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Sample records for disorders radioiodine therapy

  1. Dosage assessment for radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isselt, J.W. van

    2001-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to investigate the value and the shortcomings of the becquerel-per-gram method for radioiodine therapy in various benign thyroid disorders. The history of this treatment form, which goes back to the late 1940s, is described in Chapter 1. Almost fifty years after

  2. Dosage assessment for radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isselt, J.W. van

    2001-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis was to investigate the value and the shortcomings of the becquerel-per-gram method for radioiodine therapy in various benign thyroid disorders. The history of this treatment form, which goes back to the late 1940s, is described in Chapter 1. Almost fifty years after th

  3. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter [Clinic and Policlinic for Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. {sup 131}I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  4. Endocrine ophthalmopathy and radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, F. Anders [Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Inst. of Medical Sciences (Sweden). Section of Endocrinology and Diabetes

    2006-12-15

    Endocrine ophthalmopathy is to some degree present in most patients with Graves' disease. In few cases, a severe form of the condition develops and in the majority of these cases, the course of the eye problems has been influenced by the treatment for thyrotoxicosis. In this regard, radioiodine therapy has been increasingly recognized as carrying a special risk. Here, the current understanding of endocrine ophthalmopathy and the risks associated with the development of severe eye disease are discussed. The results of a retrospective investigation of patients with severe eye disease in our hospital, and the experience with corticosteroid administration following radioiodine in order to reduce the risk of ophthalmopathy, are also presented.

  5. Radioiodine therapy of euthyroid multinodular goitres

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    Manders, Jeroen M.B.; Corstens, Frans H.M. [University Medical Center Nijmegen, 565 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 8, 6525 GA Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Euthyroid multinodular goitre is caused by excessive replication of thyroid epithelial cells, due to various stimuli. With time there is a gradual increase in size and in nodularity. The clinical manifestations arise solely from thyroid enlargement. Treatment of euthyroid multinodular goitre is indicated only when thyroid enlargement causes symptoms of obstruction, such as dysphagia and dyspnoea. Treatment options are radioiodine (iodine-131), surgery and TSH suppression therapy. In this review we compare these treatment modalities. In our opinion, radioiodine is the treatment of choice in elderly patients, in patients in whom surgery is contra-indicated and in patients who are unwilling to undergo surgery. The life-time risk of fatal and non-fatal cancer due to radioiodine is negligible in patients over 65 years of age, compared with the life-time risk of fatal cancer in the non-exposed population. (orig.)

  6. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit; Benigne Schilddruesenerkrankungen, Radioiodtherapie und Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs): Kosten-Nutzen-Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  7. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4); Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen (Version 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany). Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung des allgemeinen Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  8. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) therapy of benign thyroid diseases was introduced 70 yr ago, and the patients treated since then are probably numbered in the millions. Fifty to 90% of hyperthyroid patients are cured within 1 yr after (131)I therapy. With longer follow-up, permanent hypothyroidism seems...... inevitable in Graves' disease, whereas this risk is much lower when treating toxic nodular goiter. The side effect causing most concern is the potential induction of ophthalmopathy in predisposed individuals. The response to (131)I therapy is to some extent related to the radiation dose. However, calculation...

  9. Thyrotoxicosis and radioiodine therapy: Does the dose matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 3 treatment options for thyrotoxicosis: Antithyroid drugs, Surgery and radioiodine. The choice of treatment varies geographically. Radioiodine therapy is preferred in the United States. The aim of radioiodine is to destroy sufficient thyroid tissue to cure the hyperthyroidism. There is a lack of consensus towards what dose of radioiodine should be used. Several methods are used to determine the dose. In our practice we administer 400 MBq to patients with Graves and in patients with large multinodular goiter, we would administer 800 MBq.

  10. Radioiodine Therapy Does Not Change the Atherosclerotic Burden of the Carotid Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2016-01-01

    of cerebrovascular events has been reported after radioiodine therapy. This study aimed to examine whether atherosclerosis develops early or late after radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. METHOD: Patients treated for benign thyroid disorders (nontoxic goiter, adenoma, and hyperthyroidism) were examined...... with ultrasound for the main outcome, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), and for plaque presence (plaque presence only in late damage). Signs of early damage from radioiodine were studied in 39 radioiodine-treated patients, who were examined before treatment and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Late...... were adjusted for age, sex, cholesterol, smoking status, known atherosclerotic disease, and body mass index. RESULTS: No changes in CIMT were found in the patients followed prospectively for one year after treatment with radioactive iodine for benign thyroid disease (p = 0.58). In the study on late...

  11. Does radioiodine therapy have disadvantageous effects in non-iodine accumulating differentiated thyroid carcinoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, J; Eustatia-Rutten, CFA; Stokkel, M; Links, TP; Diamant, M; Romijn, JA; Smit, JWA; van der Velde, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma without radioiodine accumulation has not been considered harmful, increased thyrotrophin levels during thyroxine withdrawal without the benefit of radiotoxicity as well as the selection of de-differentiated cells may have di

  12. Outcome of Radioiodine Therapy in a West African Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onimode, Yetunde A; Ankrah, Alfred; Adedapo, Kayode S

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism continues to be a pressing public health concern in West Africa. Its prevalence in Africa has been quoted as 1.2%-9.9%, with Graves' disease as its most common cause. Radioiodine-131 (RAI) therapy of hyperthyroidism recently commenced in two government hospitals in Ghana and Nigeria.

  13. Predictors of the results of radioiodine therapy of Gagves’ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Shestakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate different clinical and laboratory predictors influence on radioiodine therapy results for Graves' disease. A 1-year prospective study was performed on 621 patients treated with empirical radioiodine therapy. Mean administered dose of 131I was 350 MBq. All patients were divided into two groups with small (<25 ml and large (>25 ml thyroid gland volume. One day before radioiodine therapy all patients were examined with fT4 measurement and radioiodine uptake test to determine percentage uptake at 2 h, 4 h, and 24 h after test dose of 131I administration. Unique universal method to estimate predictors influence for any classification task was presented and used for actual task of radioiodine therapy results estimation. For patients with small thyroid gland volume a set of 11 predictors that have an influence on therapy result was revealed and importance of each predictor from indicated set was determined. The most influential predictors were administered dose of 131I, thyroid gland volume, percentage uptake at 24 h after test dose of 131I administration, and patient age. For patients with large thyroid gland volume a set of 10 predictors was revealed. The most influential predictors were administered dose of 131I, thyroid gland volume, percentage uptake at 2 h after test dose of 131I administration, and patient age. Accounting all predictors from indicated sets for both patient groups allows constructing of classification system that provides therapy result estimation for any patient and any administered dose of 131I with accuracy above 90%.

  14. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy; Gravidez apos radioiodoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine; Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br

    2007-06-15

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of {sup 131}I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  15. [Advances in research on radioiodine therapy of carcinoma mediated by gene transfer technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Da; Kuang, Anren

    2010-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of carcinoma could be mediated by transferring the genes which participate in the process of iodine metabolism in thyroid. The correlative genes are sodium/iodine symporter gene, thyroid peroxidase gene and the specific thyroid transcription factors, and others. The objective gene can specifically express in carcinoma by inserting the tissue-specific promoter/enhancer upstream of them, so radioiodine could be used to treat varied carcinomas. The radioiodine uptake in carcinoma cells was obviously increased and the radioiodine therapy of carcinoma was effective after those genes had expressed in carcinoma cells. The main problem was that the effective half-time of radioiodine in cells was too short to produce the ideal effect of radioiodine therapy. Moreover, 211At and 188Re could be transferred by sodium/iodine symporter and they could be used to treat the carcinoma that is capable of radioiodine uptake.

  16. Radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose

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    Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ., Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Analogous to subtotal struma resection, stable long-term results are attained with radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis only with an ablative therapy concept. Hypothyreosis is thus no longer an undesired or unavoidable side effect of radioiodine therapy, but constitutes part of the treatment principle. In addition to the negligible theoretical low late risk of radiation effect, an increase in immunostimulation is induced in the majority of patients by means of increased antigen presentation. In a minority of patients, this has detrimental effects on the treatment results and leads to a requirement for relatively high focal doses (200-300 Gy) to achieve a generally satisfactory therapeutic result. In individual cases, endocrine orbitopathy may be exacerbated or elicited. It is therefore recommended that radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis should be undertaken with cortisone protection as a matter of principle. (orig.) [Deutsch] In Analogie zur subtotalen Strumaresektion werden auch mit der Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose nur mit einem ablativen Therapiekonzept stabile Langzeitergebnisse erzielt. Die Hypothyreose ist somit nicht laenger unerwuenschte oder unvermeidliche Nebenwirkung der Radioiodtherapie, sondern Bestandteil des Behandlungsprinzips. Neben dem vernachlaessigbar geringen theoretischen Spaetrisiko durch Strahleneinwirkung wird bei einem Grossteil der Patienten durch eine vermehrte Antigenpraesentation eine Zunahme der Immunstimulation induziert, die bei einem kleineren Teil der Patienten das Behandlungsergebnis beeintraechtigt und dazu fuehrt, dass relativ hohe Herddosen (200-300 Gy) fuer ein insgesamt zufriedenstellendes Behandlungsergebnis erforderlich werden. In Einzelfaellen kann hierdurch auch eine endokrine Orbitopathie verschlechtert oder neu ausgeloest werden. Es wird daher empfohlen, die Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose grundsaetzlich unter Kortisonschutz vorzunehmen. (orig.)

  17. Recent advances in radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang Kyun [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Well-differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy with an increasing incidence. Most patients with well-differentiated thyroid caner have a favorable prognosis with high survival rate. While surgery and radioiodine therapy is sufficient treatment for the majority of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, a minority of these patients experiences progressive, life-threatening growth and metastatic spread of the disease. Because there is no prospective controlled study to evaluate the differences of management of thyroid cancer, it is hard to choose the best treatment option. And there are still lots of controversies about the management of this disease, such as surgical extent, proper use of radioiodine for remnant ablation and therapy, use of rhTSH instead of withdrawal of thyroid hormone, long-term follow-up strategy, thyroglobulin as a tumor marker, etc. In this review, recent data related to these conflicting issues and recent advances in diagnosis, radioiodine therapy and long-term monitoring of well-differentiated thyroid cancer are summarized.

  18. Primary hyperthyroidism--diagnosis and treatment. Indications and contraindications for radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgul, Edyta; Sowinski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Isotope therapy is one of the methods used in primary hyperthyroidism. The therapy is based on short-range beta radiation emitted from radioactive iodine. Radioiodine administration must always be preceded by pharmacological normalization of thyroid function. Otherwise, post-radiation thyrocyte destruction and thyroid hormones release may lead to hyperthyroidism exacerbation. Indications for radioiodine therapy in Graves-Basedow disease include recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyrostatic treatment or thyroidectomy and side-effects observed during thyrostatic treatment. In toxic nodule, isotope therapy is the first choice therapy. Radioiodine is absorbed only in autonomous nodule. Therefore, it destroys only this area and does not damage the remaining thyroid tissue. In toxic goitre, radioiodine is used mostly in recurrent nodules. Absolute contraindications for radioiodine treatment are pregnancy and lactation. Relative contraindications are thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy and age under 15 years. In patients with thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy, radioiodine treatment may be applied as a preparation for surgery, if thyrostatic drugs are ineffective or contraindicated. In children, radioiodine therapy should be considered in recurrent toxic goitre and when thyrostatic drugs are ineffective. In patients with Graves-Basedow disease and thyroid-associated orbitopathy, radioiodine treatment may increase the inflammatory process and exacerbate the ophthalmological symptoms. However, thyroid-associated orbitopathy cannot be considered as a contraindication for isotope therapy. The potential carcinogenic properties of radioiodine, especially associated with tissues with high iodine uptake (thyroid, salivary glands, stomach, intestine, urinary tract, breast), have not been confirmed.

  19. Use of recombinant human thyrotropin (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy in thyroid disorders; Utilisation de la thyreostimuline humaine recombinante dans la preparation au traitement par iode-131 des pathologies thyroidiennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Guillet, B.A.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-02-15

    The introduction of recombinant human TSH (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy of follicular-derived thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) is a significant medical advance. Rh TSH has been approved for use in remnants ablation after total thyroidectomy for carcinoma. There are other potential uses for rh TSH that have not yet been licensed. The use of rh TSH allows to reduce administrated doses in goiters through an increase of iodine uptake and a more homogeneous distribution of radioiodine in the gland. Rh TSH also improves thyroid cancer patients quality of life by avoiding hypothyroidism. (authors)

  20. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Leisner, B. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin des Allg. Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3{sup rd} version. (orig.) [German] Die Version 3 der Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen stellt im Wesentlichen eine redaktionelle Ueberarbeitung der Version 2 dar. Im Kapitel Indikation und Empfehlungen fuer eine Radioiodtherapie, eine Operation oder eine thyreostatische Therapie bei gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen basiert die Leitlinie auf einem interdisziplinaer abgestimmten Konzept. Die Entscheidungskriterien sind multifaktoriell und beruecksichtigen die Art der Schilddruesenerkrankung (Autonomie, Morbus Basedow, Struma, Rezidivstruma

  1. Long-term impairment of the lacrimal glands after radioiodine therapy: a cross-sectional study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettinig, Georg; Fueger, Barbara J.; Pirich, Christian; Dudczak, Robert [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Wien (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna (Austria); Hanselmayer, Georg; Nepp, Johannes [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Vienna (Austria); Hofmann, Andrea [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Wien (Austria)

    2002-11-01

    Impairment of the lacrimal glands after external radiation has been well documented, but there are only a few reports on the effects of radioiodine therapy on the lacrimal glands. Long-term effects of high-dose radioiodine therapy on tear secretion have not previously been studied. We investigated 175 eyes of 88 patients with a history of radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma (68 females, 20 males; mean age 55{+-}16 years, range 17-81 years) and compared them with a sex- and age-matched control group (n=39). All patients had been given at least 2.96 GBq iodine-131 (maximal administered activity 22.3 GBq {sup 131}I). An ophthalmological investigation was performed 64{+-}71 months (range 3-317 months) after initial radioiodine therapy by a single ophthalmologist. Lacrimal gland function was evaluated with three different function tests. External eye morphology was considered, and detailed ophthalmological history-taking was performed. Patients with factors known to affect lacrimal gland function (contact lenses, autoimmune disorders, history of additional radiation exposure) were excluded from the study. A total of 81 patients (92%) had at least one abnormal function test indicating impaired lacrimal gland function. Schirmer's tear test was decreased (<10 mm/5 min) in 47 of the 88 patients and definitely abnormal (<5 mm/5 min) in 35 patients. A tear film break-up time of <10 s was found in 78 patients, and 62 patients had a definitely abnormal break-up time of <5 s. The lacrimal lipid layer was impaired in 43 patients. The function tests were all significantly altered in the study group as compared with the controls (P<0.005, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively). Both subjective symptoms of dry eye (P<0.01) and changes in the external eye morphology (P<0.001) were significantly more prevalent in the study group. Our findings suggest that in the majority of patients, lacrimal gland function may be permanently impaired after high-dose radioiodine therapy. All three

  2. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease; Radioiodbehandling af benign thyreoideasygdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogh Rasmussen, Aa.; Jarloev, A.E.; Faber, J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in the use of radioactive iodine in the treatment of benigh thyroid disease in Denmark. A questionnaire was distributed to all departments in Denmark which administer radioiodine in the treatment of benign thyroid disease (n=20). Radioiodine is used for patients with toxic nodular goitre and for patients with relapse of toxic diffuse goitre. Four departments did not use radioiodine for volume reduction in non-toxic goitre. Patient information's included very different recommendations regarding cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. Radioiodine is widely used in the treatment of benign thyroid disease. We recommend a national standardization of the cautions in relation to radioiodine treatment. (au)

  3. Radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroid disease: poorer outcome in patients with high 24 hours radioiodine uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Ulrik Sloth; Hesse, Birger; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the importance of 24 h radioiodine uptake (24 h RIU) for the outcome of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 72 patients who underwent radioiodine treatment for toxic goiter at our outpatient clinic [29 diffuse goiters (DG), 30 toxic...... multinodular goiters (TMG) and 13 toxic adenomas (TA)]. Thyroid status was determined by TSH, fT3 and fT4 levels, and outcome was rendered successful when hyperthyroidism was absent. Relation between low 24 h RIU (below median) or high 24 h RIU (above or equal to median) and outcome was evaluated. RESULTS......: Of patients with DG and low 24 h RIU, 15% remained hyperthyroid, as opposed to 56% of patients with DG and high 24 h RIU (Phyperthyroid, as opposed to 44% of patients with TMG and high 24 h RIU (P

  4. Feasibility of a randomized trial on adjuvant radio-iodine therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dragoiescu, C.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Kuik, D.J.; Lips, P.T.A.M.; Plaizier, MA; Rodrigus, PT; Huijsmans, DA; Ribot, JG; Kuijpens, J; Coebergh, J.W.; Teule, G.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Justification for adjuvant radio-iodine (I-131) therapy in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is purely based on retrospective data. This is true for ablative therapy and even more so for high-dosage adjuvant schedules. Randomized trials on the latter application are considered impossib

  5. Strategies of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET Center Klagenfurt, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Several therapeutic options are available for the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), including long-term antithyroid drug medication (ATD), near-total resection (NTR) and radioiodine therapy (RIT). These treatments are used with different frequencies depending on geographical location, size of the goitre, age of the patient and experience of the physician. It should be noted that RIT is still being applied more frequently in the United States than in Europe. Despite the fact that RIT was introduced as long ago as 1941, several questions are still the subject of debate: Should a fixed dose or a calculated dose be used. If the dose is calculated, how many Grays (Gy) should be delivered to the thyroid? What is the goal of RIT in GD? Which factors, including ATD, influence the outcome of RIT? Is RIT appropriate in GD with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO)? Although not all these questions have been answered yet, conclusions can be derived regarding a general strategy for use of RIT in GD. As with surgery, the goal of RIT in GD is euthyroidism with or without L-thyroxine medication. There is a clear advantage of dose calculation over use of a fixed dose because the only factor influencing the outcome is the dose delivered to a certain thyroid volume. To minimise recurrent hyperthyroidism, an ablative approach using a delivered dose of 250 Gy is widely accepted. Beside pretherapeutic T{sub 3} levels, thyroid volume and 24-h thyroid uptake, ATD may influence the outcome of RIT. Today it is accepted by most thyroidologists that, if ATD medication is necessary in overt hyperthyroidism, it should be withdrawn at least 2 days before RIT. In patients with GD and GO, RIT may worsen GO. If RIT is performed in GO it should be done under a 3-month steroid medication regimen. In conclusion, RIT can be considered an appropriate and cost-effective therapy in GD, although the decision regarding treatment should be taken on an individual basis, paying due respect to the course and

  6. Exhalation of {sup 131}I after radioiodine therapy: measurements in exhaled air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schomaecker, Klaus; Sudbrock, Ferdinand; Fischer, Thomas; Dietlein, Markus; Kobe, Carsten; Gaidouk, Mark; Schicha, Harald [University of Cologne, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A considerable amount of radioiodine is exhaled after radioiodine therapy leading to unwanted radiation exposure through inhalation. This study focused on the concentration of radioactivity exhaled and its chemical nature. Air exhaled by 47 patients receiving {sup 131}I-iodine for different thyroid diseases (toxic goitre n=26, Graves' disease n=13, thyroid cancer n=8) was investigated with a portable constant air-flow sampler. Different chemical iodine species were collected separately (organic, elemental and aerosolic) up to 26 h after administration of the radioiodine capsule. The data approximated to a monoexponential time-activity curve when integrated over 100 h. The radioactivity in the filters was measured with a well counter at defined time points after administration. The radioactivity of {sup 131}I in the exhaled air 1 h after administration ranged from 1 to 100 kBq/m{sup 3}. Two parameters (half-life of radioiodine exhalation and time-integrated activity over 100 h) were substantially higher in patients with cancer after near-total thyroidectomy (11.8 {+-} 2.1 h and 535 {+-} 140 kBq / m{sup 3}, respectively) than in patients with hyperfunctioning thyroid tissue due to toxic adenoma (7.6 {+-} 2.5 h and 115 {+-} 27 kBq/m{sup 3}, respectively) or Graves' disease (6.4 {+-} 3.6 h and 113 {+-} 38 kBq/m{sup 3}, respectively). The percentage of radioiodine in the exhaled air in relation to radioiodine administered to the patient was between 80 ppm and 150 ppm. The fraction of organically bound radioiodine (mean value) for all time points after administration was 94-99.9%. This percentage did not depend on the type of thyroid disease. The amount of exhaled radioiodine is small but by no means negligible on the first day after administration. This is the first study to provide experimental evidence on a systematic basis that radioiodine becomes exhalable in vivo, i.e. in the patient. The mechanism of organification of orally administered radioiodine

  7. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...

  8. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP); Monte, Osmar [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Physiology Department; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Speech Therapy School; Duprat, Andre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department; Marone, Marilia [Nuclimagem - Irmanity of the Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department. Endocrinology and Metabology Unit

    2008-07-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  9. Value of recombinant human thyrotropin in high-dose radioiodine therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vika; Bohuslavizki, Karl H; Klutmann, Susanne; Clausen, Malte

    2002-12-01

    We report on a high-dose radioiodine therapy after injection of recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) in a 61-y-old woman with compression of the spinal cord caused by metastasis of a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Fourteen years ago, the patient underwent subtotal thyroidectomy because of multinodular goiter without any histologic evidence for malignant disease, and the patient was put on thyroxine substitution (100 micro g/d). In April 2000, she developed paralysis of the right leg. Morphologic imaging revealed spinal compression caused by a space-occupying lesion within the thoracic spine. Subsequent biopsy and histology demonstrated metastasis of a follicular thyroid carcinoma. Therefore, high-dose radioiodine therapy was scheduled after 4 wk of hormone withdrawal. Within a few days of being off thyroxine, the patient's paralytic symptoms worsened rapidly. The patient was again put on thyroxine, 100 micro g/d, and high-dose radioiodine therapy under stimulation with rhTSH was performed without any side effects. The second high-dose radioiodine therapy 3 mo later, again performed under stimulation with rhTSH, showed significantly less iodine avidity, and thyroglobulin levels fell from 1,024 micro g/L to 361 micro g/L, thereby demonstrating therapeutic efficacy. Thus, rhTSH might be used as a tool not only in the diagnostic application but also in the therapeutic application of (131)I.

  10. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat [University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T{sub 3}, fT{sub 4}, TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p<0.001; Crooks-Wayne score 3 (0-30), p<0.03]. Time to achieve cure was delayed on carbimazole. No changes in thyroid hormone levels occurred after 3 days' discontinuation of carbimazole. Logistic regression revealed that all observed cure rates were independent of entity, sex, age, thyroid volume, radioiodine uptake, radioiodine half-life, fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH. (orig.)

  11. Use of corticosteroids to prevent progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Bogazzi, F.; Panicucci, M.; Lepri, A.; Pinchera, A. (Univ. of Pisa (Italy))

    1989-11-16

    We studied the effects of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease on Graves' ophthalmopathy and the possible protective role of corticosteroids. Between June 1985 and June 1988, 26 patients were randomly assigned to treatment with radioiodine alone (group 1) and 26 to treatment with this agent and concomitant administration of systemic prednisone for four months (group 2). The initial dose of prednisone was 0.4 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for one month; the drug was gradually withdrawn over the next three months. All patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for 18 months after they underwent radioiodine therapy. Ocular changes were assessed with the ophthalmopathy index; patients with moderate-to-severe changes (scores greater than or equal to 4) were excluded from the study. Before treatment, 10 patients in group 1 and 5 in group 2 had no evidence of ophthalmopathy: in none of them did ocular symptoms appear after radioiodine therapy. Among the patients in group 1 with an initial ophthalmopathy index greater than or equal to 1, ocular disease worsened in 56 percent (mostly involving soft-tissue changes and extraocular-muscle function) and did not change in 44 percent. In contrast, ophthalmopathy improved in 52 percent and did not change in 48 percent of group 2. The mean ophthalmopathy index increased from 1.5 to 3.0 in group 1 (P less than 0.005) and decreased from 2.2 to 1.3 in group 2 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic corticosteroid treatment prevents the exacerbations of Graves' ophthalmopathy that occur after radioiodine therapy in a substantial proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism who have some degree of ocular involvement before treatment.

  12. Radioiodine therapy of benign non-toxic goitre. Potential role of recombinant human TSH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, S; Bonnema, S J; Hegedüs, L

    2011-01-01

    This review provides an update on recombinant human TSH (rh-TSH) augmented radioiodine (¹³¹I) therapy and outlines its potential role in the treatment of symptomatic benign multinodular non-toxic goitre. In some countries, ¹³¹I has been used for three decades to reduce the size of nodular goitres......-56% amplification of goitre reduction at one-year post radioiodine compared to conventional (without rh-TSH) ¹³¹I therapy. Although patient satisfaction is not improved at one-year, this approach facilitates tracheal decompression and is particularly promising in large goitres. The majority of multinodular non......-toxic goitre patients may not require amplified goitre reduction. But as an alternative strategy, rh-TSH allows up to 80% reduction of the therapeutic ¹³¹I activity while still achieving goitre reduction comparable to that of conventional ¹³¹I therapy and maintaining high patient satisfaction. The dose...

  13. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  14. Effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M N; Chakrabarty, R K; Akhter, M; Nahar, N; Swapan, M K; Alam, M M; Nahar, R; Sultana, N; Hallaz, M M; Alam, M M; Uddin, M M; Hossain, M A; Yasmin, S; Islam, M R

    2013-10-01

    The present non randomized clinical trial was conducted in the Center for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Mymensingh, Bangladesh for duration of one year. Total 30 patients with hyperthyroidism diagnosed by clinical and biochemical profile were included in the study. All patients received radioiodine treatment and regular follow up at 1st month, 3rd month, 6th month & 9th month were done to evaluate clinical and biochemical status and complications. Data were analyzed by computer with SPSS programme using 't' test and chi-square test. In the present study, out of 30 respondents more than three fourth of the respondents (76.6%) were in the age group of 31-50 years followed by less than 30 years are group (16.7%) and rest of respondents were in the age group of more than 50 years (06.7%). Mean±SD and range of age of the respondents were 39.80±10.02 years and 17-65 years respectively. Among the 30 respondents 11(36.7%) were male and 19(63.3%) were female. Male to female ratio was 1:1.73. Out of 30 patients 26(86.7%) presented with goiter and among them 21(80.8%) has diffused goiter and five (19.2%) had nodular goiter. Baseline mean±SD, median, range of serum T₃ level were 5.24±3.62, 4.34, 1.48-14.65nmol/L respectively. Base line mean±SD, median range of serum T₄ level were 192.25±99.17, 201.77, 1.75-336.25nmol/L respectively. Baseline mean±SD, median range of serum TSH level were 6.33±23.93, 0.15-0.07, 130.46nmol/L respectively. In the present study serum T₃, T₄ level among the respondents sharply decrease from baseline to 2nd follow up then gradually decrease from 2nd to 4th follow up. Serum TSH level gradually increases from baseline to 3rd follow up and then gradually decreases from 3rd to 4th follow up. The result showed radioiodine is an effective option for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis.

  15. Dosimetry in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases. Background and practice; Dosimetrie bei Radioiodtherapie benigner Schilddruesenerkrankungen. Hintergrund und Durchfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Sonnenschein, W.; Jentzen, W.; Hartung, V.; Goerges, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-09-15

    Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases (focal = [toxic adenoma], multifocal, disseminated autonomy, Grave's disease or clinical relevant goitre) needs to be and can be performed individually for each patient. Most frequently a radioiodine test is performed applying a small activity of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I). The paper discusses some protocols for pre- or posttherapeutic dosimetry and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. All are based on the volumetry of the target tissue as well as the radioiodine kinetics in the target volume what may be represented by maximum uptake and half life of iodine retention in the thyroid. Possible disturbances and measuring uncertainties of these parameters are presented and discussed. In spite of the discussed uncertainties in dosimetry, due to its high therapeutic width radioiodine therapy is a very successful procedure to cure hyperthyroidism or to reduce goitre volume with only little side effects. (orig.)

  16. Parathyroid gland function after radioiodine ((131)I) therapy for toxic and non-toxic goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumowski, Piotr; Abdelrazek, Saeid; Mojsak, Małgorzata; Rogowski, Franciszek; Kociura-Sawicka, Agnieszka; Myśliwiec, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of radioactive iodine ((131)I) on benign goitre consists of the emission of tissue-destructive beta-radiation. Since the range of beta (131)I radiation in tissue can reach 2.4 mm, it can affect the adjacent parathyroid glands. The purpose of this paper is to assess parathyroid function in patients with toxic and non-toxic goitres, up to five years following (131)I therapy. The study sample consisted of 325 patients with benign goitres (220 with toxic nodular goitre (TNG), 25 with non-toxic nodular goitre (NTNG), and 80 with Graves' disease (GD) treated with (131)I. The therapeutic activity of (131)I for each patient was calculated using Marinelli's formula. The serum levels of fT3, fT4, TSH, iPTH and Ca(2+), Ca and phosphates were determined one week before (131)I administration, as well as every two months up to a year following the therapy, and then after three and five years post-treatment. After two months following the administration of (131)I, all the treated patients showed a statistically significant above normal increase in iPTH concentrations (amounting to a value almost twice the norm in patients with TNG), which remained stable up to ten months after treatment, to return to normal level in the following months. In all the patients, Ca(2+), Ca, phosphates concentration remained within normal range throughout the course of the study. The concentrations of fT3 and fT4 quickly returned to normal after (131)I administration, and remained within normal range until the completion of the study. Radioiodine treatment of benign thyroid disorders results in transient (up to ten months after (131)I administration) hyperparathyroidism. The condition does not influence the level of calcium and phosphates concentration in any significant way.

  17. Antithyroid drugs as a factor influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease and toxic nodular goitre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerber, C.; Schneider, P.; Koerber-Hafner, N.; Haenscheid, H.; Reiners, C. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-09-01

    There is controversy over the factors that may influence the outcome of radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases. Antithyroid medication has been claimed to negatively influence the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease. In a longitudinal study, we assessed the influence of sex, age, antithyroid drugs, target radiation dose, target mass, applied activity, delivered dose, interval between last meal and application, and TSH, FT{sub 3} and FT{sub 4} levels on the outcome of radioiodine therapy. One hundred and forty-four patients (111 female, 33 male) suffering from Graves' disease (GD) and 563 patients (434 female, 129 male) with toxic nodular goitre (TNG) were entered in the study and followed up until 8 months after therapy. Treatment was defined as successful when the TSH level was found to be normal or elevated. Ninety-eight GD patients and 418 TNG patients were successfully treated. Forward stepwise multiple regression analysis models retained only the target mass in GD and the applied activity in TNG as significantly associated with the outcome of therapy. The predictive value of all variables involved was extremely low in both disease groups. Whereas concomitant antithyroid medication had no influence in GD, it adversely influenced radioiodine therapy of TNG. This effect may be attributed to a radioiodine ''steal phenomenon'' induced by TSH-stimulated normal thyroid tissue, which causes overestimation of the uptake in toxic nodules. (orig.)

  18. Glycididazole sodium combined with radioiodine therapy for patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qiang; Ma, Qingjie; Bai, Lin; Wang, Tongtong; Han, Yuping; Zhang, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate efficacy and side effects of glycididazole sodium (CMNa) combined with radioiodine therapy for patients with DTC cervical metastases. 53 patients of DTC cervical lymph node metastasis were randomly divided into 2 groups, where 24 cases were treated with 4.44 GBq of (131)I alone, 29 cases were treated with 800 mg/m(2) of CMNa combined with 4.44 GBq of (131)I. Peripheral blood samples were collected before and after treatment to perform measurements of routine blood test, liver function, renal function, parathyroid hormone (PTH), lymphocyte micronucleus rates and chromosome mutation. The results showed that rates of complete response (CR) in CMNa combined with radioiodine group (65.5%) were significantly higher than that in radioiodine monotherapy group (37.5%). Furthermore, CMNa combined with adioiodine treatment significantly increased the percentage of thyroglobulin (Tg) reduction at 12 weeks after treatment (P0.05). These results indicate 4.44 GBq of (131)I treatment combined with 800 mg/m(2) of CMNa could significantly improve clinical efficacy of DTC patients without increasing side effects.

  19. The role of radioiodine therapy in benign nodular goitre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    For treatment of benign nodular goitre the choice usually stands between surgery and (131)I therapy. (131)I therapy, used for 30 years for this condition, leads to a goitre volume reduction of 35-50% within 1-2 years. However, this treatment has limited efficacy if the thyroid (131)I uptake is low...... or if the goitre is large. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)-stimulated (131)I therapy significantly improves goitre reduction, as compared with conventional (131)I therapy without pre-stimulation, and adverse effects are few with rhTSH doses of 0.1 mg or lower. RhTSH-stimulated (131)I therapy reduces the need...... for additional therapy due to insufficient goitre reduction, but the price is a higher rate of hypothyroidism. Another approach with rhTSH-stimulation is to reduce the administered (131)I activity by a factor that equals the increase in the thyroid (131)I uptake. Using this approach, radiation exposure...

  20. Influencing factors of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiehua; ZHANG Zikang; CHENG Muhua; WANG Ping; WU Chunxing; SHAN Hong

    2007-01-01

    The study was to evaluate factors affecting outcome of 131I therapy in hyperthyroidism for optimizing the method. Data from 213 patients who received 131I treatment from July 2003 to July 2005 in our department were retrospectively analyzed. Factors possibly contributing to the outcome of the 131I therapy were analyzed, including gender, age, history of antithyroid drug, thyroid volume, duration of disease and radioactive iodine uptake rate. Multivariate analysis was done. The rates of euthyroidism and hypothyroidism were 69% and 8.5%, respectively, after one time 131I therapy. Multivariate analysis of the patients showed no statistically significant factors affecting the outcome of 131I therapy. The study showed that 131I dose can be directly calculated, and this simplifies the dose-determined method and individualizes the therapy.

  1. The role of radioiodine therapy in benign nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    For treatment of benign nodular goitre the choice usually stands between surgery and (131)I therapy. (131)I therapy, used for 30 years for this condition, leads to a goitre volume reduction of 35-50% within 1-2 years. However, this treatment has limited efficacy if the thyroid (131)I uptake is low or if the goitre is large. Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)-stimulated (131)I therapy significantly improves goitre reduction, as compared with conventional (131)I therapy without pre-stimulation, and adverse effects are few with rhTSH doses of 0.1 mg or lower. RhTSH-stimulated (131)I therapy reduces the need for additional therapy due to insufficient goitre reduction, but the price is a higher rate of hypothyroidism. Another approach with rhTSH-stimulation is to reduce the administered (131)I activity by a factor that equals the increase in the thyroid (131)I uptake. Using this approach, radiation exposure is considerably reduced while the goitre reduction is similar to that obtained with conventional (131)I therapy.

  2. A case report of mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the parotid gland developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Cuevas, S.; Baena Ocampo, L. [Hospital de Oncologia (Mexico). Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery

    1995-12-01

    This a report on a 19-year-old female who developed a low grade T2 N0 M0 mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the right parotid gland 3 years and 5 months after the post-operative treatment of 100 mCi of radioactive iodine ({sup 131}I) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The parotid tumour appeared during the patient`s pregnancy. There are few reports of salivary gland cancer developing after radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma and it is hoped that this report may stimulate others to investigate this association further in order to clarify the risk of secondary malignancies after radioiodine therapy. (author).

  3. In-vivo isotope diagnosis and radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spesshardt, K. (Sankt-Vincentius-Krankenhaeuser, Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Abt. mit Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin)

    1980-10-15

    In-vivo diagnoses of thyroid diseases can be carried out using /sup 123/I, /sup 131/I, and /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate. For the thyroid scintiscan, /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate or /sup 123/I are used. Some functional parameters can be determined using /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-pertechnetate, but iodine is more accurate, so that thyroid clearance examinations with /sup 123/I are rapidly gaining importance. However, the iodine turnover in the thyroid can only be determined by a several-days' test using /sup 131/I. The available techniques of diagnosis are employed in several steps. Most thyroid diseases can already be diagnosed on the basis of the hormone parameters and a thyroid scan; otherwise, a TRH test and suppression and functional studies will be necessary. Treatment of enthyroid struma is limited to inoperable cases with functional blockage or compression of the trachea. In the treatment of diffuse hyperthyroidism, doses should be exact enough to counteract the hyperthyroid metabolism without inducing hypothyroidism. With exact doses, a second radioiodine therapy will only be necessary in about 40% of all cases. High doses should not be applied in the treatment of hyperthyroidism unless it is a case of excessive clinical hyperthyroid somatics as the risk of hypothyroidism is high. The diagnostic problem of autonomous adenoma is the highly varying hormone activity. The intention of radioiodine therapy here is a functional elimination of the autonomous adenoma. Radioiodine resection is indicated in cases where there are several small autonomous adenomas or where the operability of the patient is limited.

  4. Gastrointestinal Side Effects of the Radioiodine Therapy for the Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma Two Days after Prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashnehsaz, Mehran; Takavar, Abbas; Izadyar, Sina; Zakariaee, Seyed Salman; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Paydar, Reza; Geramifar, Parham

    2016-01-01

    Iodine-131 (I-131) therapy is one of the conventional approaches in the treatment of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). The radioiodine agents also accumulate in the other organs that cause pain and damage to the patients. Radioiodine therapy is associated with various gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. In this study, GI side effects of the radioiodine therapy were investigated. GI toxicities of the radioiodine therapy were studied in 137 patients with histologically proven DTC in Jun-Nov 2014. All the patients were treated by radioiodine agents in the research institute of Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran. The patients were examined 48 h after prescription (before discharge) and their GI side effects were registered. Correlation of the age, gender, administered dose, administered dose per body weight as the independent factors, and GI side effects were analyzed using the Pearson correlation test with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Regression coefficients and linearity of the variable were investigated by MATLAB software. Line fitting was performed using MATLAB curve-fitting toolbox. From the subjects, 38 patients had GI complaints (30.4%). Significant factors influencing GI side effects were dose per body weight and administered doses. There was no significant correlation between age and gender as the independent parameters and GI complaints. The most prevalent GI side effect was nausea that occurs in 26.4% of the patients. From the results, it could be concluded that the GI side effects could be prevented by administering a safe radioiodine dose value less than 5,550 MBq. PMID:27651737

  5. Radiation protection measures for the reduction of incorporation for personnel during radioiodine therapy; Strahlenschutzmassnahmen zur Verringerung der Inkorporation beim Personal waehrend der Radiojodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Alborzi, H.; Keller, A.; Lincke, T.; Meyer, K.; Petzold, L.; Sabri, O.; Schoenmuth, T.

    2008-07-01

    As a result of extensive measurements of Radioiodine concentration in the room air and in the breathing air of the patients in a Radioiodine therapy station, simple radiation-hygenic measures are developed and described that lead to a considerable reduction of Iodine incorporation and with it of the effective dose for the nursing personnel. (orig.)

  6. Recombinant human thyrotropin-stimulated radioiodine therapy of nodular goiter allows major reduction of the radiation burden with retained efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Grupe, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    Context and Objective: Stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) before radioiodine ((131)I) therapy augments goiter volume reduction (GVR). Observations indicate that rhTSH has a preconditioning effect beyond increasing thyroid (131)I uptake. We test the hypothesis that an equivalent GVR...

  7. Radiation protection of patients and staff during radioiodine therapy; Strahlenschutz von Patient und Personal bei der Radiojodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldauf, D.; Schueler, W.; Winkler, B. [STEP Sensortechnik und Elektronik Pockau GmbH, Pockau (Germany); Petzold, J.; Lincke, T.; Sabri, O.; Sattler, B.; Seese, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-07-01

    A measuring system for continuous assessment of local dose rate in the environment of radioiodine therapy patients is presented that allows statements on doses reached in the target area with high statistical reliability. Furthermore, this kind of measurement leads to a noticeable reduction of external radiation exposure for the group of medical personnel involved. (orig.)

  8. Beneficial Effects of Lithium and Radioiodine Therapy in the Treatment of Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Barud

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous contrast media used for coronary angiography are iodine-based and could induce thyroid gland dysfunction. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with coronary artery disease who developed hyperthyroidism after percutaneus coronary intervention. Treatment with thiamazole induced agranulocytosis, complicated with severe tonsillitis. During recurrence of hyperthyroidism, after careful assessment of available methods of treatment, she was recommended to undergo radioiodine therapy (131I. The patient received lithium carbonate as pre-treatment. After 13 days of pre-treatment, patient received the therapeutic dose of 131I. Neither thyrotoxicosis progression nor acute coronary syndrome occurred. After 3 weeks, her thyroid hormones were found to be within normal ranges. Lithium therapy could be used as an effective treatment in patients who developed serious side-effects due to previous treatment with thionamides. Turk Jem 2014; 18: 92-94

  9. Radioiodination and biological evaluation of Cladribine as potential agent for tumor imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayoumi, Noha Anwer; Amin, Abeer M.; El-Kolaly, Mohamed T. [Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Hot Lab Center; Ismail, Nasser S.M.; Abouzid, Khaled A.M. [Ain-Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Pharmaceutical Chemistry Dept.

    2015-07-01

    Cladribine, a purine analogue antimetabolite, was radioiodinated with {sup 125}I via direct electrophilic substitution reaction. The maximum radiochemical yield (92.5 ± 0.8%) was obtained when the reaction was done at ambient temperature for 30 min using 100 μg of Cladribine and 10 μg N-chlorosuccinamide (NCS) in 150 μL of 0.2 M phosphate buffer, pH 7. In vitro stability studies of HPLC purified {sup 125}I-Cladribine sample dissolved in 0.5 ml of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 7 at ambient temperature showed that {sup 125}I-Cladribine is stable up to 12 h post labeling. Biodistribution results revealed excretion of {sup 125}I-Cladribine mainly by kidneys. The uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine in the induced Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma was 2.8 ± 0.4%ID/g at 1 h post injection with maximum tumor/muscle ratio of 5.5. The good uptake of {sup 125}I-Cladribine confirms the molecular docking studies results which indicate that iodinated Cladribine binds with polymerase enzyme with a good-CDOCKER energy. As a result, radioiodinated Cladribine may be used as a valuable agent for tumor diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-driven expression of iodine pump genes for targeted radioiodine therapy of malignant glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Tan; Wei Li; Peng Wang

    2011-01-01

    Radioiodine is a routine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancers. Non-thyroid cancers can intake radioiodine after transfection of the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter, an excellent tumor-specific promoter, has potential value for targeted gene therapy of glioma. We used the hTERT promoter to drive the expression of the hNIS and human thyroid peroxidase (hTPO) gene as a primary step for testing the effects of radioiodine therapy on malignant glioma. The U87 and U251 cells were co-transfected with two adenoviral vectors, in which the hNIS gene had been coupled to the hTERT promoter and the hTPO gene had been coupled to the CMV promoter, respectively. Then, we performed Western blot, 135l intake and efflux assays, and clonogenic assay with cancer cells. We also did 99mTc tumor imaging of nude mice models. After co-transfection with Ad-hTERT-hNIS and Ad-CMV-hTPO, glioma cells showed the 125l intake almost 1.5 times higher than cells transfected with Ad-hTERT-hNIS alone. Western blots revealed bands of approximately 70 kDa and 110 kDa, consistent with the hNIS and hTPO proteins. In clonogenic assay, approximately 90% of co transfected cells were killed, compared to 50% of control cells after incubated with 37 MBq of 131I. These results demonstrated that radioiodine therapy was effective in treating malignant glioma cell lines following induction of tumor-specific iodide intake by the hTERT promoter-directed hNIS expression in vitro. Co transfected hNIS and hTPO genes can result in increased intake and longer retention of radioiodine. Nude mice harboring xenografts transfected with Ad-hTERT-NIS can take 99mTc scans.

  11. Effects of Radioiodine Therapy on the Natural History of Graves' Ophtalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dreval

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available 21 patients with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO received radioiodine treatment (RIT. Before 131-I therapy in all patients GO were non-active and no severe. Six patients not received any treatment before RIT; four patients received orbital radiotherapy and 11 patients received intravenous glucocorticoids. Thyreotoxicosis compensation were achieved by antithyroid medication before RIT. Antithyroid medication was stopped 10 days before RIT. Worsening of GO was seen on 47.7% patients 3 months after RIT, but only 9.5% of patients needed additional treatment GO. GO exacerbation take place in 90% of hypothyroid patients and its compensation reduced the symptoms of activity of GO for 3 months. 42.8% was without any symptoms of activity of GO by 9—12 months after RIT. Treatment of GO before RIT were improved the course of GO after RIT.

