations require the inclusion of more atmospheric dynamics such as microphysics, cumulus parameterization and atmospheric radiation. (author)

  9. Critical study of the dispersive n- 90Zr mean field by means of a new variational method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1994-02-01

    A new variational method is developed for the construction of the dispersive nucleon-nucleus mean field at negative and positive energies. Like the variational moment approach that we had previously proposed, the new method only uses phenomenological optical-model potentials as input. It is simpler and more flexible than the previous approach. It is applied to a critical investigation of the n- 90Zr mean field between -25 and +25 MeV. This system is of particular interest because conflicting results had recently been obtained by two different groups. While the imaginary parts of the phenomenological optical-model potentials provided by these two groups are similar, their real parts are quite different. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that these two sets of phenomenological optical-model potentials are both compatible with the dispersion relation which connects the real and imaginary parts of the mean field. Previous hints to the contrary, by one of the two other groups, are shown to be due to unjustified approximations. A striking outcome of the present study is that it is important to explicitly introduce volume absorption in the dispersion relation, although volume absorption is negligible in the energy domain investigated here. Because of the existence of two sets of phenomenological optical-model potentials, our variational method yields two dispersive mean fields whose real parts are quite different at small or negative energies. No preference for one of the two dispersive mean fields can be expressed on purely empirical grounds since they both yield fair agreement with the experimental cross sections as well as with the observed energies of the bound single-particle states. However, we argue that one of these two mean fields is physically more meaningful, because the radial shape of its Hartree-Fock type component is independent of energy, as expected on theoretical grounds. This preferred mean field is very close to the one which had been obtained by the Ohio

  10. FDTD scattered field formulation for scatterers in stratified dispersive media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkkonen, Juuso

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a simple scattered field (SF) technique that enables finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling of light scattering from dispersive objects residing in stratified dispersive media. The introduced SF technique is verified against the total field scattered field (TFSF) technique. As an application example, we study surface plasmon polariton enhanced light transmission through a 100 nm wide slit in a silver film.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012. First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of the experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code, Code-Saturne, in RANS mode with a standard k

  12. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012.First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code Code-Saturne in RANS mode with a standard κ

  13. The Brooklyn traffic real-time ambient pollutant penetration and environmental dispersion (B-TRAPPED) field study methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Hahn, Intaek; Fortune, Christopher R; Rodes, Charles E; Portzer, Jeffrey W; Lee, Sangdon; Wiener, Russell W; Smith, Luther A; Wheeler, Michael; Seagraves, Jeremy; Stein, Mark; Eisner, Alfred D; Brixey, Laurie A; Drake-Richman, Zora E; Brouwer, Lydia H; Ellenson, William D; Baldauf, Richard

    2009-12-01

    The Brooklyn Traffic Real-Time Ambient Pollutant Penetration and Environmental Dispersion (B-TRAPPED) field study examined indoor and outdoor exposure to traffic-generated air pollution by studying the individual processes of generation of traffic emissions, transport and dispersion of air contaminants along a roadway, and infiltration of the contaminants into a residence. Real-time instrumentation was used to obtain highly resolved time-series concentration profiles for a number of air pollutants. The B-TRAPPED field study was conducted in the residential Sunset Park neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY, USA, in May 2005. The neighborhood contained the Gowanus Expressway (Interstate 278), a major arterial road (4(th) Avenue), and residential side streets running perpendicular to the Gowanus Expressway and 4(th) Avenue. Synchronized measurements were obtained inside a test house, just outside the test house façade, and along the urban residential street canyon on which the house was located. A trailer containing Federal Reference Method (FRM) and real-time monitors was located next to the Gowanus Expressway to assess the source. Ultrafine particulate matter (PM), PM(2.5), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed and direction were monitored. Different sampling schemes were devised to focus on dispersion along the street canyon or infiltration into the test house. Results were obtained for ultrafine PM, PM(2.5), criteria gases, and wind conditions from sampling schemes focused on street canyon dispersion and infiltration. For comparison, the ultrafine PM and PM(2.5) results were compared with an existing data set from the Los Angeles area, and the criteria gas data were compared with measurements from a Vancouver epidemiologic study. Measured ultrafine PM and PM(2.5) concentration levels along the residential urban street canyon and at the test house façade in Sunset Park

  14. Overview of the Brooklyn traffic real-time ambient pollutant penetration and environmental dispersion (B-TRAPPED) study: theoretical background and model for design of field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Intaek; Wiener, Russell W; Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Brixey, Laurie A; Henkle, Stacy W

    2009-12-01

    The Brooklyn traffic real-time ambient pollutant penetration and environmental dispersion (B-TRAPPED) study was a multidisciplinary field research project that investigated the transport, dispersion, and infiltration processes of traffic emission particulate matter (PM) pollutants in a near-highway urban residential area. The urban PM transport, dispersion, and infiltration processes were described mathematically in a theoretical model that was constructed to develop the experimental objectives of the B-TRAPPED study. In the study, simultaneous and continuous time-series PM concentration and meteorological data collected at multiple outdoor and indoor monitoring locations were used to characterize both temporal and spatial patterns of the PM concentration movements within microscale distances (street canyon; (2) investigating the effects of urban structures such as a tall building or an intersection on the transport and dispersion of PM; (3) studying the influence of meteorological variables on the transport, dispersion, and infiltration processes; (4) characterizing the relationships between the building parameters and the infiltration mechanisms; (5) establishing a cause-and-effect relationship between outdoor-released PM and indoor PM concentrations and identifying the dominant mechanisms involved in the infiltration process; (6) evaluating the effectiveness of a shelter-in-place area for protection against outdoor-released PM pollutants; and (7) understanding the predominant airflow and pollutant dispersion patterns within the neighborhood using wind tunnel and CFD simulations. The 10 papers in this first set of papers presenting the results from the B-TRAPPED study address these objectives. This paper describes the theoretical background and models representing the interrelated processes of transport, dispersion, and infiltration. The theoretical solution for the relationship between the time-dependent indoor PM concentration and the initial PM concentration

  15. Progress in urban dispersion studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The present Study addresses recent achievements in better representation Of the urban area structure in meteorology and dispersion parameterisations. The setup and Main Outcome of several recent dispersion experiments in Urban areas and their use in model validation are discussed. The maximum con...

  16. Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

    2000-01-01

    Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc

  17. Dispersion and settlement of heavy metals in clay liners for sanitary landfills. Comparison of laboratory and field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The migration of heavy metals from long-standing waste dumps (blast furnace flue dust, ore flotation slurries, household refuse and toxic waste dumps) into natural clay barriers or artificial mineral liners was investigated in laboratory studies and field studies. (orig.) [de

  18. A laboratory dispersant effectiveness test which reflects dispersant efficiency in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.; Wood, P.

    1996-01-01

    Oil dispersion efficiencies of surfactants, from laboratory dispersion tests and field data were compared and calibrated. Data from an oil spill, where dispersants were used as a major part of the response, was analysed. The data was accumulated through the monitoring of the dispersant operation of the Sea Empress spill incident, in which Forties Blend oil was spilled at sea. This detailed data set was used to calibrate existing laboratory dispersant tests, and to devise a new International Dispersant Effectiveness Test. The objective was to create a comprehensive guide to decision making on whether and when to start a dispersant spraying operation. The dispersion efficiencies obtained from the laboratory dispersant tests were compared with field data. Flume tests produced the highest percentage of dispersed oil for all the dispersal tests. However, it was emphasised that the total percentage of oil dispersed should not be the only measure of dispersant effectiveness, since it does not distinguish between the contribution of natural and chemically enhanced dispersion. 9 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs

  19. EDITORIAL: Colloidal dispersions in external fields Colloidal dispersions in external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    third conference in a series that began in 2004 [2] and was continued in 2008 [3]. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Papers from scientists working within this network as well as those from further invited contributors are summarized in this issue. They are organized according to the type of field applied, namely: shear flow electric field laser-optical and magnetic field confinement other fields and active particles To summarize the highlights of this special issue as regards shear fields, the response of depletion-induced colloidal clusters to shear is explored in [4]. Soft particles deform under shear and their structural and dynamical behaviour is studied both by experiment [5] and theory [6]. Transient dynamics after switching on shear is described by a joint venture of theory, simulation and experiment in [7]. Colloids provide the fascinating possibility to drag single particles through the suspension, which gives access to microrheology (as opposed to macrorheology, where macroscopic boundaries are moved). Several theoretical aspects of microrheology are discussed in this issue [8-10]. Moreover, a microscopic theory for shear viscosity is presented [11]. Various aspects of colloids in electric fields are also included in this issue. Electrokinetic phenomena for charged suspensions couple flow and electric phenomena in an intricate way and are intensely discussed both by experiment and simulation in contributions [12-14]. Dielectric phenomena are also influenced by electric fields [15]. Electric fields can induce effective dipolar forces between colloids leading to string formation [16]. Finally, binary mixtures in an electric driving field exhibit laning [17]. Simulation [18] and theoretical [19] studies of this nonequilibrium phenomenon are also discussed in this issue. Laser-optical fields can be used to

  20. Dispersant effectiveness in the field on fresh oils and emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.; Davies, L.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed data set on the effectiveness of dispersants on fresh oils and emulsions, was presented. The data set could be used to calibrate laboratory dispersant tests and dispersion models so that oil spill response teams would have accurate information to make decisions regarding remediation processes. AEA Technology developed steady state continuous release experiments to provide a data set with quantitative measures of dispersant effectiveness in the field. The Sea Empress incident was closely monitored in order to compare the quantification obtained through field trials. It was noted that the prediction of the percentage of oil dispersed chemically is not the only indication of whether or not to use a dispersant. The important determinant to consider should be the extent to which the natural dispersion process would be enhanced by dispersant application. 17 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs

  1. A wind-tunnel study on exhaust gas dispersion from road vehicles. Part 1. Velocity and concentration fields behind single vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Isao; Uehara, Kiyoshi; Yamao, Yukio [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, 305-8506 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Yasuo; Morikawa, Tazuko [Petroleum Energy Center, 4-3-9 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0001 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    By a reduced-scale model in a wind tunnel, we investigate the dispersion behavior of exhaust gas from automobiles. Two types of vehicles are considered, a passenger car and a small-size truck. Tracer gas experiments show that the exhaust gas dispersion is enhanced significantly by the vehicle wake compared to the case when the vehicle body is absent. The passenger car and the truck promote dispersion in the horizontal and the vertical direction, respectively. The wake field is analyzed by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the distribution of the mean and the fluctuation fields is found to conform to the concentration field of the exhaust gas. The buoyancy of the exhaust gas has minor effect except on the vertical spread behind the truck whose wake flow amplifies the vertical displacement generated near the pipe exit. (author)

  2. Dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, K.J.; O'Farrell, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field. The present study is designed to study the dispersion of particles in a mesoscale eddy field produced by the numerical model. Dispersion rates are calculated for flows above three types of topography, a flat bottom, a random collection of hills and a ridge. The presence of topography is found to significantly affect the flow. The effective diffusion coefficient of the flow near the bottom is reduced by 20% for the random topography and 60% for the ridge from that for the flat bottom case. Estimates are given of the number of float years required to obtain a given accuracy for the diffusion coefficient. At the surface a modest number of floats (order 5) are required to obtain a 50% accuracy. However at the bottom, to be within a factor of 2 of the true value for the flows considered requires respectively 26, 42 and 103 float years for the flat, random and ridge cases. (author)

  3. Dispersant field testing : a review of procedures and considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of a dispersant is defined by the amount of oil that the dispersant puts into the water column compared to the amount of oil that was initially spilled. Effectiveness is generally determined visually in plumes of dispersed oil that are visible from ships and aircraft. This paper describes 25 specific issues and technical concerns regarding field testing of dispersant effectiveness. Recent field tests were reviewed and literature that relates to testing procedures was sited. The 25 factors that are important for the appropriate outcome of dispersant field experiments include: mass balance; proper controls; analytical method; differential plume movement; time lag and length of time followed; mathematics of calculation and integration; lower and upper limits of analytical methods; use of remote sensing; thickness measurement; behaviour of oil with surfactant content; surfactant stripping; tracking surface oil and dispersed oil; recovering surface oil; visibility of oil from the surface; background levels of hydrocarbons; fluorescence of dispersant; herding; emulsion breaking; application success; heterogeneity of slick and plume; deposition measurements; true analytical standards; effect of wind on dispersant and slick; dispersant run-off; and weathering of the oil. It was concluded that the most important factors are the ability to determine mass balance, use proper controls, analytical methods and to avoid procedures that give incorrect results. 34 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  4. Estimating nitrogen loading and far-field dispersal potential from background sources and coastal finfish aquaculture: A simple framework and case study in Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIver, R.; Milewski, I.; Loucks, R.; Smith, R.

    2018-05-01

    Far-field nutrient impacts associated with finfish aquaculture have been identified as a topic of concern for regulators, managers, scientists, and the public for over two decades but disentangling aquaculture impacts from those caused by other natural and anthropogenic sources has impeded the development of monitoring metrics and management plans. We apply a bulk, steady-state nitrogen loading model (NLM) framework to estimate the annual input of Total Dissolved Nitrogen (TDN) from point and non-point sources to the watershed surrounding Port Mouton Bay, Nova Scotia (Canada). We then use the results of the NLM together with estimates of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) loading from a sea-cage trout farm in the Bay and progressive vector diagrams to illustrate potential patterns of DIN dispersal from the trout farm. Our estimated anthropogenic nitrogen contribution to Port Mouton Bay from all terrestrial and atmospheric sources is ∼211,703 kg TDN/year with atmospheric deposition accounting for almost all (98.6%). At a stocking level of ∼400,000 rainbow trout, the Port Mouton Bay sea-cage farm increases the annual anthropogenic TDN loading to the bay by 14.4% or 30,400 kg. Depending on current flow rates, nitrogen flux from the trout farm can be more than double the background concentrations of TDN near the farm site. Although it is unlikely that nitrogen loading from this single fish farm is saturating the DIN requirements of the entire bay, progressive vector diagrams suggest that the dispersal potential may be insufficient to mitigate potential symptoms of eutrophication associated with nitrogen fluxes. We present an accessible and user-friendly tool for managers to estimate baseline nutrient loading in relation to aquaculture and our use of progressive vector diagrams illustrate a practical and simple method for characterizing potential nutrient dispersal based on local conditions and spatial scales. Our study joins numerous studies which have highlighted

  5. Dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the dispersion of tracers by the oceanic eddy field. The study is designed to investigate the horizontal and vertical structure of the eddies and how this structure is influenced by the bottom topography. It is found that hills and valleys have a strong effect on the eddies above them. The flow close to the bottom has a tendency to be steered by the height contours. The surface and bottom flows become decorrelated and the vertical variation of the kinetic energy of the eddies is increased with higher topographic features. (author)

  6. A field study of the survival and dispersal pattern of Lutzomyia longipalpis in an endemic area of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Claudio; Pimentel Bergamaschi, Denise

    2018-01-01

    Zoonotic Visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) is a neglected tropical disease that in the Americas is caused by the infection of Leishmania infantum and the domestic dog (Canis familiaris) is the main parasite reservoir in urban areas. The parasite is mainly transmitted by populations of the sibling species Lutzomyia longipalpis that has been spreading in countries including Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and more recently Uruguay. Although bionomic parameters such as population survival and the duration of the gonotrophic cycle are critical in evaluating vector capacity, field studies have rarely been applied to sand fly populations. The present study sought to evaluate basic bionomic parameters related to the vectorial capacity of the (S)-9-methylgermacrene-B population of the Lu. longipalpis complex in a visceral leishmaniasis area of Sao Paulo state. The daily survival rate, the duration of the gonotrophic cycle and the dispersal pattern were evaluated through the mark- release-recapture method. A total of 1,547 males and 401 females were marked and released in five experiments carried out between February 2013 and February 2014. The higher recapture rates occurred within 100 meters of the release point and the estimated daily survival rates varied between 0.69 and 0.89 for females and between 0.69 and 0.79 for males. The minimum duration of the gonotrophic cycle observed was five days. The absolute population size, calculated ranged from 900 to 4,857 females and from 2,882 to 9,543 males. Our results demonstrate a high survival rate of this vector population and low dispersal that could be associated with the presence of all necessary conditions for its establishment and maintenance in the peridomiciles of this area. Our findings contribute to the basic data necessary for the understanding of ZVL dynamics and the evaluation of the implementation of prevention and control measures. PMID:29608563

  7. The characterisation of magnetic pigment dispersions using pulsed magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, J.J.; O'Grady, K.; Nelson, N.K.; Sharrock, M.P.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we describe the application of pulsed field magnetometry techniques for the characterisation of magnetic pigment dispersions. Magnetic pigment dispersions are important technological materials as in one form they are the material which are used to coat base film in order to make magnetic recording tape. It is these materials that have been evaluated. In this work, we describe the use of two pulsed field magnetometers, one being a low-field instrument with a maximum field of 750 Oe and the other a high-field instrument with a maximum field of 4.1 kOe. Using inductive sensing, the magnetisation is monitored in real time as the pulse is applied. We find that using these techniques we can successfully monitor the progress of the dispersion process, the effects of different resin systems and the effect of different processing conditions. We find that our results are consistent with rheological and other measurements

  8. The characterisation of magnetic pigment dispersions using pulsed magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackwell, J.J.; O' Grady, K. E-mail: kog1@york.ac.uk; Nelson, N.K.; Sharrock, M.P

    2003-10-01

    In this work, we describe the application of pulsed field magnetometry techniques for the characterisation of magnetic pigment dispersions. Magnetic pigment dispersions are important technological materials as in one form they are the material which are used to coat base film in order to make magnetic recording tape. It is these materials that have been evaluated. In this work, we describe the use of two pulsed field magnetometers, one being a low-field instrument with a maximum field of 750 Oe and the other a high-field instrument with a maximum field of 4.1 kOe. Using inductive sensing, the magnetisation is monitored in real time as the pulse is applied. We find that using these techniques we can successfully monitor the progress of the dispersion process, the effects of different resin systems and the effect of different processing conditions. We find that our results are consistent with rheological and other measurements.

  9. Wind field and dispersion modelling in complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.; Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Konte, K.; Amanatidis, G.

    1991-01-01

    Dispersion of airborne radioactive material can have an important environmental impact. Its prediction remains a difficult problem, especially over complex and inhomogeneous terrain, or under complicated atmospheric conditions. The ADREA-I code, a three-dimensional transport code especially designed for terrains of high complexity can be considered as contribution to the solution of the above problem. The code development has been initiated within the present CEC Radiation Program. New features are introduced into the code to describe the anomalous topography, the turbulent diffusion and numerical solution procedures. In this work besides a brief presentation of the main features of the code, a number of applications will be presented with the aim on one hand to illustrate the capability and reliability of the code and on the other hand to clarify the effects on windfield and dispersion in special cases of interest. Within the framework of ADREA-I verification studies, a I-D simulation of the experimental Wangara Day-33 mean boundary layer was attempted, reproducing the daytime wind speeds, temperatures, specific humidities and mixing depths. In order to address the effect of surface irregularities and inhomogeneities on contamination patterns, the flow field and dispersion were analyzed over a 2-D, 1000m high mountain range, surrounded by sea, with a point source assumed 40km offshore from one coastline. This terrain was studied as representing a greater Athens area idealization. The effects of a 2-D, 1000m high mountain range of Gaussian shape on long range transport has also been studied in terms of influence area, wind and concentration profile distortions and dry deposition patterns

  10. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed (ℎ/2π)ω/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  11. From field theory to phenomenology: the history of dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors chart the history of quantum field theory (QFT) in the 1950s with reference to the ideas of dispersion relations. QFT failed to explain strong interaction physics and so was discarded. Connections are drawn between a central group of particle theorists working on applying Kramers-Kronig light scattering relations to high energy particle scattering and the way physics developed. The concepts of single and double dispersion relations and Regge poles, when connected with the large quantity of empirical data from the large particle accelerators of the 1950s, could not be embodied within QFT, which then fell into decline. (UK)

  12. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.E.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high T c superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , FeNi 2 BO 5 ), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x , Eu 3 O 4 , GaCl 2 , Fe 2 PO 5 ), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y 3 Ga 5 O l2 )

  13. Relaxation dispersion in MRI induced by fictitious magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Timo; Mangia, Silvia; Ling, Wen; Ellermann, Jutta; Sorce, Dennis J; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom

    2011-04-01

    A new method entitled Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) was recently introduced for investigating relaxations in rotating frames of rank ≥ 2. RAFF generates a fictitious field (E) by applying frequency-swept pulses with sine and cosine amplitude and frequency modulation operating in a sub-adiabatic regime. In the present work, MRI contrast is created by varying the orientation of E, i.e. the angle ε between E and the z″ axis of the second rotating frame. When ε > 45°, the amplitude of the fictitious field E generated during RAFF is significantly larger than the RF field amplitude used for transmitting the sine/cosine pulses. Relaxation during RAFF was investigated using an invariant-trajectory approach and the Bloch-McConnell formalism. Dipole-dipole interactions between identical (like) spins and anisochronous exchange (e.g., exchange between spins with different chemical shifts) in the fast exchange regime were considered. Experimental verifications were performed in vivo in human and mouse brain. Theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that changes in ε induced a dispersion of the relaxation rate constants. The fastest relaxation was achieved at ε ≈ 56°, where the averaged contributions from transverse components during the pulse are maximal and the contribution from longitudinal components are minimal. RAFF relaxation dispersion was compared with the relaxation dispersion achieved with off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) experiments. As compared with the off-resonance spin lock T(₁ρ) method, a slower rotating frame relaxation rate was observed with RAFF, which under certain experimental conditions is desirable. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Estimating adhesive seed-dispersal distances : field experiments and correlated random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouissie, AM; Lengkeek, W; van Diggelen, R

    1. In this study we aimed to estimate distance distributions of adhesively dispersed seeds and the factors that determine them. 2. Seed attachment and detachment were studied using field experiments with a real sheep, a sheep dummy and a cattle dummy. Seed-retention data were used in correlated

  15. Retardation and dispersive effects in the nuclear mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Davies, K.T.R.; Satchler, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    We consider several parametrizations of the energy dependence of the imaginary part of the mean field, for nucleons as well as heavy ions. These parametrizations specify the energy dependence of the corresponding real part, because the real and imaginary parts are connected by a dispersion relation. The latter can be viewed as equivalent to the causality property. Since Hilbert transforms appear in the dispersion relation and since Fourier transforms give the correspondence between energy dependence and temporal nonlocality, we derive several properties of these transforms which are of particular interest in the present context. The most useful one is that the Fourier transform of a function F(E) which is analytic in the upper half of the complex E-plane can be expressed in terms of the Fourier transform of the imaginary part of F(E) alone. We investigate several schematic models for the mean field. They fall into two main categories. These correspond to the two main definitions which have been proposed for the mean field, namely the self-energy and Feshbach's potential. Both of these definitions can be used for the nucleon-nucleus system, in which case they correspond to two different ways of handling the combined influence of ground state correlations and antisymmetrization. The resulting two mean fields have different energy dependences and, correspondingly, temporal nonlocalities. Feshbach's approach can also be applied to the nucleus-nucleus system. Our schematic models are semi-realistic, in the sense that they all take account of the 'Fermi surface anomaly' for the nucleon-nucleus system or of the 'threshold anomaly' for the nucleus-nucleus case. The temporal nonlocality is investigated for each model. A physical interpretation of this nonlocality is given in terms delay of the response of the medium, in which an incident wave is partially trapped in nonelastic channels and subsequently reemitted. (orig./HSI)

  16. Field-scale variation in colloid dispersibility and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2014-01-01

    comparison parameters including textural, chemical, and structural (e.g. air permeability) 8 soil properties. The soil dispersibility was determined (i) using a laser diffraction method on 1-2 mm aggregates equilibrated to an initial matric potential of -100 cm H2O, (ii) using an end-over-end shaking on 6......Colloids are potential carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals in macroporous soils, but predicting the amount of colloids readily available for facilitated chemical transport is an unsolved challenge. This study addresses potential key parameters and predictive indicators when assessing colloid....... Predictions of soil dispersibility and the risk of colloid-facilitated chemical transport will therefore need to be highly scale- and area-specific....

  17. Study of nonequilibrium dispersed two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, J.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of liquid droplets in a superheated steam environment is essential to the accurate prediction of nuclear fuel rod surface temperatures during the blowdown and reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). In response to this need, this treatise presents several original and significant contributions to the field of thermofluid physics. The research contained herein presents a statistical derivation of the two-phase mass, momentum, and energy-conservation equations using a droplet continuity equation analogous to that used in the Kinetic Theory of Gases. Unlike the Eulerian volume and time-averaged conservation equations generally used to describe dispersed two-phase flow behavior, this statistical averaging approach results in an additional mass momentum or energy term in each of the respective conservation equations. Further, this study demonstrates that current definitions of the volumetric vapor generation rate used in the mass conservation equation are inappropriate results under certain circumstances. The mass conservation equation derived herein is used to obtain a new definition for the volumetric vapor-generation rate. Last, a simple two phase phenomenological model, based on the statistically averaged conservation equations, is presented and solved analytically. It is shown that the actual quality and vapor temperature, under these circumstances, depend on a single dimensionless group

  18. Wind tunnel and field assessment of pollen dispersal in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Although genetically modified (GM) soybean has never been cultivated commercially in Japan, it is essential to set up the isolation distance required to prevent out-crossing between GM and conventional soybean in preparation for any future possibility of pollen transfer. The airborne soybean pollen was sampled using some Durham pollen samplers located in the range of 20 m from the field edge. In addition, the dispersal distance was assessed in a wind tunnel under constant air flow and then it was compared with the anticipated distances based on the pollen diameter. In the field, the maximum pollen density per day observed was 1.235 grains cm(-2) day(-1) at three observation points within 2.5 m from the field and inside the field the mean density did not reach the rate of 1 grain cm(-2 )day(-1) during 19 flowering days. The results of the wind tunnel experiment also showed that the plants had almost no airborne release of pollen and the dispersal distance was shorter than theoretical value due to clustered dispersal. This study showed little airborne pollen in and around the soybean field and the dispersal is restricted to a small area. Therefore, wind-mediated pollination appears to be negligible.

  19. Electric field driven plasmon dispersion in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Ren-Bing; Qin Hua; Zhang Xiao-Yu; Xu Wen

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical study on the electric field driven plasmon dispersion of the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). By introducing a drifted Fermi—Dirac distribution, we calculate the transport properties of the 2DEG in the AlGaN/GaN interface by employing the balance-equation approach based on the Boltzmann equation. Then, the nonequilibrium Fermi—Dirac function is obtained by applying the calculated electron drift velocity and electron temperature. Under random phase approximation (RPA), the electric field driven plasmon dispersion is investigated. The calculated results indicate that the plasmon frequency is dominated by both the electric field E and the angle between wavevector q and electric field E. Importantly, the plasmon frequency could be tuned by the applied source—drain bias voltage besides the gate voltage (change of the electron density)

  20. Dispersion functions for weakly relativistic magnetized plasmas in inhomogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaelzer, R.; Schneider, R.S.; Ziebell, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    The study of wave propagation and absorption inhomogeneous plasmas can be made by using a formulation in which the dielectric properties of the plasma are described by an effective dielectric tensor which incorporates inhomogeneity effects, inserted into a dispersion relation which is formally the same as that of an homogeneous plasma. We have recently utilized this formalism in the study of electron cyclotron absorption in inhomogeneous media, both in the case of homogeneous magnetic field and in the case of inhomogeneous magnetic field. In the present paper we resume the study of the case with inhomogeneous magnetic field, in order to introduce a generalized dispersion function useful for the case of a Maxwellian plasma, and discuss some of its properties. (author). 10 refs

  1. Wave dispersion relation of two-dimensional plasma crystals in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, G.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.

    2004-01-01

    The wave dispersion relation in a two-dimensional strongly coupled plasma crystal is studied by theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulation taking into account a constant magnetic field parallel to the crystal normal. The expression for the wave dispersion relation clearly shows that high-frequency and low-frequency branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorenz force acting on the dust particles. The high-frequency and the low-frequency branches are found to belong to right-hand and left-hand polarized waves, respectively

  2. Atmospheric tracer experiments for regional dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffter, J.L.; Ferber, G.J.

    1980-01-01

    Tracer experiments are being conducted to verify atmospheric transport and dispersion calculations at distances from tens to hundreds of km from pollutant sources. In one study, a 2 1/2 year sampling program has been carried out at 13 sites located 30 to 140 km from a source of 85 Kr at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. Average weekly concentrations as well as twice-daily concentrations were obtained. Sampling data and meteorological data, including surface, tower, and rawinsonde observations are available on magnetic tape for model verification studies. Some verification results for the Air Resources Laboratories Atmospheric Transort and Dispersion Model (ARL-ATAD) are shown for averaging periods from one week to two years

  3. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread

  4. Studies of emulsification, emulsion prevention and underwater dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celius, H.K.; Vassbotn, T.

    1985-03-01

    This is a report from the work performed under task 2: ''Effect of demulsifiers and despersants injected into a blowing oil stream'' of the research program ''Dispersion of oil on sea''. Three ad hoc experiments have been carried out involving laboratory studies in a small turbulent oil plume, tests with revolving flasks, and a small scale field test with a combined gas/oil plume. The results show that emulsion is formed in plume from underwater blowouts, and that this formation is prevented by small amounts (250 ppM) of demulsifiers or dispersants. Larger concentrations of dispersants (ca 2%) disperse the oil, and the oil is transported to the upper water layer in the gas/oil plume. None of the experiments have been designed as true scale tests, and the results cannot be directly transferred to operational, full scale conditions. The experiments have however narroved the necessary extent of studies, and allows for a simpler experimental procedure in the full scale field test planned for June 1985. 19 references.

  5. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  6. Light-pressure-induced nonlinear dispersion of a laser field interacting with an atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, R.; Mlynek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on detailed studies of the effect of resonant light pressure on the optical response of an atomic gas to a single monochromatic laser field. In this very elementary situation of laser spectroscopy, the redistribution of atomic velocities that is induced by spontaneous light pressure leads to a novel contribution to the optical dispersion curve of the medium. This light-pressure-induced dispersion phenomenon displays a pronounced nonlinear dependence on the laser intensity. Moreover, for a given intensity, its strength is closely related to the laser beam diameter. As most important feature, this light-pressure-induced dispersion displays an even symmetry with respect to the optical detuning from line center. As a result, the total Doppler-broadened dispersion curve of the gas can become asymmetric, and a significant shift of the dispersion line center can occur. In addition to a detailed theoretical description of the phenomenon, we report on its experimental investigation on the λ=555.6 nm 1 S 0 - 3 P 1 transition in atomic ytterbium vapor with the use of frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The experimental findings are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions

  7. Dispersal of solitary bees and bumblebees in a winter oilseed rape field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calabuig, Isabel

    2000-01-01

    Dispersal distributions of solitary bees and bumblebees were studied in a winter oilseed rape field. Window-traps were placed in the rape field along a line transect perpendicular to the field edge. 19 species of solitary bees were recorded and all but four species are polylectic, including...... Brassicaceae as host-plant family. Through non-linear regression, the decline in solitary bee individuals versus distance from field edge significantly fitted a steep two-parameter exponential decay function. Activity of solitary bees was clearly highest within 30 metres from the field edge. Apparently......, solitary bees do not play any noteworthy role in the pollination of winter oilseed rape in Denmark. The traps yielded ten species of bumblebees, and a significant linear correlation was found between numbers of individuals and distance from the field edge. This result is attributed to bumblebee foraging...

  8. Analytical relation between effective mode field area and waveguide dispersion in microstructure fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenster, Mathias; Steinmeyer, Günter; Iliew, Rumen; Lederer, Falk; Petermann, Klaus

    2006-11-15

    For optical fibers exhibiting a radially symmetric refractive index profile, there exists an analytical relation that connects waveguide dispersion and the Petermann-II mode field radius. We extend the usefulness of this relation to the nonradially symmetric case of microstructure fibers in the anomalous dispersion regime, yielding a simple relation between dispersion and effective mode field area. Assuming a Gaussian mode distribution, we derive a fundamental upper limit for the effective mode field area that is required to obtain a certain amount of anomalous waveguide dispersion. This relation is demonstrated to show excellent agreement for fiber designs suited for supercontinuum generation and soliton lasers in the near infrared.

  9. On the use of numerical modelling for near-field pollutant dispersion in urban environments − A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateb, M.; Meroney, R.N.; Yataghene, M.; Fellouah, H.; Saleh, F.; Boufadel, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the state-of-the-art of experimental and numerical studies carried out regarding air pollutant dispersion in urban environments. Since the simulation of the dispersion field around buildings depends strongly on the correct simulation of the wind-flow structure, the studies performed during the past years on the wind-flow field around buildings are reviewed. This work also identifies errors that can produce poor results when numerically modelling wind flow and dispersion fields around buildings in urban environments. Finally, particular attention is paid to the practical guidelines developed by researchers to establish a common methodology for verification and validation of numerical simulations and/or to assist and support the users for a better implementation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. - This review article enlightens the reader on the use of CFD for pollutant dispersion. Errors that induce poor results and critical parameters that compromise significantly the accuracy and reliability are identified.

  10. Trajectory and Relative Dispersion Case Studies and Statistics from the Green River Mesoscale Deformation, Dispersion, and Dissipation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Brand Lee

    A major field program to study beta-mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex mountainous terrain was conducted during 1969 with the cooperation of three government agencies at the White Sands Missile Range in central Utah. The purpose of the program was to measure simultaneously on a large number of days the synoptic and mesoscale wind fields, the relative dispersion between pairs of particle trajectories and the rate of small scale turbulence dissipation. The field program included measurements during more than 60 days in the months of March, June, and November. The large quantity of data generated from this program has been processed and analyzed to provide case studies and statistics to evaluate and refine Lagrangian variable trajectory models. The case studies selected to illustrate the complexities of mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex terrain include those with terrain blocking, lee waves, and stagnation, as well as those with large vertical wind shears and horizontal wind field deformation. The statistics of relative particle dispersion were computed and compared to the classical theories of Richardson and Batchelor and the more recent theories of Lin and Kao among others. The relative particle dispersion was generally found to increase with travel time in the alongwind and crosswind directions, but in a more oscillatory than sustained or even accelerated manner as predicted by most theories, unless substantial wind shears or finite vertical separations between particles were present. The relative particle dispersion in the vertical was generally found to be small and bounded even when substantial vertical motions due to lee waves were present because of the limiting effect of stable temperature stratification. The data show that velocity shears have a more significant effect than turbulence on relative particle dispersion and that sufficient turbulence may not always be present above the planetary boundary layer for "wind direction shear

  11. Characterization of dispersion, attenuation, and anisotropy at the Buena Vista Hills field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, C.L.; Parra, J.O.; Brown, R.L.; Collier, H.A.

    2001-01-01

    We create a log of intrinsic dispersion and attenuation for the Antelope Shale formation of the Buena Vista Hills field, San Joaquin Valley, California. High dispersion (or low Q) values correlate with thin sand and carbonate beds within the Antelope Shale. These beds are at least ten times as permeable as the host shale formation, so this effect provides a possible avenue for seismic prediction of permeability. The dispersion log is formed through comparison of crosswell seismic velocities (measured at approximately 1 kHz) and sonic log velocities (measured at approximately 10 kHz). In order to provide a proper basis for comparison, the sonic log must first be adjusted for field anisotropy, scaling effects, and resolution of measurement. We estimate a local shale anisotropy of about 20% based on correlations generated from published measurements of other shale fields. We apply resolution enhancement to capture the thin sand and carbonate beds, and windowed Backus averaging to match the measurement scales. A modeling study verifies the technique, and shows that beds of thickness greater than 30 cm have a measurement signature. The actual resolution is on the order of the crosswell Fresnel length, or about 7 m for the model study.

  12. Pigment dispersion syndrome: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheie, H G; Cameron, J D

    1981-01-01

    This study involved a group of 407 patients (799 eyes) with pigment dispersion syndrome gathered from a glaucoma population of 9200 patients. The sex distribution was equal. The majority (65%) of patients were myopic. The incidence of retinal detachment was 6.4%. No patients were black, but 5 were mulatto. Approximately one-quarter of the patients wih pigment dispersion syndrome (31% of the men, 19% of the women) had glaucoma. The average age of onset of glaucoma was 15 years less than in control patients with chronic simple glaucoma. When both eyes were affected by glaucoma, the glaucoma was consistently more severe in the eye with the more heavily pigmented angle. The degree of iris transillumination was found to be of no importance in predicting the presence of glaucoma or the severity of trabecular pigmentation. The pressure in 66% of the eyes with pigmentary glaucoma was controlled medically. A higher percentage of patients with pigmentary glaucoma required surgery than patients in the control group with chronic simple glaucoma. Men with pigmentary glaucoma required surgery at a much earlier age than women with pigmentary glaucoma. PMID:7236571

  13. Field study of the planetary boundary layer at subtropical regions of Brazil applied to investigate the dispersion conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, A.P. de; Degrazia, G.A.; Moraes, O.L.L. de; Goedert, J.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper is shown some observational results of four field campaigns carried out in the last two years, three during summer, in March 1991, 92 and 93, and one during the winter in July 1992. The site is located in the country side of State of Sao Paulo, Brazil, (23 0 C 25'S; 47 0 C 35' W), approximately 120 km far from the Atlantic Ocean. Measurements of vertical velocity, temperature and water vapor density at three levels (3,5, and 9.40 m) and horizontal wind velocity components at one level (11.5 m) with a sample rate of 1-10 Hz were made using a 12 m tower. It was also carried out measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux, and tethered balloon and radiosonde system followed the vertical evolution of the local Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL).During daytime in the summer, the vertical evolution of the PBL is strongly dependent upon the cloud activity, that inhibits its vertical evolution. In the winter, cloud activity is reduced but the vertical extent of the PBL is constraint by the small surface heating. During the nighttime, the PBL is characterized by moderate stable conditions and low level jets observed in both seasons. (author)

  14. Derivation of equations for scalar and fermion fields using properties of dispersion-codispersion operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raoelina Andriambololona; Ranaivoson, R.T.R; Hanitriarivo, R.; Harison, V.

    2014-01-01

    We establish equations for scalar and fermion fields using results obtained from a study on a phase space representation of quantum theory that we have performed in a previous work. Our approaches are similar to the historical ones to obtain Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations but the main difference is that ours are based on the use of properties of operators called dispersion-codispersion operators. We begin with a brief recall about the dispersion-codispersion operators. Then, introducing a mass operator with its canonical conjugate coordinate and applying rules of quantization, based on the use of dispersion - codispersion operators , we deduce a second order differential operator relation from the relativistic expression relying energy, momentum and mass. Using Dirac matrices, we derive from this second order differential operator relation a first order one. The application of the second order differential operator relation on a scalar function gives the equation for the scalar field and the use of the first order differential operator relation leads to the equation for fermion field.

  15. DNA fingerprinting validates seed dispersal curves from observational studies in the neotropical legume parkia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Eckhard W; Lüttmann, Kathrin; Michalczyk, Inga M; Saboya, Pedro Pablo Pinedo; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Bialozyt, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Determining the distances over which seeds are dispersed is a crucial component for examining spatial patterns of seed dispersal and their consequences for plant reproductive success and population structure. However, following the fate of individual seeds after removal from the source tree till deposition at a distant place is generally extremely difficult. Here we provide a comparison of observationally and genetically determined seed dispersal distances and dispersal curves in a Neotropical animal-plant system. In a field study on the dispersal of seeds of three Parkia (Fabaceae) species by two Neotropical primate species, Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax, in Peruvian Amazonia, we observationally determined dispersal distances. These dispersal distances were then validated through DNA fingerprinting, by matching DNA from the maternally derived seed coat to DNA from potential source trees. We found that dispersal distances are strongly right-skewed, and that distributions obtained through observational and genetic methods and fitted distributions do not differ significantly from each other. Our study showed that seed dispersal distances can be reliably estimated through observational methods when a strict criterion for inclusion of seeds is observed. Furthermore, dispersal distances produced by the two primate species indicated that these primates fulfil one of the criteria for efficient seed dispersers. Finally, our study demonstrated that DNA extraction methods so far employed for temperate plant species can be successfully used for hard-seeded tropical plants.

  16. DNA Fingerprinting Validates Seed Dispersal Curves from Observational Studies in the Neotropical Legume Parkia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Eckhard W.; Lüttmann, Kathrin; Michalczyk, Inga M.; Saboya, Pedro Pablo Pinedo; Ziegenhagen, Birgit; Bialozyt, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background Determining the distances over which seeds are dispersed is a crucial component for examining spatial patterns of seed dispersal and their consequences for plant reproductive success and population structure. However, following the fate of individual seeds after removal from the source tree till deposition at a distant place is generally extremely difficult. Here we provide a comparison of observationally and genetically determined seed dispersal distances and dispersal curves in a Neotropical animal-plant system. Methodology/Principal Findings In a field study on the dispersal of seeds of three Parkia (Fabaceae) species by two Neotropical primate species, Saguinus fuscicollis and Saguinus mystax, in Peruvian Amazonia, we observationally determined dispersal distances. These dispersal distances were then validated through DNA fingerprinting, by matching DNA from the maternally derived seed coat to DNA from potential source trees. We found that dispersal distances are strongly right-skewed, and that distributions obtained through observational and genetic methods and fitted distributions do not differ significantly from each other. Conclusions/Significance Our study showed that seed dispersal distances can be reliably estimated through observational methods when a strict criterion for inclusion of seeds is observed. Furthermore, dispersal distances produced by the two primate species indicated that these primates fulfil one of the criteria for efficient seed dispersers. Finally, our study demonstrated that DNA extraction methods so far employed for temperate plant species can be successfully used for hard-seeded tropical plants. PMID:22514748

  17. The mechanism of strong electric field effect on the dispersed media in the rarefied gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagarin, A.G.; Savchenko, Y.N.; Vigdonchik, V.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses two approaches to the description of the flow of fluids and gases, that is, a phenomenological method and a molecular-kinetic method. Four dispersed admixtures are described using the model of solid spheres as for molecules and a system of aerodynamic equations is obtained. In this system interactions between gas molecules and admixtures are taken into consideration already in the zero approximation. The paper is also concerned with the experimental study of the motion of dispersed particles in corona discharge which is a typical example of a strong nonuniform electric field with a volume discharge. From the comparison of experimental and calculated paths it was found that the particles move five to seven times faster than they would have done under the action of the Coulomb force alone at a real amount of charge of the particle. The result of comparison also shows that their motion primarily depends on the jet flow of electric wind

  18. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models

  19. Assimilating concentration observations for transport and dispersion modeling in a meandering wind field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Sue Ellen; Beyer-Lout, Anke; Long, Kerrie J.; Young, George S.

    Assimilating concentration data into an atmospheric transport and dispersion model can provide information to improve downwind concentration forecasts. The forecast model is typically a one-way coupled set of equations: the meteorological equations impact the concentration, but the concentration does not generally affect the meteorological field. Thus, indirect methods of using concentration data to influence the meteorological variables are required. The problem studied here involves a simple wind field forcing Gaussian dispersion. Two methods of assimilating concentration data to infer the wind direction are demonstrated. The first method is Lagrangian in nature and treats the puff as an entity using feature extraction coupled with nudging. The second method is an Eulerian field approach akin to traditional variational approaches, but minimizes the error by using a genetic algorithm (GA) to directly optimize the match between observations and predictions. Both methods show success at inferring the wind field. The GA-variational method, however, is more accurate but requires more computational time. Dynamic assimilation of a continuous release modeled by a Gaussian plume is also demonstrated using the genetic algorithm approach.

  20. The Spread of a Noise Field in a Dispersive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Leon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the production of induced noise by a pulse and the propagation of the noise in a dispersive medium. We present a simple model where the noise is the sum of pulses and where the mean of each pulse is random. We obtain explicit expressions for the standard deviation of the spatial noise as a function of time. We also formulate the problem in terms of a time-frequency phase space approach and in particular we use the Wigner distribution to define the spatial/spatial-frequency distribution.

  1. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-21

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  3. Preparation and study of properties of dispersed graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya Seliverstova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ability of graphene oxide to form stable dispersion in organic solvents was studied in this work. As it was shown, sonication of graphene leads to the decreas of the particle size. Stability of prepared graphene dispersions was studied upon measurements of distribution of number of the particles via size and change of optical density of the solutions with time. It was found that graphene oxide forms a more stable dispersion in tetrahydrofuran and dimethylformamide than in chloroform and acetone.

  4. Broadening our approaches to studying dispersal in raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, J.L.; Wood, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Dispersal is a behavioral process having consequences for individual fitness and population dynamics. Recent advances in technology have spawned new theoretical examinations and empirical studies of the dispersal process in birds, providing opportunities for examining how this information may be applied to studies of the dispersal process in raptors. Many raptors are the focus of conservation efforts; thus, reliable data on all aspects of a species' population dynamics, including dispersal distances, movement rates, and mortality rates of dispersers, are required for population viability analyses that are increasingly used to inform management. Here, we address emerging issues and novel approaches used in the study of avian dispersal, and provide suggestions to consider when developing and implementing studies of dispersal in raptors. Clarifying study objectives is essential for selection of an appropriate methodology and sample size needed to obtain accurate estimates of movement distances and rates. Identifying an appropriate study-area size will allow investigators to avoid underestimating population connectivity and important population parameters. Because nomadic individuals of some species use temporary settling areas or home ranges before breeding, identification of these areas is critical for conservation efforts focusing on habitats other than breeding sites. Study designs for investigating raptor dispersal also should include analysis of environmental and social factors influencing dispersal, to improve our understanding of condition-dependent dispersal strategies. Finally, we propose a terminology for use in describing the variety of movements associated with dispersal behavior in raptors, and we suggest this terminology could be used consistently to facilitate comparisons among studies. ?? 2009 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  5. Field-dependent dynamic responses from dilute magnetic nanoparticle dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, Jeppe; Balceris, Christoph; Costo, Rocio

    2018-01-01

    The response of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to an oscillating magnetic field outside the linear response region is important for several applications including magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic resonance imaging and biodetection. The size and magnetic moment are two critical parameters for the pe...

  6. Electrical characteristics of silicon percolating nanonet-based field effect transistors in the presence of dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazimajou, T.; Legallais, M.; Mouis, M.; Ternon, C.; Salem, B.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2018-05-01

    We studied the current-voltage characteristics of percolating networks of silicon nanowires (nanonets), operated in back-gated transistor mode, for future use as gas or biosensors. These devices featured P-type field-effect characteristics. It was found that a Lambert W function-based compact model could be used for parameter extraction of electrical parameters such as apparent low field mobility, threshold voltage and subthreshold slope ideality factor. Their variation with channel length and nanowire density was related to the change of conduction regime from direct source/drain connection by parallel nanowires to percolating channels. Experimental results could be related in part to an influence of the threshold voltage dispersion of individual nanowires.

  7. STATISTICALLY DETERMINED DISPERSION RELATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD FLUCTUATIONS IN THE TERRESTRIAL FORESHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hnat, B.; O’Connell, D.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Sundberg, T.

    2016-01-01

    We obtain dispersion relations of magnetic field fluctuations for two crossings of the terrestrial foreshock by Cluster spacecraft. These crossings cover plasma conditions that differ significantly in their plasma β and in the density of the reflected ion beam, but not in the properties of the encountered ion population, both showing shell-like distribution function. Dispersion relations are reconstructed using two-point instantaneous wave number estimations from pairs of Cluster spacecraft. The accessible range of wave vectors, limited by the available spacecraft separations, extends to ≈2 × 10 4 km. Results show multiple branches of dispersion relations, associated with different powers of magnetic field fluctuations. We find that sunward propagating fast magnetosonic waves and beam resonant modes are dominant for the high plasma β interval with a dense beam, while the dispersions of the interval with low beam density include Alfvén and fast magnetosonic modes propagating sunward and anti-sunward.

  8. STATISTICALLY DETERMINED DISPERSION RELATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD FLUCTUATIONS IN THE TERRESTRIAL FORESHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnat, B.; O’Connell, D.; Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick (United Kingdom); Sundberg, T., E-mail: B.Hnat@warwick.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-20

    We obtain dispersion relations of magnetic field fluctuations for two crossings of the terrestrial foreshock by Cluster spacecraft. These crossings cover plasma conditions that differ significantly in their plasma β and in the density of the reflected ion beam, but not in the properties of the encountered ion population, both showing shell-like distribution function. Dispersion relations are reconstructed using two-point instantaneous wave number estimations from pairs of Cluster spacecraft. The accessible range of wave vectors, limited by the available spacecraft separations, extends to ≈2 × 10{sup 4} km. Results show multiple branches of dispersion relations, associated with different powers of magnetic field fluctuations. We find that sunward propagating fast magnetosonic waves and beam resonant modes are dominant for the high plasma β interval with a dense beam, while the dispersions of the interval with low beam density include Alfvén and fast magnetosonic modes propagating sunward and anti-sunward.

  9. Quantum theory of parametric excitation in plasmas with the driving field space dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Hong Anh

    1998-11-01

    A development of the quantum theory of parametric wave excitation in plasmas is presented to take into account the effects of space dispersion of the driving external fields. The quantum equation of motion method with the use of appropriate matrix formalism leads to the system of dispersion equations for the eigenmodes of vibrations. Calculations show the enlargement of the excitable waves region both in wave number values and directions as compared to the case of dipole approximation considered earlier. (author)

  10. The mean energy loss by neutrino with magnetic moment in strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium contribution to photon dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosichkin, A. F.

    2017-11-01

    The process of radiative decay of the neutrino with a magnetic moment in a strong magnetic field with consideration of positronium influence on photon dispersion has been studied. Positronium contribution to the photon polarization operator induces significant modifications of the photon dispersion law and neutrino radiative decay amplitude. It has been shown that the mean energy loss of a neutrino with magnetic a moment significantly increases, when the positronium contribution to photon dispersion is taken into account.

  11. Noise Studies of Externally Dispersed Interferometry for Doppler Velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erskine, D J; Edelstein, J; Lloyd, J; Muirhead, P

    2006-01-01

    Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is the series combination of a fixed-delay field-widened Michelson interferometer with a dispersive spectrograph. This combination boosts the spectrograph performance for both Doppler velocimetry and high resolution spectroscopy. The interferometer creates a periodic comb that multiplies against the input spectrum to create moire fringes, which are recorded in combination with the regular spectrum. Both regular and high-frequency spectral components can be recovered from the data--the moire component carries additional information that increases the signal to noise for velocimetry and spectroscopy. Here we present simulations and theoretical studies of the photon limited Doppler velocity noise in an EDI. We used a model spectrum of a 1600K temperature star. For several rotational blurring velocities 0, 7.5, 15 and 25 km/s we calculated the dimensionless Doppler quality index (Q) versus wavenumber v. This is the normalized RMS of the derivative of the spectrum and is proportional to the photon-limited Doppler signal to noise ratio

  12. Numerical study on general dispersion relation of anisotropic and weakly relativistic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Fujiu; Chen Yanping

    1987-01-01

    The key problem in heating and instability studies in plasma physics is to obtain dispersive equation and its solution. This paper presents the general dispersive equation and corresponding procedure for electromagnetic wave which nearly poloidally impinges on anisotropic, weakly relativistic Maxwellian plasma with inhomogeneous density in nonuniform magnetic field (such as plasma in TOKAMAK). The double index function F ij , significant in plasma physics, was expanded as single index function F 1 , and then the values were calculated by means of dispersive function. It was also pointed out that the severe error would be involved in the calculation of F ij from recurrence relation of F 11

  13. Validation of dispersion model of RTARC-DSS based on ''KIT'' field experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the performance of the Gaussian dispersion model RTARC-DSS (Real Time Accident Release Consequences - Decision Support System) at the 'Kit' field experiments. The Model Validation Kit is a collection of three experimental data sets from Kincaid, Copenhagen, Lillestrom and supplementary Indianopolis experimental campaigns accompanied by software for model evaluation. The validation of the model has been performed on the basis of the maximum arc-wise concentrations using the Bootstrap resampling procedure the variation of the model residuals. Validation was performed for the short-range distances (about 1 - 10 km, maximum for Kincaid data set - 50 km from source). Model evaluation procedure and amount of relative over- or under-prediction are discussed and compared with the model. (author)

  14. Field induced spontaneous quasiparticle decay and renormalization of quasiparticle dispersion in a quantum antiferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao; Qiu, Y; Matsumoto, M; Tennant, D A; Coester, K; Schmidt, K P; Awwadi, F F; Turnbull, M M; Agrawal, H; Chernyshev, A L

    2017-05-05

    The notion of a quasiparticle, such as a phonon, a roton or a magnon, is used in modern condensed matter physics to describe an elementary collective excitation. The intrinsic zero-temperature magnon damping in quantum spin systems can be driven by the interaction of the one-magnon states and multi-magnon continuum. However, detailed experimental studies on this quantum many-body effect induced by an applied magnetic field are rare. Here we present a high-resolution neutron scattering study in high fields on an S=1/2 antiferromagnet C 9 H 18 N 2 CuBr 4 . Compared with the non-interacting linear spin-wave theory, our results demonstrate a variety of phenomena including field-induced renormalization of one-magnon dispersion, spontaneous magnon decay observed via intrinsic linewidth broadening, unusual non-Lorentzian two-peak structure in the excitation spectra and a dramatic shift of spectral weight from one-magnon state to the two-magnon continuum.

