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  1. Platelet Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Thromobocytopenia - drug-induced (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Platelet Disorders updates ... Willebrand disease Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Bleeding Disorders Blood Clots Blood Count Tests Blood ...

  2. Medical Encyclopedia: MedlinePlus

    ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright ...

  3. NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine: Health, Medical & Wellness Articles

    ... to the Web site for NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine. Our purpose is to present you with the ... sponsorship and other charitable donations for NIH MedlinePlus magazine's publication and distribution, many more thousands of Americans ...

  4. Collapsed Lung: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Pneumothorax - infants (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Collapsed Lung updates ... Lung surgery Pneumothorax - slideshow Pneumothorax - infants Related Health Topics Chest Injuries and Disorders Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders ...

  5. Hearing Aids: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... for hearing loss (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Hearing Aids updates ... MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Devices for hearing loss Related Health Topics Cochlear Implants Hearing Disorders and Deafness National Institutes ...

  6. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    ... Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents MLA ... From You We want your feedback on the magazine and ideas for future issues, as well as ...

  7. Hip Replacement: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... invasive hip replacement (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Hip Replacement updates ... replacement - precautions Minimally invasive hip replacement Related Health Topics Hip Injuries and Disorders National Institutes of Health ...

  8. Dialysis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... access for hemodialysis (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Dialysis updates by ... for hemodialysis Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Creatinine Kidney Cysts Kidney Failure Peritoneal Disorders National ...

  9. Sexual Problems in Men: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Retrograde ejaculation (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Sexual Problems in ... Premature ejaculation Reifenstein syndrome Retrograde ejaculation Related Health Topics Erectile Dysfunction Penis Disorders Prostate Diseases Testicular Disorders ...

  10. Child Mental Health: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... events and children (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Child Mental Health ... in childhood Traumatic events and children Related Health Topics Bullying Child Behavior Disorders Mental Disorders Mental Health ...

  11. Blood Count Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish WBC count (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Blood Count Tests ... WBC count Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Bleeding Disorders Blood Laboratory Tests National Institutes of ...

  12. Mobile MedlinePlus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Mobile MedlinePlus Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Trusted medical information on your mobile phone http://m.medlineplus.gov Wondering what the ...

  13. Mobile MedlinePlus | NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Mobile MedlinePlus Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Trusted medical information on your mobile phone http://m.medlineplus.gov Wondering what the ...

  14. Studying Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Studying Anxiety Disorders Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents ... physical and psychological stress, and diet. 5 Major Anxiety Disorders Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) : chronic anxiety, exaggerated ...

  15. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... National Center for PTSD (Department of Veterans Affairs) Statistics and Research How Common Is PTSD? (National Center for PTSD) Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (National Institute of Mental Health) Clinical ...

  16. A Leader in Clinical Trials, Medical Data, & Electronic Health Information | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of C. Everett Koop, the former Surgeon General; Charles Drew, the “father of the blood bank”; Rosalind ... MedlinePlus information resources about prescriptions. Soon, such information will be available through one click on the name ...

  17. Pneumocystis Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Pneumocystis Infections updates ... GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia Related Health Topics HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS and Infections Pneumonia National ...

  18. Psoriatic Arthritis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  19. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Handouts Cardiac arrest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Arrest updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Cardiac arrest Related Health Topics Arrhythmia CPR Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators National Institutes ...

  20. Kawasaki Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Kawasaki disease (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Kawasaki Disease updates ... GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Electrocardiogram Kawasaki disease Related Health Topics Vasculitis National Institutes of Health The primary NIH ...

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Handouts Postural drainage (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Pulmonary Rehabilitation updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Postural drainage Related Health Topics Lung Diseases National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  2. Medical comorbidity of sleep disorders.

    Dikeos, Dimitris; Georgantopoulos, Georgios

    2011-07-01

    Recently published literature indicates that sleep disorders present with medical comorbidities quite frequently. The coexistence of a sleep disorder with a medical disorder has a substantial impact for both the patient and the health system. Insomnia and hypersomnia are highly comorbid with medical conditions, such as chronic pain and diabetes, as well as with various cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and neurological disorders. Restless legs syndrome and periodic leg movement syndrome have been associated with iron deficiency, kidney disease, diabetes, and neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular and respiratory disorders. Rapid eye movement behaviour disorder has been described as an early manifestation of serious central nervous system diseases; thus, close neurological monitoring of patients referring with this complaint is indicated. Identification and management of any sleep disorder in medical patients is important for optimizing the course and prognosis. Of equal importance is the search for undetected medical disorder in patients presenting with sleep disorders.

  3. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... the information in this issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine helps you and your loved ones stay healthier! ... From You! We want your feedback on the magazine, ideas for future issues, as well as questions ...

  4. Genetic Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Your Family's Health (National Institutes of Health) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Genetic Testing updates ... testing and your cancer risk Karyotyping Related Health Topics Birth Defects Genetic Counseling Genetic Disorders Newborn Screening ...

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... injury - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Chronic subdural hematoma (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish EEG (Medical Encyclopedia) ... Intracranial pressure monitoring (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Subdural hematoma (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus ...

  6. Female Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  7. Folic Acid: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... acid in diet (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Folic Acid updates ... acid - test Folic acid in diet Related Health Topics Vitamins National Institutes of Health The primary NIH ...

  8. Chiropractic: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  9. Wilms' Tumor: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Wilms tumor (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Wilms Tumor updates ... ENCYCLOPEDIA After chemotherapy - discharge Wilms tumor Related Health Topics Kidney Cancer National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  10. Child Safety: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... injuries in children (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Child Safety updates ... safety Preventing head injuries in children Related Health Topics Infant and Newborn Care Internet Safety Motor Vehicle ...

  11. Diets: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Mediterranean diet (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Diets updates by ... foods Diet-busting foods Mediterranean diet Related Health Topics Child Nutrition DASH Eating Plan Diabetic Diet Nutrition ...

  12. Colonoscopy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Virtual colonoscopy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Colonoscopy updates by ... Colonoscopy Colonoscopy discharge Sigmoidoscopy Virtual colonoscopy Related Health Topics Colonic Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer National Institutes ...

  13. Male Infertility: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Testicular biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Male Infertility updates ... analysis Sperm release pathway Testicular biopsy Related Health Topics Assisted Reproductive Technology Female Infertility Infertility National Institutes ...

  14. Diabetes: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... High blood sugar (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Diabetes updates by ... ketones test Show More Show Less Related Health Topics A1C Blood Sugar Diabetes and Pregnancy Diabetes Complications ...

  15. Cardiac Rehabilitation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... in Spanish Electrocardiogram (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Rehabilitation updates ... How to take your pulse Pulse Related Health Topics Heart Attack Heart Diseases How to Prevent Heart ...

  16. Diabetic Diet: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  17. Infection Control: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  18. Vaginitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  19. Kidney Tests: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Total protein (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Kidney Tests updates ... hour volume Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Kidney Cancer Kidney Diseases National Institutes of Health ...

  20. Ischemic Stroke: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish Thrombolytic therapy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Ischemic Stroke updates ... cardiogenic embolism Stroke - slideshow Thrombolytic therapy Related Health Topics Hemorrhagic Stroke Stroke Stroke Rehabilitation National Institutes of ...

  1. FNLM 2013 Events & Programs Announced | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... study in their field of expertise. Annual Awards Dinner In 2013, the Awards Dinner to celebrate advances ... Mobile MedlinePlus! Trusted medical information on your mobile phone. http://m.medlineplus.gov and in Spanish at ...

  2. "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Bionic Man Meet the Bionic Man Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents The ... medical imaging, visit www.nibib.nih.gov "Bionic Man" Showcases Medical Research The National Institute of Biomedical ...

  3. Dr. George Koob: "Alcohol use disorders are a major problem …" | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... recipe. Treatment and Support In addition to Alcohol Anonymous and other mutual support groups, alcohol use disorders can be treated with medications, behavioral therapies, and combinations of treatments. Email and the Internet have opened new avenues for diagnosis and treatment. ...

  4. Articles about MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus → Articles about MedlinePlus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/bibliography.html Articles about MedlinePlus To ... Dec 29]; 3(5):256-60. Available from: http://ecp.acponline.org/sepoct00/nlm.htm . Marill JL, ...

  5. MedlinePlus Connect in Use

    ... MedlinePlus Connect in Use URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/users.html MedlinePlus Connect in ... will change.) Old URLs New URLs Web Application https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm? ...

  6. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine

    ... from the world's largest medical library, NIH's National Library of Medicine. MedlinePlus has extensive information from the NIH and other trusted sources on more than 700 diseases and conditions. There ...

  7. Mentoring in Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  8. Baby Health Checkup: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Baby Health Checkup ... GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Well-child visits Related Health Topics Childhood Immunization Common Infant and Newborn Problems Infant ...

  9. Cancer--Living with Cancer: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... during cancer treatment (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cancer--Living with ... care plan Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Palliative Care National Institutes of ...

  10. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... and your heart (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get How to Prevent ... your heart Stress and your heart Related Health Topics Blood Thinners Cholesterol Heart Diseases Heart Health Tests ...

  11. Laser Eye Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... corneal surgery - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Laser Eye Surgery ... surgery - what to ask your doctor Related Health Topics Refractive Errors National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  12. Bone Marrow Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Bone Marrow Transplantation ... transplant - slideshow Graft-versus-host disease Related Health Topics Bone Marrow Diseases Stem Cells National Institutes of ...

  13. Hormone Replacement Therapy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... of hormone therapy (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Hormone Replacement Therapy ... Estrogen overdose Types of hormone therapy Related Health Topics Menopause National Institutes of Health The primary NIH ...

  14. MedlinePlus

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MedlinePlus is the National Institutes of Health's Web site for patients and their families and friends. Produced by the National Library of Medicine, the world’s...

  15. MedlinePlus Tour

    ... captioning, click the CC button on the lower right-hand corner of the player. Video player keyboard shortcuts Transcript Welcome to MedlinePlus, the consumer health information website from the National Library of ...

  16. Search Tips: MedlinePlus

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/searchtips.html Search Tips To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. How do I search MedlinePlus? The search box appears at the top ...

  17. MedlinePlus FAQ: Framing

    ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/faq/framing.html I'd like to link to MedlinePlus, ... M. encyclopedia. Our license agreements do not permit framing of their content from our site. For more ...

  18. Linking to MedlinePlus

    ... want to link patients or healthcare providers from electronic health record (EHR) systems to relevant MedlinePlus information, use MedlinePlus ... updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for ...

  19. Friends of the National Library of Medicine, Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus, the magazine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... Contents Dear Readers, WELCOME to NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine. The purpose of NIH MedlinePlus , the magazine, is to provide you with a FREE , trusted ... medical information. Published four times a year, the magazine showcases the National Institutes of Health's (NIH) latest ...

  20. MedlinePlus FAQ: What's the difference between MedlinePlus and MedlinePlus Connect?

    ... MedlinePlus Connect is a free service that allows electronic health record (EHR) systems to easily link users to MedlinePlus, ... updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for ...

  1. MedlinePlus Connect: How it Works

    ... Connect → How it Works URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/howitworks.html MedlinePlus Connect: How ... will change.) Old URLs New URLs Web Application https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm? ...

  2. Comorbid medical illness in bipolar disorder.

    Forty, Liz; Ulanova, Anna; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Fraser, Christine; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M; Hosang, Georgina M; Rivera, Margarita; Craddock, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with a mental health disorder appear to be at increased risk of medical illness. To examine rates of medical illnesses in patients with bipolar disorder (n = 1720) and to examine the clinical course of the bipolar illness according to lifetime medical illness burden. Participants recruited within the UK were asked about the lifetime occurrence of 20 medical illnesses, interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. We found significantly increased rates of several medical illnesses in our bipolar sample. A high medical illness burden was associated with a history of anxiety disorder, rapid cycling mood episodes, suicide attempts and mood episodes with a typically acute onset. Bipolar disorder is associated with high rates of medical illness. This comorbidity needs to be taken into account by services in order to improve outcomes for patients with bipolar disorder and also in research investigating the aetiology of affective disorder where shared biological pathways may play a role. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  3. Medication Treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Hughes, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has become the most commonly diagnosed psychiatric disorder among school-age children. For more than half a century, physicians have prescribed medications to help manage behaviors such as hyperactivity, impulsivity, and inattention. Today, there is a growing consensus that ADHD is a biologically…

  4. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service

    ... MedlinePlus Connect → Web Service URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/service.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web ... will change.) Old URLs New URLs Web Application https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm? ...

  5. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application

    ... MedlinePlus Connect → Web Application URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/connect/application.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web ... will change.) Old URLs New URLs Web Application https://apps.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/services/mpconnect.cfm? ...

  6. MedlinePlus Connect: Technical Information

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  7. MedlinePlus Connect: Email List

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  8. Medical Comorbidities in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Irem Yalug

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders of childhood with a reported world-wide prevalence of 8 to 12 %. In studies conducted in our country the prevalence rates in community were reported to vary between 8.6 to 8.1 % while clinical prevalence rates were reported to vary between 8.6 to 29.44 %. Fifty to eighty percent of cases were reported to continue into adolescence while thirty to fifty percent may continue into adulthood. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is known to accompany subtle physical anomalies, allergic and neurologic disorders, obesity and eating disorders, traumatic injuries, risky sexual behavior, sleep disorders, substance and alcohol use, axis I and II disorders, occupational, legal and academic problems and increased treatment expenditures. Though the effects of this disorder continue throughout life, create burdens to the society along with its treatment as well as disabling the affected patients through their lives, and receive increasing attention in recent years, reviews focusing on problems associated with it are lacking. Therefore, this study aimed to summarize the results of previous studies conducted about medical comorbidities in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  9. Medical makeup: the correction of hyperpigmentation disorders.

    Nonni, J

    2012-12-01

    Medical makeup corrects skin tone imperfections with dermocosmetic products, which bring together tolerance efficacy, colour neutralization and sun protection. Highly suitable for imperfections caused by hyperpigmentation, it allows patients affected by these disorders to cover them up effectively and discretely, giving them a better quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Medical makeup: the correction of hyperpigmentation disorders].

    Nonni, J

    2012-11-01

    Medical makeup corrects skin tone imperfections with dermo-cosmetic products, which bring together tolerance efficacy, colour neutralization and sun protection. Highly suitable for imperfections caused by hyperpigmentation, it allows patients affected by these disorders to cover them up effectively and discretely, giving them a better quality of life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematics disorder

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001534.htm Mathematics disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's ...

  12. Health Videos: MedlinePlus

    ... Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright ...

  13. Mood Disorders - Multiple Languages

    ... Expand Section Mood Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Trastornos del estado de ánimo: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Bipolar Disorder (An Introduction) - English PDF Bipolar Disorder (An ...

  14. Antibiotic Resistance: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Health Topics → Antibiotic Resistance URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/antibioticresistance. ...

  15. MedlinePlus Milestones: 1998-present

    ... Connect , a service linking patients or providers in electronic health record (EHR) systems to related MedlinePlus information on conditions ... updates Subscribe to RSS Follow us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for ...

  16. MedlinePlus XML Data Sources

    ... on MedlinePlus health topic pages. With the Web service, software developers can build applications that leverage the authoritative, reliable health information in MedlinePlus. The MedlinePlus Web service is free of charge and does not require ...

  17. 78 FR 18837 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders

    2013-03-28

    ... updating our regulations is to address advances in medical technology and terminology. We have removed the... Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final..., Office of Medical Listings Improvement, Social Security Administration, 6401 Security Boulevard...

  18. Evaluating and treating anxiety disorders in medical settings.

    Ball S; Goddard A; Shekhar A

    2002-01-01

    Anxiety disorders and medical illness present to the primary care physician as a common comorbidity. This article aims to review the literature on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients presenting to primary care physicians; to address the key issues in assessing the comorbid condition; and to discuss psychological and pharmacological treatment options for patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder and medical illness. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent within the primary care pop...

  19. Evaluating and treating anxiety disorders in medical settings.

    Ball S

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders and medical illness present to the primary care physician as a common comorbidity. This article aims to review the literature on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients presenting to primary care physicians; to address the key issues in assessing the comorbid condition; and to discuss psychological and pharmacological treatment options for patients with a comorbid anxiety disorder and medical illness. Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent within the primary care population, and these disorders significantly impact the patient′s course and outcome. Fortunately, primary care physicians have a variety of effective cognitive, behavioral and pharmacological interventions available for managing these patients with comorbid anxiety and medical illnesses.

  20. NIH Institutes and MLN MedlinePlus Advisory Board | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  1. 75 FR 71632 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders

    2010-11-24

    ... Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Mental Disorders AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION... comments on any other aspects of the proposed listings for mental disorders that we receive during this... our mental disorders listings: Definitions we provide for the terms ``marked'' and ``extreme'' that...

  2. Prevalence and Polysomnographic Correlates of Insomnia Comorbid with Medical Disorders

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Roth, Thomas; Hudgel, David W.; Budhiraja, Pooja; Drake, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the prevalence and polysomnographic correlates of insomnia in subjects with self-reported medical disorders. Design: Prospective cross-sectional study. Participants: Community-based sample of 3282 men and women aged 18 to 65 years old, with a subset who underwent polysomnography. Measurements: Self-reported measures of sleep habits and current health, and polysomnographic sleep variables. Results: The prevalence of insomnia was 21.4%. The adjusted odds of insomnia were 2.2 times as high in persons with any medical disorders as in those without medical disorders. Specifically, odds of insomnia were higher in people with heart disease (OR = 1.6 [95% CI: 1.2-23], P = 0.004), hypertension (1.5 [12-18], P insomnia increased with increasing number of medical disorders. However, polysomnographic sleep was not significantly different in persons with or without medical disorders for most disorders assessed. Conclusion: This large population-based study suggests that insomnia is highly prevalent in diverse chronic medical disorders. However, polysomnographic evidence of disturbed sleep is present in only a subset of comorbid insomnia populations. Citation: Budhiraja R; Roth T; Hudgel DW; Budhiraja P; Drake CL. Prevalence and polysomnographic correlates of insomnia comorbid with medical disorders. SLEEP 2011;34(7):859-867. PMID:21731135

  3. Stereotypic movement disorder

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  4. Medical Devices Assess, Treat Balance Disorders

    2009-01-01

    You may have heard the phrase as difficult as walking and chewing gum as a joking way of referring to something that is not difficult at all. Just walking, however, is not all that simple physiologically speaking. Even standing upright is an undertaking requiring the complex cooperation of multiple motor and sensory systems including vision, the inner ear, somatosensation (sensation from the skin), and proprioception (the sense of the body s parts in relation to each other). The compromised performance of any of these elements can lead to a balance disorder, which in some form affects nearly half of Americans at least once in their lifetimes, from the elderly, to those with neurological or vestibular (inner ear) dysfunction, to athletes with musculoskeletal injuries, to astronauts returning from space. Readjusting to Earth s gravity has a significant impact on an astronaut s ability to balance, a result of the brain switching to a different "model" for interpreting sensory input in normal gravity versus weightlessness. While acclimating, astronauts can experience headaches, motion sickness, and problems with perception. To help ease the transition and study the effects of weightlessness on the body, NASA has conducted many investigations into post-flight balance control, realizing this research can help treat patients with balance disorders on Earth as well. In the 1960s, the NASA-sponsored Man Vehicle Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) studied the effects of prolonged space flight on astronauts. The lab s work intrigued MIT doctoral candidate Lewis Nashner, who began conducting NASA-funded research on human movement and balance under the supervision of Dr. Larry Young in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In 1982, Nashner s work resulted in a noninvasive clinical technique for assessing the cooperative systems that allow the body to balance, commonly referred to as computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). CDP employs a

  5. Medical Considerations in Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders.

    DerMarderosian, Diane; Chapman, Heather A; Tortolani, Christina; Willis, Matthew D

    2018-01-01

    Eating disorders are a group of psychiatric disorders with potentially fatal medical complications. Early integrated care including the family as well as pediatric medicine, nutrition, psychology and psychiatry is critical for improving prognosis and limiting negative outcomes. Mental health services are a critical component of treatment; timely weight restoration maximizes efficacy. Despite being relatively common, there are many misperceptions about eating disorders, their severity, and the associated morbidity and mortality. Opportunities exist within the medical and psychiatric communities for a better understanding of the complexity of diagnosing and treating patients with eating disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Medical Disorders in Pregnancy in Ebonyi State ...

    Background: Pregnancy is a physiological state, but when associated with an underlying medical disorder, it has a large ..... bacteriuria in pregnant women versus inpatient treatment ... implication of routine screen for asymptomatic bacteria.

  7. Comorbidity and medication in REM sleep behavior disorder

    Frauscher, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Ju, Yo-El S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This controlled study investigated associations between comorbidity and medication in patients with polysomnographically confirmed idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD), using a large multicenter clinic-based cohort. METHODS: Data of a self-administered questionnaire...

  8. Critical gaps in the medical knowledge base of eating disorders.

    Gibson, Dennis; Drabkin, Anne; Krantz, Mori J; Mascolo, Margherita; Rosen, Elissa; Sachs, Katherine; Welles, Christine; Mehler, Philip S

    2018-04-21

    Eating disorders are unique in that they inherently have much medical comorbidity both as a part of restricting-type eating disorders and those characterized by purging behaviors. Over the last three decades, remarkable progress has been made in the understanding and treatment of the medical complications of eating disorders. Yet, unfortunately, there is much research that is sorely needed to bridge the gap between current medical knowledge and more effective and evidence-based medical treatment knowledge. These gaps exist in many different clinical areas including cardiology, electrolytes, gastrointestinal and bone disease. In this paper, we discuss some of the knowledge gap areas, which if bridged would help develop more effective medical intervention for this population of patients.

  9. The medical management of attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder ...

    This paper focuses specifically on the medical management of attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and the options currently available in South Africa. References are made to current thinking on the etiology of this disorder and the pharmacological principles involved in its treatment. This review will not try to ...

  10. Psychiatric disorders and general medical conditions: implications ...

    African Journal of Psychiatry ... They are also at increased risk of contracting HIV. ... As medical practice becomes more specialized and arguably compartmentalized it may increasingly fail to integrate health care for patients with severe mental ...

  11. Do language fluency and other socioeconomic factors influence the use of PubMed and MedlinePlus?

    Sheets, L; Gavino, A; Callaghan, F; Fontelo, P

    2013-01-01

    Increased usage of MedlinePlus by Spanish-speakers was observed after introduction of MedlinePlus in Spanish. This probably reflects increased usage of MEDLINE and PubMed by those with greater fluency in the language in which it is presented; but this has never been demonstrated in English speakers. Evidence that lack of English fluency deters international healthcare personnel from using PubMed could support the use of multi-language search tools like Babel-MeSH. This study aims to measure the effects of language fluency and other socioeconomic factors on PubMed MEDLINE and MedlinePlus access by international users. We retrospectively reviewed server pageviews of PubMed and MedlinePlus from various periods of time, and analyzed them against country statistics on language fluency, GDP, literacy rate, Internet usage, medical schools, and physicians per capita, to determine whether they were associated. We found fluency in English to be positively associated with pageviews of PubMed and MedlinePlus in countries with high literacy rates. Spanish was generally found to be positively associated with pageviews of MedlinePlus en Español. The other parameters also showed varying degrees of association with pageviews. After adjusting for the other factors investigated in this study, language fluency was a consistently significant predictor of the use of PubMed, MedlinePlus English and MedlinePlus en Español. This study may support the need for multi-language search tools and may increase access of health information resources from non-English speaking countries.

  12. Sleep disorders in the elderly

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000064.htm Sleep disorders in older adults To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sleep disorders in older adults involve any disrupted sleep ...

  13. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001551.htm Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a problem caused by ...

  14. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    ... is also known as cannabis. Medical marijuana is cannabis used as medicine. When used as a drug, marijuana can produce ... THC). CBD and THC are taken from the cannabis plant for use in medicine. They also can be created (synthesized) in a ...

  15. Newborn Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... more articles Reference Desk Glossary (National Center for Biotechnology Information) Find an Expert Eunice Kennedy Shriver National ... other than English on Newborn Screening NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Hearing Loss: Screening Newborns Screening Newborns' Hearing Now ...

  16. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

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  18. MedlinePlus: Quinoa Black Bean Salad

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/recipe/quinoablackbeansalad.html Quinoa Black Bean Salad To use the sharing features ... a side dish. Ingredients 1/2 cup dry quinoa 1 and 1/2 cups water 1 and ...

  19. Mobility Aids: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Mobility Problems (AGS Foundation for Health in Aging) Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Mobility Aids updates ... standing and walking Using a cane Related Health Topics Assistive Devices Other Languages Find health information in ...

  20. Pneumococcal Infections: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Prevention, Immunization Action Coalition) - PDF Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Pneumococcal Infections updates ... ray Meningitis - pneumococcal Sputum gram stain Related Health Topics Meningitis Pneumonia Sepsis Sinusitis Streptococcal Infections National Institutes ...

  1. Healthy Aging: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Aging National Institute on Aging Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Healthy Aging updates ... 65 Health screening - women - over 65 Related Health Topics Exercise for Seniors Nutrition for Seniors Seniors' Health ...

  2. Eye Wear: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... When You Exercise (National Institute on Aging) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Eye Wear updates by email What's this? GO Related Health Topics Refractive Errors National Institutes of Health The primary ...

  3. Menopause: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Spanish What is Menopause? (National Institute on Aging) Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Menopause updates by ... test Menopause Types of hormone therapy Related Health Topics Hormone Replacement Therapy Menstruation Premature Ovarian Failure National ...

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    ... MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: Transcription profiling of peripheral B cells in antibody-positive primary ... our quality guidelines . About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  5. Trends in Opioid Use Disorder Diagnoses and Medication Treatment Among Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Shiner, Brian; Leonard Westgate, Christine; Bernardy, Nancy C; Schnurr, Paula P; Watts, Bradley V

    2017-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid use disorder comorbidity, there is a paucity of data on the prevalence of opioid use disorder in patients with PTSD. Therefore, there is limited understanding of the use of medications for opioid use disorder in this population. We determined the prevalence of diagnosed opioid use disorder and use of medications for opioid use disorder in a large cohort of patients with PTSD. We obtained administrative and pharmacy data for veterans who initiated PTSD treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between 2004 and 2013 (N = 731,520). We identified those with a comorbid opioid use disorder diagnosis (2.7%; n = 19,998) and determined whether they received a medication for opioid use disorder in the year following their initial clinical PTSD diagnosis (29.6%; n = 5,913). Using logistic regression, we determined the predictors of receipt of opioid use disorder medications. Comorbid opioid use disorder diagnoses increased from 2.5% in 2004 to 3.4% in 2013. Patients with comorbid opioid use disorder used more health services and had more comorbidities than other patients with PTSD. Among patients with PTSD and comorbid opioid use disorder, use of medications for opioid use disorder increased from 22.6% to 35.1% during the same time period. Growth in the use of buprenorphine (2.0% to 22.7%) was accompanied by relative decline in use of methadone (19.3% to 12.7%). Patients who received buprenorphine were younger and more likely to be rural, White, and married. Patients who received methadone were older, urban, unmarried, from racial and ethnic minorities, and more likely to see substance abuse specialists. While use of naltrexone increased (2.8% to 8.6%), most (87%) patients who received naltrexone also had an alcohol use disorder. Controlling for patient factors, there was a substantial increase in the use of buprenorphine, a substantial decrease in the use of methadone, and no change

  6. Eating disorder emergencies: understanding the medical complexities of the hospitalized eating disordered patient.

    Cartwright, Martina M

    2004-12-01

    Eating disorders are maladaptive eating behaviors that typically develop in adolescence and early adulthood. Psychiatric maladies and comorbid conditions, especially insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, frequently co-exist with eating disorders. Serious medical complications affecting all organs and tissues can develop and result in numerous emergent hospitalizations. This article reviews the pathophysiologies of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and orthorexia nervosa and discusses the complexities associated with the treatment of medical complications seen in these patients.