  12. Graves' disease radioiodine-therapy: Choosing target absorbed doses for therapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willegaignon, J., E-mail: j.willegaignon@gmail.com; Sapienza, M. T.; Coura-Filho, G. B.; Buchpiguel, C. A. [Cancer Institute of São Paulo State (ICESP), Clinical Hospital, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Watanabe, T. [Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Traino, A. C. [Unit of Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Pisa 56126 (Italy)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The precise determination of organ mass (m{sub th}) and total number of disintegrations within the thyroid gland (A{sup ~}) are essential for thyroid absorbed-dose calculations for radioiodine therapy. Nevertheless, these parameters may vary according to the method employed for their estimation, thus introducing uncertainty in the estimated thyroid absorbed dose and in any dose–response relationship derived using such estimates. In consideration of these points, thyroid absorbed doses for Graves’ disease (GD) treatment planning were calculated using different approaches to estimating the m{sub th} and the A{sup ~}. Methods: Fifty patients were included in the study. Thyroid{sup 131}I uptake measurements were performed at 2, 6, 24, 48, 96, and 220 h postadministration of a tracer activity in order to estimate the effective half-time (T{sub eff}) of {sup 131}I in the thyroid; the thyroid cumulated activity was then estimated using the T{sub eff} thus determined or, alternatively, calculated by numeric integration of the measured time-activity data. Thyroid mass was estimated by ultrasonography (USG) and scintigraphy (SCTG). Absorbed doses were calculated with the OLINDA/EXM software. The relationships between thyroid absorbed dose and therapy response were evaluated at 3 months and 1 year after therapy. Results: The average ratio (±1 standard deviation) betweenm{sub th} estimated by SCTG and USG was 1.74 (±0.64) and that between A{sup ~} obtained by T{sub eff} and the integration of measured activity in the gland was 1.71 (±0.14). These differences affect the calculated absorbed dose. Overall, therapeutic success, corresponding to induction of durable hypothyroidism or euthyroidism, was achieved in 72% of all patients at 3 months and in 90% at 1 year. A therapeutic success rate of at least 95% was found in the group of patients receiving doses of 200 Gy (p = 0.0483) and 330 Gy (p = 0.0131) when m{sub th} was measured by either USG or SCTG and A

  13. Administration of additional inactive iodide during radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Who might benefit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Reinholz, U.; Schmidt, M.; Schomaecker, K.; Schicha, H.; Wellner, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2007-07-01

    Aim: Graves' hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drugs empty the intrathyroid stores of hormones and iodine. The consequence is rapid {sup 131}I turnover and impending failure of radioiodine therapy. Can administration of additional inactive iodide improve 131I kinetics? Patients, methods: Fifteen consecutive patients, in whom the 48 h post-therapeutically calculated thyroid dose was between 150 and 249 Gy due to an unexpectedly short half-life, received 3 x 200 {mu}g inactive potassium-iodide ({sup 127}I) daily for 3 days (Group A), while 17 consecutive patients with a thyroid dose of = 250 Gy (Group B) served as the non-iodide group. 48 hours after {sup 131}I administration (M1) and 4 or 5 days later (M2) the following parameters were compared: effective {sup 131}I half-life, thyroid dose, total T3, total T4, {sup 131}I-activity in the T3- and T4-RIAs. Results: In Group A, the effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 before iodine (3.81 {+-} 0.93 days) was significantly (p <0.01) shorter than the effective {sup 131}I half-life M2 (4.65 {+-} 0.79 days). Effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 correlated with the benefit from inactive {sup 127}I (r = -0.79): Administration of {sup 127}I was beneficial in patients with an effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 of <3 or 4 days. Patients from Group A with high initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 showed lower specific {sup 131}I activity after addition of inactive iodine compared with patients from the same group with a lower initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 and compared with the patient group B who was given no additional inactive iodide. This correlation was mathematically described and reflected in the flatter gradient in Group A (y = 0.5195x + 0.8727 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.0827x - 0.4444 for {sup 131}I T4) and steeper gradient for Group B (y = 0.6998x + 0.5417 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.3191x - 0.2901 for {sup 131}I T4). Radioiodine therapy was successful in all 15 patients from Group A

  14. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects; Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Morbus Basedow - aktuelle Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  15. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  16. Does Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Increase the Frequency of Another Malignant Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirosawa, Renata Midori; Marivo, Monica; Luengo, Juliana de Moura Leite; Tagliarini, Jose Vicente; Castilho, Emanuel Cellice; Marques, Mariangela de Alencar; Kiy, Yoshio; Marone, Marilia Martins Silveira; Silveira, Liciana Vaz de Arruda; Mazeto, Glaucia Maria Ferreira da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the frequency of another primary malignancy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) who received radioiodine therapy or not (131I). Material and Methods. 168 cases of DTC patients were retrospectively evaluated as to the frequency of another neoplasia by comparing patients with and without it, taking into account clinical, laboratory, and therapeutic parameters. Results. Another primary malignancy occurred in 8.9% of patients. Of these, 53.3% showed the malignancy before 131I and 46.7% after it. By comparing both groups, the age at the moment of diagnosis of another neoplasia was 46.1 ± 20.2 years for the group before 131I therapy and of 69.4 ± 11.4 years for the group after it (P = 0.02). Of the 148 patients treated with 131I, 4.7% developed another malignancy. The latter were older (61 ± 17 years) than those who did not show another cancer type (44.1 ± 14.2 years) (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The frequency of another neoplasia found after 131I was similar to that found before 131I. PMID:22084737

  17. Combined therapy with {sup 131}I and retinoic acid in Korean patients with radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Seung-hwan; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Do Joon; Cho, Bo Youn [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University WCU Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcome of redifferentiation therapy using retinoic acid (RA) in combination with {sup 131}I therapy, and to identify biological parameters that predict therapeutic response in Korean patients with radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). A total of 47 patients (13 men, 34 women; age 54.2 {+-} 13.6 years) with radioiodine-refractory PTC underwent therapy consisting of consecutive treatment with {sup 131}I and RA. Each {sup 131}I/RA treatment cycle involved the administration of oral isotretinoin for 6 weeks at 1-1.5 mg/kg daily followed by a single oral dose of {sup 131}I (range 5.5-16.7 GBq). Therapeutic responses were determined using serum thyroglobulin (Tg) levels and the change in tumour size 6 months after completing the {sup 131}I/RA therapy. Biological parameters and pathological parameters before and after combined therapy were compared. After completing {sup 131}I/RA therapy, 1 patient showed a complete response, 9 partial response, 9 stable disease, and 28 progressive disease, representing an overall response rate of 21.3%. Univariate analysis revealed that an age of <45 years and a persistently high serum Tg level were related to a good response. No clinical response was achieved when metastases showing no iodine uptake were present. Multivariate regression analysis showed that an age of <45 years was significantly associated with a good response. Of the 24 patients with well-differentiated carcinoma, 5 (20.8%) responded to {sup 131}I/RA therapy, whereas all 6 patients with poorly differentiated carcinoma failed to respond. {sup 131}I/RA therapy was found to elicit a response rate of 21.3% among patients with radioiodine-refractory PTC, and an age of <45 years was found to be significantly associated with a good response. (orig.)

  18. Cytogenetic effects of radioiodine therapy: a 20-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Gordon K. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Khvostunov, Igor K. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Gregoire, Eric [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, PRP-HOM/SRBE/LDB, BP 17, Fontenay aux roses Cedex (France); Barquinero, Joan-Francesc [Universtitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Biociencies, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Shi, Lin; Tashiro, Satoshi [Hiroshima University, Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare cytogenetic data in a patient before and after treatment with radioiodine to evaluate the assays in the context of biological dosimetry. We studied a 34-year-old male patient who underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by ablation therapy with {sup 131}I (19.28 GBq) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient provided blood samples before treatment and then serial samples at monthly intervals during the first year period and quarterly intervals for 5 years and finally 20 years after treatment. A micronucleus assay, dicentric assay, FISH method and G-banding were used to detect and measure DNA damage in circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of the patient. The results showed that radiation-induced cytogenetic effects persisted for many years after treatment as shown by elevated micronuclei and chromosome aberrations as a result of exposure to {sup 131}I. At 5 years after treatment, the micronucleus count was tenfold higher than the pre-exposure frequency. Shortly after the treatment, micronucleus counts produced a dose estimate of 0.47 ± 0.09 Gy. The dose to the patient evaluated retrospectively using FISH-measured translocations was 0.70 ± 0.16 Gy. Overall, our results show that the micronucleus assay is a retrospective biomarker of low-dose radiation exposure. However, this method is not able to determine local dose to the target tissue which in this case was any residual thyroid cells plus metastases of thyroidal origin. (orig.)

  19. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT changes therapy management in high-risk DTC after first radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra J.; Goerges, Rainer; Bockisch, Andreas; Binse, Ina [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Advanced tumour stage and initial metastases are associated with reduced general and tumour-free survival in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Optimal initial therapy is mandatory for a positive patient outcome, but can only be performed if all non-iodine-avid tumour lesions are known before planning treatment. We analysed the benefit of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at initial diagnosis in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma and determined whether the {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT results led to a deviation from the standard procedure, which consists of two consecutive radioiodine treatments with thyroid hormone suppression in between and no additional imaging, with individual patient management. The study group comprised 90 consecutive patients with either extensive or metastasized high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma who received {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT after the first radioiodine treatment approximately 4 weeks after thyroidectomy under endogenous TSH stimulation. We carried out PET/CT imaging with low-dose CT without contrast medium, which we only used for attenuation correction of PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 26 patients (29%) and negative in 64 patients (71%). Compared to the results of posttherapeutic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy, the same lesions were PET-positive in 7 of the 26 patients, different lesions were PET-positive in 15 patients, and some PET-positive lesions were the same and some were different in 4 patients. TNM staging was changed due to the PET results in 8 patients. Management was changed in 19 of the 90 patients (21%), including all patients with only FDG-positive lesions and all patients with both FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions. Age was not a predictive factor for the presence of FDG-positive lesions. FDG-positive and iodine-positive lesions were associated with high serum thyroglobulin. However, at low serum thyroglobulin values, tumour lesions (iodine- and/or FDG-avid) were also

  20. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  1. What is the best pre-therapeutic dosimetry for successful radioiodine therapy of multifocal autonomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotthardt, M. [Radboud Univ. Nijmegen Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Rubner, C. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bauhofer, A. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (DE). Inst. of Theoretical Surgery] (and others)

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Dose calculation for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of multifocal autonomies (MFA) is a problem as therapeutic outcome may be worse than in other kinds of autonomies. We compared different dosimetric concepts in our patients. Patients, methods: Data from 187 patients who had undergone RIT for MFA (Marinelli algorithm, volumetric compromise) were included in the study. For calculation, either a standard or a measured half-life had been used and the dosimetric compromise (150 Gy, total thyroid volume). Therapeutic activities were calculated by 2 alternative concepts and compared to therapeutic success achieved (concept of TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume with 300 Gy and TcTUs-based adaptation of target dose on total thyroid volume). Results: If a standard half-life is used, therapeutic success was achieved in 90.2% (hypothyroidism 23,1%, n=143). If a measured half-life was used the success rate was 93.1% (13,6% hypothyroidism, n=44). These differences were statistically not significant, neither for all patients together nor for subgroups eu-, hypo-, or hyperthyroid after therapy (ANOVA, all p>0.05). The alternative dosimetric concepts would have resulted either in significantly lower organ doses (TcTUs-based calculation of autonomous volume; 80.76{+-}80.6 Gy versus 125.6{+-}46.3 Gy; p<0.0001) or in systematic over-treatment with significantly higher doses (TcTUs-adapted concept; 164.2{+-}101.7 Gy versus 125.6{+-}46.3 Gy; p=0.0097). Conclusions: TcTUs-based determination of the autonomous volume should not be performed, the TcTUs-based adaptation of the target dose will only increase the rate of hypothyroidism. A standard half-life may be used in pre-therapeutic dosimetry for RIT of MFA. If so, individual therapeutic activities may be calculated based on thyroid size corrected to the 24h ITUs without using Marinelli's algorithm. (orig.)

  2. Radioiodine Therapy of Hyperthyroidism. Simplified patient-specific absorbed dose planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joensson, Helene

    2003-10-01

    Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism is the most frequently performed radiopharmaceutical therapy. To calculate the activity of {sup 131}I to be administered for giving a certain absorbed dose to the thyroid, the mass of the thyroid and the individual biokinetic data, normally in the form of uptake and biologic half-time, have to be determined. The biologic half-time is estimated from several uptake measurements and the first one is usually made 24 hours after the intake of the test activity. However, many hospitals consider it time-consuming since at least three visits of the patient to the hospital are required (administration of test activity, first uptake measurement, second uptake measurement plus treatment). Instead, many hospitals use a fixed effective half-time or even a fixed administered activity, only requiring two visits. However, none of these methods considers the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. In this work a simplified patient-specific method for treating hyperthyroidism is proposed, based on one single uptake measurement, thus requiring only two visits to the hospital. The calculation is as accurate as using the individual biokinetic data. The simplified method is as patient-convenient and time effective as using a fixed effective half-time or a fixed administered activity. The simplified method is based upon a linear relation between the late uptake measurement 4-7 days after intake of the test activity and the product of the extrapolated initial uptake and the effective half-time. Treatments not considering individual biokinetics in the thyroid result in a distribution of administered absorbed dose to the thyroid, with a range of -50 % to +160 % compared to a protocol calculating the absorbed dose to the thyroid of the individual patient. Treatments with a fixed administered activity of 370 MBq will in general administer 250 % higher activity to the patient, with a range of -30 % to +770 %. The absorbed dose to other

  3. Radioiodine therapy increases the risk of cerebrovascular events in hyperthyroid and euthyroid patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Jensen, Lars Thorbjoern; Vej-Hansen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    to radiation and is capable of inducing atherosclerosis. The objective of the study was to elucidate whether ionizing radiation from radioiodine might contribute to cerebrovascular morbidity. METHODS: In a retrospective register cohort study, 4000 hyperthyroid and 1022 euthyroid goitre patients treated...

  4. Embolization in combination with radioiodine therapy for bone metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tol, KM; Hew, JM; Jager, PL; Vermey, A; Dullaart, RPF; Links, TP

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND The outcome for patients with bone metastases from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is worse compared to the overall prognosis of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of embolization with concomitant radioiodine treatment on the s

  5. Clinical Usefulness between High Dose Radioiodine Therapy and Helicobacter Pylori Infection after Total Thyroidectomy due to Well Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kuk No; Lim, Seok Tae; Moon, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Suk; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Helicobacter (H) pylori infection has been considered the most important cause of gastritis, dyspepsia, and gastroduodenal ulcer. Radioiodine can be accumulated in the remaining thyroid tissue, salivary gland, and stomach. We investigated if the high radiation induced by radioiodine in the stomach after high dose radioiodine therapy (HD-RIT) is effective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. One hundred ninety nine patients (M:F=33:166, age 46.7{+-}12.3 years) who had HD-RIT (dose 159.1{+-}25.9 mCi, range 120-250 mCi) after thyroidectomy due to well differentiated thyroid cancer were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urea breath tests (UBT) were performed at 1 hour before HD-RIT and at 4 weeks after HD-RIT. The results of UBT were classified as positive ({>=}50 dpm) or negative (<50 dpm), and analyzed its values. Of 199 patients, 103 (51.8%) patients had positive UBT before HD-RIT. Of these, 80 patients had follow-up UBT after HD-RIT. Among them, 76 (95.0%) patients had persistent positive UBT and only 4 (5.0%) patients were changed negative UBT. Among 76 patients with persistent positive UBT, 26 (34.2%) patients had increased the values of follow-up UBT, 49 (64.5%) had decreased them, and 1 (1.3%) had shown the same value. The different values of UBT between before and after HD-RIT were 62{+-}66.1 dpm in increased one of follow-up UBT, and 153.3{+-}157.1 dpm in decreased one of follow-up UBT. We conclude that the radiation induced by HD-RIT is ineffective in the eradication of H. pylori infection. However, it could be influential the degree or distribution of H. pylori infection.

  6. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the achieved dose above 200 Gy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobe, C.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Weber, I.; Marx, K.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to determine the results of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) when the achieved dose in the thyroid was above 200 Gy and to characterize predictive factors for treatment outcome. Patients, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis Groves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of antithyroid drugs two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose was 250 Gy and the therapeutically achieved dose was calculated from serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months after RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The relation between success rate and the achieved dose, thyroid volume, age and sex of patients, TSH- and TRAb-values and presence of ophthalmopathy was analysed. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients who received more than 200 Gy, even for thyroid volumes >40 ml. The success of ablative RIT was not influenced by age or sex of patients, or by TSH- or TRAb values or concomitant ophthalmopathy. The mean achieved dose in the thyroid was 298 Gy with a standard deviation of 74.6 Gy. Conclusion: to achieve a dose of over 200 Gy with the above standard deviation, we recommend calculating on intended dose of 250 Gy and using a dosimetric approach with early and late uptake values in the radioiodine test, to allow early therapeutic intervention should the posttherapeutic thyroid dose fall unexpectedly below 200 Gy. (orig.)

  7. Radioiodine therapy effects on offspring of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Efeitos da radioiodoterapia nas geracoes futuras de mulheres com carcinoma diferenciado de tireoide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores Goncalves [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br; Antonucci, Jane [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Correa, Nilson Duarte [Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-02-01

    Radioiodine therapy has attained a significant role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The literature addressing possible secondary effects of {sup 131} I is limited, although there has been increasingly interest in this field. A more comprehensive understanding of the mutagenic effects of radiation on the offspring of women exposed to {sup 131} I is mandatory in view of the possibility of occurrence of miscarriages, congenital abnormalities and malignancies in these children. In this review, we found that many reports on safety of this type of treatment in female patients in reproductive age recommend that pregnancy should be avoided for at least one year after therapeutic administration of radioiodine. (author)

  8. Survival outcome of radioiodine therapy in post thyroidectomy thyroid carcinoma patients: Outcome of long term follow up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, F.; Nahar, N.; Sultana, S.; Nasreen, F.; Jabin, Z.; Alam, A. S. M. M.

    2016-03-01

    The overall prognosis of patients with thyroid carcinoma is excellent whenever managed following best practice guidelines. Objective: To calculate sex and age group affected by thyroid cancer; to compare between single or multiple dose of radio ablation needed after thyroidectomy and to determine the percentage of patients become disease free during their follow up. Methods: This was a retrospective study done in NINMAS, Bangladesh on 687 patients from 1984 to 2004. In all cases total or near total thyroidectomy was done before commencing radioiodine therapy. Patients TG level, neck ultrasonography, thyroid scan, whole body I131 scans, neck examination were done every six monthly/yearly. Results: Among 687 patients, female were more sufferers (68.1%) and female to male ratio was 2:1. Age group 19-40 years was mostly affected (57.8%). Most common type seen was papillary carcinoma (81.8%). After ablation 100 patients did not follow-up. Total 237 patients discontinued within 4 years. Remaining 450 patients undergone regular follow-up for 5 years and more, 394 were disease free (87.6%). Total recurrence of metastasis was 23 and 12 patients expired at different times. Conclusions: Long-term regular follow-up is necessary after radioiodine ablation to become free of disease.

  9. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinsiche Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Luster, M.; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Moser, E. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative {sup 131}I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC {<=}1 cm {sup 131}I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for {sup 131}I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for {sup 131}I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of {sup 131}I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for {sup 131}I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of {sup 131}I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  10. Nationwide trends in surgery and radioiodine treatment for benign thyroid disease during iodization of salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, C.; Knudsen, N.; Ovesen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Iodization of salt was introduced in Denmark in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency (ID). The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization rate of surgery and radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid disorders before and after the introduction of iodization, and to stu...

  11. Prognostic Value of Tc99m-Pertechnetate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Radioiodine Therapy in a Cohort of Chinese Graves’ Disease Patients: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study is to assess the prognostic value of Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy for predicting the outcomes of fixed low dose of radioiodine therapy (RIT in a cohort of Chinese Graves’ disease (GD patients. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study of GD patients who received RIT with a single dose of radioiodine (5 mCi. All the patients received Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy prior to RIT. Thyroid mass, Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake, gender, age at diagnosis, duration of the disease, ophthalmopathy, and serum levels of FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 prior to RIT were analyzed as potential interference factors for outcomes of RIT. Results. One hundred and eighteen GD patients who completed RIT were followed up for 12 months. The outcomes (euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism were found to be significantly associated with thyroid mass and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake. Patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g or Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2% had higher treatment success. Conclusions. A fixed low dose of 5 mCi radioiodine seems to be practical and effective for the treatment of Chinese GD patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2%. This study demonstrates Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy is an important prognostic factor for predicting the outcomes of RIT.

  12. Radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease: case selection and restrictions recommended to patients in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartofsky, L

    1997-04-01

    Each of the three major therapies for Graves' disease has its own advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications. Today, radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy is the most commonly employed means of therapy for Graves' disease in the United States, with approximately 70% of patients so treated after initial presentation and an additional fraction of arguably 10-15% treated with RAI after failure of antithyroid drugs or surgery. RAI therapy is acknowledged to have the clear-cut advantage of being safe, with low morbidity and cost. The indications for RAI therapy are clear and noncontroversial for most patients with Graves' disease. Moreover, RAI treatment is employed by some thyroidologists for subclinical thyrotoxicosis (normal T4 or T3 but immeasurable TSH), particularly in patients > age 45 due to risks of atrial fibrillation. RAI therapy is not considered indicated or is contraindicated during breast feeding and in pregnancy, subacute thyroiditis, postpartum thyroiditis, struma ovarii, pituitary (TSH-driven) hyperthyroidism, euthyroid, hyperthyroxinemia, and thyroid hormone resistance. Opinions vary on the use of RAI therapy in children with Graves' disease; generally, a lower age cutoff of 17 years is acceptable in most clinics. Even more controversial is whether RAI therapy in the presence of Graves' ophthalmology constitutes a risk for worsening ophthalmopathy. Resolution of this latter issue awaits more definitive studies, but RAI therapy is likely to remain the first choice for most patients with Graves' disease.

  13. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Noboru; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Konishi, Toshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism.

  14. A 30-year perspective on radioiodine therapy of benign nontoxic multinodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is no consensus on the ideal treatment of patients with a benign nontoxic multinodular goiter. In some European countries, (131)I therapy has replaced surgery as the treatment of choice in these patients. Recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) is a very potent stimulator o...... effective than (131)I therapy without rhTSH. However, no trial has yet compared (131)I therapy and surgery head-to-head, and future trials should include evaluation of quality of life and cost....

  15. Follow-up on thyroidal uptake after radioiodine therapy. How robust is the peri-therapeutic dosimetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschner, Wolfgang; Kobe, Carsten; Schicha, Harald [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for benign thyroid diseases in Germany requires the patient to stay in a nuclear medicine therapy ward for at least 48 hours and the dose to the thyroid to be computed from activity measurements performed during that stay. A major part of the total dose will be delivered after the patient's discharge from the hospital and thus has to be predicted through extrapolation with the effective half-life measured peri-therapeutically. We performed repeated thyroid uptake measurements on patients up to five months post therapy to investigate post-therapeutic changes in their effective half-lives and examine the dosimetric consequences. 12 patients (4 m, 8 f; age 36 - 76 y; 4 Graves' disease, 4 toxic adenoma, 3 toxic goitre, 1 non-toxic goitre) underwent late uptake measurements (1 - 7 meas., 13 - 154 d post administration, median 54 d, performed with thyroid probe resp. whole body counter at lower activities). Doses calculated from late measurements were compared to those predicted at discharge; half-lives calculated from the late measurement closest to the median delay (54 d) were compared to those determined at time of discharge. A cross-calibration between activity calibrator, thyroid probe, and whole body counter over an activity range from 52 MBq down to 45 Bq revealed linearity to within 6%, which was considered sufficient. In 9 out of 12 patients the achieved dose was within the range predicted at discharge. Averaged deviation between achieved and predicted dose was 3.1 {+-} 2.2% (median 2.5%, range 0.7% - 7.2%). Averaged deviation between post- and peri-therapeutic half-lives was 5.1 {+-} 3.9% (median 3.5%, range 1.3% - 12.5%). For n=5 patients discharged after 3 days, averaged deviations were greater (dose 4.0%, half-life 5.6%) than for those patients (n = 7) who stayed in the hospital for a minimum of 4 days (dose 2.5%, half-life 4.8%). Excretion of iodine from the thyroid remains practically unchanged for at least two months

  16. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  17. Myopathy Associated with Acute Hypothyroidism following Radioiodine Therapy for Graves Disease in an Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivkees ScottA

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe acute myopathy following I-131 treatment for hyperthyroidism due to Graves Disease (GD in an adolescent. A 15 year-old diagnosed with GD required treatment with radioactive iodine (I-131 therapy. Six weeks post I-131, he developed generalized muscle cramps. The CK was 19.800 U/L, the total thyroxine was 2.3 mcg/dL (29.6 nmol/L SI and the estimated free thyroxine (EFT was 0.5 ng/dL (6.4 pmol/L SI. The ALT was 112 U/L and AST was 364 U/L (normal

  18. Radioiodine therapy in skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer: a Johannesburg experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Sindy Perumal

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim.The purpose of this study was to examine the outcome of patients with skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma and analyse the effect of variables that influence the prognosis of this disease. Method. We retrospectively reviewed 352 patients treated and followed-up at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital’s thyroid cancer clinic from 1982 - 1999. Findings. Skeletal metastases were diagnosed in 24 (6.8%, 17 at presentation to the thyroid clinic, and 7 at follow-up. Patients’ ages ranged from 30 - 77 years (mean 53.9 years and the female:male ratio was 3.8:1. Based on the original pathology reports from resected tumours, 9 were papillary and 15 were follicular cancers. Twenty-three of the 24 patients underwent thyroid surgery as the initial management – total thyroidectomy in 18, subtotal thyroidectomy in 3, and lobectomy plus neck dissection in one. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was based on lobectomy in a single subject. Radioactive iodine (RAI was used as part of the original treatment; external radiation therapy (XRT was mainly used to alleviate severe symptoms. Twenty-one patients (87.5% were treated with RAI; 11 (45.8% received radiotherapy. Seven patients died – 4 from neurological disease directly associated with bone metastases. Of the 17 surviving patients, 2 appeared to be disease-free, 8 were asymptomatic despite overt bony disease, and 7 had persistent symptoms which much improved in 5. Bone metastases were uncommon, and follicular cancer predominated in this survey. Conclusion. RAI therapy improves quality of life in most patients. There is a place for XRT.

  19. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley [Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Endocrinology Service

    2013-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate {sup 131}I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Subjects and methods: Thirty-six patients with TSH {<=} 0.1mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter (< 60 cm{sup 3} were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Results: Mean 24-h {sup 131}I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. Conclusions: In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. (author)

  20. Dry Distillation of Radioiodine from TeO2 Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Jacek Koziorowski; Jesper Fonslet

    2013-01-01

    As medical cyclotrons are becoming more abundant, 123I and 124I are getting more attention as alternatives to 131I for diagnostics of thyroid disease. Both 123I and 124I provide better diagnostics, deliver less dose to patients and both reduce the risk of thyroid stunning, facilitating subsequent therapy. Dry distillation of radioiodine from tellurium dioxide targets has become the standard approach to producing these radioiodines. Setting up such a production of radioiodine is associated wit...

  1. Occupational exposure of nursing staff working with radioiodine therapy during 11 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calegaro, Jose Ulisses Manzzini; Teixeira, Sandra Mara Pessano [Hospital de Base do Distrito Federal, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear]. E-mail: jcalegaro@uol.com.br

    2007-07-15

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the occupational exposure of nursing staff in charge of inpatients undergoing {sup 131}I therapy during 11 years. Materials and methods: The exposure situations were classified according to a questionnaire answered by three nursing attendants, correlating the procedures with activities, distances and amount of time in the iodotherapy room. Records of received doses by two types of dosimeters were evaluated over two subsequent periods. In both periods the nursing attendants received instructions about radiological protection. Results: In usual situations, their amount of time in the iodotherapy room was in compliance with the standard time established by the service. In unusual situations, where the patient needed assistance for mobility, the exposure period was above the standard. However, this exposure occurs casually (only one or two times a year). During the period between 1993 and 1999 (dosimetric films) there were ten dose records, all of them at record level. From 2000 to 2003 (thermoluminescent dosimeters) ten dose records were also obtained, with only one of them at the investigation level. During this study period, the mean {sup 131}I activity was doubled. Conclusion: Despite the increased levels of activity there was no significant increase in dose to nursing attendants. (author)

  2. Iodine kinetics and dosimetry in the salivary glands during repeated courses of radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.; Huang, R.; Kuang, A.; Zhao, Z.; Zeng, Y.; Wang, J.; Tian, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: The present study was conducted to investigate salivary iodine kinetics and dosimetry during repeated courses of radioiodine ({sup 131}I) therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Such data could provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of {sup 131}I induced salivary toxicity and help to develop appropriate methods to reduce this injury. Methods: Seventy-eight consecutive DTC patients (mean age 45 {+-} 17 years, 60%, female) undergoing {sup 131}I therapy for remnant ablation or metastatic tumors were prospectively recruited. Planar quantitative scintigraphy of head-neck images was serially acquired after administration of 2.9-7.4 GBq of {sup 131}I to assess kinetics in the salivary glands of patients. Salivary absorbed doses were calculated based on the schema of Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry. Results: The maximum uptakes in percentage of administered {sup 131}I activity per kilogram of gland tissue (%/kg) were 12.9% {+-} 6.5%/kg (range, 0.4%-37.3%/kg) and 12.3% {+-} 6.2%/kg (range, 0.4%-35.1%/kg) for the parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. Statistically significant correlations of maximum uptake versus cumulative activity (r = -0.74, P < 0.01, for the parotid glands; r = -0.71, P < 0.01, for the submandibular glands) and treatment cycle (P < 0.001, for both gland types) were found. The effective half-lives of {sup 131}I in the parotid and submandibular glands were 9.3 {+-} 3.5 h (range, 1.5-19.8 h) and 8.6 {+-} 3.2 h (range, 0.8-18.0 h), respectively. A statistically significant correlation was observed between effective half-life with cumulative activity (r = 0.37, P < 0.01) and treatment cycle (P = 0.03) only for the parotid glands. The calculated absorbed doses were 0.20 {+-} 0.10 mGy/MBq (range, 0.01-0.92 mGy/MBq) and 0.25 {+-} 0.09 mGy/MBq (range, 0.01-1.52 mGy/MBq) for the parotid and submandibular glands, respectively. The photon contribution to the salivary absorbed dose was minimal in relation to the beta dose

  3. Clinical Studies of Nonpharmacological Methods to Minimize Salivary Gland Damage after Radioiodine Therapy of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Frangos, Savvas; Tamana, Panayiota

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To systematically review clinical studies examining the effectiveness of nonpharmacological methods to prevent/minimize salivary gland damage due to radioiodine treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Methods. Reports on relevant trials were identified by searching the PubMed, CINHAL, Cochrane, and Scopus electronic databases covering the period 01/2000–10/2015. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were prespecified. Search yielded eight studies that were reviewed by four of the present authors. Results. Nonpharmacological methods used in trials may reduce salivary gland damage induced by radioiodine. Sialogogues such as lemon candy, vitamin E, lemon juice, and lemon slice reduced such damage significantly (p DTC. However, the studies retrieved were limited in number, sample size, strength of evidence, and generalizability. More randomized controlled trials of these methods with multicenter scope and larger sample sizes will provide more systematic and reliable results allowing more definitive conclusions. PMID:27446226

  4. Combined use of radioiodine therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating postsurgical thyroid remnant of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Long; Linfa Li; Lifang Yao; Shoucong Chen; Heqing Yi; Xuemei Ye; Dong Xu; Peng Wu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether postoperative radioiodine (RAI) combined with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an effective, safe, and feasible method for elimination of excessive postsurgical thyroid remnant for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Materials and Methods: We took a prospective study and treated 12 DTC patients (4 males, 8 females, age 20–78 years) who underwent thyroidectomy for RFA followed by 131 I ablation. The pretreatment requires iodine-free diet and thyroid hormone...

  5. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies, proteins and peptides for diagnosis and therapy. A review of standardized, reliable and safe procedures for clinical grade levels kBq to GBq in the Goettingen/Marburg experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, Th.M.; Gotthardt, M.; Behe, M. [Marburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Becker, W. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Simple and reliable methodologies for radioiodination of proteins and peptides are described. The labeling systems are easy to assemble, capable of radioiodinating any protein or, with slight modifications, also peptide (molecular mass 1000-300,000) from kBq to GBq levels of activity for use in diagnosis and/or therapy. Furthermore, the procedures are feasible in any nuclear medicine department. Gigabecquerel amounts of activity can be handled safely. The most favored iodination methodology relies on the lodogen system, a mild oxidating agent without reducing agents. Thus, protein degradation is minimized. Labeling yields are between 60 and 90%, and immunoreactivities remain {>=}85%. Other radioiodination methods (chloramine-T, Bolton-Hunter) are described and briefly discussed. (orig.)

  6. Long-term efficacy of modified-release recombinant human TSH (MRrhTSH) augmented radioiodine (131I) therapy for benign multinodular goiter. Results from a multicenter international, randomized, placebo-controlled dose-selection study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Hegedus, Laszlo; Pacini, Furio

    2014-01-01

    Background: Enhanced reduction of multinodular goiter (MNG) can be achieved by stimulation with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) before radioiodine (131I) therapy. The objective was to compare the long-term efficacy and safety of two low doses of modified release rhTSH (MRrhTSH) in combinati...

  7. Combined 2-deoxy glucose and metformin improves therapeutic efficacy of sodium-iodide symporter-mediated targeted radioiodine therapy in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatterjee S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sushmita Chatterjee, Nirmal Thaker, Abhijit DeMolecular Functional Imaging Laboratory, Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer, Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, IndiaAbstract: Radiosensitization using either metformin or 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG in various cancer cells has been reported. The present study reveals novel information on combining these drugs to enhance radiosensitization effect in breast cancer (BC cells. Responses to low-dose Cobalt60 radiation, as well as a newly emerged radioiodine therapy target for BC, that is, sodium-iodide symporter (NIS or SLC5A5 protein, are tested. As therapeutic potential of NIS in BC is often limited due to low uptake and fast efflux rate of iodine, the scope of these two radiosensitizers to further improve NIS-mediated 131I therapeutic efficacy is explored. Two BC cell lines, MCF-7, and MDA MB231 are tested to optimize minimal drug doses required for radiosensitization. A combination of 2 mM metformin and 20 mM 2-DG with 2 grey (Gy Cobalt60 radiation shows significant radiosensitization effect (P=0.0002. In cells treated with the combination therapy, increased γH2A.X foci formation was noted. Further, MCF-7 BC cells overexpressing NIS (MCF-7 NIS was established, and using the optimized drug concentrations, significant radiosensitization (P=0.0019 by 50 µ Ci 131I usage was found to be the case as well. Apoptosis data corroborates with the result of clonogenic assay showing significant increase in apoptotic population upon dual drug-mediated radiosensitization. In case of metformin treatment, lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP content of the cell has been observed. The encouraging radiosensitization effect observed using combined 2-DG and metformin may aid in reducing Cobalt60 radiation exposure or for targeted radioiodine therapy in BC cells with NIS expression. This study indicates high potential of this drug combination in sensitizing BC cells for NIS

  8. Radioiodine therapy in veterinary medicine: treatment of hyperthyroidism in a cat; Die Radioiodtherapie in der Veterinaermedizin: Behandlung der Schilddruesenueberfunktion bei einer Katze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinartz, P.; Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kinzel, S.; Kuepper, W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Versuchstierkunde; Bachmann, T. [Tierarztpraxis Dr. med. vet. Thomas Bachmann, Glashhuetten (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    A nine-year-old cat with symptoms of a distinct hyperthyroidism was presented at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. The clinical symptoms as well as the diagnostic procedures performed at the hospital confirmed the diagnosis. After five weeks of thyreostatic medication a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland was established, followed by a radioiodine therapy with 70.3 MBq 131-iodine. Subsequently, the cat was hospitalized for two days before it could be released in good condition. Six weeks after treatment the former drastically reduced weight of the cat recovered to near normal. Even though the chemical analysis detected a discrete hyperthyroidism, clinical symptoms were no longer prominent. Three months after treatment, the final examination showed a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland without a specific thyroidal medication. The presented case illustrates that radioiodine therapy is a safe and efficient treatment of thyroidal dysfunctions in veterinary medicine. (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine neun Jahre alte, europaeische Langhaarkatze wurde mit Symptomen einer ausgepraegten Schilddruesenueberfunktion im Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen vorgestellt. Sowohl die klinische Symptomatik als auch die Labordiagnostik und die apparativ erhobenen Befunde belegten das Vorliegen einer Hyperthyreose. Im Anschluss an eine fuenfwoechige thyreostatische Therapie, mit der eine euthyreote Stoffwechsellage erreicht werden konnte, wurde eine Radioiodtherapie mit 70,3 MBq 131-Iod durchgefuehrt. Nach einer nur zweitaegigen komplikationslosen Hospitalisierung konnte die Katze in gutem Allgemeinzustand entlassen werden. Sechs Wochen nach der Therapie hatte sich das zuvor deutlich reduzierte Koerpergewicht auf nahezu normgerechte Werte erhoeht; klinische Symptome der Schilddruesenueberfunktion liessen sich trotz einer laborchemisch diagnostizierten diskreten Gesamtthyroxiderhoehung nicht mehr nachweisen. Bei einer abschliessenden Kontrolle drei Monate nach Entlassung wies

  9. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy on the basis of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Mallek, Dirk von; Manka-Waluch, Agnieszka; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Bonn (Germany); Joe, Alexius; Zimmerlin, Martina [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise radioiodine therapy of diffuse and nodular toxic goitre by calculation of the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid on the basis of the pretreatment technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU{sub s}). The TcTU{sub s} value serves as a substitute for the non-suppressible iodine turnover and the functional autonomous mass. Marinelli's formula was used to calculate tissue absorbed doses of 150 Gy, 200 Gy, 250 Gy and 300 Gy to the thyroids of 438 patients with multifocal and disseminated autonomy. The mean age of patients was 70{+-}9 years, and the mean thyroid volume was 54{+-}26 ml. Two hundred and sixty-one of the patients had at least one documented previous episode of overt hyperthyroidism. Tissue absorbed doses were adapted to the pretreatment TcTU{sub s}: 150 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 1.5%-2.49%, 200 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 2.5%-3.49%, 250 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of 3.5%-4.49% and 300 Gy for a TcTU{sub s} of {>=}4.5%. Normalisation of TcTU{sub s} and thyrotropin (TSH), thyroid volume reduction and frequency of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism were evaluated 1 year after a single radioiodine therapy. The presented dose strategy resulted in normalisation of TcTU{sub s} in 96% and an increase in TSH to the normal range in 92%. Recurrent hyperthyroidism was observed in only five patients. Thyroid volume decreased from 54{+-}26 before treatment to 34{+-}20 ml, a mean reduction of 37%. The frequency of hypothyroidism, at 0.9%, was encouragingly low. Dose selection in accordance with pretreatment TcTU{sub s} can be recommended for elimination of functional autonomous tissue with a single radioiodine therapy in patients of advanced age with enlarged thyroid glands and relevant autonomous masses who are at risk of developing iodine-induced hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  10. Radioiodine treatment for non-toxic goitre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2009-01-01

    There is no ideal treatment for benign multinodular goitre. Besides surgery, which is recommended for large goitres or when malignancy cannot be excluded, the non-surgical treatment options are levothyroxine therapy and radioiodine ((131)I) therapy. Conventional (131)I therapy [without recombinant...... human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH)] has been used for more than a decade in symptomatic non-toxic multinodular goitre, and although it does lead to significant thyroid volume reduction, relatively high activities of radioiodine are needed because of a frequent finding of a low thyroid radioiodine...... in multinodular goitre, aspects of this association, such as the cost-benefit and optimum rhTSH dose and safety, will have to be sufficiently clarified....

  11. Randomized prospective study comparing a single radioiodine dose and a single laser therapy session in autonomously functioning thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Helle; Bennedbaek, Finn Noe; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) with radioiodine in hot thyroid nodules. DESIGN: Thirty consecutive outpatients with subclinical or mild hyperthyroidism and a scintigraphically solitary hot nodule with extraglandular suppression were randomized...... at inclusion and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. RESULTS: Normalization of serum TSH was achieved in 7 out of 14 patients in the ILP group and in all 15 patients in the (131)I group (P=0.0025). In the ILP group, mean thyroid nodule volume reduction was 44+/-5% (s.e.m.; P

  12. Cost-effectiveness-analysis: radioiodine or antithyroid drugs as first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism due to Graves` disease; Kosten-Effektivitaets-Analyse: Radioiod oder thyreostatische Medikation bei der Primaerbehandlung der Immunhyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Dederichs, B.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Hunsche, E.; Lauterbach, K.W. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Gesundheitsoekonomie, Medizin und Gesellschaft

    1999-06-01

    Aim: As first-line therapy of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves` disease antithyroid drugs are favoured in Europe, while radioiodine therapy is favoured in the USA. Radioiodine therapy has become more economic in Germany since the new recommendations by the Federal German Radiation Protection Committee (SSK) for patient discharge guidelines. Method: Sensitivity analyses took into account the long-term relapse rate of conservative or radioiodine therapy, use of diagnostic tests, level of health insurance, drops in productivity and a discount factor. Costing models included the costs of follow-up care over 30 years. The costs of the hospitalisation for radioiodine therapy were calculated for 300 patients, discharged with 250 MBq I-131 residual activity. Result: Antithyroid drugs were considered cost-effective when they achieved relapse rate of 50% or less, a cut in the number of tests needed and reduced working hours. Failure to meet any one of these conditions makes primary radioiodine therapy more cost-effective in 1593 of 1944 calculated costing models. Repeated conservative therapies will increase clearly the overall costs. Conclusion: Radioiodine is a cost-effective, first-line therapy in patients with a special risk of relapse after primary conservative therapy (goitre, younger patient, persistent elevated TSH-receptor-antibodies or Tc-uptake). (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die Erstmanifestation einer Immunhyperthyreose wird in Europa ueberwiegend thyreostatisch, in den USA mehrheitlich mit Radioiod definitiv behandelt. Diese beiden Alternativen wurden auf dem Hintergrund neuer nationaler Entlassungsrichtwerte nach einer Radioiodtherapie (RITh) verglichen. Methode: Aus Sicht der Gesellschaft entscheiden einerseits die langfristigen Rezidivraten, andererseits die Menge medizinischer Leistungen, der Versicherungsstatus und der Produktivitaetsausfall des Patienten (Fehlzeiten, Einkommen) sowie die zeitliche Verteilung der Kosten (Diskontierung) ueber die Kosten

  13. Systemic oxidative stress to nucleic acids is unaltered following radioiodine therapy of patients with benign nodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Stovgaard, Elisabeth S; Fast, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the whole body oxidative stress burden following radioactive iodine ((131)I) therapy of thyroid diseases. METHODS: We studied 17 patients with benign nodular goiter treated with (131)I therapy. The targeted thyroid dose was 50 Gy in 11 patients pretreated with 0....... in the thyroid gland, but the study supports that (131)I therapy of benign nodular goiter carries no or only a minute risk of developing subsequent malignancies. It remains to be explored whether our findings also apply to hyperthyroid disorders.......BACKGROUND: Little is known about the whole body oxidative stress burden following radioactive iodine ((131)I) therapy of thyroid diseases. METHODS: We studied 17 patients with benign nodular goiter treated with (131)I therapy. The targeted thyroid dose was 50 Gy in 11 patients pretreated with 0.......1 mg of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). In 6 patients, the applied thyroid dose was 100 Gy without rhTSH prestimulation. Well-established biomarkers of oxidative stress to RNA (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine; 8-oxoGuo) and DNA (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine; 8-oxodG) were measured in freshly voided...

  14. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients according to thyroid uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate: applicability to unifocal thyroid autonomy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Biermann, Kim; Brockmann, Holger; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Wissmeyer, Michael [Inselspital Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Juengling, Freimut D.; Krause, Thomas M. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hugstetter Str. 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Inselspital Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying a previously described dose strategy based on {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU{sub s}) to radioiodine therapy for unifocal thyroid autonomy. A total of 425 consecutive patients (302 females, 123 males; age 63.1{+-}10.3 years) with unifocal thyroid autonomy were treated at three different centres with {sup 131}I, using Marinelli's formula for calculation of three different absorbed dose schedules: 100-300 Gy to the total thyroid volume according to the pre-treatment TcTU{sub s} (n=146), 300 Gy to the nodule volume (n=137) and 400 Gy to the nodule volume (n=142). Successful elimination of functional thyroid autonomy with either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism occurred at a mean of 12 months after radioiodine therapy in 94.5% of patients receiving 100-300 Gy to the thyroid volume, in 89.8% of patients receiving 300 Gy to the nodule volume and in 94.4% receiving 400 Gy to the nodule volume. Reduction in thyroid volume was highest for the 100-300 Gy per thyroid and 400 Gy per nodule strategies (36{+-}19% and 38{+-}20%, respectively) and significantly lower for the 300 Gy per nodule strategy (28{+-}16%; p<0.01). A dose strategy based on the TcTU{sub s} can be used independently of the scintigraphic pattern of functional autonomous tissue in the thyroid. (orig.)

  15. Clinical significance of thyroglobulin autoantibodies enhancement in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Severskaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the clinical utility of antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb as a tumor marker in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation. Patients and methods. From 345 consecutive DTC patients after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation we select ed 148 patients with elevated TgAb level (with distant metastasis n = 93, without distant metastasis n = 55. Serum TgAb concentration was measured before radioiodine ablation and then every time before 131I treatment (RIT or diagnostic 131I whole body scanning (WBS. Results were compared with serum thyroglobulin (Tg concentration, neck echography, lung and bone roentgenography and 131I WBS findings. Results. TgAb level was elevated in 21% DTC patients before 131I ablation. The other 22% with initially normal TgAb displayed their rising during followup. In absence of distant metastasis TgAb declined after 1 st–2 nd cycle of RIT (an average 8.9 months after 131I ablation. Persistance or rising of TgAb in the longer term was associated with detectable thyroid remnant, residual tumor or metastatic lymph nodes. In case of negative TgAb status after sugery an increase of TgAb during first 3–6 months after ablation indicated mostly a response to the rise of Tg antigen secondary to 131I ablation. A rise TgAb in the longer term (after 3rd–5th cycles of RIT indicated to residual or recurrent disease in 86% cases. In patients with distant metastasis there were no correlation between change in TgAb concentration and clinical sta tus, including the rate of regression of metastatic disease. But in case of low or undetectable Tg and permanent high TgAb level only TgAb indicated the presence of disease. Conclusion: persistence or rising TgAb in longer term after 131I ablation can serve as surrogate tumor marker of per sistent or recurrent disease. It is critical to measure TgAb concentration, especially in patients with low or unde tectable Tg, because

  16. Radioiodine Therapy of Liver Cancer Cell Following Tissue Specific Sodium Iodide Symporter Gene Transfer and Assessment of Therapeutic Efficacy with Optical Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, You La; Lee, Yong Jin [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-10-15

    Cancer specific killing can be achieved by therapeutic gene activated by cancer specific promotor. Expression of sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene causes transportation and concentration of iodide into the cell, therefore radioiodine treatment after NIS gene transfer to cancer cell could be a form of radionuclide gene therapy. luciferase (Luc) gene transfected cancer cell can be monitored by in vivo optical imaging after D-luciferin injection. Aims of the study are to make vector with both therapeutic NIS gene driven by AFP promoter and reporter Luc gene driven by CMV promoter, to perform hepatocellular carcinoma specific radiodiodine gene therapy by the vector, and assessment of the therapy effect by optical imaging using luciferase expression. A Vector with AFP promoter driven NIS gene and CMV promoter driven Luc gene (AFP-NIS-CMV-Luc) was constructed. Liver cancer cell (HepG2, Huh-7) and non liver cancer cell (HCT-15) were transfected with the vector using liposome. Expression of the NIS gene at mRNA level was elucidated by RT-PCR. Radioiodide uptake, perchlorate blockade, and washout tests were performed and bioluminescence also measured by luminometer in these cells. In vitro clonogenic assay with I-131 was performed. In vivo nuclear imaging was obtained with gamma camera after I-131 intraperitoneal injection. A Vector with AFP-NIS-CMV-Luc was constructed and successfully transfected into HepG2, Huh-7 and HCT-15 cells. HepG2 and Huh-7 cells with AFP-NIS-CMV-Luc gene showed higher iodide uptake than non transfected cells and the higher iodide uptake was totally blocked by addition of perchlorate. HCT-15 cell did not showed any change of iodide uptake by the gene transfection. Transfected cells had higher light output than control cells. In vitro clonogenic assay, transfected HepG2 and Huh-7 cells showed lower colony count than non transfected HepG2 and Huh-7 cells, but transfected HCT-15 cell did not showed any difference than non transfected HCT-15 cell

  17. Combination of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation and radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease. A 3-month follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkusuz, H.; Happel, C.; Koch, D.A.; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2016-01-15

    Pilot studies of combined therapies treating benign nodular goiters reported promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combined microwave ablation (MWA) and radioiodine therapy (RIT) with a special focus on thyroid function at the 3-month follow-up. 15 patients (median age: 55 years) with a large goiter and benign thyroid nodules or Graves' disease were treated with the combined therapy. Serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), thyroglobuline (Tg) and, additionally, antibody levels against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyrotropin receptors (TRAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) were measured at enrollment, post MWA and at the 3-month follow-up (3MFU). Furthermore, the goiter volume, I-131 dose and hospitalization time were analyzed to evaluate effectiveness. MWA was operated under local anesthesia with a system working in a wavelength field of 902 to 928 MHz. TSH, T4, T3 and Tg did not change at 3MFU, except for in two patients in whom the initial TSH levels improved to normal thyroid functioning levels at follow-up. One of the patients developed a high TRAb-level that receded back into the normal range. At 3MFU, the combined therapy showed a mean thyroid volume reduction of 26.4 ml ± 7.9 ml (30.5 % ± 4.6 % (p < 0.05)). By utilizing the combined therapy, administered activity could be reduced by 26.6 % ± 4.8 % (p < 0.05) and hospitalization time by 30.9 % ± 19.9 % (p < 0.05). The data confirmed the effectiveness of the combination of MWA with RIT. The combined therapy is an innovative and conservative approach and could become a safe alternative to surgery for the treatment of very large benign nodular goiters. Due to the short follow-up and the limited number of patients, further studies will be necessary.

  18. Paradoxical therapy in conversion disorder

    OpenAIRE

    ATAOĞLU, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical therapy consists of suggesting that the patient intentionally engages in the unwanted behaviour, such as performing complusive ritual or bringing on a conversion attack. In this study paradoxical intention (PI) was used with to half of the patients with conversion disorders, while the other half were treated with diazepam in order to examine the efficiency of the PI versus diazepam in conversion disorder. Patients treated with PI appeared to have a greater improvement r...