  15. Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometric study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectrometric study of compositional differences in trace elements in dried Moringa oleifera leaves grown in two different agro-ecological locations in Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

  16. Plume dispersion from the MVP field experiment. Analysis of surface concentration and its fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yimin; Boybeyi, Zafer; Hanna, Steven; Chayantrakom, Kittisak

    Surface concentration and its fluctuations from plume dispersion under unstable conditions in a coastal environment are investigated using the model validation program field experimental data. The goal of this study is to better understand plume dispersion under such conditions. Procedures are described to derive the plume surface concentration from moving vehicle measurements. Convective boundary layer scalings are applied and cumulative density functions (CDF) are studied. The results indicate that the relative concentration fluctuation intensity ( σc/C(y)) decreases with the normalized downwind distance ( X) and that it is relatively small at the plume central line and largely increased at the plume edges, consistent with other field and laboratory results. The relation between σc/C(y) at the plume centerline ( σc/C) and X for elevated sources can be described by σc/C=a+b/X. The crosswind plume spread ( σy) is found to satisfy Deardorff and Willis's (J. Appl. Meteorol., 14 (1975) 1451) form of σy/h=a1X/(1+a2X) scaled with convective layer depth h. For elevated sources, the normalized crosswind integrated concentration ( Cy) is found to satisfy a relation of Cy=16X, with Yaglom's (Izr. Atmos. Oceanic Phys., 8 (1972) 333) scaling rule on the free convective layer being applied. Empirical CDFs based on the gamma and the clipped probability density functions show agreements with the experimental CDFs, with the former being better than the latter when (c-C)/σc>0.5. A new clipped-gamma CDF form is proposed based on the analysis of the present data, showing a better agreement. We suggest that a parameter u0*(12-0.5h/L), with combined efforts of surface friction velocity ( u0*), Monin-Obukhov stability length ( L) and unstable boundary layer height ( h), replace the convective velocity scale ( w*) under weak convective conditions in a coastal environment.

  17. Wind dispersal of alien plant species into remnant natural vegetation from adjacent agricultural fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Egawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge regarding the seed dispersal of alien species is crucial to manage invasion risk in fragmented natural habitats. Focusing on wind dispersal, this study assessed the spatial and quantitative extents to which a remnant natural fen receives the seeds of alien species dispersed from adjacent hay meadows in Hokkaido, northern Japan. I established a total of 80 funnel seed traps in the fen at distances of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, and 100 m from the meadows. The proportion of alien species in the seed rain at each distance was quantified, and the 99th-percentile dispersal distance from the meadows was estimated for each alien species by constructing dispersal kernels. Despite the presence of a marginal ditch and an elevational difference between the fen and the meadows, five alien species, including four grasses that do not have modified seed structures for wind dispersal, dispersed their seeds into the fen. These alien species accounted for up to 65.9% of the seed rain in terms of quantity. The 99th-percentile dispersal distances of the alien species ranged from 3.8 m to 309.3 m, and these distances were longer than the values predicted on the basis of their functional traits, such as terminal velocity. The results of this study demonstrated that numerous seeds of farmland-derived alien species were transported into the remnant vegetation via wind dispersal, and that simple predictions of dispersal distance based on functional traits could underestimate the potential area that alien species can reach. Continuous management both in farmland (to reduce seed escape and in remnant vegetation (to prevent the establishment of alien species is necessary to protect native vegetation from biological invasion in agricultural landscapes.

  18. Field experiments on seed dispersal by wind in ten umbelliferous species (Apiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongejans, E.; Telenius, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents data from experiments on seed dispersal by wind for ten species of the family Apiaceae. Seed shadows were obtained in the field under natural conditions, using wind speeds between four and ten m/s. The flight of individual seeds was followed by eye, and seed shadows were

  19. Relationship of field components and the matched dispersion function in Arc achromats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieguth, T.; Kheifets, S.; Murray, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The general integral condition connecting the field, its derivative and the resulting eta function derived for any lattice is applied to the achromats of the SLC Arcs. This condition can be combined with the non-dispersive condition to give a simple parameterization of second-order achromats constructed of combined function magnets

  20. Numerical study on flow and pollutant dispersion inside street canyons

    OpenAIRE

    Yunkai, Yang

    2013-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the characteristics of flow pattern and vehicle-emitted pollutant dispersion in roughness surface layer. In an urban environment, wind flow and transported-pollutant source interfere strongly with buildings and other roughness elements on the surface ground, which results in complex characteristics of flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in 3D circumstances. The present study intends to simplify the research domain and investigate the fundamental modeling problems that e...

  1. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: Analytical, numerical, and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burt, G.; Ronald, K.; Young, A.R.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Cross, A.W.; Konoplev, I.V.; He, W.; Thomson, J.; Whyte, C.G.; Samsonov, S.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.

    2004-01-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared

  2. Mass dispersions in a time-dependent mean-field approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balian, R.; Bonche, P.; Flocard, H.; Veneroni, M.

    1984-05-01

    Characteristic functions for single-particle (s.p.) observables are evaluated by means of a time-dependent variational principle, which involves a state and an observable as conjugate variables. This provides a mean-field expression for fluctuations of s.p. observables, such as mass dispersions. The result differs from TDHF, it requires only the use of existing codes, and it presents attractive theoretical features. First numerical tests are encouraging. In particular, a calculation for 16 O + 16 O provides a significant increase of the predicted mass dispersion

  3. Ultralow-field and spin-locking relaxation dispersion in postmortem pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Hwang, Seong-Min; Wendland, Michael; You, Lixing; Clarke, John; Inglis, Ben

    2017-12-01

    To investigate tissue-specific differences, a quantitative comparison was made between relaxation dispersion in postmortem pig brain measured at ultralow fields (ULF) and spin locking at 7 tesla (T). The goal was to determine whether ULF-MRI has potential advantages for in vivo human brain imaging. Separate specimens of gray matter and white matter were investigated using an ULF-MRI system with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) signal detection to measure T1ULF at fields from 58.7 to 235.0 μT and using a commercial MRI scanner to measure T1ρ7T at spin-locking fields from 5.0 to 235.0 μT. At matched field strengths, T1ρ7T is 50 to 100% longer than T1ULF. Furthermore, dispersion in T1ULF is close to linear between 58.7 and 235 µT, whereas dispersion in T1ρ7T is highly nonlinear over the same range. A subtle elbow in the T1ULF dispersion at approximately 140 µT is tentatively attributed to the local dipolar field of macromolecules. It is suggested that different relaxation mechanisms dominate each method and that ULF-MRI has a fundamentally different sensitivity to the macromolecular structure of neural tissue. Ultralow-field MRI may offer distinct, quantitative advantages for human brain imaging, while simultaneously avoiding the severe heating limitation imposed on high-field spin locking. Magn Reson Med 78:2342-2351, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Influence of Complete Coriolis Force on the Dispersion Relation of Ocean Internal-wave in a Background Currents Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis, the influence of complete Coriolis force (the model includes both the vertical and horizontal components of Coriolis force on the dispersion relation of ocean internal-wave under background currents field are studied, it is important to the study of ocean internal waves in density-stratified ocean. We start from the control equation of sea water movement in the background of the non-traditional approximation, and the vertical velocity solution is derived where buoyancy frequency N(z gradually varies with the ocean depth z. The results show that the influence of complete Coriolis force on the dispersion relation of ocean internal-wave under background currents field is obvious, and these results provide strong evidence for the understanding of dynamic process of density stratified ocean internal waves.

  5. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  6. Quantum treatment of field propagation in a fiber near the zero dispersion wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, A.; Bassi, A.; Bolorizadeh, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this report, we present a quantum theory describing the propagation of the electromagnetic radiation in a fiber in the presence of the third order dispersion coefficient. We obtained the quantum photon-polariton field, hence, we provide herein a coupled set of operator forms for the corresponding nonlinear Schrödinger equations when the third order dispersion coefficient is included. Coupled stochastic nonlinear Schrödinger equations were obtained by applying a positive P-representation that governs the propagation and interaction of quantum solitons in the presence of the third-order dispersion term. Finally, to reduce the fluctuations near solitons in the first approximation, we developed coupled stochastic linear equations.

  7. Field dispersal ability and taxis to sex pheromone of irradiated F-1 male Asian corn borer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huasong; Liu Qiongru; Lu Daguang; Wang Endong; Kang Wen; Li Yongjun; He Qiulan; Hu Jianguo

    1998-01-01

    The dispersal ability of F-1 male Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenee), irradiated with 100, 150 and 200 Gy Separately in parental generation were tested by marking (with Calco oil red or Sudan blue internally)-releasing-recapturing (with synthesized sex pheromone) method in the field where the farthest distance from release point to pheromone trap was 550 m. The results showed that, as compared with the normal male moths, despite of the fact that a part of the irradiated F-1 males had lost dispersal ability or taxis to sex pheromone, there was no significant difference between the captured rates of irradiated F-1 males and normal males in the trap 550 m from release point, indicated that the dispersal ability or taxis to sex pheromone of irradiated F-1 males arrived at 550 m from release point are still well matched with the normal ones

  8. Dispersion relations for the self-energy in noncommutative field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Das, Ashok; Frenkel, J.

    2002-01-01

    We study the IR-UV connection in noncommutative φ 3 theory as well as in noncommutative QED from the point of view of the dispersion relation for self-energy. We show that, although the imaginary part of the self-energy is well behaved as the parameter of noncommutativity vanishes, the real part becomes divergent as a consequence of the high energy behavior of the dispersion integral. Some other interesting features that arise from this analysis are also briefly discussed

  9. An Experiment of GMPLS-Based Dispersion Compensation Control over In-Field Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seno, Shoichiro; Horiuchi, Eiichi; Yoshida, Sota; Sugihara, Takashi; Onohara, Kiyoshi; Kamei, Misato; Baba, Yoshimasa; Kubo, Kazuo; Mizuochi, Takashi

    As ROADMs (Reconfigurable Optical Add/Drop Multiplexers) are becoming widely used in metro/core networks, distributed control of wavelength paths by extended GMPLS (Generalized MultiProtocol Label Switching) protocols has attracted much attention. For the automatic establishment of an arbitrary wavelength path satisfying dynamic traffic demands over a ROADM or WXC (Wavelength Cross Connect)-based network, precise determination of chromatic dispersion over the path and optimized assignment of dispersion compensation capabilities at related nodes are essential. This paper reports an experiment over in-field fibers where GMPLS-based control was applied for the automatic discovery of chromatic dispersion, path computation, and wavelength path establishment with dynamic adjustment of variable dispersion compensation. The GMPLS-based control scheme, which the authors called GMPLS-Plus, extended GMPLS's distributed control architecture with attributes for automatic discovery, advertisement, and signaling of chromatic dispersion. In this experiment, wavelength paths with distances of 24km and 360km were successfully established and error-free data transmission was verified. The experiment also confirmed path restoration with dynamic compensation adjustment upon fiber failure.

  10. Dispersant testing : a study on analytical test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Wang, Z.; Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON

    2004-01-01

    Crude oil is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons, ranging from small, volatile compounds to very large, non-volatile compounds. Analysis of the dispersed oil is crucial. This paper described Environment Canada's ongoing studies on various traits of dispersants. In particular, it describes small studies related to dispersant effectiveness and methods to improve analytical procedures. The study also re-evaluated the analytical procedure for the Swirling Flask Test, which is now part of the ASTM standard procedure. There are new and improved methods for analyzing oil-in-water using gas chromatography (GC). The methods could be further enhanced by integrating the entire chromatogram rather than just peaks. This would result in a decrease in maximum variation from 5 per cent to about 2 per cent. For oil-dispersant studies, the surfactant-dispersed oil hydrocarbons consist of two parts: GC-resolved hydrocarbons and GC-unresolved hydrocarbons. This study also tested a second feature of the Swirling Flask Test in which the side spout was tested and compared with a new vessel with a septum port instead of a side spout. This decreased the variability as well as the energy and mixing in the vessel. Rather than being a variation of the Swirling Flask Test, it was suggested that a spoutless vessel might be considered as a completely separate test. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  11. Dispersive versus constant-geometry models of the neutron-208Pb mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1990-01-01

    Phenomenological optical-model analyses of differential elastic scattering cross sections of neutrons by 208 Pb indicate that the radius of the real part of the potential decreases with increasing energy in the domain 4< E<40 MeV. On the other hand, the experimental total cross section is compatible with a real potential whose radial shape is energy independent. In order to clarify this situation, we compare a 'constant geometry' model whose real part has an energy-independent radial shape with a 'dispersive model' whose real part has an energy-dependent radial shape calculated from the dispersion relation which connects the real and imaginary parts of the field. The following three main features are considered. (i) The junction of the optical-model potential with the shell-model potential at negative energy. (ii) The agreement between the calculated total and differential cross sections and their experimental values. (iii) The extent to which the real part of the optical-model potential can be accurately determined by analyzing the total cross section only. It is concluded that the presently available experimental data support the existence of an energy dependence of the radial shape of the real potential, in keeping with the dispersion relation. A new parametrization of a 'dispersive' mean field is also presented. It does not involve more parameters than the previously published one but takes better account of the physical properties of the spectral functions; it is shown to improve the agreement between predicted and experimental scattering data. (orig.)

  12. Nucleon form factors in dispersively improved chiral effective field theory. II. Electromagnetic form factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, J. M.; Weiss, C.

    2018-05-01

    We study the nucleon electromagnetic form factors (EM FFs) using a recently developed method combining chiral effective field theory (χ EFT ) and dispersion analysis. The spectral functions on the two-pion cut at t >4 Mπ2 are constructed using the elastic unitarity relation and an N /D representation. χ EFT is used to calculate the real functions J±1(t ) =f±1(t ) /Fπ(t ) (ratios of the complex π π →N N ¯ partial-wave amplitudes and the timelike pion FF), which are free of π π rescattering. Rescattering effects are included through the empirical timelike pion FF | Fπ(t) | 2 . The method allows us to compute the isovector EM spectral functions up to t ˜1 GeV2 with controlled accuracy (leading order, next-to-leading order, and partial next-to-next-to-leading order). With the spectral functions we calculate the isovector nucleon EM FFs and their derivatives at t =0 (EM radii, moments) using subtracted dispersion relations. We predict the values of higher FF derivatives, which are not affected by higher-order chiral corrections and are obtained almost parameter-free in our approach, and explain their collective behavior. We estimate the individual proton and neutron FFs by adding an empirical parametrization of the isoscalar sector. Excellent agreement with the present low-Q2 FF data is achieved up to ˜0.5 GeV2 for GE, and up to ˜0.2 GeV2 for GM. Our results can be used to guide the analysis of low-Q2 elastic scattering data and the extraction of the proton charge radius.

  13. Evaluation of field-collected data measuring fluorescein dye movements and dispersion for dispersed oil transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French McCay, D.; Mueller, C.; Jayko, K.; Longval, B.; Schroeder, M. [Applied Science Associates Inc., Narragansett, RI (United States); Terrill, E.; Carter, M.; Otero, M.; Kim, S.Y. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Nordhausen, W.; Lampinen, M. [California Dept. of Fish and Game, San Diego, CA (United States). Office of Spill Prevention and Response; Payne, J.R. [Payne Environmental Consultants Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States); Ohlmann, C. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In the event of on oil spill at sea, the concentration of hydrocarbons in the water column can be evaluated using oil spill fate and transport modeling. Such modeling can also determine the potential exposure to zooplankton, and the impacts of oil spills with and without the use of dispersants. This paper reported on fluorescein dye studies that were conducted off Sand Diego, California to evaluate the ability of transport models to hindcast movement and dispersion of dye using data such as surface currents calculated from high-frequency radar; near surface currents from drifter measurements drogued at several depths; dye concentrations measured by fluorescence; spreading and dye intensity measurements based on aerial photography; and, water density profiles from conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) casts. This paper presented modeling issues that remain to be addressed, such as the need to resolve small-scale transport processes in order to evaluate effects on water column biota. Since these processes determining current velocities are complex, it is not feasible to include most of the complexities at appropriately small scales in oil spill modeling applications. The difficulty in predicting currents that transport oil components and organisms with a hydrodynamic model application that does not include temporal details in the forcing function was also discussed. This paper demonstrated that the SIMAP spill trajectory model, using the drifter velocities as current input, successfully reproduced trajectories of the dye. The effect of wind drift transporting the surface material faster than the subsurface materials was identified as a spreading mechanism. Therefore, subtraction of the wind drift from the shallower drifter velocities, and inclusion of wind drift in SIMAP would allow those velocities to be used for depths other than those tracked by the drifters. 57 refs., 8 tabs., 17 figs.

  14. Energy dispersion of charged particles decelerated in a two-dimensional electrostatic field of the type x1/n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zashkvara, V.V.; Bok, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Two components of the spatial dispersion of particles with respect to kinetic energy can be distinguished of the motion of charged particle beams in electrostatic mirros with a two-dimensional field φ(x,y) ans xz symmetry plane. The first is the longitudinal dispersion, which is along the z axis perpendicular to the field; the second is the transverse dispersion, along the x axis parallel to the field vector in the plane of symmetry. The longitudinal dispersion is a basic characteristic of electrostatic mirrors used as energy analyzers. It has been shown that for first-order angular focusing, the longitudinal dispersion, divided by the focal length, is independent of the structure of the two-dimensional field and is a function only of the angle at which the charged particle beam enters the mirror. The transverse dispersion stems from the energy dependence of the penetration depth of the beam as it is decelerated, and it plays an important role when the energy of a charged particle beam is analyzed by the filtering principle, making use of the property of an electrostatic mirror to transmit or reflect charged particles with kinetic energy in a specified interval. This type of dispersion in electrostatic mirrors with two-dimensional fields has not been analyzed systematically. In the present note the authors consider a particular type of two-dimensional electrostatic field which is characterized by a large transverse dispersion, many times larger than in existing electrostatic reflecting filters employing planar and cylindrical fields

  15. Dispersed solar thermal generation employing parabolic dish-electric transport with field modulated generator systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of field modulated generator systems (FMGS) to dispersed solar-thermal-electric generation from a parabolic dish field with electric transport. Each solar generation unit is rated at 15 kWe and the power generated by an array of such units is electrically collected for insertion into an existing utility grid. Such an approach appears to be most suitable when the heat engine rotational speeds are high (greater than 6000 r/min) and, in particular, if they are operated in the variable speed mode and if utility-grade a.c. is required for direct insertion into the grid without an intermediate electric energy storage and reconversion system. Predictions of overall efficiencies based on conservative efficiency figures for the FMGS are in the range of 25 per cent and should be encouraging to those involved in the development of cost-effective dispersed solar thermal power systems.

  16. Faraday rotation dispersion microscopy imaging of diamagnetic and chiral liquids with pulsed magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Masayori; Nakano, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Satoshi; Watarai, Hitoshi

    2013-05-21

    We have constructed an experimental setup for Faraday rotation dispersion imaging and demonstrated the performance of a novel imaging principle. By using a pulsed magnetic field and a polarized light synchronized to the magnetic field, quantitative Faraday rotation images of diamagnetic organic liquids in glass capillaries were observed. Nonaromatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives, and naphthalene derivatives were clearly distinguished by the Faraday rotation images due to the difference in Verdet constants. From the wavelength dispersion of the Faraday rotation images in the visible region, it was found that the resonance wavelength in the UV region, which was estimated based on the Faraday B-term, could be used as characteristic parameters for the imaging of the liquids. Furthermore, simultaneous acquisition of Faraday rotation image and natural optical rotation image was demonstrated for chiral organic liquids.

  17. Dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in axisymmetric magnetospheric plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Grishanov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we derive the dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in two-dimensional (2-D magnetospheric plasmas with anisotropic temperature. Two magnetic field configurations are considered with dipole and circular magnetic field lines. The main contribution of the trapped particles to the transverse dielectric permittivity is estimated by solving the linearized Vlasov equation for their perturbed distribution functions, accounting for the cyclotron and bounce resonances, neglecting the drift effects, and assuming the weak connection of the left-hand and right-hand polarized waves. Both the bi-Maxwellian and bi-Lorentzian distribution functions are considered to model the ring current ions and electrons in the dipole magnetosphere. A numerical code has been developed to analyze the dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in an electron-proton magnetospheric plasma with circular magnetic field lines, assuming that the steady-state distribution function of the energetic protons is bi-Maxwellian. As in the uniform magnetic field case, the growth rate of the proton-cyclotron instability (PCI in the 2-D magnetospheric plasmas is defined by the contribution of the energetic ions/protons to the imaginary part of the transverse permittivity elements. We demonstrate that the PCI growth rate in the 2-D axisymmetric plasmasphere can be significantly smaller than that for the straight magnetic field case with the same macroscopic bulk parameters.

  18. Mord studies in IR region by new dispersion relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, V.R.; Kumar, R. Jeevan

    1994-01-01

    This is the continuation of the series reporting MORD studies to typical problem in Chemistry and Polymer Science. In our earlier papers the MORDsup1.2 studied only in visible region. In this present investigation we extended the application of the New Dispersion Relation in IR region to determine the MORD and tested to some simple systems

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of the response of bi-disperse polyelectrolyte brushes to external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fen; Ding Huan-Da; Duan Chao; Tong Chao-Hui; Zhao Shuang-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Langevin dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the response of bi-disperse and strong polyacid chains grafted on an electrode to electric fields generated by opposite surface charges on the polyelectrolyte (PE)-grafted electrode and a second parallel electrode. Simulation results clearly show that, under a negative external electric field, the longer grafted PE chains are more strongly stretched than the shorter ones in terms of the relative change in their respective brush heights. Whereas under a positive external electric field, the grafted shorter chains collapse more significantly than the longer ones. It was found that, under a positive external electric field, the magnitude of the total electric force acting on one shorter PE chain is larger than that on one longer PE chain, or vice versa. The effects of smeared and discrete charge distributions of grafted PE chains on the response of PE brushes to external electric fields were also examined. (paper)

  20. Dispersion and settlement of heavy metals in clay liners for sanitary landfills. Comparison of laboratory and field studies. Verlagerung und Festlegung von Schwermetallen in tonigen Deponieabdichtungen. Ein Vergleich von Labor- und Gelaendestudien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J F

    1992-01-01

    The migration of heavy metals from long-standing waste dumps (blast furnace flue dust, ore flotation slurries, household refuse and toxic waste dumps) into natural clay barriers or artificial mineral liners was investigated in laboratory studies and field studies. (orig.)

  1. Experimental study on the dispersion properties of cusptron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, J.Y.; Crosby, H.; Jablon, D.G.; Krall, A.D.; Namkung, W.

    1984-01-01

    One of the promising devices that generates high frequency microwaves is the cusptron, where the fast rotating electron beam interacts with the high muthal (iota>1) waveguide mode, thereby producing multiples of the cyclotron frequency (iotaω/sub c/). In order to encourage the chosen azimuthal perturbation, it is necessary to structure the wall in a magnetron-like shape. In particular, the authors consider the structure where the outer wall is radially cut out to make multiple vane-like resonators. With these interruptions, it obvious that there exist strong couplings among the muthal space harmonics, iota n in the cusptron device. The mode is characterized by the axial wave number, k, the primary azimuthal mode number iota, which indicates the phase difference between adjacent segments, and whether it is TE or TM. Recently, a rigorous numerical method has been devised to determine the cusptron structure. This method uses the orthonormal mode expansions both in the interaction space and the resonators to assure the point-by-point match of the fields. The method also finds the distribution of the harmonics iota n as well, that serves as a signature of the particular mode. In the present study, the authors experimentally investigate the dispersion characteristics of the cusptron, and compare the results with the theory

  2. Equilibrium Eulerian approach for predicting the thermal field of a dispersion of small particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, J. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Center for Simulation of Advanced Rockets; Balachandar, S. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2005-02-01

    The equilibrium Eulerian method [J. Ferry, S. Balachandar, A fast Eulerian method for disperse two-phase flow, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 27 (7) (2001) 1199-1226] provides an accurate approximation to the velocity field of sufficiently small dispersed particles in a turbulent fluid. In particular, it captures the important physics of particle response to turbulent flow, such as preferential concentration and turbophoresis. It is therefore employed as an efficient alternative to solving a PDE to determine the particle velocity field. Here we explore two possible extensions of this method to determine the particle temperature field accurately and efficiently, as functions of the underlying fluid velocity and temperature fields. Both extensions are theoretically shown to be highly accurate for asymptotically small particles. Their behavior for finite-size particles is assessed in a DNS of turbulent channel flow (Re{sub {tau}} = 150) with a passive temperature field (Pr = 1). Here it is found that although the order of accuracy of the two extensions is the same, the constant factor by which one is superior to the other can be quite large, so the less accurate extension is appropriate only in the case of a very small mechanical-to-thermal response time ratio. (Author)

  3. The experimental study of seed dispersal by fish (ichthyochory)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollux, B.J.A.

    2011-01-01

    1.The last few years have seen an increased interest in the experimental study of seed dispersal by fish (ichthyochory). This paper reviews such experiments, aiming to determine what functional aspects of ichthyochory have been investigated, what experimental designs have been used and what the

  4. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuefeng; Wang Zhengxiong

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  5. Studies of migration and dispersion of radionuclides from the storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlouhy, Z.

    1976-08-01

    Conditions were tested under which fixed low level liquid radioactive wastes could be safely stored in geological formations of Czechoslovakia. Geological models were constructed to yield relatively accurate information on the migration and dispersion properties of some soils and rock formation in both static and dynamic conditions. Based on results of the models further testing was conducted under field conditions. The principal radionuclides used during the tests were 90 Sr and 137 Cs. Relative transport and dispersion data are provided for various of the earth studied groups and an assessment of the various sites provided in the report

  6. High Explosive Radiological Dispersion Device: Time and Distance Multiscale Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharon, A.; Sattinger, I.; Halevy, D.; Banaim, P.; Yaar, I.; Krantz, L.

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of explosion tests imitates different explosive RDD scenarios were conducted and aimed at increasing the preparedness for possible terrorism events, where radioactive (RA) materials disperse via an explosive charge. About 20 atmospheric dispersion tests were conducted using6-8 Ci of 99mTc which were coupled to TNT charges within the range of 0.2525 kg. Tests performed above different typical urban ground surfaces (in order to study the surface effect on the activity ground deposition pattern due to different in particles size distribution). We have used an efficient aerosolizing devices, means that most of the RA particles were initially created within the size of fine aerosols, mostly respirable. Ground activity measurements were performed both, around the dispersion point and up to few hundred meters downwind. Micrometeorology parameters (wind intensity and direction, potential temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and atmospheric stability) were collected allowing comparisons topredictions of existing atmospheric dispersion models’1. Based on the experimental results, new model parameterizations were performed. Improvements in the models’ predictions were achieved and a set of thumb rules for first responders was formulated. This paper describes the project objectives, some of the experimental setups and results obtained. Post detonation nuclear forensic considerations can be made based upon results achieved

  7. Field studies courses open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourteen month-long courses combining applied academics with training in field research methodology are being offered this summer by the School for Field Studies. The courses, held in eight countries during May, June, July, and August, provide unique opportunities for participants to work as a team under primitive conditions.‘Our courses bind together the academic challenge of the research problem, the physical challenge of the site itself, and the interpersonal challenge of the expedition team in a dynamic way so that both cognitive and affective learning are accelerated,’ according to Jim Elder, the school's director.

  8. Stability studies of colloidal silica dispersions in binary solvent mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, Keith Howard

    1997-01-01

    A series of monodispersed colloidal silica dispersions, of varying radii, has been prepared. These particles are hydrophilic in nature due to the presence of surface silanol groups. Some of the particles have been rendered hydrophobic by terminally grafting n-alkyl (C 18 ) chains to the surface. The stability of dispersions of these various particles has been studied in binary mixtures of liquids, namely (i) ethanol and cyclohexane, and (ii) benzene and n-heptane. The ethanol - cyclohexane systems have been studied using a variety of techniques. Adsorption excess isotherms have been established and electrophoretic mobility measurements have been made. The predicted stability of the dispersions from D.V.L.O. calculations is compared to the observed stability. The hydrophilic silica particles behave as predicted by the calculations, with the zeta potential decreasing and the van der Waals attraction increasing with increasing cyclohexane concentration. The hydrophobic particles behave differently than expected, and the stability as a function of solvent mixture composition does not show a uniform trend. The effect of varying the coverage of C 18 chains on the surface and the effect of trace water in the systems has also been investigated. Organophilic silica dispersions in benzene - n-heptane solvent mixtures show weak aggregation and phase separation into a diffuse 'gas-like' phase and a more concentrated 'liquid-like' phase, analogous to molecular condensation processes. Calculations of the van der Waals potential as a function of solvent mixture composition show good agreement with the observed stability. Determination of the number of particles in each phase at equilibrium allows the energy of flocculation to be determined using a simple thermodynamic relationship. Finally, the addition of an AB block copolymer to organophilic silica particles in benzene n-heptane solvent mixtures has been shown to have a marked effect on the dispersion stability. This stability

  9. Morphological studies of polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin-Woo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the morphologies of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on E7/NOA61. Scanning electron microscope studies show that the PDLC morphology is strongly affected by the LC concentration and the cure temperature. A typical PDLC morphology with isolated LC droplets dispersed in a polymer matrix is only observed at low LC compositions and at low cure temperatures. Increasing either the LC composition or the cure temperature results in a polymer ball morphology, in which LCs exist in irregularly shaped voids in the polymer network structure. It is shown that the transition between these two morphologies can be qualitatively explained using a pseudo-binary phase diagram.

  10. Long-distance wind-dispersal of spores in a fungal plant pathogen: estimation of anisotropic dispersal kernels from an extensive field experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Rieux

    Full Text Available Given its biological significance, determining the dispersal kernel (i.e., the distribution of dispersal distances of spore-producing pathogens is essential. Here, we report two field experiments designed to measure disease gradients caused by sexually- and asexually-produced spores of the wind-dispersed banana plant fungus Mycosphaerella fijiensis. Gradients were measured during a single generation and over 272 traps installed up to 1000 m along eight directions radiating from a traceable source of inoculum composed of fungicide-resistant strains. We adjusted several kernels differing in the shape of their tail and tested for two types of anisotropy. Contrasting dispersal kernels were observed between the two types of spores. For sexual spores (ascospores, we characterized both a steep gradient in the first few metres in all directions and rare long-distance dispersal (LDD events up to 1000 m from the source in two directions. A heavy-tailed kernel best fitted the disease gradient. Although ascospores distributed evenly in all directions, average dispersal distance was greater in two different directions without obvious correlation with wind patterns. For asexual spores (conidia, few dispersal events occurred outside of the source plot. A gradient up to 12.5 m from the source was observed in one direction only. Accordingly, a thin-tailed kernel best fitted the disease gradient, and anisotropy in both density and distance was correlated with averaged daily wind gust. We discuss the validity of our results as well as their implications in terms of disease diffusion and management strategy.

  11. Curcumin containing monoolein aqueous dispersions: A preformulative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Elisabetta, E-mail: ese@unife.it [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Ravani, Laura [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Mariani, Paolo [Department of Life and Environmental Sciences and CNISM, Università Politecnica delle Marche, I-60100 Ancona (Italy); Contado, Catia [Department of Chemistry, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy); Drechsler, Markus [Macromolecular Chemistry II, University of Bayreuth (Germany); Puglia, Carmelo [Department of Drug Sciences, University of Catania, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Cortesi, Rita [Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, I-44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    The present study describes the production and characterization of monoolein aqueous dispersions (MAD) as drug delivery systems for curcumin (CR). MAD based on monoolein and different emulsifiers have been produced and characterized. Morphology and dimensional distribution have been investigated by Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). Monoolein in different mixtures with sodium cholate, sodium caseinate, bentonite and poloxamer resulted in heterogeneous dispersions constituted of unilamellar vesicles, cubosomes and sponge type phases, depending on the employed components, as found by cryo-TEM and X-ray studies. CR was encapsulated with entrapment efficiencies depending on the MAD composition, particularly the highest was reached in the case of monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixture. The same mixture was able to maintain CR stability also after 6 months. CR release modalities were in vitro investigated in order to mimic a possible subcutaneous administration of MAD. It was found that MAD constituted of monoolein/poloxamer and monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixtures were able to sustain CR release. MAD viscous vehicles were produced by xanthan gum. CR percutaneous absorption has been studied in vitro using excised human skin membranes [stratum corneum epidermis (SCE)] mounted into Franz cells. It was found that fluxes (F{sub n}) of CR incorporated in MAD are influenced by the presence of monoolein based nanosystems. In particular xanthan gum based MAD better control CR diffusion from MAD. - Highlights: • Curcumin (CR) can be solubilized in monoolein aqueous dispersions (MAD). • Different emulsifiers result in different inner structures in the disperse phase. • Monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixture (MCP) results in the highest CR encapsulation. • MCP maintains CR stability for 6 months. • Xanthan gum based MAD better control CR fluxes with respect to plain gel and liquid MAD.

  12. Curcumin containing monoolein aqueous dispersions: A preformulative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Ravani, Laura; Mariani, Paolo; Contado, Catia; Drechsler, Markus; Puglia, Carmelo; Cortesi, Rita

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the production and characterization of monoolein aqueous dispersions (MAD) as drug delivery systems for curcumin (CR). MAD based on monoolein and different emulsifiers have been produced and characterized. Morphology and dimensional distribution have been investigated by Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM), X-ray and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). Monoolein in different mixtures with sodium cholate, sodium caseinate, bentonite and poloxamer resulted in heterogeneous dispersions constituted of unilamellar vesicles, cubosomes and sponge type phases, depending on the employed components, as found by cryo-TEM and X-ray studies. CR was encapsulated with entrapment efficiencies depending on the MAD composition, particularly the highest was reached in the case of monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixture. The same mixture was able to maintain CR stability also after 6 months. CR release modalities were in vitro investigated in order to mimic a possible subcutaneous administration of MAD. It was found that MAD constituted of monoolein/poloxamer and monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixtures were able to sustain CR release. MAD viscous vehicles were produced by xanthan gum. CR percutaneous absorption has been studied in vitro using excised human skin membranes [stratum corneum epidermis (SCE)] mounted into Franz cells. It was found that fluxes (F n ) of CR incorporated in MAD are influenced by the presence of monoolein based nanosystems. In particular xanthan gum based MAD better control CR diffusion from MAD. - Highlights: • Curcumin (CR) can be solubilized in monoolein aqueous dispersions (MAD). • Different emulsifiers result in different inner structures in the disperse phase. • Monoolein/poloxamer/sodium cholate mixture (MCP) results in the highest CR encapsulation. • MCP maintains CR stability for 6 months. • Xanthan gum based MAD better control CR fluxes with respect to plain gel and liquid MAD

  13. Dispersant effectiveness: Studies into the causes of effectiveness variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.; Tennyson, E.

    1995-01-01

    Effectiveness, a key issue of using dispersants, is affected by many interrelated factors. The principal factors involved are the oil composition, dispersant formulation, sea surface turbulence and dispersant quantity. Oil composition is a very strong determinant. Current dispersant formulation effectiveness correlates strongly with the amount of saturate component in the oil. The other components of the oil, the asphaltenes, resins or polars and aromatic fractions show a negative correlation with the dispersant effectiveness. Viscosity is also a predictor of dispersant effectiveness and may have an effect because it is in turn determined by oil composition. Dispersant composition is significant and interacts with oil composition. Dispersants show high effectiveness at HLB values near 10. Sea turbulence strongly affects dispersant effectiveness.Effectiveness rises with increasing turbulence to a maximum value. Effectiveness for current commercial dispersants is gaussian around a peak salinity value. Peak effectiveness is achieved at very high dispersant quantities--at a ratio of 1:5, dispersant-to-oil volume. Dispersant effectiveness for those oils tested and under the conditions measured, is approximately logarithmic with dispersant quantity and will reach about 50% of its peak value at a dispersant to oil ratio of about 1:20 and near zero at a ratio of about 1:50

  14. Studies of Tracer Dispersion and Fluid Flow in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rage, T.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis explores the connection between the topology of a porous medium and its macroscopic transport properties and is based on computerized simulation. In porous media, both diffusion and convection contribute to the dispersion of a tracer and their combined effect is emphasized. The governing equations are solved numerically, using finite differences and Monte Carlo technique. The influence of finite Reynolds number on the outcome of echo-experiments is discussed. Comparing experiments and simulations it is found that nonlinear inertial forces lead to a visible deformation of a returned tracer at surprisingly small Reynolds numbers. In a study of tracer dispersion and fluid flow in periodic arrays of discs it is demonstrated that the mechanisms of mechanical dispersion in periodic media and in natural (non-periodic) porous media are essentially different. Measurements of the percolation probability distribution of a sandstone sample is presented. Local porosity theory predicts that this simple geometric function of a porous medium is of dominant importance for its macroscopic transport properties. It is demonstrated that many aspects of transport through fractures can be studied by using simple but realistic models and readily available computer resources. An example may be the transport of hydrocarbon fluids from the source rock to a reservoir. 165 refs., 44 figs., 1 table

  15. The optical manifestation of dispersive field-aligned bursts in auroral breakup arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, H.; Semeter, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Zettergren, M.

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution optical observations of a substorm expansion show dynamic auroral rays with surges of luminosity traveling up the magnetic field lines. Observed in ground-based imagers, this phenomenon has been termed auroral flames, whereas the rocket signatures of the corresponding energy dispersions are more commonly known as field-aligned bursts. In this paper, observations of auroral flames obtained at 50 frames/s with a scientific-grade Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor (30° × 30° field of view, 30 m resolution at 120 km) are used to provide insight into the nature of the precipitating electrons similar to high-resolution particle detectors. Thanks to the large field of view and high spatial resolution of this system, it is possible to obtain a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution in altitude of the volume emission rate from a single sensor. The measured volume emission rates are compared with the sum of modeled eigenprofiles obtained for a finite set of electron beams with varying energy provided by the TRANSCAR auroral flux tube model. The energy dispersion signatures within each auroral ray can be analyzed in detail during a fraction of a second. The evolution of energy and flux of the precipitation shows precipitation spanning over a large range of energies, with the characteristic energy dropping from 2.1 keV to 0.87 keV over 0.2 s. Oscillations at 2.4 Hz in the magnetic zenith correspond to the period of the auroral flames, and the acceleration is believed to be due to Alfvenic wave interaction with electrons above the ionosphere.

  16. Comparative Study on Atmospheric Dispersion Module of Level 3 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Dahye; Jang, Misuk; Kang, Hyun Sik; Kim, Seoung Rae [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Some regulation documents such as Regulatory Guides and NUREG publications from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have influences on domestic radiation environmental analyses. As renewal versions of NUREG-0800 and NUREG-1555 have issued lately, the assessment for Severe Accident (SA) with Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) should be added to Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Radiation Environmental Report (RER). Because these reports are the required documents for obtaining the construction permit and operating license, it is important to understand the PSA methodology and it needs to improve the site-specific input data of L3PSA codes for SA. First, our review focuses on the atmospheric dispersion and deposition related input data of L3PSA code in this paper. Then we will continue to review the improvements of other input data. Two atmospheric dispersion models, which are PAVAN developed for design basis accident and ATMOS of MACCS2 code developed for SA, were reviewed in this paper. L3PSA deals with the effects of severe accidents and basically includes the evaluation of both short- and long-term effects. Therefore, both the deposition effects and nuclide information(type, amount, and chemical characteristics of released radionuclide) would be considered as the input parameters of atmospheric dispersion model for L3PSA. Additionally, the meteorological data would be sampled randomly to meet the purpose of probabilistic method. However, the sampling method would be selected according to analysis purpose. After review, ATMOS module and its input data are suitably developed for the atmospheric dispersion analysis of L3PSA. However, ATMOS module was developed using the site-specific terrain and environment characteristics. For the domestic application, it needs to study the input data reflecting the Korean terrain and environment characteristics. It would be also continuously improved in response to the time- and site-specific changes of weather

  17. Dispersive FDTD analysis of induced electric field in human models due to electrostatic discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Nagai, Toshihiro; Koyama, Teruyoshi; Hattori, Junya; Chan, Kwok Hung; Kavet, Robert

    2012-07-07

    Contact currents flow from/into a charged human body when touching a grounded conductive object. An electrostatic discharge (ESD) or spark may occur just before contact or upon release. The current may stimulate muscles and peripheral nerves. In order to clarify the difference in the induced electric field between different sized human models, the in-situ electric fields were computed in anatomically based models of adults and a child for a contact current in a human body following ESD. A dispersive finite-difference time-domain method was used, in which biological tissue is assumed to obey a four-pole Debye model. From our computational results, the first peak of the discharge current was almost identical across adult and child models. The decay of the induced current in the child was also faster due mainly to its smaller body capacitance compared to the adult models. The induced electric fields in the forefingers were comparable across different models. However, the electric field induced in the arm of the child model was found to be greater than that in the adult models primarily because of its smaller cross-sectional area. The tendency for greater doses in the child has also been reported for power frequency sinusoidal contact current exposures as reported by other investigators.

  18. Dispersive FDTD analysis of induced electric field in human models due to electrostatic discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Nagai, Toshihiro; Koyama, Teruyoshi; Hattori, Junya; Chan, Kwok Hung; Kavet, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Contact currents flow from/into a charged human body when touching a grounded conductive object. An electrostatic discharge (ESD) or spark may occur just before contact or upon release. The current may stimulate muscles and peripheral nerves. In order to clarify the difference in the induced electric field between different sized human models, the in-situ electric fields were computed in anatomically based models of adults and a child for a contact current in a human body following ESD. A dispersive finite-difference time-domain method was used, in which biological tissue is assumed to obey a four-pole Debye model. From our computational results, the first peak of the discharge current was almost identical across adult and child models. The decay of the induced current in the child was also faster due mainly to its smaller body capacitance compared to the adult models. The induced electric fields in the forefingers were comparable across different models. However, the electric field induced in the arm of the child model was found to be greater than that in the adult models primarily because of its smaller cross-sectional area. The tendency for greater doses in the child has also been reported for power frequency sinusoidal contact current exposures as reported by other investigators. (paper)

  19. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolkova, Ilona S. [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Polymer Centre, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, T.G. Masaryk Sq. 275, 762 72 Zlin (Czech Republic); Kazantseva, Natalia E., E-mail: nekazan@yahoo.com [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila [Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nad Ovcirnou 3685, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g{sup −1} to 48 emu g{sup −1}) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2–7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g{sup −1}. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy. - Highlights: • Mixed phase iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles were obtained by coprecipitation. • A part of nanoparticles was annealed at 300 °C to achieve the single-phase γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Nanoparticles revealed ferromagnetic-like behavior due to interparticle interactions. • Nanoparticles glycerol

  20. Studying the factors affecting urban dispersion in mashhad metropolis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic, social, and physical aspects including increased air pollution, potential deterioration within ... solutions to control this problem. The tools used in ... Key words: urban dispersion, technology, roots of Mashhad dispersion, the price of

  1. Electric and magnetic field modulated energy dispersion, conductivity and optical response in double quantum wire with spin-orbit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaaslan, Y.; Gisi, B.; Sakiroglu, S.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2018-02-01

    We study the influence of electric field on the electronic energy band structure, zero-temperature ballistic conductivity and optical properties of double quantum wire. System described by double-well anharmonic confinement potential is exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field and Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. Numerical results show up that the combined effects of internal and external agents cause the formation of crossing, anticrossing, camel-back/anomaly structures and the lateral, downward/upward shifts in the energy dispersion. The anomalies in the energy subbands give rise to the oscillation patterns in the ballistic conductance, and the energy shifts bring about the shift in the peak positions of optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes.

  2. Phytophthora capsici Epidemic Dispersion on Commercial Pepper Fields in Aguascalientes, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Vázquez, Adrián; Sánchez-Sánchez, Mario; del-Río-Robledo, Alicia; Silos-Espino, Héctor; Perales-Segovia, Catarino; Flores-Benítez, Silvia; González-Chavira, Mario Martín; Valera-Montero, Luis Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper blight observed on pepper farms from north Aguascalientes was monitored for the presence of Phytophthora capsici during 2008–2010. Initially, ELISA tests were directed to plant samples from greenhouses and rustic nurseries, showing an 86% of positive samples. Later, samples of wilted plants from the farms during the first survey were tested with ELISA. The subsequent survey on soil samples included mycelia isolation and PCR amplification of a 560 bp fragment of ITS-specific DNA sequence of P. capsici. Data was analyzed according to four geographical areas defined by coordinates to ease the dispersal assessment. In general, one-third of the samples from surveyed fields contained P. capsici, inferring that this may be the pathogen responsible of the observed wilt. Nevertheless, only five sites from a total of 92 were consistently negative to P. capsici. The presence of this pathogen was detected through ELISA and confirmed through PCR. The other two-thirds of the negative samples may be attributable to Fusarium and Rhizoctonia, both isolated instead of Phytophthora in these areas. Due to these striking results, this information would be of interest for local plant protection committees and farmers to avoid further dispersal of pathogens to new lands. PMID:22629131

  3. A scheme for teleporting Schrdinger-cat states via the dispersive atom-cavity-field interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A proposal is presented for teleporting Schrding-cat states. The process of the teleportation is achieved through the dispersive atom-cavity-field interaction. In this proposal, only measurement on the cavity field and on the singlet atomic states are used.

  4. A Study on Fluid Dispersion after Liquid Filled Missile Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Hahm, Daegi; Choi, In-Kil

    2015-01-01

    In order to fire damage evaluations by fuel included transportation crash, the fire duration should be analyzed that consider the fuel spread range, amount of leaked fuel, and various ignition sources. The water slug impact test performed in Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in 2002 was representative. The cloud of mist dispersion range of the dyed red water and ejection velocity of water after impact were analyzed using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method and numerical simulation. In this study, the included fluid was modeled by using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The fluid dispersion range following impact was analyzed by considering the particle velocity and flying distance. The result values obtained through this study were compared to the water slug (WS) test results. And the applicability of an analysis method was verified by comparing the WS test results. The results and methodology obtained through this study can be utilized to damage assessment, fuel spread and fire risk for large infrastructures such as nuclear power plants following an aircraft impact. In this study, the included fluid was modeled by using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique; the fluid spread range following an impact was analyzed. The radius of fluid spread on the numerical analysis became conservative than the WS test results. However, the shape of the cloud is similar to the WS test results

  5. A Study on Fluid Dispersion after Liquid Filled Missile Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Hahm, Daegi; Choi, In-Kil [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In order to fire damage evaluations by fuel included transportation crash, the fire duration should be analyzed that consider the fuel spread range, amount of leaked fuel, and various ignition sources. The water slug impact test performed in Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in 2002 was representative. The cloud of mist dispersion range of the dyed red water and ejection velocity of water after impact were analyzed using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) method and numerical simulation. In this study, the included fluid was modeled by using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The fluid dispersion range following impact was analyzed by considering the particle velocity and flying distance. The result values obtained through this study were compared to the water slug (WS) test results. And the applicability of an analysis method was verified by comparing the WS test results. The results and methodology obtained through this study can be utilized to damage assessment, fuel spread and fire risk for large infrastructures such as nuclear power plants following an aircraft impact. In this study, the included fluid was modeled by using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique; the fluid spread range following an impact was analyzed. The radius of fluid spread on the numerical analysis became conservative than the WS test results. However, the shape of the cloud is similar to the WS test results.

  6. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) Dispersed in Bile Salt Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Frederick, Jr.; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNCTs) are materials with structural, electronic and optical properties that make them attractive for a myriad of advanced technology applications. A practical barrier to their use is that SWCNT synthesis techniques produce heterogeneous mixtures of varying lengths and chirality, whereas applications generally require tubes with narrow size distributions and individual type. Most separation techniques currently in use to obtain monodisperse tube fractions rely on dispersion of these materials in aqueous solution using surfactants. The dispersion process results in a mixture of colloidal structures in which individual tubes are dispersed and contained in a surfactant shell. Understanding the structure and properties of the SWCNT-surfactant complex at the molecular level, and how this is affected by chirality, is key to understanding and improving separations processes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the structure and properties of SWCNT-surfactant colloidal complexes. We tested a number of methods and protocols in order to build an accurate model for simulating SWCNT systems for a variety of bile salt surfactants as well as anionic co-surfactants, components that are widely used and important in experimental separation studies at NIST. The custom force field parameters used here will be stored in WebFF, a Web-hosted smart force-field repository for polymeric and organic materials being developed at NIST for the Materials Genome Initiative.

  7. A terahertz study of taurine: Dispersion correction and mode couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zelin; Xu, Xiangdong; Gu, Yu; Li, Xinrong; Wang, Fu; Lian, Yuxiang; Fan, Kai; Cheng, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhegeng; Sun, Minghui; Jiang, Yadong; Yang, Chun; Xu, Jimmy

    2017-03-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of polycrystalline taurine were studied experimentally by terahertz (THz) absorption spectroscopy and theoretically by ab initio density-functional simulations. Full optimizations with semi-empirical dispersion correction were performed in spectral computations and vibrational mode assignments. For comparison, partial optimizations with pure density functional theory were conducted in parallel. Results indicate that adding long-range dispersion correction to the standard DFT better reproduces the measured THz spectra than the popular partial optimizations. The main origins of the observed absorption features were also identified. Moreover, a coupled-oscillators model was proposed to explain the experimental observation of the unusual spectral blue-shift with the increase of temperature. Such coupled-oscillators model not only provides insights into the temperature dynamics of non-bonded interactions but also offers an opportunity to better understand the physical mechanisms behind the unusual THz spectral behaviors in taurine. Particularly, the simulation approach and novel coupled-oscillators model presented in this work are applicable to analyze the THz spectra of other molecular systems.

  8. Sexual Competitiveness, Field Survival, and Dispersal of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Fruit Flies Irradiated at Different Doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Ortiz, Uriel; Pérez-Staples, Diana; Liedo, Pablo; Toledo, Jorge

    2018-04-02

    The sterile insect technique (SIT) is used in area-wide pest management programs for establishing low pest prevalence and/or areas free of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). The aim of this technique is to induce high levels of sterility in the wild population, for this the released insects must have a high sexual competitiveness and field dispersal. However, radiation decreases these biological attributes that do not allow it to compete successfully with wild insects. In this study the sexual competitiveness, field survival and dispersal of Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart; Diptera: Tephritidae) irradiated at 0, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 Gy were evaluated in laboratory. A dose of 60 Gy produced 98% sterility, whereas doses of 70 and 80 Gy produced 99% sterility. Sexual competitiveness was assessed in field cages, comparing males irradiated at 0, 50, 60, 70, and 80 Gy against wild males for mating with wild fertile females. Males irradiated at 50 and 60 Gy achieved more matings than those irradiated at 70 and 80 Gy. Wild males were more competitive than mass-reared males, even when these were not irradiated (0 Gy). There was no effect of irradiation on mating latency, yet wild males showed significantly shorter mating latency than mass-reared males. Female remating did not differ among those that mated with wild males and those that mated with males irradiated with different doses. The relative sterility index (RSI) increased from 0.25 at 80 Gy to 0.37 at 60 Gy. The Fried competitiveness index was 0.69 for males irradiated at 70 Gy and 0.57 for those irradiated at 80 Gy, which indicates that a 10 Gy reduction in the irradiation dose produces greater induction of sterility in the wild population. There were no significant differences in field survival and dispersal between flies irradiated at 70 or 80 Gy. Reducing the irradiation dose to 60 or 70 Gy could improve the performance of sterile males and the effectiveness of the SIT. Our results also distinguish between the

  9. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  10. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-01

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10 μm or smaller defects on a moving target at 20 m/s within a scan width of 25 mm at a scan rate of 90.9 MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  11. In vitro Dissolution Studies on Solid Dispersions of Mefenamic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K R S Sambasiva; Nagabhushanam, M V; Chowdary, K P R

    2011-03-01

    Solid dispersions of mefanamic acid with a water-soluble polymer polyvinyl pyrrolidine and a super disintegrant, primojel were prepared by common solvent and solvent evaporation methods employing methanol as the solvent. The dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency of the prepared solid dispersions were evaluated in comparison to the corresponding pure drug. Solid dispersions of mefenamic acid showed a marked enhancement in dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency. At 1:4 ratio of mefenamic acid-primojel a 2.61 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid was observed with solid dispersion. The solid dispersions in combined carriers gave much higher rates of dissolution than super disintegrants alone. Mefanamic acid-primojel-polyvinyl pyrrolidine (1:3.2:0.8) solid dispersion gave a 4.11 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid. Super disintegrants alone or in combination with polyvinyl pyrrolidine could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid.

  12. THE STUDYING OF COLLOIDAL-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF CLAY MINERALS DISPERSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Tymchuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The element structure is studied, the microscopic analysis of fine-dispersed min­eral systems (ground sediments of a mouth of the river Danube is carried out. The sedimentation process of clay minerals dispersions in solutions of surfactants and macromolecular substances is studied. Concentration intervals of stabilization of investigating dispersions were defined.

  13. Study of memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jinwoo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the memory effects in polymer dispersed liquid crystal films. We found that optical responses, such as the memory effects, of the films depended strongly on the morphology. For example, memory effects were observed for films with polymer ball morphologies; however, only weak hysteresis effects were observed for films with droplet morphologies. In particular, a stronger memory effect was observed for films with more complicated polymer ball structures. Coincidentally, T TE , the temperature at which the memory state is thermally erased, was generally higher for the films exhibiting a stronger memory effect. In addition, studies of the temporal evolution of the films show that the memory effects become stronger after films have been kept on the shelf for a period of time. This change is likely to be associated with a modification of surface anchoring properties at the LC-polymer interface.