  7. Combating HIV/AIDS | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  8. Helping others hear better | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [2.68 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  9. Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

    ... Issues Mary Tyler Moore Helps Launch NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. Among those attending the NIH MedlinePlus magazine launch on Capitol Hill were (l-r) NIH ...

  10. Recovery and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  11. Racing Against Lung Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  12. Exploring Graphic Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  13. The Opioid Crisis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  14. The ABCs of GERD | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  15. A Lifelong Asthma Struggle | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  16. NIH on the web | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  17. Hope for Aphasia Patients | NIH MedlinePlus Magazine

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  18. Surgery of the Future | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  19. 10 NIH Research Highlights | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  20. Expanding Hearing Healthcare | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  1. NIH on the web | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  2. MedlinePlus FAQ: Disease or Condition Information

    ... on the Health Topics button on the MedlinePlus homepage. You can also find the Health Topics button ... MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 ...

  3. Non medical factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients

    Iqbal, A.; Intikhab, K.; Saeed, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To find out major non-medial factors associated with psychological disorders in cancer patients. Design: An observational study conducted on adult cancer patients. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Center Lahore Pakistan from January 1999. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-four newly-diagnosed adult cancer patients were interviewed by the clinical psychologist and data was collected regarding non-medical causal factors, patients age, gender family support system, general home atmosphere and marital status. Collected data was analyzed by utilizing. SPSS for windows version 10.0. Results: Of the 224 patients 142 (63.4%) reported non-medical factors causing psychological distress and 82 (36.6%) reported that medical sources are the most distressing. Ten most common non-medical sources of developing psychological disorders were identified. It was observed that family support system and general home atmosphere were significantly associated with the development of psychological disorders whereas the other variables such as age, gender and marital status had no significant relationship with the non Medical factors. Conclusion: It was concluded that non-medical factors causing psychological problems are significant in cancer patients. The results suggest that we should identify these factors and target psychosocial intervention for those patients most at risk. (author)

  4. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... turn Javascript on. Subscribe to NIH MedlinePlus the magazine NIH MedlinePlus the magazine is published quarterly, in print and on the ... up for a free subscription to NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Librarians may order this magazine in bulk . Please ...

  5. Sleep disorder among medical students: relationship to their academic performance.

    Abdulghani, Hamza M; Alrowais, Norah A; Bin-Saad, Norah S; Al-Subaie, Nourah M; Haji, Alhan M A; Alhaqwi, Ali I

    2012-01-01

    Medical students are exposed to a significant level of pressure due to academic demands. Their sleep pattern is characterized by insufficient sleep duration, delayed sleep onset, and occurrence of napping episodes during the day. To examine the prevalence of sleep disorder among medical students and investigate any relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance. This is a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire-based study. The participants were medical students of the first, second, and third academic years. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was also included to identify sleep disorder and grade point average was recorded for academic performance. There were 491 responses with a response rate of 55%. The ESS score demonstrated that 36.6% of participants were considered to have abnormal sleep habits, with a statistically significant increase in female students (p = 0.000). Sleeping between 6-10 h per day was associated with normal ESS scores (p = 0.019) as well as the academic grades ≥ 3.75. Abnormal ESS scores were associated with lower academic achievement (p = 0.002). A high prevalence of sleep disorder was found in this group of students, specifically female students. Analysis of the relationship between sleep disorder and academic performance indicates a significant relationship between abnormal ESS scores, total sleeping hours, and academic performance.

  6. 78 FR 25521 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders

    2013-05-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION [Docket No. SSA-2010-0078] Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final rules; Correction. SUMMARY: The Social Security Administration published a document in the Federal Register of March 28, 2013, in FR Doc...

  7. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder among medical students of a ...

    Abstract. Background/Objective: This study aimed at estimating the prevalence and associated factors of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) among medical students in a University in the ... symptoms and is associated with impairment of social and role functioning. .... includes depressed mood, anxiety, mood lability,.

  8. Prevalence of Alcohol use Disorders among Medical and Surgical in ...

    reasons include inadequate medical school and residency training in addictions and a lack of adequate faculty role models who intervene and diagnose alcohol dependence (30). The likelihood that a physician will detect and address alcohol use disorders in patients varies according to the physician's field of training (8).

  9. Common mental disorders among medical students in Jimma ...

    2017-09-03

    Sep 3, 2017 ... Department of Psychiatry, College of Health Science, Jimma University, Ethiopia. 2. Laska Meles ... Cite as: Kerebih H, Ajaeb M, Hailesilassie H. Common mental disorders among medical students in Jimma University, SouthWest Ethiopia. Afri ..... Edméa FC, Margleice MR, Ana Teresa RS, Enaldo VM,.

  10. The relation between burnout and sleep disorders in medical students.

    Pagnin, Daniel; de Queiroz, Valéria; Carvalho, Yeska Talita Maia Santos; Dutra, Augusto Sergio Soares; Amaral, Monique Bastos; Queiroz, Thiago Thomasin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the mutual relationships between burnout and sleep disorders in students in the preclinical phase of medical school. This study collected data on 127 medical students who filled in the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Beck Anxiety Inventory. Hierarchical logistic regressions tested the reciprocal influence between sleep disorders and burnout, controlling for depression and anxiety. Regular occurrence of emotional exhaustion, poor sleep quality, and excessive daytime sleepiness affected 60, 65, and 63% of medical students, respectively. Emotional exhaustion and daytime sleepiness influenced each other. Daytime sleep dysfunctions affected unidirectionally the occurrence of cynicism and academic efficacy. The odds of emotional exhaustion (odds ratio (OR)=1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08 to 1.35) and cynicism (OR=2.47, 95% CI=1.25 to 4.90) increased when daytime sleepiness increased. Reciprocally, the odds of excessive daytime sleepiness (OR=2.13, 95% CI=1.22 to 3.73) increased when emotional exhaustion worsened. Finally, the odds of academic efficacy decreased (OR=0.86, 95% CI=0.75 to 0.98) when daytime sleepiness increased. Burnout and sleep disorders have relevant bidirectional effects in medical students in the early phase of medical school. Emotional exhaustion and daytime sleepiness showed an important mutual influence. Daytime sleepiness linked unidirectionally with cynicism and academic efficacy.

  11. Medication refusal in children with oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder and comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: medication history and clinical correlates.

    Demidovich, Mark; Kolko, David J; Bukstein, Oscar G; Hart, Jonathan

    2011-02-01

    Abstract Objective: This study examines the characteristics of 96 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and their families who refused a recommendation for medication as part of their treatment for disruptive disorders. The ADHD cases were taken from a sample of 139 youth (age 6-11) who were recruited for a clinical trial that compared the administration of a modular psychosocial treatment in an outpatient clinic or community settings. Medication management was an optional treatment module for children with ADHD in both conditions. Children who were (vs. were not) taking medication at intake, and children who accepted (vs. refused) medication recommendations during the study were compared on diagnostic and clinical measures related to child, school, parent, and family domains of functioning. Parents of 30% of the children refused study medication for ADHD. Parental medication acceptability and intake correlated highly with both medication history and study refusal of medication. Increased parental self-efficacy and emotional support for their youth correlated with medication refusal. No demographics and few child or school factors were associated with medication refusal. Medication use was associated with reductions in some key ADHD symptoms, but did not affect disruptive behaviors as did the psychosocial interventions. Medication refusers remain poorly understood but certain correlates, such as parental self-efficacy, parental emotional support for their youth, and medication acceptability, warrant further evaluation.

  12. Multiple Antipsychotic Medication Use in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Horn, Paul S; McDougle, Christopher J; Erickson, Craig A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of multiple antipsychotic medications in patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by reviewing the longitudinal medication management of 1100 patients consecutively treated for behavioral symptoms associated with ASD at a tertiary care specialty clinic. We identified all patients with ASD treated with daily doses of two or more antipsychotics for at least two visits at our clinic. For each patient meeting inclusion criteria, diagnostic and demographic data were collected. To evaluate clinical need and effectiveness of antipsychotic medications in this sample, we reviewed symptoms targeted with each antipsychotic medication and concomitant medications prescribed. Clinical Global Impressions-Severity (CGI-S) and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale ratings had been completed at the time of each visit, and the duration of treatment with antipsychotic medications was determined. To evaluate the safety and tolerability of antipsychotic medication use in ASD, we reviewed reported adverse effects and calculated body mass index (BMI) change with treatment. Seventy patients met the inclusion criteria (6.4% of our sample). The majority of patients were moderately to severely ill Caucasian males, as determined by baseline mean CGI-S of 4.7 (SD = 0.8), and were diagnosed with autistic disorder and comorbid intellectual disability. The mean age was 15.1 years (SD = 10.9), the primary targeted symptoms were agitation/irritability, physical aggression, and self-injury. The majority of patients remained on two or more antipsychotics for >1 year. In this population, patients demonstrated greater symptomatic improvement and generally tolerated treatment without significant adverse effects. The use of two or more antipsychotic medications may be increasingly common in patients with ASD. This retrospective study demonstrates that this treatment approach may be of some clinical benefit, and is generally well

  13. MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY IN MANAGEMENT OF EATING DISORDERS

    Miloš Pavlović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of eating disorders demands a comprehensive medical approach, where a dietitian has an important role, primarily due to numerous instances of malnutrition. The objective of this paper was to recapitulate the research findings and clinical evidence which show the importance of medical nutrition therapy in the treatment of eating disorders; furthermore, they present significant guidelines for clinical practice. The research methods have entailed a thorough exploration of literature available at research data bases. The results of the research studies published so far have unambiguously pointed out that, when eating disorders are concerned, there is an urgent need for a diet therapy in order for the patient to restore the appropriate body weight as well as normal eating habits. On the one hand, certain authors suggest returning to normal nutritional habits immediately, whereas, on the other hand, certain others advocate a diet therapy program, that is, a gradual process of recovery. Patients incapable of oral food intake receive enteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is applied for recovering the lost electrolytes and fluids, but it should be applied rarely, primarily in states of urgency. For patients suffering from eating disorders the increase in weight indicates good chances of recovery; therefore, the patient’s nutritional status should be carefully and continuously noted. Finally, it is important that our country, too, should adopt a carefully prescribed and conducted diet therapy as an obligatory step in the treatment of patients with eating disorders.

  14. Screening and Evaluation of Medications for Treating Cannabis Use Disorder

    Panlilio, Leigh V.; Justinova, Zuzana; Trigo, Jose M.; Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis use has been increasingly accepted legally and in public opinion. However, cannabis has the potential to produce adverse physical and mental health effects and can result in cannabis use disorder (CUD) in a substantial percentage of both occasional and daily cannabis users. Many people have difficulty discontinuing use. Therefore, it would be beneficial to develop safe and effective medications for treating CUD. To achieve this, methods have been developed for screening and evaluating potential medications using animal models and controlled experimental protocols in human volunteers. In this chapter we describe: 1) animal models available for assessing the effect of potential medications on specific aspects of CUD; 2) the main findings obtained so far with these animal models; 3) the approaches used to assess potential medications in humans in laboratory experiments and clinical trials; and 4) the effectiveness of several potential pharmacotherapies on the particular aspects of CUD modeled in these human studies. PMID:27055612

  15. Neurological Disorders in Medical Use of Cannabis: An Update.

    Solimini, Renata; Rotolo, Maria Concetta; Pichini, Simona; Pacifici, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Medical cannabis is increasingly used as a treatment or adjunct treatment with different levels of efficacy in several neurological disorders or related symptoms (such as multiple sclerosis, autism, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease, Tourette's syndrome, Huntington's disease, neuropathic pain, epilepsy, headache), as well as in other medical conditions (e.g. nausea and vomiting, glaucoma, appetite stimulation, cancer, inflammatory conditions, asthma). Nevertheless, a number of neurological adverse effects from use of medical cannabis on the short- and on the longterm have been reported, in addition to other adverse health events. It has been noticed that the use of medical cannabis can lead to a paradoxical effects depending on the amount of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) -like cannabinoids the preparation contain. Accordingly, some neurological disorders or symptoms (e.g. multiple sclerosis, seizures, epilepsy, headache) may be caused or exacerbated by the same treatment supposed to cure them. The current review presents an update of the neurological adverse effects resulting from the use of cannabis for medical purposes, highlighting the need to weigh the benefits and risks, when using cannabinoidbased treatments. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Testing for clinical inertia in medication treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Merrick, Elizabeth L; O'Brien, Peggy L; McGuire, Thomas G; Lee, Sue; Deckersbach, Thilo; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2016-11-15

    Clinical inertia has been defined as lack of change in medication treatment at visits where a medication adjustment appears to be indicated. This paper seeks to identify the extent of clinical inertia in medication treatment of bipolar disorder. A second goal is to identify patient characteristics that predict this treatment pattern. Data describe 23,406 visits made by 1815 patients treated for bipolar disorder during the STEP-BD practical clinical trial. Visits were classified in terms of whether a medication adjustment appears to be indicated, and also whether or not one occurred. Multivariable regression analyses were conducted to find which patient characteristics were predictive of whether adjustment occurred. 36% of visits showed at least 1 indication for adjustment. The most common indications were non-response to medication, side effects, and start of a new illness episode. Among visits with an indication for adjustment, no adjustment occurred 19% of the time, which may be suggestive of clinical inertia. In multivariable models, presence of any indication for medication adjustment was a predictor of receiving one (OR=1.125, 95% CI =1.015, 1.246), although not as strong as clinical status measures. The associations observed are not necessarily causal, given the study design. The data also lack information about physician-patient communication. Many patients remained on the same medication regimen despite indications of side effects or non-response to treatment. Although lack of adjustment does not necessarily reflect clinical inertia in all cases, the reasons for this treatment pattern merit further examination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychotherapy and medication management strategies for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    McDougle CJ

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kelda H Walsh, Christopher J McDougleDepartment of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USAAbstract: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is a chronic anxiety disorder. While medication and psychotherapy advances have been very helpful to patients, many patients do not respond adequately to initial trials of serotonergic medication or cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT and require multiple treatment trials or combination therapies. Comorbidity may also influence treatment response. The role of streptococcal infections in pediatric OCD has become an area of intense scrutiny and controversy. In this article, current treatment methods for OCD will be reviewed, with special attention to strategies for treating OCD in children and in patients with comorbid tic disorders. Alternative psychotherapy strategies for patients who are highly anxious about starting CBT, such as cognitive therapy or augmentation with D-cycloserine, will be reviewed. Newer issues regarding use of antibiotics, neuroleptics, and glutamate modulators in OCD treatment will also be explored.Keywords: OCD, exposure/response prevention therapy, PANDAS, tic disorder

  18. NLM MedlinePlus Magazine Team | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  1. MedlinePlus FAQ: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device?

    ... mobile.html Question: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device? To use the sharing features on this page, ... Some video content might not play on your mobile device. See our FAQ on playing videos on phones ...

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  3. Relationship between Eating Disorders, Stress and Depression in Medical Students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences & Health Services

    Afarin Ahmadian

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: Nowadays eating disorders are considered as one of the main psychological disorders. These types of disorder result in physical and mental health problems and affect the individuals’ quality of life. This study has aimed to survey eating disorders and its relation with depression and stress in medical students of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: In a descriptive study, 340 university students were chosen by the use of simple random sampling and als...

  4. Are diagnostic criteria for eating disorders markers of medical severity?

    Peebles, Rebecka; Hardy, Kristina K; Wilson, Jenny L; Lock, James D

    2010-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the medical severity of adolescents who had eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) with those who had anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Medical records of 1310 females aged 8 through 19 years and treated for AN, BN, or EDNOS were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with EDNOS were subcategorized into partial AN (pAN) and partial BN (pBN) when they met all Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria but 1 for AN or BN, respectively. Primary outcome variables were heart rate, systolic blood pressure, temperature, and QTc interval on electrocardiogram. Additional physiologically significant medical complications were also reviewed. A total of 25.2% of females had AN, 12.4% had BN, and 62.4% had EDNOS. The medical severity of patients with EDNOS was intermediate to that of patients with AN and BN in all primary outcomes. Patients with pAN had significantly higher heart rates, systolic blood pressures, and temperatures than those with AN; patients with pBN did not differ significantly from those with BN in any primary outcome variable; however, patients with pAN and pBN differed significantly from each other in all outcome variables. Patients with pBN and BN had longer QTc intervals and higher rates of additional medical complications reported at presentation than other groups. EDNOS is a medically heterogeneous category with serious physiologic sequelae in children and adolescents. Broadening AN and BN criteria in pediatric patients to include pAN and pBN may prove to be clinically useful.

  5. Welcome to NIH MedlinePlus magazine!

    ... companion Web site medlineplus.gov are the best sources of health information for you and yours. Try them. You'll come to rely on what they can do for your good health. Sincerely, Donald West King, M.D., Chairman Friends of the National Library of Medicine Winter 2009 Issue: Volume 4 Number ...

  6. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Living With Related Issues Specifics See, Play and Learn Videos and Tutorials Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources ... Also in Spanish Videos and Tutorials MedlinePlus: Surgery Videos ... strategy is better to reduce postoperative stroke... Article: Ferumoxtyol-enhanced MR ...

  7. Distinguishing medication-free subjects with unipolar disorder from subjects with bipolar disorder: state matters.

    Rive, Maria M; Redlich, Ronny; Schmaal, Lianne; Marquand, André F; Dannlowski, Udo; Grotegerd, Dominik; Veltman, Dick J; Schene, Aart H; Ruhé, Henricus G

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have indicated that pattern recognition techniques of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data for individual classification may be valuable for distinguishing between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). Importantly, medication may have affected previous classification results as subjects with MDD and BD use different classes of medication. Furthermore, almost all studies have investigated only depressed subjects. Therefore, we focused on medication-free subjects. We additionally investigated whether classification would be mood state independent by including depressed and remitted subjects alike. We applied Gaussian process classifiers to investigate the discriminatory power of structural MRI (gray matter volumes of emotion regulation areas) and resting-state fMRI (resting-state networks implicated in mood disorders: default mode network [DMN], salience network [SN], and lateralized frontoparietal networks [FPNs]) in depressed (n=42) and remitted (n=49) medication-free subjects with MDD and BD. Depressed subjects with MDD and BD could be classified based on the gray matter volumes of emotion regulation areas as well as DMN functional connectivity with 69.1% prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy using the FPNs and SN did not exceed chance level. It was not possible to discriminate between remitted subjects with MDD and BD. For the first time, we showed that medication-free subjects with MDD and BD can be differentiated based on structural MRI as well as resting-state functional connectivity. Importantly, the results indicated that research concerning diagnostic neuroimaging tools distinguishing between MDD and BD should consider mood state as only depressed subjects with MDD and BD could be correctly classified. Future studies, in larger samples are needed to investigate whether the results can be generalized to medication-naïve or first-episode subjects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  8. Korean Medication Algorithm for Depressive Disorders 2017: Third Revision

    Seo, Jeong Seok; Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Park, Young-Min; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Won; Shim, Se-Hoon; Lee, Jung Goo; Jon, Duk-In

    2018-01-01

    Objective In 2002, the Korean Society for Affective Disorders developed the guidelines for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), and revised it in 2006 and 2012. The third revision of these guidelines was undertaken to reflect advances in the field. Methods Using a 44-item questionnaire, an expert consensus was obtained on pharmacological treatment strategies for MDD 1) without or 2) with psychotic features, 3) depression subtypes, 4) maintenance, 5) special populations, 6) the choice of an antidepressant (AD) regarding safety and adverse effects, and 7) non-pharmacological biological therapies. Recommended first, second, and third-line strategies were derived statistically. Results AD monotherapy is recommended as the first-line strategy for non-psychotic depression in adults, children/adolescents, elderly adults, patient with persistent depressive disorder, and pregnant women or patients with postpartum depression or premenstrual dysphoric disorder. The combination of AD and atypical antipsychotics (AAP) was recommended for psychotic depression in adult, child/adolescent, postpartum depression, and mixed features or anxious distress. Most experts recommended stopping the ongoing initial AD and AAP after a certain period in patients with one or two depressive episodes. As an MDD treatment modality, 92% of experts are considering electroconvulsive therapy and 46.8% are applying it clinically, while 86% of experts are considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation but only 31.6% are applying it clinically. Conclusion The pharmacological treatment strategy in 2017 is similar to that of Korean Medication Algorithm for Depressive Disorder 2012. The preference of AAPs was more increased. PMID:29397669

  9. Social support and common mental disorder among medical students

    Adriano Gonçalves Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Different kinds of psychological distress have been identified for students in the health field, especially in the medical school. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of mental suffering among medical students in the Southeastern Brazil and asses its association with social support. METHODS: It is a cross-sectional study. Structured questionnaires were applied for students from the 1st up to the 6th years of the medical school of Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", assessing demographic variables related to aspects of graduation and adaptation to the city. Psychological suffering was defined as a common mental disorder (CMD assessed by the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20. Social support was assessed by the social support scale of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS. The association between the outcome and explanatory variables was assessed by the χ2 test and Logistic Regression, for the multivariate analyses, using p < 0.05. RESULTS: The response rate was of 80.7%, with no differences between sample and the population regarding gender (p = 0.78. The average age was 22 years old (standard deviation - SD = 2.2, mainly women (58.2% and students who were living with friends (62%. The prevalence of CMD was 44.9% (95%CI 40.2 - 49.6. After the multivariate analyses, the explanatory variables that were associated with CMD were: feeling rejected in the past year (p < 0.001, thinking about leaving medical school (p < 0.001 and "interaction" in the MOS scale (p = 0.002. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of CMD among medical students was high and insufficient social support was an important risk factor. Our findings suggest that interventions to improve social interaction among those students could be beneficial, decreasing the prevalence of CMD in this group.

  10. Social support and common mental disorder among medical students.

    Silva, Adriano Gonçalves; Cerqueira, Ana Teresa de Abreu Ramos; Lima, Maria Cristina Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Different kinds of psychological distress have been identified for students in the health field, especially in the medical school. To estimate the prevalence of mental suffering among medical students in the Southeastern Brazil and asses its association with social support. It is a cross-sectional study. Structured questionnaires were applied for students from the 1st up to the 6th years of the medical school of Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio de Mesquita Filho", assessing demographic variables related to aspects of graduation and adaptation to the city. Psychological suffering was defined as a common mental disorder (CMD) assessed by the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). Social support was assessed by the social support scale of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS). The association between the outcome and explanatory variables was assessed by the χ2 test and Logistic Regression, for the multivariate analyses, using p < 0.05. The response rate was of 80.7%, with no differences between sample and the population regarding gender (p = 0.78). The average age was 22 years old (standard deviation - SD = 2.2), mainly women (58.2%) and students who were living with friends (62%). The prevalence of CMD was 44.9% (95%CI 40.2 - 49.6). After the multivariate analyses, the explanatory variables that were associated with CMD were: feeling rejected in the past year (p < 0.001), thinking about leaving medical school (p < 0.001) and "interaction" in the MOS scale (p = 0.002). The prevalence of CMD among medical students was high and insufficient social support was an important risk factor. Our findings suggest that interventions to improve social interaction among those students could be beneficial, decreasing the prevalence of CMD in this group.

  11. Psychological Variables for Identifying Susceptibility to Mental Disorders in Medical

    Rosa Sender

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study analyses some psychological variables related to susceptibility to mental disorders in medical students. Methods: A sample of 209 first- and second-year medical students was evaluated using the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, and three questionnaires: Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 and UNCAHS scale of STRAIN. Results: Thirty percent of the students suffered from emotional distress as measured by de GHQ-28, and showed significantly higher scores on trait anxiety, sensitivity to punishment and reward scales, and had higher levels of strain both in the academic environment and their personal life. Women scored significantly higher than men on trait anxiety and sensitivity to reward. Logistical regression found that trait anxiety and strain in non-academic life were the best predictors of the development of a mental disorder. Conclusions: The study confirms the usefulness of the STAI for detecting psychological distress and the validity of the SPSRQ for identifying subjects likely to present emotional distress when facing high environmental demands. Subjects most likely to present with mental illness are those who evaluate their personal (non-academic lives as more stressful.

  12. Medical marijuana for digestive disorders: high time to prescribe?

    Gerich, Mark E; Isfort, Robert W; Brimhall, Bryan; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-02-01

    The use of recreational and medical marijuana is increasingly accepted by the general public in the United States. Along with growing interest in marijuana use has come an understanding of marijuana's effects on normal physiology and disease, primarily through elucidation of the human endocannabinoid system. Scientific inquiry into this system has indicated potential roles for marijuana in the modulation of gastrointestinal symptoms and disease. Some patients with gastrointestinal disorders already turn to marijuana for symptomatic relief, often without a clear understanding of the risks and benefits of marijuana for their condition. Unfortunately, that lack of understanding is shared by health-care providers. Marijuana's federal legal status as a Schedule I controlled substance has limited clinical investigation of its effects. There are also potential legal ramifications for physicians who provide recommendations for marijuana for their patients. Despite these constraints, as an increasing number of patients consider marijuana as a potential therapy for their digestive disorders, health-care providers will be asked to discuss the issues surrounding medical marijuana with their patients.

  13. MedlinePlus Connect: Linking Patient Portals and Electronic Health Records to Health Information

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  14. 78 FR 7967 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Respiratory System Disorders

    2013-02-04

    ... medical terminology for this disorder. We explain the nature of the disorder and our documentation... cause, to reflect current medical terminology. We propose to remove the criterion for arterial hypoxemia... evaluate it?). The change would reflect current medical terminology. There have been advances in the...

  15. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

    Lidia Kotuła

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 and CB2 receptors. The first type CB1 is mostly found in the central nervous system, modulate pain. It also has an anti-emetic effect, and has influence on the memory and the motor system. The second type of receptors CB2 is peripheral, and it is primarily found in immune system cells and it is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids. Medical cannabis can help in cases of the neurodegeneration disorders, for example Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Patients generally tolerate medical cannabis well.

  16. BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THE MEDICAL SETTING: Suggestive Behaviors, Syndromes, and Diagnoses.

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a personality dysfunction that is characterized by disinhibition and impulsivity, which oftentimes manifest as self-regulation difficulties. Patients with this disorder have always been present in medical settings, but have been described as "difficult patients" rather than patients with borderline personality disorder. According to empirical findings, a number of behaviors and medical syndromes/diagnoses are suggestive of borderline personality disorder. Suggestive behaviors in the medical setting may include aggressive or disruptive behaviors, the intentional sabotage of medical care, and excessive healthcare utilization. Suggestive medical syndromes and diagnoses in the medical setting may include alcohol and substance misuse (including the abuse of prescription medications), multiple somatic complaints, chronic pain, obesity, sexual impulsivity, and hair pulling. While not all-inclusive or diagnostic, these behaviors and syndromes/diagnoses may invite further clinical evaluation of the patient for borderline personality disorder.

  17. NIH Institutes and MLN MedlinePlus Advisory Board

    ... main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [1.9 mb] ... nih.gov (301) 496-7301 National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) www.nimh.nih.gov 1-866- ...

  18. MedlinePlus FAQ: Listing Your Web Site

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  19. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision.