  19. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Malies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juaraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [131I]-capsules (A01 = 2818.5; A02 = 7355.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2 > 0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was radioactivity.

  20. Prestimulation with Recombinant Human Thyrotropin (rhTSH) Improves the Long-Term Outcome of Radioiodine Therapy for Multinodular Nontoxic Goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fast, Søren; Nielsen, Viveque Egsgaard; Grupe, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)-augmented radioiodine ((131)I) therapy for benign multinodular nontoxic goiter. Patients and Methods: Between 2002 and 2005, 86 patients with a multinodular nontoxic goiter were treated...... scale. Results: In both groups, thyroid volume was further reduced from 1 yr to final FU (71 months). The mean goiter volume reductions obtained at 1 yr and final FU [59.2 ± 2.4% (sem) and 69.7 ± 3.1%, respectively] in the rhTSH group were significantly greater than those obtained in the (131)I......-alone group (43.2 ± 3.7 and 56.2 ± 3.6%, respectively, P = 0.001 and P = 0.006), corresponding to a gain of 24% at final FU. At last FU the mean reduction in compression visual analog scale score was significantly greater in patients receiving rhTSH (P = 0.049). Additional therapy (thyroid surgery or (131)I...

  1. The influence of saliva flow stimulation on the absorbed radiation dose to the salivary glands during radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer using {sup 124}I PET(/CT) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentzen, Walter; Schmitz, Jochen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Eising, Ernst; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Balschuweit, Dorothee; Hilbel, Thomas [Fachhochschule Gelsenkirchen, Fachbereich Physikalische Technik, Gelsenkirchen (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    A serious side effect of high-activity radioiodine therapy in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is radiogenic salivary gland damage. This damage may be diminished by lemon-juice-induced saliva flow immediately after {sup 131}I administration. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing lemon slices on the absorbed (radiation) doses to the salivary glands. Ten patients received (pretherapy) {sup 124}I PET(/CT) dosimetry before their first radioiodine therapy. The patients underwent a series of six PET scans at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 48 and {>=}96 h and one PET/CT scan at 24 h after administration of 27 MBq {sup 124}I. Blood samples were also collected at about 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 h. Contrary to the standard radioiodine therapy protocol, the patients were not stimulated with lemon juice. Specifically, the patients chewed no lemon slices during the pretherapy procedure and neither ate food nor drank fluids until after completion of the last PET scan on the first day. Organ absorbed doses per administered {sup 131}I activity (ODpAs) as well as gland and blood uptake curves were determined and compared with published data from a control patient group, i.e. stimulated per the standard radioiodine therapy protocol. The calculations for both groups used the same methodology. A within-group comparison showed that the mean ODpA for the submandibular glands was not significantly different from that for the parotid glands. An intergroup comparison showed that the mean ODpA in the nonstimulation group averaged over both gland types was reduced by 28% compared to the mean ODpA in the stimulation group (p=0.01). Within each gland type, the mean ODpA reductions in the nonstimulation group were statistically significant for the parotid glands (p=0.03) but not for the submandibular glands (p=0.23). The observed ODpAs were higher in the stimulation group because of increased initial gland uptake rather than group differences in blood kinetics. The {sup 124}I PET

  2. Extrathyroidal Radioiodine Accumulation in a Fibroadenoma of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Hun Soo; Park, Soon-Ah

    2017-02-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a differentiated thyroid carcinoma received adjuvant radioiodine therapy following total thyroidectomy and left modified radical neck dissection. A posttherapy planar radioiodine scan showed multifocal uptake in the thyroid bed and left chest. SPECT/CT revealed a fibroadenoma in the left breast. Six months later, an I scan showed no iodine avidity in the breast fibroadenoma, whereas ultrasonography showed no significant change in the size of the fibroadenoma. Altered radioiodine uptake of a breast fibroadenoma can be observed on follow-up scans after cytotoxic radioiodide treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  3. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  4. Meditation therapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisanaprakornkit, T; Krisanaprakornkit, W; Piyavhatkul, N; Laopaiboon, M

    2006-01-25

    Anxiety disorders are characterised by long term worry, tension, nervousness, fidgeting and symptoms of autonomic system hyperactivity. Meditation is an age-old self regulatory strategy which is gaining more interest in mental health and psychiatry. Meditation can reduce arousal state and may ameliorate anxiety symptoms in various anxiety conditions. To investigate the effectiveness of meditation therapy in treating anxiety disorders Electronic databases searched include CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References, complementary and alternative medicine specific databases, Science Citation Index, Health Services/Technology Assessment Text database, and grey literature databases. Conference proceedings, book chapters and references were checked. Study authors and experts from religious/spiritual organisations were contacted. Types of studies: Randomised controlled trials. patients with a diagnosis of anxiety disorders, with or without another comorbid psychiatric condition. Types of interventions: concentrative meditation or mindfulness meditation. Comparison conditions: one or combination of 1) pharmacological therapy 2) other psychological treatment 3) other methods of meditation 4) no intervention or waiting list. Types of outcome: 1) improvement in clinical anxiety scale 2) improvement in anxiety level specified by triallists, or global improvement 3) acceptability of treatment, adverse effects 4) dropout. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers using a pre-designed data collection form. Any disagreements were discussed with a third reviewer, and the authors of the studies were contacted for further information. Two randomised controlled studies were eligible for inclusion in the review. Both studies were of moderate quality and used active control comparisons (another type of meditation, relaxation, biofeedback). Anti-anxiety drugs were used as standard treatment. The duration of trials ranged from 3 months (12 weeks) to 18 weeks. In one study

  5. Combined use of radioiodine therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating postsurgical thyroid remnant of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Long

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Combined use of RAI therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating excessive postsurgical thyroid remnant of DTC can be an effective approach and avoids re-operation. Long-term efficacy monitoring would further determine its feasibility.

  6. Radioiodine therapy in a patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with breast uptake; hyperprolactinemia due to empty sella syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Moon Sun; Park, Chan H.; Seo, Jung Ho [College of Medicine, Ajou Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung Rae [Yungdong Sevrance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    We report a 37 year-old-female patient with papillary thyroid cancer treated by surgery who demonstrated residual thyroid and bilateral breast uptake on a diagnostic I-131 whole body scan. She had an extrathyroidal extension needing I-131 ablative therapy. Her galactorrhea was investigated and treated with low doses of bromocriptine prior to I-131 therapy. Her galactorrhea was was due to the decreased secretion of PIF induced by empty sella.

  7. Therapies for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... researchers do not yet know if they work. Cognitive behavioral therapy reduces anxiety in some older children with ASD who do ... in this guide comes from the reports, Comparative Effectiveness of Therapies for ... Disorders and Therapies for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: ...

  8. Efeitos agudos laringológicos e vocais da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por doença de Basedow Graves Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of Basedow-Graves patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Werlang Isolan-Cury

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A Doença de Graves constitui a forma mais comum de hipertireoidismo e três abordagens terapêuticas são atualmente utilizadas: uso de medicamentos antitireoideanos, cirurgia e iodo radioativo (I 131. Os efeitos do o I 131 e a indução precoce de hipotireoidismo são conseqüências da destruição induzida do I131 sobre o parênquima tireoideano. São poucos relatos encontrados na literatura acerca dos efeitos da radioioterapia sobre a laringe e conseqüentemente na produção vocal. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos agudos sobre a voz da radioiodoterapia em pacientes com hipertireoidismo por Doença de Basedow Graves. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo de corte contemporâneo longitudinal, prospectivo. Procedimentos: Investigação vocal, mensuração do tempo máximo fonatório de /a/ e relação s/z, análise freqüência fundamental (Software Praat, laringoscopia e análise perceptivo-auditiva em três momentos: pré-dose, 4 dias e 20 dias pós dose. Momentos baseados no perfil inflamatório do tecido tireoideano. RESULTADOS: Não houve mudanças estatisticamente significantes nos aspectos vocais e laringológicos nos três momentos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: A radioiodoterapia não afeta a qualidade vocal.Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131. There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim and the AIM: os this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/ and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software, laringoscopy and (perceptive-auditory analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and

  9. Recombinant human thyrotropin-stimulated radioiodine therapy of large nodular goiters facilitates tracheal decompression and improves inspiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Nielsen, Viveque E; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik;

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The impact on tracheal anatomy and respiratory function of recombinant human (rh)TSH-stimulated (131)I therapy in patients with goiter is not clarified. METHODS: In a double-blinded design, patients (age 37-87 yr) with a large multinodular goiter (range, 99-440 ml) were randomized...... previously. In the placebo group, no significant changes in the lung function or SCAT were found throughout the study. In the rhTSH group, a slight decrease was observed in the forced vital capacity 1 wk after therapy, whereas the mean individual change in SCAT was significantly increased by 10.5% (95...

  10. Intermediate and long-term adverse effects of radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, S. C.; Peeters, R. P.; Ronckers, C. M.; Links, T. P.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M. M.; van Dijkum, E. J. M. Nieveen; van Rijn, R. R.; van der Pal, H. J. H.; Neggers, S. J.; Kremer, L. C. M.; van Eck-Smit, B. L. F.; van Santen, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) often involves administration of radioactive iodine (I-131) for remnant ablation or adjuvant therapy. As DTC has favorable outcome and the incidence is increasing, concerns have been raised about the possible adverse effects of I-131 th

  11. Intermediate and long-term adverse effects of radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clement, S C; Peeters, R P; Ronckers, C M; Links, T P; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Nieveen van Dijkum, E J M; van Rijn, R R; van der Pal, H J H; Neggers, S J; Kremer, L C M; van Eck-Smit, B L F; van Santen, H M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) often involves administration of radioactive iodine (I-131) for remnant ablation or adjuvant therapy. As DTC has favorable outcome and the incidence is increasing, concerns have been raised about the possible adverse effects of I-131 th

  12. Light Therapy Boxes for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Light therapy boxes can offer an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder. Features such as light intensity, safety, cost and style are important considerations. ...

  13. Procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy and {sup 131}iodine whole-body scintigraphy in paediatric patients with differentiated thyroid cancer; Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie und {sup 131}I-Ganzkoerperszintigraphie bei differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinomen im Kindes- und Jugendalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzius, C.; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dietlein, M. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Biermann, M. [Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway). Nuclear Medicine and PET-Center; Bergen Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Surgical Sciences; Fruehwald, M.; Linden, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinderheilkunde; Bucsky, P. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Haematologie, Onkologie und Immunologie der Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin; Reiners, C. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine ({sup 131}I) therapy and {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy of differentiated thyroid cancer in paediatric patients is the counterpart to the procedure guidelines (version 3) for adult patients and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Characteristics of thyroid cancer in children are the higher aggressiveness of papillary thyroid cancer, the higher frequency of extrathyroidal extension and of disseminated pulmonary metastases as well as the high risk of local recurrences. Radioiodine therapy is generally recommended in children, the {sup 131}I activity depends on the children's body weight. Radioiodine ablation in children with small papillary cancer ({<=}1 cm) should be considered. TSH stimulation is reached two weeks (children) or three weeks (adolescents) after withdrawal of thyroid hormones. Anti-emetic drugs are highly recommended. CT of the chest and examination of pulmonary function are clearly indicated if there is any suspicion on metastases. 3-6 months after {sup 131}I ablation, the {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy is highly recommended as lymph node metastases are frequently detected in paediatric patients. Follow-up care should be arranged in shorter intervals than in adults to test the compliance and to adapt dosage of thyroid hormones to the children's body weight. Reference values of fT3 are higher in children than in adults. Evidence is insufficient to describe in which constellation the TSH may be kept within the low normal level. Therefore, TSH suppression is generally recommended. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of the Influence on the Liver Function Between Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal and rh-TSH Before High-Dose Radioiodine Therapy in Patients with Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeon-Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Yun, Kuk-No; Yim, Sung Kyun; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Sohn, Myung-Hee [Chonbuk National Univ. Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    An elevated thyroid stimulating hormone level (TSH) is essential to stimulate the uptake of radioiodine into thyroid remnants and metastases and metastases of thyroid cancer when a patient under-goes high-dose radioiodine therapy. Nowadays, recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) is increasingly used instead of the classic method of thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). However, beyond the therapeutic effects, clinical differences between the two methods have not yet been clearly demonstrated. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of the two methods, especially on liver function. We identified 143 evaluable patients who were further divided into two groups: THW and rh-TSH. We first reviewed the aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which were measured during the admission period for total thyroidectomy. We called these liver enzyme levels 'base AST' and 'base ALT.' We also assessed other chemistry profiles, including AST, ALT, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TB), and triglyceride (TG), which were measured on admission day for high-dose radioiodine therapy. We called these liver enzyme levels 'follow-up AST'and 'follow-up ALT.' We compared the changes in base and follow-up liver enzyme levels and the other chemistry profiles between the two groups. The base AST and base ALT levels of the two groups were within normal range, and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In contrast to these base liver enzyme levels, follow-up AST and ALT levels than did the rh-TSH group. Patients in the THW group. Patients in the THW group also had higher levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol than did the patients in the rh-TSH group. However there were no statistically significant differences in ALP, total bilirubin, and triglyceride levels between the two groups. In this retrospective analysis of liver

  15. Determination of factors influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves` disease; Bestimmung von Einflussgroessen fuer den Therapieerfolg der Radioiodtherapie bei Patienten mit Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, O.; Schulz, G.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Zimny, D.; Wagenknecht, G.; Kaiser, H.J.; Dohmen, B.M.; Bares, R.; Buell, U. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH), Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1998-05-01

    Aim of this study was to determine whether success of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in Graves` disease depends on thyroid volume, function, thyroideal receptor antibodies (TRAK), thyresotasis, therapeutic dosage, {sup 131}I uptake, or effective half-life. Method: 78 patients received an average of 626{+-}251 MBq of iodine-131 orally for tyroid ablation. 60 were assessed for successful therapy 3 months after RIT. Results: In patients showing hyperthyreosis or a TRAK value >11 U/l at the beginning of RIT, a significantly lower therapeutic doseage and effective iodine half-life were found than in non-hyperthyreotic patients or patients with TRAK{<=}11 U/l. Patients with a thyroid volume {<=}25 ml showed a significantly lower {sup 131}I uptake, but a significantly higher relative uptake ({sup 131}I uptake/volume) than patients with a tyroid volume >25 ml. All failures were treated thyreostatically during RIT and showed a signifiantly lower therapeutic iodine dosage and relative uptake, as well as a significantly higher thyroid volume than patients with a successful therapy. RIT caused a thyroid volume reduction of 44%, with therapy failures showing a significantly lower volume reduction. Patients who received a therapeutic doseage of {<=}250 Gy showed significantly worse results than did those who had received >250 Gy. Only one case of therapy failure received a dosage >250 Gy, while 50% of failures received dosages >200 Gy but <250 Gy. Multivariate analyses (MANOVA, factor analyses) showed thyreostasis as the decisive negative factor for a successful course of therapy. Conclusions: Since most treatment failures occurred in patients under thyreostatic medication, we recommend raising the target dosage to 250 Gy for these cases. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der Studie war es, zu pruefen, inwieweit der Erfolg einer Radioiodtherapie (RIT) des Morbus Basedow (MB) von verschiedenen Parametern (Schilddruesenvolumen [SDVol], Funktion, TRAK, Thyreostase, Therapiedosis, {sup 131}I

  16. Noninferior response in BRAF{sup V600E} mutant nonmetastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiao; Zhao, Teng; Lin, Yansong [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); Liang, Jun [Peking University International Hospital, Department of Oncology, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    As the most frequent and specific genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), BRAF{sup V600E} has an intimate relationship with more invasive tumour and higher postoperative recurrence risk in PTC patients. We investigate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on the clinical outcome in PTC patients with the BRAF{sup V600E} mutation without distant metastases. This retrospective study included PTC 228 patients without distant metastases who underwent total or near-total thyroidectomy and RAI treatment in our hospital from January 2011 to July 2014. The BRAF{sup V600E} status of the primary lesions was determined and the patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of the mutation. Serological and imaging data were collected at a median follow-up of 2.34 years after RAI administration. Suppressed and stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg), Tg antibody, diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy, and other imaging examinations were used to assess clinical outcome, which was defined as excellent response, indeterminate response, biochemical incomplete response and structural incomplete response. The BRAF{sup V600E} mutation was observed in 153 of the 228 patients (67.1 %). The clinicopathological features did not differ between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and wild-type groups except age at diagnosis (P = 0.000), tumour size (P = 0.023) and TNM stage (P = 0.003). Older age and more advanced TNM stage were prevalent in the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation group, whereas tumours were slightly larger in the BRAF{sup V600E} wild-type group. The response to RAI therapy was evaluated in both the entire series and the patients with a high recurrence risk, and no significant difference in response was found between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and the wild-type groups (P = 0.881 and P = 0.851, respectively). The clinical response to timely postsurgical RAI therapy is not inferior in BRAF{sup V600E} mutation PTC patients without distant metastases, which

  17. Evaluation of radioiodine therapy with fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi in patients with Graves disease; Avaliacao da radioiodoterapia com doses fixas de 10 e 15 mCi em pacientes com doenca de Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canadas, Viviane; Vilar, Lucio; Moura, Eliane; Brito, Ana; Castellar, Enio [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Servico de Endocrinologia]. E-mail: vivi2207@ig.com.br

    2007-10-15

    The treatment options for the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease are antithyroid drugs, surgery and radioiodine, none of which is considered ideal, as they do not act directly on the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Radioiodine has been increasingly used as the treatment of choice because it is a safe and definitive therapy whose administration is very easy. Some authors prefer to administer higher doses in order to deliberately induce hypothyroidism, while others recommend lower doses that result in a lower incidence of hypothyroidism and a greater incidence of euthyroidism. There is no consensus for the optimal regimen of fixed doses to be used and this is the main focus of the present study, where doses of 10 and 15 mCi of {sup 131}I were compared. Among the 164 patients analyzed, 61 (37.2%) were submitted to 10 mCi and 103 (62.8%) to 15 mCi. In the longitudinal analysis it was observed that remission of the hyperthyroidism was statistically different in the sixth month (p < 0.001), being higher in the group that used the dose of 15 mCi, but similar in both groups at 12 and 24 months. It may be concluded that the administration of fixed doses of 10 and 15 mCi of {sup 131}I brought about a similar remission of the hyperthyroidism after 12 months of treatment. Moreover, the remission rate of the hyperthyroidism had no association with age, sex or previous therapy with antithyroid drugs. (author)

  18. Therapy of NMO spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Biswas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an autoimmune demyelinating condition of the central nervous system often associated with aquaporin-4 (AQP4 autoantibodies manifesting as severe optic neuritis and long segment myelitis with tendency to relapse. Seronegative patients and who do not meet the NMO criteria are classified as having NMO Spectrum Disorder (NMOSD, but are treated identically to clinically definite NMO. Acute relapse is treated with intravenous methylprednisolone for 5 days with or without subsequent treatment with plasma exchange (PE. This must be followed by oral steroid to prevent rebound worsening and further relapse. For relapse prevention, immunosuppressive agents that have been found to be effective are azathioprine, rituximab, mycophenolate mofetil, methotrexate, and mitoxantrone; although none of which have been validated in randomized, controlled trial. Some patients do relapse with monotherapy, and switching to more effective agent or use of combination therapy is beneficial in such situation. There is no consensus about the duration of preventive therapy, but generally 2-3 years of relapse-free period is considered the minimum, taking into account the risks of long-term toxicity of these agents.

  19. Thyroid volume reduction following radioiodine therapy in patients with autonomous goitre and Graves` disease; Volumenreduktion der Schilddruese nach Radiojodtherapie bei Patienten mit Schilddruesenautonomie und Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dederichs, B. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Otte, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Klink, J.E. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1996-10-01

    Aim: It is well known that radioiodine therapy (RITh) leads to a significant thyroid volume reduction (TVR). But until now only little data has been presented due to the course of time and the extent of TVR. Method: Therefore the data of 33 patients with Graves` disease (GD), 36 patients with multifocal (MAG) and 31 with solitary (SAG) autonomous goitre were analyzed retrospectively. Results: All the patients showed a highly significant (p<0.001) TVR, which continued up to 1 year after RITh. Receiving equal effective radiation doses, the extent of TVR was significantly greater for GD than for MAG. This difference developed within six weeks up to 3 months after RITh. Conclusion: This observation suggests that the underlying thyroid disease affects the therapeutic effect of RITh and may be partially explained by the total suppression of non-autonomous thyroid tissue in AG at the time of RITh. In patients with SAG with a 1.7 times higher effective radiation dose than in MAG relative TVR was about 1.6 times stronger in SAG than in MAG. This demonstrates a direct relation between the effective radiation dose and the extent of the TVR after RITh. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Es ist bekannt, dass die Radiojodtherapie (RJTh) zu einer relvanten Schilddruesenvolumenreduktion (SVR) fuehrt. Bisher wurden jedoch nur vereinzelt systematische Daten zum zeitlichen Verlauf und quantitativen Ausmass der SVR veroeffentlicht. Methode: Daher fuehrten wir eine retrospektive Auswertung der Daten von 33 Patienten mit Morbus Basedow (MB), 36 Patienten mit multifokaler (MFA) und 31 mit unifokaler (UFA) Autonomie der Schilddruese durch. Ergebnisse: Fuer alle Patientengruppen ergab sich eine hochsignifikante (p<0,001) SVR, welche sich bis ein Jahr nach RJTh signifikant fortsetzte. Obwohl die effektive Herddosis nicht signifikant verschieden war, war das Ausmass der SVR fuer Patienten mit MB signifikant groesser als fuer Patienten mit MFA. Dieser Unterschied war bereits innerhalb der ersten 6

  20. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs; Radioiodtherapie des Morbus Basedow - dosimetrischer Vergleich verschiedener Therapieregime bezueglich der Thyreostatikabgabe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Einrichtungen der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p<0,001, respectively). In Group B the medication with ATD was stopped in 61 of 111 cases 1-5 days after RITh. In this subgroup the effective RI-half-life increased from 4,4 {+-} 1,7 d to 5,1 {+-} 1,6 d after stopping of ATD (p = 0,001). Conclusion: Stopping of ATD 2 days prior to RITh leads to an increased efficiency of about 50% compared to RITh carried out under ATD and therefore to a clear reduction of radiation exposure to the rest of the body with equal absorbed doses of the thyroid. Stopping of ATD shortly after RITh increases efficiency in case of short effective RI

  1. Radioiodine therapy for combined disseminated and nodular thyroid autonomy. Results after using a correction term for the disseminated part; Radioiodtherapie bei kombinierter Schilddruesenautonomie. Ergebnisse nach Korrektur fuer disseminierte Anteile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Otto, I.; Sciuk, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum Augsburg (Germany); Wengenmair, H.; Kopp, J. [Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz, Klinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: in combined focal and disseminated thyroid autonomy a variety of concepts in the treatment with radioiodine are used. The difference lies mainly in the calculation of the autonomous volume. This retrospective study shows a new method of calculating the autonomous volume. Patients and methods: in 398 patients with combined thyroid autonomy and good correlation of scintigraphically hot nodules and lesions defined by ultrasound the volume of the nodules is ascertained from scintigraphic and ultrasound parameters and the volume of the disseminated autonomous tissue is assessed with a weighting factor (VF). This factor is the ratio of impulse density in a ROI over the disseminated volume divided by the corresponding impulse density over the nodular volume of the thyroid scintigraphy. The sum of nodular volume and weighted perinodular volume gives the total autonomous volume. A standard radioiodine test gives the maximum iodine-131-uptake and effective half-life to calculate the activity to obtain a treatment dose of 400 Gy. Results: the rate of success with and without thyrostatic medication was 97% with an 18.6% rate of hypothyroidism observed from 4 months post therapy onwards. Conclusion: the use of the weighting factor VF in the treatment of combined autonomy leads to an excellent rate of success in patients with good correlation of functional imaging and ultrasound findings. (orig.)

  2. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa (Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after [sup 131]I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after [sup 131]I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after [sup 131]I therapy.(author).

  3. [Cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to take the psychological characteristics of anxiety into account when we consider the improvement of anxiety. Anxiety is generally observed basic emotion in human and never extinguishable. Therefore, it is important for patients with anxiety disorders to learn how to manage their daily anxious responses, even after their pathological anxiety is successfully treated and improved. Considering these points, comprehensive psychological treatment, including not only effective intervention to pathological anxiety but also anxiety management program, is needed in treating anxiety disorders effectively. Reviewing previous studies on effectiveness of psychotherapy for anxiety disorders shows that the cognitive behavior therapy is the most effective intervention in terms of extinction of pathological anxiety, prolonged effectiveness of the treatment, prognosis, prevention of recurrence, and improvement of patients' quality of life. In this article, firstly, basic conceptualization and case formulation of anxiety disorders are discussed theoretically. Secondly, effectiveness of cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, general anxiety disorder, and specific phobia, is reviewed. And finally, challenges of cognitive behavior therapy are discussed in terms of further development and dissemination of cognitive behavior therapy in Japan.

  4. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann-Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases.

  5. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  6. Neurostimulation therapies for primary headache disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magis, Delphine; Jensen, Rigmor; Schoenen, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Most pharmacological treatments of primary headache disorders are partially effective and have cumbersome side effects. Therapies with better efficacy and tolerance are needed. Neurostimulation techniques may have this potential. This is an attempt to summarize the latest clinical trial results...

  7. Temporomandibular Disorders and Physical Therapy Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ilke Coskun Benlidayi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular disorders are comprised of clinical problems associated with masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint and neighboring tissues. The frequency of temporomandibular disorders is high among premenopausal women. Patient education and behavioral therapy, occlusal splints, pharmacological agents, intra-articular and surgical approaches and physical therapy methods are used in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Physical therapy approaches include exercise (passive stretching, resistive and posture exercises, superficial heat and cold applications, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, therapeutic ultrasound, trigger point injections, acupuncture and laser. In this article, temporomandibular disorders were reviewed and physical therapy methods used for treatment were discussed in detail. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 542-554

  8. Novel radioiodinated neuroreceptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musachio, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Since many bioactive compounds do not readily undergo direct labeling with radioisotopes of iodine, the novel prosthetic groups, p-toluenesulfonate esters of (E)- and (Z)-3-(tri-n-butylstannyl)prop-2-en-1-ol, were designed to complement existing methods for radioiodine incorporation. The preparation and synthetic utility of these bifunctional reagents are described. These vinylstannylated alkylating agents were coupled with nucleophilic functionalities (amide nitrogen, secondary amine, tertiary alcohol) in acceptable to excellent yields. Regio- and stereospecific radioiododestannylation with retention of configuration occurred under mild, no-carrier-added conditions to give the corresponding radiolabeled N- or O-iodoallyl analogs in good radiochemical yields with high specific radioactivities. The methodology is versatile and well-suited to selective labeling of small molecules with radioisotopes of iodine. Of particular importance are the N-iodoallyl analogs of spiperone and the O-iodoallyl analog of diprenorphine for in vitro and in vivo studies of dopamine D[sub 2] and opioid receptors. For in vivo studies of central serotonin 5-HT[sub 2] receptors via single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), novel radioiodinated N1-alkyl-2-iodo-LSD derivatives were synthesized. These target radioligands were prepared in moderate radiochemical yields. D-(+)-N1-ethyl-2-iodo-LSD, EIL, was identified as the most promising candidate of this series. [[sup 125]I]-EIL binds to central 5-HT[sub 2] receptors with high affinity and selectivity in vitro and labels 5-HT[sub 2] receptors in vivo with high specificity. For preparation of EIL labeled with [sup 123]I, an optimized procedure was developed that gave [[sup 123]I]-EIL in acceptable yields. This radioligand allowed visualization of serotonin 5-HT[sub 2] sites in living baboon brain via SPECT. [[sup 123]I]-EIL may serve as an agent for tomographic studies of human cerebral 5-HT[sub 2] receptors in normal and disease states.

  9. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Vieira, Karen F

    2008-01-21

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD), addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such noncompliant patients who

  10. Nutritional therapies for mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira Karen F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4 out of the 10 leading causes of disability in the US and other developed countries are mental disorders. Major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD are among the most common mental disorders that currently plague numerous countries and have varying incidence rates from 26 percent in America to 4 percent in China. Though some of this difference may be attributable to the manner in which individual healthcare providers diagnose mental disorders, this noticeable distribution can be also explained by studies which show that a lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to the development of mental disorders. Notably, essential vitamins, minerals, and omega-3 fatty acids are often deficient in the general population in America and other developed countries; and are exceptionally deficient in patients suffering from mental disorders. Studies have shown that daily supplements of vital nutrients often effectively reduce patients' symptoms. Supplements that contain amino acids also reduce symptoms, because they are converted to neurotransmitters that alleviate depression and other mental disorders. Based on emerging scientific evidence, this form of nutritional supplement treatment may be appropriate for controlling major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD, addiction, and autism. The aim of this manuscript is to emphasize which dietary supplements can aid the treatment of the four most common mental disorders currently affecting America and other developed countries: major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD. Most antidepressants and other prescription drugs cause severe side effects, which usually discourage patients from taking their medications. Such

  11. Therapies for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summary – Sept. 23, 2014 Therapies for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Formats View PDF (PDF) 692 kB Help with ... Web page Understanding Your Child's Condition What is autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? ASD includes a range of behavioral symptoms. ...

  12. Advances in eating disorder therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Annika Helgadóttir; Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2014-01-01

    Researchers at the Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre are seeking to improve outcomes for patients with eating disorders by gathering their feedback on group psychotherapy sessions with the aim of optimising treatment.......Researchers at the Stolpegaard Psychotherapy Centre are seeking to improve outcomes for patients with eating disorders by gathering their feedback on group psychotherapy sessions with the aim of optimising treatment....

  13. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with (131)I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with (131)I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Regenerative Therapy for Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narsis Daftarian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in various disciplines of basic sciences including embryology, molecular and cell biology, genetics, and nanotechnology, as well as stem cell biology have opened new horizons for regenerative therapy. The unique characteristics of stem cells prompt a sound understanding for their use in modern regenerative therapies. This review article discusses stem cells, developmental stages of the eye field, eye field transcriptional factors, and endogenous and exogenous sources of stem cells. Recent studies and challenges in the application of stem cells for retinal pigment epithelial degeneration models will be summarized followed by obstacles facing regenerative therapy.

  15. Autism spectrum disorder and pet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewertsen, Caitlin M; French, Emma D; Teramoto, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) encompasses a wide range of social and mental afflictions that are difficult to treat. Due to a lack of established treatments for ASD, alternative therapies have been the primary form of intervention. One of these alternatives is pet therapy, a field that has experienced growing interest and has recently accumulated studies that investigate its efficacy. This article reviews and summarizes that effectiveness as well as the findings and limitations associated with pet therapy for ASD. The majority of research on ASD and pet therapy has examined children and has primarily used dogs and horses for therapy. Studies have shown positive effects for the therapy, including high satisfaction rates among the participants' families. Major limitations of studies in the current literature include the lack of control groups and small sample sizes. Future research should incorporate better study designs and large samples to validate pet therapy as an appropriate treatment for ASD.

  16. Efeitos da radioiodoterapia nas gerações futuras de mulheres com carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide Radioiodine therapy effects on offspring of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dolores Gonçalves Brandão

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available A radioiodoterapia tem conseguido desempenhar um papel significante no tratamento do carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide. A literatura é limitada em relação a possíveis efeitos secundários do 131I, embora o interesse tenha aumentado nesse campo. A importância de se saber mais sobre os efeitos mutagênicos da radiação em filhos de mães expostas ao 131I para tratamento do carcinoma diferenciado de tireóide é devida à possibilidade de ocorrência de abortos, anormalidades genéticas e aparecimento de malignidades nas crianças. Nesta revisão da literatura vários estudos têm demonstrado a segurança desse tipo de tratamento em mulheres na idade fértil, sendo apenas aconselhadas a evitar gravidez pelo período de, pelo menos, um ano após a administração da radioiodoterapia.Radioiodine therapy has attained a significant role in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The literature addressing possible secondary effects of 131I is limited, although there has been increasingly interest in this field. A more comprehensive understanding of the mutagenic effects of radiation on the offspring of women exposed to 131I is mandatory in view of the possibility of occurrence of miscarriages, congenital abnormalities and malignancies in these children. In this review, we found that many reports on safety of this type of treatment in female patients in reproductive age recommend that pregnancy should be avoided for at least one year after therapeutic administration of radioiodine.

  17. Art Therapy and Dissociative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates how art therapy helped a woman address her identity and memory difficulties while she managed her daily activities. The process helped her validate traumatic events in her history and provided a starting point for addressing internal conflicts. The client's artwork helped the therapist learn about the client's unconscious states. (MKA)

  18. Schema therapy for borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Scott H; Young, Jeffrey E

    2006-04-01

    This article presents the Schema Therapy (Young, Klosko, & Weishaar, 2003) approach to the treatment of borderline personality disorder. Schema therapy draws on the cognitive-behavioral, attachment, psychodynamic, and emotion-focused traditions and conceptualizes patients who have borderline personality disorder as being under the sway of five modes or aspects of the self. The goal of the therapy is to reorganize this inner structure. To this end, there are four core mechanisms of change that are used in this therapy: (1) limited reparenting, (2) experiential imagery and dialogue work, (3) cognitive restructuring and education, and (4) behavioral pattern breaking. These interventions are used during the three phases of treatment: (1) bonding and emotional regulation, (2) schema mode change, and (3) development of autonomy.

  19. Reduced radioiodine uptake at increased iodine intake and {sup 131}I-induced release of ''cold'' iodine stored in the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Haase, A.; Richter, E.; Baehre, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Seyfarth, M. [Inst. of Clinical Chemistry, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Wenzel, B.E. [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim: the extent of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) provides information about iodine supply and release. In the present study we investigated correlations between UIE and radioiodine uptake (RIU) as well as effects of radioiodine therapy on UIE in patients with autonomous goitre. Patients, methods: In 197 consecutive patients with thyroid autonomy, UIE was measured twice during radioiodine test (RITe) and correlated with RIU. In 98 of these patients, thyroglobulin and thyroid volume (V) were determined prior to therapy. Individual changes in urinary iodine excretion ({delta}UIE) and TG ({delta}TG) could be investigated four weeks (4W) and six months (6M) after radioiodine therapy. Additionally, {delta}V was determined 6M after therapy. {delta}UIE, {delta}TG and {delta}V were correlated with target dose and target volume. Results: patients with higher iodine excretion exhibited significantly lower thyroidal radioiodine uptake values. Twofold increased UIE prior to therapy decreased radioiodine uptake by 25%. Compared with pretherapeutic values, UIE and TG were significantly increased four weeks after radioiodine therapy (p < 0.001). Median values of both parameters were found to be doubled. The product of target dose and target volume was not only correlated with a decrease of thyroid volume 6M after therapy, but also with an increase of UIE and TG in the early phase after therapy. Conclusions: it was confirmed that UIE during RITe is a measure for iodine intake and can be used to investigate the competition between stable iodine and radioiodine. The increase of UIE and TG four weeks after therapeutic administration of radioiodine can be explained by disintegrated thyroid follicles. The therapy-induced iodine release may be one important cause for the development of hyperthyroidism in some patients during the first weeks after radioiodine therapy. It may contribute to the known decrease of radioiodine uptake after preapplications of {sup 131}I in various thyroid

  20. Developing genetic therapies for polyglutamine disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, Melvin Maurice

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis various genetic therapies to reduce polyglutamine-induced toxicity are discussed. Although polyglutamine disorders are caused by CAG triplet repeat expansions in different genes, they all result in gain of toxic polyglutamine protein function and subsequently neurodegeneration. The po

  1. [Virtual reality therapy in anxiety disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrousia, V; Giotakos, O

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade a number of studies have been conducted in order to examine if virtual reality exposure therapy can be an alternative form of therapy for the treatment of mental disorders and particularly for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Imaginal exposure therapy, which is one of the components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, cannot be easily applied to all patients and in cases like those virtual reality can be used as an alternative or a supportive psychotherapeutic technique. Most studies using virtual reality have focused on anxiety disorders, mainly in specific phobias, but some extend to other disorders such as eating disorders, drug dependence, pain control and palliative care and rehabilitation. Main characteristics of virtual reality therapy are: "interaction", "immersion", and "presence". High levels of "immersion" and "presence" are associated with increased response to exposure therapy in virtual environments, as well as better therapeutic outcomes and sustained therapeutic gains. Typical devices that are used in order patient's immersion to be achieved are the Head-Mounted Displays (HMD), which are only for individual use, and the computer automatic virtual environment (CAVE), which is a multiuser. Virtual reality therapy's disadvantages lie in the difficulties that arise due to the demanded specialized technology skills, devices' cost and side effects. Therapists' training is necessary in order for them to be able to manipulate the software and the hardware and to adjust it to each case's needs. Devices' cost is high but as technology continuously improves it constantly decreases. Immersion during virtual reality therapy can induce mild and temporary side effects such as nausea, dizziness or headache. Until today, however, experience shows that virtual reality offers several advantages. Patient's avoidance to be exposed in phobic stimuli is reduced via the use of virtual reality since the patient is exposed to them as many times as he

  2. Investigation of biokinetics of radioiodine with a population kinetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, T; Giussani, A; Canzi, C; Gerundini, P; Oeh, U; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    The dosimetric studies required for planning individually tailored radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid pathologies may be too complex and time-demanding for many ordinary nuclear medicine departments. In this work, a preliminary population kinetics approach was applied to a model structure for iodine biokinetics in order to identify those model features that actually need to be individually investigated, in order to simplify the protocol for data collection in patients. Data from 29 patients undergoing radioiodine therapy for the treatment of the autonomous nodule syndrome were used in the analysis. The greatest inter-individual variations were observed in the parameters describing the transformation of iodide into organic iodine in the thyroid and in the kinetics of the organic form.

  3. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanashanmugham, K; Saravanan, B; Sukumar, M R; Tajir, T Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy.

  4. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gnanashanmugham

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences. This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy

  5. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy PMID:26015741

  6. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; T Faisal Tajir

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic...

  7. 224例分化型甲状腺癌放射性碘治疗分析%Experience of 224 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma by radioiodine therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭一玲; 陈佐伟; 张英男; 冯程; 辛镇祓

    2011-01-01

    目的:对在我科8年来治疗的分化型甲状腺癌(DTC)患者进行回顾性分析,了解DTC发病规律,并证明131碘治疗DTC的疗效.方法:2002至2010年确诊为DTC并有颈部淋巴结转移的患者,进行甲状腺近全切除,并进行颈部淋巴结清扫,术后131碘治疗.131碘治疗后,每半年随访一次.随访指标:颈部超声检查;血清TSH、FT4、FT3;血清Tg、TgAb检查;全身放射性碘扫描;胸部CT或MRI.疗效判定:当血清Tg、TgAb阴性,颈部超声未见肿大淋巴结,全身放射性碘扫描未见放射性浓聚时,为DTC治愈.当上述指标为阳性时,则进行再次131碘治疗.用SPSS软件进行统计学处理.结果:DTC患者数逐年明显增加;乳头癌与滤泡癌的比例约为12(207):1(17),女性患者远多于男性,男:女患者患病比例约为1(57):3(167);DTC在20-55岁之间为高发年龄段,峰值在25-35岁之间;131碘治疗对DTC治愈率约达90%,近10%的顽固性DTC患者多次131碘治疗效果欠佳.结论:分化型甲状腺癌患病率有明显增加趋势,25-35岁为高发年龄,女性多于男性,早期诊断及早期治疗是关键.手术切除甲状腺后进行131碘治疗对DTC治愈率达90%.近10%的患者131碘治疗效果欠佳,需寻求更好的治疗方法.%Objective: To study the incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma ( DTC ) and the outcome of 131 Iodine therapy for DTC, we summarized retrospectively data of patients with DTC who were managed by 131 Iodine therapy in our department in past 8 years. Methods :Patients with DTC and neck lymph nodes metastasis were diagnosed and near - total thyroidectomy were performed, and neck metastatic lymph nodes were excised. After operation they were treated by radioiodine. Patients were followed up once every half of year after 131 Iodine therapy . To observe the following ired: neck ultrasound test , serum TSH, FT4, FT3 test, serum Tg, TgAb test, radioiodine whole body scan,chest CT or MRI. Assessment of outcome of 131 Iodine

  8. Laser puncture therapy of nervous system disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anishchenko, G.; Kochetkov, V.

    1984-08-29

    The authors discuss experience with treatment of nervous system disorders by means of laser-puncture therapy. Commenting on the background of the selection of this type of treatment, they explain that once researchers determined the biological action of laser light on specific nerve receptors of the skin, development of laser apparatus capable of concentrating the beam in the millimeter band was undertaken. The devices that are being used for laser-puncture are said to operate in the red helium-neon band of light. The authors identify beam parameters that have been selected for different groups of acupuncture points of the skin, and the courses of treatment (in seconds of radiation) and their time intervals. They go on to discuss the results of treatment of over 800 patients categorized in a group with disorders of the peripheral nervous system and a second group with disorders of the central nervous system.

  9. RADIOSYNOVIORTHESIS IN THERAPY FOR INFLAMMATORY JOINT DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerii Vasilyevich Krylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiosynoviorthesis (RSO, also known as radiosynovectomy, is an approved method of treatment for inflammatory joint disorders that is commonly used both in the industrialized American and European countries as well as in the developing Asian and African countries. In terms of frequency of its use, this method ranks second among all the methods for radionuclide therapy in Germany. The treatment includes intra-articular administration of radiopharmaceuticals as microparticles (colloidal forms, macroaggregates, or microspheres containing radioactive isotopes, which are rapidly phagocytized by the synovial membrane cells. Indications for therapy include inflammatory joint disorders of different genesis: rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, osteoarthritis and intra-articular effusion after joint endoprosthetics. RSO is the optimal method for local therapy for arthritis in patients with hemophilic arthropathy, since it both heals the inflammation and reduces the frequency of bleeding relapses. This aspect is of particular significance for the developing countries where the disease is often complicated by arthropathies due to the lack of coagulation factor. The main advantages include the low frequency of undesired reactions and low radiation burden to a patient. Depending on the degree to which a joint is affected, the frequency of responses to therapy is 50–80%, reaching 90% in patients with hemophilic arthropathy.

  10. Novel molecular therapies for heritable skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M; McLean, W H Irwin; McGrath, John A

    2012-03-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades in molecular genetics of heritable skin diseases, and pathogenic mutations have been identified in as many as 500 distinct human genes. This progress has resulted in improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, has refined genetic counseling, and has formed the basis for prenatal and presymptomatic testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. However, there has been relatively little progress in developing effective and specific treatments for these often devastating diseases. However, very recently, a number of novel molecular strategies, including gene therapy, cell-based approaches, and protein replacement therapy, have been explored for the treatment of these conditions. This overview will focus on the prototypic heritable blistering disorders, epidermolysis bullosa, and related keratinopathies, in which significant progress has been made recently toward treatment, and it will illustrate how some of the translational research therapies have already entered the clinical arena.

  11. [Diagnosis and therapy of personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, V

    1997-07-01

    Approximately 10% of the unselected population are affected with personality disorders, among the patients of psychiatrists and family doctors the quota goes up to 40%. Personality disorders comprise deeply ingrained and enduring behaviour patterns, manifesting themselves as inflexible responses to a broad range of personal and social situations. They are stable and lead frequently to subjective distress and/or to impaired social functioning. The division in subgroups is made on the reason of typical patterns of experience and behaviour, but overlapping between different subtypes is frequent. People with personality disorders often come into conflicts with their environment because of their maladaptive behaviour which lead to crises and need of intervention. Psychopharmaca can be given in such situations, but substances with an addictive potential like benzodiazepines should not be prescribed for a longer period. The long-term psychotherapy of personality disordered persons requires an individual planing after a careful analysis of the behaviour pattern and should focus on concretely defined and reachable aims. Personality disordered persons belong to the most difficult patients, their long-term treatment demands appropriate therapeutic skills. In the primary care family doctors therapy and support is important but several basic rules should be followed.

  12. Corticosteroid Therapy for Hearing and Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trune, Dennis R.; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses the current status of steroid therapies for hearing and vestibular disorders and how certain misconceptions may be undermining the efficacy in restoring normal ear function, both experimentally and clinically. Specific misconceptions addressed are that steroid therapy is not effective, steroid-responsive hearing loss proves an underlying inflammatory problem in the ear, and steroids only have application to the hearing disorders listed below. Glucocorticoid therapy for hearing and balance disorders has been employed for over 60 years. It is recommended in cases of sudden hearing loss, Meniére’s disease, immune-mediated hearing loss, and any vestibular dysfunction suspected of having an inflammatory etiology. The predominant steroids employed today are dexamethasone, prednisone, prednisolone, and methyl-prednisolone. In spite of years of use, little is known of the steroid responsive mechanisms in the ear that are influenced by glucocorticoid therapy. Furthermore, meta-analyses and clinical study reviews occasionally question whether steroids offer any benefit at all. Foremost in the minds of clinicians is the immune suppression and antiinflammatory functions of steroids because of their efficacy for autoimmune hearing loss. However, glucocorticoids have a strong binding affinity for the mineralocorticoid (aldosterone) and glucocorticoid receptors, both of which are prominent in the ear. Because the auditory and vestibular end organs require tightly regulated endolymph and perilymph fluids, this ion homeostasis role of the mineralocorticoid receptor cannot be overlooked in both normal and pathologic functions of the ear. The function of the glucocorticoid receptor is to provide anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic signals by mediating survival factors. PMID:23044978

  13. Subjective perception of radioactivity. No change post successful treatment with radioiodine; Strahlen bleiben boese. Keine Aenderung der subjektiven Konzepte von Radioaktivitaet nach erfolgreicher Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Mueller, S.P.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2009-07-01

    We assess the attitude of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity before and after radioiodine therapy by means of a cultural-anthropological approach. We evaluate in patient interviews how their subjective attitude towards radioactivity as an abstract term and towards radioactivity in the medical context on the basis of their personal experiences with radionuclide therapy. 29 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (17 women, 12 men, 35-79 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed prior to and 22-27 month post radioiodine therapy in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1: positive, 5: negative) to quantify their perception of radioactivity. The personal perception of radioactivity as an abstract term does not change significantly (p = 0.15) before and after radioiodine therapy. This perception is linked to mostly negative impressions of radiactivity. However, patients become more positive when assessing the value of radioactivity as part of their therapy regimen. Thus, we observe a significant increase in percepted value of radioactivity post radioiodine therapy (p = 0.03). Patients continue to view radioactivity as something negative despite treatment success following radioiodine therapy. Our results provide useful information for patient information by the nuclear medicine physician prior to a radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  14. Neuroenhancement of Exposure Therapy in Anxiety Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan G. Hofmann

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure-based treatments and anxiolytic medications are more effective than placebo for treating anxiety disorders, there is still considerable room for further improvement. Interestingly, combining these two modalities is usually not more effective than the monotherapies. Recent translational research has identified a number of novel approaches for treating anxiety disorders using agents that serve as neuroenhancers (also known as cognitive enhancers. Several of these agents have been studied to determine their efficacy at improving treatment outcome for patients with anxiety and other psychiatric disorders. In this review, we examine d-cycloserine, yohimbine, cortisol, catecholamines, oxytocin, modafinil, and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids as potential neuroenhancers. Of these agents, d-cycloserine shows the most promise as an effective neuroenhancer for extinction learning and exposure therapy. Yet, the optimal dosing and dose timing for drug administration remains uncertain. There is partial support for cortisol, catecholamines, yohimbine and oxytocin for improving extinction learning and exposure therapy. There is less evidence to indicate that modafinil and nutrients such as caffeine and amino fatty acids are effective neuroenhancers. More research is needed to determine their long term efficacy and clinical utility of these agents.