  14. Theoretical study of liquid droplet dispersion in a venturi scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathikalajahi, J; Talaie, M R; Taheri, M

    1995-03-01

    The droplet concentration distribution in an atomizing scrubber was calculated based on droplet eddy diffusion by a three-dimensional dispersion model. This model is also capable of predicting the liquid flowing on the wall. The theoretical distribution of droplet concentration agrees well with experimental data given by Viswanathan et al. for droplet concentration distribution in a venturi-type scrubber. The results obtained by the model show a non-uniform distribution of drops over the cross section of the scrubber, as noted by the experimental data. While the maximum of droplet concentration distribution may depend on many operating parameters of the scrubber, the results of this study show that the highest uniformity of drop distribution will be reached when penetration length is approximately equal to one-fourth of the depth of the scrubber. The results of this study can be applied to evaluate the removal efficiency of a venturi scrubber.

  15. Colloidal dispersions in external fields: from equilibrium to non-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowen, Hartmut

    2010-03-01

    Dispersions of colloidal particles are excellent model systems of classical statistical mechanics in order to understand the principles of self-organization processes. Using an external field (e.g. electric or magnetic field) the effective interaction between the colloidal particles can be tailored and the system can be brought into non-equilibrium in a controlled way. Glass formation after an ultrafast quench in a two-dimensional superparamagnetic binary colloidal mixture [1,2] will be discussed as well as lane [3,4,5,6,7] and band [8] formation in mixtures of charged suspensions and dusty plasmas driven by an electric field. [4pt] References:[0pt] [1] L. Assoud, F. Ebert, P. Keim, R. Messina, G. Maret, H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Letters 102, 238301 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Assoud, F. Ebert, P. Keim, R. Messina, G. Maret, H. Lowen, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 21, 464114 (2009). [0pt] [3] J. Dzubiella, G. P. Hoffmann, H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. E 65, 021402 (1-8) (2002). [0pt] [4] M. E. Leunissen, C. G. Christova, A. P. Hynninen, C. P. Royall, A. I. Campbell, A. Imhof, M. Dijkstra, R. van Roij, A. van Blaaderen, Nature 437, 235 (2005). [0pt] [5] M. Rex, H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. E 75, 051402 (2007). [0pt] [6] M. Rex, C. P. Royall, A. van Blaaderen, H. Lowen, Lane formation in driven colloidal mixtures: is it continuous or discontinuous?, http://arxiv.org/abs/0812.0908 [0pt] [7] K. R. Sutterlin, A. Wysocki, A. V. Ivlev, C. Rath, H. M. Thomas, M. Rubin-Zuzic, W. J. Goedheer, V. E. Fortov, A. M. Lipaev, V. I. Molotkov, O. F. Petrov, G. E. Morfill, H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Letters 102, 085003 (2009). [0pt] [8] A. Wysocki, H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. E 79, 041408 (2009).

  16. High resolution modelling of aerosol dispersion regimes during the CAPITOUL field experiment: from regional to local scale interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Aouizerats

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available High resolution simulation of complex aerosol particle evolution and gaseous chemistry over an atmospheric urban area is of great interest for understanding air quality and processes. In this context, the CAPITOUL (Canopy and Aerosol Particle Interactions in the Toulouse Urban Layer field experiment aims at a better understanding of the interactions between the urban dynamics and the aerosol plumes. During a two-day Intensive Observational Period, a numerical model experiment was set up to reproduce the spatial distribution of specific particle pollutants, from the regional scales and the interactions between different cities, to the local scales with specific turbulent structures. Observations show that local dynamics depends on the day-regime, and may lead to different mesoscale dynamical structures. This study focuses on reproducing these fine scale dynamical structures, and investigate the impact on the aerosol plume dispersion. The 500-m resolution simulation manages to reproduce convective rolls at local scale, which concentrate most of the aerosol particles and can locally affect the pollutant dispersion and air quality.

  17. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    -differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  18. Spontaneous dispersion of PdO onto acid sites of zeolites studied by in situ DXAFS

    CERN Document Server

    Okumura, K; Niwa, M; Yokota, S; Kato, K; Tanida, H; Uruga, T

    2003-01-01

    The generation of highly dispersed PdO over zeolite supports was studied using in situ energy-dispersive XAFS (DXAFS) technique. From the comparison with the Na-ZSM-5, it was found that the oxidation as well as the spontaneous dispersion of Pd was promoted through the interaction between PdO and acid sites of H-form zeolites. (author)

  19. Parametric study of the dispersion aspects in a street-canyon area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsourakis, N.; Neofytou, P.; Venetsanos, A.G.; Bartzis, J.G. [NCSR Demokritos (Greece). Environmental Research Lab.

    2004-07-01

    Continuously increasing vehicles' fleet is still considered to be the main emission factor in urban environments, despite the enormous progress of modern catalytic technology. Under that perspective, calculation of transportation induced pollutant dispersion is of augmented importance, especially within street canyons, where poor ventilation can result in awkward concentration levels. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies have been conducted in the past by Neofytou, P. et al, so as to define appropriate locations for measuring-instrument placement by numerically simulating the flow and pollution dispersion fields in the vicinity of the measuring site taking into account the wind rose of the area and selecting locations of high pollution concentrations so that non-zero indications are assured. Vardoulakis, S. et al, provides a general overview of the street-canyon studies concerning both modelling and experimental investigations and offers plenty of references on air quality within street canyons. Besides air-quality, street canyon CFD studies have also been performed to evaluate accident consequences and hydrogen safety, Venetsanos A. et al. The current study examines a real street canyon in Thessaloniki, Greece. It was performed in order to examine dispersion patterns for different parameters' scenarios and help deciding where to place actual pollutant measurement instruments to better capture traffic pollution data. Various wind directions and speeds are examined and height influence on concentration levels is investigated. Complex area geometry is a key factor of the whole study. (orig.)

  20. Numerical Study of Traffic Pollutant Dispersion within Different Street Canyon Configurations

    OpenAIRE

    Yucong Miao; Shuhua Liu; Yijia Zheng; Shu Wang; Yuan Li

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to numerically study flow and traffic exhaust dispersion in urban street canyons with different configurations to find out the urban-planning strategies to ease the air pollution. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model used in this study—Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM) software package—was firstly validated against the wind-tunnel experiment data by using three different k-ε turbulence models. And then the patterns of flow and dispe...

  1. Numerical Study of Traffic Pollutant Dispersion within Different Street Canyon Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucong Miao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to numerically study flow and traffic exhaust dispersion in urban street canyons with different configurations to find out the urban-planning strategies to ease the air pollution. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model used in this study—Open Source Field Operation and Manipulation (OpenFOAM software package—was firstly validated against the wind-tunnel experiment data by using three different k-ε turbulence models. And then the patterns of flow and dispersion within three different kinds of street canyon configuration under the perpendicular approaching flow were numerically studied. The result showed that the width and height of building can dramatically affect the pollution level inside the street canyon. As the width or height of building increases, the pollution at the pedestrian level increases. And the asymmetric configuration (step-up or step-down street canyon could provide better ventilation. It is recommended to design a street canyon with nonuniform configurations. And the OpenFOAM software package can be used as a reliable tool to study flows and dispersions around buildings.

  2. A Study of Dispersion Compensation of Polarization Multiplexing-Based OFDM-OCDMA for Radio-over-Fiber Transmissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chih-Ta; Chen, Wen-Bin

    2016-09-07

    Chromatic dispersion from optical fiber is the most important problem that produces temporal skews and destroys the rectangular structure of code patterns in the spectra-amplitude-coding-based optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA) system. Thus, the balance detection scheme does not work perfectly to cancel multiple access interference (MAI) and the system performance will be degraded. Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is the fastest developing technology in the academic and industrial fields of wireless transmission. In this study, the radio-over-fiber system is realized by integrating OFDM and OCDMA via polarization multiplexing scheme. The electronic dispersion compensation (EDC) equalizer element of OFDM integrated with the dispersion compensation fiber (DCF) is used in the proposed radio-over-fiber (RoF) system, which can efficiently suppress the chromatic dispersion influence in long-haul transmitted distance. A set of length differences for 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF) and 4 km-long DCF is to verify the compensation scheme by relative equalizer algorithms and constellation diagrams. In the simulation result, the proposed dispersion mechanism successfully compensates the dispersion from SMF and the system performance with dispersion equalizer is highly improved.

  3. A Study of Dispersion Compensation of Polarization Multiplexing-Based OFDM-OCDMA for Radio-over-Fiber Transmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ta Yen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatic dispersion from optical fiber is the most important problem that produces temporal skews and destroys the rectangular structure of code patterns in the spectra-amplitude-coding-based optical code-division multiple-access (SAC-OCDMA system. Thus, the balance detection scheme does not work perfectly to cancel multiple access interference (MAI and the system performance will be degraded. Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM is the fastest developing technology in the academic and industrial fields of wireless transmission. In this study, the radio-over-fiber system is realized by integrating OFDM and OCDMA via polarization multiplexing scheme. The electronic dispersion compensation (EDC equalizer element of OFDM integrated with the dispersion compensation fiber (DCF is used in the proposed radio-over-fiber (RoF system, which can efficiently suppress the chromatic dispersion influence in long-haul transmitted distance. A set of length differences for 10 km-long single-mode fiber (SMF and 4 km-long DCF is to verify the compensation scheme by relative equalizer algorithms and constellation diagrams. In the simulation result, the proposed dispersion mechanism successfully compensates the dispersion from SMF and the system performance with dispersion equalizer is highly improved.

  4. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  5. A vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel tests and its application in pollutant dispersion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromke, Christof

    2011-01-01

    A new vegetation modeling concept for Building and Environmental Aerodynamics wind tunnel investigations was developed. The modeling concept is based on fluid dynamical similarity aspects and allows the small-scale modeling of various kinds of vegetation, e.g. field crops, shrubs, hedges, single trees and forest stands. The applicability of the modeling concept was validated in wind tunnel pollutant dispersion studies. Avenue trees in urban street canyons were modeled and their implications on traffic pollutant dispersion were investigated. The dispersion experiments proved the modeling concept to be practicable for wind tunnel studies and suggested to provide reliable concentration results. Unfavorable effects of trees on pollutant dispersion and natural ventilation in street canyons were revealed. Increased traffic pollutant concentrations were found in comparison to the tree-free reference case. - Highlights: → A concept for aerodynamic modelling of vegetation in small scale wind tunnel studies is presented. → The concept was applied to study pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons with avenue tress. → The wind tunnel studies show that modelling the aerodynamic effects of vegetation is important. → Avenue trees give rise to increased pollutant concentrations in urban street canyons. - Avenue trees in urban street canyons affect the pollutant dispersion and result in increased traffic exhaust concentrations.

  6. Development of the ClearSky smoke dispersion forecast system for agricultural field burning in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rahul; Vaughan, Joseph; Heitkamp, Kyle; Ramos, Charleston; Claiborn, Candis; Schreuder, Maarten; Schaaf, Mark; Lamb, Brian

    The post-harvest burning of agricultural fields is commonly used to dispose of crop residue and provide other desired services such as pest control. Despite careful regulation of burning, smoke plumes from field burning in the Pacific Northwest commonly degrade air quality, particularly for rural populations. In this paper, ClearSky, a numerical smoke dispersion forecast system for agricultural field burning that was developed to support smoke management in the Inland Pacific Northwest, is described. ClearSky began operation during the summer through fall burn season of 2002 and continues to the present. ClearSky utilizes Mesoscale Meteorological Model version 5 (MM5v3) forecasts from the University of Washington, data on agricultural fields, a web-based user interface for defining burn scenarios, the Lagrangian CALPUFF dispersion model and web-served animations of plume forecasts. The ClearSky system employs a unique hybrid source configuration, which treats the flaming portion of a field as a buoyant line source and the smoldering portion of the field as a buoyant area source. Limited field observations show that this hybrid approach yields reasonable plume rise estimates using source parameters derived from recent field burning emission field studies. The performance of this modeling system was evaluated for 2003 by comparing forecast meteorology against meteorological observations, and comparing model-predicted hourly averaged PM 2.5 concentrations against observations. Examples from this evaluation illustrate that while the ClearSky system can accurately predict PM 2.5 surface concentrations due to field burning, the overall model performance depends strongly on meteorological forecast error. Statistical evaluation of the meteorological forecast at seven surface stations indicates a strong relationship between topographical complexity near the station and absolute wind direction error with wind direction errors increasing from approximately 20° for sites in

  7. Shear- and magnetic-field-induced ordering in magnetic nanoparticle dispersion from small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, V.V.; Bhandar, A.S.; Piao, M.; Zoto, I.; Lane, A.M.; Nikles, D.E.; Wiest, J.M.; Mankey, G.J.; Porcar, L.; Glinka, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been performed to investigate orientational ordering of a dispersion of rod-shaped ferromagnetic nanoparticles under the influence of shear flow and static magnetic field. In this experiment, the flow and flow gradient directions are perpendicular to the direction of the applied magnetic field. The scattering intensity is isotropic in zero-shear-rate or zero-applied-field conditions, indicating that the particles are randomly oriented. Anisotropic scattering is observed both in a shear flow and in a static magnetic field, showing that both flow and field induce orientational order in the dispersion. The anisotropy increases with the increase of field and with the increase of shear rate. Three states of order have been observed with the application of both shear flow and magnetic field. At low shear rates, the particles are aligned in the field direction. When increasing shear rate is applied, the particles revert to random orientations at a characteristic shear rate that depends on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Above the characteristic shear rate, the particles align along the flow direction. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the predictions of a mean field model

  8. Experimental study of ERT monitoring ability to measure solute dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekmine, Grégory; Pessel, Marc; Auradou, Harold

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports experimental measurements performed to test the ability of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) imaging to provide quantitative information about transport parameters in porous media such as the dispersivity α, the mixing front velocity u, and the retardation factor R(f) associated with the sorption or trapping of the tracers in the pore structure. The flow experiments are performed in a homogeneous porous column placed between two vertical set of electrodes. Ionic and dyed tracers are injected from the bottom of the porous media over its full width. Under such condition, the mixing front is homogeneous in the transverse direction and shows an S-shape variation in the flow direction. The transport parameters are inferred from the variation of the concentration curves and are compared with data obtained from video analysis of the dyed tracer front. The variations of the transport parameters obtained from an inversion performed by the Gauss-Newton method applied on smoothness-constrained least-squares are studied in detail. While u and R(f) show a relatively small dependence on the inversion procedure, α is strongly dependent on the choice of the inversion parameters. Comparison with the video observations allows for the optimization of the parameters; these parameters are found to be robust with respect to changes in the flow condition and conductivity contrast. © 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  9. Positron annihilation lifetime study of oxide dispersion strengthened steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krsjak, V.; Szaraz, Z.; Hähner, P.

    2012-01-01

    A comparative positron annihilation lifetime study has been performed on various commercial ferritic and ferritic/martensitic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. Both as-extruded and recrystallized materials were investigated. In the materials with recrystallized coarse-grained microstructures, only the positron trapping at small vacancy clusters and yttria nanofeatures was observed. Materials which had not undergone recrystallization treatment clearly showed additional positron trapping which is associated with dislocations. Dislocation densities were calculated from a two-component decomposition of the positron lifetime spectra by assuming the first component to be a superposition of the bulk controlled annihilation rate and the dislocation controlled trapping rate. The second component (which translates into lifetimes of 240–260 ps) was found to be well separated in all those ODS materials. This paper presents the potentialities and limitations of the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, and discusses the results of the experimental determination of the defect concentrations and sensitivity of this technique to the material degradation due to thermally induced precipitation of chromium-rich α′ phases.

  10. Host-seeking behavior and dispersal of Triatoma infestans, a vector of Chagas disease, under semi-field conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Castillo-Neyra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease affects millions of people in Latin America. The control of this vector-borne disease focuses on halting transmission by reducing or eliminating insect vector populations. Most transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, involves insects living within or very close to households and feeding mostly on domestic animals. As animal hosts can be intermittently present it is important to understand how host availability can modify transmission risk to humans and to characterize the host-seeking dispersal of triatomine vectors on a very fine scale. We used a semi-field system with motion-detection cameras to characterize the dispersal of Triatoma infestans, and compare the behavior of vector populations in the constant presence of hosts (guinea pigs, and after the removal of the hosts. The emigration rate - net insect population decline in original refuge - following host removal was on average 19.7% of insects per 10 days compared to 10.2% in constant host populations (p = 0.029. However, dispersal of T. infestans occurred in both directions, towards and away from the initial location of the hosts. The majority of insects that moved towards the original location of guinea pigs remained there for 4 weeks. Oviposition and mortality were observed and analyzed in the context of insect dispersal, but only mortality was higher in the group where animal hosts were removed (p-value <0.01. We discuss different survival strategies associated with the observed behavior and its implications for vector control. Removing domestic animals in infested areas increases vector dispersal from the first day of host removal. The implications of these patterns of vector dispersal in a field setting are not yet known but could result in movement towards human rooms.

  11. Electric field sensor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, R.D.; Parks, S.

    1977-01-01

    Above-ground intrusion sensors are reviewed briefly. Buried wire sensors are next considered; feasibility studies were conducted. A triangular system of an overhead transmitter wire exciting two buried sensor wires was developed and tested. It failed sometimes to detect a man making a broad jump. A differential receiver was developed to solve this problem

  12. Measurement of the factor of dispersion in air for a field of 0,8* 8,0 CM 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Tejedor Alonso, S.; Huertas Martinez, C.; Penedo Cobos, J. M.; Garcia Castejon, M. A.; Rincon Perezx, M.

    2013-01-01

    The measures of this factor of dispersion in air is usually performed with an ionization chamber cover a cap of balance of such thickness that is achieved the electronic balance, and must be covered completely the CAP by the radiation field. This procedure is not applicable for small fields. The need to measure the Sc of a field of 0.8 * 0.8 cm 2 for a new system of planning led us to try another measure procedure proposed in the literature, using detectors of semiconductor with a sheet of cerrobend by way of balance Cap. (Author)

  13. Comparative calculations and validation studies with atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paesler-Sauer, J.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the results of an intercomparison of different mesoscale dispersion models and measured data of tracer experiments. The types of models taking part in the intercomparison are Gaussian-type, numerical Eulerian, and Lagrangian dispersion models. They are suited for the calculation of the atmospherical transport of radionuclides released from a nuclear installation. For the model intercomparison artificial meteorological situations were defined and corresponding arithmetical problems were formulated. For the purpose of model validation real dispersion situations of tracer experiments were used as input data for model calculations; in these cases calculated and measured time-integrated concentrations close to the ground are compared. Finally a valuation of the models concerning their efficiency in solving the problems is carried out by the aid of objective methods. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Magnetic field dependence observed by 27 Al NMR of species contained in alumina colloidal dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado Junior, Edisson; Menezes, Sonia M.C.; San Gil, Rosane

    1995-01-01

    The behaviour of some aluminium species front a magnetic field have been investigated by 27 Al NMR analysis, this method was used for characterization of an octahedric aluminium specie from sols prepared by bohemite acid peptization. X-ray diffraction data have identified the mineral structure. The results have been shown and discussed, and NMR spectra were also presented and studied. Concluding this work, the nature of a colloidal specie of alumina was clarified through the dependence research of magnetic field by 27 Al NMR

  15. Parametric study of guided waves dispersion curves for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cǎtǎlin; Kettani, Mounsif Ech Cherif El; Leduc, Damien

    2018-02-01

    Nondestructive testing of composite panels benefit from the relatively long range propagation of guided waves in sandwich structures. The guided waves are sensitive to delamination, air bubbles inclusions and cracks and can thus bring information about hidden defects in the composite panel. The preliminary data in all such inspections is represented by the dispersion curves, representing the dependency of the phase/group velocity on the frequency for the propagating modes. In fact, all modes are more or less attenuated, so it is even more important to compute the dispersion curves, which provide also the modal attenuation as function of frequency. Another important aspect is the sensitivity of the dispersion curves on each of the elastic constant of the composite, which are orthotropic in most cases. All these aspects are investigated in the present work, based on our specially developed finite element numerical model implemented in Comsol, which has several advantages over existing methods. The dispersion curves and modal displacements are computed for an example of composite plate. Comparison with literature data validates the accuracy of our results.

  16. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometric Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2017-06-11

    Jun 11, 2017 ... Compositional Differences in Trace Elements in Dried Moringa oleifera ... Ti, Cu, Mo, Fe, Zn, Ni, Re, Eu and Pb using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence ... Africa, Southeast Asia (Valdez-Solana et al., 2015). ... vegetable in many countries, including Nigeria .... of other elements in environmental samples.

  17. Study of the determination method of the river dispersion coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.A.G. de.

    1982-01-01

    An application of the method introduced by 'Fischer, H.B. - 1968 - Dispersion prediction in natural streams Journal of the Sanitary Engineering Division, ACSE, vol. 94 n 5A5. Proc. Paper 6169 pp 927-943.', for the calculation of the dispersion coefficient, based on Taylor's model is made. The aim is to develop a method which avoids the necessity of having an instantaneous impulse at the entrance section (1st section) of the system being measured. The dispersion coefficient is determined by curve fitting the experimental response in the 2nd secton and that obtained with the model by means of the non-linear least-squares method. The same method is applied with the residence time distribution function. The theoretical differences between these two function and their results are discussed. By adjusting the two model parameters in all these calculations, the dispersion coefficient and the mean velocity are determined, simultaneously. A comparison between the moment's method and Fischer's formulation is also done using the same experimental data. (E.G.) [pt

  18. Studies on dispersive stabilization of porous media flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daripa, Prabir, E-mail: prabir.daripa@math.tamu.edu; Gin, Craig [Department of Mathematics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Motivated by a need to improve the performance of chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, we investigate dispersive effects on the linear stability of three-layer porous media flow models of EOR for two different types of interfaces: permeable and impermeable interfaces. Results presented are relevant for the design of smarter interfaces in the available parameter space of capillary number, Peclet number, longitudinal and transverse dispersion, and the viscous profile of the middle layer. The stabilization capacity of each of these two interfaces is explored numerically and conditions for complete dispersive stabilization are identified for each of these two types of interfaces. Key results obtained are (i) three-layer porous media flows with permeable interfaces can be almost completely stabilized by diffusion if the optimal viscous profile is chosen, (ii) flows with impermeable interfaces can also be almost completely stabilized for short time, but become more unstable at later times because diffusion flattens out the basic viscous profile, (iii) diffusion stabilizes short waves more than long waves which leads to a “turning point” Peclet number at which short and long waves have the same growth rate, and (iv) mechanical dispersion further stabilizes flows with permeable interfaces but in some cases has a destabilizing effect for flows with impermeable interfaces, which is a surprising result. These results are then used to give a comparison of the two types of interfaces. It is found that for most values of the flow parameters, permeable interfaces suppress flow instability more than impermeable interfaces.

  19. A survey of atmospheric dispersion models applicable to risk studies for nuclear facilities in complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittek, P.

    1985-09-01

    Atmospheric dispersion models are reviewed with respect to their application to the consequence assessment within risk studies for nuclear power plants located in complex terrain. This review comprises: seven straight-line Gaussian models, which have been modified in order to take into account in a crude way terrain elevations, enhanced turbulence and some others effects; three trajectory/puff-models, which can handle wind direction changes and the resulting plume or puff trajectories; five three-dimensional wind field models, which calculate the wind field in complex terrain for the application in a grid model; three grid models; one Monte-Carlo-model. The main features of the computer codes are described, along with some informations on the necessary computer time and storage capacity. (orig.) [de

  20. Marine radioactivity studies in the Suez Canal. A modelling study on radionuclide dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, J.M.; Abdel-Aal, M.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes work carried out under the IAEA Project EGY/07/002 to study the dispersion of radioactive material in the Suez Canal and the Bitter Lakes. This effort is linked with increased public concern about radiation safety through this important trade route. We apply a sequence of related modelling approaches, covering: (1) hydrodynamics, (2) transport of dissolved pollutants, (3) suspended loads and sediment dynamics, and (4) electrolytic reactions in aqueous suspension and in-sediment water pores. The final stage is a kinetic-reactive transport model for these tidal waters. The hydrodynamics have been studied using both 1D and 2D modelling approaches, and a reasonable calibration has been possible from the data set prepared with the collaboration of the Suez Canal Authority. Diffusion coefficients are calibrated from field tracing experiments included in the IAEA Project. They have been implemented in 1D and 2D models. Suspended matter dynamics and electrolytic reactions are documented from the available literature. Finally, different scenarios of discharges for both conservative and non-conservative radionuclides have been investigated

  1. On the local field method with the account of spatial dispersion. Application to the optical activity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyu, N. S.; Ekhilevsky, S. G.

    1992-07-01

    For the perfect molecular crystals the equations of the local field method (LFM) with the account of spatial dispersion are formulated. They are used to derive the expression for the crystal polarizability tensor. For the first time within the framework of this method the formula for the gyrotropy tensor of an arbitrary optically active molecular crystal is obtained. This formula is analog of well known relationships of Lorentz-Lorenz.

  2. Prisoners in their habitat? Generalist dispersal by habitat specialists: a case study in southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Centeno-Cuadros

    Full Text Available Habitat specialists inhabiting scarce and scattered habitat patches pose interesting questions related to dispersal such as how specialized terrestrial mammals do to colonize distant patches crossing hostile matrices. We assess dispersal patterns of the southern water vole (Arvicola sapidus, a habitat specialist whose habitat patches are distributed through less than 2% of the study area (overall 600 km² and whose populations form a dynamic metapopulational network. We predict that individuals will require a high ability to move through the inhospitable matrix in order to avoid genetic and demographic isolations. Genotypes (N = 142 for 10 microsatellites and sequences of the whole mitochondrial Control Region (N = 47 from seven localities revealed a weak but significant genetic structure partially explained by geographic distance. None of the landscape models had a significant effect on genetic structure over that of the Euclidean distance alone and no evidence for efficient barriers to dispersal was found. Contemporary gene flow was not severely limited for A. sapidus as shown by high migration rates estimates (>10% between non-neighbouring areas. Sex-biased dispersal tests did not support differences in dispersal rates, as shown by similar average axial parent-offspring distances, in close agreement with capture-mark-recapture estimates. As predicted, our results do not support any preferences of the species for specific landscape attributes on their dispersal pathways. Here, we combine field and molecular data to illustrate how a habitat specialist mammal might disperse like a habitat generalist, acquiring specific long-distance dispersal strategies as an adaptation to patchy, naturally fragmented, heterogeneous and unstable habitats.

  3. Near field resonant inductive coupling to power electronic devices dispersed in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, J.; Bruning, H.; Bakker, S.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate inductive coupling as a way to wirelessly power electronic devices dispersed in water. The most important parameters determining this efficiency are: (1) the coupling between transmitting and receiving coils, (2) the quality factors of the transmitting

  4. Probing the dispersion properties of 1D nanophotonic waveguides with far-field Fourier optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Thomas, N.; Jágerská, J.; Houdré, R.

    2008-01-01

    We present an advanced Fourier space imaging technique to probe guided light in nanophotonic structures with an effective numerical aperture of 2.5. This superresolution technique allows us to successfully investigate the dispersive properties of 1D nanowaveguides such as photonic crystal W1...

  5. Energy dispersive X-ray diffractometry in texture studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Information about texture is traditionally obtained from the two-dimensional distributions of crystallographic directions in the reference frame of the specimen. The distributions can be measured using the angular dispersive diffractometry. In such measurements the rotation of the specimen brings the crystallographic planes of differently oriented crystals into the diffraction position. The distribution (pole figure) can be measured continuously or alternatively the angular space can be scanned in different directions and with required accuracy. The subject is discussed, with examples. (author)

  6. Phonon dispersion in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni2MnGa studied by neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorderwisch, P.; Shapiro, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is an ideal technique to study the structure and dynamics of crystals. For the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2 MnGa, all previously obtained information from inelastic neutron scattering experiments is restricted to the phonon dispersion in the austenitic (fcc) phase of alloys with different compositions. For the (tetragonally distorted) martensitic phase recent inelastic neutron scattering data are presented. These new data were taken on a single crystal with stoichiometric composition. A single-variant martensitic phase of the sample has been obtained by the application of magnetic fields in horizontal or vertical direction with respect to the scattering plane used in the experiments. The measured phonon-dispersion curves are compared with recently published ab initio (zero-temperature) phonon-dispersion calculations. The anomalous phonon behavior observed in both, the austenitic and martensitic phase is discussed

  7. Moessbauer investigation of static-disorder crystalline media. V. Hyperfine fields' dispersion in static-disordered crystalline media of tetragonal and trigonal iron germanates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, S.

    2007-01-01

    The refined 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra of some static-disordered crystalline media (with melilite and Ca-gallate structure) evidenced observable electric and magnetic crystal field dispersions. It is the fifth in a series of papers published previously in the same journal on this subject. The data of crystalline hyperfine fields and their dispersion parameters have calculated using the modeling procedure given in a paper by Kaminskii, et al. published in 1986. The obtained values of the magnetic and quadrupole splitting parameters compared with to experimental data showed the possibility to predict the crystal fields' dispersion. (author)

  8. Experimental study on thermal dispersion in and near the surf zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Shuzo; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Wada, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The site of Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Company was selected, and first, irregular waves with the typical wave spectra (in usual time and in storm time) in the sea region of the site were reproduced in the hydraulic model, then the characteristics of thermal dispersion and the velocityfield of warmed water (its discharge is 25.3 m 3 /sec.) in and near the surf zone under the action of those irregular waves were discussed. Finally, the similarity was investigated between the dispersion phenomenon in the hydraulic model and that in the prototype by comparing the experimental results of the dispersion range of warmed water with the results of field measurements. It may be concluded that the enveloped range of thermal dispersion in prototype can be predicted fairly correctly under almost the same discharge condition as this experiment if the prototype conditions of waves and currents are considered carefully and reproduced in a hydraulic model. (Kobatake, H.)

  9. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilms, D; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  10. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  11. A study of preparation techniques and properties of bulk nanocomposites based on aqueous albumin dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Dedkova, A. A.; Ichkitidze, L. P.; Podgaetskii, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.

    2013-08-01

    Bulk nanocomposites prepared from an aqueous albumin dispersion with carbon nanotubes by removing the liquid component from the dispersion have been investigated. The composites were obtained by thermostating and exposure to LED and IR diode laser radiation. The nanocomposites obtained under laser irradiation retain their shape and properties for several years, in contrast to the composites fabricated in different ways (which decompose into small fragments immediately after preparation). The low density of the composites under study (˜1200 kg/m3), which is close to the density of water, is due to their high porosity. The hardness of stable nanocomposites (˜300 MPa) was found to be at the same level as the hardness of polymethylmethacrylate, aluminum, and iron and close to the hardness of human bone tissue. The cluster quasiordering of the inner structure of nanocomposites revealed by atomic force microscopy indicates the possibility of forming a bulk nanotube framework in them, which can be caused by the effect of the electric field of laser radiation and ensure their stability and hardness. The presence of a framework in nanocomposites provides conditions for self-assembly of biological tissues and makes it possible to apply laser-prepared nanocomposites as a component of surgical implants.

  12. Numerical study of dispersing pollutant clouds in a built-up environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingchen; Yee, Eugene; Lien, F.-S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the dispersion of a passive scalar released from an instantaneous point source in a built-up (urban) environment using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A nonlinear k-ε turbulence model [Speziale, C.G., 1987. On nonlinear k-l and k-ε models of turbulence. J. Fluid Mech., 178, 459-475] was used for the closure of the mean momentum equations. A tensor diffusivity model [Yoshizawa, A., 1985. Statistical analysis of the anisotropy of scalar diffusion in turbulent shear flows. Phys. Fluids, 28, 3226-3231] was used for closure of the scalar transport equations. The concentration variance was also calculated from its transport equation, for which new values of Yoshizawa's closure coefficients are used, in order to account for the instantaneous tracer release and the complex geometry. A new dissipation length-scale model, required for the modelling of the dissipation rate of concentration variance, is also proposed. The numerical results for the flow, the pollutant concentration and the concentration variance, are compared with experimental data. This data was obtained from a water-channel simulation of a full-scale field experiment of tracer dispersion through a large array of building-like obstacles known as the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST)

  13. Numerical study of dispersing pollutant clouds in a built-up environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bingchen [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, 75A Chancellors Circle, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada)], E-mail: bc_wang@umanitoba.ca; Yee, Eugene [Defence Research and Development Canada - Suffield, P.O. Box 4000, STN Main, Medicine Hat, AB, T1A 8K6 (Canada)], E-mail: eugene.yee@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Lien, F.-S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: fslien@mecheng1.uwaterloo.ca

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, we study numerically the dispersion of a passive scalar released from an instantaneous point source in a built-up (urban) environment using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A nonlinear k-{epsilon} turbulence model [Speziale, C.G., 1987. On nonlinear k-l and k-{epsilon} models of turbulence. J. Fluid Mech., 178, 459-475] was used for the closure of the mean momentum equations. A tensor diffusivity model [Yoshizawa, A., 1985. Statistical analysis of the anisotropy of scalar diffusion in turbulent shear flows. Phys. Fluids, 28, 3226-3231] was used for closure of the scalar transport equations. The concentration variance was also calculated from its transport equation, for which new values of Yoshizawa's closure coefficients are used, in order to account for the instantaneous tracer release and the complex geometry. A new dissipation length-scale model, required for the modelling of the dissipation rate of concentration variance, is also proposed. The numerical results for the flow, the pollutant concentration and the concentration variance, are compared with experimental data. This data was obtained from a water-channel simulation of a full-scale field experiment of tracer dispersion through a large array of building-like obstacles known as the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST)

  14. Neutron-/sup 90/Zr mean field from a dispersive optical model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaroche, J.P.; Wang, Y.; Rapaport, J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastic scattering cross sections have been measured for 8, 10, and 24 MeV neutrons incident on /sup 90/Zr. These measurements, together with other neutron elastic scattering and total cross section data available up to 29 MeV, are used in grid searches to obtain an optical model potential which contains a dispersion relation term. This potential is then extrapolated toward negative energies to predict bound single-particle state properties. An overall good description of the data at positive and negative energies is achieved

  15. QT and JT dispersion and cardiac performance in children with neonatal Bartter syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacihamdioglu, Duygu Ovunc; Fidanci, Kursat; Kilic, Ayhan; Gok, Faysal; Topaloglu, Rezan

    2013-10-01

    QT dispersion and JT dispersion are simple noninvasive arrhythmogenic markers that can be used to assess the homogeneity of cardiac repolarization. The aim of this study was to assess QT and JT dispersion and their relation with left ventricular systolic and diastolic functions in children with Bartter syndrome (BS). Nine neonatal patients with BS (median age 9.7 years) and 20 controls (median age 8 years) were investigated at rest. Both study and control subjects underwent electrocardiography (ECG) in which the interval between two R waves and QT intervals, corrected QT, QT dispersion, corrected QT dispersion, JT, corrected JT, JT dispersion and corrected JT dispersion were measured with 12-lead ECG. Two-dimensional, Doppler echocardiographic examinations were performed. Patients and controls did not differ for gender and for serum levels of potassium, magnesium, and calcium (p > 0.05). Both study and control subjects had normal echocardiographic examination and baseline myocardial performance indexes. The QT dispersion and JT dispersion were significantly prolonged in patients with BS compared to those of the controls {37.5 ms [interquartile range (IQR) 32.5-40] vs. 25.5 ms (IQR 20-30), respectively, p = 0.014 and 37.5 ms (IQR 27.5-40) vs. 22.5 ms (IQR 20-30), respectively, p = 0.003}. Elevated QT and JT dispersion during asymptomatic and normokalemic periods may be risk factors for the development of cardiac complications and arrhythmias in children with BS. In these patients the need for systematic cardiac screening and management protocol is extremely important for effective prevention.

  16. Real-time observation of template-assisted colloidal aggregation and colloidal dispersion under an alternating electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao-Rong, Li; Shu-Wen, Li; Jie, Mei; Qing, Xu; Ying-Ying, Zheng; Wen-Jun, Dong

    2011-01-01

    A fascinating colloid phenomenon was observed in a specially designed template-assisted cell under an alternating electrical field. Most colloidal particles experienced the processes of aggregation, dispersion and climbing up to the plateaus of the patterns pre-lithographed on the indium tin oxide glass as the frequency of the alternating electrical field increased. Two critical frequencies f crit1 ≈ 15 kHz and f crit2 ≈ 40 kHz, corresponding to the transitions of the colloid behaviour were observed. When f < 15 kHz, the particles were forced to aggregate along the grooves of the negative photoresist patterned template. When 15 kHz < f < 40 kHz, the particle clusters became unstable and most particles started to disperse and were blocked by the fringes of the negative photoresist patterns. As the frequency increased to above 40 kHz, the majority of particles started to climb up to the plateaus of the patterns. Furthermore, the dynamics analysis for the behaviour of the colloids was given and we found out that positive or negative dielectrophoresis force, electrohydrodynamic force, particle—particle interactions and Brownian motion change with the frequency of the alternating electric field. Thus, changes of the related forces affect or control the behaviour of the colloids. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  17. Modelling and tracer studies of atmospheric dispersion and deposition in regions of complex topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norden, C.E.

    1981-11-01

    An indium tracer aerosol generating apparatus based on an alcohol/oxygen burner, and an analytical procedure by which filter samples containing tracer material could be analysed quantitatively by means of neutron activation analysis, were developed for use in atmospheric dispersion and deposition studies. A number of series of atmospheric dispersion experiments were conducted in the Richards Bay and Koeberg- Cape Town areas. The results are given, comparing the airbone tracer concentrations measured at ground level with values predicted by means of a numerical model, utilising two to three schemes, varying in sophistication, for calculating the dispersion coefficients. Recommendations are given regarding a dispersion model and dispersion coefficients for regular use in the Koeberg area, and ways for estimating plume trajectories

  18. Labelling with radioisotopes, release and dispersal of the rove beetle, Aleochara bilineata Gyll. (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in a Danish cauliflower field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esbjerg, P.; Bromand, B.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 and 1976 the dispersal of Aleochara bilineata in a cauliflower field was investigated using radioactively labelled beetles from laboratory cultures. In 1975, 920 beetles were labelled with 54 MnCl 2 . 900 of these were released in two batches of 600 and 300 individuals respectively. 20 were kept for observations in the laboratory. In 1976, lO33 beetles were labelled with 65 ZnCl 2 . These beetles were released in 7 batches of 130-200 specimens each. Optimal labelling was obtained with 65 ZnCl 2 , which had a durability of 40 days. 54 MnCl 2 labelling, on the contrary, only lasted for 20 days. Also labelling with fluorescent dust and oil-soluble dye was tried, but proved to be ineffective. 100 pitfalls placed up to 30 meters from the release point were used for recapture of the labelled beetles. 143 were recaptured in 1975, and 47 were recaptured in 1976. Dispersal rates up to 6.5 metres per day were ascertained. For biological control of cabbage root flies (Hylemya brassicae) spread of few batches of several hundred beetles each is sufficient. However, a maximum distance of 20 metres between release points is recommended to ensure quick dispersal over the whole area. (author)

  19. A study of radionuclide dispersion by river systems, using GIS and remote sensing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borghuis, Sander; Brown, Justin; Steenhuisen, Frits; Skorve, Johnny

    2000-01-01

    The Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine in Zheleznogorsk, Russia, is situated on the banks of the Yenisey river. The combine consists of three RBMK-type graphite moderate reactors, a reprocessing plant for the production of weapons-grade plutonium and storage facilities for nuclear waste. Discharges of radionuclides into the Yenisey river were either part of normal operation procedures or caused by accidental releases (Strand et al., 1997). So far, little is known about the transport and fate of the radioactive contaminants in the areas downstream of the Krasnoyarsk CC that are influenced by the Yenisey river system. Aim is to comprehend the dispersion of radionuclides through the river system. Remotely sensed and field study information are combined in a geographical information system (GIS) to study the processes leading to the dispersion of sediment-bound radionuclides carried by the river system. Since the extent of the study area is several thousands or kilometres of river and adjacent flood plains, use is made of a record of remotely sensed (satellite) images that are handled by the GIS. Panchromatic, high resolution satellite images as well as multispectral Landsat MSS and TM images were compiled for the area of interest. The panchromatic images were taken in a period during which the facility was in operation (1960-1972) and obtained for intervals of circa 6 months. A time series of satellite images enables the identification of erosion and sedimentation zones. The behaviour and fate of particle-reactive radionuclides, e.g. 239,240 Pu and to large extent 137 Cs, will be closely related to the movement of sediment. With respect to the behaviour and fate of more conservative radionuclides as 90 Sr, information is required accounting for fractionation between the particulate and aqueous phases. Stereo images are used to comprehend the geomorphology of the Yenisey river systems, focused on classification of sedimentary deposits. Landsat MSS and TM with five

  20. [Studies in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    During the period 4/1/89--3/31/90 the theoretical physics group supported by Department of Energy Contract No. AC02-78ER04915.A015 and consisting of Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Senior Research Associate Visser has made progress in many areas of theoretical and mathematical physics. Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Research Associate Visser are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including OCD; studies of the early universe and inflation, and quantum gravity

  1. Marine radioactivity studies in the Suez Canal: Modelling hydrodynamics and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abril, J.M.; Abdel-Aal, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper comprises the work carried out under the IAEA Technical Co-operation Project EGY/07/002. The main goal was to develop a modelling study on the dispersion of radioactive pollution in the Suez Canal

  2. Studies on Dissolution Enhancement of Prednisolone, a Poorly Water-Soluble Drug by Solid Dispersion Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Zakeri-Milani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prednisolone is a class II substance according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. It is a poorly water soluble agent. The aim of the present study was to improve dissolution rate of a poorly water-soluble drug, prednisolone, by a solid dispersion technique. Methods: Solid dispersion of prednisolone was prepared with PEG 6000 or different carbohydrates such as lactose and dextrin with various ratios of the drug to carrier i.e., 1:10, 1:20 and 1:40. Solid dispersions were prepared by coevaporation method. The evaluation of the properties of the dispersions was performed using dissolution studies, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffractometery. Results: The results indicated that lactose is suitable carriers to enhance the in vitro dissolution rate of prednisolone. The data from the x-ray diffraction showed that the drug was still detectable in its solid state in all solid dispersions except solid dispersions prepared by dextrin as carrier. The results from infrared spectroscopy showed no well-defined drug–carrier interactions for coevaporates. Conclusion: Solid dispersion of a poorly water-soluble drug, prednisolone may alleviate the problems of delayed and inconsistent rate of dissolution of the drug.

  3. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E.; Charlet, L.

    2010-01-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the 238 U initially present in the soil column and 233 U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  4. Radiotracer study to investigate the dilution and dispersion of sewage off Worli coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelgaonkar, V.N.; Pendharkar, A.S.; Agashe, S.M.; Kumar, U.S.; Kulkarni, U.P.; Mendhekar, G.N.; Navada, S.V.

    1998-01-01

    Radiotracer experiments were carried out off Worli Coast, Mumbai to study the dilution and dispersion of sewage from the proposed out fall at 3000 m and existing out fall at 500 m from the shore. Dilutions observed were 2.3 x 10 7 at 3.3 km from the injection point for the disposal at 3,000 m and 6.9 x 10 5 at 5 km for the disposal at 500 m. Dispersion coefficients obtained from two dimensional advection dispersion model for the experiment off 500 m are Dx 15-18 m 2 /s and Dy = 0.5-2 m 2 /s. (author)

  5. Numerical study of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation and dispersive shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grava, T.; Klein, C.; Pitton, G.

    2018-02-01

    A detailed numerical study of the long time behaviour of dispersive shock waves in solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) I equation is presented. It is shown that modulated lump solutions emerge from the dispersive shock waves. For the description of dispersive shock waves, Whitham modulation equations for KP are obtained. It is shown that the modulation equations near the soliton line are hyperbolic for the KPII equation while they are elliptic for the KPI equation leading to a focusing effect and the formation of lumps. Such a behaviour is similar to the appearance of breathers for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the semiclassical limit.

  6. Study of line source characteristics for 2-D physical modelling of pollutant dispersion in street canyons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meroney, Robert N. [Fluid Mechanics and Wind Engineering Program, Civil Engineering Department, Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO (United States); Pavageau, Michel; Rafailidis, Stilianos; Schatzmann, Michael [Meteorologisches Institut, Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    The University of Hamburg initiated a wind tunnel study of car exhaust dispersion from street canyons in an urban environment to investigate how pollution dispersion is affected by street geometry. Particular emphasis at the beginning of this work was put on the design of a line source to represent traffic exhaust. Pollution dispersion was studied in two dimensions (i.e., infinite-length streets were assumed). The case of an isolated street canyon in open country was examined first. The same street canyon geometry was subsequently studied in an urban environment, i.e., with additional canyons of similar geometry upstream and downstream of the test street. The dynamic and dispersion characteristics of the flow in the two cases were quite different. In the canyon amidst open country we observed better canyon ventilation than in the urban roughness case

  7. Dispersion characteristics of a two-beam electron-ion system in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapchinskij, M.I.; Rozanov, N.E.

    1982-01-01

    Without an assumption of the problem potentiality the dispersion properties of a two-beam system important for the realization of the autoresonance method of the acceleration are investigated for the different configurations of an electron flow and arbitrary radii of an ion beam. Two models are used. In the first the ion beam is considered a homogeneous dielectric medium of low density, which permits to apply to the problem the method of perturbations and examine both continuous and thin-wall tubular electron beams. The second model based on an assumption of the self-similarity of beam density change permits to describe ion instabilities of both the cyclotron and Langmuir waves of the electron beam in the quasistatic long-wave limit. Comparison of the results shows that both approaches in the longwave limit give the same qualitative dependence of instability increments on the system parameters and the complicated qualitative dependence. It is shown that for the purposes of the collective ion acceleration it is necessary to decrease the ion beam radius, as it permits to avoid the development of stray instabilities [ru

  8. Survey of literature on dispersion ratio and collection ratio of radioisotopes in animal study using radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozuka, Zenzaburo; Doi, Masahiro; Miyazawa, Eiji; Kawakami, Takeo

    1998-01-01

    A survey of literature in the title was performed to know the actual status of the dispersion from excretion and expiration studies of radioisotopes since, at present, the probable dispersion ratio is assumed to be 100% in calculation for legally permitted use of radioisotopes which conceivably being far from the real status and being incompatible with the guideline for pharmacokinetic studies requiring the recovery of >95% of dosed radioactivity in balance study. There are two interpretations for the dispersion; it is the expiration ratio and it is the fraction unrecovered. Survey was done on 11 Japanese and foreign journals in 1985-1996 publishing most of pharmacokinetic studies and on 650 compounds in 358 facilities with 1,975 experiments in total. In those experiments, the total recovery of radioactivity was 95% in average, unrecovered fraction, 5% and expiration ratio, 2%. As for unclide, 14 C, 3 H, 125 I and 35 S were surveyed since they occupied 99.4% of the experiments and their dispersion was <5%. Rats were used in 70% of the experiments and the dispersion in all animal experiments was about 5%. Administration route was regardless of the dispersion. (K.H.)

  9. Long-term resource variation and group size: A large-sample field test of the Resource Dispersion Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morecroft Michael D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Resource Dispersion Hypothesis (RDH proposes a mechanism for the passive formation of social groups where resources are dispersed, even in the absence of any benefits of group living per se. Despite supportive modelling, it lacks empirical testing. The RDH predicts that, rather than Territory Size (TS increasing monotonically with Group Size (GS to account for increasing metabolic needs, TS is constrained by the dispersion of resource patches, whereas GS is independently limited by their richness. We conducted multiple-year tests of these predictions using data from the long-term study of badgers Meles meles in Wytham Woods, England. The study has long failed to identify direct benefits from group living and, consequently, alternative explanations for their large group sizes have been sought. Results TS was not consistently related to resource dispersion, nor was GS consistently related to resource richness. Results differed according to data groupings and whether territories were mapped using minimum convex polygons or traditional methods. Habitats differed significantly in resource availability, but there was also evidence that food resources may be spatially aggregated within habitat types as well as between them. Conclusions This is, we believe, the largest ever test of the RDH and builds on the long-term project that initiated part of the thinking behind the hypothesis. Support for predictions were mixed and depended on year and the method used to map territory borders. We suggest that within-habitat patchiness, as well as model assumptions, should be further investigated for improved tests of the RDH in the future.

  10. Influence of seed density and aggregation on post-dispersal weed seed predation in cereal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, P.C.; Westerman, P.R.; Pinkert, C.; Werf, van der W.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of density dependence, aggregation and background density of seeds on intensity of seed predation in cereal fields were examined in central Netherlands. Four sequential 1-week trials were conducted from 9 July to 8 August 2001 and lamb's quarters (Chenopodium album) was used as the

  11. Study of glow discharge positive column with cloud of disperse particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, D.N.; Shumova, V.V.; Vasilyak, L.M.; Fortov, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to describe plasma parameters changes induced by clouds of disperse micron size particles. Dust clouds were formed in the positive column of glow discharge in air at pressure 0.1-0.6 torr and current 0.1-3 mA. The simultaneous registration of discharge voltage and dust cloud parameters was carried out. Experimental results were simulated using diffusion model. The dust cloud is shown to smooth the radial electron concentration profile, increase electric field strength and electron temperature and stabilize the discharge. The cloud is demonstrated to be a trap for positive ions without increase of discharge current. -- Highlights: → 25% increase of longitudinal electric field strength in discharge with dust cloud. → The smoothing effect of dust cloud on radial electron and ion concentration profiles. → Dust cloud as a trap for positive ions without increase of discharge current. → Increase of electron temperature in discharge with dust cloud. → Increase of discharge stability in presence of dust cloud.

  12. Visualization Study of Melt Dispersion Behavior for SFR with a Metallic Fuel under Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Hyo Heo; Park, Seong Dae; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Jerng, Dong Wook [Jungang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The safety strategy provides negative reactivity driven by the melt dispersal, so it could reduce the possibility of the recriticality event under a severe triple or more fault scenario for SFR. Since the behavior of the melt dispersion is unpredictable, it depends on the accident condition, particularly core region. While the voided coolant channel region is usually developed in the inner core, the unvoided coolant channel region is formed in the outer core. It is important to confirm the fuel dispersion with the core region, but there are not sufficient existing studies for them. From the existing studies, the coolant vapor pressure is considered as one of driving force to move the melt towards outside of the core. There is a complexity of the phenomena during intermixing of the melt with the coolant after the horizontal melt injections. It is too difficult to understand the several combined mechanisms related to the melt dispersion and the fragmentation. The specific conditions to be well dispersed for the molten metallic fuel were discussed in the experiments with the simulant materials. The each melt behavior was compared to evaluate the melt dispersion under the coolant void condition and the boiling condition.

  13. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P.; Pili, E. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF, 91 (France); Charlet, L. [Univ Grenoble 1, Lab Geophys Interne and Tectonophys LGIT OSUG, CNRS, UJF, UMR5559, F-38041 Grenoble 9 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podsolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the {<=} 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean pore-water velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source. (authors)

  14. Uranium facilitated transport by water-dispersible colloids in field and soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crancon, P., E-mail: pierre.crancon@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Pili, E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Charlet, L. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique (LGIT-OSUG), University of Grenoble-I, UMR5559-CNRS-UJF, BP53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2010-04-01

    The transport of uranium through a sandy podzolic soil has been investigated in the field and in column experiments. Field monitoring, numerous years after surface contamination by depleted uranium deposits, revealed a 20 cm deep uranium migration in soil. Uranium retention in soil is controlled by the < 50 {mu}m mixed humic and clayey coatings in the first 40 cm i.e. in the E horizon. Column experiments of uranium transport under various conditions were run using isotopic spiking. After 100 pore volumes elution, 60% of the total input uranium is retained in the first 2 cm of the column. Retardation factor of uranium on E horizon material ranges from 1300 (column) to 3000 (batch). In parallel to this slow uranium migration, we experimentally observed a fast elution related to humic colloids of about 1-5% of the total-uranium input, transferred at the mean porewater velocity through the soil column. In order to understand the effect of rain events, ionic strength of the input solution was sharply changed. Humic colloids are retarded when ionic strength increases, while a major mobilization of humic colloids and colloid-borne uranium occurs as ionic strength decreases. Isotopic spiking shows that both {sup 238}U initially present in the soil column and {sup 233}U brought by input solution are desorbed. The mobilization process observed experimentally after a drop of ionic strength may account for a rapid uranium migration in the field after a rainfall event, and for the significant uranium concentrations found in deep soil horizons and in groundwater, 1 km downstream from the pollution source.

  15. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Praveen, E-mail: pmalik100@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144011, Punjab (India); Raina, K.K. [Liquid Crystal Group, Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that approx1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  16. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Praveen; Raina, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that ∼1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  17. Unified description of the neutron-/sup 208/Pb mean field between -20 and +165 MeV from the dispersion relation constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.H.; Horen, D.J.; Mahaux, C.