    Woo, Young Sup; Lee, Jung Goo; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Sohn, Inki; Shim, Se-Hoon; Jon, Duk-In; Seo, Jeong Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Min, Kyung Joon; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    To constitute the third revision of the guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder (KMAP-BP 2014). A 56-item questionnaire was used to obtain the consensus of experts regarding pharmacological treatment strategies for the various phases of bipolar disorder and for special populations. The review committee included 110 Korean psychiatrists and 38 experts for child and adolescent psychiatry. Of the committee members, 64 general psychiatrists and 23 child and adolescent psychiatrists responded to the survey. The treatment of choice (TOC) for euphoric, mixed, and psychotic mania was the combination of a mood stabilizer (MS) and an atypical antipsychotic (AAP); the TOC for acute mild depression was monotherapy with MS or AAP; and the TOC for moderate or severe depression was MS plus AAP/antidepressant. The first-line maintenance treatment following mania or depression was MS monotherapy or MS plus AAP; the first-line treatment after mania was AAP monotherapy; and the first-line treatment after depression was lamotrigine (LTG) monotherapy, LTG plus MS/AAP, or MS plus AAP plus LTG. The first-line treatment strategy for mania in children and adolescents was MS plus AAP or AAP monotherapy. For geriatric bipolar patients, the TOC for mania was AAP/MS monotherapy, and the TOC for depression was AAP plus MS or AAP monotherapy. The expert consensus in the KMAP-BP 2014 differed from that in previous publications; most notably, the preference for AAP was increased in the treatment of acute mania, depression, and maintenance treatment. There was increased expert preference for the use of AAP and LTG. The major limitation of the present study is that it was based on the consensus of Korean experts rather than on experimental evidence.

  20. Transcript for Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial

    ... medlineplus.gov/medicalwordstranscript.html Transcript for Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial To use the sharing features on ... get to what those mean in a minute. Word Roots Word Roots. Let's begin with body parts. ...

  1. Female medical students are estimated to have a higher risk for developing eating disorders than male medical students

    Dissing, Nete; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context....

  2. Weight Control: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... loss medications Show More Show Less Related Health Topics Body Weight Diets Eating Disorders Exercise and Physical Fitness Nutrition Obesity Weight Loss Surgery National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Weight Control is the National Institute of ...

  3. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Medication Use in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Buck, Tara R.; Viskochil, Joseph; Farley, Megan; Coon, Hilary; McMahon, William M.; Morgan, Jubel; Bilder, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate comorbid psychiatric disorders and psychotropic medication use among adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) ascertained as children during a 1980's statewide Utah autism prevalence study (n = 129). Seventy-three individuals (56.6%) met criteria for a current psychiatric disorder; 89 participants…

  4. Medications for addiction treatment: an opportunity for prescribing clinicians to facilitate remission from alcohol and opioid use disorders.

    Park, Tae Woo; Friedmann, Peter D

    2014-10-01

    Substance use disorders are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders are effective yet underutilized. This article reviews recent literature examining medications used for the treatment of alcohol and opioid use disorders. The neurobehavioral rationale for medication treatment and the most common ways medications work in the treatment of substance use disorders are discussed. Finally, the medications and the evidence behind their effectiveness are briefly reviewed. Physicians and other prescribing clinicians should take an active role in facilitating remission and recovery from substance use disorders by prescribing these effective medications with brief medical management counseling.

  5. Self-medication of mood and anxiety disorders with marijuana: Higher in states with medical marijuana laws.

    Sarvet, Aaron L; Wall, Melanie M; Keyes, Katherine M; Olfson, Mark; Cerdá, Magdalena; Hasin, Deborah S

    2018-05-01

    Self-medication with drugs or alcohol is commonly reported among adults with mood or anxiety disorders, and increases the risk of developing substance use disorders. Medical marijuana laws (MML) may be associated with greater acceptance of the therapeutic value of marijuana, leading individuals to self-medicate. The study utilized data from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2004-2005). Participants were sampled from households in the general population and included adults with a mood or anxiety disorder in the past 12 months (n = 7418), and the subset of those who used marijuana and no other drug (n = 314). Weighted logistic regression models predicted the prevalence of self-medication with drugs in U.S. states with and without MML, adjusting for individual and state-level covariates. As a negative control, analyses were repeated for self-medication with alcohol. Overall, self-medication with drugs was 3.73 percentage points higher (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.93-6.53) among those living in MML states (p = 0.01). For the subpopulation that only used marijuana, self-medication with drugs was 21.22 percentage points higher (95% CI: 3.91-38.53) among those living in MML states (p = 0.02). In contrast, self-medication with alcohol had nearly identical prevalence in MML and non-MML states, overall and for drinkers. Among adults with mood or anxiety disorders, living in a medical marijuana law state is associated with self-medication with marijuana. While additional research is needed to determine the reasons for this association, clinical screening for self-medication with marijuana may be particularly important in states with medical marijuana laws. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision

    Woo YS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Young Sup Woo,1 Jung Goo Lee,2,3 Jong-Hyun Jeong,1 Moon-Doo Kim,4 Inki Sohn,5 Se-Hoon Shim,6 Duk-In Jon,7 Jeong Seok Seo,8 Young-Chul Shin,9 Kyung Joon Min,10 Bo-Hyun Yoon,11 Won-Myong Bahk1 1Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Psychiatry, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan, South Korea;3Paik Institute for Clinical Research, Inje Univeristy, Busan, South Korea; 4Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju, South Korea; 5Department of Psychiatry, Keyo Hospital, Keyo Medical Foundation, Uiwang, South Korea; 6Department of Psychiatry, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan, South Korea; 7Department of Psychiatry, Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Anyang, South Korea; 8Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju, South Korea; 9Department of Psychiatry, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea; 10Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, South Korea; 11Department of Psychiatry, Naju National Hospital, Naju, South Korea Objective: To constitute the third revision of the guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder (KMAP-BP 2014. Methods: A 56-item questionnaire was used to obtain the consensus of experts regarding pharmacological treatment strategies for the various phases of bipolar disorder and for special populations. The review committee included 110 Korean psychiatrists and 38 experts for child and adolescent psychiatry. Of the committee members, 64 general psychiatrists and 23 child and adolescent psychiatrists responded to the survey. Results: The treatment of choice (TOC for euphoric, mixed, and psychotic mania was the combination of a mood stabilizer (MS and an atypical antipsychotic (AAP; the TOC for

  7. Evaluation of changes in prescription medication use after a residential treatment programme for borderline personality disorder.

    Broadbear, Jillian H; Nesci, Julian; Thomas, Rosemary; Thompson, Katherine; Beatson, Josephine; Rao, Sathya

    2016-12-01

    Residential patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder were evaluated to determine whether borderline personality disorder-focused psychotherapy reduced prescribing, personality disorder and co-morbid symptom severity. Psychotropic prescriptions were measured at admission, discharge and 1 year later in 74 female participants with one or more personality disorder diagnosis and co-morbid mood disorders. Changes in pharmacotherapy were examined in the context of improvements in borderline personality disorder and/or co-morbid disorder symptom severity. Residential treatment included individual and group psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV was used to confirm the borderline personality disorder diagnosis and associated co-morbid conditions. The Beck Depression Inventory was completed at each time point. A significant reduction in the incidence and severity of self-rated depression as well as clinician assessed personality disorder, including borderline personality disorder, was accompanied by a reduction in prescription of psychoactive medications. Three to six months of intensive borderline personality disorder-specific psychotherapy showed lasting benefit with regard to symptom severity of personality disorders (borderline personality disorder in particular) as well as depressive symptoms. This improvement corresponded with a reduction in prescriptions for psychoactive medications, which is consistent with current thinking regarding treatment for borderline personality disorder. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Medical consequences and associations with untreated sleep-related breathing disorders and outcomes of treatments.

    Norman, Daniel; Haberman, Paul B; Valladares, Edwin M

    2012-02-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders are a broad group of disorders that include obstructive sleep apnea, central sleep apnea, and periodic breathing disorders. This article reviews the scientific literature that links SRBD to various medical conditions including hypertension, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and depression. Pathophysiologic mechanisms by which SRBD may contribute to these disorders will be discussed, as will data on the degree to which treatment of SRBD may improve these conditions.

  9. Current Medications for the Treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Vaughan, Brigette S.; Roberts, Holly J.; Needelman, Howard

    2009-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is common among children. Fortunately, ADHD is highly treatable with medication. The purpose of this article is to serve as a primer on medication treatment for ADHD for school psychologists. The article discusses the available stimulant and nonstimulant medication for the treatment of ADHD.…

  10. Assessment and importance of personality disorders in medical patients: an update.

    Dhossche, D M; Shevitz, S A

    1999-06-01

    Personality disorders in medical patients have received less attention than depression, anxiety, or somatization. We conducted a selective literature search to assess the role of personality disorders in medical patients. Review of recent studies suggests a high prevalence and morbidity of personality disorders in medical populations. Important correlates in selected groups are depression, somatization, noncompliance, sexual risk taking, and substance abuse. Difficulties in physician-patient relationships are also frequently reported. Psychiatric interventions are considered beneficial, though no single treatment of choice is available. We recommend that physicians consider the possibility of personality disorders in medical patients to choose appropriate treatments for selected symptoms. Training in interviewing skills may enhance recognition of personality disorders and management of associated psychiatric conditions.

  11. Psychotropic Medication Use Among Adults With Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder in the United States.

    Stroup, T Scott; Gerhard, Tobias; Crystal, Stephen; Huang, Cecilia; Tan, Zhiqiang; Wall, Melanie M; Mathai, Chacku M; Olfson, Mark

    2018-05-01

    The authors examined the use of different classes of psychotropic medication in outpatient treatment of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Data from the United States Medicaid program were used to examine psychotropic medication use in a cohort of patients who had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in the calendar year 2010. The cohort of Medicaid recipients who filled one or more prescriptions for a psychotropic medication in 2010 included 116,249 patients classified as having schizophrenia and 84,537 classified as having schizoaffective disorder. During 2010, 86.1% of patients with schizoaffective disorder and 70.1% with schizophrenia were treated with two or more different classes of psychotropic. Psychotropic medications other than antipsychotics were commonly prescribed for individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Their widespread use and uncertainty about their net benefits signal a need for research on their efficacy, safety, and appropriate use in these conditions.

  12. Common mental disorders among medical students in Jimma University, SouthWest Ethiopia.

    Kerebih, Habtamu; Ajaeb, Mohammed; Hailesilassie, Hailemariam

    2017-09-01

    Medical students are at risk of common mental disorders due to difficulties of adjustment to the medical school environment, exposure to death and human suffering. However there is limited data on this aspect. Therefore, the current study assessed the magnitude of common mental disorders and contributing factors among medical students. An institutional based cross-sectional study was conducted from May 12-16, 2015 using stratified sampling technique. Three hundred and five medical students participated in the study. Common mental disorders were assessed using the self-reported questionnaire (SRQ-20). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with common mental disorders among students. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the level of significance. Prevalence of common mental disorders among medical students was 35.2%. Being female, younger age, married, having less than 250 birr monthly pocket money, attending pre-clinical class, khat chewing, smoking cigarettes, alcohol drinking and ganja/shisha use were significantly associated with common mental disorders. The overall prevalence of common mental disorders among medical students was high. Therefore, it is essential to institute effective intervention strategies giving emphasis to contributing factors to common mental disorders.

  13. Childhood maltreatment and the medical morbidity in bipolar disorder: a case-control study.

    Hosang, Georgina M; Fisher, Helen L; Uher, Rudolf; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Maughan, Barbara; McGuffin, Peter; Farmer, Anne E

    2017-09-07

    Childhood maltreatment (abuse and neglect) can have long-term deleterious consequences, including increased risk for medical and psychiatric illnesses, such as bipolar disorder in adulthood. Emerging evidence suggests that a history of childhood maltreatment is linked to the comorbidity between medical illnesses and mood disorders. However, existing studies on bipolar disorder have not yet explored the specific influence of child neglect and have not included comparisons with individuals without mood disorders (controls). This study aimed to extend the existing literature by examining the differential influence of child abuse and child neglect on medical morbidity in a sample of bipolar cases and controls. The study included 72 participants with bipolar disorder and 354 psychiatrically healthy controls (average age of both groups was 48 years), who completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and were interviewed regarding various medical disorders. A history of any type of childhood maltreatment was significantly associated with a diagnosis of any medical illness (adjusted OR = 6.28, 95% confidence intervals 1.70-23.12, p = 0.006) and an increased number of medical illnesses (adjusted OR = 3.77, 95% confidence intervals 1.34-10.57, p = 0.012) among adults with bipolar disorder. Exposure to child abuse was more strongly associated with medical disorders than child neglect. No association between childhood maltreatment and medical morbidity was detected among controls. To summarise, individuals with bipolar disorder who reported experiencing maltreatment during childhood, especially abuse, were at increased risk of suffering from medical illnesses and warrant greater clinical attention.

  14. HIV Viral Load: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/hivviralload.html HIV Viral Load To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an HIV Viral Load? An HIV viral load is a ...

  15. BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen): MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/bunbloodureanitrogen.html BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen) To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. What is a BUN (Blood Urea Nitrogen) Test? A BUN, or blood urea nitrogen ...

  16. Protein in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  18. Treating Cataracts | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... Claudine Klose, 63, lives on a farm in New York's Hudson Valley. She had successful cataract surgery in 2013 and shared her experience recently with NIH MedlinePlus magazine. What did you notice about your vision that ...

  19. Epithelial Cells in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  20. Bilirubin Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  2. Hepatitis Panel: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  3. AST Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  4. Chlamydia Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  5. Hemoglobin Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  6. Amylase Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  7. Lipase Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/lipasetest.html Lipase Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a lipase test? Lipase is a type of protein made by ...

  8. Cortisol Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/cortisoltest.html Cortisol Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Cortisol Test? Cortisol is a hormone that affects almost every ...

  9. Hematocrit Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  10. Procalcitonin Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  11. MedlinePlus Connect: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

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  14. Flu (Influenza) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  15. Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccines: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - PDF Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Tetanus, Diphtheria, and ... updates by email What's this? GO Related Health Topics Childhood Immunization Diphtheria Immunization Tetanus Whooping Cough National ...

  16. Nutrition for Seniors: MedlinePlus Health Topic

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  17. Allergy Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  18. Lipoprotein (a) Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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  19. Medical comorbidities in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders: a systematic review.

    Muskens, Jet B; Velders, Fleur P; Staal, Wouter G

    2017-09-01

    Somatic disorders occur more often in adult psychiatric patients than in the general adult population. However, in child and adolescent psychiatry this association is unclear, mainly due to a lack of integration of existing data. To address this issue, we here present a systematic review on medical comorbidity in the two major developmental disorders autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and formulate clinical recommendations. The literature was searched using the PubMed and PsycINFO databases (2000-1 May 2016) with the keywords "[((child and adolescent) AND (Autism OR Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder* OR ADHD)) AND ("Cardiovascular Diseases" [Mesh] OR "Endocrine System Diseases" [Mesh] OR "Immune System Diseases" [Mesh] OR "Neurobehavioral Manifestations" [Mesh] OR "Gastrointestinal Disorders" [Mesh] OR Somatic OR Autoimmune disease OR Nervous system disease OR Infection OR Infectious disease)]. Two raters independently assessed the quality of the eligible studies. The initial search identified 5278 articles. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria 104 papers were selected and subsequently subjected to a quality control. This quality was assessed according to a standardized and validated set of criteria and yielded 29 studies for inclusion. This thorough literature search provides an overview of relevant articles on medical comorbidity in ADHD and/or ASD, and shows that medical disorders in these children and adolescents appear to be widespread. Those who work with children with ASD and/or ADHD should be well aware of this and actively promote routine medical assessment. Additionally, case-control studies and population-based studies are needed to provide reliable prevalence estimates. Future studies should furthermore focus on a broader evaluation of medical disorders in children and adolescents with ADHD and/or ASD to improve treatment algorithm in this vulnerable group.

  20. Increased use of antimicrobial medication in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder prior to the eating disorder treatment.

    Raevuori, Anu; Lukkariniemi, Laura; Suokas, Jaana T; Gissler, Mika; Suvisaari, Jaana M; Haukka, Jari

    2016-06-01

    We examined the use of antimicrobial medication as a proxy for infections in large patient cohort treated for binge-eating disorder (BED), bulimia nervosa (BN), and anorexia nervosa (AN) over the five-year period preceding eating disorder treatment. Patients (N = 1592) at the Eating Disorder Unit of Helsinki University Central Hospital between 2000 and 2010 were compared with matched general population controls (N = 6368). The study population was linked to the prescription data of antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral medication from the Register on Reimbursed Prescription Medicine. Data were analyzed using regression models. Individuals with BN and BED had received more often antimicrobial medication prescriptions compared to their controls (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.3-2.1; OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.6, respectively), while no significant difference emerged in AN (OR: 0.9, 95% CI: 0.7-1.0, p = 0.10). Of the main drug categories, the respective pattern was seen in antibacterial and antifungal medication, while increased use for antivirals appeared only in BN (OR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3). Measured with the mean number of prescriptions or mean Defined Daily Doses per individual, patients with BN, BED and males with AN had also higher total antimicrobial medication use. Indicating increased infections, we found elevated use of antimicrobial medication in BN, BED and in males with AN. Infections may be consequence of hyperglycemia, weight gain, or dysregulation of intestinal microbiota associated with core eating disorder behaviors. Or the other way round; changes in intestinal microbiota due to infections, inflammation, or antibacterial medications might contribute to eating disorders in multiple ways. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:542-552). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. We’re All in This Together | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  2. Achoo! Cold, Flu, or Something Else? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  3. Psoriasis: On the Road to Discovery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  4. Nick Jonas on Type 1 Diabetes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  5. Asthma: What You Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  6. Preventing Pregnancy with a Gel for Men? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  7. Caregiving: It Takes a Village | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  8. Breathtaking: Managing a COPD Diagnosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  9. Understanding and preventing tick bites | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  10. Battling C. Difficile: Don’t Delay | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  11. From the lab - Exercise Key to Keeping Weight Off | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  12. From the lab - Can Potassium Help Your Heart? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  13. Sickle Cell Disease: What You Should Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  14. A Journey with Mid-life Hearing Loss | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  15. Joint Replacement Surgery: What you Need to Know | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  16. The Future of Asthma Monitoring | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  17. Too ‘Stubborn’ to Give in to COPD | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  18. Cholesterol: The Good, the Bad, and the Unhealthy | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  19. Palliative Care: A Spectrum of Support | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  20. Confronting 9/11 Trauma from Childhood into Adulthood | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  1. Solving the Undiagnosed Disease Puzzle at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  2. Love and Life without Gluten | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  3. A Couple’s Caregiving Journey | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  4. Surgeon General Outlines Opioid Plan | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  5. From the lab - Testing Malaria-Resistant Mosquitoes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  6. A Path to Hope for Sickle Cell Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  7. Step Inside NIH’s Sickle Cell Branch | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  8. From the lab - Progress Against Zika | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  9. A Closer Look at Cancer Imaging Tools | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  10. Exploring the Celiac Disease Mystery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  11. Beyond Pain Relief: Total Knee Replacement Surgery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  12. TV Star Jim Parsons Shines Light on NIH Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  13. Advance Care Plan: A Checklist for the Future | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  14. Understanding Asthma from the Inside Out | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  15. Keys to Recovery after Knee Replacement Surgery | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  16. Fighting the Flu with a Universal Vaccine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

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  17. Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/medicalwords.html Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine ... enable JavaScript. This tutorial teaches you about medical words. You'll learn about how to put together ...

  18. Keep calm and carry on: Mental disorder is not more "organic" than any other medical condition.

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Quiles, C; Masson, M

    2017-10-01

    Psychiatry as a discipline should no longer be grounded in the dualistic opposition between organic and mental disorders. This non-dualistic position refusing the partition along functional versus organic lines is in line with Jean Delay, and with Robert Spitzer who wanted to include in the definition of mental disorder discussed by the DSM-III task force the statement that "mental disorders are a subset of medical disorders". However, it is interesting to note that Spitzer and colleagues ingeniously introduced the definition of "mental disorder" in the DSM-III in the following statement: "there is no satisfactory definition that specifies precise boundaries for the concept "mental disorder" (also true for such concepts as physical disorder and mental and physical health)". Indeed, as for "mental disorders", it is as difficult to define what they are as it is to define what constitutes a "physical disorder". The problem is not the words "mental" or "organic" but the word "disorder". In this line, Wakefield has proposed a useful "harmful dysfunction" analysis of mental disorder. They raise the issue of the dualistic opposition between organic and mental disorders, and situate the debate rather between the biological/physiological and the social. The paper provides a brief analysis of this shift on the question of what is a mental disorder, and demonstrates that a mental disorder is not more "organic" than any other medical condition. While establishing a dichotomy between organic and psychiatry is no longer intellectually tenable, the solution is not to reduce psychiatric and non-psychiatric disorders to the level of "organic disorders" but rather to continue to adopt both a critical and clinically pertinent approach to what constitutes a "disorder" in medicine. Copyright © 2017 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Impacts of nurses’ circadian rhythm sleep disorders, fatigue, and depression on medication administration errors

    Abdelbaset M. Saleh

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Medication administration errors, fatigue and depression were all significantly affected by circadian sleep disorders. An administration’s control of work flow to provide convenient sleep hours will help in improving sleep circadian rhythms and consequently minimize these problems.

  20. Addressing Medical Needs of Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Primary Care Setting

    Saqr, Youssra; Braun, Erika; Porter, Kyle; Barnette, Debra; Hanks, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Little has been reported about how to improve health care access and delivery for adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder. To understand the contributions to the health disparities in the autism spectrum disorder population, we conducted two independent research approaches to learn about current medical needs. A retrospective chart…

  1. Schizophrenia and comorbid cannabis use disorders: Brain structure, function and the effect of antipsychotic medications

    Machielsen, M.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of the studies described in this thesis was to increase our understanding of schizophrenia, co-morbid cannabis use disorders and the effects of different antipsychotic medications in patients with schizophrenia and a comorbid cannabis use disorder. Therefore we studied the clinical

  2. Medication Related Cutaneous Disorders in End Stage Renal ...

    TNHJOURNALPH

    BACKGROUND. In End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients, a wide range of cutaneous manifestations are present which may be due to the medications prescribed. Most patients' with ESRD are on numerous medications for their primary ailment, with transplant patients needing long term steroids and cytotoxics for ...

  3. Concurrent Medical and Psychiatric Disorders among Schizophrenic and Neurotic Outpatients.

    Lima, Bruno R.; Pai, Shaila

    Although the occurrence of medical illnesses in psychiatric patients is quite high, medical illnesses manifested by psychiatric symptoms are often overlooked. The higher mortality rates among psychiatric patients when compared to the general population may be a reflection of neglect or inadequate treatment of the psychiatric patients' medical…

  4. Sexual Dysfunction 1 - Sexual sequelae of general medical disorders

    Basson, Rosemary; Schultz, Willibrord Weijmar

    2007-01-01

    That sexual symptoms can signal serious underlying disease confirms the importance of sexual enquiry as an integral component of medical assessment. Data on sexual function are sparse in some medical specialties. However, increased scientific understanding of the central and peripheral physiology of

  5. Use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder medication among older adults in Denmark

    Ormhøj, Stina Schultz; Pottegård, Anton; Gasse, Christiane

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Knowledge on the use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication among older adults is limited. We hypothesized that ADHD medication is used off-label in adults aged ≥50 years as part of palliative care in e.g. cancer patients. The aim of this study was to describe the use...... of ADHD medication among adults aged ≥50 years in Denmark. METHODS: Using the Danish health registries, we identified new users ≥50 years of ADHD medication during 2000-2012. We estimated the annual incidence of ADHD medication use and ADHD diagnoses. We described new users of ADHD medication according...... to co-medication, comorbidities and assessed the 1-year cumulative mortality rate. A posthoc analysis allowed us to include new users until 2015. RESULTS: We identified 6690 new users of ADHD medication from 2000 to 2012. From 2000 to 2015 we observed an increase in the incidence of ADHD medication use...

  6. Role of childhood adversity in the development of medical co-morbidities associated with bipolar disorder

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trisha; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz; Rowe, Mike

    Objective: A role for childhood adversity in the development of numerous medical conditions in adults has been described in the general population, but has not been examined in patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple medical comorbidities which contribute to their premature mortality.

  7. The medical management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder ...

    Adele

    medical management options, their advantages or disadvantages, their clinical application ..... (irritability, sadness) and the rebound effect, where children appear to be even worse in the ..... The latter fear has been put to rest.67,68 One recent ...

  8. 77 FR 7549 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Visual Disorders

    2012-02-13

    ... disorder that may result in abnormalities that do not appear on a standard eye examination. We also intend..., 2006, we explained that while the National Research Council (NRC) 2002 report, Visual Impairments.... We would add the definition of the term mean deviation (or defect), abbreviated as MD, which we use...

  9. Medication persistence in Turkish children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Ayaz, Muhammed; Ayaz, Ayşe Burcu; Soylu, Nusret; Yüksel, Serhat

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate medication persistence in Turkish children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The effects of sociodemographic characteristics, symptom severity of ADHD, comorbidity, and treatment-related factors influencing medication persistence in children diagnosed with ADHD were studied. Medication persistence over a continuous 12 month period was evaluated for 877 children and adolescents between 6 and 18 years of age, who were diagnosed with ADHD for the first time and started to receive medication. Medication persistence was determined according to whether or not taking the prescribed medication continued for 12 months after the initiation of treatment. Whereas the symptom severity of ADHD was assessed by using the Turgay Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV)-based Child and Adolescent Behaviour Disorders Screening and Rating Scale-Parents Form (T-DSM-IV-S), perceived medication efficacy after the first treatment was evaluated by the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement Scale (CGI-I). In this study, medication persistence over a continuous 12 month period occurred at a rate of 30.2% (n=265) in the subjects studied. The hierarchical regression analysis conducted in this research revealed that younger age, higher hyperactivity/impulsivity symptom severity, use of long-acting methylphenidate, addition of another ADHD medication, addition of other psychotropic medications, absence of side effects, and perceived medication efficacy were associated with successful medication persistence over a continuous 12 month period. Understanding the factors that affect medication persistence in ADHD may improve treatment efficacy and symptom control, while minimizing future risks.

  10. Cardiovascular considerations of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications: a report of the European Network on Hyperactivity Disorders work group, European Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Guidelines Group on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug safety meeting.

    Hamilton, Robert M; Rosenthal, Eric; Hulpke-Wette, Martin; Graham, John G I; Sergeant, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Regulatory decisions regarding attention deficit hyperactivity disorder drug licensing and labelling, along with recent statements from professional associations, raise questions of practice regarding the evaluation and treatment of patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. To address these issues for the European community, the European Network for Hyperkinetic Disorders, through its European Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Guidelines Group, organised a meeting between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder specialists, paediatric cardiovascular specialists, and representatives of the major market authorisation holders for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications. This manuscript represents their consensus on cardiovascular aspects of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications. Although sudden death has been identified in multiple young individuals on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medication causing regulatory concern, when analysed for exposure using currently available data, sudden death does not appear to exceed that of the general population. There is no current evidence to suggest an incremental benefit to electrocardiography assessment of the general attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patient. Congenital heart disease patients have an increased prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and can benefit from attention deficit hyperactivity disorder therapies, including medication. The attention deficit hyperactivity disorder specialist is the appropriate individual to evaluate benefit and risk and recommend therapy in all patients, although discussion with a heart specialist is reasonable for congenital heart disease patients. For attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patients with suspected heart disease or risk factor/s for sudden death, assessment by a heart specialist is recommended, as would also be the case for a non-attention deficit hyperactivity disorder patient. The

  11. Eating disorders in medical students of Karachi, Pakistan-a cross-sectional study

    Memon Akhtar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the incidence of high-risk population of medical students with eating disorders in Karachi by using validated self-administered questionnaires. The earlier these disorders are diagnosed and assessed, the better the chances are for enhanced treatment and fuller recovery. Therefore, we intended to undertake a study to find out the frequency of such disorders among medical students of Karachi and design strategies to overcome them. Findings A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 435 medical students of Karachi. Data was collected using 2 self administered questionnaires, the SCOFF Eating Disorders Questionnaire and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. Subjects' body mass indexes (BMI were also calculated. The data was sorted and analyzed in SPSS version 16. According to EAT-26, 22.75% individuals were found to be at high-risk of eating disorders, with 87.9% females and 12.1% males. However, according to SCOFF questionnaire, 17% individuals were found to be at high-risk, with 78.4% females and 21.6% males. According to BMI calculation, 9% were severely underweight, 41.4% underweight, 41.1% normal, 7.6% overweight and 0.9% belonged to obese class 1. Conclusions A significant fraction of medical students in Karachi are at high risk of development of eating disorders, females being more prone than males. Strategies should be designed to prevent occurrence of such disorders among medical students that would undoubtedly hamper the availability of dependable medical services in future.