  15. Group therapy for anxiety disorders using rational emotive behaviour therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, D; Brunero, S

    1997-12-01

    This paper reports a pilot study designed to investigate Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy in the group treatment of selected clients suffering from anxiety disorders. A convenience sample of 17 clients who completed the treatment programme was selected for the study. Biographical information was sought and data were collected on subject anxiety and depression. Intervention was targeted at identifying and correcting irrational beliefs via the application of a range of Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy techniques. Pre- and postintervention data were analysed by two-tailed t-tests for paired samples and found to be significant at P < 0.001. The results suggest that the treatment approach was successful in modifying irrational beliefs and anxiety.

  16. Stem cell therapy in pediatric neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy in Pediatric Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Torabian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric neurological disorders including muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and spinal cord injury are defined as a heterogenous group of diseases, of which some are known to be genetic. The two significant features represented for stem cells, leading to distinguish them from other cell types are addressed as below: they can renew themselves besides the ability to differentiate into cells with special function as their potency. Researches about the role of stem cells in repair of damaged tissues in different organs like myocardium, lung, wound healing, and others are developing. In addition, the use of stem cells in the treatment and improving symptoms of neurological diseases such as autism are known. Many epigenetic and immunological studies on effects of stem cells have been performed. The action of stem cells in tissue repair is a need for further studies. The role of these cells in the secretion of hormones and growth factors in the niche, induction of cell division and differentiation in local cells and differentiation of stem cells in damaged tissue is the samples of effects of tissue repair by stem cells.Cognitive disorders, epilepsy, speech and language disorders, primary sensory dysfunction, and behavioral challenges are symptoms of non-neuromotor dysfunction in half of pediatrics with CP. Occupational therapy, oral medications, and orthopedic surgery for supportive and rehabilitative approaches are part of Conventional remedy for cerebral palsy. This paper summarizes the clinical world wide experience about stem cell based therapeutic procedures for pediatric neurological disorders.

  18. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magee, Wendy L.; O'Kelly, Julian

    Music therapy is a clinical healthcare discipline that draws its evidence base from a number of theoretical frameworks, including psychology and music neuroscience to improve the health and well-being in individuals from varied clinical populations. Working with individuals across the lifespan...... is to present the latest developments in music therapy intervention and measurement with people with disorders of consciousness stemming from acquired profound brain injury. We will share a standardized clinical protocol and examine recent research findings that illustrate the benefits of music-based methods......, evidence-based therapeutic methods are developed from an understanding of music perception and cognition. However, there are several key challenges. First, developing a theory-based clinical and research approach is necessary to deepen understandings of the complex interactions between music stimulus...

  19. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magee, Wendy L.; O'Kelly, Julian

    Music therapy is a clinical healthcare discipline that draws its evidence base from a number of theoretical frameworks, including psychology and music neuroscience to improve the health and well-being in individuals from varied clinical populations. Working with individuals across the lifespan...... is to present the latest developments in music therapy intervention and measurement with people with disorders of consciousness stemming from acquired profound brain injury. We will share a standardized clinical protocol and examine recent research findings that illustrate the benefits of music-based methods......, evidence-based therapeutic methods are developed from an understanding of music perception and cognition. However, there are several key challenges. First, developing a theory-based clinical and research approach is necessary to deepen understandings of the complex interactions between music stimulus...

  20. Thyrotropin receptor antibody activities significantly correlate with the outcome of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaise, Kazuro; Kaise, Nobuko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Koki; Yamamoto, Makiko; Sakurada, Toshiro; Saito, Shintaro; Yoshinaga, Kaoru (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-08-01

    The outcome of {sup 131}I therapy for 109 patients with Graves' disease was analysed according to pretreatment laboratory data including thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) activities. Forty-five percent of patients became euthyroid, and 13% of patients became hypothyroid within one year after {sup 131}I therapy. Forty-two percent of patients remained hyperthyroid one year after {sup 131}I therapy. Pretreatment values for serum T{sub 4}, T{sub 3}, and the estimated weight of the thyroid were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid group. The mean for the TRAb index of the hyperthyroid group was significantly higher than that of the euthyroid group. Life table analysis revealed a significant effect of the TRAb index on the rate of hyperthyroidism after 3 months or later. These results appear to suggest that the TRAb index is one of the factors which influence the outcome of {sup 131}I therapy for Graves' disease. (author).

  1. Dry Distillation of Radioiodine from TeO2 Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Koziorowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As medical cyclotrons are becoming more abundant, 123I and 124I are getting more attention as alternatives to 131I for diagnostics of thyroid disease. Both 123I and 124I provide better diagnostics, deliver less dose to patients and both reduce the risk of thyroid stunning, facilitating subsequent therapy. Dry distillation of radioiodine from tellurium dioxide targets has become the standard approach to producing these radioiodines. Setting up such a production of radioiodine is associated with a lengthy optimization of the process and for this purpose natural tellurium is often used for economical reasons. In this paper, the distillation parameters are scrutinized to ensure optimal distillation temperature, in order to minimize time spent and prevent loss of expensive target material. It is further demonstrated how the individual iodine isotopes, produced from proton bombardment of natTe, will diffuse out of the target in a time dependent ratio. We believe the effect is due to the isotopes having their maximum cross section at different energies. The individual isotopes produced will thus have their highest concentration at different depths in the target. This results in individual mean diffusion lengths and diffusion times for the different isotopes.

  2. Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany M.; Quintino, Olga; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Koslovsky, Gabrielle

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-eight adolescents with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder were provided either massage therapy or relaxation therapy for 10 consecutive school days. The massage therapy group, but not the relaxation therapy group, self-rated as happier, and observers rated them as fidgeting less following the sessions. Teachers reported more time on…

  3. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakheet, S.M.; Powe, J.; Al Suhaibani, H. [Department of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hammami, M.M.; Bazarbashi, M. [Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1999-06-01

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs.

  4. Virtual reality exposure therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Maryrose; Cukor, Judith; Difede, Joann; Rizzo, Albert; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2010-08-01

    Anxiety disorders, including phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder, are common and disabling disorders that often involve avoidance behavior. Cognitive-behavioral treatments, specifically imaginal and in vivo forms of exposure therapy, have been accepted and successful forms of treatment for these disorders. Virtual reality exposure therapy, an alternative to more traditional exposure-based therapies, involves immersion in a computer-generated virtual environment that minimizes avoidance and facilitates emotional processing. In this article, we review evidence on the application of virtual reality exposure therapy to the treatment of specific phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder and discuss its advantages and cautions.

  5. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  6. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  7. Abnormal radioiodine uptake on post-therapy whole body scan and sodium/iodine symporter expression in a dermoid cyst of the ovary: report of a case and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campenni, Alfredo; Baldari, Sergio, E-mail: acampenni@unime.ittalia [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e delle Immagini Morfologiche e Funzionali, Unità di Medicina Nucleare, Università degli Studi di Messina, Messina (Italy); Giovinazzo, Salvatore; Ruggeri, Rosaria M. [Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, Unità di Endocrinologia, Università degli Studi di Messina (Italy); Tuccari, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Patologia Umana, Università degli Studi di Messina (Italy); Fogliani, Simone [Unità di Scienze Radiologiche, Ospedale di Milazzo, Messina (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In patients affected by differentiated thyroid cancer, the whole-body scan (WBS) with 131-radioiodine, especially when performed after a therapeutic activity of {sup 131}I, represents a sensitive procedure for detecting thyroid remnant and/or metastatic disease. Nevertheless, a wide spectrum of potentially pitfalls has been reported. Herein we describe a 63-year-old woman affected by follicular thyroid cancer, who was accidentally found to have an abdominal mass at post-dose WBS (pWBS). pWBS showed abnormal radioiodine uptake in the upper mediastinum, consistent with lymph-node metastases, and a slight radioiodine uptake in an abdominal focal area. Computed tomography revealed an inhomogeneous mass in the pelvis, previously unrecognized. The lesion, surgically removed, was found to be a typical dermoid cyst of the ovary, without any evidence of thyroid tissue. By immunohistochemistry, a moderate expression of the sodium-iodine symporter (NIS) was demonstrated in the epithelial cells, suggesting a NIS-dependent uptake of radioiodine by the cyst. (author)

  8. Emulating Upper Limb Disorder for Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Ayuni binti Che Zakaria

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Robotics not only contributes to the invention of rehabilitation devices, it can also enhance the quality of medical education. In recent years, the use of patient simulators and part-task trainers in the medical education field has brought meaningful improvements in the training of medical practitioners. Nevertheless, in the context of therapy training for upper limb disorders, trainee therapists still have to engage directly with the patients to gain experience of the rehabilitation of physical diseases. In this work, a high-fidelity part-task trainer that is able to reproduce the stiffness of spasticity and rigidity symptoms of the upper limb, such as those observed in post-stroke patients and Parkinson's disease patients, has been developed. Based on the evaluation carried out by two experienced therapists, the developed part-task trainer is able to simulate different patient cases and help trainee therapists gain pre-clinical experience in a safe and intuitive learning environment.

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for compulsive buying disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James E; Burgard, Melissa; Faber, Ron; Crosby, Ross D; de Zwaan, Martina

    2006-12-01

    To our knowledge, no psychotherapy treatment studies for compulsive buying have been published. The authors conducted a pilot trial comparing the efficacy of a group cognitive behavioral intervention designed for the treatment of compulsive buying to a waiting list control. Twenty-eight subjects were assigned to receive active treatment and 11 to the waiting list control group. The results at the end of treatment showed significant advantages for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) over the waiting list in reductions in the number of compulsive buying episodes and time spent buying, as well as scores on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale--Shopping Version and the Compulsive Buying Scale. Improvement was well-maintained at 6-month follow-up. The pilot data suggests that a cognitive behavioral intervention can be quite effective in the treatment of compulsive buying disorder. This model requires further testing.

  10. Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre. The possibility of effect-amplification with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Nielsen, Viveque E; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimum treatment of benign non-toxic goitre. L-thyroxine suppressive therapy is widely used, but there is poor evidence of its efficacy, and it may have serious adverse effects on health. Surgery is first choice in large goitres or if malignancy is suspected....... 131I therapy results in a one-year goitre reduction of around 40% in multinodular goitres, usually with a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement of the inspiratory capacity. The effect is attenuated with increasing goitre size. The risk of hypothyroidism is 22-58% within 5-8 years...... intrathyroidal isotope distribution. Pre-stimulation with even a small dose of rhTSH seems to allow a reduction of the 131I activity while still achieving a mean goitre reduction of approximately 40% within a year. A significantly lower extrathyroidal radiation is achieved by this approach. With an unchanged 131...

  11. Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre. The possibility of effect-amplification with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Steen J.; Nielsen, Viveque E.; Hegedues, Laszlo [Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Endocrinology and Metabolism

    2006-12-15

    There is no consensus regarding the optimum treatment of benign non-toxic goitre. L-thyroxine suppressive therapy is widely used, but there is poor evidence of its efficacy, and it may have serious adverse effects on health. Surgery is first choice in large goitres or if malignancy is suspected. {sup 131}I therapy results in a one-year goitre reduction of around 40% in multinodular goitres, usually with a high degree of patient satisfaction and improvement of the inspiratory capacity. The effect is attenuated with increasing goitre size. The risk of hypothyroidism is 22-58% within 5-8 years. A sufficient thyroid {sup 131}I uptake is mandatory for {sup 131}I therapy to be feasible and pre-stimulation with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) increases this considerably. This leads to an increased absorbed thyroid dose by approx.75%, mainly in those patients with the lowest thyroid {sup 131}I uptake, and a more homogeneous intrathyroidal isotope distribution. Pre-stimulation with even a small dose of rhTSH seems to allow a reduction of the {sup 131}I activity while still achieving a mean goitre reduction of approximately 40% within a year. A significantly lower extrathyroidal radiation is achieved by this approach. With an unchanged {sup 131}I activity, rhTSH pre-stimulation improves the goitre reduction by 30-50%. However, this is at the expense of a higher rate of hypothyroidism, cervical pain and transient thyrotoxicosis. Of particular concern is the observation made in healthy persons, that rhTSH results in a transient average thyroid volume increase of 35%. A similar goitre swelling may cause problems in susceptible patients during rhTSH-augmented {sup 131}I therapy. Thus, this concept still needs a closer evaluation before routine use.

  12. Diffuse pulmonary metastases with negative 18FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography and positive post-radioiodine therapy scan of papillary thyroid cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yan-song; LIANG Zhi-yong; QIU Li-heng; CHENG Xin

    2012-01-01

    A female papillary thyroid cancer patient with diffuse micronodular pulmonary metastases was confirmed only by post radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy whole body scan (RxWBS).Her diagnostic iodine-131 whole body scan (DxWBS),chestCT and 18FDG PET/CT scan were all negative.Attention and pitfalls of this case concerning surgical and RAI dosemanagement are against current international guidelines on thyroid cancer.

  13. Effects of Radioiodine Treatment on Salivary Gland Function in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Hesselink, Esther N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Jong, Johan R; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N A; Coppes, Rob P; Lefrandt, Joop D; Jager, Piet L; Vissink, Arjan; Links, Thera P

    2016-11-01

    Complaints of a dry mouth (xerostomia) and sialoadenitis are frequent side effects of radioiodine treatment in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. However, detailed prospective data on alterations in salivary gland functioning after radioiodine treatment ((131)I) are scarce. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to prospectively assess the effect of high-activity radioiodine treatment on stimulated whole saliva flow rate. Secondary aims were to study unstimulated whole and stimulated glandular (i.e., parotid and submandibular) saliva flow rate and composition alterations, development of xerostomia, characteristics of patients at risk for salivary gland dysfunction, and whether radioiodine uptake in salivary glands on diagnostic scans correlates to flow rate alterations. In a multicenter prospective study, whole and glandular saliva were collected both before and 5 mo after radioiodine treatment. Furthermore, patients completed the validated xerostomia inventory. Alterations in salivary flow rate, composition, and xerostomia inventory score were analyzed. Salivary gland radioiodine uptake on diagnostic scans was correlated with saliva flow rate changes after radioiodine treatment. Sixty-seven patients (mean age ± SD, 48 ± 17 y; 63% women, 84% underwent ablation therapy) completed both study visits. Stimulated whole saliva flow rate decreased after ablation therapy (from 0.92 [interquartile range, 0.74-1.25] to 0.80 [interquartile range, 0.58-1.18] mL/min, P = 0.003), as well as unstimulated whole- and stimulated glandular flow rates (P subjective feeling of dry mouth increased (P = 0.001). Alterations in saliva flow rate were not associated with semiquantitatively assessed radioiodine uptake in salivary glands on diagnostic scans. For the small cohort of patients undergoing repeated radioiodine therapy, we could not demonstrate alterations in salivary parameters. We prospectively showed that salivary gland function is affected after high

  14. Variants and pitfalls on radioiodine scans in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Mohamed; Vali, Reza; Chan, Jeffrey; Omarkhail, Yusuaf; Shammas, Amer [University of Toronto, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Medical Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Potentially false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma can mimic functioning thyroid tissue and functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue. Such false-positive findings comprise variants and pitfalls that can vary slightly in children as compared with adults. To determine the patterns and frequency of these potential false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We reviewed a total of 223 radioiodine scans from 53 pediatric patients (mean age 13.3 years, 37 girls) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Focal or regional activity that likely did not represent functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue were categorized as variants or pitfalls. The final diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing the concurrent and follow-up clinical data, correlative ultrasonography, CT scanning, serum thyroglobulin and antithyroglobulin antibody levels. We calculated the frequency of these variants and pitfalls from diagnostic and post-therapy radioiodine scans. The most common variant on the radioiodine scans was the thymic activity (24/223, 10.8%) followed by the cardiac activity (8/223, 3.6%). Salivary contamination and star artifact, caused by prominent thyroid remnant, were the most important observed pitfalls. Variants and pitfalls that mimic functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue on radioiodine scan in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are not infrequent, but they decrease in frequency on successive radioiodine scans. Potential false-positive findings can be minimized with proper knowledge of the common variants and pitfalls in children and correlation with clinical, laboratory and imaging data. (orig.)

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders.

  16. [Dance therapy in the treatment of psychiatric and somatic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziarko, Beata; Twardowska, Marzena

    2002-01-01

    The article is an attempt of review of recent achievements in dance therapy. It presents possibilities of introducing dance into the treatment of psychiatric disturbances (psychoses, dementias, neurotic disorders) and somatic disorders (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, terminal stages). The authors basing on the contemporary literature describe positive results of dance therapy in various clinical situations.

  17. Focal Bronchiectasis Causing Abnormal Pulmonary Radioiodine Uptake in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash Gargya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. False-positive pulmonary radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma has been reported in patients with certain respiratory conditions. Patient Findings. We describe a case of well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation therapy. Postablation radioiodine whole body scan and subsequent diagnostic radioiodine whole body scans have shown persistent uptake in the left hemithorax despite an undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin in the absence of interfering thyroglobulin antibodies. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography has confirmed that the abnormal pulmonary radioiodine uptake correlates with focal bronchiectasis. Summary. Bronchiectasis can cause abnormal chest radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Conclusions. Recognition of potential false-positive chest radioactive iodine uptake, simulating pulmonary metastases, is needed to avoid unnecessary exposure to further radiation from repeated therapeutic doses of radioactive iodine.

  18. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging.

  19. Radioiodine treatment of recurrent hyperthyroidism in patients previously treated for Graves' disease by subtotal thyroidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Laurberg, P

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy is often employed for treatment of patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, after previous thyroid surgery. Little is known about the outcome of this treatment compared to patients with no previous surgery. A total of 20 patients who had received surgical...... treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism 1-46 years previously and with relapse of the hyperthyroidism, and 25 patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and no previous thyroid surgery were treated with radioiodine, following the same protocol. Early after treatment the previously operated patients...

  20. Radioiodine concentration by the thymus in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Maria Eduarda; Flamini, Rodrigo C.; Corbo, Rossana; Mamede, Marcelo [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear], e-mail: mamede@inca.gov.br

    2009-10-15

    The radioactive iodine has been used with great value as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma previously submitted to total thyroidectomy. False-positive whole-body scans may occur due to misinterpretation of the physiologic distribution of the radioisotope or lack of knowledge on the existence of other pathologies that could eventually present radioiodine uptake. Thymic uptake is an uncommon cause of false-positive whole-body scan, and the mechanism through which it occurs is not completely understood. The present paper reports five cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who presented a mediastinum uptake of radioiodine in a whole-body scan during follow-up. The patients had either histological or radiological confirmation of the presence of residual thymus gland. It is very important to know about the possibility of iodine uptake by the thymus in order to avoid unnecessary treatment, such as surgery or radioiodine therapy. (author)

  1. [ADHD and conduct disorder: trends in diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Franz; Lehmkuhl, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Since 2010 trends outlined in diagnosis and therapy in the German speaking countries in the area of externalizing disorders (ADHD, conduct disorder) are presented. In particular, publications of children and adolescent psychiatry and clinical psychology have been examined. It turns out that in the German-speaking countries, the concern with conduct disorder (including psychopathy) increased compared with the discussion of the significance of ADHD. This development reflects the important therapeutic challenge of conduct disorders.

  2. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Social Anxiety Disorder: Current Concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Fistikci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioral therapy is still one of the most important treatment modalities in social anxiety disorder with a high level of evidence. However, some patients do not fully benefit from these therapies and this fact leads to ongoing search for new approaches. This paper reviews use of cognitive behavioral therapy in social anxiety disorder studies and discusses related updated concepts. The frequent use of computer-assisted therapy for most of recent studies was found noteworthy. Recent studies regarding social anxiety disorder focused on concepts such as attention bias, biased information processing, attention training, judgment biases, internet-based cognitive behavioral therapies and social mishap exposure. Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy seemed to be a good option for people who were unable to access face to face treatment. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(3.000: 229-243

  3. Cell therapy for pediatric disorders of glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albuquerque Osório, Maria Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The childhood disorders of glia comprise a group of diseases that include the pediatric leukodystrophies and lysosomal storage disorders, cerebral palsies and perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathies, and selected neurodevelopmental disorders of glial origin. Essentially, all of these disorders...... (GPCs) and their derivatives, the glial disorders may be uniquely attractive targets for cell-based therapeutic strategies, and the pediatric disorders especially so. As a result, GPCs, which can distribute throughout the neuraxis and give rise to new astrocytes and myelinogenic oligodendrocytes, have...... become of great interest as candidates for the therapeutic restoration of normal glial architecture and function, as well as new myelin, to the pediatric brain....

  4. Computer-based speech therapy for childhood speech sound disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Lisa; Erickson, Shane; Morris, Meg E

    2017-07-01

    With the current worldwide workforce shortage of Speech-Language Pathologists, new and innovative ways of delivering therapy to children with speech sound disorders are needed. Computer-based speech therapy may be an effective and viable means of addressing service access issues for children with speech sound disorders. To evaluate the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs for children with speech sound disorders. Studies reporting the efficacy of computer-based speech therapy programs were identified via a systematic, computerised database search. Key study characteristics, results, main findings and details of computer-based speech therapy programs were extracted. The methodological quality was evaluated using a structured critical appraisal tool. 14 studies were identified and a total of 11 computer-based speech therapy programs were evaluated. The results showed that computer-based speech therapy is associated with positive clinical changes for some children with speech sound disorders. There is a need for collaborative research between computer engineers and clinicians, particularly during the design and development of computer-based speech therapy programs. Evaluation using rigorous experimental designs is required to understand the benefits of computer-based speech therapy. The reader will be able to 1) discuss how computerbased speech therapy has the potential to improve service access for children with speech sound disorders, 2) explain the ways in which computer-based speech therapy programs may enhance traditional tabletop therapy and 3) compare the features of computer-based speech therapy programs designed for different client populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  6. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

  7. Pharmacological enhancement of behavioral therapy: focus on posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dennis C; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Gerardi, Maryrose; Ressler, Kerry J

    2010-01-01

    Improved efficacy in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other anxiety disorders is urgently needed. Traditional anxiety treatments of hypnosis and psychodynamic therapy may be of some help, but uncontrolled studies lead to inconclusive results on the efficacy of these treatment techniques. There is a larger literature supporting the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral procedures with PTSD, including prolonged exposure therapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing, and anxiety management techniques. The cutting-edge technology of virtual reality-based exposure therapy for PTSD is particularly exciting. To further build on effective psychosocial treatments, current pharmacological augmentation approaches to emotional learning are being combined with psychotherapy. In particular, D-cycloserine, a partial NMDA agonist, has shown to be effective in facilitating the exposure/extinction therapy to improve the efficacy of treating anxiety disorders, and may guide the way for new pharmacological enhancements of behavioral therapy.

  8. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for severe Functional Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone Overby

    MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL   Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently...... to their thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Randomised controlled studies of MBSR have shown mitigation of stress, anxiety, and dysphoria in general population and reduction in total mood disturbance and stress symptoms in a medical population. In Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy MBSR is recombined...... with cognitive therapy. Aim: To examine the efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in severe Functional disorders, defined as severe Bodily Distress Disorder. Method: 120 patients are randomised to either Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy: a manualized programme with eight weekly 3 ½ hour group...

  9. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for severe Functional Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone Overby

      MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently...... to their thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Randomised controlled studies of MBSR have shown mitigation of stress, anxiety, and dysphoria in general population and reduction in total mood disturbance and stress symptoms in a medical population. In Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy MBSR is recombined...... with cognitive therapy. Aim: To examine the efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in severe Functional disorders, defined as severe Bodily Distress Disorder. Method: 120 patients are randomised to either Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy: a manualized programme with eight weekly 3 ½ hour group...

  10. Contribution of Occupational Therapy to funcional approach in personality disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellido Mainar, J R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Personality disorders ( personality disorder F03.675 are defined by a rigid pattern of unadapting behaviours that, on the short and medium term generate a significant socio environmental deterioration. The level of psychosocial function or dysfunction is a first class indicator when assessing the extent and assessment of the personality disorder.Psychotherapy ( psychotherapy F04.754 intervenes in the psychosocial compounds of this disorder by designing specific programs for the training in psychosocial skills (conductual-dialectic therapy. Occupational Therapy ( occupational therapy E02.831.489 is a health science with a long history in socioenvironmental therapy of mental diseases F04.754.864 . The focal point is the assessment of the disease, disorder or social unadaptation impact in the individual's occupation functionality. This science puts forward a wide, integrating concept of functionality, which is divided into three occupation areas: productive occupational area, self maintenance area and leisure time area.In the first part of this paper, the extent and features of the occupational disfunction in the personality disorder are analysed employing the occupational therapy method.Based on our six-year experience, a method for socioenvironmental treatment based on two models of occupational therapy (human occupation model and Canadian model is suggested in the second part of the paper

  11. Clinical research of juvenile hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine%131I治療青少年及兒童甲亢臨床應用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱陵; 張春銀; 陳躍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects and side effects in the radioiodine management of juvenile hyperthyroidism. Methods 80 patients with poor effects using anti-thyroid drug were assigned to receive 131Itherapy. The follows of therapy outcome were assessed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment. One follows up per 1-3 years. Results Among 80 patients followed by 6 months, clinical response was excellent in 65patients (81%), good in 15 (19 % ). There were 12 patients with hypothyroidism followed 4 years, and with no other side effects, Conclusion The good therapeutic effect was obtained in radioiodine treatment for juvenile hyperthyroidism. Radioiodine was effective to juvenile hyperthyroidism.

  12. Optimizing Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Childhood Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, John

    2008-01-01

    Reports that expand the understanding of the treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder by using exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy in the age group of 5 to 8-year-olds are presented. A model for collecting the common core elements of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for childhood disorders is also presented.

  13. Psychomotor therapy and aggression regulation in eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Cees; van Busschbach, Jooske T.; Wiersma, Durk; Hoek, Hans W.

    2013-01-01

    Eating disorder behaviours can be seen as self-destructive behaviours to a great extent related to inhibited anger expression. However, a treatment protocol targeted at anger and aggression in these disorders is lacking. This paper describes a psychomotor therapy (PMT) model as a body-oriented metho

  14. Child-Centered Play Therapy in Management of Somatoform Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Renuka; Mehta, Manju

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Child-centered play therapy is a well recognized and research-supported form of child psychotherapy. Methods: Fifteen children in the age range of 5-11 years (eight girls and seven boys) with somatoform disorder were administered 25 sessions of non directive play therapy. Parents received 3 reflective counseling sessions. Children…

  15. SPEECH DISORDERS ENCOUNTERED DURING SPEECH THERAPY AND THERAPY TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlhan ERDEM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech which is a physical and mental process, agreed signs and sounds to create a sense of mind to the message that change . Process to identify the sounds of speech it is essential to know the structure and function of various organs which allows to happen the conversation. Speech is a physical and mental process so many factors can lead to speech disorders. Speech disorder can be about language acquisitions as well as it can be caused medical and psychological many factors. Disordered speech, language, medical and psychological conditions as well as acquisitions also be caused by many factors. Speaking, is the collective work of many organs, such as an orchestra. Mental dimension of the speech disorder which is a very complex skill so it must be found which of these obstacles inhibit conversation. Speech disorder is a defect in speech flow, rhythm, tizliğinde, beats, the composition and vocalization. In this study, speech disorders such as articulation disorders, stuttering, aphasia, dysarthria, a local dialect speech, , language and lip-laziness, rapid speech peech defects in a term of language skills. This causes of speech disorders were investigated and presented suggestions for remedy was discussed.

  16. [Schema therapy for personality disorders. A critical review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, E; Zarbock, G

    2015-01-01

    In the 10 years since schema therapy was first recognized in Germany it has become widespread among practitioners and has taken a place among the so-called third wave therapies. The overall goal of schema therapy is conceptualizing and treating personality disorders or traits reinforcing axis I disorders. Early maladaptive schemas result from a child's unmet emotional core needs. In a limited reparenting therapy relationship these interpersonal situations are re-experienced and rescripted under the therapist's control. Schema therapy integrates elements of existing models and techniques into a consistent case conceptualization as the bedrock for understanding and changing maladaptive coping behavior. This review article gives a comprehensive overview about the model, the therapy relationship and the application of the experiential techniques in relation to already developed approaches (including the current evidence). The strengths and weaknesses are briefly discussed.

  17. Preparation of radioiodine labelled thiouracil derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, T.J.; Klootwijk, W. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1981-05-01

    2-Thiouracil and 6-propyl-2-thiouracil are radioiodinated with high yield using the chloramine-T method at low pH to prevent oxidation of the sulfur. The radioiodine-labelled derivatives are purified by adsorption chromatography on Sephadex G-10. The identity and purity of the products obtained are demonstrated by both normal- and reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. The specific activity of the tracers amounts to approximately 1750 Ci mmol/sup -1/. Conditions for storage are described as well. These radioactive compounds may be used in the investigation of the mechanism of action of thyroid peroxidase as well as of iodothyronine deiodinases.

  18. Integrative Response Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED), a chronic condition characterized by eating disorder psychopathology and physical and social disability, represents a significant public health problem. Guided self-help (GSH) treatments for BED appear promising and may be more readily disseminable to mental health care providers, accessible to patients, and…

  19. Integrative Response Therapy for Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED), a chronic condition characterized by eating disorder psychopathology and physical and social disability, represents a significant public health problem. Guided self-help (GSH) treatments for BED appear promising and may be more readily disseminable to mental health care providers, accessible to patients, and…

  20. Radioiodine concentrated in a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Daniel I; Zhang, Saijin; Roberts, Kimberly A; Schwehr, Kathy; Xu, Chen; Creeley, Danielle; Ho, Yi-Fang; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Yeager, Chris M; Santschi, Peter H

    2014-05-01

    Most subsurface environmental radioactivity contamination is expected to eventually resurface in riparian zones, or wetlands. There are a number of extremely sharp biogeochemical interfaces in wetlands that could alter radionuclide speciation and promote accumulation. The objective of this study was to determine if a wetland concentrated (129)I emanating from a former waste disposal basin located on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina, USA. Additionally, studies were conducted to evaluate the role of sediment organic matter in immobilizing the radioiodine. Groundwater samples were collected along a 0.7-km transect away from the seepage basin and in the downstream wetlands. The samples were analyzed for (129)I speciation (iodide (I(-)), iodate (IO3(-)), and organo-I). Groundwater (129)I concentrations in many locations in the wetlands (as high as 59.9 Bq L(-1)(129)I) were greatly elevated with respect to the source term (5.9 Bq L(-1)(129)I). (129)I concentration profiles in sediment cores were closely correlated to organic matter concentrations (r(2) = 0.992; n = 5). While the sediment organic matter promoted the uptake of (129)I to the wetland sediment, it also promoted the formation of a soluble organic fraction: 74% of the wetland groundwater (129)I could pass through a 1 kDa (wetlands may be highly effective at immobilizing aqueous (129)I, they may also promote the formation of a low-molecular-weight organic species that does not partition to sediments. This study provides a rare example of radioactivity concentrations increasing rather than decreasing as it migrates from a point source and brings into question assumptions in risk models regarding continuous dilution of released contaminants.

  1. Basic Principles of Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokben Hizli Sayar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal Social Rhythm Therapy is a psychotherapy modality that helps the patient recognize the relationship between disruptions in social rhythms and the onset of previous episodes of psychiatric disorders. It uses psychoeducation and behavioral techniques to maintain social rhythm and sleep/wake regularity. It is closely related to and ldquo;social zeitgeber theory and rdquo; that emphasizes the importance that social rhythm regularity may play in synchronization of circadian rhythms in individuals with or at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy have been shown to stabilize social rhythms and enhance course and outcome in bipolar disorder. This review focuses on the theoretical principles and the basic steps of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy as a psychotherapy approach in bipolar disorder. PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar databases were searched without temporal restriction. Search terms included interpersonal social rhythm therapy, bipolar, mood disorders. Abstracts were reviewed for relevance, and randomized controlled trials of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy in bipolar disorder selected. These researches also summarized on the final part of this review. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 438-446

  2. Prolonged Exposure Therapy For Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent SÜTÇİGİL

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD is a psychiatric illness that usually develops after an event that threatens one’s life and body integrity and it affects quality of life and impairs social functioning significantly. Many studies have shown therapeutic effect of cognitive behavioral therapies on posttraumatic stress disorder, so that these therapies take part in the first step of treatment guides. Exposure is a practice that is generally used to reduce pathological fear and related emotions common in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and other anxiety disorders. During exposure, patients intentionally confront with feared objects, situations, thoughts and similar stimuli in order to reduce anxiety level. Exposure can be divided into two main techniques as in vivo exposure and imaginal exposure. Prolonged exposure therapy is a specialized treatment program configured for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder and it is based on emotional processing theory. Program is comprised of four main components: (a Psycho-education about trauma and posttraumatic disorders, (b Training for breathing exercises, (c repeated facing with objects, persons, situations and thoughts which causes re-experience about trauma, (d Patient are instructed for telling repeatedly and loudly about traumatic experiences . Prolonged exposure usually involves 9 to 12 sessions, each lasting about 60-90 minutes, administered once or twice a week. Prolonged exposure therapy was started to be implemented since the 1980s, during this period the effectiveness of the therapy has been shown in various empirical studies.

  3. Group Therapy for Adolescents Living With an Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Downey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Group models are commonly used to treat eating disorders; however, research in this area remains largely underdeveloped. Interest in group work is likely to increase due to the demands on the public health system and the cost-effectiveness of group modalities. This scoping review sought to explore the evidence underpinning group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder. A literature search of 10 academic databases and four gray literature databases was undertaken in 2013. Selected Internet resources were searched and the author consulted professionals from Eating Disorders Victoria, the Butterfly Foundation, and the University of Melbourne. A total of 11 peer-reviewed articles published between 2003 and 2013 were included for review. There was an overall lack of research with no randomized-controlled trials available. Six program evaluations and five program descriptions were found, and they reported on a range of eating disorders and group modalities. The program evaluations suggested the utility of group therapy for promoting weight restoration in underweight individuals living with an eating disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy groups were found to be more effective for bulimia nervosa and multifamily group therapy showed promise for anorexia nervosa. More rigorous research is needed to establish the effectiveness of group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder.

  4. SPEECH DISORDERS ENCOUNTERED DURING SPEECH THERAPY AND THERAPY TECHNIQUES

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Speech which is a physical and mental process, agreed signs and sounds to create a sense of mind to the message that change . Process to identify the sounds of speech it is essential to know the structure and function of various organs which allows to happen the conversation. Speech is a physical and mental process so many factors can lead to speech disorders. Speech disorder can be about language acquisitions as well as it can be caused medical and psychological many factors. Disordered sp...

  5. Changing trends in the treatment of Graves' disease with radioiodine: a 12-year experience in a university hospital; Mudancas evolutivas no tratamento da doenca de Graves com iodo radioativo: 12 anos de experiencia em um hospital universitario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Marcus Vinicius Leitao de [Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia (IEDE), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: marcusleitao@gmail.com; Souza, Honomar Ferreira de [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Endocrinologia; Buescu, Alexandru; Vaisman, Mario [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Endocrinologia

    2009-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the changes in clinical parameters and in the approach to patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Materials and methods: Dossiers of 226 patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in the period between January 1990 and December 2001 were retrospectively evaluated. For the purposes of statistical analysis, the 12-year period was subdivided into three periods of 4 years, with a comparison of clinical and laboratory variables in these periods. Results: The authors have observed that the total number of patients referred for radioiodine therapy as well as the percentage of female patients presented a significant increase (from 62% to 86%; p = 0.005). The percentage of patients pretreated with methimazole before radioiodine therapy increased significantly (from 9.1% to 35.6%; p = 0.03). The mean radioiodine dose delivered has also presented a significant increase (from 7.6 mCi to 12.7 mCi; p = 0.000003) with a direct reflection on a higher percentage of patients cured one year after the radioiodine therapy (from 55.6% to 83.7%; p = 0.004). Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy has increasingly been accepted for treatment of patients with Graves' disease and the doses delivered have increased to achieve a permanent cure as well as a reduction of the chances of recurrence. (author)

  6. Benefits of automated surface decontamination of a radioiodine ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Eliza; Broadhurst, Alicia; Crossley, Steven; Lee, Lloyd; Phan, Xuyen; Scharli, Rainer; Xu, Yan

    2012-02-01

    A floor-washing robot has been acquired to assist physicists with decontamination of radioiodine therapy ward rooms after discharge of the patient at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital. The effectiveness of the robot in decontaminating the ward has been evaluated. A controlled experiment was performed by deliberately contaminating a polyvinyl chloride flooring offcut with 131I followed by automated decontamination with the robot. The extent of fixed and removable contamination was assessed before and after decontamination by two methods: (1) direct Geiger-Mueller counting and (2) beta-counting wipe tests. Surface contamination was also assessed in situ on the ward by Geiger-Mueller counting and wipe testing. Contamination maps confirmed that contamination was removed rather than spread around by the robot. Wipe testing revealed that the robot was successful in clearing approximately 60-80% of removable contamination. The robotic floor-washing device was considered suitable to provide effective automated decontamination of the radioiodine ward. In addition, the robot affords other benefits: the time spent by the physicists decontaminating the room is greatly reduced offering financial and occupational safety and health benefits. The robot has also found utility in other decontamination applications in the healthcare environment.

  7. A rare case of isolate pericardial effusion detected by SPECT/CT on a post-therapeutic radioiodine whole-body scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Teik Hin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, Putrajaya (Malaysia); Hassan, Siti Zarina Amir [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-15

    We reported a rare finding of isolated pericardial uptake detected by SPECT/CT on posttherapeutic radioiodine whole body scan. This case highlights the usefulness of hybrid SPECT/CT, with subsequent correlation with biochemical results, in ruling out metastatic pericardial effusion in the postsurgical radioiodine remnant ablation setting. The effusion was resolved after reinstituted thyroid replacement therapy. Recombinant thyrotropin is recommended to avoid such rare but life-threatening complication.

  8. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchek, Scott; Koenig, Kristie Patten; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice Project. In this Evidence Connection article, we describe a case report of an adolescent with autism spectrum disorder. The occupational therapy assessment and treatment processes for school, home, community, and transition settings are described. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the September/October 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder. Each article in this series summarizes the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  9. Mammary radioiodine accumulation due to functional sodium iodide symporter expression in a benign fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, F; Unterholzner, S; Diebold, J; Knesewitsch, P; Hahn, K; Spitzweg, C

    2006-11-03

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has been characterized to mediate the active transport of iodide not only in the thyroid gland but also in various non-thyroidal tissues, including lactating mammary gland and the majority of breast cancers, thereby offering the possibility of diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine application in breast cancer. In this report, we present a 57-year-old patient with multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma, who showed focal radioiodine accumulation in a lesion in the right breast on a posttherapy (131)I scan following radioiodine therapy. CT and MR-mammography showed a focal solid lesion in the right breast suggestive of a fibroadenoma, which was confirmed by histological examination. Immunostaining of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections using a human NIS antibody demonstrated NIS-specific immunoreactivity confined to epithelial cells of mammary ducts. In conclusion, in a thyroid cancer patient we identified a benign fibroadenoma of the breast expressing high levels of functionally active NIS protein as underlying cause of focal mammary radioiodine accumulation on a posttherapy (131)I scan. These data show for the first time that functional NIS expression is not restricted to lactating mammary gland and malignant breast tissue, but can also be detected in benign breast lesions, such as fibroadenomata of the breast.

  10. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for severe Functional Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone Overby

      MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently to their ......  MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently...... to their thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Randomised controlled studies of MBSR have shown mitigation of stress, anxiety, and dysphoria in general population and reduction in total mood disturbance and stress symptoms in a medical population. In Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy MBSR is recombined...... with cognitive therapy. Aim: To examine the efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in severe Functional disorders, defined as severe Bodily Distress Disorder. Method: 120 patients are randomised to either Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy: a manualized programme with eight weekly 3 ½ hour group...

  11. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for severe Functional Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Lone Overby

    MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL   Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently to their ......MINDFULNESS-BASED COGNITIVE THERAPY FOR FUNCTIONAL DISORDERS- A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL   Background: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) is a group skills-training program developed by Kabat-Zinn. It is designed to teach patients to become more aware of and relate differently...... to their thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Randomised controlled studies of MBSR have shown mitigation of stress, anxiety, and dysphoria in general population and reduction in total mood disturbance and stress symptoms in a medical population. In Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy MBSR is recombined...... with cognitive therapy. Aim: To examine the efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy in severe Functional disorders, defined as severe Bodily Distress Disorder. Method: 120 patients are randomised to either Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy: a manualized programme with eight weekly 3 ½ hour group...

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia as a preparatory treatment for exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, Jenna L; Gros, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is present in a majority of individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, when both disorders are present, disagreements exist about whether to provide exposure therapy for PTSD before insomnia treatment, or vice versa. The current case study describes the psychological treatment of a psychotherapy-naive veteran with comorbid insomnia and PTSD. The patient initially refused exposure therapy for PTSD; thus, cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) was a first-step treatment. Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia provided insomnia symptom relief psychoeducation and self-monitoring of PTSD symptoms prepared the patient to enter exposure therapy. After six CBTi sessions, the patient completed seven sessions of trauma-specific exposure therapy. At the conclusion of treatment and at 90-day follow up, the patient demonstrated significant reductions in insomnia and PTSD symptoms. Findings support the safe and effective use of CBTi in patients with comorbid insomnia and PTSD to improve sleep and facilitate entry into exposure therapy for PTSD.

  13. Evidence-based therapy for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Ling

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the treatments for sleep disorders in neurodegenerative diseases so as to provide the best therapeutic regimens for the evidence-based treatment. Methods Search PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases with "sleep disorder or sleep disturbance", "neurodegenerative diseases", "Parkinson's disease or PD", "Alzheimer's disease or AD", "multiple system atrophy or MSA" as retrieval words. The quality of the articles were evaluated with Jadad Scale. Results A total of 35 articles, including 2 systematic reviews, 5 randomized controlled trials, 13 clinical controlled trials, 13 case series and 2 epidemiological investigation studies were included for evaluation, 13 of which were high grade and 22 were low grade articles. Clinical evidences showed that: 1 advice on sleep hygiene, careful use of dopaminergic drugs and hypnotic sedative agents should be considered for PD. Bright light therapy (BLT may improve circadian rhythm sleep disorders and clonazepam may be effective for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD. However, to date, very few controlled studies are available to make a recommendation for the management of sleep disorders in PD; 2 treatments for sleep disorders in AD include drug therapy (e.g. melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotic drugs, antidepressants and non-drug therapy (e.g. BLT, behavior therapy, but very limited evidence shows the effectiveness of these treatments; 3 the first line treatment for sleep-related breathing disorder in MSA is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP, and clonazepam is effective for RBD in MSA; 4 there is rare evidence related to the treatment of sleep disorders in dementia with Lewy body (DLB and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Conclusion Evidence-based medicine can provide the best clinical evidence on sleep disorders' treatment in neurodegenerative

  14. Novel targeted therapies for eosinophilic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, Michael E.; Fulkerson, Patricia C.; Bochner, Bruce S.; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Henkel, Tim; Kolbeck, Roland; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ortega, Hector; Patel, Jatin; Prussin, Calman; Renzi, Paolo; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Roufosse, Florence; Simon, Dagmar; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weller, Peter F.; Klion, Amy D.

    2013-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are a diverse group of conditions characterized by clinical manifestations attributable to eosinophilia and eosinophilic infiltration of tissues. HESs are chronic disorders with significant morbidity and mortality. Although the availability of targeted chemotherapeutic agents, including imatinib, has improved quality of life and survival in some patients with HESs, additional agents with increased efficacy and decreased toxicity are sorely needed. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of eosinophil biology with an emphasis on potential targets of pharmacotherapy and to provide a summary of potential eosinophil-targeting agents, including those in development, in clinical trials, or approved for other disorders. PMID:22935585

  15. Harm expectancy violation during exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleine, Rianne A; Hendriks, Lotte; Becker, Eni S; Broekman, Theo G; van Minnen, Agnes

    2017-06-01

    Exposure therapy has proven efficacy in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotional processing theory proposes that fear habituation is a central mechanism in symptom reduction, but the empirical evidence supporting this is mixed. Recently it has been proposed that violation of harm expectancies is a crucial mechanism of action in exposure therapy. But to date, changes in harm expectancies have not been examined during exposure therapy in PTSD. The goal of the current study was to examine harm expectancy violation as mechanism of change in exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Patients (N=50, 44 female) with a primary diagnosis of chronic PTSD received intensive exposure therapy. Harm expectancies, harm experiences and subjective units of distress (SUDs) were assessed at each imaginal exposure session, and PTSD symptoms were assessed pre- and posttreatment with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Results showed that harm expectancies were violated within and strongly declined in-between exposure therapy sessions. However, expectancy violation was not related to PTSD symptom change. Fear habituation measures were moderately related to PTSD symptom reductions. In line with theory, exposure therapy promotes expectancy violation in PTSD patients, but this is not related to exposure therapy outcome. More work is warranted to investigate mechanisms of change during exposure therapy in PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Common Questions About Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Scott F; Banducci, Anne N; Vinci, Christine

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is a time-limited, goal-oriented psychotherapy that has been extensively researched and has benefits in a number of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, obsessive-compulsive and tic disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, and insomnia. CBT uses targeted strategies to help patients adopt more adaptive patterns of thinking and behaving, which leads to positive changes in emotions and decreased functional impairments. Strategies include identifying and challenging problematic thoughts and beliefs, scheduling pleasant activities to increase environmental reinforcement, and extended exposure to unpleasant thoughts, situations, or physiologic sensations to decrease avoidance and arousal associated with anxiety-eliciting stimuli. CBT can be helpful in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder by emphasizing safety, trust, control, esteem, and intimacy. Prolonged exposure therapy is a CBT technique that includes a variety of strategies, such as repeated recounting of the trauma and exposure to feared real-world situations. For attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, CBT focuses on establishing structures and routines, and clear rules and expectations within the home and classroom. Early intensive behavioral interventions should be initiated in children with autism before three years of age; therapy consists of 12 to 40 hours of intensive treatment per week, for at least one year. In many disorders, CBT can be used alone or in combination with medications. However, CBT requires a significant commitment from patients. Family physicians are well suited to provide collaborative care for patients with psychiatric disorders, in concert with cognitive behavior therapists.

  17. Gene therapy in disorders of lipoprotein metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, Stefan F C; Twisk, Jaap; Kastelein, John J P; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2007-01-01

    Current pharmacologic interventions in lipid metabolism are insufficient in a subset of patients at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. In particular, several monogenetic disorders of lipid metabolism with diverse clinical complications are beyond treatment to date. Somatic gene transfer is a

  18. [Child developmental disorder and art therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroquea, Fabienne; Sudres, Jean-luc

    2014-01-01

    Accompanying the art therapy of a young girl suffering from evolutive disharmony shows how this therapeutic mediation can be used in a beneficial way. As part of the workshop proposed by carers, the use of painting and collages of different materials led to a transformation process. The girl became less aggressive, more receptive to her emotions and more open to the outside world.

  19. Effects of testosterone therapy on bipolar disorder with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Jono, Tadashi; Nishi, Yoshitomo; Ushijima, Hirokage; Ikeda, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is widely associated with cognitive impairment and language problems. KS patients may also exhibit psychiatric symptoms. We present the case of an 18-year-old man with KS who experienced rapidly repeating relapses of manic episodes. He was unresponsive to the usual pharmacotherapies for bipolar disorders such as mood stabilizers and second-generation antipsychotics. Mood was eventually improved with testosterone therapy in addition to pharmacotherapy, with no relapse of manic episodes for 3 years after discharge. Testosterone therapy may prevent relapsing manic episodes of bipolar disorder in patients with KS.

  20. Efficacy of transdiagnostic cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholt, Nina; Krogh, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Transdiagnostic approaches to cognitive behaviour therapy (TCBT) of anxiety disorders have drawn increasing interest and empirical testing over the past decade. In this paper, we review evidence of the overall efficacy of TCBT for anxiety disorders, as well as TCBT efficacy compared with wait......-list, treatment-as-usual, and diagnosis-specific cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) controls. A total of 11 studies reporting 12 trials (n = 1933) were included in the systematic review. Results from the meta-analysis of 11 trials suggest that TCBT was generally associated with positive outcome; TCBT patients did...