    1987-01-01

    The real part of the central neutron-/sup 208/Pb mean field is the sum of a Hartree-Fock component plus a dispersive component. In keeping with theoretical expectations, the Hartree-Fock field is assumed to have a Woods-Saxon shape whose depth decreases exponentially with increasing energy and whose radius and diffuseness are independent of energy. The dispersive component is determined from the imaginary part of the optical-model potential by making use of the dispersion relation which connects these two quantities. The imaginary part is written as the sum of a volume and a surface-peaked contribution. The dispersion relation then implies that the real dispersive contribution is also the sum of volume and surface-peaked components. The parameters of the complex mean field are determined by fitting the available differential and polarization cross sections in the energy domain [4, 40 MeV] and the total cross sections in the domain [1,120 MeV]; these data are contained in previous published or unpublished reports, but new measurements of the total cross sections are presented from 1 to 25 MeV. Good fits to these cross sections, and also to unpublished total cross sections for energies up to 165 MeV, are obtained despite the fact that the number of adjusted parameters is quite small because of our use of the constraint implied by the dispersion relation

  18. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  19. Studies in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.M.; Mandula, J.E.; Shrauner, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Washington University is currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large orders; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the l/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including QCD

  20. Analytical study of the relativistic dispersion: Application to the generation of the auroral kilometric radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Queau, D.; Louarn, P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurements recently performed by the Viking spacecraft have shown that, in addition to being cold plasma depleted, the source regions of the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (A.K.R.) are characterized by a relatively denser, more energetic electron component. In order to properly study the Cyclotron Maser Instability (C.M.I.) which is thought to be responsible for the A.K.R. generation, it is thus necessary to include relativistic corrections in both the hermitian and the antihermitian parts of the dielectric tensor characterizing the linear properties of the plasma. Here one presents an analytical study of the corresponding dispersion equation which aims to describe stable and unstable waves having frequencies lying very close to the electronic gyrofrequency and propagating across the geomagnetic field with a perpendicular refractive index less than a few units (n perpendicular 1 and χ small), the growth rate could maximize at the cut-off frequency of the relativistic X mode. Moreover, for small χ, the relativistic X mode is connected to freely propagating modes which guarantees an easy access of the electromagnetic energy to free space

  1. A structure study of copper oxide for monolayer dispersion of anatase supported

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zi Fenlan; Yu Xiaofeng; Guo Hongyou; Cai Xiaohai; Yang Pengcheng; Wu Nianzu; Xie Yaning; Zang Jing; Hu Tiandou

    2002-01-01

    The monolayer dispersion of copper oxide on the surface of anatase and its effect on the properties have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray extended absorption fine structure (EXAFS). XPS results give an utmost dispersion capacity of 7.2 mg/gTiO 2 . Strong interactions between copper oxide and anatase can be seen from EXAFS results. The structure of the supported CuO species is strongly dependent on the amount of CuO loading. When the content of CuO loading is below the utmost dispersion capacity, the surface of CuO/TiO 2 is dominated by the highly dispersed CuO species having no -Cu-O-Cu- chains. The copper ion is located in an octahedral coordination environment, and the Cu-O coordination distance is much longer than that in pure crystalline CuO. When CuO loading is exceeds the utmost dispersion capacity, crystalline CuO is formed on the surface of CuO/TiO 2 . From the result of the structure study, it is Cu-O octahedral coordination and coordination distance change in comparison with pure crystalline CuO on the surface CuO/TiO 2 that have catalytic activity

  2. Contaminant dispersion and bacterial declination studies ate the bay of Chimbote - Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, C.; Maghella, G.; Mamani, E.

    2000-02-01

    A review of both, the dispersion studies and preliminary determination of T-90 performed at the bay of Chimbote - Peru, has been made. As for the dispersion studies, a fundamental partial differential equation and its solution for three-dimensional case is presented. The shape and characteristics of the tracer plume is determined as well as the decrease rate of peak concentrations. The method considers a point injection with Rhodamine B and Iodine-131 as tracers, in order to determine the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients that govern the dispersion rates of industrial and waste waters to be discharged through a submarine outfall that will be installed at the sea of Chimbote. The method presented herein allows the estimation of the dispersion coefficients and predicts the influence of the future diffuser as well, regardless of the nature of the body of water in which the tests were conducted. With regard to T-90 determinations, they were better performed by the use of a combined tracer technique, using I-131 for dilution measurement and Rhodamine B as a visual aid. Dilution and decrease in bacterial concentrations were taken into consideration as well as continuous radiotracer injection. The values of T-90 estimated from experiments should be reconfirmed in future experiments under different oceanographic conditions. (authors)

  3. Tracer Studies to Characterize the Effects of Roadside Noise Barriers on Near-Road Pollutant Dispersion under Varying Atmospheric Stability Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A roadway toxics dispersion study was conducted by the Field Research Division (FRD) of NOAA at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) near Idaho Falls, ID to document the effects on concentrations of roadway emissions behind a roadside sound barrier in various conditions of atmosph...

  4. Correction of the closed orbit and vertical dispersion and the tuning and field correction system in ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1979-01-01

    Each ring in ISABELLE will have 10 separately powered systematic field correction coils to make required corrections which are the same in corresponding magnets around the ring. These corrections include changing the ν-value, shaping the working line in ν-space, correction of field errors due to iron saturation effects, the conductor arrangements, the construction of the coil ends, diamagnetic effects in the superconductor and to rate-dependent induced currents. The twelve insertion quadrupoles in the insertion surrounding each crossing point will each have a quadrupole trim coil. The closed orbit will be controlled by a system of 84 horizontal dipole coils and 90 vertical dipole coils in each ring, each coil being separately powered. This system of dipole coils will also be used to correct the vertical dispersion at the crossing points. Two families of skew quadrupoles per ring will be provided for correction of the coupling between the horizontal and vertical motions. Although there will be 258 separately powered correction coils in each ring

  5. Case Study of Airborne Pathogen Dispersion Patterns in Emergency Departments with Different Ventilation and Partition Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chang Heon; Lee, Seonhye

    2018-03-13

    The prevention of airborne infections in emergency departments is a very important issue. This study investigated the effects of architectural features on airborne pathogen dispersion in emergency departments by using a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulation tool. The study included three architectural features as the major variables: increased ventilation rate, inlet and outlet diffuser positions, and partitions between beds. The most effective method for preventing pathogen dispersion and reducing the pathogen concentration was found to be increasing the ventilation rate. Installing partitions between the beds and changing the ventilation system's inlet and outlet diffuser positions contributed only minimally to reducing the concentration of airborne pathogens.

  6. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-09-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive.

  7. Blocking effect and numerical study of polymer particles dispersion flooding in heterogeneous reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiyao; Li, Jianhui; Lou, Yu

    2018-02-01

    Polymer flooding has become an effective way to improve the sweep efficiency in many oil fields. Many scholars have carried out a lot of researches on the mechanism of polymer flooding. In this paper, the effect of polymer on seepage is analyzed. The blocking effect of polymer particles was studied experimentally, and the residual resistance coefficient (RRF) were used to represent the blocking effect. We also build a mathematical model for heterogeneous concentration distribution of polymer particles. Furthermore, the effects of polymer particles on reservoir permeability, fluid viscosity and relative permeability are considered, and a two-phase flow model of oil and polymer particles is established. In addition, the model was tested in the heterogeneous stratum model, and three influencing factors, such as particle concentration, injection volume and PPD (short for polymer particle dispersion) injection time, were analyzed. Simulation results show that PPD can effectively improve sweep efficiency and especially improve oil recovery of low permeability layer. Oil recovery increases with the increase of particle concentration, but oil recovery increase rate gradually decreases with that. The greater the injected amount of PPD, the greater oil recovery and the smaller oil recovery increase rate. And there is an optimal timing to inject PPD for specific reservoir.

  8. Contaminant dispersion and bacterial declination studies ate the bay of Chimbote - Peru; Estudios de dispersion de contaminantes y declinacion bacteriana en la bahia del mar de Chimbote - Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastian, C; Maghella, G; Mamani, E [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru)

    2000-02-01

    A review of both, the dispersion studies and preliminary determination of T-90 performed at the bay of Chimbote - Peru, has been made. As for the dispersion studies, a fundamental partial differential equation and its solution for three-dimensional case is presented. The shape and characteristics of the tracer plume is determined as well as the decrease rate of peak concentrations. The method considers a point injection with Rhodamine B and Iodine-131 as tracers, in order to determine the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients that govern the dispersion rates of industrial and waste waters to be discharged through a submarine outfall that will be installed at the sea of Chimbote. The method presented herein allows the estimation of the dispersion coefficients and predicts the influence of the future diffuser as well, regardless of the nature of the body of water in which the tests were conducted. With regard to T-90 determinations, they were better performed by the use of a combined tracer technique, using I-131 for dilution measurement and Rhodamine B as a visual aid. Dilution and decrease in bacterial concentrations were taken into consideration as well as continuous radiotracer injection. The values of T-90 estimated from experiments should be reconfirmed in future experiments under different oceanographic conditions. (authors)

  9. Numerical Study on Sensitivity of Pollutant Dispersion on Turbulent Schmidt Number in a Street Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, J.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, sensitivity of pollutant dispersion on turbulent Schmidt number (Sct) was investigated in a street canyon using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this, numerical simulations with systematically varied Sct were performed and the CFD model results were validated against a wind‒tunnel measurement data. The results showed that root mean square error (RMSE) was quite dependent on Sct and dispersion patterns of non‒reactive scalar pollutant with different Sct were quite different among the simulation results. The RMSE was lowest in the case of Sct = 0.35 and the apparent dispersion pattern was most similar to the wind‒tunnel data in the case of Sct = 0.35. Also, numerical simulations using spatially weighted Sct were additionally performed in order for the best reproduction of the wind‒tunnel data. Detailed method and procedure to find the best reproduction will be presented.

  10. The study of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide near nuclear power plant using CFD approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagrale, Dhanesh B.; Bera, Subrata; Deo, Anuj K.; Gaikwad, Avinash J.

    2015-01-01

    Most of the studies on atmospheric dispersion of radioactive material released from nuclear power plants are based on Gaussian plume models which fail to take account turbulence generated. The Fire Dynamic Simulator (FDS) code is one such flow model that uses a form of Navier-Stokes equation for low mach number applications. In the 0-2 km range near nuclear power plant, mainly near the source of emission of radionuclides, obstructions like natural draft cooling towers, plant building and structures are located. The stability class 'F' conditions and temperature of surrounding atmosphere, 15°C are considered in analysis. Main constituents of radionuclides released from stack mainly xenon, krypton. Two cases are carried out a) dispersion of gases without obstruction of cooling tower and b) dispersion of gases with obstruction of cooling tower. It is observed that mass fraction of radionuclides near the cooling tower ground increased to certain extent due to obstruction and wake effect. (author)

  11. Topography and its effects on atmospheric dispersion in a risk study for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittek, P.

    1985-07-01

    In the consequence assessment model, applied in the German Reactor Risk Study (GRRS), atmospheric dispersion of radioactive substances is beeing treated with a straight line Gaussian dispersion model. But some of the German nuclear power plants are located in complex terrain. In this report, the 19 sites which are considered in the GRRS, are described and classified by two different methods in respect to terrain complexity. The relevant effects of the terrain on the dispersion are commented. Two modifications of the GRRS consequence assessment code UFOMOD take into account in a simple way the terrain elevation and the enhanced turbulence effected eventually by the terrain structure. Sample calculations for two release categories of the GRRS demonstrate the effect of these modifications on the calculated number of early fatalities. (orig.) [de

  12. Effects of predation and dispersal on Mastomys natalensis population dynamics in Tanzanian maize fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibe-Petersen, Solveig; Leirs, Herwig; de Bruyn, L

    2006-01-01

    ), excluding predators by nets and attracting avian predators by nest boxes and perch poles. Because dispersal of the rodents could mask the predation pressure treatment effects, control and predator exclusion treatments were repeated with enclosed rodent populations. 3.  Population growth during the annual...... risk. Reducing dispersal of rodents removed the effect of predation on population growth and peak size, suggesting that local predators may play a role in driving rodent dispersal, but have otherwise little direct effect on population dynamics....

  13. Evaluation of twin-head electrospray nanoparticle disperser for nanotoxicity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiaoling; Budiman, Thomas; Chen, Da-Ren

    2014-08-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanoparticles with various sizes and compositions have been synthesized and proposed for industrial applications. At the same time, the health effects and environmental impacts of nanoparticles become an emerging concern to be addressed. Both in vitro and in vivo studies are of importance to better understand the toxicity of nanoparticles. It is thus essential to have a nanoparticle disperser capable of dispersing individual nanoparticles for these studies. A twin-head electrospray (THES) nanoparticle disperser for animal inhalation exposure studies has recently become commercially available from TSE Systems Inc. Different from the cone-jet electrospray method used in the majority of literature, this particular disperser operates at the multi-jet mode. In this study, we reported our finding on the performance evaluation of the THES disperser with respect to its mass throughput and quality of size distribution of aerosol produced. Three different nanomaterials (TiO2, ZnO, and NiO) were used in this study. It is found that the maximal mass throughput of the studied disperser was achieved by keeping the distance between two opposite spray capillary tips at 3.0 cm, operating the primary carrier-to-capillary sheath flow rates at the ratio of 4:3, and feeding spray suspensions at a flow rate of 20 µl/min. Under the above settings and operations, the highest mass concentration for nano-ZnO was measured at 14.56 mg/m3. Nanoparticle streams with higher concentrations can be further produced by lowering the total carrier gas flow rate and spraying suspensions of higher nanomaterial concentrations. Our study also found that the particle mass throughput of the studied disperser had a good linear relationship with the mass concentration of spray suspension. In addition, the spatial uniformity of nano aerosol distribution in a TSE head-nose-only exposure chamber was investigated. An acceptable nano aerosol uniformity result was

  14. Study of the interaction of Tb (III) with dextran through fluorescence spectroscopy and optical rotatory dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Sandra S.; Rodrigues, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the interaction of Tb(III) with dextran in aqueous solution was perform using fluorescence spectroscopy and optical rotatory dispersion. The results indicate the formation of a complex with the displacent of water from the cation coordinated sphere by hydroxyl groups at the second and third carbon atoms of the monomer unit. (Author) [pt

  15. Study of abrasive wear process of lining of grinding chamber of vortex-acoustic disperser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelygin, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    The theoretical and experimental studies of the process of gas-abrasive wear of the lining of a vortex-acoustic disperser made it possible to establish the conditions and patterns of their occurrence and also to develop proposals for its reduction.

  16. Aggregation dynamics and magnetic properties of magnetic micrometer-sized particles dispersed in a fluid under the action of rotating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llera, María [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Codnia, Jorge [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro de Investigaciones en Láseres y Aplicaciones, CITEDEF-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jorge, Guillermo A., E-mail: gjorge@ungs.edu.ar [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-06-15

    We present a dynamic study of soft magnetic, commercial Fe and Ni micrometer-sized particles dispersed in oleic acid and subjected to a variable (rotating) magnetic field in the horizontal plane. A very complex structure is formed after the particles decant towards the bottom liquid–solid interface and the magnetic field is applied for several minutes. The dynamics of structure formation was studied by means of the registration and analysis of microscopic video images, through a Matlab image analysis script. Several parameters, such as the number of clusters, the perimeter-based fractal dimension and circularity, were calculated as a function of time. The time evolution of the number of clusters was found to follow a power-law behavior, with an exponent consistent with that found in other studies for magnetic systems, whereas the typical formation time depends on the particle diameter and field configuration. Complementarily, the magnetic properties of the formed structure were studied, reproducing the experiment with liquid paraffin as the containing fluid, and then letting it solidify. The sample obtained was studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The magnetization curves show that the material obtained is a planar magnetically anisotropic material, which could eventually be used as an anisotropic magnetic sensor or actuator. - Highlights: • Dynamic study of Fe and Ni particles in oleic acid under rotating fields. • A very complex system of interconnected clusters was observed. • Larger particles had a smaller aggregation time. • A power law behavior of the number of clusters vs. time. • A Fe-paraffin sample with planar anisotropy characterized.

  17. Aggregation dynamics and magnetic properties of magnetic micrometer-sized particles dispersed in a fluid under the action of rotating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llera, María; Codnia, Jorge; Jorge, Guillermo A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a dynamic study of soft magnetic, commercial Fe and Ni micrometer-sized particles dispersed in oleic acid and subjected to a variable (rotating) magnetic field in the horizontal plane. A very complex structure is formed after the particles decant towards the bottom liquid–solid interface and the magnetic field is applied for several minutes. The dynamics of structure formation was studied by means of the registration and analysis of microscopic video images, through a Matlab image analysis script. Several parameters, such as the number of clusters, the perimeter-based fractal dimension and circularity, were calculated as a function of time. The time evolution of the number of clusters was found to follow a power-law behavior, with an exponent consistent with that found in other studies for magnetic systems, whereas the typical formation time depends on the particle diameter and field configuration. Complementarily, the magnetic properties of the formed structure were studied, reproducing the experiment with liquid paraffin as the containing fluid, and then letting it solidify. The sample obtained was studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The magnetization curves show that the material obtained is a planar magnetically anisotropic material, which could eventually be used as an anisotropic magnetic sensor or actuator. - Highlights: • Dynamic study of Fe and Ni particles in oleic acid under rotating fields. • A very complex system of interconnected clusters was observed. • Larger particles had a smaller aggregation time. • A power law behavior of the number of clusters vs. time. • A Fe-paraffin sample with planar anisotropy characterized

  18. Characterization of size, surface charge, and agglomeration state of nanoparticle dispersions for toxicological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jingkun; Oberdoerster, Guenter; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-01-01

    Characterizing the state of nanoparticles (such as size, surface charge, and degree of agglomeration) in aqueous suspensions and understanding the parameters that affect this state are imperative for toxicity investigations. In this study, the role of important factors such as solution ionic strength, pH, and particle surface chemistry that control nanoparticle dispersion was examined. The size and zeta potential of four TiO 2 and three quantum dot samples dispersed in different solutions (including one physiological medium) were characterized. For 15 nm TiO 2 dispersions, the increase of ionic strength from 0.001 M to 0.1 M led to a 50-fold increase in the hydrodynamic diameter, and the variation of pH resulted in significant change of particle surface charge and the hydrodynamic size. It was shown that both adsorbing multiply charged ions (e.g., pyrophosphate ions) onto the TiO 2 nanoparticle surface and coating quantum dot nanocrystals with polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) suppressed agglomeration and stabilized the dispersions. DLVO theory was used to qualitatively understand nanoparticle dispersion stability. A methodology using different ultrasonication techniques (bath and probe) was developed to distinguish agglomerates from aggregates (strong bonds), and to estimate the extent of particle agglomeration. Probe ultrasonication performed better than bath ultrasonication in dispersing TiO 2 agglomerates when the stabilizing agent sodium pyrophosphate was used. Commercially available Degussa P25 and in-house synthesized TiO 2 nanoparticles were used to demonstrate identification of aggregated and agglomerated samples.

  19. Transverse Field Dispersion in the Generalized Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation: Four Wave Mixing in a Higher Order Mode Fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Cheng, Ji; Xu, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An improved version of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived, which takes into account the correct dispersion of the transverse field distribution. The new improved version of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is verified to give the same results as the standard...

  20. Dispersants in an organic medium: synthesis and physicochemical study of dispersants for fuels and lubricants; Dispersants en milieu organique: synthese et etude physicochimique de dispersants pour carburants et lubrifiants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois-Clochard, M.C.

    1998-11-19

    Carbonaceous deposits coming from the fuel and the lubricant are known to form over time at critical locations in an engine. In general, the deposits have an adverse effect on four functional areas which are the fuel metering system, the intake system, the lubrication system and the combustion chambers. These deposits can degrade vehicle performance and drive-ability, reduce fuel economy, increase fuel consumption and pollutant emissions and may lead to the destruction of the engine. In order to remedy these problems, detergent-dispersant additives are used in fuels and lubricants to avoid or decrease deposit adhesion on metallic surfaces and prevent from deposit aggregation. These products are mainly polymer surfactants and in this work, poly-iso-butenyl-succinimide of different structures have been studied. Firstly, 'comb like' polymers have been synthesized. Then they have been compared to classical di-bloc additives in terms of performance and action mechanism. These additives are adsorbed from their hydrophilic polyamine part on the acidic functions of the carbon black surface chosen as an engine deposit model and on the aluminium oxide function of an aluminium powder chosen as an engine wall model. The adsorption increases with temperature on the two solids. Their affinity with the solid surface increases with the length of the hydrophilic part. In the same way, changing the di-bloc structure for a comb like one lead to a better adsorption. At low concentration, it has been shown that the adsorption phenomenon was irreversible, due to the polymer structure of the polar part. Depending on the space required by the hydrophilic part on the solid surface, a more of less dense monolayer is formed. At higher concentrations, an important increase of the adsorbed amount appears. This phenomenon is totally reversible showing that the interactions additive / additive are weak. The dispersing efficiency of a comb like structure is better than a di-bloc one as

  1. Study of field emission phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Devaki; Vijendran, P.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of field emission has been explained, using Fowler-Nordheim equation and the Fowler-Nordheim plot. The imaging theory is also described in brief. The fabrication details of a field emission microscope (FEM) are mentioned. The design of the tube and the emitter assemblies are explained in detail. Simple experiments that can be demonstrated on the FEM such as indexing, detetermination of work function and surface diffusion constants, etc. are also mentioned. The use of FEM as a simple teaching aid has been brought out. (K.B.)

  2. Study of phenomena of tracer transport and dispersion in fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ippolito, Irene

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to present some transport phenomena according to two different approaches: firstly, the study of flows and tracing in a natural crack within a granitic site, and secondly, the study of flows of different geometries in model cracks, mainly by using techniques of tracer dispersion. The author first presents some properties of fractured media and elements of the theory of the phenomenon of dispersion. She notably discusses the reversibility of the Taylor dispersion which is the prevailing mechanism for simply connected geometries such as in the case of a flow between two continuous solid surfaces limiting a fracture. In the next chapters, the author reports the analysis of characteristics of local structures (mouths, roughnesses) of a single fracture by using echo dispersion. She reports experiments as well as Monte Carlo simulations performed on well defined geometries. In a parallel way, some characteristics measurements (rate-pressure, distribution of flows and tracing in transmission) and mechanical measurements of fracture deformation have been performed on a natural fracture in a granitic site [fr

  3. Discrete element method study of fuel relocation and dispersal during loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, K.; Verwerft, M.

    2016-01-01

    The fuel fragmentation, relocation and dispersal (FFRD) during LOCA transients today retain the attention of the nuclear safety community. The fine fragmentation observed at high burnup may, indeed, affect the Emergency Core Cooling System performance: accumulation of fuel debris in the cladding ballooned zone leads to a redistribution of the temperature profile, while dispersal of debris might lead to coolant blockage or to debris circulation through the primary circuit. This work presents a contribution, by discrete element method, towards a mechanistic description of the various stages of FFRD. The fuel fragments are described as a set of interacting particles, behaving as a granular medium. The model shows qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental observations, such as the packing efficiency in the balloon, which is shown to stabilize at about 55%. The model is then applied to study fuel dispersal, for which experimental parametric studies are both difficult and expensive. - Highlights: • We performed Discrete Element Methods simulation for fuel relocation and dispersal during LOCA transients. • The approach provides a mechanistic description of these phenomena. • The approach shows the ability of the technique to reproduce experimental observations. • The packing fraction in the balloon is shown to stabilize at 50–60%.

  4. Gas and aerosol radionuclide transfers in complex environments: experimental studies of atmospheric dispersion and interfaces exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maro, Denis

    2011-01-01

    In situations of chronic or accidental releases, the atmosphere is the main pathway of radioactive releases from nuclear facilities to the environment and, consequently, to humans. It is therefore necessary to have sufficient information on this pathway to accurately assess the radiological impact on man and his environment. Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety develops its own tools of dispersion and atmospheric transfer for its expertise, under normal operation conditions of a facility, but especially in crisis or post-accident. These tools must have a national and international recognition in particular through scientific validation against benchmark experiments performed internationally, nationally or within the IRSN. The Radioecology Laboratory of Cherbourg-Octeville provides, and will increasingly make, a significant contribution to the scientific influence of the Institute in this field. The work presented in this report has contributed to the development or improvement of experimental techniques in the fields of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides and transfer at interfaces, in complex environments (complex topography, urban area). These experimental techniques, applied during field campaigns, have allowed to acquire new data in order to get a better understanding of radionuclide transfers in the form of gases and aerosols. (author)

  5. Study of marine magnetic field

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.

    magnetized in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field at that time. As seafloor spreading pulls the new oceanic crust apart, stripes of approximately the same size gets carried away from the ridge on each side. The basaltic oceanic crust formed...

  6. Alabama warm mix asphalt field study : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The Alabama Department of Transportation hosted a warm mix asphalt field demonstration in August 2007. The warm mix asphalt technology demonstrated was Evotherm Dispersed Asphalt Technology. The WMA and hot mix asphalt produced for the demonstration ...

  7. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  8. Radiotracer study on dispersion of sewerage off Mumbai Coast in Western India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, U.S.; Yelgaonkar, V.N.; Navada, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai discharges the treated sewage at various locations off Mumbai coast. One such discharge point is located near Colaba near South Mumbai. Screened, degritted and aerated sewage is discharged through a 1 m diameter steel pipe by gravity to the diffuser installed on the sea bed at 1.1 km away from the shore. A radiotracer study was carried out to evaluate the dilution and dispersion pattern of the sewage at different points from the disposal point. The experiment was carried out during high tide. About 110 GBq of 82 Br was used as the tracer. A dilution factor of about 5.5 x 10 3 was obtained at a distance of 4.3 km from the outfall. The dilution downshore was small even for a long distance due to strong unidirectional currents. Comparable dilution factors were also obtained by Brooks' model. Vertical tracer profiles showed that the waste plume was well mixed over a depth of 2 to 3 m from the surface. A 2-D advection simulation model was employed to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of the radiotracer data. From the model simulation best fit was obtained for dispersion coefficients Dx = 15 m 2 .s -1 and Dy = 2m 2 .s -1 . The dispersion coefficients can be used for predicting the effluent dispersion under different outfall and disposal conditions. The tracer pattern at Colaba and Malad indicated no possibility of contamination of the beaches

  9. 30 years of the Goiania Accident: a comparative study with other radioactivity dispersion events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ricardo Bastos; Vicente, Roberto, E-mail: rbsmith@ipen.br, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The year 2017 marks 30 years since the radioactive accident that occurred in the city of Goiania, capital of the state of Goias. It was the largest radiological accident in Brazil, and one of the largest in the world occurring outside nuclear facilities. Regarding the accidents at nuclear power plants, two of the biggest were Chernobyl in Ukraine, a year and a half before Goiania, and the Fukushima accident in Japan, in 2011. Different amounts of radioactive material were dispersed in the environment in each of these events. However, each one’s main pathway of dispersion was different: the accident of Goiania was terrestrial, Chernobyl was at the atmosphere, and Fukushima was mainly in the ocean. This work aims to study these different amounts, comparing such activities. In addition, it proposes to compare the sea dispersion of Fukushima with the amount of radioactive waste dumped in the oceans, when the release of radioactive waste at sea was permitted. It also proposes to compare the Chernobyl aerial dispersion with the radioactive material dissipated in the atmosphere, resulting from the more than 500 atmospheric nuclear tests conducted between 1945 and 1962 by the United States, the former Soviet Union, England, France and China. (author)

  10. 30 years of the Goiania Accident: a comparative study with other radioactivity dispersion events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ricardo Bastos; Vicente, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The year 2017 marks 30 years since the radioactive accident that occurred in the city of Goiania, capital of the state of Goias. It was the largest radiological accident in Brazil, and one of the largest in the world occurring outside nuclear facilities. Regarding the accidents at nuclear power plants, two of the biggest were Chernobyl in Ukraine, a year and a half before Goiania, and the Fukushima accident in Japan, in 2011. Different amounts of radioactive material were dispersed in the environment in each of these events. However, each one’s main pathway of dispersion was different: the accident of Goiania was terrestrial, Chernobyl was at the atmosphere, and Fukushima was mainly in the ocean. This work aims to study these different amounts, comparing such activities. In addition, it proposes to compare the sea dispersion of Fukushima with the amount of radioactive waste dumped in the oceans, when the release of radioactive waste at sea was permitted. It also proposes to compare the Chernobyl aerial dispersion with the radioactive material dissipated in the atmosphere, resulting from the more than 500 atmospheric nuclear tests conducted between 1945 and 1962 by the United States, the former Soviet Union, England, France and China. (author)

  11. Stability and generalization in seed dispersal networks: a case study of frugivorous fish in Neotropical wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Sandra Bibiana; Arujo, Joisiane K; Penha, Jerry; Nunes da Cunha, Catia; Bobier, Karen E; Anderson, Jill T

    2016-08-31

    When species within guilds perform similar ecological roles, functional redundancy can buffer ecosystems against species loss. Using data on the frequency of interactions between fish and fruit, we assessed whether co-occurring frugivores provide redundant seed dispersal services in three species-rich Neotropical wetlands. Our study revealed that frugivorous fishes have generalized diets; however, large-bodied fishes had greater seed dispersal breadth than small species, in some cases, providing seed dispersal services not achieved by smaller fish species. As overfishing disproportionately affects big fishes, the extirpation of these species could cause larger secondary extinctions of plant species than the loss of small specialist frugivores. To evaluate the consequences of frugivore specialization for network stability, we extracted data from 39 published seed dispersal networks of frugivorous birds, mammals and fish (our networks) across ecosystems. Our analysis of interaction frequencies revealed low frugivore specialization and lower nestedness than analyses based on binary data (presence-absence of interactions). In that case, ecosystems may be resilient to loss of any given frugivore. However, robustness to frugivore extinction declines with specialization, such that networks composed primarily of specialist frugivores are highly susceptible to the loss of generalists. In contrast with analyses of binary data, recently developed algorithms capable of modelling interaction strengths provide opportunities to enhance our understanding of complex ecological networks by accounting for heterogeneity of frugivore-fruit interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  12. Preface: Proceedings of the Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields II Conference (Bonn-Bad Godesberg, 31 March 2 April 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwen, H.

    2008-10-01

    This special issue reflects the scientific programme of the International Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields Conference (CODEF II) that took place in Bonn-Bad Godesberg from 31 March-2 April 2008. This is the second conference in a series that started in 2004 when the first CODEF meeting was held. The proceedings of the first CODEF meeting were summarized in a previous special issue (Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 16 (issue 38)). The present issue represents recent progress in this rapidly developing field. The CODEF meeting series is held in conjunction with the German-Dutch Transregional Collaborative Research Centre SFB TR6 with the title Physics of Colloidal Dispersions in External Fields. Scientists working within this network as well as international invited guest speakers contributed to these meetings. The contributions in this issue are organized according to the type of different fields applied namely: bulk (no external field) shear flow electric field magnetic and laser-optical field confinement We would like to thank the CODEF II sponsors (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and MWFZ Mainz) for their financial support. Furthermore, we thank IOP Publishing for their willingness to publish the proceedings of this conference as a special issue. Participants O Alarcón-Waess (Puebla), M Allen (Coventry), J L Arauz-Lara (San Luis Potosi), L Assoud (Düsseldorf), G K Auernhammer (Mainz), R Backofen (Dresden), M Balbás-Gambra (Munich), J Bammert (Bayreuth), M Baptista (Mainz), J-L Barrat (Lyon), M Bier (Utrecht), K Binder (Mainz), R Blaak (Düsseldorf), V Blickle (Stuttgart), D Block (Kiel), S Böhm (Düsseldorf), V Botan (Mainz), J P Bouchaud (Paris), J Brader (Konstanz), G Brambilla (Montpellier), W J Briels (Enschede), M Brinkmann (Göttingen), C Brunet (Paris), H-J Butt (Mainz), M A Camargo Chaparro (Düsseldorf), R Castañeda Priego (Guanajuato), J J Cerdà Pino (Frankfurt), A Chatterji (Jülich), M Chavez Paez (San Luis Potosi), A Chremos

  13. Studies of faint field galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Although claims are often made that photometric surveys of faint field galaxies reveal evidence for evolution over recent epochs (z<0.6), it has not yet been possible to select a single evolutionary model from comparisons with the data. Magnitude counts are sensitive to evolution but the data is well-mixed in distance because of the width of the luminosity function (LF). Colours can narrow the possibilities but the effects of redshift and morphology can only be separated using many passbands. In this paper, the author highlights two ways in which one can make further progress in this important subject. First, he discusses results based on the AAT redshift survey which comprises 5 Schmidt fields to J = 16.7 i.e. well beyond local inhomogeneities. Secondly, the difficulties in resolving the many possibilities encountered with faint photometry could be resolved with redshifts. To obtain redshift distributions for faint samples is now feasible via multi-object spectroscopy. At intermediate magnitudes (J=20) such distributions test the faint end of the galaxy LF; at faint magnitudes (J=22) they offer a direct evolutionary test. (Auth.)

  14. Experimental and numerical study of light gas dispersion in a ventilated room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelain, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.gelain@irsn.fr; Prévost, Corinne

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Presentation of many experimental local data for different configurations. • Highlight of the influence of numerical parameters used in the CFD code. • Validation of the CFD code ANSYS CFX on the basis of experimental data. - Abstract: The objective of this study is to validate the ANSYS CFX version 12 computational code on the basis of light gas dispersion tests performed in two ventilated rooms. It follows an initial study on heavy gas dispersion carried out by Ricciardi et al. (2008). First, a study of sensitivity to various numerical parameters allows a set of reference data to be developed and the influence of the numerical scheme of advection to be revealed. Second, two helium (simulating hydrogen) dispersion test grids are simulated for the two rooms studied, and the results of the calculations are compared with experimental results. The very good agreement between these results allows the code and its dataset to be validated for this application. In future, a study with higher levels of helium (on the order of 4% vol at equilibrium) is envisaged in the context of safety analyses related to the hydrogen risk, these levels representing the lower explosive limit (LEL) of hydrogen.

  15. Evaluation of field-collected drifter and subsurface fluorescein dye concentration data and comparisons to high frequency radar surface current mapping data for dispersed oil transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, J.R. [Payne Environmental Consultants Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States); Terrill, E.; Carter, M.; Otero, M.; Middleton, W.; Chen, A. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); French McCay, D.; Mueller, C.; Jayko, K. [Applied Science Associates Inc., Narragansett, RI (United States); Nordhausen, W.; Lewis, R.; Lampinen, M.; Evans, T. [California Dept. of Fish and Game, San Diego, CA (United States). Office of Spill Prevention and Response; Ohlmann, C. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Via, G.L.; Ruiz-Santana, H.; Maly, M.; Willoughby, B.; Varela, C. [United States Coast Guard Pacific Strike Team, Novato, CA (United States); Lynch, P.; Sanchez, P. [Marine Spill Response Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Extensive coastal areas in the United States have been designated as pre-approved zones for dispersant applications in the event of an oil spill. Although the use of dispersants may reduce impacts to wildlife and shoreline habitats, it is recognized that the dispersed oil may cause impacts to organisms in the water column. The State of California Department of Fish and Game Office of Spill Prevention and Response is currently using oil spill fate and transport modeling to address this issue. The purpose is to develop the time and spatial scales, and equipment needs for a formal dispersed oil monitoring plan (DOMP) to document hydrocarbon water column concentrations, potentially exposed zooplankton, and the impact of the oil spills with and without dispersant use. A series of 7 fluorescein dye releases were completed off the coast of San Diego, California in order to test the operational framework for repeated sampling of dispersed oil plumes as outlined in the DOMP. The ability of high-frequency radar to provide surface current input data to oil spill models was also evaluated. The dye concentrations were measured over three spatial dimensions and time in order to verify the model-predicted movement of subsurface dye. Surface current fields at varying depths were also measured and the subsurface dye plume structure was mapped using a GPS coupled towed-fluorometer equipped with pressure sensors. Measurements were compared with data from traditional special monitoring of applied response technology (SMART). The database acquired through this program represents a technical resource that can help physical and chemical oceanographers, modelers, spill response and contingency planners involved in the debate of whether or not to use dispersants to mitigate near shore and open ocean marine oil spills. 14 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  16. Improvement of CBR and compaction characteristics of bauxite rich dispersive soils available in pakistan: a case study of khushab soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion of dispersive soil occurs when it comes in contact with water and clay particles deflocculate and disperse away from each other. Thus dispersive soils undergo erosion under low seepage velocity leading to instability problems of slopes and earth retaining structures. The amount of dispersion depends upon the mineralogy and geochemistry of clayey soil as well as the dissolved salts of the pore fluid. The dispersivity of the soil mainly depends on the amount of exchangeable sodium present in its formation. Under saturated conditions, the attractive forces are less than the repulsive forces and this will help the particles to disperse and go into colloidal suspension. The use of chemical stabilizers such as lime and cement to bind the clay particles and reduce the dispersivity of soil and to improve the compaction and CBR characteristics of bauxite rich dispersive soil present in Khushab district have been studied in this research. Soil behavior was studied after addition of 2%, 4%, 6% and 8% Lime and Cement, at optimum level of 6% for Lime and Cement; it has been observed that the CBR and compaction characteristics of Khushab soil have been improved. (author)

  17. The influence of the directional energy distribution on the nonlinear dispersion relation in a random gravity wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Tung, C.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the directional distribution of wave energy on the dispersion relation is calculated numerically using various directional wave spectrum models. The results indicate that the dispersion relation varies both as a function of the directional energy distribution and the direction of propagation of the wave component under consideration. Furthermore, both the mean deviation and the random scatter from the linear approximation increase as the energy spreading decreases. Limited observational data are compared with the theoretical results. The agreement is favorable.

  18. Study of Phonon Dispersion Relations in Cuprous Oxide by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beg, M. M.; Shapiro, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Phonon dispersion relations in Cu2O have been studied at 20°C using inelastic neutron scattering. Seven acoustic branches and twelve optical branches have been studied in detail in the three symmetry directions [00ζ], [ζζ0], and [ζζζ] of the cubic lattice. Four of the six zone-center phonons have...... been observed and the assignments and energies are confirmed as Γ25=87±2 cm-1, Γ12′=105±3 cm-1, Γ15=146±1 cm-1, and Γ2′≈347 cm-1. The dispersion relations agree only qualitatively with the rigid-ion-model calculations. It is suggested that more detailed calculations may be performed in the light...

  19. Near-field solubility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, H.P.; Williams, S.J.

    1992-02-01

    Experimental determinations of the solubilities of americium, plutonium, neptunium, protactinium, thorium, radium, lead, tin, palladium and zirconium are reported. These elements have radioactive isotopes of concern in assessments of radioactive waste disposal. All measurements were made under the highly alkaline conditions typical of the near field of a radioactive waste repository which uses cementitious materials for many of the immobilisation matrices, the backfill and the engineered structures. Low redox potentials, typical of those resulting from the corrosion of iron and steel, were simulated for those elements having more than one accessible oxidation state. The dissolved concentrations of the elements were defined using ultrafiltration. In addition, the corrosion of iron and stainless steel was shown to generate low redox potentials in solution and the solubility of iron(II) at high pH was measured and found to be sufficient for it to act as a redox buffer with respect to neptunium and plutonium. (author)

  20. Impact of the initial streamwise inclination of a double jet emitted within a cool crossflow on its temperature field and pollutants dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhouane, A.; Mahjoub Said, Nejla; Mhiri, H. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Unite de Thermique et Thermodynamique des Procedes Industriels, Monastir (Tunisia); Palec, G. le; Bournot, P. [IUSTI, UMR 6595, Technopole de Chateau-Gombert, Marseille (France)

    2009-04-15

    An experimental study and a numerical modeling are carried out simultaneously on a twin inclined jets' configuration issuing into a cooler crossflow. The main purpose of this study is to track the overall evolution of the jets among the surrounding flow and then determine the thermal and mass transfer features that characterize the resulting flowfield. The experimental data are depicted by means of a particle image velocimetry technique; whereas the numerical three-dimensional model is simulated through the resolution of the different governing Navier-Stokes' equations by means of the finite volume method. Two different closure models were tested: the standard k-{epsilon} model and the Reynolds stress model (RSM) second order model. The introduction of the latter in such a configuration brings some valuable improvement since it allows the detection of the slightest variations within the domain and then describes the least occurring mechanisms. The confrontation of the differently processed numerical results with the experimentally tracked data comforted our opinion since it proved the better efficiency of the RSM model for the description of the handled flow; that's why we adopted it for the rest of the paper. Once the validation obtained, we proceeded to the evaluation of the influence of the initial streamwise inclination of the emitted jets on the engendered thermal field and on the pollutants' dispersion. For the matter, we tested the following angles: 30 , 45 , 60 and 90 . After that, we represented the temperature variation along different directions in order to detail its behavior in all of them and at different levels. This characterization is highly recommended since it may promote the efficiency of several applications (mainly the cooling applications). We also evaluated the influence of this same parameter; the initial inclination; on the pollutants' dispersion due to the high and alarming importance of the problem on the

  1. Field emission studies at Saclay and Orsay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, J.

    1996-01-01

    During the last five years, DC and RF equipment for field emission studies have been developed at Saclay and Orsay laboratories. Combining these devices, straight comparison has been carried out between DC and RF field emission from artificial emission sites on the same sample. Other topics are also reviewed: high field cleaning, plausible origins of thermal effects that occurred on emission sites in RF, behaviour of alumina particles under RF field, and optical observations and measurements. (author)

  2. Noise study of all-normal dispersion supercontinuum sources for potential application in optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bravo Gonzalo, Ivan; Engelsholm, Rasmus Dybbro; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    bandwidths, such sources are characterized by large intensity fluctuations, limiting their performance for applications in imaging such as optical coherence tomography (OCT). An approach to eliminate the influence of noise sensitive effects is to use a so-called all-normal dispersion (ANDi) fiber, in which...... the dispersion is normal for all the wavelengths of interest. Pumping these types of fibers with short enough femtosecond pulses allows to suppress stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which is known to be as noisy process as modulation instability (MI), and coherent SC is generated through self-phase modulation...... (SPM) and optical wave breaking (OWB). In this study, we show the importance of the pump laser and fiber parameters in the design of low-noise ANDi based SC sources, for application in OCT. We numerically investigate the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the SC, calculating the relative intensity noise...

  3. A Study On Dispersion Stability Of Nickel Nanoparticles Synthesized By Wire Explosion In Liquid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol using portable pulsed wire evaporation, which is a one-step physical method. From transmission electron microscopy images, it was found that the Ni nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape with an average diameter of 7.3 nm. To prevent aggregation of the nickel nanoparticles, a polymer surfactant was added into the ethanol before the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles, and adsorbed on the freshly synthesized nickel nanoparticles during the wire explosion. The dispersion stability of the prepared nickel nanofluids was investigated by zeta-potential analyzer and Turbiscan optical analyzer. As a result, the optimum concentration of polymer surfactant to be added was suggested for the maximized dispersion stability of the nickel nanofluids.

  4. A study of the physical factors affecting air pollution dispersion in Helwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megahed, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Air pollution is considered as one of the most important environmental problems facing the humanity. Cement industry, usually, is responsible for building high levels of pollutants. The present research focused on the study of air pollution control of cement industry using mathematical modeling. A mathematical dispersion model was developed based on Gaussian distribution where the dispersion parameters increase with increasing atmospheric turbulence. The Gaussian equation takes in consideration the effect of emission rates. stack height, buoyant plume rise, weather and meteorological parameters. The model was tested for different stack heights, wind speeds. And atmospheric stability classes. Maximum ground level concentration of cement pollutants were measured in different locations of Helwan, south Cairo around the cement factories. Analysis of results shows that the ground level of pollutants concentrations are inversely proportional to wind speed and atmospheric stability classes. Stack height also affects the behaviour of deposition of cement particulates. The model results show satisfactory agreement with the measured concentrations. 6 figs

  5. A more than six orders of magnitude UV-responsive organic field-effect transistor utilizing a benzothiophene semiconductor and Disperse Red 1 for enhanced charge separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Chad S; Wu, Yiliang; Wigglesworth, Tony; Zhu, Shiping

    2015-01-14

    A more than six orders of magnitude UV-responsive organic field-effect transistor is developed using a benzothiophene (BTBT) semiconductor and strong donor-acceptor Disperse Red 1 as the traps to enhance charge separation. The device can be returned to its low drain current state by applying a short gate bias, and is completely reversible with excellent stability under ambient conditions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Dielectric Dispersion Studies Indicate Change in Structure of Water by Potentised Homeopathic Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Response of living bodies to different vastly `diluted' homeopathic medicines are different (rejecting the sceptic's view of `placebo' effect), though they are chemically same. Till now there is no satisfactory answer to how one such medicine differs from another in terms of scientifically measurable parameters. This paper tries to address this basic issue by taking two medicines of the same potency and two different potencies of the same medicine, namely, Arnica Mont 30c, 200c and Anacardium Orient 30c, 200c. These potencies are well above the Avogadro limit. The investigation reported here proceeds with the concept of `induced molecular structure' advanced by a number of scientists. Dielectric dispersion is used as the tool for experimental verification. It is based on the fact that when the exciting frequency of applied electric field equals the characteristic frequency, then macromolecules resonate leading to anomalous dielectric dispersion associated with sharp increase in dielectric loss, the resonance frequencies being different for macromolecules of different structures or dimensions. The results suggest that medicine- and potency-specific attributes are acquired by the vehicle (i.e. water) in the form of macromolecules generated by the potentization process of homeopathy making one medicine structurally different from another.

  7. Study of the dispersion phenomena connected with the absorption by recoilless nuclear resonance fluorescence; Etude des phenomenes de dispersion lies a l'absorption resonnante sans recul des noyaux atomiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imbert, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-12-01

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence as in the optical field abnormal dispersion curves are related to the absorption lines. It is possible, by using quadrupolar or magnetic splitting of the line in the case of recoilless resonance fluorescence (Moessbauer effect) to obtain differential dispersion effects between the two orthogonal linear or the two inverse circular components of the incident gamma radiation. These effects induce bi-refraction phenomena or Faraday rotation on the gamma beam, which have been studied on Fe-57 enriched absorbers. (author) [French] Comme dans le domaine optique, aux raies d'absorption de fluorescence resonnante des noyaux atomiques sont associees des courbes de dispersion anormale. Les decompositions des raies d'absorption de fluorescence resonnante sans recul (raies Moessbauer) par couplage quadrupolaire ou effet Zeeman permettent d'obtenir des effets dispersifs differentiels entre composantes lineaires orthogonales ou circulaires inverses du rayonnement gamma incident. Ces effets se traduisent par des phenomenes de birefringence ou de rotation Faraday, qui ont pu etre etudies sur des milieux enrichis en fer-57. (auteur)

  8. Dispersal of Engineered Male Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winskill, Peter; Carvalho, Danilo O; Capurro, Margareth L; Alphey, Luke; Donnelly, Christl A; McKemey, Andrew R

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal vector of dengue fever, have been genetically engineered for use in a sterile insect control programme. To improve our understanding of the dispersal ecology of mosquitoes and to inform appropriate release strategies of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti detailed knowledge of the dispersal ability of the released insects is needed. The dispersal ability of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti at a field site in Brazil has been estimated. Dispersal kernels embedded within a generalized linear model framework were used to analyse data collected from three large scale mark release recapture studies. The methodology has been applied to previously published dispersal data to compare the dispersal ability of 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in contrasting environments. We parameterised dispersal kernels and estimated the mean distance travelled for insects in Brazil: 52.8 m (95% CI: 49.9 m, 56.8 m) and Malaysia: 58.0 m (95% CI: 51.1 m, 71.0 m). Our results provide specific, detailed estimates of the dispersal characteristics of released 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti in the field. The comparative analysis indicates that despite differing environments and recapture rates, key features of the insects' dispersal kernels are conserved across the two studies. The results can be used to inform both risk assessments and release programmes using 'genetically sterile' male Aedes aegypti.

  9. Personality and field of study choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humburg, M.

    2014-01-01

    Field of study choice has far-reaching implications for individuals enrolling in university. Field of study choice is strongly linked to the subject matter graduates will specialize in, the kind of work environment they will be working in, and the returns to their skills they can expect once they

  10. Using Case Studies to Enrich Field Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Ruane, Susan; Clark, Christopher M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of field experience in teacher education and how it can be augmented by phenomenological case studies. It summarizes a particular case study involving three teacher education classes, noting that reflective analysis of cases can prepare students to observe in the field. (SM)

  11. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  12. A first principle study for the comparison of phonon dispersion of armchair carbon and silicon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Surjeet Kumar; Kumar, Arun; Bharti, Ankush; Sharma, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Using first principles density functional theoretical calculations, the present paper reports a systematic study of phonon dispersion curves in pristine carbon (CNT) and silicon nanotubes (SiNT) having chirality (6,6) in the armchair configuration. Some of the phonon modes are found to have negative frequencies which leads to instability of the systems under study. The number of phonon branches has been found to be thrice as much as the number of atoms. The frequency of the higher optical bands varies from 1690 to 1957 cm −1 for CNT(6,6) while it is 596 to 658 cm −1 for SiNT

  13. High-transmission excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter edge filter based on a Halbach cylinder magnetic-field configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Andreas; Walther, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We report on the realization of an excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (ESFADOF) edge filter based on the 5P(3/2)→8D(5/2) transition in rubidium. A maximum transmission of 81% has been achieved. This high transmission is only possible by utilizing a special configuration of magnetic fields taken from accelerator physics to provide a strong homogeneous magnetic field of approximately 6000 G across the vapor cell. The two resulting steep transmission edges are separated by more than 13 GHz, enabling its application in remote sensing.

  14. Significance of Space Charge and the Earth Magnetic Field on the Dispersive Characteristics of a Low Energy Electron Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kishek, Rami A; Bernal, Santiago; Godlove, Terry; Haber, Irving; Quinn, Bryan; Reiser, Martin; Tobin, C; Walter, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The combination of energy spread and space charge provides a rich domain for interesting beam dynamics that are currently not well understood. The University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) [1] is a small scaled ring designed to probe the little-known regions of higher beam intensities using low-energy electrons. As such, design, commissioning and operation of UMER present many challenges, some quite novel. For example the UMER beam energy of 10 keV makes the beam very sensitive to the Earth magnetic field, which we can fortunately use to assist in bending the beam. This paper presents a systematic simulation study of the interaction of space charge and energy spread, with and without the earth magnetic field.

  15. A high resolution complex terrain dispersion study in the Rocky Flats, Colorado vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulos, G.S.; Bossert, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    In January/February, 1991 an intensive set of measurements was taken around Rocky Flats near Denver, CO under the auspices of the Department of Energy Atmospheric Studies over Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program. This region of the country is known as the Front Range, and is characterized by a transition from the relatively flat terrain of the Great Plains to the highly varied terrain of the Rocky Mountains. One goal of the ASCOT 1991 program was to gain insight into multi-scale meteorological interaction by observing wintertime drainage conditions at the mountain-valley-plains interface. ASCOT data included surface and upper air measurements on approximately a 50km 2 scale. Simultaneously, an SF 6 tracer release study was being conducted around Rocky Flats, a nuclear materials production facility. Detailed surface concentration measurements were completed for the SF 6 plume. This combination of meteorological and tracer concentration data provided a unique data set for comparisons of mesoscale and dispersion modeling results with observations and for evaluating our capability to predict pollutant transport. Our approach is to use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model to simulate atmospheric conditions and the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM), a component of the RAMS system, to model the dispersion of the SF 6 . We have chosen the 4--5 February, 1991 overnight period as our case study. This night was characterized by strong drainage flows from the Rocky Mountains to the west of Rocky Flats, southerly winds in a layer about lkm thick above the drainage flows, and northwesterly winds above that layer extending to the tropopause

  16. Ultra-sensitive speciation analysis of mercury by CE-ICP-MS together with field-amplified sample stacking injection and dispersive solid-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, YiQuan; Cheng, Xian; Mo, Fan; Huang, LiMei; Wu, Zujian; Wu, Yongning; Xu, LiangJun; Fu, FengFu

    2016-04-01

    A simple dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) used to extract and preconcentrate ultra-trace MeHg, EtHg and Hg(2+) from water sample, and a sensitive method for the simultaneous analysis of MeHg, EtHg and Hg(2+) by using capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) with field-amplified sample stacking injection (FASI) were first reported in this study. The DSPE used thiol cotton particles as adsorbent, and is simple and effective. It can be used to extract and preconcentrate ultra-trace mercury compounds in water samples within 30 min with a satisfied recovery and no mercury species alteration during the process. The FASI enhanced the sensitivity of CE-ICP-MS with 25-fold, 29-fold and 27-fold for MeHg, EtHg and Hg(2+) , respectively. Using FASI-CE-ICP-MS together with DSPE, we have successfully determined ultra-trace MeHg, EtHg and Hg(2+) in tap water with a limits of quantification (LOQs) of 0.26-0.45 pg/mL, an RSD (n = 3) mercury. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Application of energy-dispersive XRF technique in the hydrometallurgy study of local zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Sulaiman; Kamaruddin Hussin; Azizan Aziz

    1996-01-01

    In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXR-F) was used to analyse the elemental composition of the starting zircon mineral associated elements in the leaching solution. Besides analysing the major elements i.e. of zirconium, silicon and hafnium, trace elemental analysis for iron, titanium and the naturally occurring radioactive element thorium and uranium are important in establishing the grades of Malaysian zircon. The technique was also used in determine the optimum conditions for zirconium and hafnium recovery during the leaching process

  18. A numerical study of scalar dispersion downstream of a wall-mounted cube using direct simulations and algebraic flux models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R., E-mail: riccardo.rossi12@unibo.i [Laboratorio di Termofluidodinamica Computazionale Seconda Facolta di Ingegneria di Forli, Universita di Bologna Via Fontanelle 40, 47100 Forli (Italy); Center for Turbulence Research Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States); Philips, D.A.; Iaccarino, G. [Center for Turbulence Research Department of Mechanical Engineering Stanford University, CA 94305 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The computed DNS statistics indicate that a gradient-transport scheme can be applied to the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. {yields} The streamwise scalar flux is characterized by a counter-gradient transport mechanism in the wake region close to the obstacle. {yields} The wake profiles of scalar fluctuations and the shape of probability density functions do not suggest a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. {yields} The evaluation of scalar dispersion models must include a careful assessment of the computed mean velocity field and Reynolds stress tensor. {yields} Algebraic models provide an improved prediction of the mean concentration field as compared to the standard eddy-diffusivity model. -- Abstract: The dispersion of a passive scalar downstream of a wall-mounted cube is examined using direct numerical simulations and turbulence models applied to the Reynolds equations. The scalar is released from a circular source located on top of the obstacle, which is immersed in a developing boundary-layer flow. Direct simulations are performed to give insight into the mixing process and to provide a reference database for turbulence closures. Algebraic flux models are evaluated against the standard eddy-diffusivity representation. Coherent structures periodically released from the cube top are responsible for a counter-diffusion mechanism appearing in the streamwise scalar flux. Alternating vortex pairs form from the lateral edges of the cube, but the intensity profiles and probability density functions of scalar fluctuations suggest that they do not cause a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. The gradient-transport scheme is consistent with the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. From the comparative study with our direct simulations, we further stress that Reynolds stress predictions must be carefully evaluated along with scalar flux closures in order to establish the reliability of

  19. A numerical study of scalar dispersion downstream of a wall-mounted cube using direct simulations and algebraic flux models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, R.; Philips, D.A.; Iaccarino, G.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The computed DNS statistics indicate that a gradient-transport scheme can be applied to the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. → The streamwise scalar flux is characterized by a counter-gradient transport mechanism in the wake region close to the obstacle. → The wake profiles of scalar fluctuations and the shape of probability density functions do not suggest a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. → The evaluation of scalar dispersion models must include a careful assessment of the computed mean velocity field and Reynolds stress tensor. → Algebraic models provide an improved prediction of the mean concentration field as compared to the standard eddy-diffusivity model. -- Abstract: The dispersion of a passive scalar downstream of a wall-mounted cube is examined using direct numerical simulations and turbulence models applied to the Reynolds equations. The scalar is released from a circular source located on top of the obstacle, which is immersed in a developing boundary-layer flow. Direct simulations are performed to give insight into the mixing process and to provide a reference database for turbulence closures. Algebraic flux models are evaluated against the standard eddy-diffusivity representation. Coherent structures periodically released from the cube top are responsible for a counter-diffusion mechanism appearing in the streamwise scalar flux. Alternating vortex pairs form from the lateral edges of the cube, but the intensity profiles and probability density functions of scalar fluctuations suggest that they do not cause a significant flapping movement of the scalar plume. The gradient-transport scheme is consistent with the vertical and spanwise scalar flux components. From the comparative study with our direct simulations, we further stress that Reynolds stress predictions must be carefully evaluated along with scalar flux closures in order to establish the reliability of Reynolds

  20. Experimental Study of Dispersion and Deposition of Expiratory Aerosols in Aircraft Cabins and Impact on Infectious Disease Transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    To, G.N.S.; Wan, M.P.; Chao, C.Y.H.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion and deposition characteristics of polydispersed expiratory aerosols were investigated in an aircraft cabin mockup to study the transmission of infectious diseases. The airflow was characterized by particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Aerosol dispersionwas measured...