  12. Dyssomnias, parasomnias, and sleep disorders associated with medical and psychiatric diseases.

    Barthlen, G M; Stacy, C

    1994-03-01

    Sleep disorders can be intrinsic, as are insomnia or narcolepsy, or can be accounted for by external factors, such as noise, altitude, drug or alcohol abuse, or shift work. The arousal disorders, common in children, are usually benign and disappear by puberty. Sleep-wake transition disorders such as sleep starts are benign as well, and may occur at any age. The parasomnias comprise different entities such as nightmares, REM-sleep behavior disorder, sleep enuresis, and bruxism. Diagnosis and treatment often require a multidisciplinary approach. Virtually every psychiatric, neurologic, or medical disease, when of sufficient severity, leaves its specific fingerprint on sleep; some disorders, such as peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux, or epilepsy, tend to be exacerbated during sleep. Fortunately, most sleep disorders are amenable to therapy, which can include counseling, sleep hygiene, withholding of an offending agent, behavioral therapy, light therapy, or cautious drug therapy.

  13. Anxiety Disorders

    ... Registry Residents & Medical Students Residents Medical Students Patients & Families Mental Health Disorders/Substance Use Find a Psychiatrist Addiction and Substance Use Disorders ADHD Anxiety Disorders Autism Spectrum Disorder Bipolar Disorders Depression Eating Disorders Obsessive-Compulsive ...

  14. 78 FR 69324 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Hematological Disorders

    2013-11-19

    ...://www.regulations.gov , or in person, during regular business hours, by arranging with the contact... rehospitalizations for sickle cell disease, Journal of the American Medical Association, Apr;303(13), 1288-1294 (2010... radiographic review of hemophilic shoulder arthropathy, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Jun;423...

  15. Mobile technology for medication adherence in people with mood disorders: A systematic review.

    Rootes-Murdy, Kelly; Glazer, Kara L; Van Wert, Michael J; Mondimore, Francis M; Zandi, Peter P

    2018-02-01

    Medication non-adherence is a critical challenge for many patients diagnosed with mood disorders (Goodwin and Jamison, 1990). There is a need for alternative strategies that improve adherence among patients with mood disorders that are cost-effective, able to reach large patient populations, easy to implement, and that allow for communication with patients outside of in-person visits. Technology-based approaches to promote medication adherence are increasingly being explored to address this need. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the use of mobile technologies to improve medication adherence in patients with mood disorders. A total of nine articles were identified as describing mobile technology targeting medication adherence in mood disorder populations. Results showed overall satisfaction and feasibility of mobile technology, and reduction in mood symptoms; however, few examined effectiveness of mobile technology improving medication adherence through randomized control trials. Given the limited number of studies, further research is needed to determine long term effectiveness. Mobile technologies has the potential to improve medication adherence and can be further utilized for symptom tracking, side effects tracking, direct links to prescription refills, and provide patients with greater ownership over their treatment progress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The mixed message behind "Medication-Assisted Treatment" for substance use disorder.

    Robinson, Sean M; Adinoff, Bryon

    2018-01-01

    The gap between treatment utilization and treatment need for substance use disorders (SUDs) remains a significant concern in our field. While the growing call to bridge this gap often takes the form of more treatment services and/or better integration of existing services, this perspective proposes that more effective labels for and transparent descriptions of existing services would also have a meaningful impact. Adopting the perspective of a consumer-based health-care model (wherein treatments and services are products and patients are consumers) allows us to consider how labels like Addiction-focused Medical Management, Medication-Assisted Treatment, Medication-Assisted Therapy, and others may actually be contributing to the underutilization problem rather than alleviating it. In this perspective, "Medication-Assisted Therapy" for opioid-use disorder (OUD) is singled out and discussed as inherently confusing, providing the message that pharmacotherapy for this disorder is a secondary treatment to other services which are generally regarded, in practice, as ancillary. That this mixed message is occurring amidst a nationwide "opioid epidemic" is a potential cause for concern and may actually serve to reinforce the longstanding, documented stigma against OUD pharmacotherapy. We recommend that referring to pharmacotherapy for SUD as simply "medication," as we do for other chronic medical disorders, will bring both clarity and precision to this effective treatment approach.

  17. The effect of medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on foster care caseloads

    Fallesen, Peter; Wildeman, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    = 157,938) in the period from 1998 to 2010 to show that increasing medical treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) accounts for a substantial share of the decrease in foster care caseloads. According to our estimates, the decline in foster care caseloads during this period would...... have been 45% smaller absent increases in medical treatment of ADHD. These findings are especially provocative in light of recent research showing ambiguous effects of medical treatment of ADHD. Future research should be attentive to how medical treatment aimed at addressing children’s acute behavioral...

  18. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  19. Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder

    Michelle Nigri Levitan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. Methods: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for “patient” [or population], “intervention” [or exposure], “comparison” [or control], and “outcome”. Results: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. Conclusions: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

  20. Previous medical history of diseases in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and their parents

    Ayyoub Malek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The etiology of Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is complex and most likely includes genetic and environmental factors. This study was conducted to evaluatethe role of previous medical history of diseases in ADHD children and their parents during theearlier years of the ADHD children's lives. Methods: In this case-control study, 164 ADHD children attending to Child and AdolescentPsychiatric Clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, compared with 166 normal children selected in a random-cluster method from primary and guidance schools. ADHDrating scale (Parents version and clinical interview based on schedule for Schedule forAffective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version(K-SADS were used to diagnose ADHD cases and to select the control group. Two groupswere compared for the existence of previous medical history of diseases in children andparents. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression model were used for data analysis. Results: The frequency of maternal history of medical disorders (28.7% vs. 12.0%; P = 0.001was significantly higher in children with ADHD compared with the control group. The frequency of jaundice, dysentery, epilepsy, asthma, allergy, and head trauma in the medicalhistory of children were not significantly differed between the two groups. Conclusion: According to this preliminary study, it may be concluded that the maternal historyof medical disorders is one of contributing risk factors for ADHD.

  1. The Presentation of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Medical Settings

    Phillips, Katharine A.

    2006-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a relatively common psychiatric illness that often presents to mental health professionals as well as nonpsychiatric physicians. However, BDD usually goes unrecognized and undiagnosed in clinical settings. It is important to recognize and accurately diagnose BDD because this often secret illness may be debilitating. Patients with BDD typically have markedly impaired functioning, notably poor quality of life, and a high rate of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Thus, it is important to screen patients for BDD and avoid misdiagnosing it as another illness. Nonpsychiatric treatments (eg, dermatologic, surgical), which most patients seek and receive, appear ineffective for BDD and can be risky for physicians to provide. This article provides a clinically focused overview of BDD, including its symptoms, morbidity, case examples, nonpsychiatric (ie, cosmetic) treatment, diagnostic “do’s” and “don’ts,” and suggestions for how to persuade patients to accept appropriate psychiatric care. PMID:17183412

  2. Child attention deficit hyperactive disorder co morbidities on family stress: effect of medication.

    Silva, Desiree; Houghton, Stephen; Hagemann, Erika; Jacoby, Peter; Jongeling, Brad; Bower, Carol

    2015-04-01

    We examined the degree of parental and child mental health in a community sample of children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder and the effect on family stress prior to and during treatment using a community retrospective questionnaire study. In total 358 questionnaires were returned for analysis where 92 % of children had at least one co-morbid condition and mental health conditions in parents was common. Overall, the Family Strain Index was significantly reduced after commencement of medication (p disorders or autism spectrum disorder.

  3. Pharmacist's Role in Improving Medication Adherence in Transplant Recipients With Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders.

    Khorassani, Farah; Tellier, Shannon; Tsapepas, Demetra

    2018-01-01

    Medication nonadherence rates are high in both the transplant and psychiatric populations. The consequence of medication nonadherence posttransplant is graft rejection and psychiatric decompensation, highlighting the importance of optimizing adherence to medication regimens. Pharmacists may work with transplant patients with psychiatric comorbidity to improve medication adherence through identifying patient-specific barriers and recommending an appropriate intervention. Multiple evidence-based practices for improving nonadherence have been detailed in the transplant and psychiatric population. Medication adherence aids, medication management, patient education, and motivational interviewing are all strategies that may be used to improve adherence. Selecting which interventions to make will be based on the reasons for a patient's nonadherence. Most patients benefit from medication management, patient education, and medication adherence aids. Selection of medication adherence aids may be based on patient demographics, technology literacy, and preference. Motivational interviewing may be considered in patients with intentional nonadherence relating to a lack of insight into their illness or the importance of taking medication. Pharmacists may promote adherence and potentially improve patient outcomes in transplant recipients with comorbid psychiatric disorders through assisting patients with designing a tailored medication adherence plan.

  4. Mood and anxiety disorders as early manifestations of medical illness: a systematic review.

    Cosci, Fiammetta; Fava, Giovanni A; Sonino, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Affective disturbances involving alterations of mood, anxiety and irritability may be early symptoms of medical illnesses. The aim of this paper was to provide a systematic review of the literature with qualitative data synthesis. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane, and ISI Web of Science were systematically searched from inception to February 2014. Search terms were 'prodrome/early symptom', combined using the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'anxiety/depression/mania/hypomania/irritability/irritable mood/hostility', combined with the Boolean 'AND' operator with 'medical illness/medical disorder'. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A total of 21 studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Depression was found to be the most common affective prodrome of medical disorders and was consistently reported in Cushing's syndrome, hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism, pancreatic and lung cancer, myocardial infarction, Wilson's disease, and AIDS. Mania, anxiety and irritability were less frequent. Physicians may not pursue medical workup of cases that appear to be psychiatric in nature. They should be alerted that disturbances in mood, anxiety and irritability may antedate the appearance of a medical disorder.

  5. Relationship Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Care and Medication Continuity.

    Brinkman, William B; Baum, Rebecca; Kelleher, Kelly J; Peugh, James; Gardner, William; Lichtenstein, Phil; Langberg, Joshua; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2016-04-01

    To describe the relationships between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care practices and subsequent medication use. A retrospective cohort from a random sample of medical records in 50 pediatric practices with 188 providers, including 1,352 children who started ADHD medication, was studied. Independent variables included physician behaviors related to medication titration and monitoring of treatment response. Primary outcomes were number of days covered with ADHD medication during the first year of treatment and time from starting medicine to the first 30-day gap in medication supply. Multilevel modeling and Cox proportional hazards regression models were conducted. Children had an average medication supply of 217 days in the first year. Half experienced a 30-day gap in medication supply in the first 3 months. Nearly three-fourths had a medication adjustment in the first year with the first adjustment usually being a dosage change. The average time to the first medication adjustment was over 3 months. Physician's first contact with parents occurred in the first month of treatment for less than half, with the average time being over 2 months. Little variation related to ADHD care quality was accounted for at the physician level. Early titration and early contact were related to greater medication supply and continuity of treatment. Earlier physician-delivered ADHD care (e.g., contact with parent after starting medication and medication adjustment) is related to greater medication supply and continuity. It remains to be determined whether interventions that improve the quality of titration and monitoring practices for children with ADHD would also improve medication continuity. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New Developments in Insomnia Medications of Relevance to Mental Health Disorders.

    Krystal, Andrew D

    2015-12-01

    Many insomnia medications with high specificity have become available recently. They provide a window into the clinical effects of modulating specific brain systems and establish a new guiding principal for conceptualizing insomnia medications: "mechanism matters." A new paradigm for insomnia therapy in which specific drugs are selected to target the specific type of sleep difficulty for each patient includes administering specific treatments for patients with insomnia comorbid with particular psychiatric disorders. This article reviews insomnia medications and discusses the implications for optimizing the treatment of insomnia occurring comorbid with psychiatric conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Medical Home for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Parent and Pediatrician Perspectives

    Carbone, Paul S.; Behl, Diane D.; Azor, Virgina; Murphy, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study examines differences between perceptions of parents and pediatricians regarding the needs of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and their families within the medical home. Two separate focus groups of parents of children with ASDs and pediatricians were conducted. Parents and pediatricians identify unmet needs…

  8. Psychotropic Medication Trends among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Medicaid Program

    Schubart, Jane R.; Camacho, Fabian; Leslie, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized psychotropic medication use among Medicaid-enrolled children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders by examining trends over time, including length of treatment and polypharmacy using 4 years of administrative claims data from 41 state Medicaid programs (2000-2003). The data set included nearly 3 million children…

  9. Nonmedical Use of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Among Secondary School Students in The Netherlands

    Koster, Ellen S; de Haan, Lydia; Bouvy, Marcel L; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: No studies in Europe have assessed the extent of nonmedical attention-deficit/hyperactivitiy disorder (ADHD) medication use among adolescents, while also, in Europe, prescribing of these medicines has increased. Our objective was to study the prevalence and motives for nonmedical ADHD

  10. 77 FR 5734 - New Medical Criteria for Evaluating Language and Speech Disorders

    2012-02-06

    ...-0778, or visit our Internet site, Social Security Online, at http://www.socialsecurity.gov... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Part 404 [Docket No. SSA-2006-0179] RIN 0960-AG21 New Medical Criteria for Evaluating Language and Speech Disorders AGENCY: Social Security Administration...

  11. Treatment outcome of alcohol use disorder outpatients with or without medically assisted detoxification

    Merkx, Maarten J. M.; Schippers, Gerard M.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; de Wildt, Wencke A. J. M.; Vedel, Ellen; Goudriaan, Anna E.; van den Brink, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the incremental effects of medically assisted detoxification on outpatient treatment for alcohol use disorders. The objective of this study was to compare drinking outcomes in a psychosocial treatment program between two groups of heavy drinking patients who had an alcohol use

  12. Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Common Acid-Base Disorders to Medical Students

    Petersen, Marie Warrer; Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Berg, Ronan M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize and diagnose acid-base disorders is of the utmost importance in the clinical setting. However, it has been the experience of the authors that medical students often have difficulties learning the basic principles of acid-base physiology in the respiratory physiology curriculum, particularly when applying this knowledge to…

  13. Treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Nightmares at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Detweiler, Mark B.; Pagadala, Bhuvaneshwar; Candelario, Joseph; Boyle, Jennifer S.; Detweiler, Jonna G.; Lutgens, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of medications for PTSD in general has been well studied, but the effectiveness of medicatio.ns prescribed specifically for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) nightmares is less well known. This retrospective chart review examined the efficacy of various medications used in actual treatment of PTSD nightmares at one Veteran Affairs Hospital. Records at the Salem, VA Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) were examined from 2009 to 2013 to check for the efficacy of actual treatments used in comparis.on with treatments suggested in three main review articles. The final sample consisted of 327 patients and 478 separate medication trials involving 21 individual medications plus 13 different medication combinations. The three most frequently utilized medications were prazosin (107 trials), risperidone (81 trials), and quetiapine (72 trials). Five medications had 20 or more trials with successful results (partial to full nightmare cessation) in >50% of trials: risperidone (77%, 1.0–6.0 mg), clonidine (63%, 0.1–2.0 mg), quetiapine (50%, 12.5–800.0 mg), mirtazapine (50%; 7.5–30.0 mg), and terazosin (64%, 50.0–300.0 mg). Notably, olanzapine (2.5–10.0) was successful (full remission) in all five prescription trials in five separate patients. Based on the clinical results, the use of risperidone, clonidine, terazosin, and olanzapine warrants additional investigation in clinically controlled trials as medications prescribed specifically for PTSD nightmares. PMID:27999253

  14. Patients taking medications for bipolar disorder are more prone to metabolic syndrome than Korea's general population.

    Lee, Nam Young; Kim, Se Hyun; Cho, Belong; Lee, Yeon Ji; Chang, Jae Seung; Kang, Ung Gu; Kim, Yong Sik; Ahn, Yong Min

    2010-10-01

    Despite growing concerns about the co-morbidity of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and bipolar disorder, few studies have been conducted on this topic in Asian populations. This study examined Korean patients with bipolar disorder to assess its co-morbidity with MetS and to compare the prevalence of MetS in patients with medication for bipolar disorder with that of healthy patients. We used cross-sectional data from the medical records of patients with bipolar disorder who presented to the psychiatric clinic in Seoul National University Hospital between June 2007 and June 2008. The control group, matched for age and gender, was randomly drawn from visitors to the Health Promotion Center at the same hospital during the same period. We compared the prevalence of MetS between these two groups with independent sample t-tests and chi-squared tests. We also calculated the indirectly standardized prevalence ratio (ISPR) with a standardization that used the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHNES, 2007). The prevalence of MetS in patients who took medication for bipolar disorder (N=152) was 27.0%, 25.0% and 25.7%, based on the definitions of the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute's adaptation of the Adult Treatment Panel III (AHA), the National Cholesterol Education Program for Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), respectively. The present study determined that the prevalence of MetS was significantly higher in patients with bipolar disorder than in the control group; the odds ratios (OR) (95% CI) were 2.44 (1.35-4.40), 2.48 (1.34-4.59) and 2.57 (1.40-4.74), based on the definition of the AHA, ATPIII and IDF, respectively. The ISPR (95% CI) was 1.48 (1.02-1.93), 1.54 (1.05-2.03) and 1.98 (1.36-2.60), respectively. Patients with medications for bipolar disorder showed a significantly higher prevalence of increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, and

  15. Prevalence of Sleep Disorder among Medical Students in an Eastern University in Iran

    Mohsen Heidari Mokarrar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disorder is mostly an early manifestation of psychological diseases. It is defined as disturbances in the regularity, quality and quantity of sleep as well as daily activity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 200 medical students were assessed for sleep status using SHQ and GHQ questionnaires. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, frequency and Chi square test through the statistical package of SPSS V.16. Results: The frequency of sleep disorder among students was found to be 21.5%., which was significantly more common among older students (p<0.05, males (p=0.005, employed students (p=0.004, smokers (p=0.001, and those with other psychological disorders (p=0.001. Conclusion: Sleep disorders were higher among students who were men, smokers, or had psychological disorders, and were also employed students. Although a considerable group of medical students were found to be suffering from sleep disorders, this prevalence was lower than those reported in the previous studies.

  16. Anxiety and depressive symptoms and medical illness among adults with anxiety disorders.

    Niles, Andrea N; Dour, Halina J; Stanton, Annette L; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Stein, Murray B; Sullivan, Greer; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Rose, Raphael D; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety is linked to a number of medical conditions, yet few studies have examined how symptom severity relates to medical comorbidity. The current study assessed associations between severity of anxiety and depression and the presence of medical conditions in adults diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Nine-hundred eighty-nine patients diagnosed with panic, generalized anxiety, social anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorders reported on the severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and on diagnoses of 11 medical conditions. Severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms was strongly associated with having more medical conditions over and above control variables, and the association was as strong as that between BMI and disease. Odds of having asthma, heart disease, back problems, ulcer, migraine headache and eyesight difficulties also increased as anxiety and depressive symptom severity increased. Anxiety symptoms were independently associated with ulcer, whereas depressive symptoms were independently associated with heart disease, migraine, and eyesight difficulties. These findings add to a growing body of research linking anxiety disorders with physical health problems and indicate that anxiety and depressive symptoms deserve greater attention in their association with disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder and its Association With Body Features in Female Medical Students.

    Shaffi Ahamed, Shaik; Enani, Jawaher; Alfaraidi, Lama; Sannari, Lujain; Algain, Rihaf; Alsawah, Zainah; Al Hazmi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a distressing psychiatric disorder. So far there have not been any studies on BDD in Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in female medical students and to investigate whether there is an association between BDD and body features of concern, social anxiety and symptoms of BDD. A cross sectional study was carried out on female medical students of the college of medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during January to April, 2015. Data were collected using the body image disturbance questionnaire, Body dysmorphic disorder symptomatology and social interaction anxiety scale. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analysis were used to analyze the results. Out of 365 students who filled out the questionnaire, 4.4% (95% confidence intervals (CI): 2.54% to 7.04%) were positive for BDD with skin (75%) and fat (68.8%) as the most frequent body features of concern. Ten features (skin, fat, chest, hips, buttocks, arms, legs, lips, fingers, and shoulders) out of twenty-six were significantly associated with BDD. Arms and chest were independently associated with BDD. The odds of presence of body concern related to "arms" was 4.3 (95% C.I: 1.5, 12.1) times more in BDD subjects than non-BDD subjects, while concern about "chest" was 3.8 (1.3, 10.9) times more when compared to non-BDD subjects. No statistically significant association was observed between BDD and social anxiety (P = 0.13). This was the first study conducted in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) on female medical students, which quantified the prevalence of BDD and identified the body features associated with it. Body dysmorphic disorder is prevalent in female medical students but it is relatively rare and an unnoticed disorder.

  18. Perceived treatment effectiveness, medication compliance, and complementary and alternative medicine use among veterans with bipolar disorder.

    Jarman, Christopher N; Perron, Brian E; Kilbourne, Amy M; Teh, Carrie Farmer

    2010-03-01

    Recent research shows a high rate of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among persons with mental disorders, although correlates and patterns of CAM use are relatively unknown. This study tested whether CAM use is associated with perceived effectiveness of conventional treatment (i.e., psychotropic medication and psychotherapy) and medication compliance among persons with bipolar disorder. Patients with bipolar disorder (n = 435) were included as part of a naturalistic cohort study. Measures of CAM utilization, medication compliance, and perceptions of the effectiveness of psychotropic medications and psychotherapy were based on previously established questionnaires. Associations were tested using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Bivariate analyses showed that patients who did not perceive psychotherapy as effective at improving social, family, or job functioning reported greater CAM use. However, medication compliance was not significantly associated with use of CAM. Patients who used oral (e.g., herbal therapies) or cognitive (e.g., meditation) CAM were more likely to report that their medications were not effective at relieving manic or depressive symptoms. Users of cognitive CAM were more likely to report that their medications did not help with social, job, or family functioning, and that they did not prevent recurrences of manic or depressive episodes. None of the bivariate associations remained significant in multivariate analyses. Prior research has suggested that persons who are dissatisfied with treatment for medical conditions are more likely to use CAM therapies. However, the results of this study do not show CAM therapies to be associated with perceived effectiveness of treatments for mental health problems among this sample of persons with serious mental illnesses. This suggests that motivations for CAM use may vary by population and condition. Because few correlates of CAM use among persons with serious mental illnesses are known

  19. Primary Headache Disorders- Part 2: Tension-type headache and medication overuse headache.

    Jay, Gary W; Barkin, Robert L

    2017-12-01

    In Part 2 of Primary Headache disorders, we discuss the fourth Primary Headache Disorder, Tension-Type Headache (TTHA). We are again using the ICHD-III (Beta) definitions of such headaches, taking into consideration episodic and chronic TTHA, as well as the presence or absence of pericranial muscle tenderness. We discuss the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapeutic treatment of TTHA, and the aspects of the Myofascial Pain Syndrome that enhance and help the development of TTHA. We then discuss Medication Overuse Headache (MOH), itself a Secondary headache disorder, but one that is extremely important as it assists with the chronification of both migraine and TTHA. Finally we discuss how to manage and treat those patients with MOH. Chronic migraine, which is TTHA, Migraine as well as, in many patients, MOH, is discussed along with the treatment of this multifaceted disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medical Treatment for Burn Patients with Eating Disorders: A Case Report

    Minekatsu Akimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been many cases of burn patients who also suffer from psychiatric problems, including eating disorders. We present a case of a 38-year-old female with an eating disorder and depression who became light-headed and fell, spilling boiling water from a kettle on herself at home sustaining partial thickness and full thickness burns over 5% of her total body surface area: left buttock and right thigh and calf. Eating disorders (in the present case, anorexia nervosa cause emaciation and malnutrition, and consent for hospitalization from the patient and/or family is often difficult. During the medical treatment of burns for these patients, consideration not only of physical symptoms caused by malnutrition but also the psychiatric issues is required. Therefore, multifaceted and complex care must be given to burn patients with eating disorders.

  1. Is a Widely Available Cure for Sickle Cell Disease on the Horizon? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [1.5 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  2. Journalist Liz Hernandez hopes to make Alzheimer’s a thing of the past | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [4.3 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  3. Finding Better and More Personalized Ways to Diagnose Cancer at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  4. From the lab - CancerSEEK: Blood Test Could Detect Cancer Earlier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  5. From Bench to Bedside: Researchers of NIH’s Clinical Center | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [1.5 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  6. From the lab - Brain Scan Technology Extends Treatment Window for Stroke | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  7. Post-traumatic stress disorder and medication adherence: results from the Mind Your Heart study.

    Kronish, Ian M; Edmondson, Donald; Li, Yongmei; Cohen, Beth E

    2012-12-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk for adverse outcomes from comorbid medical conditions. Medication non-adherence is a potential mechanism explaining this increased risk. We examined the association between PTSD and medication adherence in a cross-sectional study of 724 patients recruited from two Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers between 2008 and 2010. PTSD was assessed using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale. Medication adherence was assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Ordinal logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) for medication non-adherence in patients with versus without PTSD, adjusting for potential confounders. A total of 252 patients (35%) had PTSD. Twelve percent of patients with PTSD reported not taking their medications as prescribed compared to 9% of patients without PTSD (unadjusted OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.37-2.50, Pversus 13%; unadjusted OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.44-2.82, P<0.001). The association between PTSD and non-adherence remained significant after adjusting for demographics, depression, alcohol use, social support, and medical comorbidities (adjusted OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.03-2.10, P=0.04 for not taking medications as prescribed and 1.95, 95% CI 1.31-2.91, P=0.001 for skipping medications). PTSD was associated with medication non-adherence independent of psychiatric and medical comorbidities. Medication non-adherence may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality observed in patients with PTSD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nonmedical Use of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Among Secondary School Students in The Netherlands.

    Koster, Ellen S; de Haan, Lydia; Bouvy, Marcel L; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2015-10-01

    No studies in Europe have assessed the extent of nonmedical attention-deficit/hyperactivitiy disorder (ADHD) medication use among adolescents, while also, in Europe, prescribing of these medicines has increased. Our objective was to study the prevalence and motives for nonmedical ADHD medication use among secondary school students in the Netherlands. Adolescent students 10-19 years of age from six secondary schools were invited to complete an online survey on use of ADHD medication, tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. Nonmedical ADHD medication use was defined as self-reported use without a prescription during the previous 12 months. Survey data were available for 777 students (15% response rate). The overall proportion of students self-reporting nonmedical ADHD medication use was 1.2% (n = 9), which represented almost 20% of the adolescents who reported ADHD medication use (n = 49). Most adolescents reported self-medication or enhancing study performance as motives for ADHD medication use. The proportion of the study sample reporting nonmedical ADHD medication use in our study is lower compared with that in previous research conducted in the United States and Canada; however, on a population-based level, there might be a considerable proportion of recreational users.

  9. [Analysis of medical cost of atlantoaxial disorders in patients receiving innovated treatment technologies].