  1. Sudden Gains in Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Christiane; Aderka, Idan M.; Schreiber, Franziska; Stangier, Ulrich; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined the effects of sudden gains on treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial including individual cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Method: Participants were 67 individuals with SAD who received 16 treatment sessions. Symptom severity at each session…

  2. Sudden Gains in Cognitive Therapy and Interpersonal Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Christiane; Aderka, Idan M.; Schreiber, Franziska; Stangier, Ulrich; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study examined the effects of sudden gains on treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial including individual cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal therapy (IPT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Method: Participants were 67 individuals with SAD who received 16 treatment sessions. Symptom severity at each session…

  3. Hatha Yoga therapy management of urologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, Emmey; Mahowald, Dawn

    2002-11-01

    Hatha Yoga (often referred to as "yoga") is an ancient type of physical and mental exercise that has been used as a therapeutic modality in traditional Indian medicine for centuries. Yoga as a complementary modality in western medicine is more recent and continues to grow. Chronic urologic disorders are often difficult to diagnose because their presentation mimic other medical conditions and are often a diagnosis of exclusion. Treatment is also frustrating because the more traditional treatments are often unsuccessful in managing chronic disorders. Health care practitioners are often forced to look elsewhere for other modalities to provide pain relief and improve quality of life. Hatha Yoga is one of these modalities which has been extremely useful to many patients in reducing the suffering seen with chronic urologic conditions such as: prostatodynia, chronic orchitis, chronic epididymitis, vulvodynia, interstitial cystitis, etc.

  4. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jojić Boris R.; Leposavić Ljubica M.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction. Autogenic training is a widely recognised psychotherapy technique. The British School of Autogenic Training cites a large list of disorders, states, and changes, where autogenic training may prove to be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults. Our sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 35 individuals, with an average age of 39.3±1.6 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accord...

  5. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Laura D.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive behavioral therapies (CBTs) have been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of anxiety disorders in children and adolescents. Randomized clinical trials indicate that approximately two-thirds of children treated with CBT will be free of their primary diagnosis at posttreatment. Although several CBT treatment packages have been investigated in youth with diverse anxiety disorders, common core components have been identified. A comprehensive assessment, development of a good therapeutic relationship and working alliance, cognitive restructuring, repeated exposure with reduction of avoidance behavior, and skills training comprise the core procedures for the treatment of anxiety disorders in youth. PMID:21440852

  6. Therapies and nursing care of women with vulvar dermatologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Deborah; Kwon, Yanghee

    2014-01-01

    Vulvar dermatologic disorders are common among women, and prevalence increases with age. Treatment can provide women with symptomatic relief and can halt further progression of disease. Numerous therapies are available, and nurses who work with women across the life span should have an understanding of vulvar dermatologic disorders and therapeutic modalities. We provide an overview of general vulvar care, four vulvar dermatologic disorders, and common treatment modalities including topical and systemic pharmacologic management. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  7. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ye Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients.

  8. Radioiodine-131 therapy improves sex hormones and sexual function in male patients with Graves'disease%131I治疗Graves甲亢对男性患者性激素及性功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世俊; 晋建华; 徐计秀; 武志芳; 陆克义; 李聪革; 雷智莉; 李思进

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察放射性131I治疗男性Graves甲亢患者早期血清性激素和性功能的变化. 方法:男性Graves甲亢患者34例,年龄21~40(32.3±6.7)岁,给予131I治疗剂量为111-407(237.8±51.8)MBq,在131I治疗前及治疗后3、6个月分别检测血清甲状腺激素及性激素,同时对患者进行勃起功能问卷评分(IIEF-5)调查.用同期体检的健康男性20例作为对照,年龄25 ~37(31±3.1)岁. 结果:男性Graves甲亢患者雌激素、睾酮、促黄体生成素水平分别为(132.5±40.4)pmol/L、(21.6±4.6)nmol/L、(10.1±4.4)IU/L,明显高于健康对照组的(80.4±31.2)pmol/L、(14.5 ±4.2)nmol/L、(6.2±1.9)IU/L(P<0.05).131I治疗3个月后血清雌激素、睾酮水平为(110.2±20.6)pmol/L、(17.7±5.5)nmol/L,较治疗前明显下降(P<O.05).治疗6个月后雌激素、睾酮、促黄体生成素水平为(82.6±30.1)pmol/L、(13.8±3.4)nmol/L、(6.6±1.5)IU/L,与健康对照组相比无差别(P>0.05).男性Graves甲亢患者IIEF-5评分为5~25(15.5±3.5)分,明显低于对照组的19 ~25(24.5±0.5)分(P<0.05).131I治疗后6个月组为10 ~25(23.5±1.5)分,明显高于3个月组的8~25(19.5±1.0)分(P<0.05).结论:男性Graves甲亢患者雌激素、睾酮、促黄体生成素水平明显增高,性功能评分(IIEF-5)明显降低.使用131I治疗6个月后,患者血清睾酮、促黄体生成素,雌激素水平以及IIEF-5评分基本恢复正常.Graves甲亢患者使用131I治疗可明显改善其性功能.%Objective: To observe the changes of sex hormones and sexual function in male patients with Graves'disease (CD) after Radioiodine-131 (1-131) therapy. Methods-. Thirty-four male GD patients, aged 21 -40 (32.3 ±6.7) years, were treated with 1-131 at the dose of 111 -407 (237.8 ±51.8) MBq. The levels of serum sex hormones were measured, and the patients'scores on erectile function (IIEF-5) were obtained before and 3 and 6 months after the treatment. Another 20 healthy men aged 25-37 (31 ±3

  9. Cognitive behavioral therapy for sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babson, Kimberly A; Feldner, Matthew T; Badour, Christal L

    2010-09-01

    More than 70 million people in the United States experience primary insomnia (PI) at some point in their life, resulting in an estimated $65 billion in health care costs and lost productivity. PI is therefore one of the most common health care problems in the United States. To mollify the negative effects of PI, scholars have sought to evaluate and improve treatments of this costly health care problem. A breadth of research has demonstrated that cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective intervention for PI. The goal of this article is to provide an overview of CBT for PI, including evidence regarding treatment efficacy, effectiveness, and practitioner considerations.

  10. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojić Boris R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autogenic training is a widely recognised psychotherapy technique. The British School of Autogenic Training cites a large list of disorders, states, and changes, where autogenic training may prove to be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults. Our sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 35 individuals, with an average age of 39.3±1.6 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. Aim. The aim of our study was to research the effectiveness of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adults, by checking the influence of autogenic training on the biophysical and biochemical indicators of adjustment disorder. Method. We measured the indicators of adjustment disorder and their changes in three phases: before the beginning, immediately after the beginning, and six months after the completion, of a practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rate as well as the levels of cortisol in plasma, of cholesterol in blood, and of glucose. During that period, autogenic training functioned as the sole therapy. Results. The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed demonstrated that arterial blood pressure, pulse rate, concentration of cholesterol and cortisol, after the application of autogenic training among the subjects suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower in comparison to the initial values. These values remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. Conclusion. Autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and helps adults to cope with stress, facilitating their recuperation.

  11. Mindfulness-Action Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for concurrent Binge Eating Disorder and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbasson, Christine M; Nishikawa, Yasunori; Shapira, Leah B

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) often evidence comorbid Substance Use Disorders (SUD), resulting in poor outcome. This study is the first to examine treatment outcome for this concurrent disordered population. In this pilot study, 38 individuals diagnosed with BED and SUD participated in a 16-week group Mindfulness-Action Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MACBT). Participants significantly improved on measures of objective binge eating episodes; disordered eating attitudes; alcohol and drug addiction severity; and depression. Taken together, MACBT appears to hold promise in treating individuals with co-existing BED-SUD.

  12. Schema therapy for aggressive offenders with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Keulen-de Vos; D.P. Bernstein; A. Arntz

    2014-01-01

    Schema therapy (ST) is increasingly used in personality-disordered (PD) patients. ST is an integrative psychotherapy that blends elements of cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic and experiential approaches. The key concepts in ST are early maladaptive schemas, (dysfunctional) coping styles and schema

  13. Review of Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy for Spastic and Rigidity Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obringer, S. John; Coffey, Kenneth M.

    2002-01-01

    Intrathecal baclofen therapy, a treatment for cerebral palsy and other spastic and rigidity disorders, is showing promise as an effective intervention. This article synthesizes both the medical and rehabilitation conceptual literature to update educators and related service providers as to the efficacy of this intervention. Implications for…

  14. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy in inherited metabolic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Wagemaker (Gerard)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAfter more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme

  15. Dropout prediction in cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, G.P.J.; Kampman, M.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to attempt to identify reliable factors associated with dropout risk in a sample of 161 panic disorder patients treated with manualized cognitive behavior therapy. Four possible predictors of dropout were selected from the literature: level of education, treatment motivatio

  16. Harm expectancy violation during exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Hendriks, L.; Becker, E.S.; Broekman, T.G.; Minnen, A. van

    2017-01-01

    Exposure therapy has proven efficacy in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Emotional processing theory proposes that fear habituation is a central mechanism in symptom reduction, but the empirical evidence supporting this is mixed. Recently it has been proposed that violation of

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Markowitz, Sarah; Petronko, Michael R.; Taylor, Caitlin E.; Wilhelm, Sabine; Wilson, G. Terence

    2010-01-01

    The onset of appearance-related concerns associated with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) typically occurs in adolescence, and these concerns are often severe enough to interfere with normal development and psychosocial functioning. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for adults with BDD. However, no treatment studies…

  18. Modular Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Phillips, Katharine A.; Fama, Jeanne M.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Steketee, Gail

    2011-01-01

    This study pilot tested a newly developed modular cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) treatment manual for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). We tested feasibility, acceptability, and treatment outcome in a sample of 12 adults with primary BDD. Treatment was delivered in weekly individual sessions over 18 or 22 weeks. Standardized clinician ratings…

  19. Adapting Metacognitive Therapy to Children with Generalised Anxiety Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Normann, Nicoline; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    -c) with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and create suggestions for an adapted manual. The adaptation was based on the structure and techniques used in MCT for adults with GAD. However, the developmental limitations of children were taken into account. For instance, therapy was aided with worksheets, practical...

  20. Schema therapy for aggressive offenders with personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen-de Vos, M.; Bernstein, D.P.; Arntz, A.; Tafrate, R.C.; Mitchell, D.

    2014-01-01

    Schema therapy (ST) is increasingly used in personality-disordered (PD) patients. ST is an integrative psychotherapy that blends elements of cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic and experiential approaches. The key concepts in ST are early maladaptive schemas, (dysfunctional) coping styles and schema

  1. [Art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of patients with mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apotsos, P

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of art therapy in various psychiatric structures and articles supporting its application, in recent years very few data grounded on primary research have been published. Given the complexity of psychiatric disorders the number of people who suffer from them, and the fact that the primary treatment in psychiatric disorders remains pharmacotherapy, questions about the effectiveness of art therapy (as a complimentary treatment) remain open. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of people with psychiatric disorders. A search of the literature and electronic databases using indexing words was conducted. The criteria for inclusion of articles were: a. studies had to be "outcome-intervention" studies, b. studies should concern only intervention in adults, and c. studies had to include patients with diagnoses according to the DSM of the American Psychiatric Association. Finally, only five articles were included in this systematic review. There is evidence for the effectiveness of art therapy in areas related to the psychosocial rehabilitation of persons suffering from psychiatric disorders, usually in combination with pharmacotherapy. The findings of the surveys reviewed are encouraging and justify the conduct of additional primary research.

  2. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  3. Synthesis and biodistribution of radioiodinated nicotine analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S.M.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Marten, D.F.; Sadek, S.; Magarian, R.A.; Grunder, J.R.; Ice, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reported previously on the synthesis and biodistribution of radioiodinated 5-iodonicotine. In their continuous effort to search for a potential brain as well as adrenal medulla imaging agent, the authors synthesized four radioiodinated nicotine analogs. The labeled compounds were prepared by brominating nicotinic acid, and reacting the acylated product with the appropriate amines to give the respective amides which were then reduced with diborane to the amines. I-125 labeling was done by halogen exchange. Biodistribution studies performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats showed that all these compounds were taken up rapidly by the brain and the adrenal. The highest uptake of all these compounds in both organs occurred at 2 minutes after tail vein injections. The organ:blood ratios at 2 minutes and the T/sub 1/3/ (min.) of radioactivity in these organs were compared.

  4. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  5. Antisense oligonucleotides in therapy for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Melvin M; Toonen, Lodewijk J A; van Roon-Mom, Willeke M C

    2015-06-29

    Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA. They can not only reduce expression of mutant proteins by breakdown of the targeted transcript, but also restore protein expression or modify proteins through interference with pre-mRNA splicing. There has been a recent revival of interest in the use of antisense oligonucleotides to treat several neurodegenerative disorders using different approaches to prevent disease onset or halt disease progression and the first clinical trials for spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis showing promising results. For these trials, intrathecal delivery is being used but direct infusion into the brain ventricles and several methods of passing the blood brain barrier after peripheral administration are also under investigation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sverre U.; Hoffart, Asle

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT) with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however, it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. PMID:27746757

  7. Radioiodinated metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG): radiochemistry, biology, and pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia

    2011-09-01

    As an analogue of adrenergic neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE), metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) demonstrates high uptake both in normal sympathetically innervated tissues, such as the heart and salivary glands, and in tumors that express the NE transporter (NET), specifically those of neural crest and neuroendocrine origin. In 1994, (131)I-MIBG, also known as iobenguane I-131 intravenous, received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as an imaging agent. In 2008, (123)I-MIBG was also approved by FDA as a tumor imaging agent. Commercial formulations of radioiodinated MIBG are prepared on the basis of radioiodide exchange reaction with unlabeled MIBG as a precursor and contain large mass amounts of unlabeled MIBG, or "cold carrier," molecules. Because the cold MIBG molecules competitively inhibit the uptake of radiolabeled MIBG molecules by adrenergic and neuroendocrine cells expressing NET, no-carrier-added (n.c.a.), high specific activity (SA) radioiodinated MIBG preparations have been developed on the basis of electrophilic radioiodination reaction and solid-phase technology by using dibutylstanyl benzylguanidine precursor linked to polymers. On the basis of n.c.a. synthetic procedures, therapeutic doses of [(131)I]MIBG can be administered with very high SA (1600 mCi/μmol or 5734 mCi/mg). The very high SA of n.c.a. [(131)I]MIBG drug would increase the specific cellular uptake of adrenergic neurons and neuroendocrine tumor cells expressing NET.

  8. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  9. ANTIHYPERTENSIVE THERAPY AND CLIMACTERIC DISORDERS IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kirichenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study efficacy and tolerability of antihypertensive therapy with enalapril (Berlipril®, Berlin-Chemie AG/Menarini Group and diltiazem (Altiazem® PP, Berlin-Chemie AG/Menarini Group in postmenopausal women with arterial hypertension (HT and climacteric disorders.Material and methods. 60 postmenopausal women (aged 56,8±3,9 y.o. with HT of 1-3 degrees were included into the study. They were split in two groups. Patients of the first group (30 people received enalapril (Berlipril® 20 mg/daily, patients of the second group (30 people – diltiazem (Altiazem® PP 180-360 mg/daily. Observation period was 6 months. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed before treatment and after 3 weeks, 1, 3 and 6 months of therapy. Climacteric syndrome severity and urodynamic disorders was estimated as well as psychic status according to score of depression and anxiety.Results. Office and ambulance blood pressure decreased after 6 months of therapy in all patients of both groups. A number of complaints on headache and giddiness reduced significantly. Severity of climacteric syndrome also decreased. Enalapril (Berlipril® monotherapy and especially combined therapy with hydrochlorothiazide led to aggravation of urodinamic disorders. On the contrary both monotherapy with diltiazem (Altiazem® PP or its combination with hydrochlorothiazide had positive effect on urodinamics. Both therapies reduced depression and anxiety levels significantly.Conclusion. All spectrum of pharmacology effects should be taken into account during antihypertensive therapy of patients with climacteric disorders.

  10. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojić Boris R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3±0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2, in accordance with ICD 10 search criteria. OBJECTIVE The aim of our work was to figure out the influence of autogenic training on adjustment disorder, through biophysical and biochemical indicators, and to research the efficacy of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. METHOD We observed adjustment disorder indicators and their changes in three phases, using initial, final, and control values, which we measured immediately before the beginning, immediately after the completion, and six months after the completion, of the practical course in autogenic training. We measured systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, brachial pulse rates, cortisol levels in plasma, cholesterol levels in blood, as well as glucose concentrations. During that period, autogenic training was employed as the sole therapy. RESULTS The study confirmed our preliminary assumptions. The measurements we performed showed that arterial blood pressure, pulse rates, cholesterol and cortisol concentrations, after the application of autogenic training among adolescents suffering from adjustment disorder, were lower than the initial values. They remained lower even six months after the completion of the practical course in autogenic training. CONCLUSION We concluded that autogenic training significantly decreases the values of physiological indicators of adjustment disorder, diminishes the effects of stress in an individual, and eases the adaptation of

  11. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastall DP

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available David PW Rastall,1 Andrea Amalfitano1,2 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2Department of Pediatrics, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. Keywords: human trials, clinical trials, gene therapy, lysosomal storage disease, blood-brain barrier, adeno-associated virus, lentivirus, adenovirus 

  12. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process.

  13. [Behavior therapy in disorders of dietary behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agathon, M

    1976-01-01

    Behaviour therapies using conditioning principles have been successful in the treatment of some psychopatological eating behaviours. Such have been the cases for anorexia nervosae in adolescents and adults, refusal to eat in the young child and difficulties of swallowing. Some of these cases are described. Research has been done in different countries on the applications of these methods to the treatment of obesity caused by overeating which appears very frequently in our societies. Systematic and covert desensitization and operant conditioning using positive reinforcements are more frequently used in these behaviour modification procedures than aversive methods. More recently, researches on self-control (self-reward and self-punishment) have shown it as a very efficient tool for inducing weight loss. These methods using self-control have been applied to large populations: after a first, careful examination of the patient's eating behaviour, the program of reinforcement is established. It can be partially controlled by written instructions and letters. Results are already encouraging although they need to be followed up. But more research should be done on overeating behaviours, the way they appear and are maintained and on different programs of reinforcement for weight loss.

  14. Effect of juggling therapy on anxiety disorders in female patients

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    Nakahara Toshihiro

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juggling therapy for anxiety disorder patients. Design and Method Subjects were 17 female outpatients who met the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorders. Subjects were treated with standard psychotherapy, medication and counseling for 6 months. For the last 3 months of treatment, subjects were randomized into either a non-juggling group (n = 9 or a juggling therapy group (juggling group: n = 8. The juggling group gradually acquired juggling skills by practicing juggling beanbags (otedama in Japan with both hands. The therapeutic effect was evaluated using scores of psychological testing (STAI: State and Trate Anxiety Inventry, POMS: Profile of Mood Status and of ADL (FAI: Franchay Activity Index collected before treatment, 3 months after treatment (before juggling therapy, and at the end of both treatments. Results After 6 months, an analysis of variance revealed that scores on the state anxiety, trait anxiety subscales of STAI and tension-anxiety (T-A score of POMS were significantly lower in the juggling group than in the non-juggling group (p Conclusion These findings suggest that juggling therapy may be effective for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy in a man with comorbid severe obesity, binge eating disorder, and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Del Casale, Antonio; Serata, Daniele; Caccia, Federica; Di Pietro, Simone; Scatena, Paola; Carbonetti, Paolo; Fensore, Claudio; Angeletti, Gloria; Tatarelli, Roberto; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-06-01

    A 41-year-old man with comorbid binge-eating disorder, severe obesity, and bipolar disorder since the age of 20 years, resistant to drug and psychotherapy combinations, worsened progressively. Relentless weight gain forced him to immobility and dependence on others. He was hospitalized for a mixed-mood episode with anxiety, mystical delusions, and auditory hallucinations. To overcome treatment resistance, we suggested electroconvulsive therapy. After 1 electroconvulsive therapy cycle, psychological symptoms promptly improved. He received clozapine and lithium. After 2 years, he reached normal weight and fair psychopathological compensation.

  16. Intensive Outpatient Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorder

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    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a novel model of intensive outpatient cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT indicated for eating disorder patients who are having difficulty modifying their eating habits in response to conventional outpatient CBT. Intensive outpatient CBT is a manual based treatment derived by the CBT-Enhanced (CBT-E for eating disorders. The treatment has four features that distinguish it from the conventional outpatient CBT-E: (1 it is designed to be suitable for both adult and adolescent patients, (2 it is delivered by a multidisciplinary non-eclectic team trained in CBT, (3 there is assistance with eating, (4 there is a family therapy module for patients under the age of 18 years. Preliminary outcome of intensive outpatient CBT-E are encouraging. The treatment has been applied to 20 consecutive underweight eating disorder patients (age 18.2 ± 6.5 years; BMI 14.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Thirteen patients (65% concluded the treatment, five (25% were admitted at an eating disorder inpatient unit, and two (10% prematurely interrupted the treatment. Completers obtained significant weight regain and improvement of eating disorder and general psychopathology. Most of the improvements were maintained at six-month follow-up.

  17. Hypnosis as therapy for functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Q

    2017-01-01

    treatment approaches, such as cognitive-behavioral, rehabilitative, or psychodynamic therapy. Suggestions are generally symptom-focused (designed to resolve a symptom) or exploratory (using methods such as revivification or age regression to explore experiences associated with symptom onset). The evidence base is dominated by case studies and series, with a paucity of randomized controlled trials. Future evaluation studies should allow for the fact that suggestion with or without hypnosis is a component of broader treatment interventions adapted to a wide range of symptoms and presentations. An important role of the concept of suggestion in the management of functional neurologic symptoms is to raise awareness of how interactions with clinicians and wider clinical contexts can alter expectancies and beliefs of patients in ways that influence the onset, course, and remission of symptoms.

  18. Autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jojić Boris R.; Leposavić Ljubica M.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Autogenic training is a widespread technique used in psychotherapy. The British school of autogenic training cites a large list of diseases, health states, and life changes, in which autogenic training can be of help. We wanted to explore the application of autogenic training as a therapy for adjustment disorder in adolescents. The sample consisted of a homogeneous group of 31 individuals, with an average age of 17.3±0.2 years, who were diagnosed with adjustment disorder, F 43.2,...

  19. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastall, David Pw; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood-brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field.

  20. Radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer: radiologic impact of out-patient treatment with 100 to 150 mCi Iodine-131 activities; Radioiodoterapia do carcinoma diferenciado da tireoide: impacto radiologico da liberacao hospitalar de pacientes com atividades entre 100 e 150 mCi de iodo-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapienza, Marcelo Tatit; Willegaignon, Jose; Ono, Carla Rachel; Watanabe, Tomoco; Guimaraes, Maria Ines Calil Cury; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Servico de Medicina Nuclear; Gutterres, Ricardo Fraga; Marechal, Maria Helena da Hora [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate exposure and dosimetry to family members and environment due to outpatient radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Methods: Twenty patients were treated with 100-150 mCi of iodine-131 on an out-patient basis. Family members dosimetry (n = 27) and potential doses inside the house were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Surface contamination and radioactive wastes were also monitored. Results: Less than 1.0 mSv doses were found in 26 co-habitants and 2.8 mSv in a single case (inferior to the acceptable value of 5.0 mSv/procedure). Potential doses in the houses were inferior to 0.25 mSv, excluding the patients bedroom (mean value = 0.69 mSv). Surface contamination (mean = 4.2 Bq.cm{sup -2}) were below clearance levels. Radioactive wastes generated had a volume of 2.5 liters and a total activity estimated in 90 {mu}Ci, with a calculated exposure close to the background radiation levels. Conclusions: No radiological impact was detected after iodine therapy with 100-150 mCi on an out-patient basis followed by experienced professionals. (author)

  1. Etiology, pathogenesis, and therapy according to Pierre Janet concerning conversion disorders and dissociative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Karl-Ernst; Heim, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Pierre Janet's works on conversion disorders or dissociative disorders has mainly fallen to the wayside in favour of Freud's works. In the first part of this paper, Janet's conception of hysteria is discussed and his place in French psychiatry described. Different aspects of Janet's diathesis-stress approach are presented (particularly the pathogenic concept of fixed ideas), which refer not only to a conception of hysteria but also to traumatic (stress) disorders and other psychological disturbances. The second part of the paper details the varieties of Janetian therapeutic treatments of these disorders: the "liquidation" of fixed ideas by hypnosis and suggestion, confrontation techniques, which resemble contemporary cognitive behavioural approaches, and special cognitive ("logagogic") interventions. Finally, we discuss the various treatment strategies based on psychoeconomic considerations such as physical or psycho-phyical therapies, psychoeducation, treatment through rest, and simplification of life for dealing with basic disturbances of psychic disorders.

  2. Radioiodine treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre: effects of combination with lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannucchi, Guia; Mannavola, Deborah; Dazzi, Davide; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Fugazzola, Laura [Ospedale Maggiore IRCCS (Pad. Granelli), Institute of Endocrine Sciences, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo; Rodari, Marcello; Tadayyon, Sara [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radioiodine ({sup 131}I), alone or in combination with lithium, on thyroid volume and the prevention of radioiodine-induced thyrotoxicosis. This is the first clinical trial including only patients with multinodular goitre, normal TSH values and negative anti-thyroid auto-antibodies at baseline. Eighty consecutive patients were randomised to receive {sup 131}I plus lithium (group I+L) or {sup 131}I alone (group I). Thyroid ultrasonography and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. At 1-4 weeks after treatment, {sup 131}I-induced hyperthyroidism was observed in 58.8% of patients and was prevented by lithium administration. A low incidence of hypothyroidism (19%) was recorded at 24 months, whereas up to 44% of patients developed anti-thyroid antibodies. A significant reduction in thyroid volume was observed after {sup 131}I, with a mean decrease of 47.2% (median 48.2%) at 24 months, without differences between the groups. Moreover, it was shown that the decrease in thyroid volume after {sup 131}I was also due to the significant shrinkage of thyroid nodules. This demonstrates that adjunctive lithium is able to reduce radioiodine-induced hyperthyroidism. Therefore, such treatment appears to be safe in older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease. In the present large series, {sup 131}I therapy was demonstrated to be highly effective in reducing thyroid and nodular volume even in patients treated with low {sup 131}I doses (2.5 MBq/ml of thyroid tissue), further supporting the view that radioiodine therapy represents a real alternative to surgery. (orig.)

  3. Virtual reality: a new tool for panic disorder therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, Francesco; Riva, Giuseppe

    2002-05-01

    The use of a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy for panic disorder with agoraphobia is actually one of the preferred therapeutical approach for this disturbance. This method involves a mixture of cognitive and behavioral techniques which are intended to help patients identify and modify their dysfunctional anxiety-related thoughts, beliefs and behavior. Emphasis is placed on reversing the maintaining factors identified in the cognitive and behavioral patterns. The treatment protocol includes exposure to the feared situation, interoceptive exposure and cognitive restructuring. The paper presents a treatment protocol for panic disorder and agoraphobia, named experiential-cognitive therapy, that integrates the use of virtual reality in a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy. The goal of experiential-cognitive therapy is to decondition fear reactions, to modify misinterpretational cognition related to panic symptoms and to reduce anxiety symptoms.

  4. Metacognitive interpersonal therapy for narcissistic personality disorder and associated perfectionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Attinà, Giovanna

    2012-08-01

    Treating narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) successfully is possible but requires a thorough understanding of the pathology and appropriate clinical procedures. Perfectionism is one prominent feature often associated with narcissistic difficulties. Metacognitive Interpersonal Therapy (MIT) for NPD adopts manualized step-by-step procedures aimed at progressively dismantling narcissistic processes by first stimulating an autobiographical mode of thinking and then improving access to inner states and awareness of dysfunctional patterns. Finally, adaptive patterns of thinking, feeling, and acting are promoted, together with a sense of autonomy and agency and a reduction of perfectionistic regulatory strategies. Throughout, there needs to be constant attention to regulation of the therapy relationship to avoid ruptures and maximize cooperation. We describe here a successful case of MIT applied to a man in his early 20's with narcissism, perfectionism, and significant co-occurrence of Axis I and Axis II disorders.

  5. [Pharmacological therapies for alcohol use disorder in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Yosuke; Higuchi, Susumu

    2015-09-01

    We reviewed the available pharmacological therapies for alcohol use disorder in Japan. For treatment of withdrawal delirium, therapists prefer to use antipsychotic drugs rather than benzodiazepines, which is different from other countries. Japan does not have any substantial treatment guidelines for withdrawal delirium. Therefore, so treatment strategies matching the environment of each facility need to be formulated. Moreover, current choices for prescribing anti-alcoholic drugs to cope with alcohol craving are limited to drugs such as cyanamide and disulfiram. However, the use of acamprosate has recently begun and a clinical trial for nalmefene is starting soon. We anticipate that these newer pharmacological therapies will contribute to better treatment of alcohol use disorder also in Japan.

  6. Microbial copper reduction method to scavenge anthropogenic radioiodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Lee, Ji Young; Min, Je Ho; Kim, Seung Soo; Baik, Min Hoon; Chung, Sang Yong; Lee, Minhee; Lee, Yongjae

    2016-06-01

    Unexpected reactor accidents and radioisotope production and consumption have led to a continuous increase in the global-scale contamination of radionuclides. In particular, anthropogenic radioiodine has become critical due to its highly volatile mobilization and recycling in global environments, resulting in widespread, negative impact on nature. We report a novel biostimulant method to effectively scavenge radioiodine that exhibits remarkable selectivity for the highly difficult-to-capture radioiodine of >500-fold over other anions, even under circumneutral pH. We discovered a useful mechanism by which microbially reducible copper (i.e., Cu2+ to Cu+) acts as a strong binder for iodide-iodide anions to form a crystalline halide salt of CuI that is highly insoluble in wastewater. The biocatalytic crystallization of radioiodine is a promising way to remove radioiodine in a great capacity with robust growth momentum, further ensuring its long-term stability through nuclear I- fixation via microcrystal formation.

  7. Alternative Therapies for Excoriation (Skin Picking) Disorder: A Brief Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torales, Julio; Barrios, Iván; Villalba, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Context • Excoriation (skin picking) disorder is characterized by the need or urge to pick, scratch, pinch, touch, rub, scrub, squeeze, bite, or dig the skin, and it can be a perplexing condition for the inexperienced physician. Treatments include pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and alternative therapies. Alternative therapies for excoriation disorder and other body-focused repetitive behaviors include yoga, aerobic exercise, acupuncture, biofeedback, hypnosis, and inositol and N-acetylcysteine, among others. Objective • This review article intended to review the current literature on the alternative therapies to provide a brief update on their benefits for the treatment of excoriation disorder for use in conjunction with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in the management of a challenging group of patients. Design • This review (focusing on literature published in the last 15 y, selected from a search of PubMed) critically considers the evidence for the use of alternative therapies in the treatment of excoriation disorder. Setting • This review was conducted at the National University of Asunción (San Lorenzo, Paraguay). Results • Results for yoga were as follows: This technique may influence the structure and functioning of the areas of emotional processing involved in the pathophysiology of excoriation disorder and other body-focused repetitive behaviors, such as trichotillomania. Although still limited, the current research team's use of yoga as a treatment has given useful results. Results for aerobic exercise were as follows: People suffering from excoriation disorder and other-body focused repetitive behaviors generally have a worsening of their behaviors in times of negative mood and anxiety. As exercise has qualities that allow individuals to improve their mood and reduce their anxiety, it is likely that it also can help reduce behaviors like hair pulling or scratching, and it should be considered to be an adjunctive therapy. Results for

  8. [Psychoeducation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    In treating bipolar disorder, specific psychotherapies in adjunct to pharmacotherapy have been shown to be effective in preventing new episodes and treating depressive episodes. Among those, interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) developed by Frank, amalgamation of interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) with behavioral therapy focused on social rhythm has been shown to be an efficacious adjunct to mediation in preventing new episodes in bipolar I patients and in treating depression in bipolar I arid II disorder. IPSRT has also been shown to enhance total functioning, relationship functioning and life satisfaction among patients with bipolar disorder, even after pretreatment functioning and concurrent depression were covaried. IPSRT was designed to directly address the major pathways to recurrence in bipolar disorder, namely medication nonadherence, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. IPT, originated by Klerman et al., is a strategic time-limited psychotherapy focused on one or two of four current interpersonal problem areas (ie, grief, interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, and interpersonal dificits). In IPSRT, the fifth problem area "grief for the lost healthy self" has been added in order to promote acceptance of the diagnosis and the need for life-long treatment. Social rhythm therapy is a behavioral approach aiming at increasing regularity of social rhythms using the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), a chart to record daily social activities including how stimulating they were, developed from observation that disruptions in social rhythms often trigger affective episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. IPSRT also appears to be a promising intervention for a subset of individuals with bipolar II depression as monotherapy for the acute treatment.

  9. Group schema therapy for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Susan G; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame, and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post-therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviors, whilst providing a de-stigmatizing and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  10. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Simpson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviours, whilst providing a de-stigmatising and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  11. [Schema Therapy: An Approach for Treating Narcissistic Personality Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, E; Behary, W

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we review the history of the construct of narcissism and the diagnostic criteria for narcissistic personality disorder. We then discuss some etiological models of narcissism and introduce the model of Jeffrey Young, who developed Schema Therapy (ST) as an alternative to standard cognitive therapy for patients with personality disorders. ST differs from standard cognitive therapies in important respects, including limited reparenting, a focus on the patient's basic needs, and emotional activating techniques in addition to cognitive and behavioral ones. We then discuss Young's theory of basic needs, early maladaptive schemas, and schema modes. According to ST theory, narcissists are traumatized in the schema domain having to do with attachment needs. They are prone to vulnerable emotions in response to narcissistic injuries, although they often do not show these emotions directly. Instead, they use maladaptive coping strategies, resulting in emotional states, known as "schema modes". This includes the Self-Aggrandizer mode and Detached Self-Soother mode, in which a superior, arrogant self-presentation and addictive or compulsive behavior serve a self-regulatory function. These concepts are illustrated by case examples of patients with Narcissistic Personality Disorder. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Advanced Technology in Speech Disorder Therapy of Romanian Language

    CERN Document Server

    Danubianu, Mirela; Pentiuc, Stefan Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges of the society development is related to public health and one of its specific targets includes better treatments of diseases. It is true that there are affections which by their nature do not endanger the life of a person, but they may have negative implications during his/her lifetime. Various language or speech disorders are part of this category. Discovered and treated in time, they can be corrected, most often in childhood. Because the Romanian language is a phonetic one that has its own special linguistic particularities, there is a real need to develop advanced information systems, which can be used to assist and help specialists in different speech disorders therapy. The aim of this paper is to present a few CBTS developed for the treatment of various language and speech disorders specific to the Romanian language.

  13. Sleep Quality Improvement During Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsawh, Holly J; Bomyea, Jessica; Stein, Murray B; Cissell, Shadha H; Lang, Ariel J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sleep complaints among individuals with anxiety disorders, few prior studies have examined whether sleep quality improves during anxiety treatment. The current study examined pre- to posttreatment sleep quality improvement during cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder (PD; n = 26) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 24). Among sleep quality indices, only global sleep quality and sleep latency improved significantly (but modestly) during CBT. Sleep quality improvement was greater for treatment responders, but did not vary by diagnosis. Additionally, poor baseline sleep quality was independently associated with worse anxiety treatment outcome, as measured by higher intolerance of uncertainty. Additional intervention targeting sleep prior to or during CBT for anxiety may be beneficial for poor sleepers.

  14. A Comparative Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Tamannaeifar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is a new method of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 19 depressive out-patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Twelve therapeutic sessions administered in consulting center of Tehran University twice a week. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS before and after the treatments. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of depression and rumination. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that ACT is an effective treatment, the effectiveness of which appears equivalent to that of CT.

  15. Metacognitive Therapy for Comorbid Anxiety Disorders: A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Urnes Johnson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe aimed to systematically evaluate a generic model of metacognitive therapy (MCT with a highly comorbid anxiety disorder patient, that had been treated with diagnosis-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT without significant effect. Traditionally, CBT has progressed within a disorder-specific approach, however it has been suggested that this could be less optimal with highly comorbid patients. To address comorbidity, transdiagnostic treatment models have been emerging. This case study used an AB-design with repeated assessments during each therapy session and a 1-year follow-up assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of MCT. Following 8 sessions of MCT, significant decrease in anxiety and depression symptoms, as well as loss of diagnostic status was observed. Outcomes were preserved at 12 months follow up. The generic model of MCT seems promising as an approach to highly comorbid mixed anxiety depression patients. Further testing using more powered methodologies are needed. Keywords: Metacognitive therapy, transdiagnostic, metacognition, anxiety, comorbidity.

  16. Gene therapy of inherited skin adhesion disorders: a critical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, M; Pellegrini, G; Mavilio, F

    2009-07-01

    Gene therapy has the potential to treat devastating inherited diseases for which there is little hope of finding a conventional cure. These include lethal diseases, like immunodeficiencies or several metabolic disorders, or conditions associated with a relatively long life expectancy but poor quality of life and expensive and life-long symptomatic treatments, such as muscular dystrophy, cystic fibrosis and thalassaemia. Skin adhesion defects belong to both groups. For the nonlethal forms, gene therapy, or transplantation of cultured skin derived from genetically corrected epidermal stem cells, represents a very attractive therapeutic option, and potentially a definitive treatment. Recent advances in gene transfer and stem cell culture technology are making this option closer than ever. This paper critically reviews the progress and prospects of gene therapy for epidermolysis bullosa, and the technical and nontechnical factors currently limiting its development.

  17. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Natascia; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Rocchetti, Matteo; Provenzani, Umberto; Barale, Francesco; Politi, Pierluigi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a popular therapeutic option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data regarding the efficacy of CAM in ASD. The aim of the present systematic review is to investigate trials of CAM in ASD. Material and Methods. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Agricola, and Food Science Source. Results. Our literature search identified 2687 clinical publications. After the title/abstract screening, 139 publications were obtained for detailed evaluation. After detailed evaluation 67 studies were included, from hand search of references we retrieved 13 additional studies for a total of 80. Conclusion. There is no conclusive evidence supporting the efficacy of CAM therapies in ASD. Promising results are reported for music therapy, sensory integration therapy, acupuncture, and massage.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascia Brondino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM represents a popular therapeutic option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Unfortunately, there is a paucity of data regarding the efficacy of CAM in ASD. The aim of the present systematic review is to investigate trials of CAM in ASD. Material and Methods. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Agricola, and Food Science Source. Results. Our literature search identified 2687 clinical publications. After the title/abstract screening, 139 publications were obtained for detailed evaluation. After detailed evaluation 67 studies were included, from hand search of references we retrieved 13 additional studies for a total of 80. Conclusion. There is no conclusive evidence supporting the efficacy of CAM therapies in ASD. Promising results are reported for music therapy, sensory integration therapy, acupuncture, and massage.

  19. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations.

  20. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Maganga

    Full Text Available Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART, yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders.In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher's exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders.HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7% vs.11/153 (7.2%, p<0.001 and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0% vs. 8/153 (5.2%, p = 0.001 than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78-11.77, p<0.001. Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%.HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune reconstitution.

  1. A dose-effect correlation for radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flux, Glenn D.; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Buckley, Susan; Hindorf, Cecilia [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Haq, Masud; Newbold, Kate; Harmer, Clive L. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Thyroid Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the range of absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow from fixed administrations of radioiodine and to ascertain whether the success of ablation is more dependent on these absorbed doses than on the administered activity. Twenty-three patients received 3,000 MBq radioiodine following near-total thyroidectomy. The maximum absorbed dose to remnants was calculated from subsequent single photon emission tomography scans. Absorbed doses delivered to blood and red marrow were calculated from blood samples and from whole-body retention measurements. The protein bound iodine (PBI) was also calculated. Maximum absorbed doses to thyroid remnants ranged from 7 to 570 Gy. Eighteen of the 23 patients had a successful ablation. A significant difference was seen between the absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow for those patients that had a successful ablation compared to those with a failed ablation (p = 0.030, p = 0.043 and p = 0.048, respectively). The difference between the PBI values acquired at day 1 and day 6 were also indicative of response (p = 0.074). A successful ablation is strongly dependent on the absorbed dose to the thyroid remnant. Dosimetry-based personalized treatment can prevent both sub-optimal administrations, which entails further radioiodine therapy, and excessive administration of radioactivity, which increases the potential for radiation toxicity. (orig.)

  2. Dosimetry of radioiodine for embryo and fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovski, V.; Eckerman, K.F.; Phipps, A.W.; Nosske, D

    2003-07-01

    This paper discusses the biokinetic and dosimetric models adopted in ICRP Publication 88 for the evaluation of fetal doses resulting from maternal intakes of radioiodine. The biokinetic model is used to simulate the behaviour of iodine in both the mother and the fetus. Such simulations provide the basis for the estimation of the dose to the embryo and determine the distribution of maternal iodine at the beginning of the fetal period. The model considers iodine to accumulate in the fetal thyroid from the 11th week. The dose to the fetus delivered following birth is evaluated with the biokinetic and dosimetric models described in ICRP Publication 67. Although a substantial fraction of the emitted energy of electrons and photons is less than 10 keV, conventionally assumed to be non-penetrating radiation, these emissions can escape the small fetal thyroid. Absorbed fractions for both self-dose and crossfire were evaluated for the requirements of radioiodine dosimetry in ICRP Publication 88. (author)

  3. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease; Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge < 3,5 {mu}Sv/h at 2 m). An adjuvant treatment with cortisone is recommended in a simultaneous endocrine ophthalmopathy to prevent from deterioration. Radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is cost effective with a low probability of side-effects and is not associated with an increased genetic or somatic risk. Therapy control and life span follow up has to be carried out by the expert physician legally responsible for the radioiodine therapy. (orig.) [German] Die Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow wird in Deutschland, bei Patienten aelter als 20 Jahre, erst nach mindestens einjaehriger, erfolgloser thyreostatischer Therapie, bei Thyreostatikaunvertraeglichkeit, Rezidiven nach Operation und kleinen Strumen durchgefuehrt. Die Beseitigung der Hyperthyreose wird mit einem ablativen Dosiskonzept (300 Gy) in > 90%, verbunden mit einer Hypothyreoserate von ebenfalls > 90% erreicht. Prognostisch unguenstige Einflussfaktoren sind eine zu niedrig gewaehlte Herddosis und/oder eine begleitende Thyreostase. Aus Gruenden der Qualitaetssicherung und des Strahlenschutzes muss in Deutschland die Radiojodtherapie stationaer als Einzeittherapie durchgefuehrt werden. Die

  4. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Behice ÖZTOP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT becomes one of the leading approaches in the psychotherapy. However,use of CBT in childhood psychotherapy is considerably novel. After 1990s, it has been understood that it is an effectivemethod for children and adolescents. Anxiety disorders are one of the most common problems in the field of childhoodand adolescent psychiatry. In the studies conducted, the effectiveness of CBT was demonstrated in anxiety disorders ofthe children and adolescents. Moreover, it was suggested that this effectiveness is permanent in some studies. Prioritygoal of CBT is to change inappropriate learning and thinking patterns in the children and adolescents. By “now and here”fashion, it is attempted to reveal the origin of current problems. During the process, the factors are considered, whichcause to maintain the symptoms. It is attempted to decrease signs caused to stress by improving coping skills duringtherapy. To this end, methods including observation, relaxation training, systematic desensitization, social skills training,cognitive restructuring and exposure therapy are applied in sessions by taking child’s problems into consideration. Scalesspecific to anxiety disorders are used in the assessment and follow-up. Age and development level of the child should beparticularly taken into account while using assessment tools and therapeutic modality.

  5. Cell therapy for neurological disorders: The elusive goal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash N Tandon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The positive outcomes of the transplantation of fetal neural tissue in adult rat models of a variety of neurological disorders, particularly Parkinson's disease, in the 1970s, and its translation to humans in the 1980s, raised great hopes for patients suffering from these incurable disorders. This resulted in a frantic research globally to find more suitable, reliable, and ethically acceptable alternatives. The discovery of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and more recently, the induced pluripotent cells further raised our expectations. The useful functional recovery in animal models using these cell transplantation techniques coupled with the desperate needs of such patients prompted many surgeons to “jump from the rat-to-man” without scientifically establishing a proof of their utility. Each new development claimed to overcome the limitations, shortcomings, safety, and other technical problems associated with the earlier technique, yet newer difficulties prevented evidence-based acceptance of their clinical use. However, thousands of patients across the globe have received these therapies without a scientifically acceptable proof of their reliability. The present review is an attempt to summarize the current status of cell therapy for neurological disorders.

  6. An overview of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2003-04-01

    Shock waves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water with high voltage explosion and vaporization. Shock wave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shock wave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce neovascularization, improve blood supply and tissue regeneration. The application of shock wave therapy in certain musculoskeletal disorders has been around for approximately 15 years, and the success rate in non-union of long bone fracture, calcifying tendonitis of the shoulder, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow and proximal plantar fasciitis ranged from 65% to 91%. The complications are low and negligible. Recently, shock wave therapy was extended to treat other conditions including avascular necrosis of femoral head, patellar tendonitis (jumper's knee), osteochondritis dessicans and non-calcifying tendonitis of the shoulder. Shock wave therapy is a novel therapeutic modality without the need of surgery and surgical risks as well as surgical pain. It is convenient and cost-effective. The exact mechanism of shock wave therapy remains unknown. Based on the results of animal studies in our laboratory, it appears that the mechanism of shock waves first stimulates the early expression of angiogenesis-related growth factors including eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), VEGF (vessel endothelial growth factor) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), then induces the ingrowth of neovascularization that improves blood supply and increases cell proliferation and eventual tissue regeneration to repair tendon or bone tissues. The rise of angiogenic markers occurred in as early as one week and only lasted for approximately 8 weeks, whereas the neovascularization was first noted in 4 weeks and persisted for 12 weeks or longer along with cell proliferation. These findings support the clinical observation that the effect of shock wave therapy appears to be dose-dependent and

  7. Skin gene therapy for acquired and inherited disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, M; Escámez, M J; Prada, F; Mirones, I; García, M; Holguín, A; Duarte, B; Podhajcer, O; Jorcano, J L; Larcher, F; Del Río, M

    2006-11-01

    The rapid advances associated with the Human Genome Project combined with the development of proteomics technology set the bases to face the challenge of human gene therapy. Different strategies must be evaluated based on the genetic defect to be corrected. Therefore, the re-expression of the normal counterpart should be sufficient to reverse phenotype in single-gene inherited disorders. A growing number of candidate diseases are being evaluated since the ADA deficiency was selected for the first approved human gene therapy trial (Blaese et al., 1995). To cite some of them: sickle cell anemia, hemophilia, inherited immune deficiencies, hyper-cholesterolemia and cystic fibrosis. The approach does not seem to be so straightforward when a polygenic disorder is going to be treated. Many human traits like diabetes, hypertension, inflammatory diseases and cancer, appear to be due to the combined action of several genes and environment. For instance, several wizard gene therapy strategies have recently been proposed for cancer treatment, including the stimulation of the immune system of the patient (Xue et al., 2005), the targeting of particular signalling pathways to selectively kill cancer cells (Westphal and Melchner, 2002) and the modulation of the interactions with the stroma and the vasculature (Liotta, 2001; Liotta and Kohn, 2001).

  8. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

  9. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

  10. Drug therapy of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash De Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a developmental disorder with an age onset prior to 7 years. Children with ADHD have significantly lower ability to focus and sustain attention and also score higher on impulsivity and hyperactivity. Stimulants, such as methylphenidate, have remained the mainstay of ADHD treatment for decades with evidence supporting their use. However, recent years have seen emergence of newer drugs and drug delivery systems, like osmotic release oral systems and transdermal patches, to mention a few. The use of nonstimulant drugs like atomoxetine and various other drugs, such as a-agonists, and a few antidepressants, being used in an off-label manner, have added to the pharmacotherapy of ADHD. This review discusses current trends in drug therapy of ADHD and highlights the promise pharmacogenomics may hold in the future.