  1. Inverse link between density and dispersal distance in butterflies: field evidence from six co-occurring species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvička, Martin; Zimmermann, Kamil; Klímová, M.; Hůla, V.; Fric, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 1 (2012), s. 91-101 ISSN 1438-3896 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR GAP505/10/2167 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : animal movement * dispersal * landscape occupancy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2012 http://www.springerlink.com/content/b1156640p50pw285/fulltext.pdf

  2. Mixing and axial dispersion in Taylor-Couette flow: experimental and numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemri, M.

    2013-01-01

    Taylor-Couette flows between two concentric cylinders have great potential applications in chemical engineering. They are particularly convenient for two-phase small scale devices enabling solvent extraction operations. An experimental device was designed with this idea in mind. It consists of two concentric cylinders with the inner one rotating and the outer one fixed. Taylor-Couette flows take place in the annular gap between them, and are known to evolve towards turbulence through a sequence of successive instabilities. Macroscopic quantities, such as axial dispersion and mixing index, are extremely sensitive to these flow structures, which may lead to flawed modelling of the coupling between hydrodynamics and mass transfer. This particular point has been studied both experimentally and numerically. The flow and mixing have been characterized by means of flow visualization and simultaneous PIV (Particle Imaging Velocimetry) and PLIF (Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence) measurements. PLIF visualizations showed clear evidences of different transport mechanisms including 'intra-vortex mixing' and 'inter-vortex mixing'. Under WVF and MWVF regimes, intra-vortex mixing is controlled by chaotic advection, due to the 3D nature of the flow, while inter-vortex transport occurs due to the presence of waves between neighboring vortices. The combination of these two mechanisms results in enhanced axial dispersion. We showed that hysteresis may occur between consecutive regimes depending on flow history and this may have a significant effect on mixing for a given Reynolds number. The axial dispersion coefficient Dx evolution along the successive flow states was investigated thanks to dye Residence Time Distribution measurements (RTD) and particle tracking (DNS). Both experimental and numerical results have confirmed the significant effect of the flow structure and history on axial dispersion. Our study confirmed that the commonly used 1-parameter chemical engineering models (e

  3. Noise study of all-normal dispersion supercontinuum sources for potential application in optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, I. B.; Engelsholm, R. D.; Bang, O.

    2018-03-01

    Commercially available silica-fiber-based and ultra-broadband supercontinuum (SC) sources are typically generated by pumping close to the zero-dispersion wavelength (ZDW) of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF), using high-power picosecond or nanosecond laser pulses. Despite the extremely broad bandwidths, such sources are characterized by large intensity fluctuations, limiting their performance for applications in imaging such as optical coherence tomography (OCT). An approach to eliminate the influence of noise sensitive effects is to use a so-called all-normal dispersion (ANDi) fiber, in which the dispersion is normal for all the wavelengths of interest. Pumping these types of fibers with short enough femtosecond pulses allows to suppress stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), which is known to be as noisy process as modulation instability (MI), and coherent SC is generated through self-phase modulation (SPM) and optical wave breaking (OWB). In this study, we show the importance of the pump laser and fiber parameters in the design of low-noise ANDi based SC sources, for application in OCT. We numerically investigate the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the SC, calculating the relative intensity noise (RIN) as a function of the pump pulse duration and fiber length. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate the role of the fiber length on the RIN of the ANDi SC, validating the results calculated numerically. In the end, we compare the RIN of a commercial SC source based on MI and the ANDi SC source developed here, which shows better noise performance when it is carefully designed.

  4. Case study of the atmospheric dispersion of emissions from UPPR/CDTN, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Alberto A.; Cesar, Raisa H.S.; Maleta, Paulo G.M.; Grossi, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a study of the atmospheric dispersion of emissions released during activities of production and research of radiopharmaceuticals in the Center of Nuclear Technology Development (CDTN), localized in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais - Brazil. The installation, 'Unidade de Producao e Pesquisa de Radiofarmacos' (UPPR), was considered operating full time during a year. The general goal was to evaluate the radiological environmental impact due to these atmospheric emissions. The pollutants studied were the radionuclides F-18, C-11 and N-13. The meteorological view evaluated was a period of 365 days, simulated from the dates of a typical meteorological year. It was applied the dispersion model ARTM (Atmospheric Radionuclide Transport Model). The atmospheric emissions from UPPR were estimated for the simulation based in an extremely conservative operation condition. Others important data raised and analyzed were: topography, obstacles (buildings) and the land occupation around the CDTN. Among the main results, it is important to emphasize the estimate of the radionuclide concentration and the dose value calculated from these concentration. These results were compared with the dose restriction limit set by the standard CNEN 3.01. Areas of higher concentration were identified and are being used as reference for the positioning of the concentration's monitor of the pollutant by the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (PMA). (author)

  5. Preliminary Study on Dispersion of α-Mangostin in PNIPAM Micro gel System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madihah Ahmad; Bohari Mohd Yamin; Azwan Mat Lazim

    2012-01-01

    α-mangostin is a natural product containing xanthone core structure isolated from mangosteen rind. It is known to possess many biological properties including antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Some food products such as XanGo Mangosteen Juice, Vemma Mangosteen Juice Nutrition Supplement and Nanoxan Gold containing α-mangostin are readily available in the market. Spectroscopic study showed that α-mangostin exhibits a maximum fluorescence peak at approximately 500 nm which can be utilized for internal irradiation and photo imaging purposes. It may also have an effect on a formulated products containing α-mangostin. However, the emission peak for α-mangostin was not observed in the PNIPAM micro gel solution. In the present study, α--mangostin was added into PNIPAM micro gel solution. The dispersion of α-mangostin was studied by using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). (author)

  6. Kinetic modeling and half life study on bioremediation of crude oil dispersed by Corexit 9500

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahed, Mohammad Ali; Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Mohajeri, Leila; Mohajeri, Soraya; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbon pollution in marine ecosystems occurs mainly by accidental oil spills, deliberate discharge of ballast waters from oil tankers and bilge waste discharges; causing site pollution and serious adverse effects on aquatic environments as well as human health. A large number of petroleum hydrocarbons are biodegradable, thus bioremediation has become an important method for the restoration of oil polluted areas. In this research, a series of natural attenuation, crude oil (CO) and dispersed crude oil (DCO) bioremediation experiments of artificially crude oil contaminated seawater was carried out. Bacterial consortiums were identified as Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Vibrio. First order kinetics described the biodegradation of crude oil. Under abiotic conditions, oil removal was 19.9% while a maximum of 31.8% total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) removal was obtained in natural attenuation experiment. All DCO bioreactors demonstrated higher and faster removal than CO bioreactors. Half life times were 28, 32, 38 and 58 days for DCO and 31, 40, 50 and 75 days for CO with oil concentrations of 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/L, respectively. The effectiveness of Corexit 9500 dispersant was monitored in the 45 day study; the results indicated that it improved the crude oil biodegradation rate.

  7. An experimental study of dielectric dispersion in porous media and its dependence on pore geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haslund, E.

    1996-12-31

    Understanding water saturated composite media are important in the study of oil reservoirs. This doctoral thesis discusses measurements of the frequency dependent permittivity and conductivity of water saturated porous glass specimens. The experiments are designed to investigate the dispersion resulting from the geometrical properties of the pore space. Measurements are presented of the effective complex dielectric constant of water saturated porous glass specimens for frequencies below 13 MHz. The specimens are made from sintered glass spheres, and in some specimens thin plates are mixed in with the spheres. Low-conductivity water is used to saturate the pore space in order to scale the frequency range of the Maxwell-Wagner dispersion into the measurement range. The experiments are compared with two different effective medium approaches. One approach is the Mendelson and Cohen theory with randomly oriented spheroidal grains in addition to spherical grains, the other the Local porosity theory due to Hilfer. Both theories were found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations. 175 refs., 59 figs., 1 table

  8. Contribution to the study of second phases particles dispersion in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, V.

    1994-06-01

    To reduce fission gas release of irradiated polycrystalline uranium dioxide, the dispersion of intragranular nanometric particles of second phase necessary to pin gas bubbles may complete the advantage of a large-grained fuel microstructure. Moreover, intergranular glass films may improve high temperatures mechanical properties of UO 2 . In this study, mixtures of additives composed of ''corindon'' structure oxides that enhance the fuel grain growth and composed of different oxides with variable solid solubilities in the UO 2 matrix were achieved. Additives with a negligible solubility inhibit grain boundaries motion except those, such as silica, that involve a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. Rare earth oxides that form stable solid solutions with UO 2 cannot lead to precipitation, but have no effect on the fuel grain growth doped with ''corindon'' type oxides. A chromium oxide excess allows the creation of a fuel microstructure described by large grains and intragranular spherical Cr 2 O 3 inclusions observed by scanning electron microscopy. Values for the bulk lattice diffusion coefficient of Cr 3+ cations in UO 2 can be deduced from the experimental growth of those dispersed particles by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of small precipitated metal particles inside the uranium dioxide matrix induced by the internal reduction of a solid solution has not been performed. However, direct reduction of insoluble chromium oxide particles is easy and produces metallic intragranular precipitates. (author). 119 refs., 112 figs., 33 tabs., 5 annexes

  9. Accounting for Field-Scale Dry Deposition in Backward Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Modelling of NH3 Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Häni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A controlled ammonia (NH3 release experiment was performed at a grassland site. The aim was to quantify the effect of dry deposition between the source and the receptors (NH3 measurement locations on emission rate estimates by means of inverse dispersion modelling. NH3 was released for three hours at a constant rate of Q = 6.29 mg s−1 from a grid of 36 orifices spread over an area of 250 m2. The increase in line-integrated NH3 concentration was measured with open-path optical miniDOAS devices at different locations downwind of the artificial source. Using a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS dispersion model (bLSmodelR, the fraction of the modelled release rate to the emitted NH3 ( Q bLS / Q was calculated from the measurements of the individual instruments. Q bLS / Q was found to be systematically lower than 1, on average between 0.69 and 0.91, depending on the location of the receptor. We hypothesized that NH3 dry deposition to grass and soil surfaces was the main factor responsible for the observed depletion of NH3 between source and receptor. A dry deposition algorithm based on a deposition velocity approach was included in the bLS modelling. Model deposition velocities were evaluated from a ‘big-leaf’ canopy resistance analogy. Canopy resistances (generally termed R c that provided Q bLS / Q = 1 ranged from 75 to 290 s m−1, showing that surface removal of NH3 by dry deposition can plausibly explain the original underestimation of Q bLS / Q . The inclusion of a dry deposition process in dispersion modelling is crucial for emission estimates, which are based on concentration measurements of depositing tracers downwind of homogeneous area sources or heterogeneously-distributed hot spots, such as, e.g., urine patches on pastures in the case of NH3.

  10. Nanoparticle dispersion in environmentally relevant culture media: a TiO2 case study and considerations for a general approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, Allison M.; Ji, Zhaoxia; Holden, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle exposure in toxicity studies requires that nanoparticles are bioavailable by remaining highly dispersed in culture media. However, reported dispersion approaches are variable, mostly study-specific, and not transferable owing to their empirical basis. Furthermore, many published approaches employ proteinaceous dispersants in rich laboratory media, both of which represent end members in environmental scenarios. Here, a systematic approach was developed to disperse initially agglomerated TiO 2 nanoparticles (Aeroxide® TiO 2 P25, Evonik, NJ; primary particle size range 6.4–73.8 nm) in oligotrophic culture medium for environmentally relevant bacterial toxicity studies. Based on understanding particle–particle interactions in aqueous media and maintaining environmental relevance, the approach involves (1) quantifying the relationship between pH and zeta potential to determine the point of zero charge of select nanoparticles in water; (2) nominating, then testing and selecting, environmentally relevant stabilizing agents; and (3) dispersing via “condition and capture” whereby stock dry powder nanoparticles are sonicated in pre-conditioned (with base, or acid, plus stabilizing agent) water, then diluted into culture media. The “condition and capture” principle is transferable to other nanoparticle and media chemistries: simultaneously, mechanically and electrostatically, nanoparticles can be dispersed with surrounding stabilizers that coat and sterically hinder reagglomeration in the culture medium.

  11. Radioisotope studies on the paradox in dispersion and agglomeration of sewage greases discharged from ocean outfalls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, A.; Easy, J.F.; Seatonberry, B.W.

    1981-04-01

    Experiments have been undertaken in the ocean off Sydney, Australia to monitor the movement and the dispersion of sewage solids. These solids were labelled with a radioisotope, gold-198 prior to ocean discharge. The labelled material was followed at sea using submersible scintillation detectors. Lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients were determined. The experiments showed that under some conditions the labelled sewage grease dispersed and under others the grease agglomerated. This variation is explained in terms of non-conservative processes

  12. Wind tunnel experimental study on effect of inland nuclear power plant cooling tower on air flow and dispersion of pollutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Qingdang; Yao Rentai; Guo Zhanjie; Wang Ruiying; Fan Dan; Guo Dongping; Hou Xiaofei; Wen Yunchao

    2011-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment for the effect of the cooling tower at Taohuajiang nuclear power plant on air flow and dispersion of pollutant was introduced in paper. Measurements of air mean flow and turbulence structure in different directions of cooling tower and other buildings were made by using an X-array hot wire probe. The effects of the cooling tower and its drift on dispersion of pollutant from the stack were investigated through tracer experiments. The results show that the effect of cooling tower on flow and dispersion obviously depends on the relative position of stack to cooling towers, especially significant for the cooling tower parallel to stack along wind direction. The variation law of normalized maximum velocity deficit and perturbations in longitudinal turbulent intensity in cooling tower wake was highly in accordance with the result of isolated mountain measured by Arya and Gadiyaram. Dispersion of pollutant in near field is significantly enhanced and plume trajectory is changed due to the cooling towers and its drift. Meanwhile, the effect of cooling tower on dispersion of pollutant depends on the height of release. (authors)

  13. Mean field for the p + 90Zr system in the energy range -60 MeV 90Zr from a dispersive optical-model analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovsky, E.A.; Bespalova, O.V.; Goncharov, S.A.; Pleshkov, D.V.; Spasskaya, T.I.

    2000-01-01

    Data on the scattering of protons with energies 5 MeV 90 Zr nuclei and data on the energies of proton particle and hole levels in the A + 1 and A - 1 systems with A = 90 are analyzed within the dispersive optical model. The parameters of the mean proton field for 90 Zr are determined in the energy range -60 MeV 3 He), ( 3 He, d), (n, d), and (d, n) reactions for levels near the Fermi surface and in (e, e'p) and (p, 2p) reactions for deep levels

  14. Influence of Basalt Mesh Induced Increase of Heterogeneity of Cement Composites with Dispersed Fibers on Its Resistance under Near-Field Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zíma, J.; Foglar, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper describes the influence of multiple basalt meshes in the cement composite specimens on the damage induced by near-field blast. Experimental measurements performed in the Boletice military area in 2014 and 2015 are evaluated by numerical simulations. The evaluation of the results is mainly focused on the stress propagation in the cement composite with dispersed fibers, the propagation of the overpressure caused by the blast and velocity of the ejected parts from the specimen. The influence of the presence and position of the basalt meshes in the specimen on its damage induced by delamination is also examined.

  15. Nonperturbative studies of quantum field theories on noncommutative spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkholz, J.

    2007-11-16

    This work deals with three quantum field theories on spaces with noncommuting position operators. Noncommutative models occur in the study of string theories and quantum gravity. They usually elude treatment beyond the perturbative level. Due to the technique of dimensional reduction, however, we are able to investigate these theories nonperturbatively. This entails translating the action functionals into a matrix language, which is suitable for numerical simulations. First we explore the {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} model on a noncommutative plane. We investigate the continuum limit at fixed noncommutativity, which is known as the double scaling limit. Here we focus especially on the fate of the striped phase, a phase peculiar to the noncommutative version of the regularized {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} model. We find no evidence for its existence in the double scaling limit. Next we examine the U(1) gauge theory on a four-dimensional spacetime, where two spatial directions are noncommutative. We examine the phase structure and find a new phase with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. In addition we demonstrate the existence of a finite double scaling limit which confirms the renormalizability of the theory. Furthermore we investigate the dispersion relation of the photon. In the weak coupling phase our results are consistent with an infrared instability predicted by perturbation theory. If the translational symmetry is broken, however, we find a dispersion relation corresponding to a massless particle. Finally, we investigate a supersymmetric theory on the fuzzy sphere, which features scalar neutral bosons and Majorana fermions. The supersymmetry is exact in the limit of infinitely large matrices. We investigate the phase structure of the model and find three distinct phases. Summarizing, we study noncommutative field theories beyond perturbation theory. Moreover, we simulate a supersymmetric theory on the fuzzy sphere, which might provide an alternative to attempted

  16. Nonperturbative studies of quantum field theories on noncommutative spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkholz, J.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with three quantum field theories on spaces with noncommuting position operators. Noncommutative models occur in the study of string theories and quantum gravity. They usually elude treatment beyond the perturbative level. Due to the technique of dimensional reduction, however, we are able to investigate these theories nonperturbatively. This entails translating the action functionals into a matrix language, which is suitable for numerical simulations. First we explore the λφ 4 model on a noncommutative plane. We investigate the continuum limit at fixed noncommutativity, which is known as the double scaling limit. Here we focus especially on the fate of the striped phase, a phase peculiar to the noncommutative version of the regularized λφ 4 model. We find no evidence for its existence in the double scaling limit. Next we examine the U(1) gauge theory on a four-dimensional spacetime, where two spatial directions are noncommutative. We examine the phase structure and find a new phase with a spontaneously broken translation symmetry. In addition we demonstrate the existence of a finite double scaling limit which confirms the renormalizability of the theory. Furthermore we investigate the dispersion relation of the photon. In the weak coupling phase our results are consistent with an infrared instability predicted by perturbation theory. If the translational symmetry is broken, however, we find a dispersion relation corresponding to a massless particle. Finally, we investigate a supersymmetric theory on the fuzzy sphere, which features scalar neutral bosons and Majorana fermions. The supersymmetry is exact in the limit of infinitely large matrices. We investigate the phase structure of the model and find three distinct phases. Summarizing, we study noncommutative field theories beyond perturbation theory. Moreover, we simulate a supersymmetric theory on the fuzzy sphere, which might provide an alternative to attempted lattice formulations. (orig.)

  17. Diffraction properties study of reflection volume holographic grating in dispersive photorefractive material under ultra-short pulse readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Yingyan; Liu Deming; Liu Hairong, E-mail: yiyingyan0410@163.com [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the modified Kogelnik diffraction efficiency equation, we study the diffraction intensity spectrum and the total diffraction efficiency of reflection volume holographic gratings in photorefractive media. Taking photorefractive LiNbO{sub 3} crystal as an example, the effect of the grating parameters and the pulse width on the diffraction properties is presented under the influence of crystal material dispersion. Under the combined effects, the diffraction pulse profiles and the total diffraction efficiency are compared with and without crystal material dispersion. The results show that the dispersion will decrease the diffraction intensity. Moreover, when pulse width is smaller or the grating spacing and the grating thickness are larger, the influence of dispersion on diffraction is large. The results of our paper can be used in pulse shaping applications.

  18. Effective parameters and neutrography dispersion in the RP-10 reactor: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Alcides; Ticona, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a breakthrough in the study of the most important effective parameters, alternative to the standards, of the neutrography acquisition system, considering an irradiation point source and an effective register distance, as well as the dispersive effect that some kind of materials can produce when free neutrons impact them. It was observed that they do not only depend on the shape and distance from the object to the photographic screen or the neutron beam divergence, but also on the constitution of these materials. Hydrogenated materials as well as micro and nano structured solids are capable to produce significant neutron scattering. The study is developed through the analysis of images obtained by neutrography using the neutron beam of the RP-10 nuclear reactor. False color applications to the intensity of the neutron flux which gives a color contrast and simulation of 3D images intensities have helped to interpret the obtained information. (authors).

  19. Uranium and base metal dispersion studies in the Maquire Lake area, Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopuck, V.J.; Lehto, D.A.W.; Alley, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this study was to study uranium and base metal dispersion in various sample media occurring in the Maguire Lake area of Saskatchewan: bedrock, overburden, lake water, and lake sediments. Factors controlling partitioning of metals among various sample media were investigated, and lake sediment data were interpreted in terms of the factors to determine the significance of lake sediment data in indicating local mineralization. The association between organic matter contents and metal contents was found to vary between lake-center and nearshore sediments. Nickel, cobalt and zinc in lake sediments are strongly controlled by hydroxide precipitation and are less dependent on bedrock type. The concentration of Fe in center-lake sediments appears to reflect only the physicochemical parameters in the lake. Uranium and copper are strongly controlled by and preferentially concentrated in the organic matter; however, in center-lake sediments with >12 percent organic matter, U and Cu strongly reflect rock type

  20. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Akira; Hayasaka, Ryo; Majima, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction

  1. Use of analytical Born amplitude representation in studies of dispersion potentials and electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, I.L. de.

    1985-01-01

    Two distinct problems have been studied using simplifield Born's Amplitude Analitical Expressions. The first problem deals with the dispersion energy between the constituent members of the systems He - Ne, - He and H 2 - H 2 . In the second problem second order Born Aproximation has been used for the Electron - Atom Inelastic Scattering for the transitions 1 1 S → 2 1 S and 1 1 S → 2 1 P of helium atom and 1 S → 1 s 2 ([3s' {1/2} sup(o) 1; M sub(j)>) of neon atom (in the case of neon we have used the coupling scheme proposed by Cowan and Andrew). The results obtained by us have been compared with the theoretical and experimental results available in the literature. (author) [pt

  2. Observational study of the relationship between entrainment rate and relative dispersion in deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Guang Jun; Luo, Shi

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of entrainment rate (λ) on relative dispersion (ε) of cloud droplet size distributions (CDSD) in the 99 growing precipitating deep convective clouds during TOGA-COARE. The results show that entrainment suppresses ε, which is opposite to the traditional understanding that entrainment-mixing broadens CDSD. To examine how the relationship between ε and λ is affected by droplets with different sizes, CDSDs are divided into three portions with droplet radius processes is developed to illustrate the possible scenarios entailing different relationships between ε and λ. The number concentration of small droplets and the degree of evaporation of small droplets are found to be key factors that shift the sign (i.e., positive or negative) of the ε-λ relationship.

  3. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  4. Effect of a Dispersant Agent in Fine Coal Recovery from Washery Tailings by Oil Agglomeration (Preliminary Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Özüm; Uslu, Tuncay

    2017-12-01

    Among the fine coal cleaning methods, the oil agglomeration process has important advantages such as high process recovery, more clean product, simple dewatering stage. Several coal agglomeration studies have been undertaken recently and effects of different variables on the process performance have been investigated. However, unlike flotation studies, most of the previous agglomeration studies have not used dispersing agents to minimize slime coating effects of clays. In this study, agglomeration process was applied for recovery of fine coals from coal washery tailings containing remarkable amount of fine coal. Negative effect of fine clays during recovery was tried to be eliminated by using dispersing agent instead of de-sliming. Although ash reductions over 90 % were achieved, performance remained below expectations in terms of combustible matter recovery. However, this study is a preliminary one. It is considered that more satisfied results will be obtained in the next studies by changing the variables such as solid ratio, oil dosage, dispersant type and dosage.

  5. Experimental study and modelling of the high temperature mechanical behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckmeyer, A.

    2012-01-01

    The strength of metals, and therefore their maximum operating temperature, can be improved by oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS). Numerous research studies are carried out at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in order to develop a cladding tube material for Gen IV nuclear power reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened steels appear to be the most promising candidates for such application, which demands a minimum operating temperature of 650 C. The present dissertation intends to improve the understanding of the mechanical properties of ODS steels, in terms of creep lifetime and mechanical anisotropy. The methodology of this work includes mechanical tests between room temperature and 900 C as well as macroscopic and polycrystalline modelling. These tests are carried out on a Fe-14Cr1W0,26Ti + 0,3 Y 2 O 3 ODS ferritic steel processed at CEA by mechanical alloying and hot extrusion. The as-received material is a bar with a circular section. The mechanical tests reveal the high mechanical strength of this steel at high temperature. A strong influence of the strain rate on the ductility and the mechanical strength is also observed. A macroscopic mechanical model has been developed on the basis of some experimental statements such as the high kinematic contribution to the flow stress. This model has a strong ability to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of the studied material. Two different polycrystalline models have also been developed in order to reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of the material. They are based on its specific grain morphology and crystallographic texture. The discrepancy between the predictions of both models and experimental results reveal the necessity to formulate alternate assumptions on the deformation mechanisms of ODS ferritic steels. (author) [fr

  6. Ophthalmic effects of petroleum dispersant exposure on common murres (Uria aalge): An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorello, Christine V; Freeman, Kate; Elias, Becky A; Whitmer, Emily; Ziccardi, Michael H

    2016-12-15

    The safety of chemical dispersants used during oil spill responses is largely unknown in birds. We captured common murres in Monterey Bay, CA and exposed them to Corexit EC9500a, crude oil, or a combination in artificial seawater. We performed ophthalmic examinations and measured intraocular pressures and tear production before and after exposure. Loglinear analysis found that exposure to oil or dispersant was related to the development of conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. Odds ratios for birds exposed to oil or dispersant were positive and significant for the development of conjunctivitis, while odds ratios for the development of corneal ulcers were positive and significant only for birds exposed to a high concentration of oil. Ocular exposure to dispersants and petroleum in seabirds may cause conjunctivitis and may play a role in the development of corneal ulcers. These results have implications for policymakers who develop protocols for the use of dispersants during marine oil spills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical Study of Electric Field Enhanced Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-12-26

    Electric fields can be used to change and control flame properties, for example changing flame speed, enhancing flame stability, or reducing pollutant emission. The ions generated in flames are believed to play the primary role. Although experiments have been carried out to study electric field enhanced combustion, they are not sufficient to explain how the ions in a flame are affected by an electric field. It is therefore necessary to investigate the problem through numerical simulations. In the present work, the electric structure of stabilized CH4/air premixed flames at atmospheric pressure within a direct current field is studied using numerical simulations. This study consists of three parts. First, the transport equations are derived from the Boltzmann kinetic equation for each individual species. Second, a general method for computing the diffusivity and mobility of ions in a gas mixture is introduced. Third, the mechanisms for neutral and charged species are improved to give better predictions of the concentrations of charged species, based on experimental data. Following from this, comprehensive numerical results are presented, including the concentrations and fluxes of charged species, the distributions of the electric field and electric potential, and the electric current-voltage relation. Two new concepts introduced with the numerical results are the plasma sheath and dead zone in the premixed flame. A reactive plasma sheath and a Boltzmann relation sheath are discovered in the region near the electrodes. The plasma sheath penetrates into the flame gas when a voltage is applied, and penetrating further if the voltage is higher. The zone outside the region of sheath penetration is defined as the dead zone. With the two concepts, analytical solutions for the electric field, electric potential and current-voltage curve are derived. The solutions directly describe the electric structure of a premixed flame subject to a DC field. These analytical solutions

  8. Renormalization group study of scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, A.; Hasenfratz, P.

    1986-01-01

    An approximate RG equation is derived and studied in scalar quantum field theories in d dimensions. The approximation allows for an infinite number of different couplings in the potential, but excludes interactions containing derivatives. The resulting non-linear partial differential equation can be studied by simple means. Both the gaussian and the non-gaussian fixed points are described qualitatively correctly by the equation. The RG flows in d=4 and the problem of defining an ''effective'' field theory are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  9. Cadernos Pagu: Consolidating a Field of Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Beleli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available As scientific publications are influential indicators and constitute disciplinary fields, this article reflects on the importance of Cadernos Pagu, published twice a year by Unicamp’s Núcleo de Estudos de Gênero [Gender Studies Center], as it has contributed to the consolidation of that field of studies both through de stimulation and diffusion of knowledge in the area in Brazil. Here gender is no conceived of as a theme, but rather as a categorical distinction, as a distinction between characteristics taken as feminine and masculine, that run through society and, as such, can be felt within any thematic frame.

  10. Melt dispersion granules: formulation and evaluation to improve oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs - a case study with valsartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chella, Naveen; Tadikonda, Ramarao

    2015-06-01

    Solid dispersion (SD) technique is a promising strategy to improve the solubility and dissolution of BCS class II drugs. However, only few products are marketed till today based on SD technology due to poor flow properties and stability. The present work was intended to solve these problems by using combination approach, melt dispersion and surface adsorption technologies. The main aim of the present work is to improve the absorption in the stomach (at lower pH) where the absorption window exists for the drug by improving the dissolution, resulting in the enhancement of oral bioavailability of poorly soluble, weakly acidic drug with pH dependant solubility, i.e. valsartan. Melt dispersion granules were prepared in different ratios using different carriers (Gelucire 50/13, PEG 8000 and Pluronic F-68) and lactose as an adsorbent. Similarly, physical mixtures were also prepared at corresponding ratios. The prepared dispersion granules and physical mixtures were characterized by FTIR, DSC and in vitro dissolution studies. DSC studies revealed reduction in the crystallinity with a possibility of presence of amorphous character of drug in the dispersion granules. From dissolution studies, valsartan Gelucire dispersion (GSD4; 1:4 ratio) showed complete drug release in 30 min against the plain drug which showed only 11.31% of drug release in 30 min. Pharmacokinetic studies of optimized formulation in male Wistar rats showed 2.65-fold higher bioavailability and 1.47-fold higher Cmax compared to pure drug. The melt dispersion technology has the potential to improve dissolution and the bioavailability of BCS class II drugs.

  11. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  12. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil physical properties and dispersion. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.P.; Brown, C.E.; Pjontek, D.

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory and field testing have shown that the dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). This study focused on new laboratory experiments that measured the effects on the physical properties and dispersion of oil, with particular reference to the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the subsequent effects on oil droplet formation. Experiments were conducted at 15 degrees C using Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crude and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 chemical dispersants. The dispersants were denser than the 3 oils. The effect of IFT reduction on oil dispersion was measured and showed substantial reduction in the size and enhancement of the concentration of oil droplets in the water column. It was shown that the brine-oil IFT associated with the 3 crudes reduced to less than 3.6 mN/m with the application of the chemical dispersants, even at a low dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) value of 1:200. The use of chemical dispersants increased the viscosity of the dispersant-oil mixture up to 40 per cent over the neat crude oil. It was shown that for each mixing condition, an optimum value of DOR exists that provides for maximal dispersant effectiveness. The IFT reaches maximum reduction at optimum DOR. It was suggested that oil spill modelling can be improved with further study of IFT reduction with DOR and variations of critical micelle concentration with the type and solubility of chemical dispersant, oil type and oil to water ratio. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  13. Radiobiology at GANIL: local project and others fields studied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the research that is led in the field of radiobiology using heavy ions at Ganil. Our first studies with heavy ions were mainly focused on chromosome rearrangements induced in irradiated human cells. We analyzed R-banded chromosome rearrangements in human lymphocytes irradiated with several ions having a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET). Damage increased with the fluence and LET but at the higher LET, damage decreased for fluences above 10 7 particles/cm 2 . Chromosome rearrangements of high complexity involve several breaks. DNA strand breaks are concentrated in localized areas and their complexity is greatly increased by high-LET radiations. Our study was mainly qualitative and we showed a clear shift and dispersion of comet distribution towards high tail moments when particle LET and fluence increased. The higher the LET, the greater the level of DNA breaks observed for the same fluence. Gamma rays were more effective in producing DNA breaks than all the ions, at least in the lower dose range. In addition to early damage, high-LET irradiation also induces delayed lesions, and genomic instability occurs after many generations in the progeny of irradiated cells. We observed delayed chromosome instability on human dermis fibroblasts exposed to heavy ions, neon, argon, and lead but not after gamma rays. Various fields of radiobiology are now explored by different research groups. One of the studies aims to detect locally multiple damage sites (LMDS) formed in DNA after exposure to heavy ions. (A.C.)

  14. Study of the dispersion of radionuclides in the Ilha Grande Bay - RJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Franciane Martins de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    The present work aimed the study of the dispersion profiles of radionuclides released in liquid radioactive effluents from the Central Nuclear Almirante Alvaro Alberto (CNAAA), in the Ilha Grande Bay, located in Angra dos Reis, RJ. Taking the overall activity released by liquid effluents discharge from the CNAAA in the Piraquara de Fora Bay as a reference parameter to the dilution rates scanning, the accordance level between the achieved 3 H results (1 :16) and those reported by Franklin (1 :20) can be seen as relevant. The post-1965 137 Cs concentration raise can be regarded as a consequence of the operational start up in the CNAAA, being the Ribeira Bay considered its preferential uptake, from the plume displacement high tide, as well as its retention, due to local deposition favourable trends. The evaluation of the prevailing mechanism on long half-life radio isotopes dispersion pointed out its dependence on meteorological condition parameters, during the sampling procedures. If diffusion prevailingness occurs, both 223 Ra and 224 Ra distribution pathways result in diffusion coefficients ranging from 20,12 ± 3,81 - 21,07 ± 3,91 km 2 .d -1 to a 228 Ra offshore flux and time of residence of, respectively, 3,18 ± 1,01 x 108 Bq.d-1 and 25,35 ± 0,45 days. On the other hand, an uppermost advection process provided 228 Ra offshore flux and time of residence of, respectively, 2,26 ± 0,424 x 10 8 Bq.d -1 and 13,08 ± 0,21 days. (author)

  15. Comparative study of curcumin and curcumin formulated in a solid dispersion: Evaluation of their antigenotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Meneghin Mendonça

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCurcumin (CMN is the principal active component derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa (Curcuma longa L.. It is a liposoluble polyphenolic compound that possesses great therapeutic potential. Its clinical application is, however, limited by the low concentrations detected following oral administration. One key strategy for improving the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs is solid dispersion, though it is not known whether this technique might influence the pharmacological effects of CMN. Thus, in this study, we aimed to evaluate the antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects of CMN formulated in a solid dispersion (CMN SD compared to unmodified CMN delivered to Wistar rats. Cisplatin (cDDP was used as the damage-inducing agent in these evaluations. The comet assay results showed that CMN SD was not able to reduce the formation of cDDP-DNA crosslinks, but it decreased the formation of micronuclei induced by cDDP and attenuated cDDP-induced oxidative stress. Furthermore, at a dose of 50 mg/kg b.w. both CMN SD and unmodified CMN increased the expression of Tp53 mRNA. Our results showed that CMN SD did not alter the antigenotoxic effects observed for unmodified CMN and showed effects similar to those of unmodified CMN for all of the parameters evaluated. In conclusion, CMN SD maintained the protective effects of unmodified CMN with the advantage of being chemically water soluble, with maximization of absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, the optimization of the physical and chemical properties of CMN SD may increase the potential for the therapeutic use of curcumin.

  16. A Study on Silicide Coatings as Diffusion barrier for U-7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Ju Jin; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hong; Jeong, Yong Jin; Kim, Ki Nam; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Chong Tak [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gamma phase U-Mo alloys are regarded as one of the promising candidates for advanced research reactor fuel when it comes to the irradiation performance. However, it has been reported that interaction layer formation between the UMo alloys and Al matrix degrades the irradiation performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel. The excessive interaction between the U-Mo alloys and their surrounding Al matrix lead to excessive local swelling called 'pillowing'. For this reason, KAERI suggested several remedies such as alloying U-Mo with Al matrix with Si. In addition, silicide or nitride coatings on the surface of U-Mo particles have also been proposed to hinder the growth of the interaction layer. In this study, centrifugally atomized U-7Mo alloy powders were coated with silicide layers at 900 .deg. C for 1hr. U-Mo alloy powder was mixed with MoSi{sub 2}, Si and ZrSi{sub 2} powders and subsequently heat-treated to form uranium-silicide coating layers on the surface of U-Mo alloy particles. Silicide coated U-Mo powders and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The ZrSi{sub 2} coating layers has a thickness of about 1∼ 2μm. The surface of a silicide coated particle was very rough and silicide powder attached to the surface of the coating layer. 3. The XRD analysis of the coating layers showed that, they consisted of compounds such as U3Si{sub 2}, USi{sub 2}.

  17. Surface structural, morphological, and catalytic studies of homogeneously dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sareen, Shweta [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India); Mutreja, Vishal [Maharishi Markandeshwar University, Department of Chemistry (India); Pal, Bonamali; Singh, Satnam, E-mail: ssingh@thapar.edu [Thapar University, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highly dispersed anisotropic Ag nanostructures were synthesized within the channels of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS)-modified mesoporous SBA-15 for catalyzing the reduction of p-dinitrobenzene, p-nitrophenol, and p-nitroacetophenone, respectively. A green templating process without involving any reducing agent, by varying the amount (1–10 wt.%) of Ag loading followed by calcination at 350 °C under H{sub 2} led to change in the morphology of Ag nanoparticles from nanospheres (~7–8 nm) to nanorods (aspect ratio ~12–30 nm) without any deformation in mesoporous sieves. In comparison to white bare SBA-15, gray-colored samples were formed with Ag impregnation exhibiting absorption bands at 484 and 840 nm indicating the formation of anisotropic Ag nanostructures within mesoporous matrix. TEM and FE-SEM micrographs confirmed the presence of evenly dispersed Ag nanostructures within as well as on the surface of mesoporous matrix. AFM studies indicated a small decrease in the average roughness of SBA-15 from 20.59 to 19.21 nm for 4 wt.% Ag/m-SBA-15, illustrating the encapsulation of majority of Ag nanoparticles in the siliceous matrix and presence of small amount of Ag nanoparticles on the mesoporous support. Moreover, due to plugging of mesopores with Ag, a significant decrease in surface area from 680 m{sup 2}/g of SBA-15 to 385 m{sup 2}/g was observed. The Ag-impregnated SBA-15 catalyst displayed superior catalytic activity than did bare SBA-15 with 4 wt.% Ag-loaded catalyst exhibiting optimum activity for selective reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol (100 %), p-nitroacetophenone to p-aminoacetophenone (100 %), and p-dinitrobenzene to p-nitroaniline (87 %), with a small amount of p-phenylenediamine formation.

  18. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and nuclear dispersion fuels with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farahani, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Because of the possibility of rapid physical and chemical molten fuel-water interactions during a core melt accident in noncommercial or experimental reactors, it is important to understand the interactions that might occur if these materials were to contact water. An existing vertical 1-D shock tube facility was improved and a gas sampling device to measure the gaseous hydrogen in the upper chamber of the shock tube was designed and built to study the impact of a water column driven downward by a pressurized gas onto both molten aluminum (6061 alloy) and oxide and silicide depleted nuclear dispersion fuels in aluminum matrices. The experiments were carried out with melt temperatures initially at 750 to 1,000 C and water at room temperature and driving pressures of 0.5 and 1 MPa. Very high transient pressures, in many cases even larger than the thermodynamic critical pressure of the water (∼ 20 MPa), were generated due to the interactions between the water and the crucible and its contents. The molten aluminum always reacted chemically with the water but the reaction did not increase consistently with increasing melt temperature. An aluminum ignition occurred when water at room temperature impacted 28.48 grams of molten aluminum at 980.3 C causing transient pressures greater than 69 MPa. No signs of aluminum ignition were observed in any of the experiments with the depleted nuclear dispersion fuels, U 3 O 8 -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al. The greater was the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction, the finer was the debris recovered for a given set of initial conditions. Larger coolant velocities (larger driving pressures) resulted in more melt fragmentation but did not result in more molten aluminum-water chemical reaction. Decreasing the water temperature also resulted in more melt fragmentation and did not suppress the molten aluminum-water chemical reaction

  19. Physiochemical Characterization and Release Rate Studies of SolidDispersions of Ketoconazole with Pluronic F127 and PVP K-30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Mohan, Chander; KanamSrinivasan Uma Shankar, Mara; Gulati, Monica

    2011-01-01

    In the present study solid dispersions of the antifungal drug Ketoconazole were prepared with Pluronic F-127 and PVP K-30 with an intention to improve its dissolution properties. Investigations of the properties of the dispersions were performed using release studies, Differential scanning calorimetery (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The results obtained showed that the rate of dissolution of Ketoconazole was considerably improved when formulated in solid dispersions with PVP K-30 and Pluronic F-127 as compared with pure drug and physical mixtures. The results from DSC and XRD studies showed the transition of crystalline nature of drug to amorphous form, while FTIR studies demonstrated the absence of drug-carriers interaction. PMID:24250403

  20. Comparative study of sustained-release lipid microparticles and solid dispersions containing ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Almeida

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ibuprofen is one of the most important non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. In its pure state, ibuprofen presents poor physical and mechanical characteristics and its use in solid dosage forms needs the addition of excipients that improve these properties. The selection of the best excipients and the most suitable pharmaceutical dosage form to carry ibuprofen is very important for the industrial success of this drug. Given these factors, lipid microparticles and solid dispersions of ibuprofen with cetyl alcohol, stearic acid, and hydrogenated castor oil were prepared. These formulations were intended to improve the physical and mechanical characteristics and to sustain the release of this drug. Physical mixtures were also prepared with the same ingredients in similar proportions. The solid dispersions of ibuprofen/stearic acid and ibuprofen/hydrogenated castor oil showed the best flow characteristics compared with pure ibuprofen. Further, gelatin capsules filled with lipid microparticles and solid dispersions were submitted to dissolution tests in order to study the influence of the prepared systems in the release profiles of ibuprofen. Prolonged release of ibuprofen was achieved with the lipid microparticles and solid dispersions prepared with the different types of excipients.O ibuprofeno é um dos antiinflamatórios não esteróides mais utilizados no tratamento de patologias associadas a processos inflamatórios. Este fármaco, quando no seu estado puro, apresenta características físicas e mecânicas pouco satisfatórias e a sua utilização em formas sólidas só é possível se forem adicionados excipientes que permitam melhorar estas propriedades. A seleção dos excipientes ideais e da forma farmacêutica mais adequada para veicular o ibuprofeno é fundamental para o sucesso industrial deste fármaco. Tendo em conta estes fatores, prepararam-se micropartículas lipídicas e dispersões s

  1. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Wang

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ∼140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ∼140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ∼140 MV

  2. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tong [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  3. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  4. Common Group Problems: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Sanford B.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A field study of a naturally functioning group (N=125) was conducted to identify common group problems. Trained observers attended group meetings and described the problems encountered. Difficulties of cohesion, leadership, sub-group formation, and personality conflict were identified. (RC)

  5. Study of detectors in beta radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M. da P.P.; Xavier, M.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1987-01-01

    Several commercial detectors used with gamma or X radiation are studied. Their sensibility and energetic dependence are analysed in exposures of beta radiation fields. A comparative evaluation with the reference detector (the extrapolation chamber) is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. Operational evaluation of the RLINE dispersion model for studies of traffic-related air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milando, Chad W.; Batterman, Stuart A.

    2018-06-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants (TRAP) remains a key public health issue, and improved exposure measures are needed to support health impact and epidemiologic studies and inform regulatory responses. The recently developed Research LINE source model (RLINE), a Gaussian line source dispersion model, has been used in several epidemiologic studies of TRAP exposure, but evaluations of RLINE's performance in such applications have been limited. This study provides an operational evaluation of RLINE in which predictions of NOx, CO and PM2.5 are compared to observations at air quality monitoring stations located near high traffic roads in Detroit, MI. For CO and NOx, model performance was best at sites close to major roads, during downwind conditions, during weekdays, and during certain seasons. For PM2.5, the ability to discern local and particularly the traffic-related portion was limited, a result of high background levels, the sparseness of the monitoring network, and large uncertainties for certain processes (e.g., formation of secondary aerosols) and non-mobile sources (e.g., area, fugitive). Overall, RLINE's performance in near-road environments suggests its usefulness for estimating spatially- and temporally-resolved exposures. The study highlights considerations relevant to health impact and epidemiologic applications, including the importance of selecting appropriate pollutants, using appropriate monitoring approaches, considering prevailing wind directions during study design, and accounting for uncertainty.

  7. Auroral electron time dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kletzing, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket flight was launched from Greenland in 1985 to study high latitude, early morning auroral physics. The payload was instrumented with electron and ion detectors, AC and DC electric field experiments, a plasma density experiment, and a magnetometer to measure the ambient field. The rocket was launched during disturbed conditions, when the polar cap was in a contracted state with visible aurora overhead. The electron data contained numerous signatures indicative of time-of-flight energy dispersion characterized by a coherent structure in which lower energy electrons arrived at the rocket after higher energy electrons. A model was constructed to explain this phenomena by the sudden application of a region of parallel electric field along a length of magnetic field line above the rocket. The model incorporates detector response and uses an altitudinal density profile based on auroral zone measurements. Three types of potential structures were tried: linear, quadratic and cubic. Of the three it was found that the cubic (electric field growing in a quadratic manner moving up the field line) produced the best fit to the data. The potential region was found to be approximately 1-2 R e in extent with the lower edge 3000-4000 km away from the rocket. The background electron temperature in the model which produced the best fit to the data was of the order of 15 eV

  8. Comparison of Geometrical Layouts for a Multi-Box Aerosol Model from a Single-Chamber Dispersion Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C. Ø. Jensen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Models are increasingly used to estimate and pre-emptively calculate the occupational exposure of airborne released particulate matter. Typical two-box models assume instant and fully mixed air volumes, which can potentially cause issues in cases with fast processes, slow air mixing, and/or large volumes. In this study, we present an aerosol dispersion model and validate it by comparing the modelled concentrations with concentrations measured during chamber experiments. We investigated whether a better estimation of concentrations was possible by using different geometrical layouts rather than a typical two-box layout. A one-box, two-box, and two three-box layouts were used. The one box model was found to underestimate the concentrations close to the source, while overestimating the concentrations in the far field. The two-box model layout performed well based on comparisons from the chamber study in systems with a steady source concentration for both slow and fast mixing. The three-box layout was found to better estimate the concentrations and the timing of the peaks for fluctuating concentrations than the one-box or two-box layouts under relatively slow mixing conditions. This finding suggests that industry-relevant scaled volumes should be tested in practice to gain more knowledge about when to use the two-box or the three-box layout schemes for multi-box models.

  9. Denaturation of proteins by surfactants studied by the Taylor dispersion analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldona Jelińska

    Full Text Available We showed that the Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA is a fast and easy to use method for the study of denaturation proteins. We applied TDA to study denaturation of β-lactoglobulin, transferrin, and human insulin by anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS. A series of measurements at constant protein concentration (for transferrin was 1.9 x 10-5 M, for β- lactoglobulin was 7.6 x 10-5 M, and for insulin was 1.2 x 10-4 M and varying SDS concentrations were carried out in the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. The structural changes were analyzed based on the diffusion coefficients of the complexes formed at various surfactant concentrations. The concentration of surfactant was varied in the range from 1.2 x 10-4 M to 8.7 x 10-2 M. We determined the minimum concentration of the surfactant necessary to change the native conformation of the proteins. The minimal concentration of SDS for β-lactoglobulin and transferrin was 4.3 x 10-4 M and for insulin 2.3 x 10-4 M. To evaluate the TDA as a novel method for studying denaturation of proteins we also applied other methods i.e. electronic circular dichroism (ECD and dynamic light scattering (DLS to study the same phenomenon. The results obtained using these methods were in agreement with the results from TDA.

  10. Pollutant dispersion studies - An update on the problems in Indian coastal waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Swamy, G.N.

    Pollutant dispersion problems along the Indian coastal waters are characterisEd. by site-specificity, as a result of seasonal and physiographic variabilities. Presence of large rivers, estuaries and backwaters add to the problems of waste disposal...

  11. A Neutron Study for Phonon Dispersion Relations in HgTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepa, H.; Gebicki, W.; Giebultowicz, T.

    1980-01-01

    Dispersion relations for acoustic phonons in mercury telluride in three high symmetry directions [111], [110] and [001] are presented. The eleven-parameter rigid-ion model is fitted to the experimental data....

  12. Studies of tritium dispersion around and close to the buildings on the JET site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    The dispersion of gases released to the environment at significant distances from the release point can be predicted using propriety computer codes. However during and after the Preliminary Tritium Experiment 1,2 (PTE) at JET in 1991 comparatively high levels of tritium were measured around the buildings and also there was measurable uptake of tritium in the site cooling water. Better assessment of likely tritium concentrations resulting from discharges is required to determine if tritium would tend to concentrate close to the buildings due to the complex air flow patterns around them. Three methods have been considered, namely computational studies, wind tunnel testing and tracer release experiments. A graduated approach has been adopted as each method has its limitations, tracer experiments being particularly expensive. Computational studies indicate that under worst case conditions the maximum ground level concentrations (Bq/m.) per unit stack release rate (Bq/s) is 1.0E-4 but more generally less. The results are presented noting the limitations of this approach. To aid understanding and verify some of the results, wind tunnel tests on a model of the JET site have been undertaken and the results discussed. The need for tracer release studies is considered. 3 refs., 6 figs

  13. QT interval and dispersion in drug-free anorexia nervosa adolescents: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomba, Monica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Corbetta, Fabiola; Nicosia, Franco; Lanfranconi, Francesca; Poggioli, Gianni; Goulene, Karine; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Conti, Elisa; Neri, Francesca; Nacinovich, Renata

    2017-11-16

    Long QT values have been reported in patients with anorexia nervosa of the restricting type (ANr) potentially increasing the risk of fatal arrhythmia, especially if psychotropic drug treatment is required. Nevertheless, the previous studies on this topic are biased by drug exposure, long disease durations, and small sample sizes. This study is aimed at assessing QTc and QTcd values in ANr adolescents with recent onset and drug free, as compared to subjects affected by psychiatric disorders other than ANr. We evaluated QTc and its dispersion (QTcd) in a population of 77 drug-free ANr female adolescents and compared to an equal number of healthy controls (H-CTRL) and pathological controls (P-CTRL, mixed psychiatric disorders). The QT determination was performed on a standard simultaneous 12-lead ECG in blind by a single experienced investigator. QTc was calculated by the Bazett's formula and QTcd was determined as the difference between the maximum and minimum QTc intervals in different leads. Only for ANr patients, clinico-demographic data, hormones, and electrolytes were obtained. QTc was slightly reduced in ANr patients (27.7 ms, studies are needed to understand if the previously reported increase might be related to other associated chronic disorders, such as hormonal or electrolyte imbalance.

  14. Calibration and energy resolution study of a high dispersive power Thomson Parabola Spectrometer with monochromatic proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Rifuggiato, D.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Tramontana, A.; Amato, A.; Caruso, G.F.; Salamone, S.; Maggiore, M.; Velyhan, A.; Margarone, D.; Palumbo, G. Parasiliti; Russo, G.