    Wu, Yunxia; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-19

    To explore the effects of innovated technologies and products on improving outcomes and decreasing medical costs by analyzing a total and subtotal medical costs of patients with atlantoaxial disorders. The medical costs of 1 489 patients with atlantoaxial disorders from Peking University Third Hospital from 2005 to 2014, who received innovated technologies and products treatment were retrospectively analyzed and compared.Descriptive analysis and ANOVA were used for statistical analysis, and SPSS 19.0 was used to analyze data. From 2005 to 2014, under the situation of a general increase in medical cost by 327%, the total medical costs were stable for patients who used innovated technologies and products for treatment, fluctuating from 20 851 in 2005 to 20 878 in 2014; however, the cases of operation increased year by year, from 88 in 2005 to 163 in 2014; the average length of stay decreased from 21 in 2005 to 10 in 2014; the total cases of transfusion were 22 from 2005 to 2014; the safety, stability and feasibility of the innovated technologies and products were illustrated through the decrease of average length of stay, the reduction of bleeding and the significance of outcomes. It is illustrated that the innovated technologies and products not only decrease patients' suffering and medical costs but also are safe, stable and feasible.

  10. Prevalence of major depressive disorder in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy versus other medications.

    Carney, R M; Rich, M W; teVelde, A; Saini, J; Clark, K; Freedland, K E

    1987-08-01

    Depression is believed to be a common side effect in patients receiving beta-blocker therapy. However, diagnoses of depression defined by current diagnostic criteria may not be more common in patients receiving beta-blockers than in patients with the same medical disorder receiving other medications. Seventy-seven patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization for evaluation of chest pain received a semi-structured diagnostic psychiatric interview. Twenty-one percent of the patients receiving beta-blockers and 33 percent of the patients receiving medications other than beta-blockers met the current American Psychiatric Association criteria for major depressive disorder (DSM-III) (p = NS). The mean heart rate and state anxiety scores for patients taking beta-blockers were significantly lower than those measured in patients taking medications other than beta-blockers. No other medical or demographic differences were observed between the two groups. Despite the methodologic limitations of the study, there does not appear to be a difference in the point prevalence of depression between patients receiving beta-blockers and those receiving other medications.

  11. Ergonomic Intervention Effect in Reducing Musculoskeletal Disorders in Staff of Shiraz Medical School

    Keyvan Pakshir

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: High percentage of musculoskeletal disorders occurs due to awkward working posture and poor workstation design. So this study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of musculoskeletal disorders , evaluate workstations and investigate the effectiveness of ergonomic interventional measures among medical school staff of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS.   Methods: In this interventional study, 200 employees of different units of medical school of SUMS participated. They were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. Data were collected via anonymous questionnaire, RULA and QEC techniques as well as an ergonomic workstation checklist that was used to evaluate working conditions.   Results: The results showed that after conducting interventional program for the experimental group there was a significant relationship between employees' increased awareness of ergonomics and workstation improvement (p≤0.05. Additionally, the prevalence rate of reported musculoskeletal disorders in experimental group was significantly reduced following intervention (p≤0.05. After corrective measures, level of risk was decreased and working postures were improved. A significant relationship was observed between risk levels and neck and shoulder pain in the experimental group (p≤0.05 . Following the intervention, workstations scores were increased significantly. Conclusion: On the basis of the findings of this study, it could be noted that the ergonomic interventional program was effective to improve working posture and workstations as well as to reduce the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among the staff.

  12. Caregiver perspective on pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: medication satisfaction and symptom control

    Fridman M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Moshe Fridman,1 Tobias Banaschewski,2 Vanja Sikirica,3 Javier Quintero,4 M Haim Erder,3 Kristina S Chen5 1AMF Consulting, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany; 3Global Health Economics Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Wayne, PA, USA; 4Psychiatry Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain; 5Global Health Economics Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Abstract: The caregiver perspective on pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD study (CAPPA was a web-based, cross-sectional survey of caregivers of children and adolescents (6–17 years of age with ADHD and was conducted in 10 European countries. CAPPA included caregiver assessments of global medication satisfaction, global symptom control, and satisfaction with ADHD medication attributes. Overall, 2,326 caregiver responses indicated that their child or adolescent was currently receiving ADHD medication and completed the “off medication” assessment required for inclusion in the present analyses. Responses to the single-item global medication satisfaction question indicated that 88% were satisfied (moderately satisfied to very satisfied with current medication and 18% were “very satisfied” on the single-item question. Responses to the single-item global symptom control question indicated that 47% and 19% of caregivers considered their child or adolescent’s symptoms to be “controlled” or “very well controlled”, respectively. Significant variations in response to the questions of medication satisfaction and symptom control were observed between countries. The correlation between the global medication satisfaction and global symptom control questions was 0.677 (P<0.001. Global medication satisfaction was significantly

  13. A theoretical approach to medication adherence for children and youth with psychiatric disorders.

    Charach, Alice; Volpe, Tiziana; Boydell, Katherine M; Gearing, Robin E

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical review of treatment adherence for children and youth with psychiatric disorders where pharmacological agents are first-line interventions. Four empirically based models of health behavior are reviewed and applied to the sparse literature about medication adherence for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and young people with first-episode psychosis. Three qualitative studies of medication use are summarized, and details from the first-person narratives are used to illustrate the theoretical models. These studies indicate, when taken together, that the clinical approach to addressing poor medication adherence in children and youth with psychiatric disorders should be guided by more than one theoretical model. Mental health experts should clarify beliefs, address misconceptions, and support exploration of alternative treatment options unless contraindicated. Recognizing the larger context of the family, allowing time for parents and children to change their attitudes, and offering opportunities for easy access to medication in the future are important ways of respecting patient preferences, while steering them toward best-evidence interventions. Future research using qualitative methods of inquiry to investigate parent, child, and youth experiences of mental health interventions should identify effective ways to improve treatment adherence.

  14. Telepsychiatrists' Medication Treatment Strategies in the Children's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Telemental Health Treatment Study

    Tse, Yuet Juhn; Fesinmeyer, Megan D.; Garcia, Jessica; Myers, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the prescribing strategies that telepsychiatrists used to provide pharmacologic treatment in the Children's Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Telemental Health Treatment Study (CATTS). Methods: CATTS was a randomized controlled trial that demonstrated the superiority of a telehealth service delivery model for the treatment of ADHD with combined pharmacotherapy and behavior training (n=111), compared with management in primary care augmented with a telepsychiatry consultation (n=112). A diagnosis of ADHD was established with the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (CDISC), and comorbidity for oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and anxiety disorders (AD) was established using the CDISC and the Child Behavior Checklist. Telepsychiatrists used the Texas Children's Medication Algorithm Project (TCMAP) for ADHD to guide pharmacotherapy and the treat-to-target model to encourage their assertive medication management to a predetermined goal of 50% reduction in ADHD-related symptoms. We assessed whether telepsychiatrists' decision making about making medication changes was associated with baseline ADHD symptom severity, comorbidity, and attainment of the treat-to-target goal. Results: Telepsychiatrists showed high fidelity (91%) to their chosen algorithms in medication management. At the end of the trial, the CATTS intervention showed 46.0% attainment of the treat-to-target goal compared with 13.6% for the augmented primary care condition, and significantly greater attainment of the goal by comorbidity status for the ADHD with one and ADHD with two comorbidities groups. Telepsychiatrists' were more likely to decide to make medication adjustments for youth with higher baseline ADHD severity and the presence of disorders comorbid with ADHD. Multiple mixed methods regression analyses controlling for baseline ADHD severity and comorbidity status indicated that the telepsychiatrists

  15. Medical Compromise in Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified: Are Diagnostic Criteria for Eating Disorders Markers of Severity?

    Peebles, Rebecka; Hardy, Kristina K.; Wilson, Jenny L.; Lock, James D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the medical severity of adolescents with eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) to those with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Patients and Methods Medical records of 1310 females aged 8 through 19 years treated for AN, BN, or EDNOS were retrospectively reviewed. EDNOS patients were subdivided into partial anorexia (pAN) and partial bulimia (pBN) categories if they met all but one DSM-IV criterion for AN or BN, respectively. Primary outcome variables were heart rate, systolic blood pressure, temperature, and QTc interval on electrocardiogram. Additional physiologically significant medical complications were also reviewed. Results 25.2% had AN, 12.4% BN, and 62.4% had EDNOS. The medical severity of EDNOS patients was intermediate to that of subjects with AN and BN in all primary outcomes. Patients with pAN had significantly higher heart rates, systolic blood pressures, and temperatures than those with AN; patients with pBN did not differ significantly from those with BN in any primary outcome variable; however, subjects with pAN and pBN differed significantly from each other in all outcome variables. Patients with pBN and BN had longer QTc intervals and higher rates of additional medical complications reported at presentation than other groups. Conclusions EDNOS is a medically heterogeneous category with serious physiologic sequelae in children and adolescents. Broadening AN and BN criteria in pediatric patients to include pAN and pBN patients may prove to be clinically useful. PMID:20385643

  16. Female medical students are estimated to have a higher risk for developing eating disorders than male medical students.

    Dissing, Agnete Skovlund; Bak, Nanna Hasle; Pedersen, Laura Erna Toftegaard; Petersson, Birgit H

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that university students are at risk for eating disorders. However, risk behaviour has not been studied among Danish medical students, nor have the gender differences in risk behaviour been described in a Danish context. All first-year medical students (n = 979) received a questionnaire related to body perception, exercise habits, eating habits, height and weight in the fall of 2006 and 2007. The response rate was 57% (n = 561). The gender distribution of the study population was 71.8% females and 28.2% males and the average age was 21.5 years. More males (89.8%) than females (73.1%) were satisfied with their body and more females (34.8%) than males (10.9%) felt too fat. More females (42.7%) than males (19.9%) felt guilty when eating unhealthy food. 2.3% (all females) claimed to feel anxiety when they were about to eat. More males (48.4%) than females (28.6%) stated that they could not keep themselves from exercising. 13.5% of the underweight females (body mass index eating disorders than male students. Future research in this area should address the causes of such behaviour.

  17. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Esophagitis (EoE) (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Also in Spanish Latest News Eosinophilic Esophagitis May ... Pediatric and Adolescent Patients (American College of Gastroenterology) Topic Image Related Health Topics Eosinophilic Disorders Esophagus Disorders ...

  18. Musculoskeletal disorder costs and medical claim filing in the US retail trade sector.

    Bhattacharya, Anasua; Leigh, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    The average costs of Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) and odds ratios for filing medical claims related to MSD were examined. The medical claims were identified by ICD 9 codes for four US Census regions within retail trade. Large private firms' medical claims data from Thomson Reuters Inc. MarketScan databases for the years 2003 through 2006 were used. Average costs were highest for claims related to lumbar region (ICD 9 Code: 724.02) and number of claims were largest for low back syndrome (ICD 9 Code: 724.2). Whereas the odds of filing an MSD claim did not vary greatly over time, average costs declined over time. The odds of filing claims rose with age and were higher for females and southerners than men and non-southerners. Total estimated national medical costs for MSDs within retail trade were $389 million (2007 USD).

  19. Psychotropic medication management in persons with co-occurring psychiatric and substance use disorders.

    Sowers, W; Golden, S

    1999-01-01

    Persons presenting with concurrent psychiatric and substance problems present unique challenges for diagnosis and for effective and rational treatment planning. This is especially true for psychiatrists attempting to prescribe pharmacologic interventions which will promote recovery from both disorders and improve function. In order to be effective in this endeavor it is important to have a clear understanding of the dynamics of addiction as well as the particular issues and struggles related to mental illness which will affect an individual's attitude toward and use of medication. This article discusses some of the common problems related to diagnostic decision making and initiation of medication in persons with co-occurring disorders. An algorithm for guiding these decisions is presented. Common misconceptions held by these individuals regarding medication, as distinguished from "drugs," are considered. Unique psychodynamic issues that may lead these persons to actively seek medication as a solution to their problems, or which may, conversely, lead them to an outright rejection of medication as a part of their recovery, are discussed. Countertransferential issues influencing the physician's approach to prescribing for this population are also considered. The article concludes with recommendations for pharmacologic approaches to address specific psychiatric syndromes which may present in this population.

  20. Medical Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... on television or read about it in the paper. Perhaps you hear that a certain drug causes a 300% increase in strokes. That's a large ... complex experiments or have more experience with the topic. Many large clinical ... there side effects? Sometimes the side effects are almost as serious ...

  1. Beliefs About GI Medications and Adherence to Pharmacotherapy in Functional GI Disorder Outpatients

    Cassell, Benjamin; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Gott, Britt M.; Nix, Billy D.; Sayuk, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Pharmacotherapy is a mainstay in functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder (FGID) management, but little is known about patient attitudes toward medication regimens. Understanding patient concerns and adherence to pharmacotherapy is particularly important for off-label medication use (e.g., anti-depressants) in FGID. METHODS Consecutive tertiary GI outpatients completed the Beliefs About Medications questionnaire (BMQ). Subjects were categorized as FGID and structural GI disease (SGID) using clinician diagnoses and Rome criteria; GI-specific medications and doses were recorded, and adherence to medication regimens was determined by patient self-report. BMQ domains (overuse, harm, necessity, and concern) were compared between FGID and SGID, with an interest in how these beliefs affected medication adherence. Psychiatric measures (depression, anxiety, and somatization) were assessed to gauge their influence on medication beliefs. RESULTS A total of 536 subjects (mean age 54.7±0.7 years, range 22–100 years; n=406, 75.7% female) were enrolled over a 5.5-year interval: 341 (63.6%) with FGID (IBS, 64.8%; functional dyspepsia, 51.0%, ≥2 FGIDs, 38.7%) and 142 (26.5%) with SGID (IBD, 28.9%; GERD, 23.2%). PPIs (n=231, 47.8%), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) (n=167, 34.6%), and anxiolytics (n=122, 25.3%) were common medications prescribed. FGID and SGID were similar across all BMQ domains (P>0.05 for overuse, harm, necessity, and concern). SGID subjects had higher necessity-concern framework (NCF) scores compared with FGID subjects ( P=0.043). FGID medication adherence correlated negatively with concerns about medication harm (r=−0.24, P<0.001) and overuse (r=−0.15, P=0.001), whereas higher NCF differences predicted medication compliance (P=0.006). Medication concern and overuse scores correlated with psychiatric comorbidity among FGID subjects (P<0.03 for each). FGID patients prescribed TCAs (n=142, 41.6%) expressed a greater medication necessity (17.4

  2. [Analysis of Applying Chinese Medical Clinical Pathway for Treating Attention-deficit Hyperactivity Disorder].

    Guo, Yu-qing; Han, Xin-min; Zhu, Xian-kang; Zhou, Zheng; Ma, Bing-xiang; Zhang, Bao-qing; Li, Yan-ning; Feng, Yu-lin; Xue, Zheng; Wang, Yong-hong; Li, Yi-min; Jiang, Zhi-mei; Xu, Jin-xing; Yue, Wei-zhen; Xiang, Xi-xiong

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the application effect of Chinese medical clinical pathway for treating attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and to provide evidence for further improving clinical pathways. Totally 270 ADHD children patients were recruited and treated at pediatrics clinics of 9 cooperative hospitals from December 2011 to December 2012. The treatment course for all was 3 months. Scores of attention deficit and hyperactivity rating scale, scores of behavior, Conners index of hyperactivity (CIH), and Chinese medical syndrome scores were compared between before and after treatment. The efficacy difference in various sexes, ages, and disease courses were evaluated by judging standards for Chinese medical syndrome and ADHD. Fifteen children patients who entered clinical pathway dropped out, and the rest 255 completed this trial. Compared with before treatment, total scores of attention deficit and hyperactivity rating scale, scores of attention deficit and hyperactivity rating scale, CIH, and Chinese medical syndrome scores obviously decreased (all P < 0.01). The total effective rate in disease efficacy was 87.8% (224/255 cases), and the total effective rate in Chinese medical syndrome curative effect was 87.5% (223/255 cases). The clinical curative effect was not influenced by age, gender, or course of disease when statistically analyzed from judging standards for Chinese medical syndrome or for disease efficacy. Intervention by Chinese medical clinical pathway could improve ADHD patients' symptoms, and its efficacy was not influenced by sex, age, or course of disease.

  3. Prevalence of Sleep Disorder among Medical Students in an Eastern University in Iran

    Mohsen Heidari Mokarrar; Aboozar Afsharmanesh; Mahdi Afshari; Fatemeh Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorder is mostly an early manifestation of psychological diseases. It is defined as disturbances in the regularity, quality and quantity of sleep as well as daily activity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 200 medical students were assessed for sleep status using SHQ and GHQ questionnaires. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, frequency) and Chi square test through the statistical package of SPSS V.16. Resul...

  4. The modern trends of forming internet additional disorder between students of medical university

    Vanyushina E.; Goncharova M.

    2017-01-01

    Today the so-called internet–space occupies the special place in our world. The Internet is applying in almost all spheres of human life. That’s why there were manifested different side effects, in particular, the “Internet Additional Disorder”. This paper examines current trends and features of excessive internet–using by students of a medical university as a group of people, who has a predisposition to incipience of Internet Additional Disorder. During research, we interviewed 100 students ...

  5. A review of medications used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Matej Štuhec

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is one of the most common developmental disorders in children and adolescents with core symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity andinattention. Atomoxetine, immediate-release methylphenidate and extended release methylphenidate are approved for use in patients with ADHD in Slovenia. In addition, ADHD is also treated off-label with bupropion, tricyclic antidepressants and some other drugs. According to the recently adopted American and European guidelines, pharmacotherapy includes the initial, maintenance and terminal phase. Consideration of pharmacokinetic parameters of the selected drugs and potential drug-drug interactions, if the patient is taking other medications, helps to reduce symptoms of ADHD, and improves the selection of drug and appropriate dosing regimen. Clinical outcomes should be measured by standardised questionnaires. The drug of choice is methylphenidate. Guidelines for the treatment of ADHD should also include recommendations on psychosocial treatments and destigmatization of patients with this disorder. In this paper, pharmacotherapy guidelines for patients with ADHD are highlighted.

  6. Medical image of the week: REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease

    Nahapetian RR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. A 55 year old female with a past medical history significant for Parkinson disease status-post implantation of bilateral deep brain stimulators, depression, and restless legs syndrome, who initially presented to the sleep clinic on referral by neurology for evaluation of disordered sleep. Medications included carbidopa-levodopa, escitalopram, gabapentin, lorazepam, ambien, and pramipexole. Her subjective sleep complaints included snoring, restless sleep, difficulty in maintaining sleep, sleep related anxiety, dream enactment behavior, nightmares, and sleep talking. She was sent to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of suspected rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD. Overnight polysomnogram did not show evidence for sleep disordered breathing. The sleep study was notable for rapid eye movement (REM sleep without atonia, visible arm and leg movements, and audible moaning, speaking, and crying out. These findings corroborated the subjective complaints expressed by the patient and her husband. Her medication regimen was altered. Zolpidem and lorazepam were discontinued and she ...

  7. Caloric vestibular stimulation as a treatment for conversion disorder: A case report and medical hypothesis

    Michael eNoll-Hussong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is a medical condition in which a person has paralysis, blindness, or other neurological symptoms that cannot be clearly explained physiologically. To date, there is neither specific nor conclusive treatment. In this paper, we draw together a number of disparate pieces of knowledge to propose a novel intervention to provide transient alleviation for this condition. As caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS has been demonstrated to modulate transiently a variety of cognitive functions associated with brain activations, especially in the temporal-parietal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex, there is evidence to assume an effect in specific mental disorders. Therefore, we go on to hypothesize that lateralized cold vestibular caloric stimulation will be effective in treating conversion disorder and we present provisional evidence from one patient that supports this conclusion. If our hypothesis is correct, this will be the first time in psychiatry and neurology that a clinically well-known mental disorder, long considered difficult to understand and to treat, is relieved by a simple or common, non-invasive medical procedure.

  8. Pros and Cons of Medical Cannabis use by People with Chronic Brain Disorders

    Suryadevara, Uma; Bruijnzeel, Dawn M.; Nuthi, Meena; Jagnarine, Darin A.; Tandon, Rajiv; Bruijnzeel, Adriaan W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug in the world and there is growing concern about the mental health effects of cannabis use. These concerns are at least partly due to the strong increase in recreational and medical cannabis use and the rise in tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels. Cannabis is widely used to self-medicate by older people and people with brain disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Objective: This review provides an overview of the perceived benefits and adverse mental health effects of cannabis use in people with ALS, MS, AD, PD, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. Results: The reviewed studies indicate that cannabis use diminishes some symptoms associated with these disorders. Cannabis use decreases pain and spasticity in people with MS, decreases tremor, rigidity, and pain in people with PD, and improves the quality of life of ALS patients by improving appetite, and decreasing pain and spasticity. Cannabis use is more common among people with schizophrenia than healthy controls. Cannabis use is a risk factor for schizophrenia which increases positive symptoms in schizophrenia patients and diminishes negative symptoms. Cannabis use worsens bipolar disorder and there is no evidence that bipolar patients derive any benefit from cannabis. In late stage Alzheimer’s patients, cannabis products may improve food intake, sleep quality, and diminish agitation. Conclusion: Cannabis use diminishes some of the adverse effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, chronic cannabis use may lead to cognitive impairments and dependence. PMID:27804883

  9. Treating Anxiety Disorders | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... Benzodiazepines are the most common class of anti-anxiety drugs. Commonly prescribed: Xanax, Klonopin, Valium, and Ativan. Beta blockers. These drugs block norepinephrine, the body's "fight-or- ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Parkinson's Disease Parkinson's Disease Research at NIH Past Issues / Winter 2014 ... areas of its research: MedlinePlus . medlineplus.gov . Type "Parkinson's disease" in the Search box. NIHSeniorHealth —Parkinson's Disease ...

  11. [Disease versus disorder. Medical and socio-environmental aspects of mental suffering].

    Heinz, A

    2015-01-01

    A disease concept should be broad enough to provide social protection for all subjects suffering from this malady but at the same time it needs to be narrow enough to avoid pathologization of behavior that is merely socially undesirable. From a medical perspective a"disease" is present if functions are impaired that are relevant for individual survival. In the field of psychiatry and psychotherapy, such medically relevant functions include the ability to be alert and fully oriented, to ascribe one's own intentions to oneself and to modulate affects according to the situation. Beyond such medically relevant symptoms of a disease, any clinically relevant dysfunction should also be harmful for the individual if a mental malady is to be diagnosed. One such harmful consequence of a disease can be that the person feels ill and suffers from this state, another negative consequence for the individual can be due to an impairment of activities of daily living and social participation. These harmful consequences of a disease are usually discussed under the heading of the"illness experience" and the"sickness aspect" of any disorder. Beyond mental maladies characterized by disease symptoms that are accompanied either by an illness experience or impaired activities of daily living and social participation (sickness), there are many states of human suffering which can be objectified and classified but do not constitute a disease in the medical sense and should more aptly be named a disorder.

  12. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder in medical students residing in hostel and its association with lifestyle factors

    Amrita Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is scant research on premenstrual syndrome (PMS and its more severe counterpart, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD in Indian females. This study aimed to evaluate symptoms of PMS in medical students and to find the association of sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors with PMDD. Subjects and Methods: A total of 179 medical students residing in the hostel of an Indian medical college and its affiliated teaching hospital were approached, of which 100 (55.8% returned the completed questionnaires. Data related to lifestyle factors was collected. Self-screening quiz for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision PMDD and Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form were used for diagnosis of PMDD and detection of symptomatology, respectively. Results: PMDD was present in 37% of the respondents. It was found at a higher rate in older and postgraduate students. PMDD was significantly associated with lifestyle factors, namely, sleep, physical activity, total tea/coffee intake, and change in tea/coffee and food intake under stress. The most common physical and psychological symptoms were body ache/joint pain and feeling depressed/blue, respectively. Conclusions: PMDD is fairly common in Indian medical students residing in hostel although cultural factors may influence symptom expression. This study suggests that PMDD is associated with lifestyle factors in young, professional, urban women. Modification in lifestyle may thus be an important approach for management of PMS/PMDD. Prospective studies with larger representative samples are needed to validate these findings.

  13. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder in medical students residing in hostel and its association with lifestyle factors.

    Mishra, Amrita; Banwari, Girish; Yadav, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    There is scant research on premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its more severe counterpart, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Indian females. This study aimed to evaluate symptoms of PMS in medical students and to find the association of sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors with PMDD. A total of 179 medical students residing in the hostel of an Indian medical college and its affiliated teaching hospital were approached, of which 100 (55.8%) returned the completed questionnaires. Data related to lifestyle factors was collected. Self-screening quiz for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV-Text Revision PMDD and Shortened Premenstrual Assessment Form were used for diagnosis of PMDD and detection of symptomatology, respectively. PMDD was present in 37% of the respondents. It was found at a higher rate in older and postgraduate students. PMDD was significantly associated with lifestyle factors, namely, sleep, physical activity, total tea/coffee intake, and change in tea/coffee and food intake under stress. The most common physical and psychological symptoms were body ache/joint pain and feeling depressed/blue, respectively. PMDD is fairly common in Indian medical students residing in hostel although cultural factors may influence symptom expression. This study suggests that PMDD is associated with lifestyle factors in young, professional, urban women. Modification in lifestyle may thus be an important approach for management of PMS/PMDD. Prospective studies with larger representative samples are needed to validate these findings.

  14. Angioplasty: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... segment (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA) (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Percutaneous transluminal ... segment Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - slideshow Directional coronary atherectomy ... transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) Stent Related ...

  15. Allostatic load but not medical burden predicts memory performance in late-life bipolar disorder.

    Vaccarino, Sophie R; Rajji, Tarek K; Gildengers, Ariel G; Waters, Sarah E S; Butters, Meryl A; Menon, Mahesh; Blumberger, Daniel M; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Miranda, Dielle; Mulsant, Benoit H

    2018-03-01

    Older patients with bipolar disorder (BD) present with variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Over time, stress, mood episodes, and comorbidities increase the body's allostatic load. We assessed the extent to which allostatic load vs more traditional measures of medical burden account for the heterogeneity in cognition in this population. Thirty-five older euthymic patients with BD and 30 age-equated, gender-equated, and education-equated comparison participants were administered a comprehensive assessment including a neuropsychological battery, and 9 physiological measures to determine allostatic load. The relationship among allostatic load, medical burden, and cognition was assessed. Compared with the mentally healthy comparators, patients were impaired globally, and in 4 cognitive domains-information-processing speed / executive functioning, delayed memory, language, and visuomotor ability, and presented with greater medical burden but not a different allostatic load. Allostatic load, but not medical burden, was associated with delayed memory performance both in a correlational analysis and in a multivariate regression analysis. Euthymic older patients with BD are impaired on several cognitive domains and have high medical burden. Their memory performance is more strongly associated with allostatic load than with traditional measures of medical burden. These findings need to be replicated and extended longitudinally. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Risperidone added to parent training and stimulant medication: effects on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and peer aggression.