  11. Clinical application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, F; Rompe, J D; Furia, J P; Cacchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Currently the application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects are still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Tao; Chen, Hongju; Luo, Rong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-10-13

    The rising prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has increased the need for evidence-based treatments to lessen the impact of symptoms. Presently, no therapies are available to effectively treat individuals with all of the symptoms of this disorder. It has been suggested that hyperbaric oxygen therapy may alleviate the biochemical dysfunction and clinical symptoms of ASD. To determine whether treatment with hyperbaric oxygen:1. improves core symptoms of ASD, including social communication problems and stereotypical and repetitive behaviors;2. improves noncore symptoms of ASD, such as challenging behaviors;3. improves comorbid states, such as depression and anxiety; and4. causes adverse effects. On 10 December 2015, we searched CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and 15 other databases, four of which were Chinese language databases. We also searched multiple trial and research registers. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of any dose, duration, and frequency for hyperbaric oxygen therapy compared with no treatment or sham treatment for children and adults with ASD. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration, in that three review authors independently selected studies, assessed them for risk of bias, and extracted relevant data. We also assessed the quality of the evidence by using the GRADE approach. We included one trial with a total of 60 children with a diagnosis of ASD who randomly received hyperbaric oxygen therapy or a sham treatment. Using GRADE criteria, we rated the quality of the evidence as low because of the small sample size and wide confidence intervals (CIs). Other problems included selection bias and short duration or follow-up.Overall, study authors reported no improvement in social interaction and communication, behavioral problems, communication and linguistic abilities, or cognitive function. With regard to the safety of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (adverse events), they reported

  13. Cognitive behavioral therapy in pharmacoresistant obsessive–compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocilova, Jana; Prasko, Jan; Sipek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine whether patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) resistant to drug therapy may improve their condition using intensive, systematic cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) lasting for 6 weeks, and whether it is possible to predict the therapeutic effect using demographic, clinical, and selected psychological characteristics at baseline. Methods Sixty-six OCD patients were included in the study, of which 57 completed the program. The diagnosis was confirmed using the structured Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Patients were rated using the objective and subjective forms of the Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, objective and subjective forms of the Clinical Global Impression, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, Dissociative Experiences Scale, 20-item Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire, and the Sheehan Disability Scale before their treatment, and with subjective Yale–Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, objective and subjective Clinical Global Impression, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory at the end of the treatment. Patients were treated with antidepressants and daily intensive group CBT for the 6-week period. Results During the 6-week intensive CBT program in combination with pharmacotherapy, there was a significant improvement in patients suffering from OCD resistant to drug treatment. There were statistically significantly decrease in the scores assessing the severity of OCD symptoms, anxiety, and depressive feelings. A lower treatment effect was achieved specifically in patients who 1) showed fewer OCD themes in symptomatology, 2) showed a higher level of somatoform dissociation, 3) had poor insight, and 4) had a higher initial level of overall severity of the disorder. Remission of the disorder was more likely in patients who had 1) good insight, 2) a lower initial level of anxiety, and 3) no comorbid depressive disorder. PMID:27042074

  14. Mirror neuron system based therapy for emotional disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Hoff, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Mirror neuron system (MNS) represents one of the most important discoveries in the area of neuropsychology of past decades. More than 500 papers have been published in this area (PubMed), and the major functions of MNS include action understanding, imitation, empathy, all of which are critical for an individual to be social. Recent studies suggested that MNS can modulate emotion states possibly through the empathy mechanism. Here we propose that MNS-based therapies provide a non-invasive approach in treatments to emotional disorders that were observed in autism patients, post-stroke patients with depression as well as other mood dysregulation conditions.

  15. NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY IN DISORDERS OF PERSONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Zagoruyko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work the suggested method of biofeedback is one of those unique practices, which enables to find an individual approach to every patient, consider his character traits, and, in addition to this, the patient himself comes to realization of the problem, that is not so easy with personality disorders. Biofeedback therapy results not only in the change of physiological data, but also of cognitive stereotypes and behavioral patterns, which makes it possible to optimize the social, professional and interpersonal functioning of a patient.

  16. Integrated approach to yoga therapy and autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantha Radhakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A specially designed Integrated Approach to Yoga Therapy module was applied to Autism Spectrum Disorders over a period of two academic years. Despite low numbers (six in each arm, consistency and magnitude of effects make the findings significant. Parental participation, allowing firm guidance to be given to each child, resulted in significant improvements in imitation and other skills, and in behavior at home and family relationships. We hypothesize that guided imitation of therapist body positions stimulated mirror neuron activation, resulting in improved sense of self.

  17. Intensive cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, H.; Kristensen, M.; Arendt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite promising results from intensive formats of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) the format is rarely used. The aim of the study was to systematically review the literature within this area of research and provide a meta-analysis of the effectiveness......-up, mainly due to slight deterioration among patients who had received intensive CBT while patients from weekly conditions changed little. In sum, the meta-analysis indicates that intensive CBT is an effective treatment for youths and adults with OCD, and could be a promising format to enhance immediate...

  18. Carriers in Cell-Based Therapies for Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Francisca S. Y.; Chan, Barbara P.; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term neuroprotective and neuroregenerative therapies to promote full function recovery of injuries in the human nervous system resulting from trauma, stroke or degenerative diseases. Although cell-based therapies are promising in supporting repair and regeneration, direct introduction to the injury site is plagued by problems such as low transplanted cell survival rate, limited graft integration, immunorejection, and tumor formation. Neural tissue engineering offers an integrative and multifaceted approach to tackle these complex neurological disorders. Synergistic therapeutic effects can be obtained from combining customized biomaterial scaffolds with cell-based therapies. Current scaffold-facilitated cell transplantation strategies aim to achieve structural and functional rescue via offering a three-dimensional permissive and instructive environment for sustainable neuroactive factor production for prolonged periods and/or cell replacement at the target site. In this review, we intend to highlight important considerations in biomaterial selection and to review major biodegradable or non-biodegradable scaffolds used for cell transplantation to the central and peripheral nervous system in preclinical and clinical trials. Expanded knowledge in biomaterial properties and their prolonged interaction with transplanted and host cells have greatly expanded the possibilities for designing suitable carrier systems and the potential of cell therapies in the nervous system. PMID:24933636

  19. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Coutinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT, whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s. Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs.

  20. Music therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Elefant, Cochavit; Mössler, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background The central impairments of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affect social interaction and communication. Music therapy uses musical experiences and the relationships that develop through them to enable communication and expression, thus attempting to address some of the core...... of the therapy context (SMD 0.71, 95% CI 0.18 to 1.25, 3 RCTs, n = 57, moderate quality evidence), non-verbal communicative skills within the therapy context (SMD 0.57, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.85, 3 RCTs, n = 30), verbal communicative skills (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.49, 6 RCTs, n = 139), initiating behaviour (SMD 0.......73, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.11, 3 RCTs, n = 22, moderate quality evidence), and social-emotional reciprocity (SMD 2.28, 95% CI 0.73 to 3.83, 1 RCT, n = 10, low quality evidence). There was no statistically significant difference in non-verbal communicative skills outside of the therapy context (SMD 0.48, 95% CI...

  1. Early improvement in eating attitudes during cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: the impact of personality disorder cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Emma C; Waller, Glenn; Gannon, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The personality disorders are commonly comorbid with the eating disorders. Personality disorder pathology is often suggested to impair the treatment of axis 1 disorders, including the eating disorders. This study examined whether personality disorder cognitions reduce the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for eating disorders, in terms of treatment dropout and change in eating disorder attitudes in the early stages of treatment. Participants were individuals with a diagnosed eating disorder, presenting for individual outpatient CBT. They completed measures of personality disorder cognitions and eating disorder attitudes at sessions one and six of CBT. Drop-out rates prior to session six were recorded. CBT had a relatively rapid onset of action, with a significant reduction in eating disorder attitudes over the first six sessions. Eating disorder attitudes were most strongly associated with cognitions related to anxiety-based personality disorders (avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent). Individuals who dropped out of treatment prematurely had significantly higher levels of dependent personality disorder cognitions than those who remained in treatment. For those who remained in treatment, higher levels of avoidant, histrionic and borderline personality disorder cognitions were associated with a greater change in global eating disorder attitudes. CBT's action and retention of patients might be improved by consideration of such personality disorder cognitions when formulating and treating the eating disorders.

  2. Specific activity of radioiodine-labelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, M. (South African Inst. for Medical Research, Sandringham. National Inst. for Virology); Kay, G.W.; Van der Walt, L.A. (South African Inst. for Medical Research, Johannesburg. Dept. of Pathology)

    1983-10-01

    The article deals with the determination of the specific activity of radioiodine-labelled human chorionic gonadotropin ligand. The iodiation of human chorionic gonadotropin and the counting efficiency of /sup 125/I are discussed.

  3. Flibanserin for hypoactive sexual desire disorder: place in therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Faina; Atrio, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    The pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of female sexual interest in pre- and post-menopausal women present a complex arena for patients and physicians to navigate. Flibanserin was the first pharmacologic treatment, approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration in August 2015, for hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) in premenopausal women. Side effects, contraindications and lack of approval in postmenopausal women are all limitations, as are issues surrounding patient and physician knowledge and access. Testosterone, buspirone, sildenafil, bupropion, bremelanotide, as well as herbal medications (Herbal vX or Tribulus terrestris) have demonstrated some clinical benefit in women with sexual dysfunction disorders however, trials have significant design, dosing or generalizability limitations. Nonpharmaceutical cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness meditation, pelvic floor therapy, and clitoral stimulators are also interventions women may pursue. This manuscript will explore the clinical data regarding these therapeutic modalities so as to bring attention to this issue of female HSDD, to offer an overview of current research, and to incite providers to initiate discussion among themselves and their patients. PMID:28203348

  4. Kit preparation of radioiodinated o-iodohippuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkle, G.H.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Kirschner, A.S.; Ice, R.D.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a kit preparation for radioiodinated o-iodohippuran (I). All ingredients, excluding the radionuclide, were packaged in a ready-to-use kit for easy, quick formulation. Electrophoresis was utilized to evaluate the radiochemical purity of the labeled product and indicated that the radiolabeling technique provided a product with greater than 95% radiochemical purity. Biodistribution studies in rats and rabbits provided an indication of the tissue distribution and localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Computer-generated renogram curves plotted from gamma-camera images of rabbits showed the equivalency of the 131I-labeled I and 123I-labeled I to the commercially available radiopharmaceutical.

  5. Metal organic framework MIL-101 for radioiodine capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Thaer; Assfour, Bassem

    2017-09-01

    we report on the use of metal organic frameworks(MOFs) for radioiodine recovery and storage. One MOF (namely MIL-101) was prepared and investigated in detail to demonstrate the iodine removal efficiency and capacity of MOFs. The typical sorption kinetics and uptake isotherms were measured using radioactive iodine (123 I) for the first time. Our measurements indicate that MOFs can capture and store radioiodine in very high efficiency and fast kinetics.

  6. Reciprocal changes in parathyroid hormone and thyroid function after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.; Nussbaum, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with negative calcium balance, normal to increased serum calcium concentrations, and decreased cortical bone mass. There is no agreement concerning serum PTH levels in such patients. In this study, we measured serum PTH concentrations using a newly developed sensitive 2-site immunoradiometric assay in 17 hyperthyroid patients before and after radioiodine therapy. The mean serum PTH and calcium concentrations were 28 +/- 15 (+/- SD) ng/L (normal range, 12-65 ng/L) and 2.4 +/- 0.5 mmol/L (normal range, 2.1-2.6 mmol/L) before therapy. After therapy serum PTH concentrations increased in 16 of the 17 patients. The increase in serum PTH was greater in the 9 patients who became hypothyroid rapidly (29 +/- 15 to 75 +/- 29 ng/L) compared with that in the 8 patients who became euthyroid gradually (26 +/- 16 to 45 +/- 24 ng/L). Serum PTH rose along with TSH as the patients became hypothyroid after radioiodine, and both serum PTH and TSH fell when L-T4 therapy was given. The reciprocal changes in serum PTH concentrations and thyroid function over time suggest a strong association of bone mineral metabolism and thyroid status.

  7. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Lindschou Hansen, Jane; Storebø, Ole Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews....

  8. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Storebø, Ole Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews....

  9. Integrated cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with Substance Use Disorder and Comorbid ADHD : Two case presentations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Vedel, Ellen; van den Brink, Wir; Schoevers, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of integrated cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are presented illustrating that ICBT is a promising new treatment option. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review, st

  11. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review,

  12. Patterns of radioiodine uptake by the lactating breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakheet, S.M. (Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)); Hammami, M.M. (Dept. of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia))

    1994-07-01

    Breast uptake of radioiodine, if not suspected, may be misinterpreted as thyroid cancer metastasis to the lung. To characterize the patterns of radioiodine breast uptake, we retrospectively studied 20 radioiodine scans that were performed within 1 week of cessation of breast feeding. Four patterns of uptake were identified: ''full'', ''focal'', ''crescent'' and ''irregular''. The uptake was asymmetric in 60% (left>right in 45%, right>left in 15%), symmetric in 25% and unilateral in 15% of cases. A characteristic full bilateral uptake was present in 40% of cases. In three cases with the irregular pattern, caused in part by external contamination with radioactive milk, the uptake closely mimicked lung metastases. Delayed images, obtained in one case, showed an apparent radioiodine shift from the breast to the thyroid, suggesting that the presence of breast uptake can modulate radioiodine uptake by thyroid tissue. In a case of unilateral breast uptake, a history of mastitis was obtained, which to our knowledge has not been previously reported. Breast uptake of radioiodine may take several scintigraphic patterns that are not always characteristic of the lactating breast and may affect the apparent extent of thyroid remnant/metastasis. (orig.)

  13. Psychological therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder and comorbid substance use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil P; Roberts, Pamela A; Jones, Neil; Bisson, Jonathan I

    2016-04-04

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating mental health disorder that may develop after exposure to traumatic events. Substance use disorder (SUD) is a behavioural disorder in which the use of one or more substances is associated with heightened levels of distress, clinically significant impairment of functioning, or both. PTSD and SUD frequently occur together. The comorbidity is widely recognised as being difficult to treat and is associated with poorer treatment completion and poorer outcomes than for either condition alone. Several psychological therapies have been developed to treat the comorbidity, however there is no consensus about which therapies are most effective. To determine the efficacy of psychological therapies aimed at treating traumatic stress symptoms, substance misuse symptoms, or both in people with comorbid PTSD and SUD in comparison with control conditions (usual care, waiting-list conditions, and no treatment) and other psychological therapies. We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) all years to 11 March 2015. This register contains relevant randomised controlled trials from the Cochrane Library (all years), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE (1974 to date), and PsycINFO (1967 to date). We also searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform and ClinicalTrials.gov, contacted experts, searched bibliographies of included studies, and performed citation searches of identified articles. Randomised controlled trials of individual or group psychological therapies delivered to individuals with PTSD and comorbid substance use, compared with waiting-list conditions, usual care, or minimal intervention or to other psychological therapies. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 14 studies with 1506 participants, of which 13 studies were included in the quantitative synthesis. Most studies involved adult

  14. Radioiodination and biodistribution of quantum dots using Bolton-Hunter reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Park, Jae [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), 215-4 Gongneung-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Sup Lee, Tae, E-mail: nobelcow@kirams.re.k [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), 215-4 Gongneung-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun Kang, Joo [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), 215-4 Gongneung-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Rita [Nano/Bio Chemistry Group, Institut Pasteur Korea (IP-Korea), Seongnam 463-400 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong Cheon, Gi, E-mail: larry@kirams.re.k [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), 215-4 Gongneung-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear medicine, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), 215-4 Gongneung-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    In this study, the radioiodination and biodistribution of quantum dots (QDs) using Bolton-Hunter reagent were investigated. Radioiodination yield was 33.4{+-}2.0%. Fluorescent intensity of radioiodinated QDs decreased to 75.4% of the maximum prior to radioiodination. In biodistribution and ex vivo fluorescence imaging, radioiodinated QDs were highly accumulated in reticuloendothelial system (liver and spleen) and had low level bone uptakes and slow clearance from body. These results suggest that the radioiodination method of nanoparticles using Bolton-Hunter reagent could be easily used in the biodistribution and quantification of nanoparticles in vivo.

  15. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Skewes, Sally A.; Samson, Rachel A.; Simpson, Susan G.; van Vreeswijk, Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group schema therapy (ST-g) with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder) and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included c...

  16. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Ann Skewes; Rachel Anne Samson; Simpson, Susan G.; Michiel evan Vreeswijk

    2015-01-01

    Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group Schema Therapy (ST-g) with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder) and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included co...

  17. [Thyroid cancer metastasis to the lumbar spine successfully treated by embolization and radioiodine. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumimura, J; Nakagawa, K; Kawamura, J; Tayama, M; Takahashi, E; Moritomo, T; Miyata, M

    1990-07-01

    A 82-year-old woman suffered from a metastatic lesion of follicular carcinoma of the thyroid to the fourth lumbar spine, which compressed the spinal nerves and caused lumbar pain and paresthesis of the lower limb. External irradiation, 5200 RAD, was carried out. Total thyroidectomy was done for the preparation of radioiodine(131I) therapy. Two weeks later, embolization of lumbar arteries was performed to prevent the progression of the spinal cord damage during a period waiting for 131I administration. The size of the lumbar lesion decreased, and lumbal pain and spinal cord symptoms disappeared. After administration of 131I, the metastatic lesion became further smaller.

  18. The effects of dance-movement therapy methods on children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Zorko, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This specialist thesis examines the effects of dance-movement therapy methods on the life of a child with autism spectrum disorder. I included dance therapy methods as part of my daily work in the preschool education of children, which I combined with music, drama, and art therapy. Dance-movement therapy is a psychotherapeutic method that applies movement and dance. Therapists who research the characteristics of the movement and the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder have co...

  19. The effects of dance-movement therapy methods on children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Zorko, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This specialist thesis examines the effects of dance-movement therapy methods on the life of a child with autism spectrum disorder. I included dance therapy methods as part of my daily work in the preschool education of children, which I combined with music, drama, and art therapy. Dance-movement therapy is a psychotherapeutic method that applies movement and dance. Therapists who research the characteristics of the movement and the treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder have co...

  20. Improvement of goiter volume reduction after 0.3 mg recombinant human thyrotropin-stimulated radioiodine therapy in patients with a very large goiter: a double-blinded, randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen; Nielsen, Viveque E; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The effect of (131)I therapy amplification by recombinant human (rh) TSH prestimulation in very large goiters has not been evaluated in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients (22 females; age range 37-87 yr) with a large multinodular goiter (median...... the reduction of very large goiters by more than 50%, compared with (131)I therapy alone, but at the expense of more adverse effects after therapy. Our data suggest that rhTSH stimulation may work through mechanisms that go beyond the increase in thyroid (131)I uptake...

  1. Radiation exposure of persons exposed occupationally or in the vicinity of patients treated with unsealed radionuclides as for example with radioiodine; Strahlenexposition von beruflich exponierten Personen und Personen aus der Umgebung des Patienten bei der Therapie mit offenen radioaktiven Stoffen am Beispiel der Radioiodtherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.; Haenscheid, H. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2000-07-01

    In Germany, more than 30,000 patients per year are treated with radioiodine for thyroid diseases. The activity used in a treatment ward with 14 beds ranges typically between 1-2 TBq {sup 131}I annually. The mean applied activity in a patient with benign thyroid diseases is 550 MBq and in patients with thyroid cancer 4.3 GBq {sup 131}I. In patients with benign thyroid diseases the mean hospitalisation time ranges between three days (Graves' disease) and five days (toxic goitre), in patients with thyroid cancer it is approximately three days. Regular thyroid monitoring of the therapy ward staff with a semiconductor detector in a shielded whole body counter showed {sup 131}I activities of up to 300 Bq (mean 50 Bq). Assuming a constant {sup 131}I content of 50 Bq over 365 days results in a thyroid dose of 2 mSv and an effective dose of 0.1 mSv. The external exposure controlled by film badges showed a maximum dose per year of 3 mSv and a mean dose of 0.55 mSv. To reduce the exposure of persons close to the patient after dismissal from radioiodine therapy, special guidelines should be followed for approximately one week. Under this condition exposures exceeding the limit of 1 mSv for the general population according to the New German Radiation Protection Ordinance can be avoided. (orig.) [German] Jaehrlich werden in der Bundesrepublik mehr als 30.000 Radioiodbehandlungen von Schilddruesenerkrankungen durchgefuehrt. Der Radioiod-Verbrauch auf einer Therapiestation mit 14 Betten betraegt jaehrlich typischerweise 1-2 TBq {sup 131}I. Die durchschnittlich verabreichte Aktivitaet bei Patienten mit gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen liegt bei 550 MBq, bei Patienten mit Schilddruesenkarzinomen bei 4,3 GBq {sup 131}I. Die mittlere Dauer des stationaeren Aufenthalts bewegt sich bei Patienten mit gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen zwischen drei Tagen (Morbus Basedow) und fuenf Tagen (funktionelle Autonomie), bei Patienten mit Schilddruesenkarzinomen liegt sie bei ca. drei

  2. Sparse location radioactive counts/radioactive counts in thyroid area in predicting hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves disease%甲状腺显像疏/甲比预测131I治疗Graves病后甲状腺功能减退症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊红; 韦智晓; 李亚范

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the specific value of sparse location radioactive counts/radioactive counts in thyroid area (S/T) of 99mTcO4 - thyroid imaging and hypothyroidism following 131 I treatment in patients with Graves disease (GD). Methods 99mTcO4- thyroid imaging were performed for all of 172 patients with GD before radioiodine therapy, and the value of S/T of each imaging was measured. The patients were divided into recovery group, hypothyroidism group and non-recovery group according to curative effect after 1 year's following up. The diagnostic cut-off value of S/T was confirmed with ROC curve, then the relationship between S/T and hypothyroidism after treatment was assessed.Results ROC curve analysis showed the best diagnostic cut-off value of S/T was 0. 92, and the responding sensitivity and specificity was 0.86 and 0. 65, respectively. The difference of S/T was statistically significant between hypothyroidism group and recovery group, as well as between hypothyroidism group and non-recovery group (P<0. 05). S/T<0. 92 was associated with high incidence rate of hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy. Conclusion There are some relativities between the S/T and hypothyroidism after 131I treatment in patients with GD. The incidence of hypothyroidism increases when S/T<0. 92.%目的 探讨99mTcO4-甲状腺显像中甲状腺内稀疏部位平均放射性计数与整个甲状腺内平均放射性计数的比值(疏/甲比)与Graves病(GD)131I治疗后甲状腺功能减退症(简称甲减)的关系.方法 对172例经131I治疗的GD患者于治疗前进行99mTcO4-甲状腺显像,并计算其疏/甲比.根据治疗效果将患者分为痊愈组、甲减组和未愈组.用ROC曲线确定疏/甲比的诊断阈值,分析疏/甲比与治疗后甲减的关系.结果 取疏/甲比0.92为诊断甲状腺内存在稀疏部位的临界值,其灵敏度为0.86,特异度为0.65.甲减组与痊愈组、未愈组的疏/甲比

  3. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Tokgunaydin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for the treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in national and international databases. The articles that were gathered by the search have been read and the ones that were not therapy effectiveness studies, cognitive behavioral group therapies and that included posttraumatic stress disorder comorbid with alcohol/substance abuse, personality disorders and psychotic disorders were eliminated. The remaining 13 studies that fulfiilrf research criteria were introduced in the context of method and therapy characteristics. It can be seen that the cognitive behavioral group therapies are effective in decreasing the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and/or comorbid disorders. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 95-107

  4. Uninhibited thyroidal uptake of radioiodine despite iodine excess in amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersinga, W.M.; Touber, J.L.; Trip, M.D.; van Royen, E.A.

    1986-08-01

    Iodine excess is associated with a low thyroidal radioiodine uptake due to dilution of the radioisotope by the increased stable iodide pool. We studied thyroidal uptake of radioisotopes in cardiac patients with iodine excess due to amiodarone treatment. /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate scintigraphy was performed in 13 patients receiving long term amiodarone therapy. Five patients had a clearly visible thyroid gland, and 8 patients had no or a very faint thyroid image. All patients with positive scans had an increased plasma TSH level, whereas all patients with negative scans had a normal or absent TSH response to TRH. Thyroidal uptake and discharge of 123I were studied in 30 other patients. Group I (n = 11) had normal plasma TSH responses to TRH and no iodine excess, group II (n = 7) had normal TSH responses to TRH and excess iodine from metrizoate angiography in the previous month, group III (n = 7) had normal or decreased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy, and group IV (n = 5) had increased TSH responses to TRH while receiving long term amiodarone therapy. The mean radioiodine uptake value in group I (5.4 +/- 0.8% (+/- SE) at 60 min) was higher than those in group II (2.3 +/- 0.7%; P = 0.009) and group III (0.8 +/- 0.3%; P = 0.0005), but not different from that in group IV (5.3 +/- 1.2%; P = NS). Radioiodine discharge after perchlorate (expressed as a percentage of the 60 min uptake) in group I (10.1 +/- 2.2%) was lower than those in group II (24.9 +/- 10.6%; P = 0.05) and group III (28.8 +/- 5.3%; P less than 0.005), whereas discharge in group IV (58.0 +/- 6.1%) was greater than those in group II (P less than 0.05) and group III (P less than 0.01). In conclusion, 1) thyroid visualization by /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate and thyroid radioiodine uptake during iodine excess are decreased in euthyroid and hyperthyroid patients, but preserved in hypothyroid patients.

  5. Bipolar affective disorder: A review of novel forms of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziwota Ewelina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Normothymic, antidepressant and antipsychotic pharmaceutics are, in accordance with international guidelines, employed both in the therapy and the prevention of bipolar disorder (BD. Long-term studies on the mechanisms of action of such medications, as well as on the pathogenetic background of BD, have led to the discovery of effective, albeit unconventional pharmacotherapeutic approaches. These methods have the potential to successfully treat mania and depression, as well as to counter affective episode relapse. Allopurinol - commonly used to treat gout, secondary hyperuricemia and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, acts by inhibiting the synthesis of uric acid, levels of which are often increased in manic patients. Due to this, an evaluation of the potential effect of allopurinol on the reduction of mania symptoms seems to be reasonable. Additionally, the numerable research papers coming out of research regarding the role of purine neurotransmitters in mood alterations, indicate that adenosine agonists act analogously to dopamine antagonists.

  6. Gene Therapy Approaches For The Treatment Of Retinal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    There is an impelling need to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with retinal disorders. Gleaning from the large quantity of information gathered over the past two decades on the mechanisms governing degeneration of the retina, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on retinal gene transfer. Different gene-based approaches are under active investigation. They include strategies to correct the specific genetic defect in inherited retinal diseases, strategies to delay the onset of blindness independently of the disease-causing mutations and strategies to reactivate residual cells at late stages of the diseases. In this review, we discuss the status of application of these technologies, outlining the future therapeutic potential for many forms of retinal blinding diseases. PMID:27875674

  7. Potential of the drug-regulation iodide uptake in patients for prevention of radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Kirillovich Fomin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of retinoic acid derivatives and lithium salts for radioiodine-refractory prevention in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer during multistage radioiodine therapy.Materials and methodsThe retrospective analysis was performed using the diagnostic and treatment results of 40 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer that underwent 131I therapy, which on the basis of posttherapy whole-body scan had direct indications for subsequent course of radioiodine therapy. The patients were divided into two groups:the control group (20 patients, which conducted a second course of radioiodine therapy on the standard template and without special training$the main group (20 patients, who were administered Sedalia (900 mg per day for 8 days, p.o. and isotretinoin (1.2 mg/kg body weight for 60 days, p.o. to prevention of the 131I resistance.To evaluate the effectiveness of a repeated course of radioiodine therapy following parameters were used: the thyroglobulin (Tg and antibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg-Ab level in the serum, the posttherapy whole body scan in combination with SPECT-CT.ResultsWe have found, that radioactive iodine treatment was effective in 75% of the main group and 90% of patients in the control group. The remission was observed in 10% and 40% in the main and control group, respectively. The partial regression was considered as Tg and TG-Ab reduction, and was observed more in the study group. The resistance to 131I therapy was found in 20% and 10% in the main and control group, respectively, which was based on the fact of permanent Tg/Tg-Ab serum level and absence of the pathological foci iodine uptake on the whole-body scans. The disease progress was found in one patient in the main group.ConclusionThe use of retinoic acid derivatives and lithium salts, in an effort to prevent the resistance to 131I-theraphy pretend to be unjustified, because it does not lead to significant

  8. Inpatient Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severe Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E for eating disorders has been developed and evaluated only in outpatient setting. Aim of the paper is to describe a novel model of inpatient treatment, termed inpatient CBT-E, indicated for patients with an eating disorder of clinical severity not manageable in an outpatient setting or that failed outpatient treatment. Inpatient CBT-E is derived by the outpatients CBT-E with some adaptations to rend the treatments suitable for an inpatient setting. The principal adaptations include: 1 multidisciplinary and non-eclectic team composed of physicians, psychologists, dieticians and nurses all trained in CBT; 2 assisted eating; 3 group sessions; and a CBT family module for patients younger than 18 years. The treatment lasts 20 weeks (13 for inpatients followed by seven weeks of residential day treatment and, as CBT-E, is divided in four stages and can be administered in a focused form (CBT-F or in a broad form (CBT-B. A randomized control trial is evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment.

  9. [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential therapy for cognitive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, C; Sherrard, R M; Belmin, J

    2017-03-01

    Considering the limited effectiveness of drugs treatments in cognitive disorders, the emergence of noninvasive techniques to modify brain function is very interesting. Among these techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability and have potential therapeutic effects on cognition and behaviour. These effects are due to physiological modifications in the stimulated cortical tissue and their associated circuits, which depend on the parameters of stimulation. The objective of this article is to specify current knowledge and efficacy of rTMS in cognitive disorders. Previous studies found very encouraging results with significant improvement of higher brain functions. Nevertheless, these few studies have limits: a few patients were enrolled, the lack of control of the mechanisms of action by brain imaging, insufficiently formalized technique and variability of cognitive tests. It is therefore necessary to perform more studies, which identify statistical significant improvement and to specify underlying mechanisms of action and the parameters of use of the rTMS to offer rTMS as a routine therapy for cognitive dysfunction.

  10. HYPERPHAGIA REACTIONS WITHIN EATING DISORDERS. CLINICAL FEATURES AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gladyshev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical features of hyperphagia reactions, their significance in attraction abnormities within eating disorders and treatment options for these conditions with escitalopram.Material and methods. Mental state of 39 women (age 19-50 years with psychogenic overeating and obesity (body mass index of 30 to 53 kg/m2 was studied. Patients were admitted to the Institute of Nutrition of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Diagnostic criteria for International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as well as Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Ferreri Anxiety Rating Diagram (FARD were used for syndrome qualifications. Patient Global Impression of Change was also studied using a 4-point scale of results (excellent, good, fair, and negative.Results. Clinical features of hyperphagic reactions were found. Escitalopram treatment course was completed with excellent and good results in 80% of patients. 50%-reduction in HADS score for anxiety was found in 74% of patients, for depression – in 63%, and for Ferreri scale – in 68% of patients. Escitalopram promoted more intensive body weight loss: 11% vs 8% of baseline weight in active and control groups, respectively. Adverse events occurred only in 7 (36% patients; they were transient and did not require therapy discontinuation.Conclusion: Significant differences of premanifest disorders were often observed in patients history. Escitalopram in these patients showed efficacy in improvement of both mental and somatic symptoms of anxiety. It decreased dependence on food as a factor mitigating affect and stress, thus provided better results in body weight reduction.

  11. HYPERPHAGIA REACTIONS WITHIN EATING DISORDERS. CLINICAL FEATURES AND THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Gladyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate clinical features of hyperphagia reactions, their significance in attraction abnormities within eating disorders and treatment options for these conditions with escitalopram.Material and methods. Mental state of 39 women (age 19-50 years with psychogenic overeating and obesity (body mass index of 30 to 53 kg/m2 was studied. Patients were admitted to the Institute of Nutrition of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Diagnostic criteria for International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, as well as Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Ferreri Anxiety Rating Diagram (FARD were used for syndrome qualifications. Patient Global Impression of Change was also studied using a 4-point scale of results (excellent, good, fair, and negative.Results. Clinical features of hyperphagic reactions were found. Escitalopram treatment course was completed with excellent and good results in 80% of patients. 50%-reduction in HADS score for anxiety was found in 74% of patients, for depression – in 63%, and for Ferreri scale – in 68% of patients. Escitalopram promoted more intensive body weight loss: 11% vs 8% of baseline weight in active and control groups, respectively. Adverse events occurred only in 7 (36% patients; they were transient and did not require therapy discontinuation.Conclusion: Significant differences of premanifest disorders were often observed in patients history. Escitalopram in these patients showed efficacy in improvement of both mental and somatic symptoms of anxiety. It decreased dependence on food as a factor mitigating affect and stress, thus provided better results in body weight reduction.

  12. Ketogenic dietary therapy for epilepsy and other disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal EG

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth G Neal 1Matthew's Friends Clinics, Lingfield, UK, 2UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK Abstract: The ketogenic diet (KD is a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate regime, originally designed to mimic metabolic responses to fasting and has been used since the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy. Modified variants of the KD include the addition of medium-chain triglyceride and less-restrictive modified Atkins and low glycemic index protocols. Scientifically proven as treatment for intractable seizures in children, these ketone-generating diets are increasingly also being used in adults. They are the treatment of choice in glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome and pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. Evidence for the potential of KD therapy to be included within the treatment options for cancer and neurodegenerative disorders is more limited, albeit an exciting area of research with future clinical potential. This review discusses the key aspects of KD therapy, including the efficacy of treatments and clinical implementation. The importance of appropriate initiation, adequate clinical supervision, regular monitoring, and assessment of nutritional needs is highlighted. Keywords: diet, seizures, ketosis

  13. Design of an international multicentre RCT on group schema therapy for borderline personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Wetzelaer; J. Farrell; S.M.A.A. Evers; G.A. Jacob; C.W. Lee; O. Brand; G. van Breukelen; E. Fassbinder; H. Fretwell; R.P. Harper; A. Lavender; G. Lockwood; I.A. Malogiannis; U. Schweiger; H. Startup; T. Stevenson; G. Zarbock; A. Arntz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe and highly prevalent mental disorder. Schema therapy (ST) has been found effective in the treatment of BPD and is commonly delivered through an individual format. A group format (group schema therapy, GST) has also been developed. GST has

  14. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Treatment-Resistant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    An adult woman with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder who was nonresponsive to 20 sessions of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is presented in this case study. Two months after her CBT trial, she was treated with 21 sessions of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for PTSD. Measurements of PTSD severity,…

  15. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Treatment-Resistant Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    An adult woman with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder who was nonresponsive to 20 sessions of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is presented in this case study. Two months after her CBT trial, she was treated with 21 sessions of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for PTSD. Measurements of PTSD severity,…

  16. Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

  17. Augmentation of exposure therapy with D-cycloserine for social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, S.G.; Meuret, A.E.; Smits, J.A.J.; Simon, N.M.; Pollack, M.H.; Eisenmenger, K.; Shiekh, M.; Otto, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Social anxiety disorder ( SAD) is common and debilitating. Although exposure therapy is one of the most effective forms of psychotherapy for this disorder, many patients remain symptomatic. Fear reduction in exposure therapy is similar to extinction learning, and early clinical data with sp

  18. Comparison of brief dynamic and cognitive-behavioural therapies in avoidant personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Benner, Ank; Kuipers, Antoinette; Feiertag, Guus A.; Koster, Harrie C.; van Apeldoorn, Franske J.

    2006-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of controlled trials examining the effectiveness of individual psychotherapy in personality disorders, especially in patients with cluster C disorders. Aims To compare the effectiveness of brief dynamic therapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy as out-patient treatment

  19. Mindfulness based cognitive therapy improves frontal control in bipolar disorder: a pilot EEG study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cognitive processing in Bipolar Disorder is characterized by a number of attentional abnormalities. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy combines mindfulness meditation, a form of attentional training, along with aspects of cognitive therapy, and may improve attentional dysfunction in bipolar disorder patients. Methods 12 euthymic BD patients and 9 control participants underwent record of electroencephalography (EEG, band frequency analysis) during resting states (eyes open...

  20. Description of an Intensive Dialectical Behavior Therapy Program for Multidiagnostic Clients with Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Anita; Wisniewski, Lucene; Ben-Porath, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe an intensive outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for multidiagnostic clients with eating disorders who had not responded adequately to standard, empirically supported treatments for eating disorders. The program integrates DBT with empirically supported cognitive behavior therapy approaches that are well…

  1. A narrative review of schemas and schema therapy outcomes in the eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Whilst cognitive-behavioural therapy has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of eating disorders, therapy outcomes and current conceptualizations still remain inadequate. In light of these shortcomings there has been growing interest in the utility of schema therapy applied to eating pathology. The present article first provides a narrative review of empirical literature exploring schemas and schema processes in eating disorders. Secondly, it critically evaluates outcome studies assessing schema therapy applied to eating disorders. Current evidence lends support to schema-focused conceptualizations of eating pathology and confirms that eating disorders are characterised by pronounced maladaptive schemas. Treatment outcomes also indicate that schema therapy, the schema-mode approach, and associated techniques are promising interventions for complex eating disorders. Implications for clinical practice and future directions for research are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders: an update on the empirical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczkurkin, Antonia N; Foa, Edna B

    2015-09-01

    A large amount of research has accumulated on the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and specific phobia. The purpose of the current article is to provide an overview of two of the most commonly used CBT methods used to treat anxiety disorders (exposure and cognitive therapy) and to summarize and discuss the current empirical research regarding the usefulness of these techniques for each anxiety disorder. Additionally, we discuss the difficulties that arise when comparing active CBT treatments, and we suggest directions for future research. Overall, CBT appears to be both efficacious and effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, but dismantling studies are needed to determine which specific treatment components lead to beneficial outcomes and which patients are most likely to benefit from these treatment components.

  3. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. (Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  4. In contrast to matrix metalloproteinases, serum adiponectin concentrations increase after radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewiński A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, together with their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs, remodel extracellular matrix under physiological and pathological conditions and are implicated in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, cancer and in chronic inflammation. We have endeavoured to assess whether concentrations of MMPs, TIMPs, and anti-inflammatory adiponectin are altered by pharmacological treatment of acute thyrotoxicosis or by radioiodine therapy (RIT. Material and methods We measured serum concentrations of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and adiponectin, TSH, free T4 (FT4 and free T3 (FT3 in 15 patients (4 males, age (years 51.8±15.3 (mean±SD with hyperthyroidism treated with thiamazole (Group 1 and in 20 subjects (2 males, treated for thyrotoxicosis with radioiodine, age 52.3±12.4 (Group 2, where blood samples were taken before RIT, visit 1 (V1, seven days post RIT, visit 2 (V2, and two to three months post RIT, visit 3 (V3. Results In Group 1 there was no significant change in concentrations of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 or adiponectin, despite a fall in FT4 and FT3 (8.74±4.79 pg/ml vs 3.54±2.40 pg/ml, for FT3, and 4.48 ±2.21 ng/ml vs 1.02±1.07 ng/ml, for FT4, p4 and FT3 from 24.4±15.4 pmol/l (V1 to 14.7±10.6 pmol/l (V3, and from 10.0±5.65 (V1 to 6.1±4.8 pmol/l (V2, p4 and FT3, respectively. Conclusions Radioiodine therapy of thyrotoxicosis does not alter serum MMP-2, MMP-9 or TIMP-1 concentrations either acutely or after about three months of observation. An increase in serum adiponectin might reflect favourable effects of radioiodine administration on cardiovascular risk factors, while an increase in TIMP-2 (principal MMP-2 inhibitor might lead to a decrease in free MMP-2 concentrations.

  5. Synthesis and biodistribution of radioiodinated nicotine analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S.M.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Sadek, S.A.; Magarian, R.A.; Grunder, J.R.; Marten, D.F.

    1986-06-01

    Four /sup 125/I-labelled nicotine analogs were synthesized: 3-(methylpropylaminomethyl)-, 3-(diethylaminomethyl)-, 3-(isopropylaminomethyl)-, and 3-(diisopropylaminomethyl)-5-(/sup 125/I)-iodopyridines. 5-Bromonicotinic acid was acylated with thionyl chloride and then reacted with the appropriate primary and secondary amines to give the corresponding amides which were reduced with diborane to the desirable amines. Radioiodination was done by halogen exchange. Biodistribution studies in rats, showed that all four labelled compounds were rapidly taken up by the brain and the adrenal gland. This was followed by rapid washout of the compounds from these organs. The most promising of these compounds, 3-(diisopropylaminomethyl)-5-(/sup 125/I)-iodopyridine, showed a brain-to-blood ratio of 6.0:1 and an adrenal-to-blood ratio of 35.9:1 at 2 minutes post administration. In vitro correlation studies showed that brain uptake of these compounds depends on both protein binding and lipophilicity, whereas adrenal uptake depends only on lipophilicity.

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Light Therapy, and Their Combination for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohan, Kelly J.; Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Tierney Lindsey, Kathryn; Johnson, Leigh G.; Lippy, Robert D.; Lacy, Timothy J.; Barton, Franca B.

    2007-01-01

    This first controlled psychotherapy trial for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) compared SAD-tailored cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), light therapy (LT), and their combination to a concurrent wait-list control. Adults (N = 61) with major depression, recurrent with seasonal pattern, were randomized to one of four 6-week conditions: CBT (1.5-hr…

  7. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerbröker, Katharina; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review, strict methodological criteria are used to give an overview of the controlled trials regarding the efficacy of VRET in patients with anxiety disorders. Furthermore, research into process variables such as the therapeutic alliance and cognitions and enhancement of therapy effects through cognitive enhancers is discussed. The implications for implementation into clinical practice are considered.

  8. Dialectical Behavior Therapy Modified for Adolescent Binge Eating Disorder: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safer, Debra L.; Couturier, Jennifer L.; Lock, James

    2007-01-01

    Given the lack of empirically supported treatments available for adolescents with eating disorders, it is important to investigate the clinical utility of extending treatments for adults with eating disorders to younger populations. Dialectical behavior therapy for binge eating disorder, based on the affect-regulation model, conceptualizes binge…

  9. Efficacy of Electroconvulsive Therapy for Comorbid Frontotemporal Dementia with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Paul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenges encountered in the diagnosis and treatment of frontotemporal dementia (FTD are further confounded when presented with comorbid psychiatric disorder. Here we report a case of progressive FTD in a patient with a long history of bipolar affective disorder (BAD 1, depressed type. We also report beneficial effects of electroconvulsive therapy and its potential application in similar comorbid disorders.

  10. Equine assisted therapy for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jakše, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Equine assisted therapy is presented as one of possible approaches when helping individuals with special needs. This work includes explanation of basic conceptions from the fields of equine assisted therapy and autism spectrum disorders. Motives for inclusion individuals with autism spetrcum disorders to this form of therapy are presented. Study was planned based on presented findings and carried out during school year 2009/2010. The purpose of this study is to ascertain possible effects of e...

  11. The effect of comorbid major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder on cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracalanza, Katie; McCabe, Randi E; Taylor, Valerie H; Antony, Martin M

    2014-06-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD) commonly co-occur in individuals with social anxiety disorder (SAD), yet whether these comorbidities influence the outcomes of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for SAD is unclear. The present study examined the degree to which individuals with SAD and comorbid MDD (SAD+MDD; n=76), comorbid BD (SAD+BD; n=19), a comorbid anxiety disorder (SAD+ANX; n=27), or no comorbid diagnoses (SAD+NCO; n=41) benefitted from CBT for SAD. Individuals were screened using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and then completed the Social Phobia Inventory and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales before and after 12-weeks of group CBT for SAD. At pretreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups reported higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+ANX and SAD+NCO groups. All groups reported large and significant improvement in social anxiety with CBT. However, at posttreatment the SAD+MDD and SAD+BD groups continued to have higher social anxiety symptoms than the SAD+NCO group, and the SAD+ANX group did not differ in social anxiety symptoms from any group. The sample also showed small and statistically significant improvement in depressive symptoms with CBT for SAD. Information about medication was not collected in the present study, and we did not assess the long-term effects of CBT. Our results suggest that CBT for SAD is an effective treatment even in the presence of comorbid mood disorders in the short-term, although extending the course of treatment may be helpful for this population and should be investigated in future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Successful and rapid response to electroconvulsive therapy of a suicidal patient with comorbid bipolar I disorder and histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Simonetti, Alessio; Milioni, Mara; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Scatena, Paola; Fensore, Claudio; Carbonetti, Paolo; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto; Pompili, Maurizio; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    A woman with bipolar disorder I, histrionic personality disorder, and suicidal ideation with repeated suicide attempts, who had been treated for 2 years with mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines, received a total of 8 bitemporal-biparietal electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Her suicidal ideation and self-harm behavior disappeared immediately after the first session and her psychopathology soon after. This supports the existence of a relatively independent suicidal syndrome and confirms data on its immediate responsiveness to electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy must not be long withheld from patients with such characteristics to reduce unnecessary sufferance and suicidality.

  13. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine targeted activity: A comparison between two dosimetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Ernesto; Campennì, Alfredo; Leotta, Salvatore; Ruggeri, Rosaria M; Baldari, Sergio

    2016-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is an effective and safe treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, toxic adenoma, toxic multinodular goiter. We compared the outcomes of a traditional calculation method based on an analytical fit of the uptake curve and subsequent dose calculation with the MIRD approach, and an alternative computation approach based on a formulation implemented in a public-access website, searching for the best timing of radioiodine uptake measurements in pre-therapeutic dosimetry. We report about sixty-nine hyperthyroid patients that were treated after performing a pre-therapeutic dosimetry calculated by fitting a six-point uptake curve (3-168h). In order to evaluate the results of the radioiodine treatment, patients were followed up to sixty-four months after treatment (mean 47.4±16.9). Patient dosimetry was then retrospectively recalculated with the two above-mentioned methods. Several time schedules for uptake measurements were considered, with different timings and total number of points. Early time schedules, sampling uptake up to 48h, do not allow to set-up an accurate treatment plan, while schedules including the measurement at one week give significantly better results. The analytical fit procedure applied to the three-point time schedule 3(6)-24-168h gave results significantly more accurate than the website approach exploiting either the same schedule, or the single measurement at 168h. Consequently, the best strategy among the ones considered is to sample the uptake at 3(6)-24-168h, and carry out an analytical fit of the curve, while extra measurements at 48 and 72h lead only marginal improvements in the accuracy of therapeutic activity determination.