    2014-01-01

    A high energy resolution, high dispersive power Thomson Parabola Spectrometer has been developed at INFN-LNS in order to characterize laser-driven beams up to 30- 40 MeV for protons. This device has parallel electric and magnetic field to deflect particles of a certain charge-to-mass ratio onto parabolic traces on the detection plane. Calibration of the deflection sector is crucial for data analysis, namely energy determination of analysed beam, and to evaluate the effective energy limit and resolution. This work reports the study of monochromatic proton beams delivered by the TANDEM accelerator at LNS (Catania) in the energy range between 6 and 12.5 MeV analysed with our spectrometer which allows a precise characterization of the electric and magnetic deflections. Also the energy and the Q/A resolutions and the energy limits have been evaluated proposing a mathematical model that can be used for data analysis, for the experimental set up and for the device scalability for higher energy

  15. Nuclear waste treatment - Studying the mixed ion type effects and concentration on the behaviour of oxide dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omokanye, Qanitalillahi; Biggs, Simon

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain good control over a particulate dispersion it is necessary to accurately characterise the strength of inter-particle forces that may be operating. Such control is not routinely used, as yet, in the nuclear industry despite the possible benefits. We are investigating the impact of mixed electrolyte systems, for example NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 , on the stability of oxide simulant particle dispersions. The electro-acoustic zeta potentials and shear yield stresses for concentrated dispersions have been measured across a range of pH conditions and electrolyte concentrations (0.001 M - 1.0 M). This paper summarizes initial data from these studies showing how the shear yield stress of concentrated aqueous oxide particle dispersions, can be adjusted through regulation of pH and the addition of background electrolytes (salt). The yield stress as a function of pH for these dispersions in mixed electrolytes showed a direct correlation with corresponding measurements of the zeta potential. Changes in the background electrolyte concentration or type were seen to cause a shift in the position of the isoelectric point (iep). Measurements of the shear yield stress showed a maximum at the iep corresponding to the position of maximum instability in the suspension. The consequences of these data for the efficient treatment of solid-liquid systems will be discussed. (authors)

  16. Spectroscopic and magnetic studies of highly dispersible superparamagnetic silica coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadyszak, Krzysztof [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Kertmen, Ahmet, E-mail: ahmet.kertmen@pg.gda.pl [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Coy, Emerson [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Andruszkiewicz, Ryszard; Milewski, Sławomir [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Kardava, Irakli; Scheibe, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan [NanoBioMedical Centre, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Chybczyńska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.chybczynska@ifmpan.poznan.pl [Institute of Molecular Physics Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Mariana Smo.luchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Superparamagnetic core-shell nanoparticles of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@Silica were obtained. • Magnetic response was studied by DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. • Nanoparticles show magnetite structure with a well-defined Verwey transition. • Samples show no inter particle magnetic interactions or agglomeration. - Abstract: Superparamagnetic behavior in aqueously well dispersible magnetite core-shell Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles is presented. The magnetic properties of core-shell nanoparticles were measured with use of the DC, AC magnetometry and EPR spectroscopy. Particles where characterized by HR-TEM and Raman spectroscopy, showing a crystalline magnetic core of 11.5 ± 0.12 nm and an amorphous silica shell of 22 ± 1.5 nm in thickness. The DC, AC magnetic measurements confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of nanoparticles, additionally the EPR studies performed at much higher frequency than DC, AC magnetometry (9 GHz) have confirmed the paramagnetic nature of the nanoparticles. Our results show the excellent magnetic behavior of the particles with a clear magnetite structure, which are desirable properties for environmental remediation and biomedical applications.

  17. Experimentally Studied Influence of the Bullet Head Shape on Dispersion Characteristics at Subsonic Airspeeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Ilukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents description and results of experiments on a ballistic track and subsonic wind tunnel. The subject of study is important an issue such as the assessment of the influence of the bullet head shape on the accuracy of shooting parameters at subsonic muzzle velocity. The article points to the features of examined precision of guided and unguided aircraft, refers to the main disturbing factors. In addition, it outlines the most well known ways to improve the flight precision of unguided munitions. The article presents the geometric parameters of bullets and their scale models used in the experiments. It describes the experimental facilities and the studies themselves. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of experimental air-gun firings. Results for different muzzle velocities of flight are compared. The paper notes an ambiguity in comparison of accuracy and head drag coefficient. The results are clearly aligned with the data purging in the little turbulent subsonic wind tunnel. The article describes in detail the use of the method for visualizing a structure of the flow for the delimitation of attached flow and estimation of stagnation zone. A revealed physical picture has comprehensive theoretical underpinning. The conclusions of the work also give a advices on selecting a bullet to have the best dispersion parameters.

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of volatile compounds in biopolymer based dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samavati, Vahid; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mehdinia, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Partitioning and release of ethyl acetate and diacetyl from two matrices with a different composition was studied by applying static head space gas chromatography. Two matrices with a different composition have been developed: one containing carbohydrates (Tragacanth gum) and in the second one, called complex matrix, a lipid (oleic acid) was added. The roles of carbohydrate (Tragacanth gum) and lipid (oleic acid) on the retention of all the aroma compounds were pointed out. Changes in the composition of matrices exhibited a considerable effect on the thermodynamic component as expressed by the air/liquid partition coefficient (Ka/l) values at equilibrium (20 °C). The kinetic study of the release from these matrices had shown a decrease of the initial rate of release (Ri) by reference with water. The rheological properties of all matrices were investigated and the flow behaviour of all matrices was successfully modelled with power law and Ellis models and power law model was found as the better model to describe the flow behaviour of dispersions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrodynamic disperser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Chernov, V.S.; Prokopov, L.I.; Proselkov, Yu.M.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1980-01-15

    A hydrodynamic disperser is suggested which contains a housing, slit nozzles installed on a circular base arranged opposite from each other, resonators secured opposite the nozzle and outlet sleeve. In order to improve the effectiveness of dispersion by throttling the flow, each resonator is made in the form of a crimped plate with crimpings that decrease in height in a direction towards the nozzle.

  20. Test of the rem-counter WENDI-II from Eberline in different energy-dispersed neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutermuth, F.; Radon, T.; Fehrenbacher, G.; Siekmann, R.

    2004-03-01

    The neutron rem-counter WENDI-II from Eberline was tested in high-energy particle accelerator produced neutron fields. A radioactive 241 Am-Be(αn) source was used as a reference. The experimentally determined responses are compared to Monte-Carlo simulations of the response function done by R. H. Olsher et al. (2000). The energy spectra of the accelerator produced neutron fields were determined employing Monte-Carlo simulations, too. According to the simulations done by C. Birattari et al. (1998) and in this work these neutron fields exhibit large contributions to the ambient dose equivalent resulting from neutrons with kinetic energy of more than 20 MeV up to a few 100 MeV. The WENDI-II detector proved to show a response of approximately 3.10 9 pulses per Sievert ambient dose equivalent. Considering the experimental and statistical uncertainties the results are consistent with the assumption that the dose response of the WENDI-II reproduces quite accurately the function for the ambient dose equivalent of the ICRP 74

  1. Equatorial paleomagnetic time-averaged field results from 0-5 Ma lavas from Kenya and the latitudinal variation of angular dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdyke, Neil D.; Kent, Dennis V.; Huang, Kainian; Foster, David A.; Patel, J. P.

    2010-05-01

    Lavas of Pliocene-Pleistocene age were sampled in two regions in Kenya: Mount Kenya on the equator and the Loiyangalani region, east of Lake Turkana, at about 3°N. We sampled 100 sites distributed around the Mount Kenya Massif and to the northeast along the Nyambini Range. The equator bisects Mount Kenya, and all sites were sampled within 40' of the equator. Thirty-two sites were sampled in the Loiyangalani area, making a total of 132 sites. Many sites from the Mount Kenya study were severely affected by lightning; however, after progressive AF demagnetization 69 sites yielded directions with α95 equal to or less than 10°. Normal polarity sites dominate (N = 58 and a mean of declination (dec) = 1.2°, inclination (inc) = -0.7°, and α95 = 3.6°) with only 11 reverse polarity sites (mean of dec = 182.3°, inc = 0.6°, and α95 = 7.2°); no transitional directions were identified. Inverting the reverse sites yields a combined mean direction of dec = l.4°, inc = -0.7°, and α95 = 3.2°. This result is not significantly different from what is expected from the geocentric axial dipole for the mean locality (dec = 0° and inc = 0°); a quadrupole component was not resolved. The samples from the Loiyangalani region were not seriously affected by lightning, and all 32 sites gave satisfactory data with α95 less than 10° (17 reverse sites, dec = 183.4°, inc = 0.8°, and α95 = 6.7°; 15 normal sites, dec = 358.6°, inc = -1.1°, and α95 = 4.7°); after inverting the reverse sites the combined mean was dec = 1.1°, inc = -1.0°, and α95 = 4.1°. Altogether, we had a total of 101 successful sites. A virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) was calculated from each site mean; the VGP dispersion is low, with Sb = 10.9° for Mount Kenya and 9.8° for the Loiyangalani region. This dispersion agrees with updated Model G of McElhinny and McFadden (1997) and model TK03 of Tauxe and Kent (2004) that was tuned to the compilation of McElhinny and McFadden (1997) but disagrees with the

  2. Phonon dispersion on Ag (100) surface: A modified analytic embedded atom method study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiao-Jun; Chen Chang-Le

    2016-01-01

    Within the harmonic approximation, the analytic expression of the dynamical matrix is derived based on the modified analytic embedded atom method (MAEAM) and the dynamics theory of surface lattice. The surface phonon dispersions along three major symmetry directions, and XM-bar are calculated for the clean Ag (100) surface by using our derived formulas. We then discuss the polarization and localization of surface modes at points X-bar and M-bar by plotting the squared polarization vectors as a function of the layer index. The phonon frequencies of the surface modes calculated by MAEAM are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data. It is found that the present results are generally in agreement with the referenced experimental or theoretical results, with a maximum deviation of 10.4%. The agreement shows that the modified analytic embedded atom method is a reasonable many-body potential model to quickly describe the surface lattice vibration. It also lays a significant foundation for studying the surface lattice vibration in other metals. (paper)

  3. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: A cytotoxicity study in relation to functionalization, dose and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lulu; Forman, Henry Jay; Ge, Yi; Lunec, Joseph

    2017-08-01

    Chemical functionalization broadens carbon nanotube (CNT) applications, conferring new functions, but at the same time potentially altering toxicity. Although considerable experimental data related to CNT toxicity, at the molecular and cellular levels, have been reported, there is very limited information available for the corresponding mechanism involved (e.g. cell apoptosis and genotoxicity). The threshold dose for safe medical application in relation to both pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes remains ambiguous. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro cytotoxicity of pristine and functionalized (OH, COOH) multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for cell viability, oxidant detection, apoptosis and DNA mutations, to determine the non-toxic dose and influence of functional group in a human lung-cancer cell line exposed to 1-1000μg/ml MWCNTs for 24, 48 and 72h. The findings suggest that pristine MWCNTs induced more cell death than functionalized MWCNTs while functionalized MWCNTs are more genotoxic compared to their pristine form. The level of both dose and dispersion in the matrix used should be taken into consideration before applying further clinical applications of MWCNTs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest.

  5. Study on the Hot Extrusion Process of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoungkwon; Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Kibaik; Kang, Suk Hoon; Chun, Youngbum; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steel has a better thermal conductivity and swelling resistance than austenitic stainless steel. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited at up to 650 .deg. C. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels have been developed as the most prospective core structural materials for next generation nuclear systems because of their excellent high strength and irradiation resistance. The material performances of this new alloy are attributed to the existence of uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density, which is extremely stable at high temperature in a ferritic/martensitic matrix. This microstructure can be very attractive in achieving superior mechanical properties at high temperatures, and thus, these favorable microstructures should be obtained through the controls of the fabrication process parameters during the mechanical alloying and hot consolidation procedures. In this study, a hot extrusion process for advanced radiation resistant ODS steel tube was investigated. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels. A microstructure observation and creep rupture test were examined to investigate the effects of the optimized fabrication conditions. Advanced radiation resistant ODS steel has been designed to have homogeneity, productivity, and reproducibility. For these characteristics, modified mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes were developed. Microstructure observation revealed that the ODS steel has uniformly distributed fine-grain nano-oxide particles. The fabrication process for the tubing is also being propelled in earnest

  6. Numerical Study of Ammonia Leak and Dispersion in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    Release of ammonia into the International Space Station (ISS) cabin atmosphere can occur if the water/ammonia barrier breach of the active thermal control system (ATCS) interface heat exchanger (IFHX) happens. After IFHX breach liquid ammonia is introduced into the water-filled internal thermal control system (ITCS) and then to the cabin environment through a ruptured gas trap. Once the liquid water/ammonia mixture exits ITCS, it instantly vaporizes and mixes with the U.S. Laboratory cabin air that results in rapid deterioration of the cabin conditions. The goal of the study is to assess ammonia propagation in the Station after IFHX breach to plan the operation procedure. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for accurate prediction of airflow and ammonia transport within each of the modules in the ISS cabin was developed. CFD data on ammonia content in the cabin aisle way of the ISS and, in particular, in the Russian On- Orbit Segment during the period of 15 minutes after gas trap rupture are presented for four scenarios of rupture response. Localized effects of ammonia dispersion and risk mitigation are discussed.

  7. Theoretical study of phonon dispersion, elastic, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of barium chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musari, A. A.; Orukombo, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    Barium chalcogenides are known for their high-technological importance and great scientific interest. Detailed studies of their elastic, mechanical, dynamical and thermodynamic properties were carried out using density functional theory and plane-wave pseudo potential method within the generalized gradient approximation. The optimized lattice constants were in good agreement when compared with experimental data. The independent elastic constants, calculated from a linear fit of the computed stress-strain function, were used to determine the Young’s modulus (E), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), Poisson’s ratio (σ) and Zener’s anisotropy factor (A). Also, the Debye temperature and sound velocities for barium chalcogenides were estimated from the three independent elastic constants. The calculations of phonon dispersion showed that there are no negative frequencies throughout the Brillouin zone. Hence barium chalcogenides have dynamically stable NaCl-type crystal structure. Finally, their thermodynamic properties were calculated in the temperature range of 0-1000 K and their constant-volume specific heat capacities at room-temperature were reported.

  8. Exact Dispersion Study of an Asymmetric Thin Planar Slab Dielectric Waveguide without Computing {d^2}β/{d{k^2}} Numerically

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev Kumar; Palodiya, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    Waveguide dispersion can be tailored but not the material dispersion. Hence, the total dispersion can be shifted at any desired band by adjusting the waveguide dispersion. Waveguide dispersion is proportional to {d^2}β/d{k^2} and need to be computed numerically. In this paper, we have tried to compute analytical expression for {d^2}β/d{k^2} in terms of {d^2}β/d{k^2} accurately with numerical technique, ≈ 10^{-5} decimal point. This constraint sometimes generates the error in calculation of waveguide dispersion. To formulate the problem we will use the graphical method. Our study reveals that we can compute the waveguide dispersion enough accurately for various modes by knowing - β only.

  9. Dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in biocompatible dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piret, J.-P.; Detriche, S.; Vigneron, R.; Vankoningsloo, S.; Rolin, S.; Mejia Mendoza, J. H.; Masereel, B.; Lucas, S.; Delhalle, J.; Luizi, F.; Saout, C.; Toussaint, O.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their phenomenal electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been an area of intense research since their discovery in 1991. Different applications for these nanoparticles have been proposed, among others, in electronics and optics but also in the medical field. In parallel, emerging studies have suggested potential toxic effects of CNT while others did not, generating some conflicting outcomes. These discrepancies could be, in part, due to different suspension approaches used and to the agglomeration state of CNT in solution. In this study, we described a standardized protocol to obtain stable CNT suspensions, using two biocompatible dispersants (Pluronic F108 and hydroxypropylcellulose) and to estimate the concentration of CNT in solution. CNT appear to be greatly individualized in these two dispersants with no detection of remaining bundles or agglomerates after sonication and centrifugation. Moreover, CNT remained perfectly dispersed when added to culture medium used for in vitro cell experiments. We also showed that Pluronic F108 is a better dispersant than hydroxypropylcellulose. In conclusion, we have developed a standardized protocol using biocompatible surfactants to obtain reproducible and stable multi-walled carbon nanotubes suspensions which can be used for in vitro or in vivo toxicological studies.

  10. Reversed field pinch reactor study 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, A.A.; Mitchell, J.T.D.

    1977-12-01

    This report, the third of a series on the Reversed Field Pinch Reactor, describes a preliminary concept of the engineering design and layout of this pulsed toroidal reactor, which uses the stable plasma behaviour first observed in ZETA. The basic parameters of the 600 MW(e) reactor are taken from a companion study by Hancox and Spears. The plasma volume is 1.75m minor radius and 16m major radius surrounded by a 1.8m blanket-shield region - with the blanket divided into 14 removable segments for servicing. The magnetic confinement system consists of 28 toroidal field coils situated just outside the blanket and inside the poloidal and vertical field coils and all coils have normal copper conductors. The requirement to incorporate a conducting shell at the front of the blanket to provide a short-time plasma stability has a marked effect on the design. It sets the size of the blanket segment and the scale of the servicing operations, limits the breeding gain and complicates the blanket cooling and its integration with the heat engine. An extensive study will be required to confirm the overall reactor potential of the concept. (author)

  11. A radioisotope study of the dispersion of ferric hydroxide floc in Bass Strait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, A.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersion of ferric hydroxide floc in Bass Strait waters adjacent to Burnie, Tasmania, has been investigated using radioisotope tracer techniques. Gold-198 labelled floc was employed to follow the movement of floc produced by dilution of the iron-rich effluent from a titanium dioxide plant. Dispersion was determined under calm and storm conditions. Tidal and wind-driven currents were measured, oscillating wave generated currents were calculated, and lateral and vertical dispersion coefficients were determined. It is concluded that floc disperses episodically during storms. The agglomerated floc remains trapped in a stable seabed layer which spreads slowly at seabed level when wind velocities are less than 15 m s -1 . When wind velocities exceed this level, the wave generated oscillating currents at seabed level, 30 m below the surface, are strong enough to raise the floc into suspension where advective dispersion occurs. Since tidal currents in the area are negligible, the direction of floc movement depends on the direction of the wind-driven current during each storm

  12. Systematic study on intermolecular valence-band dispersion in molecular crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Intermolecular valence-band dispersion of crystalline films of phthalocyanines. • Intermolecular transfer integral versus lattice constant. • Site-specific intermolecular interaction and resultant valence-band dispersion. • Band narrowing effect induced by elevated temperature. - Abstract: Functionalities of organic semiconductors are governed not only by individual properties of constituent molecules but also by solid-state electronic states near the Fermi level such as frontier molecular orbitals, depending on weak intermolecular interactions in various conformations. The individual molecular property has been widely investigated in detail; on the other hand, the weak intermolecular interaction is difficult to investigate precisely due to the presence of the structural and thermal energy broadenings in organic solids. Here we show quite small but essential intermolecular valence band dispersions and their temperature dependence of sub-0.1-eV scale in crystalline films of metal phthalocyanines (H_2Pc, ZnPc, CoPc, MnPc, and F_1_6ZnPc) by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. The observed bands show intermolecular and site dependent dispersion widths, phases, and periodicities, for different chemical substitution of terminal groups and central metals in the phthalocyanine molecule. The precise and systematic band-dispersion measurement would be a credible approach toward the comprehensive understanding of intermolecular interactions and resultant charge transport properties as well as their tuning by substituents in organic molecular systems.

  13. Pharmaceutical development of an amorphous solid dispersion formulation of elacridar hydrochloride for proof-of-concept clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sawicki, E.; Schellens, J. H M; Beijnen, J. H.; Nuijen, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A novel tablet formulation containing an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) of elacridar hydrochloride was developed with the purpose to resolve the drug’s low solubility in water and to conduct proof-of-concept clinical studies. Significance: Elacridar is highly demanded for

  14. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the open-quotes Site Decommissioning Management Planclose quotes (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona's Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data

  15. A field study of virus removal in septic tank drainfields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, L A; Rose, J B; Stark, L; Stewart, M T

    2001-01-01

    Two field studies were conducted at a research station in Tampa, Florida to assess the removal of bacteriophage PRD1 from wastewater in septic tank drainfields. Infiltration cells were seeded with PRD1 and bromide and the effects of effluent hydraulic loading rate and rainfall on virus removal were monitored. Septic tank effluent samples were collected after passage through 0.6 m of unsaturated fine sand and PRD1 was detected over an average of 67 d. Bacteriophage PRD1 breakthrough was detected at approximately the same time as bromide in all three cells except for the low-load cell (Study 1), where bromide was never detected. Log10 removals of PRD1 were 1.43 and 1.91 for the high-load cells (hydraulic loading rate = 0.063 m/d) and 2.21 for the low-load cell (hydraulic loading rate = 0.032 m/d). Virus attenuation is attributed to dispersion, dilution, and inactivation. Significant increases in PRD1 elution with rainfall were observed in the first 10 d of the study. Approximately 125 mm of rainfall caused a 1.2 log10 increase of PRD1 detected at the 0.6-m depth. Current Florida onsite wastewater disposal standards, which specify a 0.6-m distance from the drainfield to the water table, may not provide sufficient removal of viruses, particularly during the wet season.

  16. Dispersal, individual movement and spatial ecology a mathematical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Philip; Petrovskii, Sergei

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal of plants and animals is one of the most fascinating subjects in ecology. It has long been recognized as an important factor affecting ecosystem dynamics. Dispersal is apparently a phenomenon of biological origin; however, because of its complexity, it cannot be studied comprehensively by biological methods alone. Deeper insights into dispersal properties and implications require interdisciplinary approaches involving biologists, ecologists and mathematicians. The purpose of this book is to provide a forum for researches with different backgrounds and expertise and to ensure further advances in the study of dispersal and spatial ecology. This book is unique in its attempt to give an overview of dispersal studies across different spatial scales, such as the scale of individual movement, the population scale and the scale of communities and ecosystems. It is written by top-level experts in the field of dispersal modeling and covers a wide range of problems ranging from the identification of Levy walks...

  17. Study on characteristics of U-Mo/Al-Si interaction layers of dispersion fuel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lijian; Yin Changgeng; Chen Jiangang; Sun Changlong; Liu Yunming

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the characteristics of U-Mo/Al-Si interaction layers of dispersion fuel plates. The results show that the interaction layers (IL) are with irregular morphology and uneven thickness, and are mainly formed in the internal micro cracks of the dispersion fuel particles or at the interface between the particles and the substrates. The diffusion mechanism of U-Mo/Al-Si is the vacancy diffusion, Al and Si are migrating elements, and the diffusion reaction is that Al and Si diffuse to U-Mo alloy. Inside the interaction layers, the Al content keeps constant basically, but the Si content gradually increases with the substrate-fuel direction, and the maximum content of Si appears interaction layers near the U-Mo side. Adding about 5 wt% Si into Al matrix can restrain the diffusion reaction, and improve the performance of dispersion fuel plates finally. (authors)

  18. The brasimone study (brastud) an investigation of atmospheric dispersion over complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnetti, P.; Ocone, R.; Racalbuto, S.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of atmospheric dispersion over complex terrain was carried out in September 1984 and in June 1985 at the Brasimone Energy Research Centre (B.E.R.C.). This place, where an experimental nuclear reactor is under construction, is located in the Tuscan-Emilian Appennine range approximately 50 km south of Bologna. The measuring campaigns, based on survey of wind and temperature parameters, tracer (SF 6 ) experiments and tracking of tetroons by radar, were performed with the purpose of assessing the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants under nocturnal drainage flow conditions. The three-dimensional MATHEW/ADPIC model was evaluated with the Brasimone data set and the results obtained are satisfactory

  19. Study on the irradiation swelling of U3Si2-Al dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2001-01-01

    The dominant modeling mechanisms on irradiation swelling of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel are introduced. The core of dispersion fuel is looked to as micro-fuel elements of continuous matrix. The formation processes of gas bubbles in the fuel phase are described through the behavior mechanisms of fission gases. The swelling in the fuel phase causes the interaction between fuel particles and metal matrix, and the metal matrix can restrain the irradiation swelling of fuel particles. The developed code can predict irradiation-swelling values according to the parameters of fuel elements and irradiation conditions, and the predicted values are in agreement with the measured results

  20. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. Some design aspects of transuranic field studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Eberhardt, L.L.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss some design aspects of transuranic field studies. Some of the principal steps in the design of such studies are given and illustrated using examples. This is followed by a review of sampling designs that have been used at nuclear detonation and safety-shot sites on the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere for estimating spatial pattern and total amounts in soil. Some design aspects of ecosystem-type transuranic studies for estimating total amounts as well as movement of transuranics between ecosystem components are also discussed. Acceptance sampling using either attributes or measurements is considered as a possible approach for deciding whether to clean up a contaminated site. Three general guidelines for the design of efficient transuranic studies are presented

  2. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  3. Improved new generation dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dispersants to combat oil spills has attracted controversy over the years, and there has been a number of accusations of the chemicals involved doing more harm than good. A new study by the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association discusses the positive and the negatives of dispersant use to be considered when drawing up spill contingency plans. (author)

  4. Studies on the dispersal behavior of melon flies, Dacus cucurbitae coquilett (Diptera: Tephritidae), and the influence of gamma-irradiation on dispersal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Ryoichi

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of released male adults of the melon fly, Dacus cucurbitae, was not the same in three directions from the release point. This bias seemed to depend on the habitat selection of melon flies because these was a linear relationship between the number of released flies caught and that of wild flies caught. The mean dispersal distance ranged from 50 m to 90 m and there were no remarkable differences in the values among groups which were allowed to disperse for different periods. Flies released at one point reached a stable distribution pattern in two or three days after their release. Another group of flies released at a different point, where the environment was less favourable to melon flies, showed a wider range of dispersal. It was concluded that in planning the arrangement of release points for the sterile male technique, a preliminary survey is needed to determine whether habitats favorable to the insect, that is, areas of high population density, exist continuously or not. A preliminary test to assess the influence of γ-irradiation on dispersal showed that the dosage of 10000 R reduced the dispersing ability of male adults of the melon fly. (author)

  5. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  6. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  7. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  8. A parametric study of dispersion processes in semi-enclosed basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffoni, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche S. Teresa, La Spezia (Italy). Dipt. di Innovazione; Bellucci, A.; Zambianchi, E. [Istituto Universitario Navale, Neapel (Italy); Griffa, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, La Spezia (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    The dispersion processes in semi-enclosed basins with stationary flows have been studied by means of an Eulerian advection-diffusion model. Special interest have been given to quantities which characterize the macroscopic state of the system: the normalized total quantity C(t) (C (0) = 1) of a tracer inside the basin, and its residence time T. Also the principal eigenvalue {tau}{sub 0} of the advection-diffusion problem has been considered, since for stationery flows C (t) attains, for time t long enough, an exponential decay shape C{sub 0}exp (-t/{tau}{sub 0} ). The focus is one the comparison between cases where the flow is rotational with re circulations, represented by a flow with a gyre at the outflow. The sensitivity of the results to a number of parameters, including initial and boundary conditions and the eddy diffusivity coefficient, have been studied. It is found that for small Peclet numbers, when the flow is highly diffusive, the results do not depend strongly on the flow structure. {tau}{sub 0} tends to a constant limit (dependent on the boundary conditions) at decreasing Peclet number, and T is approximated by T asymptotically equal to {tau}{sub 0}. For high Peclet numbers, instead, the rotational and irrotational cases are qualitatively different. For rotational flows, {tau}{sub 0}, tends to zero at increasing Peclet number, and T tends toward the advective time scale. For flows with re circulations, in which the tracer tends to be trapped inside the gyre, {tau}{sub 0} increases at increasing Peclet numbers and T asymptotically equal to {tau}{sub 0}, for all initial and boundary conditions. The values of T and {tau}{sub 0} do not change significantly in the range of realistic Peclet numbers considered. This suggests that, for flows with re circulations, the macroscopic dispersion properties depend only weakly on the eddy diffusion coefficient. [Italian] Processi di dispersione in bacini semi-chiusi caratterizzati da flussi stazionari sono stati

  9. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  10. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Washington and Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. Investigations discussed address principally mudflow phenomena and drainage development. At the Valley of 10,000 Smokes (Katmai, AK) and Mount St. Helens, WA, studies of the development of erosional landforms (in particular, drainage) on fresh, new surfaces permitted analysis of the result of competition between geomorphic processes. Of specific interest is the development of stream pattern as a function of the competition between perennial seepage overland flow (from glacial or groundwater sources), ephemeral overland flow (from pluvial or seasonal melt sources), and ephemeral/perennial groundwater sapping, as a function of time since initial resurfacing, material properties, and seasonal/annual environmental conditions.

  11. A study of the physical properties of lamellar liquid-crystalline dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Johannes Cornelis van de

    1993-01-01

    Important questions addressed in this thesis are (i) which are the factors governing the physical stability of these dispersions and (ii) what is the relation between the chemical composition of the surfactant and the physical stability of these systems as a function of electrolyte type and

  12. Sensing properties of pristine boron nitride nanostructures towards alkaloids: A first principles dispersion corrected study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roondhe, Basant; Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2018-05-01

    To understand the underlying physics behind the interaction of biomolecules with the nanomaterials to use them practically as bio-nanomaterials is very crucial. A first principles calculation under the frame work of density functional theory is executed to investigate the electronic structures and binding properties of alkaloids (Caffeine and Nicotine) over single walled boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and boron nitride nanoribbon (BNNR) to determine their suitability towards filtration or sensing of these molecules. We have also used GGA-PBE scheme with the inclusion of Van der Waals (vdW) interaction based on DFT-D2. Increase in the accuracy by incorporating the dispersion correction in the calculation is observed for the long range Van der Waals interaction. Binding energy range of BNNT and BNNR with both alkaloids have been found to be -0.35 to -0.76 eV and -0.45 to -0.91 eV respectively which together with the binding distance shows physisorption binding of these molecules to the both nanostructures. The transfer of charge between the BN nanostructures and the adsorbed molecule has also been analysed by using Lowdin charge analysis. The sensitivity of both nanostructures BNNT and BNNR towards both alkaloids is observed through electronic structure calculations, density of states and quantum conductance. The binding of both alkaloids with BNNR is stronger. The analysis of the calculated properties suggests absence of covalent interaction between the considered species (BNNT/BNNR) and alkaloids. The study may be useful in designing the boron nitride nanostructure based sensing device for alkaloids.

  13. Labeling of Pest Insects Using Radioisotopes to Study Dispersal Pattern, Migration and Estimation of Population Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singgih Sutrisno

    2008-01-01

    To study insects behaviour in their habitat such as dispersal, migration and flight range, insects are needed to be labelled to trace their movement. One of the most promising labeling methodology for internal labeling is the use of radioisotopes. Radioisotopes that have been used for labeling insects are 3 H, 32 P, 14 Ca, 45 K, 35 S, 59 Fe, 60 Co, and 14 C. Insect labeling with isotopes has more advantages as compared to dyes due to isotopes used for labeling is bonded to the tissue such as 3 H, 32 P, 14 Ca, K, 131 I. Several consideration have to be taken to determine isotopes that will be used in line with the time consuming for experiments. This have to be carried out due to the phenomenon that several isotopes are toxic to insects such as 45 Ca, 59 Fe, 86 Rb, 110 Ag, 115 Cd, and 131 J. Precautions have to be fulfilled for insect radiolabeling which are save to insects, environment, easy to apply, materials are available and acceptable to the public. Radioisotope 32 P with a correct dose is very convenience to be used in such experiments due to its relatively short half live, which is only 14.3 days. If it is an stable isotope it can be kept for a long time so the sample analyzed can be conducted convenience for long periods of time. Stable elements such as Rb can be changed to be radioisotopes by bombardment of neutrons in a nuclear reactor or accelerator. Then the element that has been activated can be identified using solid scintillation counter, multichannel analyzer or can be detected using autoradiography. (author)

  14. Ultrasound biomicroscopy and iris pigment dispersion: a case--control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P; Sangermani, C; Ghirardini, S; Carta, A; Ungaro, N; Gandolfi, Sa

    2010-04-01

    The study involved eyes affected by pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) or pigmentary glaucoma (PG) investigated by ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). Different irido-corneal parameters were assessed and compared with those from healthy controls. The aim was to investigate the capacity of the UBM in differentiating the cases and, potentially, in confirming the pathogenic mechanisms. Patients with a first diagnosis of PDS or PG were included. A cohort of healthy volunteers matched for sex, age and refractive errors was recruited. All underwent UBM examination: the following parameters were assessed in relaxed and stimulated accommodative state in one eye: iris-lens contact (ILC), irido-corneal angle (ICA) and iris concavity (IC). A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis assessed the ability of UBM to discriminate between subjects with and without PDS/PG. There were 24 eyes in the case group: four diagnosed as PG and the remaining 20 as PDS. There were 25 eyes in the control group. The two groups were statistically superimposable except for baseline intraocular pressure, which was higher in the case group (p=0.0001). All UBM parameters were statistically different between the two groups. ICA in near vision was the best-performing parameter, reaching a sensitivity (=specificity) of 0.875 with a cut-off at 53.0 degrees . The second most sensitive parameter was IC, still in near vision. All UBM parameters examined were statistically different between the two groups. ROC analysis showed ICA and IC in near vision to be the most discriminatory parameters. This evidence confirms the importance of iris movements in inducing the particular features of PDS/PG.

  15. Study and modeling of the dispersed phase behavior in a pulsed column: application to an oxalic precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amokrane, Abdenour

    2014-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the study and modeling of a pulsed column used in liquid-liquid extraction operations in the nuclear industry and which is otherwise considered for continuous precipitation operations in emulsion. Modeling the behavior of the dispersed phase in the column is undertaken in this manuscript. First, we began by modeling the continuous phase mean velocity and turbulence fields, which are responsible for transport, breakage and coalescence of the drops. The model developed, validated by PIV measurements, predicts turbulence in a satisfying way. Modeling the residence time distribution (RTD) of the drops by a Lagrangian approach is then achieved. This model is validated on measurements taken by a shadow-graph technique. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones. To model the droplet size distributions (DSD) in the column, we used the population balance equations (PBE) that we have coupled with the computational fluid dynamics equations (CFD). A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with an optical sensor is used, at first, to acquire the DSD representative of our liquid-liquid system. Through a 0D modeling of the flow in the CSTR, and solving the inverse problem, we have determined the breakage and coalescence kernels relevant for our system, to be used in the PBE. These kernels were then used to predict the DSD in the pulsed column by a coupled CFD-PBE model based on the QMOM method. Finally, a validation of the coupled CFD-PBE model is made from DSD in good agreement with the experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. The validated model is then used to study the emulsion sensitivity to the column operating conditions. (author) [fr

  16. Field experimentation in isotope-aided studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    1990-01-01

    Isotopic-aided studies involve the application of isotopically labelled fertilizer as tracers for the quantitative and precise determination of the fate of specific nutrient elements in the soil/plant system. The planning of isotopic-aided studies requires a different approach from that followed in the design of normal fertilizer trials because of the cost and supply of isotopically labelled materials, the use of highly specialized equipment and the need for skillful trained staff in the use of isotope techniques both in the field/greenhouse and the laboratory. This report is intended to highlight the main points to be considered while applying those techniques in the field or greenhouse. It has been well established that nuclear techniques are a powerful tool in agricultural research. One should take advantage of the use of such techniques if the following criteria are met: The isotope method is the only way to solve a particular question or to obtain a specific piece of information. There are other methods available for such a purpose but the nuclear method provides a direct and quick means to obtain the needed information resulting in higher economic return

  17. A theoretical study of interaction effects on the remanence curves of particulate dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, M.; Chantrell, R. W.; Wohlfarth, E. P.

    1990-05-01

    The remanence curves of strongly interacting fine-particle systems are investigated theoretically. It is shown that the Henkel plot of the dc demagnetisation remanence vs. the isothermal remanence is a useful representation of interactions. The form of the plot is found to be a reflection of the magnetic and physical microstructure of the material, which is consistent with experimental data. The relationship between the Henkel plot and the noise of a particulate recording medium, another property dependent on the microstructure, is also considered. The Interaction Field Factor (IFF), a single parameter characterising the non-linearity of the Henkel plot, is also investigated. The results are consistent with a previous experimental study. Finally, the effect of interactions on the Switching Field Distribution are investigated.

  18. Study of the residual porosity in fuel plate cores based on U3O8 - Al dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The residual porosity in the meat of nuclear dispersion fuel plates, the fabrication voids, explains the corrosion behaviour of the meats when exposed to the water used as coolant and moderator of MTR type research reactors. The fabrication voids also explain variations in irradiation performance of many fuel dispersion for nuclear reactors. To obtain improved corrosion and irradiation performance, we must understand the fabrication factors that control the amount of void volume in fuel plate meats. The purpose of this study was to investigate the void content of aluminum-base dispersion-type U 3 O 8 -Al fuel plates depending on the characteristics of the starting fuel dispersion used to produce the fuel meat, which is fabricated by pressing. The void content depends on the U 3 O 8 concentration. For a particular U 3 O 8 content, the rolling process establishes a constant void concentration, which is called equilibrium porosity. The equilibrium quantity of voids is insensitive to the initial density of the fuel compact. (author)

  19. Estudo das dispersões aquosas de nanotubos de carbono utilizando diferentes surfactantes Study of aqueous dispersions of carbon nanotubes using different surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella R. da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion of carbon nanotubes in water for their utilization in nanoscale devices is a challenging task. Comparative studies on interaction and dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT using two different surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, and polyoxyethylenesorbitanmonooleate, Tween 80 are presented. The interaction between carbon nanotubes and surfactants was studied by tensiometry, conductivimetry, and fluorimetry. The dispersions of MWNT in surfactants were characterized using a UV-vis spectrophotometer. For effective dispersion, the minimum weight ratio of MWNT to surfactant was 1:41 and 1:3 for SDS and Tween 80, respectively.

  20. Large Scale Numerical Modelling to Study the Dispersion of Persistent Toxic Substances Over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulinger, A.; Petersen, G.

    2003-12-01

    For the past two decades environmental research at the GKSS Research Centre has been concerned with airborne pollutants with adverse effects on human health. The research was mainly focused on investigating the dispersion and deposition of heavy metals like lead and mercury over Europe by means of numerical modelling frameworks. Lead, in particular, served as a model substance to study the relationship between emissions and human exposition. The major source of airborne lead in Germany was fuel combustion until the 1980ies when its use as gasoline additive declined due to political decisions. Since then, the concentration of lead in ambient air and the deposition rates decreased in the same way as the consumption of leaded fuel. These observations could further be related to the decrease of lead concentrations in human blood measured during medical studies in several German cities. Based on the experience with models for heavy metal transport and deposition we have now started to turn our research focus to organic substances, e.g. PAHs. PAHs have been recognized as significant air borne carcinogens for several decades. However, it is not yet possible to precisely quantify the risk of human exposure to those compounds. Physical and chemical data, known from literature, describing the partitioning of the compounds between particle and gas phase and their degradation in the gas phase are implemented in a tropospheric chemistry module. In this way, the fate of PAHs in the atmosphere due to different particle type and size and different meteorological conditions is tested before carrying out large-scale and long-time studies. First model runs have been carried out for Benzo(a)Pyrene as one of the principal carcinogenic PAHs. Up to now, nearly nothing is known about degradation reactions of particle bound BaP. Thus, they could not be taken into account in the model so far. On the other hand, the proportion of BaP in the gas phase has to be considered at higher ambient

  1. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  2. Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of stable aqueous dispersion of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; Asiri, Abdullah M; Al-Otaibi, Maha M

    2011-09-01

    A facile approach for the synthesis of stable aqueous dispersion of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using glucose as the reducing agent in water/micelles system, in which cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as capping agent (stabilizer) is described. The evolution of plasmon band of AgNPs was monitored under different conditions such as (a) concentration of sodium hydroxide, (b) concentration of glucose, (c) concentration of silver nitrate (d) concentration of CTAB, and (e) reaction time. AgNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence spectroscopy and FT-IR spectroscopy. The results revealed an easy and viable strategy for obtaining stable aqueous dispersion of AgNPs with well controlled shape and size below 30 nm in diameter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of ecologo-biological reactions of common flax to finely dispersed metallurgical wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O.; Gusev, A.; Skripnikova, E.; Skripnikova, M.; Krutyakov, Yu; Kudrinsky, A.; Mikhailov, I.; Senatova, S.; Chuprunov, C.; Kuznetsov, D.

    2015-11-01

    Study was carried out on the influence of metallurgic industrial sludge on morphometric and biochemical indicators as well as productivity of common flax under laboratory and field conditions. In laboratory settings negative influence on seed germinating ability and positive influence on sprouts biomass production in water medium were observed. In sand medium suppression of biological productivity under the influence of sludge together with photosynthetic system II (FS II) activity stimulation were registered. Biochemical study showed peroxidase activity decrease in laboratory, while activity of polyphenol oxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were given a mild boost under the influence of sludge. In the field trial, positive influence of sludge on flax photosynthetic apparatus was shown. Positive influence of sludge on vegetation and yield indicators was observed. The analysis of heavy metals content showed excess over maximum allowable concentration (MAC) of copper and zinc in control plants, it may point to the background soil pollution. In the plants from the trial groups receiving 0.5 and 2 ton/ha heavy metals content below the control values was registered. Application of 4 ton/ha led to the maximum content of copper and zinc in the plants among the trial groups. The analysis of soils from the test plots indicated no excess over maximum allowable concentrations of heavy metals. Thus, further study of possibilities of using metallurgic industrial sludge as a soil stimulator in flax cultivation at the application rate of 0.5 t/ha seems promising.

  4. Expatriate Compound Living: An Ethnographic Field Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In certain countries, closed expatriate compounds have developed.  They serve to provide resident expatriates and accompanying family members with a comfortable and safe environment. Unfortunately, not much is known about compound life since associated empirical research is scarce. Through...... ethnographic field-work methodology, including interviews and participant observation during a period of three months, this exploratory study investigated 16 Danish business expatriates of a large Danish corporation and their families living in the same compound in Saudi Arabia. They shared their spare time...... and the expatriates had the same working hours in the same subsidiary. Results show that a Danish national group was established and maintained. This in-group dominated life in the compound and at work it may have contributed to the perceptual bias and discriminatory behaviour demonstrated by the Danish expatriates...

  5. The field tracer test study of atmospheric dispersion in Fujian Huian Nuclear Power Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Erbang; Xin Cuntian; Yan Jiangyu; Ren Zhiqiang; Xuan Yiren; Jia Peirong

    2003-01-01

    The SF 6 tracer tests and its main results completed in site of Fujian Huian Nuclear Power Plant during summer, 2002, are described. A total of 15 times of SF 6 tracer tests were done in the July, in which the time of atmospheric stability B, C, D, E is respectively 3, 2, 9, 1 based on ΔT-U method and the time of B, D, E is respectively 1, 11, 3 based on ΔT method. About 50 samples were collected in each SF 6 tracer tests, the maximum of sample distance from the tower in which the SF 6 tracer was released is about 15 km. The values of p y , p z , q y , q z in the formula of diffusion parameters is determined. Finally the above diffusion parameters are compared with P-G curve, Briggs diffusion parameters and those obtained from turbulence observation and wind tunnel simulation test done in the past time. (authors)

  6. Novel Nano-Size Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels Development through Computational and Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong [Southern Univ. and A& M College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-05-30

    This report summarizes our recent works of theoretical modeling, simulation and experimental validation of the simulation results on the ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy research. The simulation of the stability and thermal dynamics simulation on potential thermal stable candidates were performed and related ODS samples were synthesized and characterized. The simulation methods and experimental texture validation techniques development, achievements already reached, course work development, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  7. Practice in a dispersed professional community : a case study of associate lecturers at the Open University

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Graham; Saunders, Murray

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines in depth the work of four associate lecturers at the Open University. Given that they see colleagues infrequently, it explores how they resource their practice, in what has been termed a dispersed community that lacks the social interaction associated with more traditional lecturing. This research identifies what knowledge resources and professional practices are used, and what the relationships are between these and the process of occupational identity-building. It also ...

  8. Non-Family Employees' Interpretations of Organizational Values : A Case Study of a Dispersed Family Business

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Malin; Öhlund, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Geographically dispersed organizations are becoming increasingly common, however, the organizational culture is often weaker in this type of organization due to geographical distances. One important aspect of the organizational culture is the organizational values, and if shared by all organizational members they can benefit the company on many levels, for example by increasing motivation and communication. If employees, on the other hand, fail to interpret the organizational values it may le...

  9. Dispersive x-ray synchrotron studies of Pt-C multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Rodricks, B.; Lamelas, F.; Medjahed, D.; Dos Passos, W.; Clarke, R.; Ziegler, E.; Fontaine, A.

    1989-02-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra and scattering data, using a combination of energy-dispersive optics and a two-dimensional CCD detector. Results are presented on the optical constants of Pt and on the reflectivity of a platinum-carbon multilayer at the L/sub III/ absorption edge of Pt. 12 refs., 5 figs

  10. A new methodology for studying nanoparticle interactions in biological systems: Dispersing titania in biocompatible media using chemical stabilisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Chen, Lan; Morris, Michael A.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2011-11-01

    We report here a highly successful and original protocol for the dispersion of nanoparticles in biocompatible fluids for in vitro and in vivo studies of the nanoparticle-biology interaction. Titania is chosen as a suitable model as it is one of the priority materials listed by the OECD and small particles of the anatase structure are extensively used as e.g. photocatalysts in solar cells. Consequently, its delivery into the environment and its interaction with biological organisms is unavoidable. Therefore, its biological effect needs to be understood. In this work, we prepared stable nanoparticle dispersions of anatase aggregates using citrate stabilisations between 45 and 55 nm at concentrations of up to 10 mg mL-1. The optimum pH for this type of suspension was 7, resulting in ζ-potentials of approximately -50 mV. The stabilised aggregates were the subject of dialysis to produce stable dispersions without the chemical stabiliser, thus allowing studies in the absence of potentially toxic chemicals. Different sizing techniques such as Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and Differential Centrifuge Sedimentation (DCS) were used to characterise the different suspensions. The results obtained with each of these techniques are compared and a critical analysis of the suitability of each technique is given.We report here a highly successful and original protocol for the dispersion of nanoparticles in biocompatible fluids for in vitro and in vivo studies of the nanoparticle-biology interaction. Titania is chosen as a suitable model as it is one of the priority materials listed by the OECD and small particles of the anatase structure are extensively used as e.g. photocatalysts in solar cells. Consequently, its delivery into the environment and its interaction with biological organisms is unavoidable. Therefore, its biological effect needs to be understood. In this work, we prepared stable nanoparticle dispersions of anatase aggregates

  11. Validation Study for an Atmospheric Dispersion Model, Using Effective Source Heights Determined from Wind Tunnel Experiments in Nuclear Safety Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Oura

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than fifty years, atmospheric dispersion predictions based on the joint use of a Gaussian plume model and wind tunnel experiments have been applied in both Japan and the U.K. for the evaluation of public radiation exposure in nuclear safety analysis. The effective source height used in the Gaussian model is determined from ground-level concentration data obtained by a wind tunnel experiment using a scaled terrain and site model. In the present paper, the concentrations calculated by this method are compared with data observed over complex terrain in the field, under a number of meteorological conditions. Good agreement was confirmed in near-neutral and unstable stabilities. However, it was found to be necessary to reduce the effective source height by 50% in order to achieve a conservative estimation of the field observations in a stable atmosphere.

  12. The particulate matter dispersion studies from a local palm oil mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, L.C.; Wong, L. L.; Amnorzahira, A.; Sa'ari, M.; Abdul Rashid, M. S.; Salmiaton Ali

    2006-01-01

    The appearance of industrial emissions and the degradation of scenic vistas are two characteristics of air pollution that humans object. Reduction in visibility suggests worsening pollution levels. The emissions from mobile source and stationary source are the major source of air pollutions contribution in Malaysia. Suspended particulate matter (SPM). The consequence of increasing the particulate concentrations, the particulate matter dissolves with vapour and grows into droplets when the humidity exceeds approximately 70% and causing opaque situation know as haze. This work focuses on the dispersion particulate matter from palm oil mill. The data obtained serves the purpose of modeling the transport of particulate matter for obtaining permits and prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) to the environment. Gaussian Plume Model from a point source, subject to various atmospheric conditions is used to calculate particulate matter concentration then display the distribution of plume dispersion using geographic information system (GIS). The calculated particulate matter concentration is evaluated using Transilient Matrice function. Atmospheric Stability, mixing height, wind direction, wind speed, natural and artificial features play an important role in dispersion process. High concentration area exhibits immediately under prevailing wind direction. (Author)

  13. Study of traffic-related pollutant removal from street canyon with trees: dispersion and deposition perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morakinyo, Tobi Eniolu; Lam, Yun Fat

    2016-11-01

    Numerical experiments involving street canyons of varying aspect ratio with traffic-induced pollutants (PM 2.5 ) and implanted trees of varying aspect ratio, leaf area index, leaf area density distribution, trunk height, tree-covered area, and tree planting pattern under different wind conditions were conducted using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, ENVI-met. Various aspects of dispersion and deposition were investigated, which include the influence of various tree configurations and wind condition on dispersion within the street canyon, pollutant mass at the free stream layer and street canyon, and comparison between mass removal by surface (leaf) deposition and mass enhancement due to the presence of trees. Results revealed that concentration level was enhanced especially within pedestrian level in street canyons with trees relative to their tree-free counterparts. Additionally, we found a dependence of the magnitude of concentration increase (within pedestrian level) and decrease (above pedestrian level) due to tree configuration and wind condition. Furthermore, we realized that only ∼0.1-3 % of PM 2.5 was dispersed to the free stream layer while a larger percentage (∼97 %) remained in the canyon, regardless of its aspect ratio, prevailing wind condition, and either tree-free or with tree (of various configuration). Lastly, results indicate that pollutant removal due to deposition on leaf surfaces is potentially sufficient to counterbalance the enhancement of PM 2.5 by such trees under some tree planting scenarios and wind conditions.

  14. A Numerical Study on Characteristics of Flow and Reactive Pollutant Dispersion in Step‒up Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. R.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, many metro‒ and/or mega‒cities have grown and densities of population and building have increased. Because pollutants released from sources near ground surface such as vehicles are not easy to escape from street canyons which are spaces between buildings standing along streets pedestrians, drivers and residents are likely to be exposed to high concentrations of hazardous pollutants. Therefore, it is important to understand characteristics of flow and pollutant dispersion in street canyons. In this study, step‒up street canyons with higher downwind buildings are considered for understanding flow and reactive pollutants' dispersion characteristics there as a basic step to understand the characteristics in wider urban areas. This study used a CFD model coupled to a chemistry module. Detailed flow and air pollutant concentration are analyzed in step‒up street canyons with different upwind building heights.

  15. Implementation of the FDTD method in cylindrical coordinates for dispersive materials: Modal study of C-shaped nano-waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    kebci, Zahia; Belkhir, Abderrahmane; Mezeghrane, Abdelaziz; Lamrous, Omar; Baida, Fadi Issam

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a code based on the finite difference time domain method in cylindrical coordinates (CC-FDTD) that integrates the Drude Critical Points model (DCP) and to apply it in the study of a metallic C-shaped waveguide (CSWG). The integrated dispersion model allows an accurate description of noble metals in the optical range and working in cylindrical coordinates is necessary to bypass the staircase effect induced by a Cartesian mesh especially in the case of curved geometrical forms. The CC-FDTD code developed as a part of this work is more general than the Body-Of-Revolution-FDTD algorithm that can only handle structures exhibiting a complete cylindrical symmetry. A N-order CC-FDTD code is then derived and used to perform a parametric study of an infinitly-long CSWG for nano-optic applications. Propagation losses and dispersion diagrams are given for different geometrical parameters.

  16. Transverse dispersion in heterogeneous fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, Bill; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate; Outters, Nils; Hermanson, Jan

    2004-12-01

    This report evaluates the significance of transverse dispersion processes for solute transport in a single fracture. Transverse dispersion is a potentially significant process because it increases the fracture surface area available for sorptive and diffusive properties, and has the potential to transport solute between what would otherwise be distinctive, streamline pathways. Transverse dispersion processes are generally ignored in one-dimensional repository performance assessment approaches. This report provides an initial assessment of the magnitude of transverse dispersion effect in a single heterogeneous fracture on repository safety assessment. This study builds on a previous report which considered the network effects on transport dispersion including streamline routing and mixing at fracture intersections. The project uses FracMan software. This platform has been extensively used by SKB in other projects. FracMan software is designed to generate and analyze DFN's as well as to compute fluid flow in DFN's with the MAFIC Finite element method (FEM) code. Solute transport was modeled using the particle tracking inside MAFIC, the 2-D Laplace Transform Galerkin inside PAWorks/LTG, and the 1-D Laplace Transform approach designed to replicate FARF31 inside GoldSim.The study reported here focuses on a single, 20-meter scale discrete fracture, with simplified boundary conditions intended to represent the position of this fracture within a fracture network. The range of assumptions made regarding fracture heterogeneity were as follows: Base case, Heterogeneous fracture, geostatistical field, correlation length 0.01 m. Case 1a, Homogeneous fracture, transmissivity = 10 -7 m 2 /s. Case 1b, Heterogeneous fracture, non-channeled geostatistical field correlation length 5 m. Case 1c, Heterogeneous fracture, channeled, anisotropic geostatistical field. Case 1d, Heterogeneous fracture, fracture intersection zone (FIZ) permeability enhanced. Case 5, Simple channelized

  17. Joint DOE/NRC field study of tracer migration in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyhan, J.; Polzer, W.; Essington, E.; Cokal, E.; Lane, L.; Lopez, E.; Stallings, E.; Walker, R.