    Gadow, Kenneth D; Arnold, L Eugene; Molina, Brooke S G; Findling, Robert L; Bukstein, Oscar G; Brown, Nicole V; McNamara, Nora K; Rundberg-Rivera, E Victoria; Li, Xiaobai; Kipp, Heidi L; Schneider, Jayne; Farmer, Cristan A; Baker, Jennifer L; Sprafkin, Joyce; Rice, Robert R; Bangalore, Srihari S; Butter, Eric M; Buchan-Page, Kristin A; Hurt, Elizabeth A; Austin, Adrienne B; Grondhuis, Sabrina N; Aman, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to expand on our prior research into the relative efficacy of combining parent training, stimulant medication, and placebo (Basic therapy) versus parent training, stimulant, and risperidone (Augmented therapy) by examining treatment effects for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms and peer aggression, symptom-induced impairment, and informant discrepancy. Children (6-12 years of age; N = 168) with severe physical aggression, ADHD, and co-occurring ODD/CD received an open trial of parent training and stimulant medication for 3 weeks. Participants failing to show optimal clinical response were randomly assigned to Basic or Augmented therapy for an additional 6 weeks. Compared with Basic therapy, children receiving Augmented therapy experienced greater reduction in parent-rated ODD severity (p = .002, Cohen's d = 0.27) and peer aggression (p = .02, Cohen's d = 0.32) but not ADHD or CD symptoms. Fewer children receiving Augmented (16%) than Basic (40%) therapy were rated by their parents as impaired by ODD symptoms at week 9/endpoint (p = .008). Teacher ratings indicated greater reduction in ADHD severity (p = .02, Cohen's d = 0.61) with Augmented therapy, but not for ODD or CD symptoms or peer aggression. Although both interventions were associated with marked symptom reduction, a relatively large percentage of children were rated as impaired for at least 1 targeted disorder at week 9/endpoint by parents (Basic 47%; Augmented 27%) and teachers (Basic 48%; Augmented 38%). Augmented therapy was superior to Basic therapy in reducing severity of ADHD and ODD symptoms, peer aggression, and symptom-induced impairment, but clinical improvement was generally context specific, and effect sizes ranged from small to moderate. Clinical trial registration information-Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (The TOSCA Study); http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00796302

  17. Perceptions of the state policy environment and adoption of medications in the treatment of substance use disorders.

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Abraham, Amanda J

    2012-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the use of evidence-based treatment practices for treating substance use disorders, adoption of medications by treatment programs remains modest. Drawing on resource dependence and institutional theory, this study examined the relationships between adoption of medications by treatment programs and their perceptions about the state policy environment. Data were collected through mailed surveys and telephone interviews with 250 administrators of publicly funded substance abuse treatment programs in the United States between 2009 and 2010. Multiple imputation and multivariate logistic regression were used to estimate the associations between perceptions of the state policy environment and the odds of adopting at least one medication for the treatment of substance use disorders. A total of 91 (37%) programs reported having prescribed any medication for treatment of a substance use disorder. Programs were significantly more likely to have adopted at least one medication if they perceived greater support for medications by the Single State Agency. The odds of adoption were significantly greater if the program was aware that at least one medication was included on their state's Medicaid formulary and that state-contract funding permitted the purchase of medications. States may play significant roles in promoting the adoption of medications, but adequate dissemination of information about state policies and priorities may be vital to further adoption. Future research should continue to study the relationships between the adoption of medications for treating substance use disorders and the evolving policy environment.

  18. Medications Used for Cognitive Enhancement in Patients With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, and Parkinson's Disease.

    Hsu, Wen-Yu; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, which frequently occurs in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, has a significant impact on the daily lives of both patients and their family. Furthermore, since the medications used for cognitive enhancement have limited efficacy, the issue of cognitive enhancement still remains a clinically unsolved challenge. We reviewed the clinical studies (published between 2007 and 2017) that focused on the efficacy of medications used for enhancing cognition in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the standard treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Some studies have reported selective cognitive improvement in patients with schizophrenia following galantamine treatment. Newer antipsychotics, including paliperidone, lurasidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, and BL-1020, have also been reported to exert cognitive benefits in patients with schizophrenia. Dopaminergic medications were found to improve language function in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, no beneficial effects on cognitive function were observed with dopamine agonists in patients with schizophrenia. The efficacies of nicotine and its receptor modulators in cognitive improvement remain controversial, with the majority of studies showing that varenicline significantly improved the cognitive function in schizophrenic patients. Several studies have reported that N -methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) enhancers improved the cognitive function in patients with chronic schizophrenia. NMDAR enhancers might also have cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has also been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on attention, processing speed, and memory in female patients with schizophrenia. Clinical trials with

  19. Anxiety Distorders: Types, Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... medications used for anxiety disorders are antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and beta-blockers. Be aware that some medications are effective only ... anxiety disorders. Benzodiazepines (anti-anxiety medications) The anti-anxiety medications called benzodiazepines ... control some of the physical symptoms ...

  20. More medical comorbidities in patients with bipolar disorder from the United States than from the Netherlands and Germany

    Post, R.M.; Altshuler, L.L.; Leverich, G.S.; Frye, M.A.; Suppes, T.; McElroy, S.L.; Keck, P.E.; Nolen, W.A.; Kupka, R.W.; Grunze, H.; Rowe, M.

    2014-01-01

    Medical comorbidities are common in patients with bipolar (BP) disorder but have not been previously examined for differences between United States and Europe. More than 900 outpatients with BP I and BP II disorder (mean age, 41 years) filled out a questionnaire including the occurrence of 30 listed

  1. More Medical Comorbidities in Patients With Bipolar Disorder From the United States Than From the Netherlands and Germany

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trish; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz; Rowe, Mike

    Medical comorbidities are common in patients with bipolar (BP) disorder but have not been previously examined for differences between United States and Europe. More than 900 outpatients with BP I and BP II disorder (mean age, 41 years) filled out a questionnaire including the occurrence of 30 listed

  2. Motor Skills of Children Newly Diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Prior to and Following Treatment with Stimulant Medication

    Brossard-Racine, Marie; Shevell, Michael; Snider, Laurie; Belanger, Stacey Ageranioti; Majnemer, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Motor difficulties are common in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Although preliminary evidence has suggested that methylphenidate can improve the motor skills in children with ADHD and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), the effect of stimulant medication on motor performance in children newly diagnosed with…

  3. Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Gender differences and prevalence in a Pakistani medical student population

    Vaqar Talha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD is a psychiatric disorder characterized by a preoccupation with an imagined or slight defect which causes significant distress or impairment in functioning. Few studies have assessed gender differences in BDD in a non clinical population. Also no study assessed BDD in medical students. This study was designed to determine the point prevalence of BDD in Pakistani medical students and the gender differences in prevalence of BDD, body foci of concern and symptoms of BDD. Methods The medical students enrolled in a medical university in Karachi, Pakistan filled out a self-report questionnaire which assessed clinical features of BDD. BDD was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Results Out of the 156 students, 57.1% were female. A total of 78.8% of the students reported dissatisfaction with some aspect of their appearance and 5.8% met the DSM-IV criteria for BDD. The male to female ratio for BDD was 1.7. Regarding gender differences in body foci of concern, the top three reported foci of concern in male students were head hair (34.3%, being fat (32.8%, skin (14.9% and nose(14.9%, whereas in females they were being fat (40.4%, skin (24.7% and teeth (18%. Females were significantly more concerned about being fat (p = 0.005. Male students were significantly more concerned about being thin (p = 0.01 and about head hair (p = 0.012. Conclusion BDD is fairly common in our medical student population, with a higher prevalence in males. Important gender differences in BDD symptomatology and reported body foci of concern were identified which reflected the influence of media on body image perception. The impact of cultural factors on the prevalence as well as gender differences in BDD symptomatology was also established.

  4. The pathophysiology, medical management and dental implications of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Friedlander, Arthur H; Yagiela, John A; Mahler, Michael E; Rubin, Robert

    2007-04-01

    Few published reports in the dental literature have focused on adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its dental implications. The authors conducted a MEDLINE search for the period 2000 through 2005 using the terms "adult" and "attention-deficit" to define ADHD's pathology, medical treatment and dental implications. ADHD is a developmental condition that affects slightly more than 4 percent of the adult U.S. population. Its symptoms include inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity that can cause personal, social, occupational and leisure-time dysfunction. Medications used to treat the disorder include stimulants, selective noradrenergic uptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants. The oral health of people with ADHD may be compromised by inattention and impulsivity that impair home care regimens and can lead to cigarette addiction, which may cause oral cancer and damage the periodontium, and excessive ingestion of caffeinated sugar-laden soft drinks that promote dental caries. To safely care for this patient population, dentists must be familiar with the stimulant and nonstimulant medications used to treat adult ADHD, because these drugs can cause adverse orofacial and systemic reactions and interact adversely with dental therapeutic agents.

  5. Psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls among women: an observational study.

    Williams, Lana J; Pasco, Julie A; Stuart, Amanda L; Jacka, Felice N; Brennan, Sharon L; Dobbins, Amelia G; Honkanen, Risto; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Rauma, Päivi H; Berk, Michael

    2015-04-08

    Psychotropic agents known to cause sedation are associated with an increased risk of falls, but the role of psychiatric illness as an independent risk factor for falls is not clear. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the association between psychiatric disorders, psychotropic medication use and falls risk. This study examined data collected from 1062 women aged 20-93 yr (median 50 yr) participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, a large, ongoing, population-based study. Depressive and anxiety disorders for the preceding 12-month period were ascertained by clinical interview. Current medication use and falls history were self-reported. Participants were classified as fallers if they had fallen to the ground at least twice during the same 12-month period. Anthropometry, demographic, medical and lifestyle factors were determined. Logistic regression was used to test the associations, after adjusting for potential confounders. Fifty-six women (5.3%) were classified as fallers. Those meeting criteria for depression within the past 12 months had a 2.4-fold increased odds of falling (unadjusted OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.5). Adjustment for age and mobility strengthened the relationship (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.4-5.2) between depression and falling, with results remaining unchanged following further adjustment for psychotropic medication use (adjusted OR = 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.6). In contrast, past (prior to 12-month) depression were not associated with falls. No association was observed between anxiety and falls risk. Falling was associated with psychotropic medication use (unadjusted OR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.2), as well as antidepressant (unadjusted OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.8) and benzodiazepine use (unadjusted OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.6-7.3); associations remained unchanged following adjustment for potential confounders. The likelihood of falls was increased among those with depression within the past 12 months, independent of psychotropic medication

  6. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Medication Use Among Teens and Young Adults.

    Johansen, Michael E; Matic, Kathleen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine rates of stimulant/atomoxetine use among teens (aged 12-17 years) and young adults (aged 18-23 years) and to investigate associations in medication use before and after the transition from teen to young adult. Repeated cross-sectional analyses using the nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The sample included all teens and young adults between 2003 and 2012. Within this group, a staggered sample of individuals between 2006 and 2012 born during a 5-year range was used to minimize false positive findings due to temporal trends. The primary outcome was attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication use (two or more prescriptions and ≥60 tablets). A multivariable logistic regression was utilized to determine associations between ADHD medication use and race/ethnicity and other sociodemographic factors. A total of 62,699 individuals were included between 2003 and 2012. Rates of ADHD medication use increased for both teens (4.2%-6.0%) and young adults (1.2%-2.6%) between 2003-2004 and 2011-2012. In adjusted analysis, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians had lower rates of use compared with whites. The decrease in use among young adults was more pronounced among blacks compared with whites. A usual source of care and health insurance were less common among young adults, and both were associated with ADHD medication use. Although there has been an increase in the use of ADHD medications in both teens and young adults, we found a drop-off in levels of ADHD treatment among young adults when compared with teens. A portion of this decrease appears to be related to race/ethnicity, usual source of care, and health insurance status. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Libraries in New Jersey: MedlinePlus

    ... deborah.org/ Camden Cooper University Hospital Cooper Medical School of Rowan University Library 1 Cooper Plaza Camden, NJ 08103 856-342- ... 8285 http://www.valleyhealth.com Stratford Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine ... Library 1 Medical Center Drive Stratford, NJ 08084-1504 ...

  8. Children and adolescents with gender identity disorder referred to a pediatric medical center.

    Spack, Norman P; Edwards-Leeper, Laura; Feldman, Henry A; Leibowitz, Scott; Mandel, Francie; Diamond, David A; Vance, Stanley R

    2012-03-01

    To describe the patients with gender identity disorder referred to a pediatric medical center. We identify changes in patients after creation of the multidisciplinary Gender Management Service by expanding the Disorders of Sex Development clinic to include transgender patients. Data gathered on 97 consecutive patients gender behaviors, provided letters from current mental health professional, and parental support. Main descriptive measures included gender, age, Tanner stage, history of gender identity development, and psychiatric comorbidity. Genotypic male:female ratio was 43:54 (0.8:1); there was a slight preponderance of female patients but not significant from 1:1. Age of presentation was 14.8 ± 3.4 years (mean ± SD) without sex difference (P = .11). Tanner stage at presentation was 4.1 ± 1.4 for genotypic female patients and 3.6 ± 1.5 for genotypic male patients (P = .02). Age at start of medical treatment was 15.6 ± 2.8 years. Forty-three patients (44.3%) presented with significant psychiatric history, including 20 reporting self-mutilation (20.6%) and suicide attempts (9.3%). After establishment of a multidisciplinary gender clinic, the gender identity disorder population increased fourfold. Complex clinical presentations required additional mental health support as the patient population grew. Mean age and Tanner Stage were too advanced for pubertal suppressive therapy to be an affordable option for most patients. Two-thirds of patients were started on cross-sex hormone therapy. Greater awareness of the benefit of early medical intervention is needed. Psychological and physical effects of pubertal suppression and/or cross-sex hormones in our patients require further investigation.

  9. Relationship of clinical course of illness variables to medical comorbidities in 900 adult outpatients with bipolar disorder'

    Post, Robert M.; Altshuler, Lori; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Suppes, Trish; McElroy, Susan L.; Keck, Paul E.; Nolen, Willem A.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz; Rowe, Mike

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical illnesses are highly comorbid with bipolar disorder, but their relationship to illness characteristics has not been previously delineated. METHODS: The incidence of 34 medical conditions and 6 poor prognosis factors (PPFs) was derived from answers to a questionnaire in over 900

  10. Relationship of clinical course of illness variables to medical comorbidities in 900 adult outpatients with bipolar disorder'

    Post, R.M.; Altshuler, L.; Leverich, G.S.; Frye, M.A.; Suppes, T.; McElroy, S.L.; Keck, P.E.; Nolen, W.A.; Kupka, R.W.; Grunze, H.; Rowe, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Medical illnesses are highly comorbid with bipolar disorder, but their relationship to illness characteristics has not been previously delineated. Methods The incidence of 34 medical conditions and 6 poor prognosis factors (PPFs) was derived from answers to a questionnaire in over 900

  11. Social, psychological and psychosomatic disorders in the people with combat stress in their medical histories

    L. V. Gracheva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors examined three groups of patients – military men (40 men in each group with combat stress of different intensity in their medical histories (two main groups and a  control group – without combat stress. The results showed that the military men with a high level combat stress in the past (more than 5 years ago more frequently demonstrated socialmental disadaptation against the background of subclinical chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The conclusion is that this group of people requires dynamic followup and adequate medicopsychological aid.

  12. Impact of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder on School Performance: What are the Effects of Medication?

    Baweja, Raman; Mattison, Richard E; Waxmonsky, James G

    2015-12-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) affects an estimated 5-7 % of schoolchildren worldwide. School functioning and academic achievement are frequently impaired by ADHD and represent one of the main reasons children start ADHD medication. Multiple potential causal pathways exist between ADHD and impaired school performance. In this review, we decompose school performance into three components and assess the impact of ADHD and its treatments on academic performance (assessed by grade point average [GPA], time on-task, percentage of work completed as well as percent completed correctly), academic skills (as measured by achievement tests and cognitive measures), and academic enablers (such as study skills, motivation, engagement, classroom behavior and interpersonal skills). Most studies examined only the short-term effects of medication on school performance. In these, ADHD medications have been observed to improve some aspects of school performance, with the largest impact on measures of academic performance such as seatwork productivity and on-task performance. In a subset of children, these benefits may translate into detectable improvements in GPA and achievement testing. However, limited data exists to support whether these changes are sustained over years. Optimizing medication effects requires periodic reassessment of school performance, necessitating a collaborative effort involving patients, parents, school staff and prescribers. Even with systematic reassessment, behavioral-based treatments and additional school-based services may be needed to maximize academic performance for the many youth with ADHD and prominent impairments in school performance.

  13. Sentra PM (a Medical Food and Trazodone in the Management of Sleep Disorders

    William E. Shell Md

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are a common and poorly treated disease state. This double blind, four arm placebo-controlled, randomized trial compared (1 low dose trazodone, (2 Sentra PM, a neurotransmitter based medical food, (3 the joint administration of trazodone and the medical food Sentra PM and (4 placebo. There were 111 subjects studied in 12 independent sites. Subjects underwent baseline screening, informed consent and an initial sleep questionnaire. After 14 days subjects underwent a second evaluation by questionnaire. At baseline and Day 14 the subjects underwent 24 hour ECG recordings that were analyzed in the frequency domain of heart rate variability. The specific high frequency parasympathetic autonomic nervous system activity was analyzed. The primary endpoints were sleep latency and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system improvement in sleeping hours. The results showed improvement in sleep latency for the Sentra PM and combination of Sentra PM and trazodone (−41 and −56 minutes P < 0.001. There was an improvement in quality of sleep for the amino acid formulation Sentra PM and the combination (3.86 and 6.48 Likert units on a 10 point scale P < 0.001. There was an activation of circadian activity percent at night in the medical food and combination groups while there was no change in parasympathetic activity in either the placebo or trazodone group. These data indicate that Sentra PM can improve the quality of sleep, the response to trazodone as a sleep medication and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system activity.

  14. Parental perceptions and satisfaction with stimulant medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Dosreis, Susan; Zito, Julie Magno; Safer, Daniel J; Soeken, Karen L; Mitchell, John W; Ellwood, Leslie C

    2003-06-01

    Few reports have documented parental perceptions of stimulants for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), despite the recent increased use of stimulants among youths. Of 302 parents recruited from six pediatric primary care clinics, 84% completed a survey of their knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the medication their child was taking for ADHD. Two thirds of the parents believed that sugar and diet affect hyperactivity. Although few parents believed that stimulants could lead to drug abuse, 55% initially were hesitant to use medication on the basis of information in the lay press, and 38% believed that too many children receive medication for ADHD. Parents were more satisfied with the behavioral and academic improvement relative to improvement in their child's self-esteem. Attitudes were positively correlated with satisfaction and were more positive among white than nonwhite parents. The findings highlight parental misconceptions and reservations about ADHD medication treatment that require clarification as to whether race/ethnicity, income, and social status influence their views and use of treatments.

  15. Erectile Dysfunction: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Men's Health (Hormone Health Network) Also in Spanish Sex and the Man With Cancer (American Cancer Society) Also in Spanish Specifics Bent Penis (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Videos and Tutorials Simultaneous Inflatable Penile Prosthesis (IPP) and ...

  16. Health Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... I Have an Eye Exam? (Prevent Blindness America) Lipid Panel (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Lung Cancer Screening (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Also in Spanish Skin Cancer Screening (National Cancer ...

  17. Urinary Incontinence: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... your doctor, or surgery. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Start Here Urinary Incontinence (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Urinary Tract Health (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) ...

  18. Financial factors and the implementation of medications for treating opioid use disorders.

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    Despite the established effectiveness of pharmacotherapies for treating opioid use disorders, implementation of medications for addiction treatment (MAT) by specialty treatment programs is limited. This research examined relationships between organizational factors and the program-level implementation of MAT, with attention paid to specific sources of funding, organizational structure, and workforce resources. Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted in 2008 to 2009 with administrators of 154 community-based treatment programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network; none of these programs exclusively dispensed methadone without offering other levels of care. Implementation of MAT was measured by summing the percentages of opioid patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance, methadone maintenance, and tablet naltrexone. Financial factors included the percentages of revenues received from Medicaid, private insurance, criminal justice, the Federal block grant, state government, and county government. Organizational structure and workforce characteristics were also measured. Implementation of MAT for opioid use disorders was low. Greater reliance on Medicaid was positively associated with implementation after controlling for organizational structure and workforce measures, whereas the association for reliance on criminal justice revenues was negative. The implementation of MAT for opioid use disorders by specialty addiction treatment programs may be facilitated by Medicaid but may be impeded by reliance on funding from the criminal justice system. These findings point to the need for additional research that considers the impact of organizational dependence on different types of funding on patterns of addiction treatment practice.

  19. Association of depressive disorders, depression characteristics and antidepressant medication with inflammation.

    Vogelzangs, N; Duivis, H E; Beekman, A T F; Kluft, C; Neuteboom, J; Hoogendijk, W; Smit, J H; de Jonge, P; Penninx, B W J H

    2012-02-21

    Growing evidence suggests that immune dysregulation may be involved in depressive disorders, but the exact nature of this association is still unknown and may be restricted to specific subgroups. This study examines the association between depressive disorders, depression characteristics and antidepressant medication with inflammation in a large cohort of controls and depressed persons, taking possible sex differences and important confounding factors into account. Persons (18-65 years) with a current (N = 1132) or remitted (N = 789) depressive disorder according to DSM-IV criteria and healthy controls (N = 494) were selected from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. Assessments included clinical characteristics (severity, duration and age of onset), use of antidepressant medication and inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)). After adjustment for sociodemographics, currently depressed men, but not women, had higher levels of CRP (1.33 versus 0.92 mg l(-1), Pdepressed peers. Associations reduced after considering lifestyle and disease indicators--especially body mass index--but remained significant for CRP. After full adjustment, highest inflammation levels were found in depressed men with an older age of depression onset (CRP, TNF-α). Furthermore, inflammation was increased in men using serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (CRP, IL-6) and in men and women using tri- or tetracyclic antidepressants (CRP), but decreased among men using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (IL-6). In conclusion, elevated inflammation was confirmed in depressed men, especially those with a late-onset depression. Specific antidepressants may differ in their effects on inflammation.

  20. Parental psychosocial attitudes and opinions on the use of psychotropic medication in mental disorders of childhood

    Abid, H.; Aadil, M.; Hamdani, S.U.

    2018-01-01

    To assess parental practices and attitude regarding administration of psychotropic agents in their children suffering from psychiatric disorders. Study Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Psychiatry Out-Patient Department (OPD) Mayo Hospital conducted over a span of 6 months, from 15 Apr to 15 Oct 2017. Material and Methods: Ninety three individuals were included in the study through non-probability purposive sampling. Informed consent was taken from the parents. A closed ended questionnaire was designed to carry out a targeted survey which was focused on the knowledge and practices followed by parents during their first contact in an outpatient department. Parents were asked whether they believe that psychotropic drugs are effective in the treatment of mental disorders. Results: Results are based on ninety three responders who participated in answering the questionnaire. Eighty turned out and submitted the questionnaire for result compilation and analysis. Participants ranged from 19 to 65 years. Males outnumbered female's patients during the study period by approx, 20%. The study indicated that two third of the patients had family history of mental illness. Common diagnosis included epilepsy, behavioral/ conversion disorders and mental retardation. One thought-provoking finding among parents was that psychotropic drugs lead to certain side effects and somehow effects which may causes biological abnormalities resulting into several medical diseases. Others had a belief that these drugs are addictive and may cause vital organs failure. Conclusion: Mostly parents were of the opinion that are of psychotropic drugs lead to certain side effects and somehow effects brain which may cause biological abnormalities resulting into several medical diseases. (author)

  1. Parent perspectives on the decision to initiate medication treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Coletti, Daniel J; Pappadopulos, Elizabeth; Katsiotas, Nikki J; Berest, Alison; Jensen, Peter S; Kafantaris, Vivian

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial evidence supporting the efficacy of stimulant medication for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), adherence to stimulant treatment is often suboptimal. Applying social/cognitive theories to understanding and assessing parent attitudes toward initiating medication may provide insight into factors influencing parent decisions to follow ADHD treatment recommendations. This report describes results from formative research that used focus groups to obtain parent input to guide development of a provider-delivered intervention to improve adherence to stimulants. Participants were caregivers of children with ADHD who were given a stimulant treatment recommendation. Focus groups were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analyzed by inductive, grounded theory methods as well as a deductive analytic strategy using an adapted version of the Unified Theory of Behavior Change to organize and understand parent accounts. Five groups were conducted with 27 parents (mean child age=9.35 years; standard deviation [SD]=2.00), mean time since diagnosis=3.33 years (SD=2.47). Most parents (81.5%) had pursued stimulant treatment. Inductive analysis revealed 17 attitudes facilitating adherence and 25 barriers. Facilitators included parent beliefs that medication treatment resulted in multiple functional gains and that treatment was imperative for their children's safety. Barriers included fears of personality changes and medication side effects. Complex patterns of parent adherence to medication regimens were also identified, as well as preferences for psychiatrists who were diagnostically expert, gave psychoeducation using multiple modalities, and used a chronic illness metaphor to explain ADHD. Theory-based analyses revealed conflicting expectancies about treatment risks and benefits, significant family pressures to avoid medication, guilt and concern that their children required medication, and distorted ideas about treatment risks

  2. Stigma associated with medication treatment for young adults with opioid use disorder: a case series.

    Hadland, Scott E; Park, Tae Woo; Bagley, Sarah M

    2018-05-07

    Opioid-related overdose deaths have risen sharply among young adults. Despite this increase, access to evidence-based medication for opioid agonist treatment (OAT) for youth remains low. Among older adults, barriers to OAT include the paucity of buprenorphine-waivered prescribers and low rates of prescribing among waivered physicians. We have increasingly found in our clinical practice significant stigma related to using OAT to treat addiction for young adults. In this series, we describe three cases of young adults who faced significant stigma related to their treatment. The first case is a young male with a history of significant trauma and a severe opioid use disorder. He started buprenorphine and has found a job, stayed abstinent, and began a healthy relationship. At each step in his recovery, he has faced resistance to taking medication from other treatment providers, directors of sober houses, and his parents. The second case is a young woman who presented to a substance use treatment program after a relapse. She was unable to restart buprenorphine despite our calling to ask that it be restarted. Ultimately, she left against medical advice and was stabilized as an outpatient on buprenorphine. The final case is a young woman who stopped buprenorphine after being told she was "not sober" while attending 12-step group but restarted after conversations with her clinical team. In each case, the patient has continued their medication treatment and are stable. Opioid-related deaths continue to rise among all age groups, including young adults. Stigma related to medication treatment can be a substantial barrier for many young adult patients but there are concrete steps that providers and communities can take to address this stigma.

  3. Alcohol use disorders increase the risk for mechanical ventilation in medical patients.

    de Wit, Marjolein; Best, Al M; Gennings, Chris; Burnham, Ellen L; Moss, Marc

    2007-07-01

    Annually, more than 300,000 patients receive mechanical ventilation in an intensive care unit in the United States. The hospital mortality for ventilated patients may approach 50%, depending on the primary diagnosis. In trauma and surgical patients, a diagnosis of alcohol use disorder (AUD) is common and is associated with a prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation. The objective of this study is to determine whether the presence of AUD and the development of alcohol withdrawal are associated with an increased use and duration of mechanical ventilation in patients with medical disorders that commonly require intensive care unit admission. We performed a retrospective cohort study using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a large all-payer inpatient database representing approximately 1,000 hospitals. For the years 2002 to 2003, adult patients with 1 of the 6 most common diagnoses associated with medical intensive care unit admission were included in the study. Both univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were performed to determine whether AUD and alcohol withdrawal were independently associated with the use and duration of mechanical ventilation in these patients. There were a total 785,602 patients who fulfilled 1 of the 6 diagnoses, 26,577 (3.4%) had AUD, 3,967 (0.5%) had alcohol withdrawal, and 65,071 (8.3%) underwent mechanical ventilation (53% or =96 hours). Independent of the medical diagnosis, AUD was associated with an increased risk of requiring mechanical ventilation (13.7 vs 8.1%, odds ratio=1.49, 95% confidence interval [1.414; 1.574], palcohol withdrawal was associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (57 vs 47%> or =96 hours, odds ratio=1.48, 95% confidence interval [1.266; 1.724], palcohol withdrawal is associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation.

  4. State-Targeted Funding and Technical Assistance to Increase Access to Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder.