  14. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kacar Basaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that evaluate effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for treatment for panic disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in the national and international databases. The articles that were not therapy effectiveness studies, and group therapies that not based on cognitive behavioral approach were eliminated. The remaining 19 studies that were met the criteria were introduced in terms of method, therapy characteristics and results. The results of the studies showed that cognitive behavioral group therapies have similar efficacy with individual cognitive behavioral therapy on panic disorder symptoms (panic attacks frequency, the level of agoraphobia etc. and comorbid disorders (depression, anxiety sensitivity. However, cognitive behavioral group therapy is more cost-effective. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 79-94

  15. Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L.; Fleming, Jan E.; Rector, Neil A.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy (MAGT) for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is based largely on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes et al., 1999), with enhanced mindfulness mostly from Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; Segal et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and initial…

  16. Cognitive therapy and exposure in-vivo in the treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppen, P. van; Dehaan, E.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van; Spinhoven, P.; Hoogduin, K.; Dyck, R. van

    1995-01-01

    The present study is the first controlled study that evaluates the effects of cognitive therapy along the lines of Beck (1976) [Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorder. New York: International University Press] and Salkovskis (1985) [Behaviour Research and Therapy, 23, 571-583] in obsessive

  17. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  18. Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L.; Fleming, Jan E.; Rector, Neil A.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy (MAGT) for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is based largely on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes et al., 1999), with enhanced mindfulness mostly from Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; Segal et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and initial…

  19. Family Therapy in Iran: A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodayarifard, Mohammad; McClenon, James

    2011-01-01

    Iranian clinical psychologists have devised family therapy methods that use cognitive behavior models that ft with their collectivist Islamic culture. The authors review Islamic-based strategies and describe family therapy with a culturally specific case of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder. Family therapy, adapted to integrated,…

  20. Lurasidone as a potential therapy for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo YS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Young Sup Woo, Hee Ryung Wang, Won-Myong Bahk Department of Psychiatry, Yeouido St Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea Abstract: Lurasidone is a benzisothiazol derivative and an atypical antipsychotic approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the acute treatment of adults with schizophrenia (October 2010 and bipolar 1 depression (June 2013. Lurasidone has a strong antagonistic property at the D2, serotonin (5-HT2A, and 5-HT7 receptors, and partial agonistic property at the 5-HT1A receptor. Lurasidone also has lower binding affinity for the α2C and 5-HT2C receptor. Lurasidone is rapidly absorbed (time to maximum plasma concentration: 1–3 hours, metabolized mainly by CYP3A4 and eliminated by hepatic metabolism. In two large, well-designed, 6-week trials in adult patients with bipolar 1 depression, lurasidone monotherapy and adjunctive therapy with mood stabilizers were significantly more effective than placebo at improving depressive symptoms assessed using the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total score. In both trials, lurasidone also reduced the Clinical Global Impression–Bipolar Severity depression score to a greater extent than placebo. In these two trials, discontinuation rates due to adverse events in the lurasidone group were small (<7% and were not different from those of the placebo group. The most common adverse events in the lurasidone group were headache, nausea, somnolence, and akathisia. The changes in lipid profiles, weight, and parameters of glycemic control were minimal, and these findings were in line with those observed in schizophrenia trials. Further active comparator trials and long-term tolerability and safety data in bipolar patients are required. Lurasidone may be an option for the management of depressive symptoms in patients with bipolar 1 disorder, and it may be considered as a treatment alternative for patients who are at high risk for metabolic abnormalities

  1. Selected forms of therapy for individuals with autism spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudzinska Ewa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a condition of multiple origins. It is characterised by a range of behaviour patterns, in addition to disturbed social and emotional functioning. Of note, early therapy is conducive to better treatment results. A few recently discussed therapies have a particularly positive impact on children with ASD. Corbett et al. [2] proposed Sense Theatre. This involves instilling appropriate behaviours and communication patterns into the afflicted individual through acting. Role-playing and other similar techniques also offer an opportunity for children with ASD to improve their areas of empathy and social cooperation. With regard to bio-feedback-related techniques, Friedrich et al. [3] was noted for developing the Brain-computer method, a system of game interface connected to an external device. The method targets the mirror neuron system (MNS in order to enhance cognitive, emotional and behavioural functions through neurofeedback. An approach put forward by Solomon et al. [10] is called ‘Play and Language for Autistic Youngsters (PLAY Project Home Consultation’. Herein, volunteers visit patients’ homes on a regular basis to engage the children in play and games, after which they discuss with parents, the issues that came up. The PLAY reduces guardians’ stress levels and improves children’s skills. A pharmacological method is that of administering sulphoraphane [9], which reduces damaging effects. As others claim [8,1,7], other dietary approaches prove efficient as well. In summation, an early intervention and the employment of a multimodal treatment approach can be of importance for enhancing the life of ASD-affected children.

  2. Food allergy and food-based therapies in neurodevelopmental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Theije, Caroline G M; Bavelaar, Bas M.; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Korte, Sijmen Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D.

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are neurodevelopmental disorders which occur in childhood and may persist into adulthood. Although the etiology of these disorders is largely unknown, genetic and environmental factors are thought to play a role in

  3. Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids - early effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarewicz Jacek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radioiodine (131I therapy is widely accepted as an essential part of therapeutic regimens in many cases of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to macromolecules is a well known phenomenon. Frequently examined process to evaluate oxidative damage to macromolecules is lipid peroxidation (LPO, resulting from oxidative damage to membrane lipids. The aim of the study was to examine serum LPO level in hypothyroid (after total thyroidectomy cancer patients subjected to ablative activities of 131I. Materials and methods The study was carried out in 21 patients (18 females and 3 males, average age 52.4 ± 16.5 years after total thyroidectomy for papillary (17 patients or follicular (4 patients thyroid carcinoma. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by increased TSH blood concentration (BRAHMS, Germany, measured before 131I therapy. Activity of 2.8 - 6.9 GBq of 131I was administered to the patients orally as sodium iodide (OBRI, Poland. Concentrations of malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA, as an index of LPO (LPO-586 kit, Calbiochem, USA, were measured in blood serum just before 131I administration (day "0" and on the days 1-4 after 131I therapy. Sera from 23 euthyroid patients served as controls. Correlations between LPO and TSH or 131I activity were calculated. Results Expectedly, serum LPO level, when measured before 131I therapy, was several times higher (p 131I therapy. LPO did not correlate with TSH concentration. In turn, negative correlation was found between 131I activity and LPO level on the day "2" after radioiodine treatment. Conclusions Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids, at least early, after therapy.

  4. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Substance-Related Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Erdogan Yildirim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that were used to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for the treatment of substance-related disorders. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (January have been screened in national and international databases. Studies that consisted nicotine addicts in sample and that group therapies that not based on cognitive behavioral group therapy approach were excluded. The remaining 36 studies were introduced in the context of method and therapy character-istics, pre / post treatment and follow up results. Consequently, it is understood that cognitive behavioral group therapies for substance- related disorders are effective in decreasing the symptoms of the disorders and recurrence and/or comorbid disorders (anxiety, depression etc. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 108-128

  5. Photodynamic Therapy and Skin Appendage Disorders: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megna, Matteo; Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Marasca, Claudio; Monfrecola, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive treatment that utilizes light treatment along with application of a photosensitizing agent. In dermatology, PDT is commonly used and approved for the treatment of oncological conditions such as actinic keratosis, Bowen disease and superficial basal cell carcinoma. In the last 2 decades however, PDT has also been used for the treatment of several nonneoplastic dermatological diseases. The present review summarizes published data on PDT application in skin appendage disorders. Our literature review shows that: (a) PDT may be a suitable treatment for acne, folliculitis decalvans, hidradenitis suppurativa, nail diseases, and sebaceous hyperplasia; (b) there is a lack of agreement on PDT features (type, concentrations and incubation period of used substances, number and frequency of PDT sessions, optimal parameters of light sources, and patient characteristics [e.g., failure to previous treatments, disease severity, body surface area involved, etc.] which should guide PDT use in these diseases); (c) further research is needed to establish international guidelines helping dermatologists to choose PDT for the right patient at the right time.

  6. Radioiodinated agents for imaging multidrug resistant tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortylewicz, Zbigniew P; Augustine, Ann M; Nearman, Jessica; McGarry, Jonathon; Baranowska-Kortylewicz, Janina

    2009-03-01

    Diagnostic agents enabling characterization of multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors can aid in the selection of chemotherapy regimens. We report here synthesis and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals based on the second-generation MDR-reversing drug MS-209. 5-[3-{4-(2-Phenyl-2-(4'-[(125)I]iodo-phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl}-2-hydroxypropoxy]quino-line (17) was prepared from the 4'-tributylstannyl precursor (16) in >95% radiochemical yield. (16) was synthesized in a six-step process with the overall yield of 25%. In vitro studies were conducted in MES-SA (drug-sensitive) and MES-SA/Dx5 (MDR) human uterine sarcoma cell lines. In vivo studies were performed in athymic mice bearing MES-SA and MES-SA/Dx5 xenografts. The uptake of (17) is higher in MES-SA than MES-SA/Dx5 cells. The uptake and efflux of (17) depend on temperature and concentration, and indicate active transport mechanism(s). Incubation of drug sensitive MES-SA cells with verapamil or (15), a nonradioactive analog of (17), alters the cellular retention of radioactivity only marginally. However, MES-SA/Dx5 cells retain approximately 12% more of (17) when incubated with 10 muM verapamil. The addition of (15) or high concentrations of (17) also increase the uptake of (17) in MES-SA/Dx5 up to 200%, depending on the concentration and temperature. The dependence of (17) uptake on the MDR status is also evident in the ex vivo binding studies. In vivo tests in mice xenografted simultaneously with both tumor cell lines indicate distinct pharmacokinetics for each tumor. The absorption half-life in MES-SA/Dx5 xenograft is approximately 10x shorter and the mean residence time approximately 50% shorter compared to MES-SA xenograft in the same mouse. Radioiodinated derivatives of MS-209 appear to be good indicators of multidrug resistance.

  7. Comparison of mortality in hyperthyroidism during periods of treatment with thionamides and after radioiodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelaert, Kristien; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Torlinska, Barbara; Franklyn, Jayne A

    2013-05-01

    Hyperthyroidism is common, but opinions regarding optimal therapy with antithyroid drugs or radioiodine (131-I) differ. There are no randomized trials comparing these options in terms of mortality. The aim of the study was to determine whether mortality associated with hyperthyroidism varies with treatment administered or other factors. We conducted a prospective observational population-based study of 1036 subjects aged ≥ 40 years presenting to a single specialist clinic from 1989-2003 with a first episode of hyperthyroidism who were followed until June 2012. Antithyroid drugs or radioiodine (131-I) were administered. We compared causes of death with age-, sex-, and period-specific mortality in England and Wales and used within-cohort analysis of influence of treatment modality, outcome, disease etiology, severity and control, and comorbidities. In 12 868 person-years of follow-up, 334 died vs 290.6 expected (standardized mortality ratio [SMR], 1.15 [95% confidence interval (CI),1.03-1.28]; P = .01). Increased all-cause mortality largely reflected increased circulatory deaths (SMR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.01-1.43]; P = .04). All-cause mortality was increased for the person-years accumulated during thionamide treatment (SMR, 1.30 [95% CI, 1.05-1.61]; P = .02) and after 131-I not associated with hypothyroidism (SMR, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.04-1.46]; P = .01) but not during T₄ replacement for 131-I-induced hypothyroidism (SMR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.82-1.18]; P = .85). Within-cohort analysis comparing mortality during thionamide treatment showed a similar hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause mortality when 131-I did not result in hypothyroidism (HR, 0.95 [95% CI, 0.70-1.29]), but reduced mortality with 131-I-induced hypothyroidism (HR, 0.70 [95% CI, 0.51-0.96]). Reduced mortality associated with hypothyroidism was seen only in those without significant comorbidities and not in those with other serious diseases. Atrial fibrillation at presentation (P = .02) and an increment of 10 pmol/L in

  8. [Third Wave Therapies of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: A Reasonable Add-on Therapy for CBT? State of the Art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Külz, AnneKatrin; Barton, Barbara; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with exposure is the state of the art and most efficient treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder and recommended as treatment of 1st choice according to guidelines. Therapies of the third wave, such as mindfulness based approaches (ACT, MBCT), metacognitive therapy, CBASP or schema therapy, have become more popular over past few years. A small number of studies that investigated some of these therapies show promising results. However, due to the small number of available studies, small sample sizes and methodologic limitations (only a few available RCTs) the evidence of these therapies is insufficient. Above all no study compared these alternative therapies with the well-proven CBT and exposure. Therefore, therapies of the third wave should only be used as add-on therapies to CBT and exposure if individually needed in the treatment of OCD. Future research is absolutely needed.

  9. Behavioral, cognitive, and family therapy for obsessive-compulsive and related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neziroglu, F; Hsia, C; Yaryura-Tobias, J A

    2000-09-01

    Behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy, individually and combined, are a solid base in any therapy, the goal of which is to decrease the maladaptive behaviors associated with obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. Future research into this area involves two branches: (1) better resolution in what components of current treatments are effective and (2) a better understanding of the cause of OCD. The therapies of choice are behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy, but often what is described as behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy varies. Further refinement of the specific components of behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy that directly apply to OCD is needed. The specific components likely include the use of ERP and rational emotive behavioral therapy but often even these therapies can be parceled into smaller discrete parts. Many facets still have not been explored thoroughly (e.g., the extent of exposure to adverse situations needed, ideal length of therapy, time needed for exposure, and the use of virtual reality versus traditional exposures). A better understanding of the biological basis for OCD also would further the field. A better understanding of the basis of this disorder also would help clinicians to treat it with medication and behavioral therapy. Research into how behavioral therapy and cognitive therapy makes neurophysiologic changes would show the effectiveness of the treatment and a biological basis. Such studies could include the use of MR imaging during different stages in behavioral therapy and the use of functional during therapy to observe changes in the brain. Although OCD still is not fully understood, researchers are now beginning to understand how to treat it, and a solid base of empiric data now exists. The authors hope that investigators will continue research toward a better understanding of this disorder so that clinicians can better help their patients.

  10. A survey of owners' perceptions and experiences of radioiodine treatment of feline hyperthyroidism in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Lara A; Murray, Jane K; Bovens, Catherine Pv; Hibbert, Angie

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy of radioiodine treatment of feline hyperthyroidism is well established; however, limited information is known about owners' perceptions or experiences of radioiodine. This study aimed to examine factors that influence owner treatment choices and their opinions following radioiodine. Surveys were sent to owners of cats referred for radioiodine treatment between 2002 and 2011 (radioiodine group; 264 cats) and owners of non-radioiodine-treated hyperthyroid cats seen at first-opinion practices (control group; 199 cats). The response rate was 67.0% (310 returned: 175 radioiodine, 135 control). Of 135 controls, 72 (53.3%) were unaware of radioiodine as a treatment option. Owners of cats ⩾15 years old and uninsured cats were less likely to pursue radioiodine. Cost of treatment, travel distance, potential human or animal health risks and waiting periods for radioiodine had a low impact on owners' treatment choice. Owners reported a moderate level of concern about treatment hospitalisation length, which included (158 respondents) the possibility of the cat being unhappy 130 (82.3%), owner missing the cat 102 (64.6%), inappetence 50 (31.6%), other pets missing the cat 32 (20.3%), development of co-morbid disease 28 (17.7%) and side effects 25 (15.8%). Owners assessed their cat's quality of life on a scale of 1 (very poor) to 10 (excellent), as 4 (4) (median [interquartile range]) pre-radioiodine (134 respondents) and 9 (2) post-radioiodine (131 respondents). Of 132 respondents, 121 (91.7%) were happy with their decision to choose radioiodine. The results of this questionnaire may assist veterinarians in addressing common owner concerns when discussing radioiodine as a treatment option for hyperthyroidism.

  11. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies.

  12. Narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder: improved symptom and interpersonal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromans, Lynette P; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated depressive symptom and interpersonal relatedness outcomes from eight sessions of manualized narrative therapy for 47 adults with major depressive disorder. Post-therapy, depressive symptom improvement (d=1.36) and proportions of clients achieving reliable improvement (74%), movement to the functional population (61%), and clinically significant improvement (53%) were comparable to benchmark research outcomes. Post-therapy interpersonal relatedness improvement (d=.62) was less substantial than for symptoms. Three-month follow-up found maintenance of symptom, but not interpersonal gains. Benchmarking and clinical significance analyses mitigated repeated measure design limitations, providing empirical evidence to support narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder.

  13. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in basal ganglia disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Rodríguez-Cueto, Carmen; Palomo-Garo, Cristina; Gómez-Cañas, María; Valdeolivas, Sara; Guaza, Carmen; Romero, Julián; Guzmán, Manuel; Mechoulam, Raphael; Ramos, José A

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoids are promising medicines to slow down disease progression in neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), two of the most important disorders affecting the basal ganglia. Two pharmacological profiles have been proposed for cannabinoids being effective in these disorders. On the one hand, cannabinoids like Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or cannabidiol protect nigral or striatal neurons in experimental models of both disorders, in which oxid...

  14. The potential of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy for treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Farzad; Rasta, Seyed Hossein

    2017-02-23

    Major depressive disorder is a common debilitating mood disorder that affects quality of life. Prefrontal cortex abnormalities, an imbalance in neurotransmitters, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the major factors in the etiology of major depressive disorder. Despite the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder, 30%-40% of patients do not respond to antidepressants. Given this, exploring the alternative therapies for treatment or prevention of major depressive disorder has aroused interest among scientists. Transcranial photobiomodulation therapy is the use of low-power lasers and light-emitting diodes in the far-red to near-infrared optical region for stimulation of neuronal activities. This non-invasive modality improves the metabolic capacity of neurons due to more oxygen consumption and ATP production. Beneficial effects of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy in the wide range of neurological and psychological disorders have been already shown. In this review, we focus on some issues relating to the application of photobiomodulation therapy for major depressive disorder. There is some evidence that transcranial photobiomodulation therapy using near-infrared light on 10-Hz pulsed mode appears to be a hopeful technique for treatment of major depressive disorder. However, further studies are necessary to find the safety of this method and to determine its effective treatment protocol.

  15. Cognitive behavioral therapy in anxiety disorders: current state of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Christian

    2011-01-01

    A plethora of studies have examined the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for adult anxiety disorders. In recent years, several meta-analyses have been conducted to quantitatively review the evidence of CBT for anxiety disorders, each using different inclusion criteria for studies, such as use of control conditions or type of study environment. This review aims to summarize and to discuss the current state of the evidence regarding CBT treatment for panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Overall, CBT demonstrates both efficacy in randomized controlled trials and effectiveness in naturalistic settings in the treatment of adult anxiety disorders. However, due to methodological issues, the magnitude of effect is currently difficult to estimate. In conclusion, CBT appears to be both efficacious and effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, but more high-quality studies are needed to better estimate the magnitude of the effect.

  16. Outpatient management of patients with large multinodular goitres treated with fractionated radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, D.M.; Thomas, P.A.; Allen, L.W.; Akerman, R.; Lan, L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Epstein, M.T. [Department of Endocrinology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-01

    The efficacy of fractionated out-patient radioiodine therapy in 38 patients with compressive symptoms due to long-standing large multinodular goitres was assessed. The diagnosis was established by clinical assessment in addition to technetium-99m pertechnetate thyroid scan or computed tomography scan of the thyroid and mediastinum. Oral iodine-131 therapy was administered as a 2.22 GBq (60 mCi) cumulative dose over 4 months (555 MBq per month). All patients were monitored with serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and free thyroxine ({+-} free tri-iodothyronine) assays before the treatment and after each dose fraction. Clinical and biochemical follow-up was performed on all patients and ranged from 6 to 45 months after therapy. The patients consisted of 35 female and three male patients with a median age of 59 years (range 37-87 years). Prior to treatment 20 patients were biochemically hyperthyroid and 18 were euthyroid. Overall, 71% of patients reported a subjective improvement in compressive symptoms and 29% reported no change. Clinically assessed reduction in goitre size occurred in 92% of patients while there was no change in 8%. At 3 months of follow-up, 31% of patients had become hypothyroid and at 18 months 66% were hypothyroid. Seven hyperthyroid patients (35%) became euthyroid and 13 hyperthyroid patients (65%) became hypothyroid. Three patients who became hypothyroid experienced neck soreness (transient in one patient, persistent in two patients). There were no differences in outcome between patients who were hyperthyroid and those who were euthyroid prior to treatment. Fractionated out-patient radioiodine therapy showed excellent short- and medium-term safety, was very well tolerated and offered a satisfactory alternative treatment to surgery. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 23 refs.

  17. Limits of fetal thyroid risk from radioiodine exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, R.D.; Tripp, D.A.; Kerber, R.A. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01

    An incident in which a young women became pregnant soon after being treated with 444 MBq {sup 131}I for Graves disease prompted us to search local records for the occurrence of thyroid abnormalities among people exposed in utero to fallout radioiodine. The data base from the Utah Fallout Study indicated that there had been 480 cohort subjects for whom dose to thyroid from fallout radioiodine had been calculated and who could have received any thyroid dose before birth (2473 subjects had been re-examined in 1985-86 of the 4818 examined in 1965-70). Of these 480 subjects in this category, 403 of them could be located in the 1980`s and were examined for abnormalities. Although nodules, thyroiditis, hypothyroidism and goiter were seen among the 375 persons with in utero thyroid doses from fallout radioiodine below 0.42 Gy, no thyroid abnormalities of any kind occurred in the 4 persons with in utero thyroid doses of 0.5 to 2.6 Gy. In addition, no neoplasia was found in any of the 403 subjects examined about 3 decades after in utero fallout exposure. These limited data do not indicate that the fetal thyroid is more sensitive than the postnatal thyroid by more than about a factor of about 4 when thyroid dose is considered and by not much more than unity when the comparison is based on dose equivalent (x-ray vs. radioiodine). 21 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Radioiodinated glucose analogues for use as imaging agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  19. Disparity of radioiodine and radiothallium concentrations in chronic thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, K.; Parthasarathy, K.L.; Friedman, M.; Rao, U.

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) presented with thyroid nodules, showed disparate uptakes of radioiodine and radiothallium. All patients were clinically euthyroid and had positive antithyroid antibody titers. On cytological and/or pathological examinations, they were consistent with chronic thyroiditis.

  20. A New Technology Developed to Remove Aqueous Radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Radioiodine is considered as a critical radionuclide by the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP) in terms of the radiation and radiotoxicity risks to nature and human health. In addition, there were reports about great increases of thyroid cancer in children in Belarus from 1990. In natural environments, there were several reports for the unusual increase of radioactive iodine ratios in most environmental samples (i.e. soils, vegetables, and seafoods). Iodine usually exists as iodide, iodate, and organic iodine in the environment. Iodide is considered as the most difficult form among the iodine species to treat by the conventional adsorption-based technology. This is why urgent new technology is needed to suppress such a progressive accumulation of radioiodine in natural environments. The conventional methods based on the anion-exchange and adsorption techniques have been difficult to manage the growing release of radioiodine for decades. Here we suggest a new solution that uses a biostimulant way to isolate radioiodine. We discovered that natural SRB can play an important intermediary role to get anionic iodide and cationic copper combined strongly as perfect counterions by enzymatic Cu-reduction.

  1. Inhibition of miR-146b expression increases radioiodine-sensitivity in poorly differential thyroid carcinoma via positively regulating NIS expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Luchuan; Lv, Bin; Chen, Bo [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Guan, Ming [Department of General Surgery, Qihe People' s Hospital, Qihe, Shandong 251100 (China); Sun, Yongfeng [Department of General Surgery, Licheng District People' s Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250115 (China); Li, Haipeng [Department of General Surgery, Caoxian People' s Hospital, Caoxian, Shandong 274400 (China); Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Changyuan; He, Shan [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Zeng, Qingdong, E-mail: qingdz0201@163.com [Department of General Surgery, Shandong University Qilu Hospital, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2015-07-10

    Dedifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) with the loss of radioiodine uptake (RAIU) is often observed in clinical practice under radioiodine therapy, indicating the challenge for poor prognosis. MicroRNA (miRNA) has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in many diseases; yet, the role of miRNAs in RAIU has not been generally investigated. Based on recent studies about miRNA expression in papillary or follicular thyroid carcinomas, the expression profiles of several thyroid relative miRNAs were investigated in one DTC cell line, derived from normal DTC cells by radioiodine treatment. The top candidate miR-146b, with the most significant overexpression profiles in dedifferentiated cells, was picked up. Further research found that miR-146b could be negatively regulated by histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in normal cells, indicating the correlation between miR-146b and Na{sup +}/I{sup −} symporter (NIS)-mediated RAIU. Fortunately, it was confirmed that miR-146b could regulate NIS expression/activity; what is more important, miR-146b interference would contribute to the recovery of radioiodine-sensitivity in dedifferentiated cells via positively regulating NIS. In the present study, it was concluded that NIS-mediated RAIU could be modulated by miR-146b; accordingly, miR-146b might serve as one of targets to enhance efficacy of radioactive therapy against poorly differential thyroid carcinoma (PDTC). - Highlights: • Significant upregulated miR-146b was picked up from thyroid relative miRNAs in DTC. • MiR-146b was negatively regulated by HDAC3 in normal thyroid carcinoma cells. • NIS activity and expression could be regulated by miR-146b in thyroid carcinoma. • MiR-146b inhibition could recover the decreased radioiodine-sensitivity of DTC cells.

  2. Implementation of outpatient schema therapy for borderline personality disorder: study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadort, M.; Arntz, A.; Smit, J.H.; Giesen-Bloo, J.; Eikelenboom, M.; Spinhoven, P.; Asselt, T. van; Wensing, M.J.P.; Dyck, R. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schema Therapy (ST) is an integrative psychotherapy based upon a cognitive schema model which aims at identifying and changing dysfunctional schemas and modes through cognitive, experiential and behavioral pathways. It is specifically developed for patients with personality disorders. It

  3. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Medication, or Combined Treatment For Child Hood Anxiety Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sevi Tok, Emine Sevinç; Arkar, Haluk; Bildik, Tezan

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of the Fear Hunter cognitive behavioral therapy program, which was developed for the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders, and to compare...

  4. Comparing cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders integrated with behavioural weight loss therapy to cognitive behavioural therapy-enhanced alone in overweight or obese people with bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavras, Marly Amorim; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen; Sainsbury, Amanda; da Luz, Felipe; Swinbourne, Jessica; Estella, Nara Mendes; Claudino, Angélica

    2015-12-18

    Around 40 % of individuals with eating disorders of recurrent binge eating, namely bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, are obese. In contrast to binge eating disorder, currently there is no evidence base for weight management or weight loss psychological therapies in the treatment of bulimia nervosa despite their efficacy in binge eating disorder. Thus, a manualised therapy called HAPIFED (Healthy APproach to weIght management and Food in Eating Disorders) has been developed. HAPIFED integrates the leading evidence-based psychological therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy-enhanced (CBT-E) and behavioural weight loss treatment (BWLT) for binge eating disorder and obesity respectively. The aim of the present study is to detail the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of HAPIFED versus CBT-E for people with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder who are overweight/obese. A single-blind superiority RCT is proposed. One hundred Brazilian participants aged ≥ 18 years, with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder, BMI > 27 to bulimia nervosa as well as with binge eating disorder. It will have the potential to improve health outcomes for the rapidly increasing number of adults with co-morbid obesity and binge eating disorder or bulimia nervosa. US National Institutes of Health clinical trial registration number NCT02464345 , date of registration 1 June 2015.

  5. Schema therapy for bipolar disorder: a conceptual model and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Lisa D; Provencher, Martin D; Parikh, Sagar V

    2013-05-15

    Schema therapy (ST) is an integrative form of psychotherapy developed for complex, chronic psychological disorders with a characterlogical underpinning. Bipolar disorder is just such a disorder--complex and often comorbid, with demonstrated stable cognitive and personality features that complicate the course of illness. This article presents the reasons justifying the application of ST to bipolar disorder and proposes a treatment rationale and future directions for treatment and research. If well adapted to the characteristics of bipolar disorder, ST might prove to be an effective adjunctive psychotherapy option that attenuates emotional reactivity, reduces symptoms and improves quality of life.

  6. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Modification Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moree, Brittany N.; Davis, Thompson E., III

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety disorders have been found to be highly comorbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Even so, the identification and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for anxiety in adults or children who have ASD has lagged behind the larger evidence-based trend. This review examines the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a…

  7. Counseling College Women Experiencing Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) is, by far, the most common eating disorder that college counseling professionals encounter among their female clients. Empirical evidence and best practice guidelines support use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with women experiencing EDNOS. This article…

  8. Children with Anxiety Disorders: Use of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Model within a Social Milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearny, Regina; Pawlukewicz, Justine; Guardino, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Because anxiety is the most common mental health disorder diagnosed in children, early intervention is crucial for fundamental coping. Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the preferred treatment method for this affective disorder, instruction for children needs to be specific for them to successfully acquire and implement essential CBT…

  9. Counseling College Women Experiencing Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified: A Cognitive Behavior Therapy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) is, by far, the most common eating disorder that college counseling professionals encounter among their female clients. Empirical evidence and best practice guidelines support use of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with women experiencing EDNOS. This article…

  10. Cognitive Processing Therapy for Acute Stress Disorder Resulting from an Anti-Gay Assault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysen, Debra; Lostutter, Ty W.; Goines, Marie A.

    2005-01-01

    This case study describes Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) with a 30-year-old gay man with symptoms of acute stress disorder (ASD) following a recent homophobic assault. Treatment addressed assault-related posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and depressive symptoms. Also addressed were low self-esteem, helplessness, and high degrees of…

  11. Mindfulness-Based Therapy in Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Annelies A.; van Ham, Nadia C.; Nyklicek, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that depression and anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric concern in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) has been found effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptoms, however research in autism is limited. Therefore, we examined the effects of a modified MBT protocol (MBT-AS) in…

  12. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety in Children Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Modification Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moree, Brittany N.; Davis, Thompson E., III

    2010-01-01

    Anxiety disorders have been found to be highly comorbid with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Even so, the identification and dissemination of empirically supported treatments for anxiety in adults or children who have ASD has lagged behind the larger evidence-based trend. This review examines the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy as a…

  13. Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for female patients with eating disorders: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurne, E.D. ter; Haan, H.A. de; Postel, M.G.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy

  14. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsillo, Susan M.; Batten, Sonja V.

    2005-01-01

    The current article describes the application of a behavioral psychotherapy, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is argued that PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder that is developed and maintained in traumatized individuals as a result of excessive, ineffective attempts to…

  15. Mindfulness-Based Therapy in Adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Annelies A.; van Ham, Nadia C.; Nyklicek, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that depression and anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric concern in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) has been found effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptoms, however research in autism is limited. Therefore, we examined the effects of a modified MBT protocol (MBT-AS) in…

  16. Web-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Female Patients With Eating Disorders: Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Huurne, E.D.; de Haan, H.A.; Postel, Marloes Gerda; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; VanDerNagel, Joanneke E.L.; de Jong, Cor A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy

  17. Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy for female patients with eating disorders: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurne, E.D. ter; Haan, H.A. de; Postel, M.G.; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Nagel, J.E.L. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many patients with eating disorders do not receive help for their symptoms, even though these disorders have severe morbidity. The Internet may offer alternative low-threshold treatment interventions. Objective: This study evaluated the effects of a Web-based cognitive behavioral therapy

  18. Children with Anxiety Disorders: Use of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Model within a Social Milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearny, Regina; Pawlukewicz, Justine; Guardino, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Because anxiety is the most common mental health disorder diagnosed in children, early intervention is crucial for fundamental coping. Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the preferred treatment method for this affective disorder, instruction for children needs to be specific for them to successfully acquire and implement essential CBT…

  19. No evidence for the use of stem cell therapy for tendon disorders : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Haiko I M F L; Moen, Maarten H; Haisma, Hidde J; Winters, Marinus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stem cells have emerged as a new treatment option for tendon disorders. We systematically reviewed the current evidence for stem cell therapy in tendon disorders. METHODS: Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, cohort studies and case series with a minimum of 5 cases were

  20. Music Therapy Promotes Self-Determination in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadberry, Anita L.; Harrison, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Self-determination leads to a higher quality of life, yet many individuals with autism spectrum disorder struggle with the component skills necessary for self-determination. Music therapy is one method of treatment for persons with autism spectrum disorder and has the ability to improve or develop skills in communication, self-awareness,…

  1. Music Therapy Promotes Self-Determination in Young People with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadberry, Anita L.; Harrison, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Self-determination leads to a higher quality of life, yet many individuals with autism spectrum disorder struggle with the component skills necessary for self-determination. Music therapy is one method of treatment for persons with autism spectrum disorder and has the ability to improve or develop skills in communication, self-awareness,…

  2. Mediated Moderation in Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Component Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Fisher, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined (a) duration of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a moderator of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus its components (cognitive therapy and self-control desensitization) and (b) increases in dynamic flexibility of anxious symptoms during the course of psychotherapy as a mediator of this moderation. Degree of…

  3. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  4. Mediated Moderation in Combined Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Component Treatments for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Fisher, Aaron J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined (a) duration of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) as a moderator of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus its components (cognitive therapy and self-control desensitization) and (b) increases in dynamic flexibility of anxious symptoms during the course of psychotherapy as a mediator of this moderation. Degree of…

  5. Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Utilizing Parent-Facilitated Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Jennifer Y.; Field, Clint E.; Morrison, Kate L.; Twohig, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a modern form of cognitive behavior therapy that uses acceptance and mindfulness-based procedures to address clinical issues. A brief protocol of ACT was used with 3 children ages 10 and 11 years who were diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Results showed notable and clinically significant…

  6. The Application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of a case series illustrating the application of different therapies to a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It describes the hypothetical application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This paper covers the philosophy and basic research on language and cognition that inform ACT. It also provides an ACT-based…

  7. Treatment of Pediatric Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Utilizing Parent-Facilitated Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Jennifer Y.; Field, Clint E.; Morrison, Kate L.; Twohig, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a modern form of cognitive behavior therapy that uses acceptance and mindfulness-based procedures to address clinical issues. A brief protocol of ACT was used with 3 children ages 10 and 11 years who were diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Results showed notable and clinically significant…

  8. The Application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is part of a case series illustrating the application of different therapies to a case of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). It describes the hypothetical application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). This paper covers the philosophy and basic research on language and cognition that inform ACT. It also provides an ACT-based…

  9. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kristy L.; Herbert, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the demonstrated efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), many individuals do not respond to treatment or demonstrate residual symptoms and impairment posttreatment. Preliminary evidence indicates that acceptance-based approaches (e.g., acceptance and commitment therapy; ACT) can be helpful for a…

  10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Three Case Studies Exemplifying a Unified Treatment Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.; Arch, Joanna; Espejo, Emmanuel; Keller, Melody; Langer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative acceptance-based behavior therapy that has been applied broadly and successfully to treat a variety of clinical problems, including the anxiety disorders. Throughout treatment ACT balances acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior change processes. As applied to…

  11. Marital and Family Therapy in the Treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Roberta G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores marital and family therapy in treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), discussing role of family of origin in MPD development and role of nuclear family in its perpetuation. Suggests family and marital interventions, illustrating them with case examples. Proposes involving MPD client in marital or family therapy, in addition to…

  12. Virtual reality exposure therapy for anxiety disorders: the state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Brahnam, S.; Jain, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the past 10 years virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become a viable alternative for exposure in vivo, the gold standard for the treatment of anxiety disorders. VRET is often regarded as a natural extension of the systematic exposure component of (cognitive) behavior therapy. The

  13. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders is here to stay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrews, Gavin; Newby, Jill M; Williams, Alishia D

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and disabling. Cognitive behavior therapy is the treatment of choice but is often difficult to obtain. Automated, internet-delivered, cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) courses may be an answer. There are three recent systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials tha

  14. Referral for Occupational Therapy after Diagnosis of Developmental Disorder by German Child Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Marcel; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to assess how many patients received occupational therapy after diagnosis of developmental disorder (DD) in child psychiatrist practices in Germany and which factors influenced the prescription of occupational therapy. Methods: This study was a retrospective database analysis in Germany utilising the Disease…

  15. Virtual reality exposure therapy for anxiety disorders: the state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Meyerbröker; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2011-01-01

    In the past 10 years virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become a viable alternative for exposure in vivo, the gold standard for the treatment of anxiety disorders. VRET is often regarded as a natural extension of the systematic exposure component of (cognitive) behavior therapy. The objecti

  16. Gender Differences in the Maintenance of Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmingham, Kim L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine potential differential responses in men and women to cognitive behavior therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Fifty-two men and 56 women diagnosed with PTSD participated in randomized controlled trials of cognitive behavior therapy for PTSD. Participants were randomly allocated to either (a) exposure-only…

  17. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for seasonal affective disorder : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, Joke; Schroevers, Maya; Panjer, Vera; Geerts, Erwin; Meesters, Ybe

    2014-01-01

    Background: The best available treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is light therapy. Yet, this treatment does not prevent recurrence of depression in subsequent seasons. The aim of the study is to gain preliminary insight in the efficacy of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in

  18. The duration of light treatment and therapy outcome in seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapen, S. E.; van de Werken, M.; Gordijn, Marijke; Meesters, Y.

    Background: Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is characterized by recurrent episodes of major depression with a seasonal pattern, treated with light therapy (LT). Duration of light therapy differs. This study investigates retrospectively whether a single week of LT is as effective as two weeks,

  19. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for seasonal affective disorder : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, Joke; Schroevers, Maya; Panjer, Vera; Geerts, Erwin; Meesters, Ybe

    2014-01-01

    Background: The best available treatment for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is light therapy. Yet, this treatment does not prevent recurrence of depression in subsequent seasons. The aim of the study is to gain preliminary insight in the efficacy of Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in t

  20. Referral for Occupational Therapy after Diagnosis of Developmental Disorder by German Child Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Marcel; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to assess how many patients received occupational therapy after diagnosis of developmental disorder (DD) in child psychiatrist practices in Germany and which factors influenced the prescription of occupational therapy. Methods: This study was a retrospective database analysis in Germany utilising the Disease…

  1. Prescriptive variables for D-cycloserine augmentation of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Hendriks, G.J.; Smits, J.A.J.; Broekman, T.G.; Minnen, A. van

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated efficacy of D-cycloserine (DCS) enhanced exposure therapy across anxiety disorders. In this study we examined person-level variables that predicted response to DCS enhanced exposure therapy in a chronic, mixed trauma PTSD sample. The sample consiste

  2. Prescriptive variables for d-cycloserine augmentation of exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Hendriks, G.J.; Smits, J.A.; Broekman, T.G.; Minnen, A. van

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have demonstrated efficacy of d-cycloserine (DCS) enhanced exposure therapy across anxiety disorders. In this study we examined person-level variables that predicted response to DCS enhanced exposure therapy in a chronic, mixed trauma PTSD sample. The sample consiste

  3. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Anxiety Disorders: Three Case Studies Exemplifying a Unified Treatment Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifert, Georg H.; Forsyth, John P.; Arch, Joanna; Espejo, Emmanuel; Keller, Melody; Langer, David

    2009-01-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an innovative acceptance-based behavior therapy that has been applied broadly and successfully to treat a variety of clinical problems, including the anxiety disorders. Throughout treatment ACT balances acceptance and mindfulness processes with commitment and behavior change processes. As applied to…

  4. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kristy L.; Herbert, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the demonstrated efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), many individuals do not respond to treatment or demonstrate residual symptoms and impairment posttreatment. Preliminary evidence indicates that acceptance-based approaches (e.g., acceptance and commitment therapy; ACT) can be helpful for a…

  5. Aquatic Physical Therapy for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Susan; McIntyre, Auburn; Plummer, Leanne

    2010-01-01

    Aquatic therapy is an intervention for children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) that has not been investigated formally. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial to investigate the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of an aquatic therapy program to improve motor skills of children with DCD. Thirteen children (mean age 7…

  6. Marital and Family Therapy in the Treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Roberta G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores marital and family therapy in treatment of Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD), discussing role of family of origin in MPD development and role of nuclear family in its perpetuation. Suggests family and marital interventions, illustrating them with case examples. Proposes involving MPD client in marital or family therapy, in addition to…

  7. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for anxiety disorders is here to stay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrews, Gavin; Newby, Jill M; Williams, Alishia D

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are common and disabling. Cognitive behavior therapy is the treatment of choice but is often difficult to obtain. Automated, internet-delivered, cognitive behavior therapy (iCBT) courses may be an answer. There are three recent systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials tha

  8. Using Animal Assisted Therapy with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Art Room Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    This case study focused on the addition of a therapy dog in an Art I level class at a public high school level that included students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The purpose of this study is to determine how Animal Assisted Therapy may benefit autism support students in the art classroom. The students participated in lessons that focused on…

  9. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja

    2016-01-01

    and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Objective: Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety...

  10. Occupational Therapy: Meeting the Needs of Families of People With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhaneck, Heather Miller; Watling, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy has much to offer to families of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, people outside the profession may be unaware of occupational therapy's breadth and scope. It is our responsibility and our duty to express the full range of occupational therapy services through research, clinical practice, advocacy, and consumer education. This special issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, with its focus on autism, embarks on this endeavor by highlighting research and theoretical articles that address the various aspects of occupational therapy practice that can help to fully meet the needs of people with ASD and their families.

  11. Food allergy and food-based therapies in neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, Caroline G M; Bavelaar, Bas M; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Korte, Sijmen Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2014-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are neurodevelopmental disorders which occur in childhood and may persist into adulthood. Although the etiology of these disorders is largely unknown, genetic and environmental factors are thought to play a role in the development of ASD and ADHD. Allergic immune reactions, in prenatal and postnatal phases, are examples of these environmental factors, and adverse reactions to foods are reported in these children. In this review, we address the clinical and preclinical findings of (food) allergy in ASD and ADHD and suggest possible underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, opportunities for nutritional interventions in neurodevelopmental disorders are provided. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this

  13. Implicit and explicit mentalisation in music therapy in psychiatric treatment of people with Borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Mentalization is a core concept in the modern treatment model for psychotherapy with personality disorders. The mentalization based treatment model presents a new view on how to understand the process of therapy, and has a view on how the therapist shall act and intervene in order to help...... of the concept of mentalization in music therapy treatment of people with diagnosed personality disorder. It will be based on integrating the theoretical perspective, on the process of therapy with focus on musical improvisation mostly. The clinical material will consist of exemplifying/illustrating vignettes....

  14. Implicit and explicit mentalisation in music therapy in psychiatric treatment of people with Borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Mentalization is a core concept in the modern treatment model for psychotherapy with personality disorders. The mentalization based treatment model presents a new view on how to understand the process of therapy, and has a view on how the therapist shall act and intervene in order to help...... of the concept of mentalization in music therapy treatment of people with diagnosed personality disorder. It will be based on integrating the theoretical perspective, on the process of therapy with focus on musical improvisation mostly. The clinical material will consist of exemplifying/illustrating vignettes....

  15. Multiple Channel Exposure Therapy: Combining Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with Panic Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsetti, Sherry A.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Davis, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    A large proportion of patients who present for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience comorbid panic attacks, yet it is unclear to what extent currently available PTSD treatment programs address this problem. Here we describe a newly developed treatment, multiple-channel exposure therapy (M-CET), for comorbid PTSD and panic…

  16. AMTA Monograph Series. Effective Clinical Practice in Music Therapy: Music Therapy for Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Barbara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Whether new to the profession or an experienced clinician, this text provides a wealth of state-of-the-art information for undergraduates, graduates and professionals. This volume covers the wide range of mental disorder diagnoses and addresses specific populations such as forensic and drug and alcohol rehabilitation. How music therapy is used…

  17. Gaze-Contingent Music Reward Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarov, Amit; Pine, Daniel S; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2017-07-01

    Patients with social anxiety disorder exhibit increased attentional dwelling on social threats, providing a viable target for therapeutics. This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of a novel gaze-contingent music reward therapy for social anxiety disorder designed to reduce attention dwelling on threats. Forty patients with social anxiety disorder were randomly assigned to eight sessions of either gaze-contingent music reward therapy, designed to divert patients' gaze toward neutral stimuli rather than threat stimuli, or to a control condition. Clinician and self-report measures of social anxiety were acquired pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Dwell time on socially threatening faces was assessed during the training sessions and at pre- and posttreatment. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy yielded greater reductions of symptoms of social anxiety disorder than the control condition on both clinician-rated and self-reported measures. Therapeutic effects were maintained at follow-up. Gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also reduced dwell time on threat, which partially mediated clinical effects. Finally, gaze-contingent music reward therapy, but not the control condition, also altered dwell time on socially threatening faces not used in training, reflecting near-transfer training generalization. This is the first randomized controlled trial to examine a gaze-contingent intervention in social anxiety disorder. The results demonstrate target engagement and clinical effects. This study sets the stage for larger randomized controlled trials and testing in other emotional disorders.

  18. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behaviour therapy for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannibale, Claudia; Teesson, Maree; Creamer, Mark; Sitharthan, Thiagarajan; Bryant, Richard A; Sutherland, Kylie; Taylor, Kirsten; Bostock-Matusko, Delphine; Visser, Alicia; Peek-O'Leary, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Aims This study aimed to test the efficacy of integrated cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for coexisting post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD). Setting Clinics across Sydney, Australia.Design Randomized controlled trial of 12 once-weekly individual sessions of either integrated CBT for PTSD and AUD(integrated therapy, IT; n = 33) or CBT for AUD plus supportive counselling (alcohol-support, AS; n = 29). Blind assessments were conducted at baseline and post-treatment and at 5 [standard deviation (SD) = 2.25] and 9.16(SD = 3.45) months post-treatment. Participants Sixty-two adults with concurrent PTSD and AUD. Measurements Outcomes included changes in alcohol consumption (time-line follow-back), PTSD severity [clinician-administered PTSD scale (CAPS)], alcohol dependence and problems, and depression and anxiety. Findings Reductions in PTSD severity were evident in both groups. IT participants who had received one or more sessions of exposure therapy exhibited a twofold greater rate of clinically significant change in CAPS severity at follow-up than AS participants [IT60%, AS 39%, odds ratio (OR): 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 5.01]. AS participants exhibited larger reductions than IT participants in alcohol consumption, dependence and problems within the context of greater treatment from other services during follow-up. Results lend support to a mutually maintaining effect between AUD and PTSD. Conclusions Individuals with severe and complex presentations of coexisting post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) can derive substantial benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy targeting AUD, with greater benefits associated with exposure for PTSD. Among individuals with dual disorders, these therapies can generate significant, well-maintained treatment effects on PTSD, AUD and psychopathology.

  19. Cognitive Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chosak, Anne; Marques, Luana; Fama, Jeanne; Renaud, Stefanie; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive therapy for OCD is an empirically validated alternative to the more widely used and validated behavioral therapy for OCD. The cognitive approach is based on the premise that belief systems contribute importantly to the development and maintenance of all types of OCD. By identifying and challenging maladaptive thoughts, beliefs, and core…

  20. Virtual reality exposure therapy: Process and outcome in anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.

    2012-01-01

    Angststoornissen kunnen behandeld worden met exposure-therapie, een van de hoofdcomponenten van cognitieve gedragstherapie. Bij exposure-therapie wordt de patiënt blootgesteld aan datgene waar hij bang voor is zonder dat de gevreesde consequentie optreedt. Dit gebeurt meestal in het echt (exposure

  1. Cognitive Therapy for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chosak, Anne; Marques, Luana; Fama, Jeanne; Renaud, Stefanie; Wilhelm, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive therapy for OCD is an empirically validated alternative to the more widely used and validated behavioral therapy for OCD. The cognitive approach is based on the premise that belief systems contribute importantly to the development and maintenance of all types of OCD. By identifying and challenging maladaptive thoughts, beliefs, and core…

  2. Schema therapy for personality disorders in older adults: a multiple-baseline study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videler, Arjan C; van Alphen, Sebastiaan P J; van Royen, Rita J J; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Rossi, Gina; Arntz, Arnoud

    2017-04-21

    No studies have been conducted yet into the effectiveness of treatment of personality disorders in later life. This study is a first test of the effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders in older adults. Multiple-baseline design with eight cluster C personality disorder patients, with a mean age of   69. After a baseline phase with random length, schema therapy was given during the first year, followed by follow-up sessions during six months. Participants weekly rated the credibility of dysfunctional core beliefs. Symptomatic distress, early maladaptive schemas, quality of life and target complaints were assessed every six months and personality disorder diagnosis was assessed before baseline and after follow-up. Data were analyzed with mixed regression analyses. Results revealed significant linear trends during treatment phases, but not during baseline and follow-up. The scores during follow-up remained stable and were significantly lower compared to baseline, with high effect sizes. Seven participants remitted from their personality disorder diagnosis. Schema therapy appears an effective treatment for cluster C personality disorders in older adults. This finding is highly innovative as this is the first study exploring the effectiveness of psychotherapy, in this case schema therapy, for personality disorders in older adults.