    1986-03-01

    The results of a joint DOE/NRC field experiment to evaluate leaching and transport of solutes in a sandy silt backfill used for shallow land burial operations at Los Alamos are presented for steady-state and unsteady-state flow conditions. The migration of iodide, bromide, and lithium through the backfill material is studied as functions of depth and time and they are compared with one another. The bromide and iodide tracer data are used to estimate the diffusion coefficient, the tortuosity factor, and dispersivity. These values are used to calculate effective dispersion coefficients for subsequent analyses of the retardation factor and the distribution coefficient for lithium using least squares procedures. The results of the tracer migration study are discussed relative to challenges facing the waste management community, and chemical transport modeling opportunities are presented for a modeling workshop to be held in FY86

  18. Gauging in volumetric activity of the L.B.123 in order to study release dispersion in 85Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Label, D.

    2001-01-01

    The L.B.123 is a krypton detector. The calculations of the different beta and gamma yields have allowed to confirm that the LB123 is low sensitive to gamma radiations and in the case of krypton 85 the only beta contribution is to be considered. This detector can be used to study the dispersion modes of gaseous releases in the environment of La Hague. (N.C.)

  19. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  20. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, Larry; Jerred, Nathan; Charit, Indrajit; Cole, James

    2012-01-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  1. Development of amorphous dispersions of artemether with hydrophilic polymers via spray drying: Physicochemical and in silico studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaywant N. Pawar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Artemether (ARM is a poorly water soluble and poorly permeable drug effective against acute and severe falciparum malaria, hence there is a strong need to improve its solubility. The objective of the study was to enhance the solubility and dissolution rate of ARM by preparation of solid dispersions using spray-drying technique. Solid dispersions of ARM were prepared with Soluplus, Kollidon VA 64, HPMC and Eudragit EPO at weight ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 using spray drying technology, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and carrier, as well as effect on dissolution. The prepared solid dispersion of ARM with polymers showed reduced crystallinity as compared to neat ARM, which was confirmed by DSC and XRD. Drug/polymer interactions were studied in-silico by docking and molecular dynamics which indicated formation of van der Waals type of interactions of ARM with the polymers. Based on solubility studies, the optimum drug/Soluplus ratio was found to be 1:3. The dissolution studies of formulation SD3 showed highest drug release up to 82% compared to neat ARM giving only 20% at 60 minutes. The spray-dried products were free of crystalline ARM; possessed higher dissolution rates, and were stable over a period according to ICH guidelines. These findings suggest that an amorphous solid dispersion of ARM could be a viable option for enhancing the dissolution rate of ARM.

  2. Study of dispersive and nonlinear effects of coastal wave dynamics with a fully nonlinear potential flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Michel; Yates, Marissa L.; Raoult, Cécile

    2017-04-01

    Efficient and accurate numerical models simulating wave propagation are required for a variety of engineering projects including the evaluation of coastal risks, the design of protective coastal structures, and the estimation of the potential for marine renewable energy devices. Nonlinear and dispersive effects are particularly significant in the coastal zone where waves interact with the bottom, the shoreline, and coastal structures. The main challenge in developing a numerical models is finding a compromise between computational efficiency and the required accuracy of the simulated wave field. Here, a potential approach is selected and the (fully nonlinear) water wave problem is formulated using the Euler-Zakharov equations (Zakharov, 1968) describing the temporal evolution of the free surface elevation and velocity potential. The proposed model (Yates and Benoit, 2015) uses a spectral approach in the vertical (i.e. the vertical variation of the potential is approximated by a linear combination of the first NT+1 Chebyshev polynomials, following the work of Tian and Sato (2008)). The Zakharov equations are integrated in time using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme with a constant time step. At each sub-timestep, the Laplace Boundary Value Problem (BVP) is solved to estimate the free surface vertical velocity using the spectral approach, with typical values of NT between 5 to 8 for practical applications. The 1DH version of the code is validated with comparisons to the experimental data set of Becq-Girard et al. (1999), which studied the propagation of irregular waves over a beach profile with a submerged bar. The nonlinear and dispersive capacities of the model are verified with the correct representation of wave-wave interactions, in particular the transfer of energy between different harmonic components during wave propagation (analysis of the transformation of the variance spectrum along the channel). Evolution of wave skewness, asymmetry and kurtosis along the

  3. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.

  4. Gas dispersion concentration of trace inorganic contaminants from fuel gas and analysis using head-column field-amplified sample stacking capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianmin; Li, Hai-Fang; Li, Meilan; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2012-08-21

    The presence of inorganic elements in fuel gas generally accelerates the corrosion and depletion of materials used in the fuel gas industry, and even leads to serious accidents. For identification of existing trace inorganic contaminants in fuel gas in a portable way, a highly efficient gas-liquid sampling collection system based on gas dispersion concentration is introduced in this work. Using the constructed dual path gas-liquid collection setup, inorganic cations and anions were simultaneously collected from real liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and analyzed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with indirect UV absorbance detection. The head-column field-amplified sample stacking technique was applied to improve the detection limits to 2-25 ng mL(-1). The developed collection and analytical methods have successfully determined existing inorganic contaminants in a real LPG sample in the range of 4.59-138.69 μg m(-3). The recoveries of cations and anions with spiked LPG samples were between 83.98 and 105.63%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 7.19%.

  5. Extraction of Dysprosium Ions with DTPA Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles Probed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and TEM/High-Angle Annular Dark Field Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Fernando Menegatti de; Almeida, Sabrina da Nobrega; Uezu, Noemi Saori; Ramirez, Carlos Alberto Ospina; Santos, Antonio Domingues Dos; Toma, Henrique Eisi

    2018-06-01

    The extraction of dysprosium (Dy3+) ions from aqueous solution was carried out successfully, using magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles functionalized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (MagNP@DTPA). The process was monitored by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, as a function of concentration, proceeding according to a Langmuir isotherm with an equilibrium constant of 2.57 × 10-3 g(MagNP) L-1 and a saturation limit of 63.2 mgDy/gMagNP. The presence of paramagnetic Dy3+ ions attached to the superparamagnetic nanoparticles led to an overall decrease of magnetization. By imaging the nanoparticles surface using scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with high resolution elemental analysis, it was possible to probe the binding of the Dy3+ ions to DTPA, and to show their distribution in a region of negative magnetic field gradients. This finding is coherent with the observed decrease of magnetization, associated with the antiferromagnetic coupling between the lanthanide ions and the Fe3O4 core.

  6. Determining the group velocity dispersion by field analysis for the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length: applications to step-index fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    By knowing the electric field distribution of a guided mode in an optical fiber, we are able to evaluate the group velocity dispersion in a weakly guiding step-index fiber for a pure mode in the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length. We demonstrate the method numerica...

  7. Simulating Real-World Exposures during Emergency Events: Studying Effects of Indoor and Outdoor Releases in the Urban Dispersion Project in Upper Manhattan, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A prospective personal exposure study, involving indoor and outdoor releases, was conducted in upper Midtown Manhattan in New York City as part of the Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) focusing on atmospheric dispersion of chemicals in complex urban settings. The UDP experiments inv...

  8. Atmospheric Dispersion Models for the Calculation of Environmental Impact: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, Marcelo; Gimenez, Marcelo; Felicelli, Sergio; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    In this paper some new comparisons are presented between the codes AERMOD, HPDM and HYSPLIT.The first two are Gaussian stationary plume codes and they were developed to calculate environmental impact produced by chemical contaminants.HYSPLIT is a hybrid code because it uses a Lagrangian reference system to describe the transport of a puff center of mass and uses an Eulerian system to describe the dispersion within the puff.The meteorological and topographic data used in the present work were obtained from runs of the prognostic code RAMS, provided by NOAA. The emission was fixed in 0.3 g/s , 284 K and 0 m/s .The surface rough was fixed in 0.1m and flat terrain was considered.In order to analyze separate effects and to go deeper in the comparison, the meteorological data was split into two, depending on the atmospheric stability class (F to B), and the wind direction was fixed to neglect its contribution to the contaminant dispersion.The main contribution of this work is to provide recommendations about the validity range of each code depending on the model used.In the case of Gaussian models the validity range is fixed by the distance in which the atmospheric condition can be consider homogeneous.In the other hand the validity range of HYSPLIT's model is determined by the spatial extension of the meteorological data.The results obtained with the three codes are comparable if the emission is in equilibrium with the environment.This means that the gases were emitted at the same temperature of the medium with zero velocity.There was an important difference between the dispersion parameters used by the Gaussian codes

  9. A study on amphiphilic fluorinated block copolymer in graphite exfoliation using supercritical CO2 for stable graphene dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hyun; Lee, Hyang Moo; Choi, Sung Wook; Cheong, In Woo

    2018-01-15

    In this study, poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PTFEMA-b-PVP) was synthesized by stepwise reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization for the preparation of graphene by the exfoliation of graphite nanoplatelets (GPs) in supercritical CO 2 (SCCO 2 ). Two different block copolymers (low and high molecular weights) were prepared with the same block ratio and used at different concentrations in the SCCO 2 process. The amount of PTFEMA-b-PVP adsorbed on the GPs and the electrical conductivity of the SCCO 2 -treated GP samples were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and four-point probe method, respectively. All GP samples treated with SCCO 2 were then dispersed in methanol and the dispersion stability was investigated using online turbidity measurements. The concentration and morphology of few-layer graphene stabilized with PTFEMA-b-PVP in the supernatant solution were investigated by gravimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Destabilization study of the graphene dispersions revealed that the longer block copolymer exhibited better affinity for graphene, resulting in a higher yield of stable graphene with minimal defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Milky Way: paediatric milk-based dispersible tablets prepared by direct compression - a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orubu, Samuel E F; Hobson, Nicholas J; Basit, Abdul W; Tuleu, Catherine

    2017-04-01

    Dispersible tablets are proposed by the World Health Organization as the preferred paediatric formulation. It was hypothesised that tablets made from a powdered milk-base that disperse in water to form suspensions resembling milk might be a useful platform to improve acceptability in children. Milk-based dispersible tablets containing various types of powdered milk and infant formulae were formulated. The influence of milk type and content on placebo tablet properties was investigated using a design-of-experiments approach. Responses measured included friability, crushing strength and disintegration time. Additionally, the influence of compression force on the tablet properties of a model formulation was studied by compaction simulation. Disintegration times increased as milk content increased. Compaction simulation studies showed that compression force influenced disintegration time. These results suggest that the milk content, rather than type, and compression force were the most important determinants of disintegration. Up to 30% milk could be incorporated to produce 200 mg 10-mm flat-faced placebo tablets by direct compression disintegrating within 3 min in 5-10 ml of water, which is a realistic administration volume in children. The platform could accommodate 30% of a model active pharmaceutical ingredient (caffeine citrate). © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Biochemical study of some environmental pollutants dyes Part II: disperse dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakra, S.; Ahmed, F.A.; Fetyan, N.A.

    2005-01-01

    This work was aimed to develop a method for removal of the dyes color from the textile wastewater that is well be much less costly than the other chemical or physical methods used. It therefore included: 1. Preparation of three disperses dyes. 2. Isolation of dyes degradable microorganisms from wastewater effluents and soil after adding 200 ppm of each dye individually. 3. Decolorisation and biodegradation of the dyes in liquid culture of the isolated bacteria (Bacillus thuringiensis). 4. Identification of the probable byproducts by different instruments. 5. Toxicity assessment of the dyes and their biodegraded products

  12. Electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol: study with Pt:Mo dispersed catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Neto Almir

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol on Pt:Mo dispersed on carbon prepared using an alternative method recently developed in this laboratory was investigated. The EDX analysis confirmed that the simultaneous reduction of the precursor salts of Pt and Mo leads to the presence of these materials at the nominal composition initially calculated. The addition of Mo to Pt causes an increase of the oxidation currents, but does not improve the catalytic effect for methanol oxidation. Tafel plots for various methanol concentrations showed the presence of two slopes. On line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS was used to investigate the distribution of products and intermediates in methanol oxidation.

  13. The study on preparation of high dispersion and pure cerium dioxide for producing automotive exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Minh Tuan; Nguyen Trong Hung; Nguyen Thanh Chung

    2003-01-01

    The multi-stage counter-current solvent extraction process using TBP as the solvent has been carried out for purifying cerium and the ammonium carbonate precipitation method has been used to produce the cerium oxide of high dispersion and pure. The flow sheet of extraction system includes 3 extraction stages with O/A = 0.7,2 stripping stages and 4 scrubbing stages with O/A = 5. The condition for ammonium carbonate precipitation, drying and calcination have been investigated and a procedure that seem to be practically suitable to prepare cerium dioxide powder with great specific surface area for producing automotive exhaust catalyst has been proposed. (LMT)

  14. Local study of pollutants dispersion by a real time tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faivre-Pierret, R.X.; Sestier-Carlin, R.; Berne, P.

    1992-01-01

    It is possible to use a Gaussian mathematical model of atmospheric dispersion for calculating atmospheric transfer coefficient (ATC) in long range model, but for proximity models, an experimental model using a tracer technic has to take in account ground effects and natural or artificial obstacles. SF 6 tracer method gives the true plume ground trace in real time. The measured ATC shows a larger ground trace, lower concentration in the axis, and a displacement of the maximum concentration with regard to wind axis in comparison with the calculated ATC. (A.B.). 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Further study of a new dispersion relation for electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, A.K.; Temkin, A.

    1988-01-01

    A new recently proposed dispersion relation (DR) [Temkin, Bhatia, and Kim, J. Phys. B 19, L707 (1986)] is tested for e-He scattering; the results show that the new DR is not satisfied. Therefore we start to investigate the analytic structure of the difference amplitude, previously assumed to be nonsingular, on the negative scattering energy axis. Even under severe approximations we find that the difference amplitude contains both poles and branch points. This suggests, however, a useful approximation of these contributions to the DR which gives very satisfactory agreement in both e-H and e-He scattering. We conclude with some brief general remarks on this problem

  16. Numerical modelling and parametric study of the atmospheric dispersion after radionuclide releases: the Chernobyl accident and the Algeciras incident. Comparison with observation data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, Y.; Mathieu, A.; Quelo, D.; Sportisse, B.; Isnard, O.; Krysta, M.; Bocquet, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The attempts of modelling the release following upon the Chernobyl accident and the Algeciras incident are reported. Computing power and observation database are used for sensitivity and parametric studies. The meteorological mesoscale model MM5 is nudged with the ERA-40 reanalysis to simulate the meteorological conditions used by the dispersion model, POLAIR3D. In case of the Chernobyl accident the points of interest are many: the representativity of the meteorological simulations is evaluated using observations with a special focus on precipitation events. The radionuclide dispersion, the dry deposition and scavenging simulated by POLAIR3D are compared with European measurements of activities and depositions. Results of the sensitivity studies are done to evaluate the impact of the deposition parameterizations and source-term characteristics (height of release, quantities). The time dynamic of the contaminated cloud is also investigated with regard to the arrival time on different countries. Similarly, for the Algeciras release, sensitivity to the meteorological fields, source term and depletion processes are analyzed. For the available activity concentrations in the air, data-model comparisons are performed. (author)

  17. In vivo field dependence of proton relaxation times in human brain, liver and skeletal muscle: a multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; de Certaines, J D; Spisni, A

    1993-01-01

    and MRS, the in vivo field dispersion of T1 and T2 has been measured in order to evaluate whether ex vivo data are representative for the in vivo situation. Brain, skeletal muscle, and liver of healthy human volunteers were studied. Fifteen MR units with a field strength ranging from 0.08 T to 1.5 T took......T1 and T2 relaxation times are fundamental parameters for signal contrast behaviour in MRI. A number of ex vivo relaxometry studies have dealt with the magnetic field dispersion of T1. By means of multicenter study within the frame of the COMAC BME Concerted Action on Tissue Characterization by MRI......, whereas no significant variations were seen for T2. Our in vivo data were generally in reasonable agreement with proposed models based on ex vivo measurements....

  18. Calculation of Longitudinal Dispersion Coefficient and Modeling the Pollution Transmission in Rivers (Case studies: Severn and Narew Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parsaie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study of rivers’ water quality is extremely important. This issue is more important when the rivers are one of the main sources of water supply for drinking, agriculture and industry. Unfortunately, river pollution has become one of the most important problems in the environment. When a source of pollution is transfused into the river, due to molecular motion, turbulence, and non-uniform velocity in cross-section of flow, it quickly spreads and covers all around the cross section and moves along the river with the flow. The governing equation of pollutant transmission in river is Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE. Computer simulation of pollution transmission in rives needs to solve the ADE by analytical or numerical approaches. The ADE has analytical solution under simple boundary and initial conditions but when the flow geometry and hydraulic conditions becomes more complex such as practical engineering problems, the analytical solutions are not applicable. Therefore, to solve this equation several numerical methods have been proposed. In this paper by getting the pollution transmission in the Severn River and Narew River was simulated. Materials and Methods: The longitudinal dispersion coefficient is proportional of properties of Fluid, hydraulic condition and the river geometry characteristics. For fluid properties the density and dynamic viscosity and for hydraulic condition, the velocity, flow depth, velocity and energy gradient slope and for river geometry the width of cross section and longitudinal slope can be mentioned. Several other parameters are influencive, but cannot be clearly measured such as sinuosity path and bed form of river. To derive the governed equation of pollution transmission in river, it is enough to consider an element of river and by using the continuity equation and Fick laws to balancing the inputs and outputs the pollution discharge. To calculate the dispersion coefficient several ways as

  19. Numerical and Experimental Study on the Formation and Dispersion Patterns of Multiple Explosively Formed Penetrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Feng Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract Three-dimensional numerical simulations and experiments were performed to examine the formation and spatial dispersion patterns of integral multiple explosively formed penetrators (MEFP warhead with seven hemispherical liners. Numerical results had successfully described the formation process and distribution pattern of MEFP. A group of penetrators consisting of a central penetrator surrounded by 6 penetrators is formed during the formation process of MEFP and moves in the direction of aiming position. The maximum divergence angle of the surrounding penetrator group was 7.8°, and the damage area could reach 0.16 m2 at 1.2 m. The laws of perforation dispersion patterns of MEFP were also obtained through a nonlinear fitting of the perforation information on the target at different standoffs. The terminal effects of the MEFP warhead were performed on three #45 steel targets with a dimension of 160cm ( 160cm ( 1.5cm at various standoffs (60, 80, and 120 cm. The simulation results were validated through penetration experiments at different standoffs. It has shown excellent agreement between simulation and experiment results.

  20. Numerical Study of Electric Field Enhanced Combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields can be used to change and control flame properties, for example changing flame speed, enhancing flame stability, or reducing pollutant emission. The ions generated in flames are believed to play the primary role. Although experiments

  1. Field Ecology Studies in the Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Philip A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a six-week field plant ecology course in Montana which is offered by the Botany Department at Southern Illinois University. The goals of the course, how it is taught, and student evaluation are also presented. (HM)

  2. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015.

  3. Field Experience Study in a Traditional Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perenich, Theresa A.

    1978-01-01

    A field experience in fashion marketing for Kansas State University students is described. The functions and responsibilities of the coordinator, the student, and the departmental supervisor are outlined, along with the evaluation processes used. (Author/LBH)

  4. Investigation of hydrodynamic parameters in a novel expanded bed configuration: local axial dispersion characterization and an empirical correlation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Taheri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of liquid behavior in an expanded bed adsorption (EBA system is important for understanding, modeling and predicting nanobioproduct/biomolecule adsorption performance in such processes. In this work, in order to analyze the local axial dispersion parameters, simple custom NBG (Nano Biotechnology Group expanded bed columns with 10 and 26 mm inner diameter were modified by insertion of sampling holes. Based on this configuration, the particles and liquid can be withdrawn directly from various axial positions of the columns. Streamline DEAE particles were used as solid phase in this work. The effects of factors such as liquid velocity, viscosity, settled bed height and column diameter on the hydrodynamic parameters were investigated. Local bed voidages in different axial bed positions were measured by a direct procedure within the column with 26 mm diameter. Increasing trend of voidage with velocity at a certain position of the bed and with bed height at a certain degree of expansion was observed. Residence time distribution (RTD analysis at various bed points showed approximately uniform hydrodynamic behavior in the column with 10 mm diameter while a decreasing trend of mixing/dispersion along the bed height at a certain degree of expansion was seen in the column with 26 mm diameter. Also lower mixing/dispersion occured in the smaller diameter column. Finally, a combination of two empirical correlations proposed by Richardson-Zaki and Tong-Sun was successfully employed for identification of the bed voidage at various bed heights (RSSE=99.9%. Among the empirical correlations presented in the literatures for variation of the axial dispersion coefficient, the Yun correlation gave good agreement with our experimental data (RSSE=87% in this column.

  5. Dispersion of sulphur in the northern hemisphere. A study with a 3-dimensional time-resolved model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrason, L

    1996-12-31

    This thesis on atmospheric dispersion of sulphur presents a calculation of intercontinental transport of oxidized sulphur and allocates different contributions to sulphur background levels over Europe. It is found that a significant fraction of anthropogenic sulphur (AS) is transported out of continental boundaries thus affecting the background levels over major parts of the northern hemisphere. Over Europe, the contribution of AS from North America is similar in amount to that of Asian AS and natural sources from the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the yearly contribution of intercontinental transport to deposition of sulphur over Europe is quite small, it can be much more important over certain areas and seasons and is comparable to the contributions from individual European countries. The calculations are based on a three-dimensional Eulerian time-resolved model that describes sulphur dispersion in the atmosphere in connection with large-scale synoptic flows and agree well with observations. The thesis emphasizes the role of synoptic scale atmospheric motions in determining intercontinental transport of sulphur. It indicates the need to resolve individual cyclones and anticyclones in order to describe the dispersion and distribution of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere and stresses the value of comparing model calculations with observations, both in atmospheric chemistry studies and in climate applications. 260 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. A numerical study of diurnally varying surface temperature on flow patterns and pollutant dispersion in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zijing; Dong, Jingliang; Xiao, Yimin; Tu, Jiyuan

    2015-03-01

    The impacts of the diurnal variation of surface temperature on street canyon flow pattern and pollutant dispersion are investigated based on a two-dimensional street canyon model under different thermal stratifications. Uneven distributed street temperature conditions and a user-defined wall function representing the heat transfer between the air and the street canyon are integrated into the current numerical model. The prediction accuracy of this model is successfully validated against a published wind tunnel experiment. Then, a series of numerical simulations representing four time scenarios (Morning, Afternoon, Noon and Night) are performed at different Bulk Richardson number (Rb). The results demonstrate that uneven distributed street temperature conditions significantly alters street canyon flow structure and pollutant dispersion characteristics compared with conventional uniform street temperature assumption, especially for the morning event. Moreover, air flow patterns and pollutant dispersion are greatly influenced by diurnal variation of surface temperature under unstable stratification conditions. Furthermore, the residual pollutant in near-ground-zone decreases as Rb increases in noon, afternoon and night events under all studied stability conditions.

  7. Dispersion of sulphur in the northern hemisphere. A study with a 3-dimensional time-resolved model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrason, L.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis on atmospheric dispersion of sulphur presents a calculation of intercontinental transport of oxidized sulphur and allocates different contributions to sulphur background levels over Europe. It is found that a significant fraction of anthropogenic sulphur (AS) is transported out of continental boundaries thus affecting the background levels over major parts of the northern hemisphere. Over Europe, the contribution of AS from North America is similar in amount to that of Asian AS and natural sources from the North Atlantic Ocean. Although the yearly contribution of intercontinental transport to deposition of sulphur over Europe is quite small, it can be much more important over certain areas and seasons and is comparable to the contributions from individual European countries. The calculations are based on a three-dimensional Eulerian time-resolved model that describes sulphur dispersion in the atmosphere in connection with large-scale synoptic flows and agree well with observations. The thesis emphasizes the role of synoptic scale atmospheric motions in determining intercontinental transport of sulphur. It indicates the need to resolve individual cyclones and anticyclones in order to describe the dispersion and distribution of atmospheric sulphur in the northern hemisphere and stresses the value of comparing model calculations with observations, both in atmospheric chemistry studies and in climate applications. 260 refs., 50 figs., 17 tabs.

  8. Geometry of physical dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzel, Dennis; Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-01-01

    To serve as a dispersion relation, a cotangent bundle function must satisfy three simple algebraic properties. These conditions are derived from the inescapable physical requirements that local matter field dynamics must be predictive and allow for an observer-independent notion of positive energy. Possible modifications of the standard relativistic dispersion relation are thereby severely restricted. For instance, the dispersion relations associated with popular deformations of Maxwell theory by Gambini-Pullin or Myers-Pospelov are not admissible. Dispersion relations passing the simple algebraic checks derived here correspond to physically admissible Finslerian refinements of Lorentzian geometry.

  9. Field studies and modeling of chemical processes in the unsaturated zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Technical assistance is being provided to Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to evaluate the validity of several guidelines listed in 10 CFR Part 61 for the future burial of low-level radioactive waste. Those guidelines include the requirement that the burial site shall be capable of being modeled. Both laboratory- and field-scale studies are being conducted under unsaturated moisture conditions and under steady-state and unsteady-state flow conditions. This paper reviews the kinds of present experiments in low-level radioactive waste disposal in development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major emphasis is on some of the initial analyses of data for laboratory sorption experiments and for field transport tests. Brief reference is made to leaching and transport studies. Laboratory batch equilibrium sorption studies suggest that adsorption of nonconservative tracers can be described in terms of two empirical constants; one gives an indication of the average K/sub d/ for all adsorption sites and the other gives an indication of the spread of individual K/sub d/'s about the average K/sub d/. This information can be translated into a ''chemical dispersion'' under dynamic flow and equilibrium sorption conditions that is in addition to the traditionally accepted physical dispersion. Laboratory nonequilibrium sorption studies suggest that nonequilibrium models may be needed to model the transport of the nonconservative tracers cobalt and cesium; equilibrium models should be suitable to model strontium transport. Analyses from field-scale studies indicate that conservative tracers can reasonably be modeled with a one-dimensional advective-dispersive equation for steady flow. 12 figs., 1 tab

  10. Gendered Choices : Fields of study of adolescents in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van der Vleuten, M.

    2018-01-01

    Choosing a field of study is an important decision in determining future educational trajectories and occupations, and we know that boys and girls make different field of study choices. Girls are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical masculine fields like science and technology, whereas boys are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical feminine fields like education or health-related fields. This dissertation provides insight in the different ways in which adolescents’ social environment a...

  11. Poloidal field distribution studies in tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Kojyu; Nishio, Satoshi; Fujisawa, Noboru; Sugihara, Masayoshi; Saito, Seiji

    1983-01-01

    On the design studies with the INTOR plasma equilibrium and poloidal field coil configuration (PFCC) from the Phase I to the Phase II A have been obtained the following main results. Three optimized PFCCs have been obtained: the INTOR-J ''Universal'' with the optimized PFCC for the divertor configuration, the optimized PFCC for the pump limiter, and the INTOR ''Universal'' with the PFCC defined as the INTOR reference. These PFCCs satisfy with the requirements for the porthole size for the remote assembly and maintenance of the device, and the maximum flux swing and current densities of the solenoidal coils. The INTOR-J ''Universal'' will be almost the same as the INTOR ''Universal'' in the reactor size. But the optimized PFCC for the pump limiter will be a little larger than the above two configuration because of being in need of slightly larger radii on the two large coils if the plasma with 1.5 in elongation is unconditionally necessary. The total sum of absolute currents with PFCC, which is used as a parameter for its figure of merit, is found to be given in a range of 80 -- 90 MAT at high beta for the divertor configuration for both of the INTOR-J ''Universal'' and the INTOR ''Universal''. The optimized PFCC for pump limiter has 70 -- 80 MAT in its range. The INTOR-J ''Universal'' and the INTOR ''Universal'' for the pump limiter will have its larger sum than one optimized for pump limiter by several MAT. The ''EF only'' method, where the flux, psi sub(P), necessary for maintaining the plasma current on high beta is provided only by EF coils, seems to give the total sum a little less than the ''EF + OH'' method using EF and OH coils for psi sub(P). (J.P.N.)

  12. Numerical studies of gauge field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creutz, M.

    1981-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation of statistical systems is a well established technique of the condensed matter physicist. In the last few years, particle theorists have rediscovered this method and are having a marvelous time applying it to quantized gauge field theories. The main result has been strong numerical evidence that the standard SU(3) non-Abelian gauge theory of the strong interaction is capable of simultaneously confining quarks into the physical hadrons and exhibiting asymptotic freedom, the phenomenon of quark interactions being small at short distances. In four dimensions, confinement is a non-perturbative phenomenon. Essentially all models of confinement tie widely separated quarks together with strings of gauge field flux. This gives rise to a linear potential at long distances. A Monte Carlo program generates a sequence of field configuration by a series of random changes of the fields. The algorithm is so constructed that ultimately the probability density for finding any given configuration is proportional to the Boltzmann weighting. We bring our lattices into thermal equilibrium with a heat bath at a temperature specified by the coupling constant. Thus we do computer experiments with four-dimensional crystals stored in a computer memory. As the entire field configuration is stored, we have access to any correlation function desired. These lectures describe the kinds of experiments being done and the implications of these results for strong interaction physics

  13. Chemical countermeasures: Dispersants overview of dispersant use (including application) and research issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    I will attempt in twenty minutes to summarize the state of research on oil spill dispersants as I perceive it. The expertise I bring to this task includes 20 years of experience with the fate and effects of petroleum in the marine environment, including participation in the 1973 and 1981 NRC studies and three years as chairman of the NRC committee on oil spill dispersants. I More recently I served on a committee of the International Maritime Organization which reviewed the open-quotes Impact of oil and related chemicals and wastes on the marine environment.close quotes That report will be published this year. However, my statements in this paper are not made as a representative of either NRC or IMO. They are my own interpretation of scientific literature cited in the above reviews. Dispersants are chemical formulations, which include surface active agents, designed to decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water. Because the first attempts to disperse oil on a large scale, at the Torrey Canyon spill of 1967, used highly toxic degreasing agents, dispersants have an undeserved reputation for toxicity. In fact, for twenty years dispersant formulations have been developed with an emphasis on reducing their toxicity to marine life. The dispersal of oil in water has been documented in the laboratory by dozens of papers (see references in NRC 1989, pp 70-79), and in the field by dozens of studies (NRC 1989, pp 165- 193). The toxicity of commercial dispersant formulations (NRC 1989, pp 81-123) and dispersed oil (NRC 1989, pp 123-147) has been tested on a wide variety of marine organisms ranging from algae to salmonid fishes. The NRC review has been updated by the IMO/GESAMP (1992) study, but the conclusions remain unchanged

  14. Reflections on the Field of Educational Management Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, John

    1999-01-01

    Explores educational management studies as an intellectual field. Draws on Bernstein and Bourieu's theorization of "field" to identify its specialized discourse, field positions and their objective relations, and the location of field occupants (the academic, the practitioner, and the entrepreneur). This configuration shapes educational…

  15. Entanglement Dynamics of Linear and Nonlinear Interaction of Two Two-Level Atoms with a Quantized Phase-Damped Field in the Dispersive Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoly, M. K.; Daneshmand, R.; Rustaee, N.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we study the linear and nonlinear (intensity-dependent) interactions of two two-level atoms with a single-mode quantized field far from resonance, while the phase-damping effect is also taken into account. To find the analytical solution of the atom-field state vector corresponding to the considered model, after deducing the effective Hamiltonian we evaluate the time-dependent elements of the density operator using the master equation approach and superoperator method. Consequently, we are able to study the influences of the special nonlinearity function f (n) = √ {n}, the intensity of the initial coherent state field and the phase-damping parameter on the degree of entanglement of the whole system as well as the field and atom. It is shown that in the presence of damping, by passing time, the amount of entanglement of each subsystem with the rest of system, asymptotically reaches to its stationary and maximum value. Also, the nonlinear interaction does not have any effect on the entanglement of one of the atoms with the rest of system, but it changes the amplitude and time period of entanglement oscillations of the field and the other atom. Moreover, this may cause that, the degree of entanglement which may be low (high) at some moments of time becomes high (low) by entering the intensity-dependent function in the atom-field coupling.

  16. An experimental study of the impact of trees and urban form on the turbulent dispersion of heavy particles from near ground point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, R., II; Christen, A.; Mahaffee, W.; Salesky, S.; Therias, A.; Caitlin, S.

    2017-12-01

    Pollution in the form of small particles has a strong impact on a wide variety of urban processes that play an important role in the function of urban ecosystems and ultimately human health and well-being. As a result, a substantial body of research exists on the sources, sinks, and transport characteristics of urban particulate matter. Most of the existing experimental work examining point sources employed gases (e.g., SF6) as the working medium. Furthermore, the focus of most studies has been on the dispersion of pollutants far from the source location. Here, our focus is on the turbulent dispersion of heavy particles in the near source region of a suburban neighborhood. To this end, we conducted a series of heavy particle releases in the Sunset neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada during June, 2017. The particles where dispersed from a near ground point source at two different locations. The Sunset neighborhood is composed mostly of single dwelling detached houses and has been used in numerous previous urban studies. One of the release points was just upwind of a 4-way intersection and the other in the middle of a contiguous block of houses. Each location had a significant density of trees. A minimum of four different successful release events were conducted at each site. During each release, fluorescing micro particles (mean diameter approx. 30 micron) were released from ultrasonic atomizer nozzles for a duration of approximately 20 minutes. The particles where sampled at 50 locations (1.5 m height) in the area downwind of the release over distances from 1-15 times the mean canopy height ( 6 m) using rotating impaction traps. In addition to the 50 sampler locations, instantaneous wind velocities were measured with eight sonic anemometers distributed horizontally and vertically throughout the release area. The resulting particle plume distributions indicate a strong impact of local urban form in the near source region and a high degree of sensitivity to the local

  17. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurements of the geomagnetic field have been made for more than 400 years, beginning with individual determinations of the angle between geographic and magnetic North. This was followed by the start of continuous time series of full vector measurements at geomagnetic observatories...... and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....

  18. Sensitivity study of the Continuous Release Dispersion Model (CRDM) for radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, F.

    1987-08-01

    The Continuous Release Dispersion Model (CRDM) is used to calculate spatial distribution of pollutants and their radiation doses in the event of accidental releases of radioactive material from Nuclear Generation Stations. A sensitivity analysis of the CRDM was carried out to develop a method for quantifying the expected output uncertainty due to inaccuracies and uncertainties in the input values. A simulation approach was used to explore the behaviour of the sensitivity functions. It was found that the most sensitive variable is wind speed, the least sensitive is the ambient temperature, and that largest values of normalized concentrations are likely to occur for small values of wind speed and highly stable atmospheric conditions. It was also shown that an error between 10% and 25% should be expected in the output values for a 1% overall error in the input values, and this factor could be much larger in certain situations

  19. Experimental study on stimulated scattering of ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Jiulin, E-mail: hyq1304@126.com; Wu, Haopeng [Nanchang Hangkong University, Jiangxi Engineering Laboratory for Optoelectronics Testing Technology (China); Yan, Feng; Yang, Junjie [Nanchang Hangkong University, School of Measuring and Optical Engineering (China); He, Xingdao, E-mail: xingdaohe@126.com [Nanchang Hangkong University, Jiangxi Engineering Laboratory for Optoelectronics Testing Technology (China)

    2016-01-15

    The backward stimulated scattering (BSS) from ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water has been investigated experimentally by employing a Nd:YAG pulse laser with ∼532 nm wavelength and ∼8 ns pulse width as the pump laser source. The present results show that the BSS effect is uniquely and unequivocally different compared to other known stimulated scattering, such as stimulated Rayleigh scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and stimulated Raman scattering, and it displays the characteristics of no frequency shift and threshold dependence on initial spontaneous Mie scattering seed source. These can be understood by means of the Mie scattering theory and a laser-induced stationary Bragg grating model.

  20. A numerical study of wave dispersion curves in cylindrical rods with circular cross-section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamos G.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a finite element approach for modeling longitudinal wave propagation in thick cylindrical rods with circular cross-section. The formulation is based on simple time domain response of the structure to a properly chosen excitation, and is calculated with an explicit finite element solver. The proposed post-treatment procedure identifies the wavenumber for each mode of wave propagation at the desired frequency. The procedure is implemented and integrated in an efficient way in the explicit finite element code Europlexus. The numerical results are compared to the analytical ones obtained from the solution of the Pochhammer — Chree equation, which provides the dispersion curves for wavetrains in solid cylinders of infinite length.

  1. An ALC study of spin exchange of a muoniated cosurfactant in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, H. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: h.dilger@ipc.uni-stuttgart.de; Martyniak, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Vujosevic' , D. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Tucker, I.M. [Unilever Research and Development, Port Sunlight, Wirral, CH63 3JW (United Kingdom); McKenzie, I. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Roduner, E. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-03-31

    The Avoided Level Crossing muon spin resonance (ALC-{mu}SR) technique has been used to measure the Heisenberg spin exchange rate between the Mu adducts of 2-phenylethanol (PEA) and Ni{sup 2+} in a concentrated lamellar phase dispersion composed of the dichain cationic surfactant 2,3-diheptadecyl ester ethoxypropyl-1,1,1-trimethylammonium chloride (DHTAC) and water. Ni{sup 2+} is only dissolved in the aqueous phase, therefore information about the local environment of the PEA can be extracted from the spin exchange rate. In the high-temperature (L{sub {alpha}}) phase the spin exchange is very slow, revealing that PEA preferentially resides in the headgroup regime of the surfactant. In the low-temperature (L{sub {beta}}) phase the spin exchange is diffusion controlled, because the PEA is expelled into the water region between the bilayers.

  2. An ALC study of spin exchange of a muoniated cosurfactant in lamellar phase surfactant dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilger, H.; Martyniak, A.; Scheuermann, R.; Vujosevic', D.; Tucker, I.M.; McKenzie, I.; Roduner, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Avoided Level Crossing muon spin resonance (ALC-μSR) technique has been used to measure the Heisenberg spin exchange rate between the Mu adducts of 2-phenylethanol (PEA) and Ni 2+ in a concentrated lamellar phase dispersion composed of the dichain cationic surfactant 2,3-diheptadecyl ester ethoxypropyl-1,1,1-trimethylammonium chloride (DHTAC) and water. Ni 2+ is only dissolved in the aqueous phase, therefore information about the local environment of the PEA can be extracted from the spin exchange rate. In the high-temperature (L α ) phase the spin exchange is very slow, revealing that PEA preferentially resides in the headgroup regime of the surfactant. In the low-temperature (L β ) phase the spin exchange is diffusion controlled, because the PEA is expelled into the water region between the bilayers

  3. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Hameed Inayat, Mansoor; Hussain Khan, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  4. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Mansoor Hameed Inayat; Iqbal Hussain Khan

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  5. A Semi-Analytical Model for Dispersion Modelling Studies in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Sharan, M.

    2017-12-01

    The severe impact of harmful air pollutants has always been a cause of concern for a wide variety of air quality analysis. The analytical models based on the solution of the advection-diffusion equation have been the first and remain the convenient way for modeling air pollutant dispersion as it is easy to handle the dispersion parameters and related physics in it. A mathematical model describing the crosswind integrated concentration is presented. The analytical solution to the resulting advection-diffusion equation is limited to a constant and simple profiles of eddy diffusivity and wind speed. In practice, the wind speed depends on the vertical height above the ground and eddy diffusivity profiles on the downwind distance from the source as well as the vertical height. In the present model, a method of eigen-function expansion is used to solve the resulting partial differential equation with the appropriate boundary conditions. This leads to a system of first order ordinary differential equations with a coefficient matrix depending on the downwind distance. The solution of this system, in general, can be expressed in terms of Peano-baker series which is not easy to compute, particularly when the coefficient matrix becomes non-commutative (Martin et al., 1967). An approach based on Taylor's series expansion is introduced to find the numerical solution of first order system. The method is applied to various profiles of wind speed and eddy diffusivities. The solution computed from the proposed methodology is found to be efficient and accurate in comparison to those available in the literature. The performance of the model is evaluated with the diffusion datasets from Copenhagen (Gryning et al., 1987) and Hanford (Doran et al., 1985). In addition, the proposed method is used to deduce three dimensional concentrations by considering the Gaussian distribution in crosswind direction, which is also evaluated with diffusion data corresponding to a continuous point source.

  6. Preparation, characterization, and dissolution studies of naproxen solid dispersions using polyethylene glycol 6000 and labrafil M2130

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naproxen is a poor water soluble, non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. The enhancement of oral bioavailability of poor water soluble drugs remains one of the most challenging aspects of drug development. Although salt formation, solubilization and particle size reduction have commonly been used to increase dissolution rate and thereby oral absorption and bioavailability of low water soluble drugs, there are practical limitation of these techniques. However, the most attractive option for increasing the release rate is improvement of solubility through formulation approaches. In this study, solid dispersions (SD of naproxen were prepared by hot melt method using various ratios of drug to polymers (PEG6000 separately and characterized for physical appearance, FTIR, DSC, X-Ray crystallography, and in-vitro dissolution studies. The influence of several amounts of Labrafil M2130 was also studied. FTIR study revealed that drug was stable in SDs, and great state of amorphous formed particles was proofed by DSC analysis. The in vitro dissolution studies were carried using USP type II (paddle dissolution apparatus at medium (pH 1.5. Solubility of naproxen from SDs was increased in dissolution media. The prepared dispersion showed increase in the dissolution rate of naproxen comparing to that of physical mixtures of drug and polymers and pure drug. Percent of drug released in 60 minutes was 23.92% for pure naproxen witch is increased in SDs and reached to100% for best formulations of PEG6000 and labrafil based SDs respectively, considering ratio of drug to polymers.It is concluded that dissolution of the naproxen could be improved by the solid dispersion. Although physical mixtures have increased the rate of dissolution, dissolution shows faster release from SDs which would therefore be due to formation of amorphous particles through the hot melt process which was also revealed by DSC analysis and XRD.

  7. A critical review on the scaling theory of dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Alraune; Mai, Juliane; Attinger, Sabine; Dietrich, Peter; Teutsch, Georg; Fiori, Aldo; Rubin, Yoram

    2014-05-01

    The phenomenon of dispersive mixing of solutes in aquifers is subject of research since decades. The characterization of dispersivity at a particular field site is a prerequisite to predict the movement and spreading of a contaminant plume. Experimental investigations have shown, that field-scale dispersivities vary over orders of magnitude, which apparently depends on the scale of measurement. Gelhar et al. [1992] and Schulze-Makuch [2005] have reviewed a large number of transport experiments reported in the literature. Based on that data Schulze-Makuch [2005] performed a trend analysis of longitudinal dispersivity, fostering the empirical relationship of a power law between dispersivities and the scale of measurement without an upper bound. The goal of our study is to critically revisit not only the data used for the trend analysis but the power-law scale dependence of longitudinal dispersivity (e.g. Neuman [1990], Xu and Eckstein [1995]). Our particular focus is on the reported dispersivities of large amount (larger than 100m) and large measurement scales (in the order of kilometers). We aim to evaluate current theories of transport against a critical "mass" of field experiments and to bracket the conditions of their applicability. We further aim to evaluate the adequacy of the field sampling techniques that were employed from the perspective of more than 30 years development in modeling and field characterization. Given the tremendous progress in field data acquisition techniques and new insights gained, it is reasonable to expect that interpretations of past experiments may be flawed due to the limitations or inadequacy of field sampling techniques. Gelhar, L.W., C. Welty, and K.R. Rehfeldt, 1992, A critical review of data on field-scale dispersion in aquifers, Water Resources Research 28, No. 7: 1955-1974. Schulze-Makuch, D., 2005, Longitudinal dispersivity data and implications for scaling behavior, Ground Water, Vol. 43, No. 3, 443-456. Neuman, S.P., 1990

  8. Theoretical study of the interparticle interaction of nanoparticles randomly dispersed on a substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikoshi, S.; Kato, T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles exhibit the phenomenon of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to the collective oscillation of their conduction electrons, which is induced by external electromagnetic radiation. The finite-differential time-domain (FDTD) method is widely used as an electromagnetic field analysis tool for nanoparticles. Although the influence of interparticle interactions is taken into consideration in the FDTD calculation for the plural particles configuration, the FDTD calculation of a random configuration is very difficult, particularly in the case of non-spherical particles. In this study, a theoretical calculation method incorporating interparticle interactions on a substrate with various particle shapes and sizes on a subwavelength scale is developed. The interparticle interaction is incorporated following FDTD calculation with an isolated single particle. This is explained systematically using a signal flow graph. Moreover, the mirror image effect of the substrate and the retardation effect are also taken into account in this method. The validity of this method is verified by calculations for simple arrangements of nanoparticles. In addition, it is confirmed that the method can improve the accuracy of predicted experimental results for Au nanoparticles prepared by the sputtering method, in terms of the plasmon peak wavelength. This method may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling nanoparticle characteristics, such as the size, shape, and distribution density

  9. IMOM Field Test Study and Accuracy Verification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levien, Fred

    1998-01-01

    .... It was desired to obtain flight test data for both TAMPS and IMOM in order to compare their ability to accurately predict the effects of Radar Terrain Masking (RTM). It was initially planned to have NPS compare predictive data from both of these systems and then do analysis of how they compared to actual field test data.

  10. Toward a Field of Interfaith Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Eboo

    2013-01-01

    Scholars from a range of fields have long taken an interest in how people who orient around religion differently interact with one another. Indeed, this phenomenon has been the subject of important works in political science ("The Clash of Civilizations" by Samuel Huntington), sociology ("American Grace" by Robert Putnam and…

  11. Combustion Safety Simplified Test Protocol Field Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, L [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Cautley, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Bohac, D. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Francisco, P. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Shen, L. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Gloss, S. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2015-11-05

    "9Combustions safety is an important step in the process of upgrading homes for energy efficiency. There are several approaches used by field practitioners, but researchers have indicated that the test procedures in use are complex to implement and provide too many false positives. Field failures often mean that the house is not upgraded until after remediation or not at all, if not include in the program. In this report the PARR and NorthernSTAR DOE Building America Teams provide a simplified test procedure that is easier to implement and should produce fewer false positives. A survey of state weatherization agencies on combustion safety issues, details of a field data collection instrumentation package, summary of data collected over seven months, data analysis and results are included. The project provides several key results. State weatherization agencies do not generally track combustion safety failures, the data from those that do suggest that there is little actual evidence that combustion safety failures due to spillage from non-dryer exhaust are common and that only a very small number of homes are subject to the failures. The project team collected field data on 11 houses in 2015. Of these homes, two houses that demonstrated prolonged and excessive spillage were also the only two with venting systems out of compliance with the National Fuel Gas Code. The remaining homes experienced spillage that only occasionally extended beyond the first minute of operation. Combustion zone depressurization, outdoor temperature, and operation of individual fans all provide statistically significant predictors of spillage.

  12. Studies on waste field dilution in the vicinity of a marine outfall off Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.; Sarma, R.V.; Zingde, M.D.

    Results are obtained using dimensional analysis to describe the characteristics of waste field at the marine outfall site off Bombay with a thrust on intermediate scale dispersion processes, which are of relevance to the assessment...

  13. Dispersion modeling by kinematic simulation: Cloud dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, J C H; Perkins, R J

    2008-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to compute mean and fluctuating concentrations in complex turbulent flows (tidal current near a coast and deep ocean). An initial distribution of material is discretized into any small clouds which are advected by a combination of the mean flow and large scale turbulence. The turbulence can be simulated either by kinematic simulation (KS) or direct numerical simulation. The clouds also diffuse relative to their centroids; the statistics for this are obtained from a separate calculation of the growth of individual clouds in small scale turbulence, generated by KS. The ensemble of discrete clouds is periodically re-discretized, to limit the size of the small clouds and prevent overlapping. The model is illustrated with simulations of dispersion in uniform flow, and the results are compared with analytic, steady state solutions. The aim of this study is to understand how pollutants disperses in a turbulent flow through a numerical simulation of fluid particle motion in a random flow field generated by Fourier modes. Although this homogeneous turbulent is rather a 'simple' flow, it represents a building block toward understanding pollutant dispersion in more complex flow. The results presented here are preliminary in nature, but we expect that similar qualitative results should be observed in a genuine turbulent flow.

  14. A CFD study on the effectiveness of trees to disperse road traffic emissions at a city scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanjean, A. P. R.; Hinchliffe, G.; McMullan, W. A.; Monks, P. S.; Leigh, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effectiveness of trees at dispersing road traffic emissions on a city scale. CFD simulations of air-pollutant concentrations were performed using the OpenFOAM software platform using the k-ε model. Results were validated against the CODASC wind tunnel database before being applied to a LIDAR database of buildings and trees representing the City of Leicester (UK). Most other CFD models in the literature typically use idealised buildings to model wind flow and pollution dispersion. However, the methodology used in this study uses real buildings and trees data from LIDAR to reconstruct a 3D representation of Leicester City Centre. It focuses on a 2 × 2 km area which is on a scale larger than those usually used in other CFD studies. Furthermore, the primary focus of this study is on the interaction of trees with wind flow dynamics. It was found that in effect, trees have a regionally beneficial impact on road traffic emissions by increasing turbulence and reducing ambient concentrations of road traffic emissions by 7% at pedestrian height on average. This was an important result given that previous studies generally concluded that trees trapped pollution by obstructing wind flow in street canyons. Therefore, this study is novel both in its methodology and subsequent results, highlighting the importance of combining local and regional scale models for assessing the impact of trees in urban planning.

  15. Optimal methods for fitting probability distributions to propagule retention time in studies of zoochorous dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Duarte S; Santamaría, Luis; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-02-01

    Propagule retention time is a key factor in determining propagule dispersal distance and the shape of "seed shadows". Propagules dispersed by animal vectors are either ingested and retained in the gut until defecation or attached externally to the body until detachment. Retention time is a continuous variable, but it is commonly measured at discrete time points, according to pre-established sampling time-intervals. Although parametric continuous distributions have been widely fitted to these interval-censored data, the performance of different fitting methods has not been evaluated. To investigate the performance of five different fitting methods, we fitted parametric probability distributions to typical discretized retention-time data with known distribution using as data-points either the lower, mid or upper bounds of sampling intervals, as well as the cumulative distribution of observed values (using either maximum likelihood or non-linear least squares for parameter estimation); then compared the estimated and original distributions to assess the accuracy of each method. We also assessed the robustness of these methods to variations in the sampling procedure (sample size and length of sampling time-intervals). Fittings to the cumulative distribution performed better for all types of parametric distributions (lognormal, gamma and Weibull distributions) and were more robust to variations in sample size and sampling time-intervals. These estimated distributions had negligible deviations of up to 0.045 in cumulative probability of retention times (according to the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic) in relation to original distributions from which propagule retention time was simulated, supporting the overall accuracy of this fitting method. In contrast, fitting the sampling-interval bounds resulted in greater deviations that ranged from 0.058 to 0.273 in cumulative probability of retention times, which may introduce considerable biases in parameter estimates. We

  16. Gendered Choices : Fields of study of adolescents in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vleuten, M.

    2018-01-01

    Choosing a field of study is an important decision in determining future educational trajectories and occupations, and we know that boys and girls make different field of study choices. Girls are underrepresented in gender-stereotypical masculine fields like science and technology, whereas boys are

  17. Study of one dimensional magnetic system via field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talim, S.L.

    1988-04-01

    We present a study of one-dimensional magnetic system using field theory methods. We studied the discreteness effects in a classical anisotropic one dimensional antiferromagnet in an external magnetic field. It is shown that for TMMC, at the temperatures and magnetic fields where most experiments have been done, the corrections are small and can be neglected. (author)

  18. Diagrammatic Monte Carlo study of Fröhlich polaron dispersion in two and three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Thomas; Klimin, Sergei; Tempere, Jacques; Devreese, Jozef T.; Franchini, Cesare

    2018-04-01

    We present results for the solution of the large polaron Fröhlich Hamiltonian in 3 dimensions (3D) and 2 dimensions (2D) obtained via the diagrammatic Monte Carlo (DMC) method. Our implementation is based on the approach by Mishchenko [A. S. Mishchenko et al., Phys. Rev. B 62, 6317 (2000), 10.1103/PhysRevB.62.6317]. Polaron ground state energies and effective polaron masses are successfully benchmarked with data obtained using Feynman's path integral formalism. By comparing 3D and 2D data, we verify the analytically exact scaling relations for energies and effective masses from 3 D →2 D , which provides a stringent test for the quality of DMC predictions. The accuracy of our results is further proven by providing values for the exactly known coefficients in weak- and strong-coupling expansions. Moreover, we compute polaron dispersion curves which are validated with analytically known lower and upper limits in the small-coupling regime and verify the first-order expansion results for larger couplings, thus disproving previous critiques on the apparent incompatibility of DMC with analytical results and furnishing useful reference for a wide range of coupling strengths.

  19. Analytical study of dispersion relations for shear horizontal wave propagation in plates with periodic stubs

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Yanlong

    2015-08-01

    The coupled mode theory with coupling of diffraction modes and waveguide modes is usually used on the calculations of transmission and reflection coefficients for electromagnetic waves traveling through periodic sub-wavelength structures. In this paper, I extend this method to derive analytical solutions of high-order dispersion relations for shear horizontal (SH) wave propagation in elastic plates with periodic stubs. In the long wavelength regime, the explicit expression is obtained by this theory and derived specially by employing an effective medium. This indicates that the periodical stubs are equivalent to an effective homogenous layer in the long wavelength. Notably, in the short wavelength regime, high-order diffraction modes in the plate and high-order waveguide modes in the stubs are considered with modes coupling to compute the band structures. Numerical results of the coupled mode theory fit pretty well with the results of the finite element method (FEM). In addition, the band structures\\' evolution with the height of the stubs and the thickness of the plate shows clearly that the method can predict well the Bragg band gaps, locally resonant band gaps and high-order symmetric and anti-symmetric thickness-twist modes for the periodically structured plates. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  1. Geosynthetic clay liners - slope stability field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, D.A.; Daniel, D.E.; Koerner, R.M.; Bonaparte, R.