    Abraham, Amanda J; Andrews, Christina M; Grogan, Colleen M; Pollack, Harold A; D'Aunno, Thomas; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    As the United States grapples with an opioid epidemic, expanding access to effective treatment for opioid use disorder is a major public health priority. Identifying effective policy tools that can be used to expand access to care is critically important. This article examines the relationship between state-targeted funding and technical assistance and adoption of three medications for treating opioid use disorder: oral naltrexone, injectable naltrexone, and buprenorphine. This study draws from the 2013-2014 wave of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of substance use disorder treatment programs. The sample includes data from 695 treatment programs (85.5% response rate) and representatives from single-state agencies in 49 states and Washington, D.C. (98% response rate). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships of single-state agency targeted funding and technical assistance to availability of opioid use disorder medications among treatment programs. State-targeted funding was associated with increased program-level adoption of oral naltrexone (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.49-6.60, p=.004) and buprenorphine (AOR=2.47, 95% CI=1.31-4.67, p=.006). Buprenorphine adoption was also correlated with state technical assistance to support medication provision (AOR=1.18, 95% CI=1.00-1.39, p=.049). State-targeted funding for medications may be a viable policy lever for increasing access to opioid use disorder medications. Given the historically low rates of opioid use disorder medication adoption in treatment programs, single-state agency targeted funding is a potentially important tool to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with opioid disorders and misuse.

  5. Paediatricians' decision making about prescribing stimulant medications for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Chow, S-J; Sciberras, E; Gillam, L H; Green, J; Efron, D

    2014-05-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is now the most common reason for a child to present to a paediatrician in Australia. Stimulant medications are commonly prescribed for children with ADHD, to reduce symptoms and improve function. In this study we investigated the factors that influence paediatricians' decisions about prescribing stimulant medications. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with paediatricians (n = 13) who were purposively recruited so as to sample a broad demographic of paediatricians working in diverse clinical settings. Paediatricians were recruited from public outpatient and private paediatrician clinics in Victoria, Australia. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim for thematic analysis. Paediatricians also completed a questionnaire describing their demographic and practice characteristics. Our findings showed that the decision to prescribe is a dynamic process involving two key domains: (1) weighing up clinical factors; and (2) interacting with parents and the patient along the journey to prescribing. Five themes relating to this process emerged from data analysis: comprehensive assessments that include history, examination and information from others; influencing factors such as functional impairment and social inclusion; previous success; facilitating parental understanding including addressing myths and parental confusion; and decision-making model. Paediatricians' decisions to prescribe stimulant medications are influenced by multiple factors that operate concurrently and interdependently. Paediatricians do not make decisions about prescribing in isolation; rather, they actively involve parents, teachers and patients, to arrive at a collective, well-informed decision. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Use of automated medication adherence monitoring in bipolar disorder research: pitfalls, pragmatics, and possibilities.

    Levin, Jennifer B; Sams, Johnny; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Cassidy, Kristin A; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-04-01

    Medication nonadherence occurs in 20-60% of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) and is associated with serious negative outcomes, including relapse, hospitalization, incarceration, suicide and high healthcare costs. Various strategies have been developed to measure adherence in BD. This descriptive paper summarizes challenges and workable strategies using electronic medication monitoring in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in patients with BD. Descriptive data from 57 nonadherent individuals with BD enrolled in a prospective RCT evaluating a novel customized adherence intervention versus control were analyzed. Analyses focused on whole group data and did not assess intervention effects. Adherence was assessed with the self-reported Tablets Routine Questionnaire and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). The majority of participants were women (74%), African American (69%), with type I BD (77%). Practical limitations of MEMS included misuse in conjunction with pill minders, polypharmacy, cost, failure to bring to research visits, losing the device, and the device impacting baseline measurement. The advantages were more precise measurement, less biased recall, and collecting data from past time periods for missed interim visits. Automated devices such as MEMS can assist investigators in evaluating adherence in patients with BD. Knowing the anticipated pitfalls allows study teams to implement preemptive procedures for successful implementation in BD adherence studies and can help pave the way for future refinements as automated adherence assessment technologies become more sophisticated and readily available.

  7. Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... medlineplus.gov/labtests/redbloodcellantibodyscreen.html Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an RBC Antibody Screen? An RBC (red blood cell) antibody screen ...

  8. The Match of Her Life | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... answer questions for this issue of NIH MedlinePlus magazine about her breast cancer. You discovered you had ... way of healing. As this issue of the magazine went to press, Navratilova was receiving radiation therapy ...

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/respiratorysyncytialvirusrsvtest.html Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Test To use the sharing ... is an RSV test? RSV , which stands for respiratory syncytial virus, is an infection that affects the ...

  10. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... medlineplus.gov/labtests/prostatespecificantigenpsatest.html Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. What is a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test? A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test measures ...

  11. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - NIH MedlinePlus magazine Winter 2018

    ... who is a star of 'The Big Bang Theory' television show, and the producer/narrator of a ... trials, NIH MedlinePlus magazine reports the current life expectancy of a person with sickle cell disease is ...

  12. NIH Launches National COPD Action Plan | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... COPD Action Plan Follow us NIH Launches National COPD Action Plan Photo: National Heart, Lung, and Blood ... questions for NIH MedlinePlus magazine. Why was the COPD National Action Plan created? The staggering numbers associated ...

  13. Help-seeking beliefs for mental disorders among medical and nursing students.

    Picco, Louisa; Seow, Esmond; Chua, Boon Yiang; Mahendran, Rathi; Verma, Swapna; Xie, Huiting; Wang, Jia; Chong, Siow Ann; Subramaniam, Mythily

    2018-05-09

    The current study aimed to investigate beliefs about help-seeking, treatment options and expected outcomes for people with alcohol abuse, dementia, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia, using a vignette-based approach, among a sample of nursing and medical students. This was a cross-sectional online study among medical and nursing students (n = 1002) who were randomly assigned 1 of 5 vignettes. Questions were asked about whom could best help the person in the vignette, the likely helpfulness of a broad range of interventions, and the likely outcome for the person in the vignette with and without appropriate help. A total of 45.1% of students recommended seeing a psychiatrist, which was the most common source of help reported for all 5 vignettes. Help-seeking preferences were significantly associated with age, academic year and vignette type. Respondents rated seeing a psychiatrist as the most helpful intervention (92.4%) and dealing with the problem on their own as the most harmful (68.1%). Then, 81.5% of students indicated that the condition of the person in the vignette would worsen if appropriate help was not sought. Medical and nursing students most commonly recommended seeking help from a psychiatrist for mental health-related problems, where help-seeking preferences were associated with various age, academic year and vignette type. As these students will be the future medical and nursing workforce, they need to be equipped with the skills and ability to recognize signs and symptoms of mental illness, to aid timely and appropriate treatment for people with mental illness. © 2018 The Authors Early Intervention in Psychiatry Published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Specific Components of Pediatricians' Medication-Related Care Predict Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Symptom Improvement.

    Epstein, Jeffery N; Kelleher, Kelly J; Baum, Rebecca; Brinkman, William B; Peugh, James; Gardner, William; Lichtenstein, Phil; Langberg, Joshua M

    2017-06-01

    The development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care quality measurements is a prerequisite to improving the quality of community-based pediatric care of children with ADHD. Unfortunately, the evidence base for existing ADHD care quality metrics is poor. The objective of this study was to identify which components of ADHD care best predict patient outcomes. Parents of 372 medication-naïve children in grades 1 to 5 presenting to their community-based pediatrician (N = 195) for an ADHD-related concern and who were subsequently prescribed ADHD medication were identified. Parents completed the Vanderbilt ADHD Parent Rating Scale (VAPRS) at the time ADHD was raised as a concern and then approximately 12 months after starting ADHD medication. Each patient's chart was reviewed to measure 12 different components of ADHD care. Across all children, the mean decrease in VAPRS total symptom score during the first year of treatment was 11.6 (standard deviation 10.1). Of the 12 components of ADHD care, shorter times to first contact and more teacher ratings collected in the first year of treatment significantly predicted greater decreases in patient total symptom scores. Notably, it was timeliness of contacts, defined as office visits, phone calls, or email communication, that predicted more ADHD symptom decreases. Office visits alone, in terms of number or timeliness, did not predict patient outcomes. The magnitude of ADHD symptom decrease that can be achieved with the use of ADHD medications was associated with specific components of ADHD care. Future development and modifications of ADHD quality care metrics should include these ADHD care components. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk of amphetamine use disorder and mortality among incident users of prescribed stimulant medications in the Veterans Administration.

    Westover, Arthur N; Nakonezny, Paul A; Halm, Ethan A; Adinoff, Bryon

    2018-05-01

    Non-medical use of prescribed stimulant medications is a growing concern. This study's aims were to ascertain the demographics of stimulant medication users compared with non-users, examine temporal trends of stimulant medication use and estimate risk factors for development of amphetamine use disorder (AUD) and mortality among new users of stimulant medications. Cox proportional hazards regression in a retrospective cohort adjusted by baseline covariates. United States, national administrative database of the Veterans Affairs (VA) health-care system. Adult incident users of stimulant medications (n = 78 829) from fiscal years (FY) 2001 to 2012. Primary outcomes were time-to-event: (1) occurrence of AUD diagnosis and (2) death. Baseline covariates included demographic information, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indications for stimulant use, substance use disorders (SUD) and depression. Stimulant users compared with non-users were younger, more likely to be non-Hispanic white and female. Incident stimulant medication users increased threefold from FY2001-FY2012 and eightfold among adults aged 18-44 years. Nearly one in 10 incident users in FY2012 had a comorbid baseline SUD. Off-label use was common-nearly three of every five incident users in FY2012. Comorbid SUDs among incident stimulant medication users were risk factors for occurrence of AUD during follow-up, with adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) estimates ranging from 1.54 to 2.83 (Ps users in the Veterans Affairs health-care system, measured from fiscal years 2001 to 2012, comorbid substance use disorders were common and were risk factors for development of an amphetamine use disorder (AUD). Increased mortality risk among incident users of stimulant medications was observed among both those who developed an AUD later and those whose use was defined as off-label. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  16. From the lab - Eyes May be ‘Windows to the Brain’ in Stroke Patients | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Skip to main content NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine NIH MedlinePlus Salud Download the Current Issue PDF [3.1 mb] Trusted Health Information from the National Institutes of Health Home Current Issue ...

  17. Effects of Motivation and Medication on Electrophysiological Markers of Response Inhibition in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Groom, Madeleine J.; Scerif, Gaia; Liddle, Peter F.; Batty, Martin J.; Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Roberts, Katherine L.; Cahill, John D.; Liotti, Mario; Hollis, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Background Theories of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) posit either executive deficits and/or alterations in motivational style and reward processing as core to the disorder. Effects of motivational incentives on electrophysiological correlates of inhibitory control and relationships between motivation and stimulant medication have not been explicitly tested. Methods Children (9?15 years) with combined-type ADHD (n = 28) and matched typically developing children (CTRL) (n = 28...

  18. Increased Postdeployment Use of Medication for Common Mental Disorders in Danish Gulf War Veterans

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Stoltenberg, Christian Ditlev Gabriel; Vedtofte, Mia Sadowa

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gulf War veterans (GWVs) have an elevated risk of reporting symptoms of mental disorders as compared with nondeployed military controls. A difficulty in the Gulf War health research is that most health outcomes are self-reported; therefore, it is highly relevant to study objective....../hypnotic medication, and (3) number of postdeployment psychiatric contacts. The association between outcomes and GWVs status was studied by using time-to-event analysis. The index date was the return date from the last deployment to the Gulf. The follow-up period was the time from index date until December 31, 2014...... and anxiolytic or hypnotic medicine among GWVs compared with NVs were rather surprising since we recently, by using the same study population, found that deployment to the Persian Gulf was not associated with increased sickness absence or reduced labor market attachment. However, our results indicate...

  19. Neurasthenia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and the Medicalization of Worry in a Vietnamese Psychiatric Hospital.

    Tran, Allen L

    2017-06-01

    This article examines two forms of the medicalization of worry in an outpatient psychiatric clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Biomedical psychiatrists understand patients' symptoms as manifestations of the excessive worry associated with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Drawing on an ethnopsychology of emotion that reflects increasingly popular models of neoliberal selfhood, these psychiatrists encourage patients to frame psychic distress in terms of private feelings to address the conditions in their lives that lead to chronic anxiety. However, most patients attribute their symptoms to neurasthenia instead of GAD. Differences between doctors' and patients' explanatory models are not just rooted in their understandings of illness but also in their respective conceptualizations of worry in terms of emotion and sentiment. Patients with neurasthenia reject doctors' attempts to psychologize distress and maintain a model of worry that supports a sense of moral selfhood based on notions of obligation and sacrifice. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  20. [A historical medical study of post-traumatic stress disorders in World War I soldiers].

    Lemke, S

    2007-01-01

    The concept of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was to be verified considering World War I soldiers suffering from psychiatric and neurologic diseases. According to hypotheses, relevant circumstances of the case history and significance of the direct military action had to be examined. In 2002, medical histories dating from 1914 to 1921 of male soldiers in Jena, Germany, were analyzed. Statistical examination carried out by means of the chi2 test revealed mental illness more frequently in soldiers with relevant family anamnesis, previous psychiatric treatment, or degree of voluntariness than in soldiers not so characterized. The accumulation of mental illnesses was lower in soldiers involved in military actions or directly with firing weapons than in soldiers never involved in battles. These results are in accord with historical but not current literature on PTSD. The author is of the opinion that psychiatric anamnesis is not given enough consideration in the concept of PTSD.

  1. A Study of the Impact of Cannabis on Doses of Discharge Antipsychotic Medication in Individuals with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Babatope, Taiwo; Chotalia, Jigar; Elkhatib, Rania; Mohite, Satyajit; Shah, Joel; Goddu, Sumana; Patel, Ruchir Arvind; Aimienwanu, Osarhiemen Ruth; Patel, Devanshu; Makanjuola, Titilayo; Okusaga, Olaoluwa O

    2016-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder have a high prevalence of comorbid cannabis use disorder (CUD). CUD has been associated with poorer outcomes in patients. We compared doses of antipsychotic medications at the time of discharge from hospital among inpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder with or without concurrent cannabis use. We reviewed the medical records of patients (N = 8157) with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder discharged from the hospital between 2008 and 2012. The patients were divided into two groups; those with urine drug tests positive for cannabis and those negative for cannabis. Doses of antipsychotic medications were converted to chlorpromazine equivalents. Bivariate analyses were done with Student's t test for continuous variables and χ 2 test for categorical variables. Linear regression was carried out to adjust for potential confounders. Unadjusted analysis revealed that the cannabis positive group was discharged on lower doses of antipsychotic medication compared with the cannabis negative group (geometric mean chlorpromazine equivalent doses 431.22 ± 2.20 vs 485.18 ± 2.21; P schizoaffective disorder.

  2. Teaching medical students about communication in speech-language disorders: Effects of a lecture and a workshop.

    Saldert, Charlotta; Forsgren, Emma; Hartelius, Lena

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of an interactive workshop involving speech-language pathology students on medical students' knowledge about communication in relation to speech-language disorders. Fifty-nine medical students received a lecture about speech-language disorders. Twenty-six of them also participated in a workshop on communication with patients with speech-language disorders. All students completed a 12-item questionnaire exploring knowledge and attitudes towards communication before and after the lecture or the workshop. The results from the two groups' self-ratings of confidence in knowledge were compared with expert-ratings of their ability to choose suitable communicative strategies. Both the lecture and the workshop increased the students' confidence in knowledge about speech-language disorders and how to support communication. Only the workshop group also displayed a statistically significant increase in expert-rated ability and changed their attitude regarding responsibility for the communication in cases of speech-language disorders. There were no statistically significant correlations between the student's own confidence ratings and the experts' ratings of ability. Increased confidence in knowledge from learning is not always reflected in actual knowledge in how to communicate. However, an interactive workshop proved to increase medical students' expert-rated ability and attitudes related to communication in cases of speech-language disorders.

  3. A Medical Cloud-Based Platform for Respiration Rate Measurement and Hierarchical Classification of Breath Disorders

    Atena Roshan Fekr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of human respiratory signals is crucial in cyberbiological systems. A disordered breathing pattern can be the first symptom of different physiological, mechanical, or psychological dysfunctions. Therefore, a real-time monitoring of the respiration patterns, as well as respiration rate is a critical need in medical applications. There are several methods for respiration rate measurement. However, despite their accuracy, these methods are expensive and could not be integrated in a body sensor network. In this work, we present a real-time cloud-based platform for both monitoring the respiration rate and breath pattern classification, remotely. The proposed system is designed particularly for patients with breathing problems (e.g., respiratory complications after surgery or sleep disorders. Our system includes calibrated accelerometer sensor, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE and cloud-computing model. We also suggest a procedure to improve the accuracy of respiration rate for patients at rest positions. The overall error in the respiration rate calculation is obtained 0.53% considering SPR-BTA spirometer as the reference. Five types of respiration disorders, Bradapnea, Tachypnea, Cheyn-stokes, Kaussmal, and Biot’s breathing are classified based on hierarchical Support Vector Machine (SVM with seven different features. We have evaluated the performance of the proposed classification while it is individualized to every subject (case 1 as well as considering all subjects (case 2. Since the selection of kernel function is a key factor to decide SVM’s performance, in this paper three different kernel functions are evaluated. The experiments are conducted with 11 subjects and the average accuracy of 94.52% for case 1 and the accuracy of 81.29% for case 2 are achieved based on Radial Basis Function (RBF. Finally, a performance evaluation has been done for normal and impaired subjects considering sensitivity, specificity and G-mean parameters

  4. Occlusion and temporomandibular disorders: a malpractice case with medical legal considerations.

    Bucci, M B; Aversa, M; Guarda-Nardini, L; Manfredini, D

    2011-01-01

    Occlusion and temporomandibular The issue of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) diagnosis and treatment has become a matter of increasing interest in the medical legal field in recent years. The old-fashioned theories based on the occlusal paradigm was proven to be erroneous, and clinicians who still provide irreversible treatments to TMD patients have to be conscious of the potential legal consequences of their behavior. The present paper described an illustrative case report of a patient to whom extensive and irreversible occlusal therapies were performed with the unique aim to provide relief from TMD symptoms. The treatment was unsuccessful and the dental practitioner was called into cause for a professional liability claim. The clinician was judged guilty of malpractice on the basis of the lack of scientific evidence of the irreversible occlusal approaches to TMD, which were erroneously used and did not give the patient any benefit, thus forcing him to a non necessary financial and biological cost. The failure to satisfy the contract with the patient, which is usually not covered by any insurance company, forced the practitioner to give the money back to the patient. The ethical and legal implications of such case were discussed, with particular focus on the concept that medical legal advices need to satisfy the highest standards of evidence and have to be strictly based on scientific knowledge.

  5. Abnormalities of white matter microstructure in unmedicated obsessive-compulsive disorder and changes after medication.

    Qing Fan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormalities of myelin integrity have been reported in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD using multi-parameter maps of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. However, it was still unknown to what degree these abnormalities might be affected by pharmacological treatment. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the abnormalities of white matter microstructure including myelin integrity exist in OCD and whether they are affected by medication. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parameter maps of DTI, including fractional anisotropy (FA, axial diffusivity (AD, radial diffusivity (RD and mean diffusivity (MD, were acquired from 27 unmedicated OCD patients (including 13 drug-naïve individuals and 23 healthy controls. Voxel-based analysis was then performed to detect regions with significant group difference. We compared the DTI-derived parameters of 15 patients before and after 12-week Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI therapies. Significant differences of DTI-derived parameters were observed between OCD and healthy groups in multiple structures, mainly within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical loop. An increased RD in combination with no change in AD among OCD patients was found in the left medial superior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal lobe, occipital lobe, striatum, insula and right midbrain. There was no statistical difference in DTI-derived parameters between drug-naive and previously medicated OCD patients. After being medicated, OCD patients showed a reduction in RD of the left striatum and right midbrain, and in MD of the right midbrain. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary findings suggest that abnormalities of white matter microstructure, particularly in terms of myelin integrity, are primarily located within the fronto-striato-thalamo-cortical circuit of individuals with OCD. Some abnormalities may be partly reversed by SSRI treatment.

  6. Outcomes of an inpatient medical nutritional rehabilitation protocol in children and adolescents with eating disorders.

    Peebles, Rebecka; Lesser, Andrew; Park, Courtney Cheek; Heckert, Kerri; Timko, C Alix; Lantzouni, Eleni; Liebman, Ronald; Weaver, Laurel

    2017-01-01

    Medical stabilization through inpatient nutritional rehabilitation is often necessary for patients with eating disorders (EDs) but includes the inherent risk of refeeding syndrome. Here we describe our experience of implementing and sustaining an inpatient nutritional rehabilitation protocol designed to strategically prepare patients with EDs and their families for discharge to a home setting in an efficient and effective manner from a general adolescent medicine unit. We report outcomes at admission, discharge, and 4-weeks follow-up. Protocol development, implementation, and unique features of the protocol, are described. Data were collected retrospectively as part of a continuous quality improvement (QI) initiative. Safety outcomes were the clinical need for phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium supplementation, other evidence of refeeding syndrome, and unexpected readmissions within one month of discharge. The value outcome was length of stay (LOS). Treatment outcomes were the percentage median BMI (MBMI) change from admission to discharge, and from discharge to 4-weeks follow-up visit. A total of 215 patients (88% F, 12% M) were included. Patients averaged 15.3 years old (5.8-23.2y); 64% had AN, 18% had atypical anorexia (AtAN), 6% bulimia nervosa (BN), 5% purging disorder (PD), 4% avoidant-restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), and 3% had an unspecified food and eating disorder (UFED). Average LOS was 11 days. Initial mean calorie level for patients at admission was 1466 and at discharge 3800 kcals/day. Phosphorus supplementation for refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) was needed in 14% of inpatients; full-threshold refeeding syndrome did not occur. Only 3.8% were rehospitalized in the thirty days after discharge. Patients averaged 86.1% of a median MBMI for age and gender, 91.4% MBMI at discharge, and 100.9% MBMI at 4-weeks follow-up. Mean percentage MBMI differences between time points were significantly different (admission-discharge: 5.3%, p  <0

  7. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    Chien WT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wai Tong Chien, Annie LK Yip School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong Abstract: During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have

  8. Impact of Psychoeducation on Knowledge of and Attitude Toward Medications in Clients With Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorders.

    Choe, Kwisoon; Sung, Byung-Ju; Kang, Youngmi; Yoo, So Yeon

    2016-04-01

    To examine a psychoeducational intervention's effects on knowledge and attitudes toward antipsychotic medication in clients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders. A one-group pretest-posttest design was employed. A convenience sample (61 psychiatric clients aged 20 or above) was recruited from a Korean mental health center. At baseline, participants had limited knowledge (M = 50.89, range: 27-77, SD = 12.05) of and negative feelings toward antipsychotic medications (M = -.89, range: -8 to 8, SD = 4.27). Both measures significantly improved post-intervention. A psychoeducational intervention improved clients' knowledge of and attitudes toward antipsychotic medications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Overview of Multiple Sclerosis: Medical, Psychosocial, and Vocational Aspects of a Chronic and Unpredictable Neurological Disorder

    Rumrill, Phillip D., Jr.; Roessler, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an overview of multiple sclerosis (MS), one of the most common neurological disorders in the western hemisphere. Medical and psychosocial aspects of the disease such as causes and risk factors, diagnosis, incidence and prevalence, symptoms, courses, and treatment are described. Existing research regarding the employment…

  10. Predictors and Moderators of Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Medication for the Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors and moderators of response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED). Method: 108 BED patients in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial testing CBT and fluoxetine treatments were assessed prior, throughout, and posttreatment. Demographic factors,…

  11. Association between eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    M. Miri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders are of common problems in adolescence and adulthood especially among athletes. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the association of eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 226 athlete students and 350 non-athlete students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences during 2013-2014. Students who followed a specific sport field and had participated in at least one sport event were considered as athlete students. All athlete students were entered the study by census method. Non-athlete students were selected among students who had not any exercise activity and by random sampling method. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, and Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ. Data were analyzed using T-test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean age was 21.92±3.19 years and mean body mass index (BMI was 22.24±3.18 kg/m2. The frequency of eating disorders was 11.5% among the athlete students and 11.2% among the non-athlete students. Anorexia nervosa was found to be more prevalent than bulimia nervosa in both groups. The students with normal BMI had better body image perception and less eating disorders symptoms than other students. The association of age, educational level, and gender with eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. The association of eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. Eating disorders were more prevalent in males than females but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction are relatively prevalent among both athletes and non-athlete students and BMI is predictor of eating disorders.

  12. [Traditional Chinese medicine inheritance system analysis of professor Ding Yuanqing in treating tic disorder medication based on experience].

    Sun, Lu-yan; Li, Qing-peng; Zhao, Li-li; Ding, Yuan-qing

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the incidence of tic disorders has increased, and it is not uncommon for the patients to treat the disease. The pathogenesis and pathogenesis of Western medicine are not yet clear, the clinical commonly used western medicine has many adverse reactions, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) research is increasingly valued. Based on the software of TCM inheritance assistant system, this paper discusses Ding Yuanqing's experience in treating tic disorder with Professor. Collect yuan Qing Ding professor in treating tic disorder of medical records by association rules Apriori algorithm, complex system entropy clustering without supervision and data mining method, carries on the analysis to the selected 800 prescriptions, to determine the frequency of use of prescription drugs, the association rules between the drug and digging out the 12 core combination and the first six new prescription, medication transferred to the liver and extinguish wind, cooling blood and relieving convulsion, Qingxin soothe the nerves, with the card cut, flexible application, strict compatibility.

  13. Depot-medication compliance for patients with psychotic disorders: the importance of illness insight and treatment motivation.

    Noordraven, Ernst L; Wierdsma, André I; Blanken, Peter; Bloemendaal, Anthony Ft; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2016-01-01

    Noncompliance is a major problem for patients with a psychotic disorder. Two important risk factors for noncompliance that have a severe negative impact on treatment outcomes are impaired illness insight and lack of motivation. Our cross-sectional study explored how they are related to each other and their compliance with depot medication. Interviews were conducted in 169 outpatients with a psychotic disorder taking depot medication. Four patient groups were defined based on low or high illness insight and on low or high motivation. The associations between depot-medication compliance, motivation, and insight were illustrated using generalized linear models. Generalized linear model showed a significant interaction effect between motivation and insight. Patients with poor insight and high motivation for treatment were more compliant (94%) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.821, 3.489) with their depot medication than patients with poor insight and low motivation (61%) (95% CI: 0.288, 0.615). Patients with both insight and high motivation for treatment were less compliant (73%) (95% CI: 0.719, 1.315) than those with poor insight and high motivation. Motivation for treatment was more strongly associated with depot-medication compliance than with illness insight. Being motivated to take medication, whether to get better or for other reasons, may be a more important factor than having illness insight in terms of improving depot-medication compliance. Possible implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  14. 78 FR 17917 - Medical Waivers for Merchant Mariner Credential Applicants With a History of Seizure Disorders

    2013-03-25

    ... be considered for a waiver. (1) Mariners with a history of epilepsy or seizure disorder may be... Waivers for Merchant Mariner Credential Applicants With a History of Seizure Disorders AGENCY: Coast Guard... of seizure disorders. Coast Guard regulations provide that convulsive disorders (also known as...