  3. The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviours in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah

    2006-01-01

    into unstructured and structured parts. There were four different types of dependent measurements; the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDDBI), the Early Social Communication Scales (ESCS), the Mother Play Intervention Profile (MPIP) and DVD analyses of selected session data. 10 children, all......This research investigated the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviours in children with autistic spectrum disorder. The study was designed to look at these behaviours in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and free play, and use both standardized...... male, age between 3-6 year old, with clear diagnoses of autistic spectrum disorder completed the trial. The overall results from the PDDBI, the ESCS and session analysis were generally in favour of music therapy over free play, indicating improvisational music therapy was more effective at improving...

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: a review of its efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prazeres AM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Angélica M Prazeres,1 Antônio L Nascimento,1 Leonardo F Fontenelle1,21Anxiety and Depression Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Hospital Universitário Antonio Pedro, Niterói, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this study was to review the efficacy of different methods of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies used to treat body dysmorphic disorder. We evaluated all case series, open studies, controlled trials, and meta-analyses of cognitive and/or behavioral treatment approaches to body dysmorphic disorder published up to July 2012, identified through a search in the PubMed/Medline, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Scopus databases. Our findings indicate that individual and group cognitive behavioral therapies are superior to waiting list for the treatment of body dysmorphic disorder. While the efficacy of cognitive therapy is supported by one controlled trial, utility of behavioral therapy is suggested by one open study and one controlled relapse prevention follow-up study. There is a pressing need to conduct head-to-head studies, with appropriate, active, control treatment groups, in order to examine further the efficacy of cognitive and/or behavioral therapies for body dysmorphic disorder.Keywords: dysmorphophobia, behavioral therapy, cognitive therapy, literature review

  5. Radioiodine therapy in skeletal metastases from well-differentiated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with skeletal metastases from well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma ... pathology reports from resected tumours, 9 were papillary and 15 were follicular cancers. ... The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was based on lobectomy in a single subject.

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORI ORI Radioiodine therapy in skeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    follicular thyroid cancer, and severely reduce quality of life, causing pain, .... the skull (9 patients), followed by spinal regions (9 patients), and the .... not done; BS = bone scan; CT = computed tomography; FNA = fine needle aspiration; MRI =.

  7. Group schema therapy versus group cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder with comorbid avoidant personality disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baljé, Astrid; Greeven, Anja; van Giezen, Anne; Korrelboom, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud; Spinhoven, Philip

    2016-10-08

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) with comorbid avoidant personality disorder (APD) has a high prevalence and is associated with serious psychosocial problems and high societal costs. When patients suffer from both SAD and APD, the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for personality disorders advise offering prolonged cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Recently there is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of schema therapy (ST) for personality disorders such as borderline personality disorder and cluster C personality disorders. Since ST addresses underlying personality characteristics and maladaptive coping strategies developed in childhood, this treatment might be particularly effective for patients with SAD and comorbid APD. To our knowledge, there are no studies comparing CBT with ST in this particular group of patients. This superiority trial aims at comparing the effectiveness of these treatments. As an additional goal, predictors and underlying mechanisms of change will be explored. The design of the study is a multicentre two-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) in which the treatment effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) will be compared to that of group schema therapy (GST) in a semi-open group format. A total of 128 patients aged 18-65 years old will be enrolled. Patients will receive 30 sessions of GCBT or GST during a period of approximately 9 months. Primary outcome measures are the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale Self-Report (LSAS-SR) for social anxiety disorder and the newly developed Avoidant Personality Disorder Severity Index (AVPDSI) for avoidant personality disorder. Secondary outcome measures are the MINI section SAD, the SCID-II section APD, the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI-2), the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (IDS-SR), the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF), the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) and the Acceptance and Action

  8. Language disorders in young children: when is speech therapy recommended?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goorhuis-Brouwer, Siena M; Knijff, Wilma A

    2003-05-01

    Analysis of treatment recommendation given by speech therapists. Evaluation of the language abilities in the examined children and re-examination of those abilities after 12 months. Thirty-four children, aged between 2.0 and 5.3 years, referred to speech therapists by their General Practitioners because of possible language problems were included in a prospective study. The number of children receiving speech therapy and the number of speech therapy sessions received during 1 year, and the therapy effect on three quantitative language measures were compiled. In 97% of the children referred to a speech therapist, speech therapy was recommended. Most of these children showed average to above-average language scores on standardised tests for sentence development (61%) and language comprehension (79%). In addition, for most children spontaneous speech, as screened by the Groningen Diagnostic Speech Norms, was age-adequate (76%). The children's problems consisted of pronunciation difficulties or periods of stammering. After 12 months for 50% of these children speech therapy was still continued which means that the articulation problems still were present. The mean number of speech therapy sessions was 26.7. The language scores on the three language tests remained relatively stable over the 12-month interval. In young children pronunciation difficulties often lead to the recommendation for speech therapy. For a large number of children therapy takes more than a year, indicating that speech therapy cannot influence these problems to a great extent. In addition language scores remained relatively stable. Therefore, language problems and especially articulation problems in young children should be reconsidered regarding maturation and normal variations in speech motor development. A 'watchful waiting' approach should be taken more often.

  9. Differentiated thyroid cancer. New concept of radioiodine ablation; Differenziertes Schilddruesenkarzinom. Fortschritte bei der Radioiodablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Kobe, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany), Zentrum fuer Integrierte Onkologie Koeln-Bonn; Luster, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2010-12-15

    Ablative radioiodine therapy is the treatment of choice in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, the only exception being the unifocal, very small papillary thyroid cancer. The TSH-stimulation can be achieved by a waiting period for 2-3 weeks after thyroidectomy without medication or by the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). Both options lead to high success rates. 'Single dose cure' using activities between 1.85 and 3.7 GBq {sup 131}I is standard. Since 2010 rhTSH is approved by the EMA for the indications pT1-4, N0-1, cM0. Survey studies did not find any inferiority of ablation with rhTSH or iatrogenic hypothyroidism in the high-risk patient group. Renal clearance is not reduced after rhTSH administration, thus the {sup 131}I blood dose and the whole body doses are lower in patients under rhTSH. Comparing identical {sup 131}I activities after endogeneous or exogeneous stimulation, rhTSH will minimize the acute adverse effects of {sup 131}I. A short-term withdrawal of levothyroxine some days before rhTSH-injection lowers the iodine plasma level, which may be advantageous for the ablation success if lower 131I activities are used. A rhTSH-based diagnostic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy 3-6 months after ablation is standard for therapy control. At this time, the rhTSH-stimulated thyroglobulin-level is essential for a personalized risk stratification. Tg-measurements by a second generation assay should be used for follow-up care. Metaanalyses have shown that radioiodine ablation lowers the mortality rate, the risk of locoregional recurrences and the risk of late metastasizing. Therefore, ablation has shown a clear benefit. (orig.)

  10. Sensory integration therapy for autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Healy, O.; Rispoli, M.; Lydon, H.; Streusand, W.; Davis, T.; Kang, S.Y.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.; Giesbers, S.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Intervention studies involving the use of sensory integration therapy (SIT) were systematically identified and analyzed. Twenty-five studies were described in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) assessments used to identify sensory deficits or behavioral functions, (c) dependent variables

  11. Treating acute stress disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder with cognitive behavioral therapy or structured writing therapy: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Emmerik, A.A.P.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Writing assignments have shown promising results in treating traumatic symptomatology. Yet no studies have compared their efficacy to the current treatment of choice, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). The present study evaluated the efficacy of structured writing therapy (SWT) and CBT as

  12. Music Therapy as a Nonpharmacological Intervention for Anxiety in Patients with a Thought Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Allison; Kameg, Kirstyn; Cline, Tom W; Chiapetta, Laurel; Stark, Stacy; Mitchell, Ann M

    2017-03-01

    Music therapy has been identified as a non-pharmacological adjunct therapy to treat anxiety. This QI project aimed to assess the effects of music therapy on anxiety in a sample of patients hospitalized with a thought disorder. Participants were assessed pre- and post-group using a visual analog scale for anxiety. The intervention significantly reduced VAS scores from 3.1 pre-intervention to .897 immediately post-intervention (p = 0.008). This data suggests that music therapy may be beneficial in the short term for this population and is a low risk intervention that provides positive outcomes without the risks associated with medications, seclusion, and restraint.

  13. Sensory integration dysfunction affects efficacy of speech therapy on children with functional articulation disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung LC

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chen Tung,1,# Chin-Kai Lin,2,# Ching-Lin Hsieh,3,4 Ching-Chi Chen,1 Chin-Tsan Huang,1 Chun-Hou Wang5,6 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, 2Program of Early Intervention, Department of Early Childhood Education, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung, 3School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 4Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, 5School of Physical Therapy, College of Medical Science and Technology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 6Physical Therapy Room, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan#These authors contributed equally Background: Articulation disorders in young children are due to defects occurring at a certain stage in sensory and motor development. Some children with functional articulation disorders may also have sensory integration dysfunction (SID. We hypothesized that speech therapy would be less efficacious in children with SID than in those without SID. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of speech therapy in two groups of children with functional articulation disorders: those without and those with SID.Method: A total of 30 young children with functional articulation disorders were divided into two groups, the no-SID group (15 children and the SID group (15 children. The number of pronunciation mistakes was evaluated before and after speech therapy.Results: There were no statistically significant differences in age, sex, sibling order, education of parents, and pretest number of mistakes in pronunciation between the two groups (P > 0.05. The mean and standard deviation in the pre- and posttest number of mistakes in pronunciation were 10.5 ± 3.2 and 3.3 ± 3.3 in the no-SID group, and 10.1 ± 2.9 and 6.9 ± 3.5 in the SID group, respectively. Results showed great changes after speech therapy treatment (F

  14. [Efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sighvatsson, Magnús Blöndahl; Kristjánsdottir, Hafrún; Sigurdsson, Engibert; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2011-11-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) represents that form of psychotherapy which has most research data to build on in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders for adults. In this review we will introduce CBT and present the results of pertinent outcome research. Efficacy at the end of treatment is discussed, as well as long term effectiveness and the efficacy of combined treatment with medication and CBT. In addition, we discuss the pros and cons of group CBT compared to CBT in individual format, and comorbidity of mental disorders. According to this review CBT is efficacious for major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social phobia and specific phobia. Efficacy of CBT is equal to or better than efficacy of drugs in the treatment of the above disorders, but there is less access to CBT. Longterm effectiveness of CBT appears to be good, but research on combined treatment is yet in its infancy and conclusions are premature on its place in treatment. Key words: Cognitive behavioral therapy, psychotropic treatment, efficacy, long-term effects, combined treatment, mental disorders, adults.

  15. Escitalopram tolerability as mono- versus augmentative therapy in patients with affective disorders: a naturalistic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernardo Dell’Osso, Chiara Arici, Cristina Dobrea, Giulia Camuri, Beatrice Benatti, A Carlo AltamuraUniversity of Milan, Department of Psychiatry, Fondazione IRCSS Ca’ Granda, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milano, ItalyBackground: Escitalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, widely used in the treatment of affective disorders. The purpose of this study was to examine its safety and tolerability, as mono- versus augmentative therapy, in a group of patients with affective disorders.Materials and methods: The sample consisted of 131 patients suffering from different affective disorders, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder, who received escitalopram for at least 4 weeks. Data were analyzed on the basis of mono- versus augmentative therapy, as well as age, gender, mean daily dosage, and patterns of combination therapy.Results: Sixty-seven (51.1% patients were treated with monotherapy (mean dose of 11.76 mg/day and 64 (48.9% with augmentative escitalopram (mean dose of 12.81 mg/day. The mean duration of escitalopram treatment was 14 months. The most frequently combined compounds were: other antidepressants (36.5%, mood stabilizers (33.4%, and atypical antipsychotics (30.1%. Side effects were reported in 5.3% of the total sample and the most common were insomnia (2.3%, nausea (2.3%, and dizziness (0.8%. No significant difference, in terms of tolerability, in mono- versus augmentative therapy groups was found. In addition, neither age nor gender was significantly correlated with a greater presence of side effects. Finally, no significant correlation between dosage and side effects was observed.Conclusion: Over a 14-month observation period, escitalopram, either as monotherapy or an augmentative treatment, was found to be well tolerated in a large sample of patients with affective disorders, with an overall low rate of side effects.Keywords: affective disorders, escitalopram

  16. Does D-cycloserine enhance exposure therapy for anxiety disorders in humans? A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Rodrigues

    Full Text Available The treatment of anxiety is on the edge of a new era of combinations of pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions. A new wave of translational research has focused on the use of pharmacological agents as psychotherapy adjuvants using neurobiological insights into the mechanism of the action of certain psychological treatments such as exposure therapy. Recently, d-cycloserine (DCS an antibiotic used to treat tuberculosis has been applied to enhance exposure-based treatment for anxiety and has proved to be a promising, but as yet unproven intervention. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of DCS in the enhancement of exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. A systematic review/meta-analysis was conducted. Electronic searches were conducted in the databases ISI-Web of Science, Pubmed and PsycINFO. We included only randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with humans, focusing on the role of DCS in enhancing the action of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. We identified 328 references, 13 studies were included in our final sample: 4 on obsessive-compulsive disorder, 2 on panic disorder, 2 on social anxiety disorder, 2 on posttraumatic stress disorder, one on acrophobia, and 2 on snake phobia. The results of the present meta-analysis show that DCS enhances exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders (Cohen d =  -0.34; CI: -0.54 to -0.14, facilitating the specific process of extinction of fear. DCS seems to be effective when administered at a time close to the exposure therapy, at low doses and a limited number of times. DCS emerges as a potential new therapeutic approach for patients with refractory anxiety disorders that are unresponsive to the conventional treatments available. When administered correctly, DCS is a promising strategy for augmentation of CBT and could reduce health care costs, drop-out rates and bring faster relief to patients.

  17. Therapy of metabolic disorders with intravenous (IV) access ports and long term intravenous L-carnitine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, S; Birek, L; Walker, T; Phalin-Roque, J; Chandler, M J; Field, C; Zorn, E

    1999-01-01

    With the expansion of newborn screening to include many organic acidurias and fatty acid oxidation defects, effective therapies of these disorders will be needed. Currently severe disorders such as methylmalonic and propionic aciduria. conventional therapy with diet and oral L-camitine often prove ineffective in preventing failure to thrive and recurrent metabolic decompensations. L-carnitine provides a natural pathway for removal of the toxic metabolites in these disorders and is life saving therapy but, with poor oral absorption (25%), it is difficult to supply adequate carnitine to meet the metabolic needs of these patients. Long term intravenous L-carnitine therapy, administered through a subcutaneous venous access port in 5 patients with organic acidurias [propionic aciduria (2), methylmalonic aciduria (2), 3 methylglutaconic aciduria(1)] resulted in improved growth, lower frequency of metabolic decompensations and increased tolerance of natural protein in the diet. An added benefit was the ability to initiate fluid. electrolytes, and antibiotics during metabolic decompensations at home thus averting hospitalizations.

  18. Treatment of medulloblastoma using an oncolytic measles virus encoding the thyroidal sodium iodide symporter shows enhanced efficacy with radioiodine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutzen Brian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood. Although the clinical outcome for medulloblastoma patients has improved significantly, children afflicted with the disease frequently suffer from debilitating side effects related to the aggressive nature of currently available therapy. Alternative means for treating medulloblastoma are desperately needed. We have previously shown that oncolytic measles virus (MV can selectively target and destroy medulloblastoma tumor cells in localized and disseminated models of the disease. MV-NIS, an oncolytic measles virus that encodes the human thyroidal sodium iodide symporter (NIS, has the potential to deliver targeted radiotherapy to the tumor site and promote a localized bystander effect above and beyond that achieved by MV alone. Methods We evaluated the efficacy of MV-NIS against medulloblastoma cells in vitro and examined their ability to incorporate radioiodine at various timepoints, finding peak uptake at 48 hours post infection. The effects of MV-NIS were also evaluated in mouse xenograft models of localized and disseminated medulloblastoma. Athymic nude mice were injected with D283med-Luc medulloblastoma cells in the caudate putamen (localized disease or right lateral ventricle (disseminated disease and subsequently treated with MV-NIS. Subsets of these mice were given a dose of 131I at 24, 48 or 72 hours later. Results MV-NIS treatment, both by itself and in combination with 131I, elicited tumor stabilization and regression in the treated mice and significantly extended their survival times. Mice given 131I were found to concentrate radioiodine at the site of their tumor implantations. In addition, mice with localized tumors that were given 131I either 24 or 48 hours after MV-NIS treatment exhibited a significant survival advantage over mice given MV-NIS alone. Conclusions These data suggest MV-NIS plus radioiodine may be a potentially useful therapy for

  19. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Kongerslev, Mickey Toftkjær

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients...... with major depression.Methods/ design: We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either 'third wave' cognitive therapy...... versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck's Depression Inventory, and The World Health...

  20. Determination of the optimal minimum radioiodine dose in patients with Graves' disease: a clinical outcome study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, D.; Tan, P.; Booker, J. [Pacific Medical Imaging, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Epstein, M. [Dept. of Endocrinology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lan, L. [High-Dependency Unit, St. George Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2001-10-01

    The study was performed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Commission, Vienna, Austria, with the aim of determining the optimal minimum therapeutic dose of iodine-131 for Graves' disease. The study was designed as a single-blinded randomised prospective outcome trial. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled, consisting of 50 females and 8 males aged from 17 to 75 years. Each patient was investigated by clinical assessment, biochemical and immunological assessment, thyroid ultrasound, technetium-99m thyroid scintigraphy and 24-h thyroid {sup 131}I uptake. Patients were then randomised into two treatment groups, one receiving 60 Gy and the other receiving 90 Gy thyroid tissue absorbed dose of radioiodine. The end-point markers were clinical and biochemical response to treatment. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months (range, 24-48 months). Among the 57 patients who completed final follow-up, a euthyroid state was achieved in 26 patients (46%), 27 patients (47%) were rendered hypothyroid and four patients (7%) remained hyperthyroid. Thirty-four patients (60%) remained hyperthyroid at 6 months after the initial radioiodine dose (median dose 126 MBq), and a total of 21 patients required additional radioiodine therapy (median total dose 640 MBq; range 370-1,485 MBq). At 6-month follow-up, of the 29 patients who received a thyroid tissue dose of 90 Gy, 17 (59%) remained hyperthyroid. By comparison, of the 28 patients who received a thyroid tissue dose of 60 Gy, 17 (61%) remained hyperthyroid. No significant difference in treatment response was found (P=0.881). At 6 months, five patients in the 90-Gy group were hypothyroid, compared to two patients in the 60-Gy group (P=0.246). Overall at 6 months, non-responders to low-dose therapy had a significantly larger thyroid gland mass (respective means: 35.9 ml vs 21.9 ml) and significantly higher levels of serum thyroglobulin (respective means: 597.6 {mu}g/l vs 96.9 {mu}g/l). Where low-dose radioiodine

  1. [Internet-based approaches in the therapy of eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, M M; Quadflieg, N; Nisslmüller, K; Lindner, S; Voderholzer, U; Wünsch-Leiteritz, W; Osen, B; Huber, T; Zahn, S; Meermann, R; Irrgang, V; Bleichner, F

    2011-09-01

    Recent technological developments of communication media offer new approaches to diagnostic and therapeutic interactions with patients. One major development is Internet-based primary prevention in vulnerable individuals not yet suffering as well as the development of new therapeutic approaches for affected individuals based on the experiences of guided self-help through CD, DVD or bibliotherapy. The eating disorder literature shows several interesting, partly controlled and randomized, studies on bulimia nervosa, a few studies on binge eating disorder and no studies on anorexia nervosa. As part of the German Eating Disorder Network on Psychotherapy (EDNET) a 9-month Internet-based relapse prevention program for patients with anorexia nervosa after inpatient treatment was evaluated. Conception, first experiences and first results of the Internet-based relapse prevention program for anorexia nervosa are reported.

  2. [The superoxide theory of pathogenesis and therapy of immune disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, V V

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of the understanding that there are common development mechanisms for the inflammatory and immune reactions it was established that the activity of the oxidant-antioxidant system (OAS) correlates not only with a severity of the inflammatory reaction but also with a degree of immune disorders. Such disorders were studied in patients with endogenous uveitis and with cancer of the esophagus or uterine cervix, i.e. those nosological forms, which are normally accompanied by OAS decompensation, which comprised a lower activity of primary antioxidants (superoxides of dismutase, catalase, lactoferrin, ceruloplasmin etc.) in patients with pronounced immune disorders. Moreover, a lower content of secondary antioxidants, like vitamin A, ascorbic acid and tocopherol, was registered in the blood of patients with immune disorders. The suppression of the antioxidant system was concomitant with an essentially increased level of lipid peroxidation in all patients. Besides, it was noted that there were intensifying signs of immune disorders primarily observed during irradiation chemotherapy. In this context, a clear-cut correlation was established, in monitoring the body immune status, between degrees of free-radical formation and lipid peroxidation, on the one hand, and an activity of detoxication-system antioxidants, on the other hand,. The OAS correction by direct or indirect-action antioxidants normally improves the clinical course of immune impairments. The indirect-action antioxidants, e.g. synthetic regulatory peptide "Imunofan", induce the increasing activity of primary endogenous antioxidants. An activation of the detoxication antioxidant system, brings about, in such cases, a lower content of inflammation mediators, a recovery of cell-immunity indices and lower parameters of body auto-sensitization. Finally, the antioxidant system in patients with chronic inflammatory or oncological disorders, when recovered, ensures the correction of cell immunity and cuts

  3. QEEG guided neurofeedback therapy in personality disorders: 13 case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmeli, Tanju; Ertem, Ayben

    2009-01-01

    According to DSM-IV, personality disorder constitutes a class only when personality traits are inflexible and maladaptive and cause either significant functional impairment or subjective distress. Classical treatment of choice for personality disorders has been psychotherapy and/or psychopharmacotherapy. Our study is to determine if subjects with antisocial personality disorders will benefit from quantitative EEG (qEEG) guided neurofeedback treatment. Thirteen subjects (9 male, 4 female) ranged in age from 19 to 48 years. All the subjects were free of medications and illicit drugs. We excluded subjects with other mental disorders by clinical assessment. Psychotherapy or psychopharmacotherapy or any other treatment model was not introduced to any of the subjects during or after neurofeedback treatment. For the subject who did not respond to neurofeedback, training was applied with 38 sessions of LORETA neurofeedback training without success. Evaluation measures included qEEG analysis with Nx Link data base, MMPI, T.O.V.A tests and SA-45 questionaries at baseline, and at the end of neurofeedback treatment. Lexicor qEEG signals were sampled at 128 Hz with 30 minutes-neurofeedback sessions completed between 80-120 sessions depending on the case, by Biolex neurofeedback system. At baseline and after every 20 sessions, patients were recorded with webcam during the interview. Twelve out of 13 subjects who received 80-120 sessions of neurofeedback training showed significant improvement based on SA-45 questionaries, MMPI, T.O.V.A. and qEEG/Nx Link data base (Neurometric analysis) results, and interviewing by parent/family members. Neurofeedback can change the view of psychiatrists and psychologists in the future regarding the treatment of personality disorders. This study provides the first evidence for positive effects of neurofeedback treatment in antisocial personality disorders. Further study with controls is warranted.

  4. Mirror system based therapy for autism spectrum disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei CHEN; Jing ZHANG; Jun DING

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the present theories and empirical research of autisms' cognitive research and mir-ror systems and introduces a new hypothesis about the causes of autism spectrum disorders (ASD): autistic mir-ror neuron dysfunction hypothesis. ASD subjects show obvious lack of the activation of the mirror system during the task of observation or emotional cognition. It is sig-nificant to investigate the mirror system for revealing the causes of autism and it is also helpful for developing new ways to diagnose or treat this disorder.

  5. "We Dance and Find Each Other"1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malin K Hildebrandt; Sabine C Koch; Thomas Fuchs

    2016-01-01

    .... The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder...

  6. Effects of Radioiodine Treatment on Salivary Gland Function in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma : A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Hesselink, Esther; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Jong, de Johan R.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N. A.; Coppes, Rob P.; Lefrandt, Joop D.; Jager, Piet L.; Vissink, Arjan; Links, Thera P.

    2016-01-01

    Complaints of a dry mouth (xerostomia) and sialoadenitis are frequent side effects of radioiodine treatment in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. However, detailed prospective data on alterations in salivary gland functioning after radioiodine treatment (I-131) are scarce. Therefore, the

  7. [Schema therapy: an integrative approach for personality disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Eckhard; Dieckmann, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Schema Therapy (ST) is a comprehensive approach deriving from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of chronic personality problems. ST extends CBT in 3 major issues: 1. The Schema-Mode-Model. 2. The therapeutic relationship. 3. The intensive use of experiential techniques. Schemas are persistent, rigid, and dysfunctional patterns preventing the patient from further personal emotive-interpersonal development. The central focus of the therapeutic process is the relationship between the therapist and the patient. Supported by the therapeutic relationship the patient gets in touch with painful childhood experiences. In ST, the core schemas are identified, put into a biographical context, and weakened by using several specific therapeutic techniques including experiential methods and strategies taken from Gestalt therapy that enrich traditional CBT techniques.

  8. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels Jørgensen; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine Lundsfryd

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric...... variables such as diagnoses, medication etc., and therapeutic variables. As outcome variable was drop out of treatment. Results: No variables were found to be statistically significant. 11 % dropped out and were identical: No prior music therapy experience, not familiar with the method, all found only maybe...... suitable for treatment, no specific referral criteria, all dropped out before the 20’ session, were women and had no occupation. Conclusion: This study found no statistical connection between drop out from treatment and specific variables. The drop out rate was relatively low. The findings indicate...

  9. Report of the APSAC task force on attachment therapy, reactive attachment disorder, and attachment problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Mark; Hanson, Rochelle; Saunders, Benjamin E; Nichols, Todd; Barnett, Douglas; Zeanah, Charles; Berliner, Lucy; Egeland, Byron; Newman, Elana; Lyon, Tom; LeTourneau, Elizabeth; Miller-Perrin, Cindy

    2006-02-01

    Although the term attachment disorder is ambiguous, attachment therapies are increasingly used with children who are maltreated, particularly those in foster care or adoptive homes. Some children described as having attachment disorders show extreme disturbances. The needs of these children and their caretakers are real. How to meet their needs is less clear. A number of attachment-based treatment and parenting approaches purport to help children described as attachment disordered. Attachment therapy is a young and diverse field, and the benefits and risks of many treatments remain scientifically undetermined. Controversies have arisen about potentially harmful attachment therapy techniques used by a subset of attachment therapists. In this report, the Task Force reviews the controversy and makes recommendations for assessment, treatment, and practices. The report reflects American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children's (APSAC) position and also was endorsed by the American Psychological Association's Division 37 and the Division 37 Section on Child Maltreatment.

  10. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression in bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Virgil L

    2010-07-01

    Given the prevalence of null hypothesis significance testing, cognitive-behavioral therapy's effect on depressive symptoms of bipolar disorder is not fully understood in the absence of effect size statistics. The present study discusses the disadvantages associated with null hypothesis significance testing and seeks to overcome these shortcomings via conducting a meta-analysis which examines cognitive-behavioral therapy for depressive symptoms in persons with bipolar disorder. A systematic literature search was conducted and included articles were subject to meta-analytic procedures. With a mean weighted Cohen's d of -0.29, relative to treatment as usual, cognitive-behavioral therapy has a small effect on depressive symptoms in persons with bipolar disorder. The strengths, limitations, and need for future research are discussed.

  11. Equivalent doses in thyroid tissue and residual body dose from radioiodine treatment of benign and malignant disorders of the thyroid as determined under therapeutic conditions. Bestimmung der Aequivalentdosen von Schilddruesengewebe und Restkoerper bei der Radiojodtherapie benigner und maligner Schilddruesenerkrankungen unter Therapiebedingungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schad, K.

    1989-11-08

    The doses actually administered to patients undergoing radiotherapy for hyperthyroidism (104), autonomous adenoma (16) and goiter without functional anomaly (22) averaged 90, 165 and 100 Sv. Attempts were made to elucidate the causes of deviations between the predetermined dose and that actually administered, which occurred quite irrespective of whether a one-staged or split-dose regimen was used. Significant differences were occasionally also seen between the individual doses of fractionation regimens in respect of their uptake and effective half-life in the thyroidal tissue. It was calculated that the mean body dose remaining after each administration of radioactivity amounted to 0.6 mSv/MBq. In the majority of patients examined, clinical follow-up observations could be made for periods ranging from 6 to 41 months. Records were kept of all the results obtained. Further analyses were made to assess the mean residual body dose of carcinoma bearers subjected to wholebody radioiodine scintigraphy in the follow-up (14 patients) as well as of patients, in which secondary radioiodine treatment was carried out after thyroidectomy (59 patients). This was found to vary between 0.05 and 0.07 mSv/MBq. The significant discrepancies formerly determined for uptake rate and effective half-life between the individual sessions of one treatment course were confirmed by these examinations. (VHE).

  12. COMPLEX THERAPY FOR VASCULAR DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH SCLERODERMA SYSTEMATICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Starovoitova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma systematica (SDS is a disease in which vascular diseases underlie the pathogenesis and presented by diverse clinical manifestations. Raynaud's syndrome and digital ulceration are the most common symptom of the diseases, which influences the quality of life in patients and requires continuous drug therapy. The paper discusses the recent European guidelines for the management of this manifestation of SDS. The proposed recommendations cannot unfortunately be realized in full measure now due to the unavailability of some drugs. The authors give their clinical experience with therapy for the vascular manifestations of SDS.

  13. COMPLEX THERAPY FOR VASCULAR DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH SCLERODERMA SYSTEMATICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M N Starovoitova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma systematica (SDS is a disease in which vascular diseases underlie the pathogenesis and presented by diverse clinical manifestations. Raynaud's syndrome and digital ulceration are the most common symptom of the diseases, which influences the quality of life in patients and requires continuous drug therapy. The paper discusses the recent European guidelines for the management of this manifestation of SDS. The proposed recommendations cannot unfortunately be realized in full measure now due to the unavailability of some drugs. The authors give their clinical experience with therapy for the vascular manifestations of SDS.

  14. Cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders in later life (Protocol)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hendriks, G.J.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van

    2009-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: 1. To assess the efficacy and feasability of CBT (CT, BT, CBT and third wave CBT interventions) for different anxiety disorders in older adults aged 55 years or over compared with minimal management 2. To asse

  15. Narrative Therapy to Prevent Illness-Related Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Suni; Bull, Carolyn; Propst, Olivia; Dettinger, Sara; Detwiler, Laura

    2005-01-01

    More than 94% of cancer patients described the experience as the most traumatic event they have ever faced and 13% have posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the aftermath. Empirical evidence demonstrates that certain behaviors lead to more positive health outcomes. Although many patients automatically engage in these behaviors, many others do…

  16. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Fuller, Erin; MacMullen, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) represent a continuum of cognitive and social problems that vary considerably in both impact and presentation for each child affected. Although successful interventions have been developed that target specific skill deficits often exhibited by children with autism, many of those interventions are exclusively…

  17. Light Therapy for Seasonal Affective Disorder. The Effects of Timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEESTERS, Y; JANSEN, JHC; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    Background. Sixty-eight patients with seasonal affective disorder participated in a 10 000-lux light treatment study in which two questions were addressed: do response rates differ when the light is applied at different times of the day and does short-term rank ordering of morning and evening light

  18. Mindfulness-based therapy for social anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Bockstaele; S.M. Bögels

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, a wealth of evidence has accumulated indicating that cognitive processes, such as attention for unwanted stimuli or sensations and the negative interpretation of ambiguous signals, are critically involved in the development and maintenance of social anxiety disorder (SAD). Alt

  19. Acceptance and commitment therapy for anxiety and OCD spectrum disorders: an empirical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluett, Ellen J; Homan, Kendra J; Morrison, Kate L; Levin, Michael E; Twohig, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    A fair amount of research exists on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a model and a treatment for anxiety disorders and OCD spectrum disorders; this paper offers a quantitative account of this research. A meta-analysis is presented examining the relationship between psychological flexibility, measured by versions of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ and AAQ-II) and measures of anxiety. Meta-analytic results showed positive and significant relationships between the AAQ and general measures of anxiety as well as disorder specific measures. Additionally, all outcome data to date on ACT for anxiety and OCD spectrum disorders are reviewed, as are data on mediation and moderation within ACT. Preliminary meta-analytic results show that ACT is equally effective as manualized treatments such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Future directions and limitations of the research are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Efficacy of exposure versus cognitive therapy in anxiety disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ougrin Dennis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT for a wide range of psychological disorders. There is a continued controversy about whether challenging maladaptive thoughts rather than use of behavioural interventions alone is associated with the greatest efficacy. However little is known about the relative efficacy of various components of CBT. This review aims to compare the relative efficacy of Cognitive Therapy (CT versus Exposure (E for a range of anxiety disorders using the most clinically relevant outcome measures and estimating the summary relative efficacy by combining the studies in a meta-analysis. Methods Psych INFO, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from the first available year to May 2010. All randomised controlled studies comparing the efficacy of exposure with cognitive therapy were included. Odds ratios (OR or standardised means' differences (Hedges' g for the most clinically relevant primary outcomes were calculated. Outcomes of the studies were grouped according to specific disorders and were combined in meta-analyses exploring short-term and long-term outcomes. Results 20 Randomised Controlled Trials with (n = 1,308 directly comparing the efficacy of CT and E in anxiety disorders were included in the meta-analysis. No statistically significant difference in the relative efficacy of CT and E was revealed in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD, in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD and in Panic Disorder (PD. There was a statistically significant difference favouring CT versus E in Social Phobia both in the short-term (Z = 3.72, p = 0.0002 and the long-term (Z = 3.28, p = 0.001 outcomes. Conclusions On the basis of extant literature, there appears to be no evidence of differential efficacy between cognitive therapy and exposure in PD, PTSD and OCD and strong evidence of superior efficacy of cognitive therapy in social phobia

  1. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Lower-Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Julie; Bradshaw, Michelle

    Lower-extremity (LE) musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can have a major impact on the ability to carry out daily activities. The effectiveness of interventions must be examined to enable occupational therapy practitioners to deliver the most appropriate services. This systematic review examined the literature published between 1995 and July 2014 that investigated the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for LE MSDs. Forty-three articles met the criteria and were reviewed. Occupational therapy interventions varied on the basis of population subgroup: hip fracture, LE joint replacement, LE amputation or limb loss, and nonsurgical osteoarthritis and pain. The results indicate an overall strong role for occupational therapy in treating clients with LE MSDs. Activity pacing is an effective intervention for nonsurgical LE MSDs, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation is effective for LE joint replacement and amputation. Further research on specific occupational therapy interventions in this important area is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. Sensory Integration Therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Russell; O'Reilly, Mark; Healy, Olive; Rispoli, Mandy; Lydon, Helena; Streusand, William; Davis, Tonya; Kang, Soyeon; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Didden, Robert; Giesbers, Sanne

    2012-01-01

    Intervention studies involving the use of sensory integration therapy (SIT) were systematically identified and analyzed. Twenty-five studies were described in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) assessments used to identify sensory deficits or behavioral functions, (c) dependent variables, (d) intervention procedures, (e) intervention…

  3. Pheromone application in prevention and therapy of domestic animal behavioral disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review-type paper presents the latest knowledge on pheromone therapy. Pheromone therapy does not imply merely the use of structural analogues of pheromones in therapy, but also in the prevention of behavioral disorders in domestic animals. Their application is induced in all cases in which the effects of stressors are expected and their negative effect on the health condition, welfare and production results of domestic animals. Structural analogues of pheromones can successfully be applied in the prevention and therapy of behavioral disorders in horses, swine, dogs, and cats. Recent investigations have confirmed that structural analogues of semiochemicals exert a positive effect also on the production results and meat quality of broilers. They realize their therapeutic and preventive effect on the behavior of domestic animals through the stabilization of the emotional state, relaxation, and calming the animals that are disturbed, or could become disturbed due to the effect of stressors.

  4. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Ann Skewes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group Schema Therapy (ST-g with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioural, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at six-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the GSI. For the SMI maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants’ psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing disinhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the small sample size and lack

  5. Short-term group schema therapy for mixed personality disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewes, Sally A; Samson, Rachel A; Simpson, Susan G; van Vreeswijk, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    Schema Therapy has shown promising results for personality disorders but there is a limited evidence base for group schema therapy (ST-g) with mixed personality disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of ST-g in a sample of eight participants with mixed personality disorders (with a predominant diagnosis of avoidant personality disorder) and high levels of comorbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, behavioral, and experiential techniques. Specific schema-based strategies were chosen for a diagnostically mixed group of personality disorder clients. Six participants attended until end of treatment and two dropped-out before mid-treatment. All outcome measures showed changes with large effect sizes in avoidant personality disorder symptom severity, depression and anxiety levels between pre-therapy and follow-up. Four participants achieved a loss of personality disorder diagnosis at the end of therapy. By follow-up, five participants had achieved a loss of diagnosis, suggesting that participants derived ongoing benefits from the group even after treatment ended. Six participants no longer met criteria for depression at the end of treatment and this was maintained for all participants at 6-month follow-up. At follow-up, the majority of participants showed clinically significant change on the Global Symptom Index (GSI). For the Schema Mode Inventory (SMI) maladaptive modes, the majority of participants showed improvement at follow-up. At follow-up, 40% of participants showed clinically significant change on the SMI adaptive modes. Qualitative feedback indicates that the group helps to normalize participants' psychological experiences and difficulties and promotes self-expression and self-disclosure, while reducing inhibition. Preliminary results suggest that short-term ST-g may benefit those with mixed personality disorders, but generalizability is limited by the

  6. Structural but not functional neuroplasticity one year after effective cognitive behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Kristoffer N T; Salami, Alireza; Carlbring, Per

    2017-01-01

    , and studies of treatment-induced long-term neuroplasticity are rare. Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (using 3T MRI) was performed in 13 subjects with social anxiety disorder on 3 occasions over 1year. All subjects underwent 9 weeks of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy...... of social anxiety disorder, but only reduced amygdala GM volume, and not functional activity, is associated with a clinical response 1year after CBT....

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy in a child suffering from acute and transient psychotic disorder with catatonic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyakam Mohapatra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a recognized and effective treatment in adults for several psychiatric disorders. However, the lack of knowledge and experience with the use of ECT among child and adolescent psychiatrists is an obstacle to its appropriate use. Treatment using ECT in children of prepubertal age has been less reported. We present a case of 10-year-old child with a diagnosis of acute and transient psychotic disorder with catatonic features, where we have used ECT successfully.

  8. Sleep and awakening disorders in Parkinson’s disease: comprehensive approach to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Romanovna Nodel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the specific features of the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of sleep and awakening disorders in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. It covers the current views of the role of chronobiological mechanisms in the regulation of sleep and awakening in PD. Major approaches to therapy for insomnia, para-, and hypersomnia in these patients are discussed. Data on the efficacy of melatonin in sleep and awakening disorders are given.

  9. The experience of use of the sand art-therapy with children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlovanova O.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of effective work to use sand art-therapy for treatment of behavior problems in children with autism spectrum disorder. The article describes the session plan, children's behavior in dynamics and intermediate results of work with children with autism spectrum disorders in the framework of this program. The influence of the sand art-therapy on the children's behavior was analyzed. The clinical case of sessions with the boy K. was described. The overwhelmingly positive influence of such sessions was determined.

  10. Psychological therapy for anxiety in bipolar spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Hannah J; Cooper, Myra J; Di Simplicio, Martina; Blackwell, Simon E; Holmes, Emily A

    2015-02-01

    Comorbid anxiety is common in bipolar spectrum disorders [BPSD], and is associated with poor outcomes. Its clinical relevance is highlighted by the "anxious distress specifier" in the revised criteria for Bipolar Disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5th Edition [DSM-5]. This article reviews evidence for the effectiveness of psychological therapy for anxiety in adults with BPSD (bipolar I, II, not otherwise specified, cyclothymia, and rapid cycling disorders). A systematic search yielded 22 treatment studies that included an anxiety-related outcome measure. Cognitive behavioural therapy [CBT] for BPSD incorporating an anxiety component reduces anxiety symptoms in cyclothymia, "refractory" and rapid cycling BPSD, whereas standard bipolar treatments have only a modest effect on anxiety. Preliminary evidence is promising for CBT for post-traumatic stress disorder and generalised anxiety disorder in BPSD. Psychoeducation alone does not appear to reduce anxiety, and data for mindfulness-based cognitive therapy [MBCT] appear equivocal. CBT during euthymic phases has the greatest weight of evidence. Where reported, psychological therapy appears acceptable and safe, but more systematic collection and reporting of safety and acceptability information is needed. Development of psychological models and treatment protocols for anxiety in BPSD may help improve outcomes.

  11. Family Therapy for Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Tom; Blessitt, Esther; Stewart, Catherine; Simic, Mima; Eisler, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Eating disorder-focused family therapy has emerged as the strongest evidence-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa, supported by evidence from nine RCTs, and there is increasing evidence of its efficacy in treating adolescent bulimia nervosa (three RCTs). There is also emerging evidence for the efficacy of multifamily therapy formats of this treatment, with a recent RCT demonstrating the benefits of this approach in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa. In this article, we critically review the evidence for eating disorder-focused family therapy through the lens of a moderate common factors paradigm. From this perspective, this treatment is likely to be effective as it provides a supportive and nonblaming context that: one, creates a safe, predictable environment that helps to contain anxiety generated by the eating disorder; two, promotes specific change early on in treatment in eating disorder-related behaviors; and three, provides a vehicle for the mobilization of common factors such as hope and expectancy reinforced by the eating disorder expertise of the multidisciplinary team. In order to improve outcomes for young people, there is a need to develop an improved understanding of the moderators and mediators involved in this treatment approach. Such an understanding could lead to the refining of the therapy, and inform adaptations for those families who do not currently benefit from treatment. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  12. The emergence of devastating impulse control disorders during dopamine agonist therapy of the restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dien; Cunnington, David; Swieca, John

    2011-01-01

    The Restless Legs Syndrome is a common sensorimotor disorder, typically amenable to treatment with dopamine agonist therapy. Dopamine agonists have been associated with emergent impulse control disorders (ICDs) when used in patients with Parkinson disease, and ICDs have now been reported in individuals with RLS on dopamine agonist therapy. Our aim was to characterize cases of emergent ICDs in Australian patients with focus on the dopamine agonists implicated and the social significance of ICDs. A series of RLS patients on dopamine agonist therapy were identified with ICDs over a 2-year period. Additional cases of ICDs were found using a mailout questionnaire designed to capture those with high impulsivity. These patients were assessed using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11, and a modified Minnesota Impulse Disorders Interview. Case records and medication schedules were evaluated. Twelve cases of patients with de novo ICDs were found with a range of impulsive behaviors including pathological gambling, kleptomania, compulsive shopping, and hypersexuality. Criminality, suicidality, and marital discord also were featured. These occurred over a wide range of latencies and l-dopa exposures. This group of Australian RLS patients with ICDs display high levels of impulsivity and is the first to use the BIS-11 questionnaire in this setting. Impulse control disorders can occur over a wide range of dopamine agonist therapy types and dose exposures. Impulse control disorder tendencies may persist, despite withdrawal of dopamine agonists. The emergence of ICDs needs careful consideration in light of their potentially devastating financial, social, and marital consequences.

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J.; Marchand, Andre; Letarte, Andree

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). A single-case, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used with 3 primary GAD patients with secondary PDA. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated with…

  14. Long-term results of two schedules of radioiodine treatment for toxic multinodular goitre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huysmans, D.A.K.C. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Nijmegen St. Radboud (Netherlands)); Hermus, A.R.M.M. (Dept. of Medicine, Div. of Endocrinology, Univ. Hospital Nijmegen St. Radboud (Netherlands)); Corstens, F.H.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Nijmegen St. Radboud (Netherlands)); Kloppenborg, P.W.C. (Dept. of Medicine, Div. of Endocrinology, Univ. Hospital Nijmegen St. Radboud (Netherlands))

    1993-11-01

    The long-term effects of two schedules of radioiodine therapy in patients with toxic multinodular goitre were evaluated. Forty-five patients (group A) were treated with low doses and 58 patients (group B) with calculated doses adjusted for thyroid weight (1.85-3.70 MBq/g) and radioactive iodine uptake. Follow-up (mean[+-]SEM) was 4.3[+-]0.2 years and 5.2[+-]0.3 years, respectively (P0.1). At the end of follow-up, hyperthyroidism was succesfully reversed in 73% (group A) and 88% (group B). In each group, hypothyroidism was present in 7%. The total dose per gram of thyroid tissue was not significantly different in groups A and B (2.1[+-]0.2 vs 2.7[+-]0.2 MBq/g). However, for patients treated with calculated doses the number of [sup 131]I administrations was significantly lower (1.3[+-]0.1) than for patients treated with low doses (2.2[+-]0.2), and the percentage of patients who were adequately treated with a single dose was more than twice as high (66% in group B versus 27% in group A). Euthyroidism was reached within a significantly shorter time after treatment with calculated doses (media time 0.6 years in group BVS 1.5 years in group A; life table analysis). It is concluded that radioiodine is an effective treatment for toxic multinodular goitre with a low risk of post-treatment hypothyroidism and that calculated (higher) doses appear to be preferable to low doses. (orig.)

  15. Dysfunctional beliefs in group and individual cognitive behavioral therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jónsson, Hjalti; Hougaard, Esben; Bennedsen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to investigate dysfunctional beliefs in the form of inflated responsibility (IR) and thought action fusion (TAF) as predictive and mediating variables in Individual (n = 33) and Group (n = 37) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD...... of the study with pre-and post-therapy measurements only does not allow for a causal mediator analysis...

  16. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This project is focused on conducting the first randomized-controlled trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in 54 verbal adults with autism...spectrum disorders, and assessing the efficacy of this approach in comparison to an active Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) intervention. Major...findings to date include: 1) considerable and broad cognitive impairments prior to treatment in the ASD adults enrolled in this trial (n = 54), 2

  17. Application of integrated yoga therapy to increase imitation skills in children with autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Radhakrishna Shantha

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim: Children with autism exhibit significant deficits in imitation skills, which impede the acquisition of more complex behavior and socialization. Imitation is often targeted early in intervention plans and continues to be addressed throughout the child′s treatment. The use of integrated approach to yoga therapy (IAYT) as a complementary therapy for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is rarely reported and little is known on the effectiveness of such th...

  18. Efficacy of exposure versus cognitive therapy in anxiety disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ougrin Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background There is growing evidence of the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for a wide range of psychological disorders. There is a continued controversy about whether challenging maladaptive thoughts rather than use of behavioural interventions alone is associated with the greatest efficacy. However little is known about the relative efficacy of various components of CBT. This review aims to compare the relative efficacy of Cognitive Therapy (CT) versus Exposure...

  19. Intravenous iloprost in the combination therapy of vascular disorders in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vitalyevich Volkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic connective tissue diseases, systemic scleroderma in particular, constitute a group of diseases in which vascular disorders underlying diverse clinical manifestations are one of the pathogenetic components. Raynaud 's syndrome and ulceration are the most common symptoms of these diseases, which influence quality of life in patients and require constant drug therapy. The paper discusses the authors' clinical experience with intravenous iloprost used in the combination therapy of the vascular manifestations of systemic scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus.

  20. Efficacy of splint therapy for the management of temporomandibular disorders: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Jun-Yi; Deng, Dong-Lai; He, Bing-Yang; Tao, Yuan; Niu, Yu-Ming; Deng, Mo-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of clinical problems affecting temporomandibular joint (TMJ), myofascial muscles and other related structures. Splint therapy is the most commonly used approach to treatment of TMD, but its effectiveness is remains unclear. We therefore conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of splint therapy for TMD in adults. The electronic databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched for reports published up ...