    1997-01-01

    A field research project was developed to examine the internal shear performance of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). Several combinations of cross sections were assembled using GCL materials that were available at the time of project initiation. The cross sections utilized were intended to simulate landfill cover applications. Thirteen (13) resulting test plots were constructed on two different slope angles, and each plot is instrumented for physical displacement and soil moisture characteristics. Test plots were constructed in a manner that dictated the shear plane in the clay portion of the GCL product. The project purpose is to assess field performance and to verify design parameters associated with the application of GCLs in waste containment applications. Interim research data shows that test slopes on 2H:1V show global deformation, but little internal shear evidence, and the 3H:1V slopes show little deformation at approximately 650 days. The research is ongoing, and this paper presents the most recent information available from the project

  2. Dispersion relation of linearly polarized strong electromagnetic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, A; Massaglia, S [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica; Dobrowolny, M [Comitato Nazionale per l' Energia Nucleaire, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Plasma Spazio

    1975-12-15

    A numerical study is presented of the dispersion relation of linearly polarized strong electromagnetic waves in a cold electron plasma. The nonlinear effects introduced by the relativistic motion of electrons are: (1) the dispersion relation depends explicitly on the field strength ..cap alpha..=eE/sub 0//mc..omega../sub 0/, and (2) the propagation of modes with frequencies below the formal electron plasma frequency is allowed.

  3. Impact of trees on pollutant dispersion in street canyons: A numerical study of the annual average effects in Antwerp, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranckx, Stijn; Vos, Peter; Maiheu, Bino; Janssen, Stijn

    2015-11-01

    Effects of vegetation on pollutant dispersion receive increased attention in attempts to reduce air pollutant concentration levels in the urban environment. In this study, we examine the influence of vegetation on the concentrations of traffic pollutants in urban street canyons using numerical simulations with the CFD code OpenFOAM. This CFD approach is validated against literature wind tunnel data of traffic pollutant dispersion in street canyons. The impact of trees is simulated for a variety of vegetation types and the full range of approaching wind directions at 15° interval. All these results are combined using meteo statistics, including effects of seasonal leaf loss, to determine the annual average effect of trees in street canyons. This analysis is performed for two pollutants, elemental carbon (EC) and PM10, using background concentrations and emission strengths for the city of Antwerp, Belgium. The results show that due to the presence of trees the annual average pollutant concentrations increase with about 8% (range of 1% to 13%) for EC and with about 1.4% (range of 0.2 to 2.6%) for PM10. The study indicates that this annual effect is considerably smaller than earlier estimates which are generally based on a specific set of governing conditions (1 wind direction, full leafed trees and peak hour traffic emissions). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental Study on Pressure Drop and Flow Dispersion in Packed Bed of Natural Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Petric Marc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional correlation for pressure drop and dispersion coefficient calculation may result in inaccurate values for zeolite packed bed as the correlations are generally developed for regularly shaped and uniformly sized particles. To support the research on the application of modified natural zeolite as tar cracking catalyst, the research on the hydrodynamic behaviour of zeolite packed bed has been conducted. Experiments were carried out using a glass column with diameter of 37.8 mm. Natural zeolite with particle size of about 2.91 to 6.4 mm was applied as packing material in the column, and the bed height was varied at 9, 19 and 29 cm. Air was used as the fluid that flows through the bed and nitrogen was used as a tracer for residence time distribution determination. Air flow rates were in the range of 20 to 100 mL/s which correspond to the laminar-transitional flow regime. The pressure drops through the bed were in the range of 1.7 to 95.6 Pa, depending on the air flow rate and bed height. From these values, the parameters in the Ergun equation were estimated, taking into account the contribution by wall effect when the ratio of column to particle diameter is low. The viscous and inertial term constants in the Ergun equation calculated ranges from 179 to 199 and 1.41 to 1.47 respectively while the particle sphericity ranges from 0.56 to 0.59. The reactor Peclet number were determined to range from 5.2 to 5.5, which indicated significant deviation from a plug flow condition.

  5. Experimental study of the propgation and dispersion of internal atmospheric gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's) appear as large-scale transverse waves in the F-region (150 to 1000 km altitude), with frequencies on the order of 0.005 to 0.005 cycles per minute, which propagate horizontally over hundreds or even thousands of kilometers. These disturbances have been observed by various radiowave techniques over the past thirty-five years and are now generally accepted as being the manifestation, in the ionized medium, of internal atmospheric gravity waves. A model describing the propagation of gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere is presented here. The dispersion relation is derived from fundamental principles, and the relation between phase velocity and group velocity is examined. The effects of the Coriolis force and horizontally stratified winds on wave propagation are also analyzed. Conservation of energy in the gravity wave requires increasing amplitude with increasing altitude, inasmuch as the atmospheric density decreases with height. However, this is counteracted by dissipation of wave energy by ion drag, thermal conductivity, and viscous damping. The production of TID's (in the ionized medium) by gravity waves (in the neutral medium) is discussed in quantitative terms, and the vertical predictive function is derived. Dartmouth College has operated a three-station ionosonde network in northern New Hampshire and Vermont on an intermittent basis since 1968. Seven large TID's, found in the 1969 data, are reexamined here in an exhaustive and successful comparison with the gravity wave model. Iso-true-height contours of electron density are used to determine several pertinent TID wave parameters as a function of height

  6. Dispersion strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scattergood, R.O.; Das, E.S.P.

    1976-01-01

    Using digital computer-based methods, models for dispersion strengthening can now be developed which take into account many of the important effects that have been neglected in the past. In particular, the self interaction of a dislocation can be treated, and a computer simulation method was developed to determine the flow stress of a random distribution of circular, impenetrable obstacles, taking into account all such interactions. The flow stress values depended on the obstacle sizes and spacings, over and above the usual 1/L dependence where L is the average obstacle spacing. From an analysis of the results, it was found that the main effects of the self interactions can be captured in a line tension analogue in which the obstacles appear to be penetrable

  7. Energy-dispersed ions in the plasma sheet boundary layer and associated phenomena: Ion heating, electron acceleration, Alfvén waves, broadband waves, perpendicular electric field spikes, and auroral emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent Cluster studies reported properties of multiple energy-dispersed ion structures in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL that showed substructure with several well separated ion beamlets, covering energies from 3 keV up to 100 keV (Keiling et al., 2004a, b. Here we report observations from two PSBL crossings, which show a number of identified one-to-one correlations between this beamlet substructure and several plasma-field characteristics: (a bimodal ion conics (<1 keV, (b field-aligned electron flow (<1 keV, (c perpendicular electric field spikes (~20 mV/m, (d broadband electrostatic ELF wave packets (<12.5 Hz, and (e enhanced broadband electromagnetic waves (<4 kHz. The one-to-one correlations strongly suggest that these phenomena were energetically driven by the ion beamlets, also noting that the energy flux of the ion beamlets was 1–2 orders of magnitude larger than, for example, the energy flux of the ion outflow. In addition, several more loosely associated correspondences were observed within the extended region containing the beamlets: (f electrostatic waves (BEN (up to 4 kHz, (g traveling and standing ULF Alfvén waves, (h field-aligned currents (FAC, and (i auroral emissions on conjugate magnetic field lines. Possible generation scenarios for these phenomena are discussed. In conclusion, it is argued that the free energy of magnetotail ion beamlets drove a variety of phenomena and that the spatial fine structure of the beamlets dictated the locations of where some of these phenomena occurred. This emphasizes the notion that PSBL ion beams are important for magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. However, it is also shown that the dissipation of electromagnetic energy flux (at altitudes below Cluster of the simultaneously occurring Alfvén waves and FAC was larger (FAC being the largest than the dissipation of beam kinetic energy flux, and thus these two energy carriers contributed more to the energy transport on PSBL field lines

  8. Nanoparticle dispersion in liquid metals by electromagnetically induced acoustic cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldre, Imants; Bojarevičs, Andris; Grants, Ilmārs; Beinerts, Toms; Kalvāns, Matīss; Milgrāvis, Mikus; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate experimentally the effect of magnetically induced cavitation applied for the purpose of nanoparticle dispersion in liquid metals. The oscillating magnetic force due to the azimuthal induction currents and the axial magnetic field excites power ultrasound in the sample. If the fields are sufficiently high then it is possible to achieve the acoustic cavitation threshold in liquid metals. Cavitation bubble collapses are known to create microscale jets with a potential to break nanoparticle agglomerates and disperse them. The samples are solidified under the contactless ultrasonic treatment and later analyzed by electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). It is observed that SiC nanoparticles are dispersed in an aluminum magnesium alloy, whereas in tin the same particles remain agglomerated in micron-sized clusters despite a more intense cavitation.

  9. The Shoreline Environment Atmospheric Dispersion Experiment (SEADEX): Meteorological and gas tracer data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.B.; Cantrell, B.K.; Morley, B.M.; Uthe, E.E.; Nitz, K.C.

    1987-10-01

    The SEADEX atmospheric dispersion field study was conducted during the period May 28 to June 8, 1982, in northeastern Wisconsin, the vicinity of the Kewaunee Power Plant on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The specific objectives of SEADEX were to characterize (1) the atmospheric dispersion and (2) the meteorological conditions influencing this dispersion as completely as possible during the test period. This field study included a series of controlled tracer tests utilizing state-of-the-art tracer measurement technology to determine horizontal and vertical dispersion over both land and water. Extensive meteorological measurements were obtained to thoroughly characterize the three-dimensional structure of the atmospheric boundary controlling the dispersion process. This volume presents the meteorological and gas tracer data collected during the field study. 391 figs., 32 tabs

  10. A Numerical Study on the Effects of Street‒canyon Aspect‒ratio on Reactive Pollutant Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. J.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the effects of street‒canyon aspect‒ratio on reactive pollutant dispersion were investigated using the coupled CFD‒chemistry model. For this, flow characteristics were analyzed first in street canyons with different aspect ratios and flow regimes were classified according to the building height. For each flow regime, dispersion characteristics were investigated in views of reactive pollutant concentration and VOCs‒NOX ratio. Finally, the relations between pollutant concentration and aspect ratio in urban street canyons were investigated. In the case of H/S = 1.0 (H is building height and S is street width), one clockwise‒rotating vortex appeared vertically and the reverse and outward flows were dominant near the street bottom. In the case of H/S = 2.0, two counter‒rotating vortices appeared vertically in the street canyon. The primary (secondary) vortex rotating clockwise (counterclockwise) was formed in upper (lower) layer. The flow patterns affected the reactive pollutant concentration in street canyons. As building height increased, mean concentration of NO decreased when one vortex was generated in street canyons and increased when two vortexes appeared in street canyons. O3 concentration showed almost contrasted tendency with those of NO because O3 was depleted by the NO titration.

  11. Postgraduate Studies in the Field of HCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Teija; Surakka, Veikko; Raisamo, Roope; Räihä, Kari-Jouko; Isokoski, Poika; Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, Kaisa; Kujala, Sari

    In September of 2007, the Tampere Unit for Computer Human Interaction (TAUCHI) at the University of Tampere and The Unit of Human-Centered Technology (IHTE) at the Tampere University of Technology initiated a joint effort to increase collaboration in the field of human-technology interaction (HTI). One of the main aims was to develop higher quality education for university students and to carry out joint internationally recognized HTI research. Both research units have their own master and postgraduate students while the focus of education is at IHTE on usability and humancentered design of interactive products and services whereas TAUCHI focuses on human-technology interaction developing it by harmonizing the potential of technology with human abilities, needs, and limitations. Based on our joint analysis we know now that together TAUCHI and IHTE are offering an internationally competitive master’s program consisting of more than 40 basic, intermediate and advanced level courses. Although both units are partners in the national Graduate School in User- Centered Information Technology (UCIT) led by TAUCHI we have recognized a clear need for developing and systematizing our doctoral education.

  12. Global and site specific multimedia (field) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutshall, N.H.; Guerin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Experience with radioactive fallout, with organic contaminants and with heavy metals has amply demonstrated that cross-media transfers are common and that understanding the transport, cycling, and fate of these contaminants requires a multimedia approach. Nonetheless, pollutants with similar physical and chemical attributes may follow markedly different pathways. The frequency of exceptions to predictions based on simplistic models is also sufficient to show that direct investigation of environmental contamination is essential to confirm validity of models used for conceptualizing a problem or for control. Modeling based on multimedia premises and regulatory controls that encompass multimedia considerations are challenged by a dilemma, however. First, the development of multimedia models or regulatory frameworks represents simplification and generalization. This is true for several reasons: (1) inadequate understanding of physical and environmental factors which control specific cross-media transfer; (2) the absence of specific data on certain multimedia pollutant concentrations; (3) even the most powerful computers do not have sufficient speed and capacity to deal with the known complexities of natural systems. On the other hand, for contaminants such as mercury, it may be necessary to include great detail; the overall distribution in the environment may be less important than the rate of some minor process. With sufficient experience and good judgment of what can be ignored, the simplifications and generalizations can be made. For the present, and for the foreseeable future, however, they absolutely must be accompanied by thorough field validation and monitoring

  13. fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad J. Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surface irrigation, such as flood or furrow, is the predominant form of irrigation in California for agronomic crops. Compared to other irrigation methods, however, it is inefficient in terms of water use; large quantities of water, instead of being used for crop production, are lost to excess deep percolation and tail runoff. In surface-irrigated fields, irrigators commonly cut off the inflow of water when the water advance reaches a familiar or convenient location downfield, but this experience-based strategy has not been very successful in reducing the tail runoff water. Our study compared conventional cutoff practices to a retroactively applied model-based cutoff method in four commercially producing alfalfa fields in Northern California, and evaluated the model using a simple sensor system for practical application in typical alfalfa fields. These field tests illustrated that the model can be used to reduce tail runoff in typical surface-irrigated fields, and using it with a wireless sensor system saves time and labor as well as water.

  14. Effects of increased small-scale biomass combustion on local air quality - A theoretical dispersion modelling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, C.

    1997-01-01

    The decided phasing out of nuclear power and the goal of reducing CO 2 emissions from fossil fuels causes a substantial estimated increase in the use of biomass fuels for energy production. Thus, a significant shift from small scale heating generated by electricity or fuel oil to biomass fuels is desirable. If a drastic deterioration of the local air quality is to be avoided, a reduction of today's emission limits is necessary. The objective of this report was therefore to describe the use of biomass fuels and small scale pellet fuel combustion, to make a theoretical study of the effects of increased pellets heating on the air quality in a residential area, and to discuss necessary emission limits for small biomass fuel plants. The general description is based on literature studies. In the theoretical study, several different dispersion model calculations were performed using the computer program Dispersion 1.1.0. The contents of tar and total hydrocarbons (THC) in the air were calculated for different scenarios with conversion from electricity to pellets and with different pellet plant performance. A sensitivity analysis was performed with additional variables and dispersion calculations according to an underlying statistical experimental design. The modeling and design computer program MODDE was used to facilitate design, evaluation and illustration of the calculated results. The results show that a substantial increase in the use of small scale pellets heating with worst calculated plant performance, will lead to a drastic increase of the content of hydrocarbons in the air. Thus, with best available performance, the content only increases marginally. Conversion from electricity to pellets, plant performance and time of year were the most influential variables. Also conversion from wood to pellets showed a significant effect, despite the small number of wood heated houses within the studied area. If a significant deterioration of the air quality is to be avoided

  15. Effect of Side Chains on Molecular Conformation of Anthracene-Ethynylene-Phenylene-Vinylene Oligomers: A Comparative Density Functional Study With and Without Dispersion Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanding; Hoppe, Harald; Beenken, Wichard J D

    2016-06-02

    Using density functional calculations with and without dispersion interaction, we studied the effects of linear octyl and branched 2-ethylhexyl side chains on the oligomer conformation of the conjugated copolymer poly(p-anthracene-ethynylene)-alt-poly(p-phenylene-vinylene). With dispersion included, the branched side chains can cause significant bending of the oligomer backbone, while without dispersion they induce mainly torsional disorder. The oligomers with mainly linear side chains keep good planarity when optimized with and without dispersion. Despite their dramatically different conformations, the calculated absorption spectra of the oligomers with various side chain combinations are very similar, indicating that the conformation of the copolymer is not the main reason for the experimentally observed different spectra of ordered and disordered phases.

  16. Selfing ability and dispersal are positively related, but not affected by range position: a multispecies study on southern African Asteraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, C; Rodger, J G; Anderson, B; Ellis, A G

    2014-05-01

    Dispersal and breeding system traits are thought to affect colonization success. As species have attained their present distribution ranges through colonization, these traits may vary geographically. Although several theories predict associations between dispersal ability, selfing ability and the relative position of a population within its geographic range, there is little theoretical or empirical consensus on exactly how these three variables are related. We investigated relationships between dispersal ability, selfing ability and range position across 28 populations of 13 annual, wind-dispersed Asteraceae species from the Namaqualand region of South Africa. Controlling for phylogeny, relative dispersal ability--assessed from vertical fall time of fruits--was positively related to an index of autofertility--determined from hand-pollination experiments. These findings support the existence of two discrete syndromes: high selfing ability associated with good dispersal and obligate outcrossing associated with lower dispersal ability. This is consistent with the hypothesis that selection for colonization success drives the evolution of an association between these traits. However, no general effect of range position on dispersal or breeding system traits was evident. This suggests selection on both breeding system and dispersal traits acts consistently across distribution ranges. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  17. Aquatic dispersion modelling of a tritium plume in Lake Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 2900 kg of tritiated water, containing 2.3E+15 Bq of tritium, were released to Lake Ontario via the cooling water discharge when a leak developed in a moderator heat exchanger in Unit 1 at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on 1992 August 2. The release provided the opportunity to study the dispersion of a tritium plume in the coastal zone of Lake Ontario. Current direction over the two-week period following the release was predominantly parallel to the shore, and elevated tritium concentrations were observed up to 20 km east and 85 km west of the PNGS. Predictions of the tritium plume movement were made using current velocity measurements taken at 8-m depth, 2.5 km offshore from Darlington and using a empirical relationship where alongshore current speed is assumed to be proportional to the alongshore component of the wind speed. The tritium migration was best described using current velocity measurements. The tritium plume dispersion is modelled using the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Transport parameters are the alongshore current speed and longitudinal dispersion coefficient. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients, estimated by fitting the solution of the advection-dispersion equation to measured concentration distance profiles ranged from 3.75 to 10.57 m 2 s -1 . Simulations using the fitted values of the dispersion coefficient were able to describe maximum tritium concentrations measured at water supply plants located within 25 km of Pickering to within a factor of 3. The dispersion coefficient is a function of spatial and temporal variability in current velocity and the fitted dispersion coefficients estimated here may not be suitable for predicting tritium plume dispersion under different current conditions. The sensitivity of the dispersion coefficient to variability in current conditions should be evaluated in further field experiments. (author). 13 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  18. Dispersion coefficients for coastal regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRae, B.L.; Kaleel, R.J.; Shearer, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken an extensive atmospheric dispersion research and measurement program from which it is intended will emerge improved predictive techniques for employment in licensing decisions and for emergency planning and response. Through this program the NRC has conducted field measurement programs over a wide range of geographic and topographic locations, and are using the acquired tracer and meteorological measurements to evaluate existing dispersion models and prediction techniques, and to develop new techniques when necessary

  19. Field Studies of Exercise and Food Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    in studies of undernourished Columbian school children playing soccer alongside adequately nour- ished children [27], when energy intake appeared to... macronutrient intakes, and energy balance. The physiological responses to hypocaloria, such as elev- ated growth hormone, increased insulin resistance, and... macronutrient composition on reproductive function has been examined, and even for women training intensely, carbohydrate intake and not protein consumption

  20. Field ion microscope studies on thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaleru, A.; Scortaru, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the progress made in the last years in FIM application to thin film structure studies and adatom properties important in the nucleation stage of thin film growth: substrate binding and mobility of individual adatoms, behaviour of adatoms clusters is presented. (author)

  1. Hydrodynamic dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryce, M.H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A dominant mechanism contributing to hydrodynamic dispersion in fluid flow through rocks is variation of travel speeds within the channels carrying the fluid, whether these be interstices between grains, in granular rocks, or cracks in fractured crystalline rocks. The complex interconnections of the channels ensure a mixing of those parts of the fluid which travel more slowly and those which travel faster. On a macroscopic scale this can be treated statistically in terms of the distribution of times taken by a particle of fluid to move from one surface of constant hydraulic potential to another, lower, potential. The distributions in the individual channels are such that very long travel times make a very important contribution. Indeed, while the mean travel time is related to distance by a well-defined transport speed, the mean square is effectively infinite. This results in an asymmetrical plume which differs markedly from a gaussian shape. The distribution of microscopic travel times is related to the distribution of apertures in the interstices, or in the microcracks, which in turn are affected in a complex way by the stresses acting on the rock matrix

  2. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to aid...... personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector......, who have a work place away from a fixed or central location and have minimal management contact. Results suggest that the support employees receive from management, such as recognition, information sharing, training, and strategic awareness are all important for spatially dispersed front...

  3. High field Moessbauer study of dilute Ir-(Fe) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takabatake, Toshiro; Mazaki, Hiromasa; Shinjo, Teruya.

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of very dilute Fe impurities in Ir has been studied by means of Moessbauer measurement in external fields up to 80 kOe at 4.2 K. The saturation hyperfine field increases in proportion to the external field up to the maximum magnetic field available. This means that for a localized spin fluctuation system IrFe, the effective magnetic moment associated with Fe impurities is induced in proportion to the external field. No anomalous spectrum was observed with a very dilute sample (--10 ppm 57 Co), indicating that the interaction between impurities is responsible for the anomalous spectrum previously observed with a less homogeneous sample. (author)

  4. Numerical study of the effects of Planetary Boundary Layer structure on the pollutant dispersion within built-up areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu; Liu, Zhenxin; Zhang, Bihui

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) structures on pollutant dispersion processes within two idealized street canyon configurations and a realistic urban area were numerically examined by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. The boundary conditions of different PBL structures/conditions were provided by simulations of the Weather Researching and Forecasting model. The simulated results of the idealized 2D and 3D street canyon experiments showed that the increment of PBL instability favored the downward transport of momentum from the upper flow above the roof to the pedestrian level within the street canyon. As a result, the flow and turbulent fields within the street canyon under the more unstable PBL condition are stronger. Therefore, more pollutants within the street canyon would be removed by the stronger advection and turbulent diffusion processes under the unstable PBL condition. On the contrary, more pollutants would be concentrated in the street canyon under the stable PBL condition. In addition, the simulations of the realistic building cluster experiments showed that the density of buildings was a crucial factor determining the dynamic effects of the PBL structure on the flow patterns. The momentum field within a denser building configuration was mostly transported from the upper flow, and was more sensitive to the PBL structures than that of the sparser building configuration. Finally, it was recommended to use the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which can explicitly output the needed turbulent variables, to provide the boundary conditions to the CFD simulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances

  6. Comparison of results from dispersion models for regulatory purposes based on Gaussian-and Lagrangian-algorithms: an evaluating literature study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, H.

    2004-01-01

    Powerful tools to describe atmospheric transport processes for radiation protection can be provided by meteorology; these are atmospheric flow and dispersion models. Concerning dispersion models, Gaussian plume models have been used since a long time to describe atmospheric dispersion processes. Advantages of the Gaussian plume models are short computation time, good validation and broad acceptance worldwide. However, some limitations and their implications on model result interpretation have to be taken into account, as the mathematical derivation of an analytic solution of the equations of motion leads to severe constraints. In order to minimise these constraints, various dispersion models for scientific and regulatory purposes have been developed and applied. Among these the Lagrangian particle models are of special interest, because these models are able to simulate atmospheric transport processes close to reality, e.g. the influence of orography, topography, wind shear and other meteorological phenomena. Within this study, the characteristics and computational results of Gaussian dispersion models as well as of Lagrangian models have been compared and evaluated on the base of numerous papers and reports published in literature. Special emphasis has been laid on the intention that dispersion models should comply with EU requests (Richtlinie 96/29/Euratom, 1996) on a more realistic assessment of the radiation exposure to the population. (orig.)

  7. Enhancement of solubility and bioavailability of ambrisentan by solid dispersion using Daucus carota as a drug carrier: formulation, characterization, in vitro, and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmane, Subhash; Deshmane, Snehal; Shelke, Santosh; Biyani, Kailash

    2018-06-01

    Ambrisentan is an US FDA approved drug, it is the second oral endothelin A receptor antagonist known for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, but its oral administration is limited due to its poor water solubility. Hence, the objective of the investigation was focused on enhancement of solubility and bioavailability of ambrisentan by solid dispersion technique using natural Daucus carota extract as drug carrier. Drug carrier was evaluated for solubility, swelling index, viscosity, angle of repose, hydration capacity, and acute toxicity test (LD 50 ). Ambrisentan was studied for the saturation solubility, phase solubility, and Gibbs free energy change. Compatibility of drug and the natural carrier was confirmed by DSC, FTIR, and XRD. Solid dispersions were evaluated for drug content, solubility, morphology, in vitro, and in vivo study. Screening of the natural carrier showed the desirable properties like water solubility, less swelling index, less viscosity, and acute toxicity study revealed no any clinical symptoms of toxicity. Drug and carrier interaction study confirmed the compatibility to consider its use in the formulation. Formed particles were found to be spherical with smooth surface. In vitro studies revealed higher drug release from the solid dispersion than that of the physical mixture. Bioavailability study confirms the increased absorption and bioavailability by oral administration of solid dispersion. Hence, it can be concluded that the natural Daucus carota extract can be the better alternative source for the preparation of solid dispersion and/or other dosage forms for improving solubility and bioavailability.

  8. Acoustomagnetoelectric effect in nondegenerate semiconductor with nonparabolic energy dispersion law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mensah, N.G.; Nkrumah, G.; Mensah, S.Y.; Allotey, F.K.A.

    2007-10-01

    We have studied acoustomagnetoelectric effect in nondegenerate semiconductor with nonparabolic energy dispersion Law. Attention was focused on the surface acoustomagnetoelectric effect (SAME). This is to reduce Joule's energy dissipated in the sample. It was observed that in a weak magnetic field the SAME is proportional to H 2 whiles in strong magnetic field it is independent of H. The effect is also dependent on the the scattering mechanism and finally SAME changes sign when the magnetic field is turned through 90 deg. (author)

  9. Field studies on the terrestrial behavior of actinide elements in East Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Bondietti, E.A.; Trabalka, J.R.; Walker, R.L.; Scott, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies on the comparative uptake of various actinide elements ( 232 Th, 233 U, 238 U, 239 Pu, 241 Am, and 244 Cm) by plants and animals inhabiting historically contaminated environments on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reservation in East Tennessee are summarized. The present-day pattern of actinide element bioaccumulation from a flood plain site contaminated with Pu in 1944 is U > Th approx. Pu. Thus the environmentally dispersed 239 Pu exhibits a transfer from floodplain soil to biota comparable to that of indigenous 232 Th and less than that of the indigenous 238 U. This ranking agrees with the chemical extractability of U, Th, and Pu from soil, using either weak acids or strongly basic reagents. The pattern of actinide element uptake from the shoreline of a historically contaminated pond is Pu 238 U = 233 U. This ranking also agrees with the chemical extractability of Pu, Am, Cm, and U from shoreline sediment, using weak acids. Results from field studies at ORNL agree with what has been generally inferred about the relative food chain transfer of the actinides, based on laboratory studies and field studies at other sites in the United States. Because they share the same valence state, there are apparent strong similarities in soil sorption, plant uptake, and animal uptake between trivalent Am and Cm and between tetravalent Pu and Th. Available evidence suggests that knowledge of the behavior of naturally occurring 232 Th in the terrestrial food chain can be useful for predicting the long-term fate of environmentally dispersed 239 Pu, while data on 238 U might be used to place an upper limit on the expected long-term food chain transfer of all transuranic elements except Np. 33 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  10. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of elemental uptake in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study suggests that the elemental concentrations in the root soils and leaves of the samples vary from farm to farm, whereby the concentrations of Cu, ... But, the most notable feature of this study is the strikingly similar elemental concentrations in the edible flower part of all samples irrespective of the type of soil.

  11. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs

  12. Study of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Systems Study of Electromagnetic Fields on Cellular Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Solorio-Meza

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Durante las últimas décadas, el interés por explicar el efecto de la radiación no ionizante, como es el caso de los campos electromagnéticos (CEM sobre sistemas celulares ha aumentado considerablemente. En este artículo se describe la interacción que existe entre los CEM y sistemas biológicos. Se discute el efecto de la estimulación electromagnética a diferentes frecuencias e intensidades en cultivos celulares. Resultados preliminares al estimular células de neuroblastomas SK-NSH con campos electromagnéticos de extra baja frecuencia (CEM-EBF, CEM que van del rango de 3 a 30 Hz, indican que se induce un estrés celularque se refleja en variaciones en la expresión de proteínas respecto al grupo de células no estimuladas. En particular, la expresión de las proteínas muestra que los CEM-EBF producen cambios en las proteínas presentes en condiciones normales o basales en las células, es decir, aparecen nuevas proteínas o existe un aumento en la cantidad de ellas.In the last decades the interest to study the effect of non-ionizing radiation, such as the electromagnetic fields (EMF on cellular systems has increased. In this article the interaction between EMF and biological systems is described. An analysis of the effect of the electromagnetic stimulation at different frequencies and intensities on cell cultures is performed. Preliminary results show that the stimulation with extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF, EMF from 3 to 30 Hz, on the cellular line of neuroblastomaSK-NSH induces cellular stress. This is reflected by a variation in the proteins expression in comparison with the group of cells no stimulated. In particular, the proteins expression shows that the ELF-EMF produce changes in the current proteins in normal or basal conditionsin the cells, that is, new proteins appear or there is evidence of an increasing in theamount of them.

  13. Study of interacting fields in a canonical formalism in Heisenberg picture of quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RANAIVOSON, R.T.R.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we have made a study on the canonical formalism of the quantum field theory. Our contribution has been the development of a study using the Heisenberg picture. We showed that this approach may be useful for the description of quantum dynamics of interacting fields in bounded states. Our approach is to start from the lagrangian density of a classical theory from which one deduce the classical evolution equations of the fields via Euler-Lagrange equation for fields and establish the expression of conserved quantities characterizing the dynamics using the Noether theorem. Passing to the canonical quantization, fields and quantities characterizing the dynamics become quantum operators and evolution equations become operatorial evolution equations in Heisenberg picture. Expressions of quantum observable are also deduced from the expressions of classical conserved quantities. After, we showed that using the properties of fields operators and quantum states vectors, one can deduce from the operatorial evolution equations, the evolution equations for the wave functions of fermions and the evolution equations of expectation values of boson fields. For the illustration, various studies were conducted: the case of electrodynamics, the case of a general gauge theory and the case of the Standard Model. [fr

  14. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2013-01-01

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media

  15. Microwave magnetoelectric fields: An analytical study of topological characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffe, R., E-mail: ioffr1@gmail.com [Microwave Magnetic Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Shamoon College of Engineering, Beer Sheva (Israel); Shavit, R.; Kamenetskii, E.O. [Microwave Magnetic Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    The near fields originated from a small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations are the fields with broken dual (electric-magnetic) symmetry. Numerical studies show that such fields – called the magnetoelectric (ME) fields – are distinguished by the power-flow vortices and helicity parameters (E.O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87 (2013) 023201). These numerical studies can well explain recent experimental results with MDM ferrite disks. In the present paper, we obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. For this purpose, we used a method of successive approximations. In the second approximation we take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk, which are excluded in the first-approximation solving of the magnetostatic (MS) spectral problem. Based on the analytical method, we obtain a “pure” structure of the electric and magnetic fields outside the MDM ferrite disk. The analytical studies can display some fundamental features that are non-observable in the numerical results. While in numerical investigations, one cannot separate the ME fields from the external electromagnetic (EM) radiation, the present theoretical analysis allows clearly distinguish the eigen topological structure of the ME fields. Importantly, this ME-field structure gives evidence for certain phenomena that can be related to the Tellegen and bianisotropic coupling effects. We discuss the question whether the MDM ferrite disk can exhibit properties of the cross magnetoelectric polarizabilities. - Highlights: • We obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. • We take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk. • We obtain a “pure” structure of the electromagnetic fields outside the ferrite disk. • Analytical studies show features that are non-observable in the numerical results. • ME-field gives evidence for

  16. Microwave magnetoelectric fields: An analytical study of topological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffe, R.; Shavit, R.; Kamenetskii, E.O.

    2015-01-01

    The near fields originated from a small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations are the fields with broken dual (electric-magnetic) symmetry. Numerical studies show that such fields – called the magnetoelectric (ME) fields – are distinguished by the power-flow vortices and helicity parameters (E.O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87 (2013) 023201). These numerical studies can well explain recent experimental results with MDM ferrite disks. In the present paper, we obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. For this purpose, we used a method of successive approximations. In the second approximation we take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk, which are excluded in the first-approximation solving of the magnetostatic (MS) spectral problem. Based on the analytical method, we obtain a “pure” structure of the electric and magnetic fields outside the MDM ferrite disk. The analytical studies can display some fundamental features that are non-observable in the numerical results. While in numerical investigations, one cannot separate the ME fields from the external electromagnetic (EM) radiation, the present theoretical analysis allows clearly distinguish the eigen topological structure of the ME fields. Importantly, this ME-field structure gives evidence for certain phenomena that can be related to the Tellegen and bianisotropic coupling effects. We discuss the question whether the MDM ferrite disk can exhibit properties of the cross magnetoelectric polarizabilities. - Highlights: • We obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. • We take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk. • We obtain a “pure” structure of the electromagnetic fields outside the ferrite disk. • Analytical studies show features that are non-observable in the numerical results. • ME-field gives evidence for

  17. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ringing of birds unveiled many aspects of avian migration and dispersal movements. However, there is even much more to be explored by the use of ringing and other marks. Dispersal is crucial in understanding the initial phase of migration in migrating birds as it is to understand patterns and processes of distribution and gene flow. So far, the analysis of migration was largely based on analysing spatial and temporal patters of recoveries of ringed birds. However, there are considerable biases and pitfalls in using recoveries due to spatial and temporal variation in reporting probabilities. Novel methods are required for future studies separating the confounding effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of recovery data and heterogeneity of the landscape as well. These novel approaches should aim a more intensive and novel use of the existing recovery data by taking advantage of, for instance, dynamic and multistate modeling, should elaborate schemes for future studies, and should also include other marks that allow a more rapid data collection, like telemetry, geolocation and global positioning systems, and chemical and molecular markers. The latter appear to be very useful in the delineating origin of birds and connectivity between breeding and non–breeding grounds. Many studies of migration are purely descriptive. However, King and Brooks (King & Brooks, 2004 examine if movement patterns of dolphins change after the introduction of a gillnet ban. Bayesian methods are an interesting approach to this problem as they provide a meaningful measure of the probability that such a change occurred rather than simple yes/no response that is often the result of classical statistical methods. However, the key difficulty of a general implementation of Bayesian methods is the complexity of the modelling —there is no general userfriendly package that is easily accessible to most scientists. Drake and Alisauskas (Drake & Alisauskas, 2004 examine the

  18. Geostatistics as a tool to study mite dispersion in physic nut plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, J F; Picanço, M C; Sarmento, R A; Pereira, R M; Pedro-Neto, M; Galdino, T V S; de Sousa Saraiva, A; Erasmo, E A L

    2015-08-01

    Spatial distribution studies in pest management identify the locations where pest attacks on crops are most severe, enabling us to understand and predict the movement of such pests. Studies on the spatial distribution of two mite species, however, are rather scarce. The mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus and Tetranychus bastosi are the major pests affecting physic nut plantations (Jatropha curcas). Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the spatial distributions of P. latus and T. bastosi in the physic nut plantations. Mite densities were monitored over 2 years in two different plantations. Sample locations were georeferenced. The experimental data were analyzed using geostatistical analyses. The total mite density was found to be higher when only one species was present (T. bastosi). When both the mite species were found in the same plantation, their peak densities occurred at different times. These mites, however, exhibited uniform spatial distribution when found at extreme densities (low or high). However, the mites showed an aggregated distribution in intermediate densities. Mite spatial distribution models were isotropic. Mite colonization commenced at the periphery of the areas under study, whereas the high-density patches extended until they reached 30 m in diameter. This has not been reported for J. curcas plants before.

  19. Application of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescent technique in the pollution study of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Htun, Kyi

    1993-03-01

    The abundance of major trace elements in water in the surface well, tube well, lake and river were measured. The technique outlined here is very useful in the study of the pollution of environmental radioactivity. For the above measurements the Si(Li) X-ray detection system was used in conjunction with a personal computer

  20. Air pollution exposure estimation using dispersion modelling and continuous monitoring data in a prospective birth cohort study in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Hooven Edith H

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previous studies suggest that pregnant women and children are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of air pollution. A prospective cohort study in pregnant women and their children enables identification of the specific effects and critical periods. This paper describes the design of air pollution exposure assessment for participants of the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study from early pregnancy onwards in 9778 women in the Netherlands. Individual exposures to PM10 and NO2 levels at the home address were estimated for mothers and children, using a combination of advanced dispersion modelling and continuous monitoring data, taking into account the spatial and temporal variation in air pollution concentrations. Full residential history was considered. We observed substantial spatial and temporal variation in air pollution exposure levels. The Generation R Study provides unique possibilities to examine effects of short- and long-term air pollution exposure on various maternal and childhood outcomes and to identify potential critical windows of exposure.

  1. A laboratory study of particulate and gaseous emissions from crude oil and crude oil-dispersant contaminated seawater due to breaking waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Li, Cheng; Rule, Ana M.; Katz, Joseph; Koehler, Kirsten

    2018-04-01

    Crude oil spill incidents occur frequently causing a verity of occupational, ecological and environmental problems. Dispersants are applied to enhance the dispersion rate of crude oil slicks into the water column. In this study, the aerosol size distribution from 10 nm to 20 μm, total particle-bound aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAH) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are measured in a 6 x 0.3 x 0.6 m tank as plunging breaking waves entrain oil slicks. The experiments are performed for seawater with slicks of crude oil, crude oil-dispersant mixture and dispersant only. The measurements investigate the effects of wave energy and slick properties on the temporal evolution of the emissions. The total number concentrations of particles originating from the oil-dispersant mixture are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those of crude oil across the entire nano-scale range, reaching 100x for 20 nm particles. Conversely, the differences in concentration are small in the micron range. The average concentrations of pPAH are variable but similar (150-270 ng/m3). The VOC concentrations for crude oil-dispersant mixtures are 2-3 times lower than those of crude oil, presumably due to the surfactant effect on mass diffusion. The drastic increase in ultrafine particle concentrations may raise concerns about effects of inhalation by cleanup workers and downstream communities though VOC emissions reduce. Findings through this study provide insight into how the spray of dispersant may change the ratio of airborne particulate matter and VOC emissions from seawater due to natural processes.

  2. Study of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants in the industrial region of the Sado estuary using biomonitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.C.; Reis, M.A.; Alves, L.C.; Marques, A.P.; Dionisio, I.; Pinheiro, R.; Almeida, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The region of Lisbon and south of Lisbon (Sado estuary) is densely industrialised, and therefore air pollution should be studied in a more detailed scale there. The topography of the Sado estuary region and the predominant wind direction from north-west contribute to the influence in this region of the industries located north. The region selected includes an oil power station. Transplants of the lichen Parmelia sulcata were suspended in nylon bags in that region within a rectangle of 15 km wide and 25 km long on a grid 2.5 km x 2.5 km; centred in the power station. In each of the 47 places two sets of four transplants each were hanged. Care was taken i) in covering the sets with a polyethylene roof to prevent leaching of elements in the lichen, ii) in building a hanging system which could rotate according to the wind direction, iii) in orienting each one set towards the wind and the other set against the wind. For one-year period and every three months, one transplant of each set is collected. In this work, the first campaign - after 3 months suspension - was collected. The lichen transplants of this campaign were cleaned, freeze-dried, and ground in a Teflon mill. Pellets were prepared for INAA and PIXE analysis. The elemental concentrations are mapped and discussed. As far as we know it is the first study on differentiation of elemental uptake of Parmelia sulcata according to wind direction; this study can furnish some insight towards the phenomena behind lichen elemental uptake. At the same time, also information upon local and distant sources is expected to be accessible. The absence of direct rainwater on the lichens during this study must be stressed too. In a previous work these two conditions - wind direction and absence of direct rainwater - were not taken into account, therefore we also aim to compare the results of both studies. (author)

  3. Normal-dispersion microresonator Kerr frequency combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb generation has developed into a hot research area in the past decade. Microresonator combs are promising for portable applications due to their potential for chip-level integration and low power consumption. According to the group velocity dispersion of the microresonator employed, research in this field may be classified into two categories: the anomalous dispersion regime and the normal dispersion regime. In this paper, we discuss the physics of Kerr comb generation in the normal dispersion regime and review recent experimental advances. The potential advantages and future directions of normal dispersion combs are also discussed.

  4. Seed dispersal in six species of terrestrial orchids in Biebrza National Park (NE Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Brzosko

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about seed dispersal is required to explain problems in ecology, phylogeography, and conservation biology. Even though seed dispersal is a fundamental mechanism to understand problems at different levels of biological organization (individual, population, species, landscape, it remains one of the least recognized processes. Similar to other groups of plants, very little is known regarding patterns and distances of seed dispersal in orchids. Orchid seeds are generally assumed to be widely dispersed by wind because of their small size and low weight. Between 2006 and 2008, we conducted a field study of the distances at which orchid seeds are dispersed, and determined factors affecting dispersal. Investigations included 13 populations of six terrestrial orchid species – Cypripedium calceolus, Cephalanthera rubra, Epipactis helleborine, Goodyera repens, Neottia ovata, and Platanthera bifolia. To evaluate seed dispersal in orchid populations, 8.5-cm Petri dishes (traps with self-adhesive paper were placed along transects, starting from a group of fruiting plants, which were considered to be the dispersal source. Seeds of the investigated orchid species were dispersed over relatively short distances. There were statistically significant negative correlations between seed density and distance from the fruiting plants. Seeds of species with taller fruiting shoots were dispersed farther than those with shorter ones (R = 0.68, p < 0.05. We discuss the causes and consequences of the dispersal patterns of orchid seeds.

  5. Preliminary Studies of the Field Movement of the Olive Fruit Fly (Dacus Oleae Gmel,) by Labelling a Natural Population with Radioactive Phosphorus (P{sup 32}); Etudes preijminaires sur les deplacements de la mouche de l'olive (Dacus Oleae Gmel. ) par marquage d'une population naturelle au radiophosphore ({sup 32}P); Predvaritel'noe issledovanie polevogo peremeshcheniya olivkovoj fruktovoj mukhi (Dacus Oleae Gmel.) posredstvom mecheniya estestvennoj populyatsii radioaktivnym fosforom (P{sup 32}).; Estudio preliminar de la dispersion de moscas del ouvo (Dacus Oleae Gmel. ) mediante la marcacion de poblaciones naturales con {sup 32}p.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelekassis, Constantine E.D.; Mourikos, P. A.; Bantzios, D. N. [Economic Entomology Laboratory, Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Athens (Greece)

    1963-09-15

    Preliminary trials were conducted to obtain the first data on the field movement of the olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae Gmel. These studies were carried out in the olive-growing area at Rovies, Evvia, Greece, during the autumn of 1961, when the maximum adult fly activity usually occurs. A mixture of radioactive P{sup 32} of H{sub 3}P{sup 32}O{sub 4} in HCl and hydrolysate protein, Staley No. 7, was prepared for labelling the naturally occurring adult fly population. Twigs of 30 olive trees which were selected in a semi-mountainous olive orchard at Rovies were treated with the P{sup 32} bait solution on 14 October 1961. Five hundred McPhail traps, containing 3% of diammonium phosphate as a lure, were used for the collection of flies. Traps were distributed in the olive groves of the entire area at Rovies and also in the adjacent areas (fewest or olive groves) up to a distance of 10 km from the treated trees. A total of 350 tagged flies of both sexes were collected in 48 traps during 15 counts of traps made between 15 October and 18 November. Labelled flies which were caught from 1 to 35 days after treatment represented 2.8% of the total number of flies collected in 48 traps, or 0.15% of the total number of flies caught in 298 traps in the entire area at Rovies. A proportion of 73% of the tagged flies were trapped within the first ten-day period following treatment. Labelled flies were found as far as 4300 m (maximum of dispersal) from the labelling station. Radioactivity of tagged flies ranged between 258 and 9549 counts/min per fly (background radiation 8-21 counts/min). These preliminary trials have confirmed a more or less continuous local movement (dispersal) o f flies from the semi-mountainous grove to the adjacent plains or to the coastal olive groves at Rovies from the north to south. Long-distance movement (migration) of Dacus flies to other areas has not been observed. Pine woods appear to act as a barrier to die movement of Dacus oleae adults. (author

  6. A Study On Dispersion Stability Of Nickel Nanoparticles Synthesized By Wire Explosion In Liquid Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kim C.K.; Lee G.-J.; Lee M.K.; Rhee C.K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol using portable pulsed wire evaporation, which is a one-step physical method. From transmission electron microscopy images, it was found that the Ni nanoparticles exhibited a spherical shape with an average diameter of 7.3 nm. To prevent aggregation of the nickel nanoparticles, a polymer surfactant was added into the ethanol before the synthesis of nickel nanoparticles, and adsorbed on the freshly synthesized nickel nanoparticles ...

  7. Gravimetric and conductometric studies of the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous dispersions of kaoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulavyin, L.A.; Khrapatij, S.V.; Koval'chuk, V.Yi.; Klepko, V.V.; Lebovka, M.Yi.

    2006-01-01

    Using gravimetric and conductometric methods, the sedimentation kinetics in aqueous suspensions of Alekseev kaoline has been studied for pH value range from 4 to 10. It has been found that pH increasing leads to the decreasing of mean radii of flocks linearly. We found that sedimentation kinetics for intermediate pH values can be described by scaling equations that crossover time defined transition from a gravitational mechanism of deposition to the diffusion one

  8. A Study of QMM Hysteresis Cycle Data. Field Linearity and Field Reproducibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernin, P.; Fonvieille, H.; Quemener, G.

    1997-08-01

    A study of the hysteresis data provided by the quadrupole field mapping of the HRS Electron Arm is presented. For each quad Q1, Q2, Q3, a series of runs was performed to obtain the hysteresis curve of the magnet at maximal current. The focus of the present document is not the field maps but a specific analysis of QMM data in terms of hysteresis curves, and field linearity as a function of the current. These measurements allow to put limits on the reproducibility of magnet setting for the presently used operating mode of the quads. (K.A.)

  9. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  10. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  11. Concept definition study of small Brayton cycle engines for dispersed solar electric power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, L. D.; Ashe, T. L.; Dobler, F. X.; Elkins, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    Three first-generation Brayton cycle engine types were studied for solar application: a near-term open cycle (configuration A), a near-term closed cycle (configuration B), and a longer-term open cycle (configuration C). A parametric performance analysis was carried out to select engine designs for the three configurations. The interface requirements for the Brayton cycle engine/generator and solar receivers were determined. A technology assessment was then carried out to define production costs, durability, and growth potential for the selected engine types.

  12. Experimental study of the causes for the dispersion of the Leidenfrost temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, O.

    1976-12-01

    This paper studies the effects of various external disturbances on the collapse of a steam film forming after hot copper spheres are immersed in water. The steam film can already be destroyed at high sphere temperatures by influences of the sphere's surface (geometrical disturbances, oxidation) and by influences on the boundary layer ( afflux of cooler water, vibrations of the boundary surface). There is therefore only a lower limit for the Leidenfrost temperature where the steam film becomes unstable alone by the effect of the so-called unintended disturbances which are always existing. (orig.) [de

  13. Study of condensate composition during field processing of gas of the Shatlyk field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuldzhayev, B.A.; Annamukhamedov, M.B.; Makarov, V.V.; Serbnenko, S.R.; Talalayev, Ye.I.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were made of the composition and properties of condensates from field separators of the East Shatlyk field. The expediency is shown of separate collection of the condensates into a separate container and used for local needs as the diesel fuel. The condensates from the UNTS separators are used as chemical raw material to produce the lowest olephins by pyrolysis of gas-oil fraction and normal paraffins from kerosene-gas-oil part to obtain the protein-vitamin concentrates.

  14. An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Albert Christian

    2005-01-01

    The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered

  15. Study of atmospheric dispersion of pollutants in the industrial region of the Sado estuary using biomonitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.C.; Reis, M.A.; Marques, A.P.; Costa, C.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2001-01-01

    The region of Lisbon and south of Lisbon (Sado estuary) is densely industrialised, and therefore air pollution should be studied in a more detailed scale there. Also the topography of the Sado estuary region and the predominant wind direction from the north-west contribute to the influence of the industries located in the north onto this region. The region selected in this work includes a oil-fired power station. Transplants of the lichen Parmelia sulcata were suspended in nylon bags in a region within a rectangle of 15 km wide and 25 km long on a grid 2.5 km x 2.5 km, centred in a oil powered station. In each of the 47 places two sets of four transplants each were hung. Care was taken i) in covering the sets with a polyethylene roof to prevent leaching of elements in the lichen, ii) in building a hanging system which could rotate according to the wind direction, iii) in orienting one set towards the wind and the other set against the wind. For a 9 month period and every three months, one transplant of each set was collected. We have no knowledge of any other study on differentiation elemental uptake of Parmelia sulcata where the component wind direction is taken into account. Some information on local and distant sources is expected to be accessible. The transplants were analysed by INAA. Contents on Cl, Na, Ca, V and Zn are mapped and discussed. (author)

  16. An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Albert Christian

    2005-07-01

    The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

  17. A new methodology for determining dispersion coefficient using ordinary and partial differential transport equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Seungwon; Ham, Young Sik; Hwang, Jin Hwan; Cha, Sung Min; Park, Yongeun; Kim, Joon Ha

    2009-01-01

    The present study proposes a methodology for determining the effective dispersion coefficient based on the field measurements performed in Gwangju (GJ) Creek in South Korea which is environmentally degraded by the artificial interferences such as weirs and culverts. Many previous works determining the dispersion coefficient were limited in application due to the complexity and artificial interferences in natural stream. Therefore, the sequential combination of N-Tank-In-Series (NTIS) model and Advection-Dispersion-Reaction (ADR) model was proposed for evaluating dispersion process in complex stream channel in this study. The series of water quality data were intensively monitored in the field to determine the effective dispersion coefficient of E. coli in rainy day. As a result, the suggested methodology reasonably estimates the dispersion coefficient for GJ Creek with 1.25 m(2)/s. Also, the sequential combined method provided Number of tank-Velocity-Dispersion coefficient (NVD) curves for convenient evaluation of dispersion coefficient of other rivers or streams. Comparing the previous studies, the present methodology is quite general and simple for determining the effective dispersion coefficients which are applicable for other rivers and streams.

  18. Study of regularities of distributing powdered dietetic additives in coarse dispersed foodstuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pogozhikh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An important intervention in the composition of food products is enrichment of food with micronutrients. In this regard, the authors investigated how the additive with the corresponding trace element will be distributed in the food product, and in this case, in minced meat, in order to meet the human needs for microelements.Micronutrient deficiencies have a significant impact on the nutritional status and health of the population in well developed and developing countries. These deficiencies cause a delay in the growth of children, various diseases, mortality, brain damage, reduced cognitive capacity and the ability of people of all ages. The global scale of micronutrient deficiencies in dietary intakes, in particular the lack of trace elements, has led to the development of powdered dietary supplements containing essential elements that enrich the coarse-type food products to increase their nutritional value. The dietary supplement should provide the daily requirement of trace elements in the human body; therefore, it should be added to the product in a normalized amount and evenly distributed in the product.Two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analysis were performed to determine the distribution of the additive in food products. The analysis was carried out in two stages respectively: study of molecules mobility by measuring the spin-spin relaxation time (Т2 and spin-lattice relaxation (Т1 on a pulsed NMR spectrometer; establishment of a connection between the exponent of the amplitude of the sample A0 and its mass. Based on the data obtained, as a result of the measurement, a curve is constructed for the dependence of the amplitude of the echo signal from the value (time interval between the probing pulses. The spin label used in this work is one of the first variants of a paramagnetic probe-an easily accessible transition metal ion Mn2+. According to the constructed graphs and tomograms from the

  19. Hooking the geographer in children with field-based studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krall, F; Sorgman, M I; Uhlenberg, D M

    1978-03-01

    Survey report:Field studies of environmental subjects are helpful in understanding the relationship between humans and their environment. Geography provides an interdisciplinary approach through which elementary children can gain this understanding. Suggested field studies revolve around the school grounds, communities, and homes of the children involved. Projects include studies of natural communities, human communities, solid wastes, and energy conservation. The projects are designed to stimulate broader inquiry by the children. (4 references)

  20. Policy Forum: Studying Eyewitness Investigations in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Robyn; Jacoby, Larry L.; Kahneman, Daniel; Lempert, Richard; Roediger, Henry L.; Rosenthal, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This article considers methodological issues arising from recent efforts to provide field tests of eyewitness identification procedures. We focus in particular on a field study (Mecklenburg 2006) that examined the “double blind, sequential” technique, and consider the implications of an acknowledged methodological confound in the study. We explain why the confound has severe consequences for assessing the real-world implications of this study. PMID:17610149