  15. The use of medications approved for Alzheimer’s disease in autism spectrum disorder: a systematic review

    Daniel eRossignol

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects 1 in 68 children in the United States. Even though it is a common disorder, only two medications (Risperidone and Aripiprazole are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA to treat symptoms associated with ASD. However these medications are approved to treat irritability, which is not a core symptom of ASD. A number of novel medications which have not been approved by the FDA to treat ASD have been used off-label in some studies to treat ASD symptoms, including medications approved for Alzheimer’s disease. Interestingly, some of these studies are high quality, double-blind, placebo-controlled (DBPC studies. This article systematically reviews studies published through April, 2014 which examined the use of Alzheimer’s medications in ASD, including donepezil (7 studies, 2 were DBPC, 5/7 reported improvements, galantamine (4 studies, 2 were DBPC, all reported improvements, rivastigmine (1 study reporting improvements, tacrine (1 study reporting improvements and memantine (9 studies, 1 was DBPC, 8 reported improvements. An evidence-based scale was used to rank each medication. Collectively, these studies reported improvements in expressive language and communication, receptive language, social interaction, irritability, hyperactivity, attention, eye contact, emotional lability, repetitive or self-stimulatory behaviors, motor planning, disruptive behaviors, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, lethargy, overall ASD behaviors and increased REM sleep. Reported side effects are reviewed and include irritability, gastrointestinal problems, verbal or behavioral regression, headaches, irritability, rash, tremor, sedation, vomiting, and speech problems. Both galantamine and memantine had sufficient evidence ranking for improving both core and associated symptoms of ASD. Given the lack of medications approved to treat ASD, further studies on novel medications, including

  16. Association of social anxiety disorder with depression and quality of life among medical undergraduate students.

    Ratnani, Imran Jahangirali; Vala, Ashok Ukabhai; Panchal, Bharat Navinchandra; Tiwari, Deepak Sachchidanand; Karambelkar, Smruti S; Sojitra, Milankumar G; Nagori, Nidhi N

    2017-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD), (also known as social phobia), is characterized by intense fear of social interaction and often associated with social avoidance and impairments. There is high risk for depression, substance use disorder, and suicide among them. It is an observational, cross-sectional, single centered, questionnaire-based study assessing the frequency of SAD and depression and their possible association with quality of life among 290 consenting medical undergraduate students. Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI II), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment scale (WHOQOL-BREF) were used to screen and assess severity of SAD, depression, and quality of life, respectively. The statistical analysis of proportions was done by Chi-square test, while the scores of SPIN, BDI II, and WHOQOL-BREF was compared using Mann-Whitney test or Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn posttest multiple comparison, using GraphPad InStat version 3.06. Frequency of SAD is 11.37%, and depression is 8.96%. Females are more likely to experience SAD. Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depression ( P social fear ( P = 0.02). Participants staying away from their family are more likely to experience social anxiety in comparison to their peers ( P = 0.01). Severity of depression is correlated with severity of social anxiety (Spearman r = 0.4423 [0.3416-0.5329], P < 0.0001). Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depressive symptoms and have poor quality of life and vice versa.

  17. Association of social anxiety disorder with depression and quality of life among medical undergraduate students

    Imran Jahangirali Ratnani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Social anxiety disorder (SAD, (also known as social phobia, is characterized by intense fear of social interaction and often associated with social avoidance and impairments. There is high risk for depression, substance use disorder, and suicide among them. Subjects and Methods: It is an observational, cross-sectional, single centered, questionnaire-based study assessing the frequency of SAD and depression and their possible association with quality of life among 290 consenting medical undergraduate students. Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN, Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI II, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment scale (WHOQOL-BREF were used to screen and assess severity of SAD, depression, and quality of life, respectively. The statistical analysis of proportions was done by Chi-square test, while the scores of SPIN, BDI II, and WHOQOL-BREF was compared using Mann–Whitney test or Kruskal–Wallis test followed by Dunn posttest multiple comparison, using GraphPad InStat version 3.06. Results: Frequency of SAD is 11.37%, and depression is 8.96%. Females are more likely to experience SAD. Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depression (P < 0.0001 and have poor quality of life (P = 0.01. Participants with depression have higher SPIN score (P < 0.0001 and poor quality of life (P < 0.0001. Females are more likely to experience social fear (P = 0.02. Participants staying away from their family are more likely to experience social anxiety in comparison to their peers (P = 0.01. Severity of depression is correlated with severity of social anxiety (Spearman r = 0.4423 [0.3416–0.5329], P < 0.0001. Conclusion: Participants with SAD are more likely to experience depressive symptoms and have poor quality of life and vice versa.

  18. Understanding the effects of stimulant medications on cognition in individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder: a decade of progress.

    Swanson, James; Baler, Ruben D; Volkow, Nora D

    2011-01-01

    The use of stimulant drugs for the treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most widespread pharmacological interventions in child psychiatry and behavioral pediatrics. This treatment is well grounded on controlled studies showing efficacy of low oral doses of methylphenidate and amphetamine in reducing the behavioral symptoms of the disorder as reported by parents and teachers, both for the cognitive (inattention and impulsivity) and non-cognitive (hyperactivity) domains. Our main aim is to review the objectively measured cognitive effects that accompany the subjectively assessed clinical responses to stimulant medications. Recently, methods from the cognitive neurosciences have been used to provide information about brain processes that underlie the cognitive deficits of ADHD and the cognitive effects of stimulant medications. We will review some key findings from the recent literature, and then offer interpretations of the progress that has been made over the past decade in understanding the cognitive effects of stimulant medication on individuals with ADHD.

  19. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder in an 11-Year Old South American Boy: Medical and Cultural Challenges.

    Schermbrucker, Jonah; Kimber, Melissa; Johnson, Natasha; Kearney, Sarah; Couturier, Jennifer

    2017-07-01

    Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) is new in the DSM-5, replacing the DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood. ARFID has no age criterion, and therefore addresses eating disturbances across the lifespan. This report illustrates the case of an 11-year-old boy of Colombian ancestry with ARFID and explores the role of culture in the diagnosis of ARFID. To date, literature describing this disorder is limited. ARFID is often seen in the child and adolescent population and can have significant medical consequences, including weight loss, hemodynamic instability, and growth retardation. Studies examining the potential cultural challenges of diagnosing and treating ARFID would benefit patients, as well as health professionals working in primary care, pediatrics, and psychiatry. This paper is intended to inform the reader about this multifaceted disorder, and to generate interest for future research.

  20. Reinforcement and stimulant medication ameliorate deficient response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Rosch, Keri S.; Fosco, Whitney D.; Pelham, William E.; Waxmonsky, James G.; Bubnik, Michelle G.; Hawk, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which reinforcement, stimulant medication, and their combination impact response inhibition in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Across three studies, participants with ADHD (n=111, 25 girls) and typically-developing (TD) controls (n=33, 6 girls) completed a standard version of the stop signal task (SST) and/or a reinforcement-manipulation SST with performance-contingent points. In two of these studies, these tasks were performed under placebo or 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg methylphenidate (MPH) conditions. Cross-study comparisons were conducted to test hypotheses regarding the separate and combined effects of reinforcement and methylphenidate on response inhibition among children with ADHD relative to TD controls. Baseline response inhibition was worse among children with ADHD compared to controls. MPH produced dose-related improvements in response inhibition in children with ADHD; compared to non-medicated TD controls, 0.3 mg/kg MPH normalized deficient response inhibition, and 0.6 mg/kg MPH resulted in better inhibition in children with ADHD. Reinforcement improved response inhibition to a greater extent for children with ADHD than for TD children, normalizing response inhibition. The combination of MPH and reinforcement improved response inhibition among children with ADHD compared to reinforcement alone and MPH alone, also resulting in normalization of response inhibition despite repeated task exposure. Deficient response inhibition commonly observed in children with ADHD is significantly improved with MPH and/or reinforcement, normalizing inhibition relative to TD children tested under standard conditions. PMID:25985978

  1. Patient-Centered Medical Home and Family Burden in Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Ronis, Sarah D; Baldwin, Constance D; Blumkin, Aaron; Kuhlthau, Karen; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can impair child health and functioning, but its effects on the family's economic burden are not well understood. The authors assessed this burden in US families of children with ADHD, and the degree to which access to a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) might reduce this burden. We conducted cross-sectional analyses of 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 National Surveys of Children with Special Health Care Needs, focusing on families of children with ADHD. They defined family economic burden as (1) family financial problems (annual expenses for the child's health care or illness-related financial problems for the family) and/or (2) family employment problems (job loss, work time loss, or failure to change jobs to avoid insurance loss). Relative risk models assessed associations between PCMH and family economic burden, adjusted for child age, sex, ethnicity, ADHD severity, poverty status, caregiver education, and insurance. In 2009, 26% of families reported financial problems because of the child's ADHD, 2.1% reported out-of-pocket expenses >5% of income, and 36% reported employment problems. Only 38% reported care that met all 5 criteria for a PCMH (similar to rates in 2005-2006). In multivariable analysis, care in a PCMH was associated with 48% lower relative risk (RR) of financial problems (RR = 0.52, p family-centered care and care coordination were more strongly associated with lower burden. The economic burdens of families with ADHD are significant but may be alleviated by family-centered care and care coordination in a medical home.

  2. Medications development for substance-use disorders: contextual influences (dis)incentivizing pharmaceutical-industry positioning.

    Janero, David R

    2014-11-01

    The significant contribution of substance-use disorders (SUDs) to the global-disease burden and associated unmet medical needs has not engendered a commensurate level of pharma-industry research and development (R&D) for novel SUD therapeutics invention. Analysis of contextual factors shaping this position suggests potential routes toward incentivizing R&D commitment for that purpose. This article considers multiple primary factors that have consorted to disincentivize pharma industry's operating in the SUD space: ill-understood pathology; variegated treatments and patient profiles; involved clinical trials; and - with particular reference to SUDs-negative cultural/business stigmas and shallow commercial precedent. Industry incentivization for SUD drug innovation requires progress on several fronts, including: translational experimental data and systems; personalized, holistic SUD treatment approaches; interactions among pharma, nonindustry constituencies, and the medical profession with vested interests in countering negative stereotypes and expanding SUD treatment options; and public-private alliances focused on improving SUD pharmacotherapy. Given the well-entrenched business stance whereby the prospect of future profits in major markets largely determines drug-company R&D investment trajectory, strategic initiatives offering substantial reductions in the risks and opportunity (i.e., time and money) costs associated with SUD drug discovery are likely to be the most potent drivers for encouraging mainstream industry positioning in this therapeutic area. Such initiatives could originate from front-loaded R&D operational and back-loaded patent, regulatory, marketing and health-care policy reforms. These may be too involved and protracted for the turbulent pharmaceutical industry to entertain amid its recent retrenchment from psychiatric/CNS diseases and intense pressures to increase productivity and shareholder value.

  3. Prescription procedures in medication for relapse prevention after inpatient treatment for alcohol use disorders in Switzerland.

    Buri, Caroline; Moggi, Franz; Giovanoli, Anna; Strik, Werner

    2007-01-01

    In randomized controlled trials with high internal validity, pharmacotherapy using acamprosate, naltrexone, and, to a somewhat lesser extent, disulfiram has proved effective in preventing relapse in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUD). There remains, however, a paucity of studies with sufficient external validity in which the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in clinical practice is investigated. This study aimed to make a contribution to close this gap in research. In this naturalistic, prospective study, a comparison on indices of substance use, psychiatric symptoms, and treatment service utilization was carried out using samples of 92 patients who received pharmacotherapy and 323 patients who did not receive pharmacotherapy following discharge from 12 residential AUD programmes (index stay). Patients that received pharmacotherapy were more likely to use alcohol during the index stay and at the 1-year follow-up. Moreover, this patient group more readily utilized treatment services during a 2-year period prior to and a 1-year period following index stay than patients who were not given pharmacotherapy. Nevertheless, when pharmacotherapy was prescribed before first post-treatment alcohol use, it was associated with delay of alcohol use, fewer relapses, and a reduced need for inpatient treatment. In many cases, however, medication was not prescribed until alcohol use and relapse had occurred. The length of time to first alcohol use was longer, and the cumulative abstinence rate higher, for disulfiram than for acamprosate, the latter being generally prescribed for more severely alcohol-dependent patients. There is a need for further studies to probe the reasons why medication for relapse prevention is not prescribed upon discharge from residential treatment and for less severely alcohol-dependent patients.

  4. Positive posttraumatic stress disorder screens among first-time medical cannabis patients: prevalence and association with other substance use.

    Bohnert, Kipling M; Perron, Brian E; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Kleinberg, Felicia; Jannausch, Mary; Ilgen, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have passed legislation allowing for the use of medical cannabis for those individuals with qualifying medical conditions, which include posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for a growing number of states. Little information is available regarding PTSD among medical cannabis patients. This study seeks to provide initial data on this topic by examining the prevalence and correlates of positive PTSD screens among a sample of patients seeking medical cannabis certification for the first time (n=186). Twenty-three percent (42/186; 95% confidence interval [CI] =17%-29%) of the patients in the study sample screened positive for PTSD. Moreover, the group that screened positive for PTSD had higher percentages of lifetime prescription opioid, cocaine, prescription sedative, and street opioid use, as well as a higher percentage of recent prescription sedative use, than the group that screened negative for PTSD. These findings highlight the relatively common use of other substances among medical cannabis patients with significant PTSD symptoms, even when compared with other patients seeking medical cannabis for the first time. As a growing number of states include PTSD among the list of qualifying medical conditions for medical cannabis, additional research is needed to better characterize the longitudinal relationship between medical cannabis use and PTSD symptoms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Resting State Brain Network Disturbances Related to Hypomania and Depression in Medication-Free Bipolar Disorder.

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Beall, Erik B; Hulvershorn, Leslie A; Altinay, Murat; Karne, Harish; Anand, Amit

    2016-12-01

    Research on resting functional brain networks in bipolar disorder (BP) has been unable to differentiate between disturbances related to mania or depression, which is necessary to understand the mechanisms leading to each state. Past research has also been unable to elucidate the impact of BP-related network disturbances on the organizational properties of the brain (eg, communication efficiency). Thus, the present work sought to isolate network disturbances related to BP, fractionate these into components associated with manic and depressive symptoms, and characterize the impact of disturbances on network function. Graph theory was used to analyze resting functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 60 medication-free patients meeting the criteria for BP and either a current hypomanic (n=30) or depressed (n=30) episode and 30 closely age/sex-matched healthy controls. Correction for multiple comparisons was carried out. Compared with controls, BP patients evidenced hyperconnectivity in a network involving right amygdala. Fractionation revealed that (hypo)manic symptoms were associated with hyperconnectivity in an overlapping network and disruptions in the brain's 'small-world' network organization. Depressive symptoms predicted hyperconnectivity in a network involving orbitofrontal cortex along with a less resilient global network organization. Findings provide deeper insight into the differential pathophysiological processes associated with hypomania and depression, along with the particular impact these differential processes have on network function.

  6. Seeing the doctor without fear: www.doctortea.org for the desensitization for medical visits in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Boada, Leticia; Parellada, Mara

    Doctor Tea is an online website designed to facilitate medical visits for those with autism spectrum disorder and other disabilities. People diagnosed with autism not only have greater medical needs than the general population, but also have particular characteristics that are often not accommodated by medical services. This lack of medical accommodation often creates a very complicated, and sometimes traumatic experience, when visiting medical facilities. Individuals with autism have great difficulty understanding social situations and contexts, such as medical tests or consultations, as well as difficulty in tolerating new situations and atypical sensory thresholds. Doctor Tea aims to reduce anxiety before medical consultations and procedures from a safe and well-known environment (school, home, etc.). The website, www.doctortea.org, provides information and materials (videos, cartoon, 3D animations, pictogram sequences, etc.) about the most frequent medical procedures and practices for patients with autism. The website also offers information to the doctors and families of patients with autism about the most common medical problems associated with autism. A total of 17,199 different users visited the website during 2015, with a total of 23,348 online visitors from more than 70 different countries since the website's release in November 2014. The familiarisation with the medical procedures and its environment appears to decrease the anxiety in patients with disabilities during medical visits, as well as optimising the effectiveness of their medical visits and tests. Copyright © 2016 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of psychotropic medication in patients with emotionally unstable personality disorder under the care of UK mental health services.

    Paton, Carol; Crawford, Michael J; Bhatti, Sumera F; Patel, Maxine X; Barnes, Thomas R E

    2015-04-01

    Guideline recommendations for the pharmacologic treatment of personality disorder lack consensus, particularly for emotionally unstable personality disorder (EUPD), and there is limited information on current prescribing practice in the United Kingdom. To characterize the nature and quality of current prescribing practice for personality disorder across the United Kingdom, as part of a quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey of self-selected psychiatric services providing care for adults with personality disorder (ICD-10 criteria) was conducted. Data were collected during May 2012. Of 2,600 patients with a diagnosis of personality disorder, more than two-thirds (68%) had a diagnosis of EUPD. Almost all (92%) patients in the EUPD subgroup were prescribed psychotropic medication, most commonly an antidepressant or antipsychotic, principally for symptoms and behaviors that characterize EUPD, particularly affective dysregulation. Prescribing patterns were similar between those who had a diagnosed comorbid mental illness and those who had EUPD alone, but the latter group was less likely to have had their medication reviewed over the previous year, particularly with respect to tolerability (53% vs 43%). The use of psychotropic medication in EUPD in the United Kingdom is largely outside the licensed indications. Whether the treatment target is identified as intrinsic symptoms of EUPD or comorbid mental illness may depend on the diagnostic threshold of individual clinicians. Compared with prescribing for EUPD where there is judged to be a comorbid mental illness, the use of off-label medication for EUPD alone is less systematically reviewed and monitored, so opportunities for learning may be lost. Treatment may be continued long term by default. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  8. Impact of one-dose package dispensing with patient counseling on medication adherence in geriatrics suffering from chronic disorders

    Narayana Goruntla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medication nonadherence in elderly patients could result in a waste of medical expenses in a long-time span as well as deterioration of the patient's medical condition. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of one-dose package dispensing with patient counseling on medication adherence among elderly patients suffering from chronic disorders. Settings and Design: This is prospective, open-labeled, randomized trial carried out at dispensing pharmacy of the secondary care referral hospital, located in resource-limited settings of Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subjects and Methods: A total of 330 (aged ≥60 years patients were randomly assigned to one of three study groups: Group A (n = 110, no change in dosing and packing; Group B (n = 110, one-dose package dispensing; Group C (n = 110, One-dose package dispensing with patient counseling. Medication adherence levels were measured using a pill count and visual analog scale (VAS method at baseline and follow-up (after 1 month. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to represent the sociodemographic, clinical, and medication adherence profile of study participants. One-way ANOVA test is used to assess significant differences between three groups with a P 60 years who are on multiple medications can benefit from one-dose package dispensing and appropriate counseling. This will improve medication adherence hence better outcomes.

  9. The transition to medication adoption in publicly funded substance use disorder treatment programs: organizational structure, culture, and resources.

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2014-05-01

    Medications for the treatment of substance use disorders (SUDs) are not widely available in publicly funded SUD treatment programs. Few studies have drawn on longitudinal data to examine the organizational characteristics associated with programs transitioning from not delivering any pharmacotherapy to adopting at least one SUD medication. Using two waves of panel longitudinal data collected over a 5-year period, we measured the transition to medication adoption in a cohort of 190 publicly funded treatment organizations that offered no SUD medications at baseline. Independent variables included organizational characteristics, medical resources, funding, treatment culture, and detailing activities by pharmaceutical companies. Of 190 programs not offering SUD pharmacotherapy at baseline, 22.6% transitioned to offering at least one SUD medication at follow-up approximately 5 years later. Multivariate logistic regression results indicated that the employment of at least one physician at baseline, having a greater proportion of Medicaid clients, and pharmaceutical detailing were positively associated with medication adoption. Adoption of pharmacotherapy was more likely in programs that had greater medical resources, Medicaid funding, and contact with pharmaceutical companies. Given the potential expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, patients served by publicly funded programs may gain greater access to such treatments, but research is needed to document health reform's impact on this sector of the treatment system.

  10. Investigation of Factors Affecting Musculoskeletal Disorders among Hospital Emergency Nurses of Qom University of Medical Sciences, Iran

    Mohsen Farahabadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Musculoskeletal disorders are one of the most common and costly occupational injuries, because they account for one-third of work-related injuries per year. In this study, the factors affecting musculoskeletal disorders, were investigated among hospital emergency nurses of Qom University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was performed as a descriptive cross-sectional study using census method on 127 nurses in the Emergency Department of hospitals affiliated to Qom University of Medical Sciences in 2014. The participants completed the Nordic musculoskeletal disorders questionnaire. Data analysis was carried out using Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square Statistical tests. The significance level was considered to be 0.05. Results: In this study, 46 (36.2% participants were men and the remaining were women. The mean age was 33.87±8.892 and the mean work hours per week was 57.71±17.675. The overall prevalence of musculoskeletal disorder was reported to be 82.7%, which had significant relationships with weight, interference with daily work, and pain per day (p0.05. Also, only 16 subjects had participated in ergonomics workshops and 118 subjects were aware of the occupational risks. Conclusion: According to the results of this study and high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among nurses, it is suggested that given the type of disorder, change in the way of job performance, adjustment of working hours, holding ergonomics workshops, and preventive measures be placed on the agenda. Keywords: Musculoskeletal disorder; Emergency nurses; Occupational injuries.

  11. Assessing medication adherence and healthcare utilization and cost patterns among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder.

    Karve, Sudeep; Markowitz, Michael; Fu, Dong-Jing; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Candrilli, Sean D; Alphs, Larry

    2014-06-01

    Hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder have a high risk of re-hospitalization. However, limited data exist evaluating critical post-discharge periods during which the risk of re-hospitalization is significant. Among hospital-discharged patients with schizoaffective disorder, we assessed pharmacotherapy adherence and healthcare utilization and costs during sequential 60-day clinical periods before schizoaffective disorder-related hospitalization and post-hospital discharge. From the MarketScan(®) Medicaid database (2004-2008), we identified patients (≥18 years) with a schizoaffective disorder-related inpatient admission. Study measures including medication adherence and healthcare utilization and costs were assessed during sequential preadmission and post-discharge periods. We conducted univariate and multivariable regression analyses to compare schizoaffective disorder-related and all-cause healthcare utilization and costs (in 2010 US dollars) between each adjacent 60-day post-discharge periods. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. We identified 1,193 hospital-discharged patients with a mean age of 41 years. The mean medication adherence rate was 46% during the 60-day period prior to index inpatient admission, which improved to 80% during the 60-day post-discharge period. Following hospital discharge, schizoaffective disorder-related healthcare costs were significantly greater during the initial 60-day period compared with the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period (mean US$2,370 vs US$1,765; p schizoaffective disorder-related costs declined during the 61- to 120-day post-discharge period and remained stable for the remaining post-discharge periods (days 121-365). We observed considerably lower (46%) adherence during 60 days prior to the inpatient admission; in comparison, adherence for the overall 6-month period was 8% (54%) higher. Our study findings suggest that both short-term (e.g., 60 days) and long-term (e.g., 6-12 months) medication

  12. Prevalence of common mental disorders among Dutch medical students and related use and need of mental health care: a cross-sectional study

    Gaspersz, Roxanne; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess common mental disorders and the related use and need for mental health care among clinically not yet active and clinically active medical students. All medical students (n=2266) at one Dutch medical university were approached. Students from study years 1-4 were

  13. The review of most frequently occurring medical disorders related to aetiology of autism and the methods of treatment.

    Cubala-Kucharska, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The medical understanding of autism has changed since it was first defined by Kanner. Nowadays medicine identifies many medical abnormalities and diseases, which may underline or aggravate the cognitive aspect, behavioural issues and general health in autists. This includes chronic inflammation of gastrointestinal tract, dysbiosis, maldigestion, malabsorption, malnutrition, food intolerance, allergies, chronic viral, fungal and bacterial infections, impaired kidney function, impaired detoxification of endo- and exotoxins, disorders of metal ion transportation. Treatment of the above mentioned conditions combined with improving detoxification mechanisms, followed by a special diet and individually customized supplementation of nutritional deficiencies may lead to the improvement of the functioning of these patients, changing their level of functioning and self-dependence. The aim of this paper is to present medical problems of children with autism which may be identified and treated by general practitioners as a review of current medical papers related to Autism Spectrum Disorder, in the context of author's professional experience, based on the medical cases from author's practice.

  14. Loose regulation of medical marijuana programs associated with higher rates of adult marijuana use but not cannabis use disorder.

    Williams, Arthur Robin; Santaella-Tenorio, Julian; Mauro, Christine M; Levin, Frances R; Martins, Silvia S

    2017-11-01

    Most US states have passed medical marijuana laws (MMLs), with great variation in program regulation impacting enrollment rates. We aimed to compare changes in rates of marijuana use, heavy use and cannabis use disorder across age groups while accounting for whether states enacted medicalized (highly regulated) or non-medical mml programs. Difference-in-differences estimates with time-varying state-level MML coded by program type (medicalized versus non-medical). Multi-level linear regression models adjusted for state-level random effects and covariates as well as historical trends in use. Nation-wide cross-sectional survey data from the US National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) restricted use data portal aggregated at the state level. Participants comprised 2004-13 NSDUH respondents (n ~ 67 500/year); age groups 12-17, 18-25 and 26+ years. States had implemented eight medicalized and 15 non-medical MML programs. Primary outcome measures included (1) active (past-month) marijuana use; (2) heavy use (> 300 days/year); and (3) cannabis use disorder diagnosis, based on DSM-IV criteria. Covariates included program type, age group and state-level characteristics throughout the study period. Adults 26+ years of age living in states with non-medical MML programs increased past-month marijuana use 1.46% (from 4.13 to 6.59%, P = 0.01), skewing towards greater heavy marijuana by 2.36% (from 14.94 to 17.30, P = 0.09) after MMLs were enacted. However, no associated increase in the prevalence of cannabis use disorder was found during the study period. Our findings do not show increases in prevalence of marijuana use among adults in states with medicalized MML programs. Additionally, there were no increases in adolescent or young adult marijuana outcomes following MML passage, irrespective of program type. Non-medical marijuana laws enacted in US states are associated with increased marijuana use, but only among adults aged 26+ years. Researchers and

  15. Testing tic suppression: comparing the effects of dexmethylphenidate to no medication in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Tourette's disorder.

    Lyon, Gholson J; Samar, Stephanie M; Conelea, Christine; Trujillo, Marcel R; Lipinski, Christina M; Bauer, Christopher C; Brandt, Bryan C; Kemp, Joshua J; Lawrence, Zoe E; Howard, Jonathan; Castellanos, F Xavier; Woods, Douglas; Coffey, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot study testing whether single-dose, immediate-release dexmethylphenidate (dMPH) can facilitate tic suppression in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and Tourette's disorder (TD) or chronic tic disorders. The primary hypothesis is that dMPH will improve behaviorally reinforced tic suppression in a standard tic suppression paradigm (TSP). Ten children with ADHD and TD were given dMPH on one visit and no medication on another, using a random crossover design. On both days, following a baseline period, subjects were reinforced for suppressing tics using a standard TSP. Thirteen subjects were enrolled; 10 subjects (mean age 12.7 +/- 2.6; 90% male) completed all study procedures. Relative to the no-medication condition, tics were reduced when children were given a single dose of dMPH. Behavioral reinforcement of tic suppression resulted in lower rates of tics compared to baseline, but dMPH did not enhance this suppression. Preliminary results indicate replication of prior studies of behavioral tic suppression in youths with TD and without ADHD. In addition, our findings indicate tic reduction (and not tic exacerbation) with acute dMPH challenge in children and adolescents with ADHD and TD.

  16. The MedlinePlus public user interface: studies of design challenges and opportunities

    Marill, Jennifer L.; Miller, Naomi; Kitendaugh, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Question: What are the challenges involved in designing, modifying, and improving a major health information portal that serves over sixty million page views a month? Setting: MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine's (NLM's) consumer health Website, is examined. Method: Challenges are presented as six “studies,” which describe selected design issues and how NLM staff resolved them. Main Result: Improving MedlinePlus is an iterative process. Changes in the public user interface are ongoing, reflecting Web design trends, usability testing recommendations, user survey results, new technical requirements, and the need to grow the site in an orderly way. Conclusion: Testing and analysis should accompany Website design modifications. New technologies may enhance a site but also introduce problems. Further modifications to MedlinePlus will be informed by the experiences described here. PMID:16404467

  17. [Impact of education program and clinical posting in psychiatry on medical students' stigmatizing attitudes towards psychiatry and psychiatric disorders].

    Simon, N; Verdoux, H

    2017-06-09

    The aim of the study was to explore whether a medical student education program and clinical posting in psychiatry had an impact on medical students' stigmatizing attitudes towards psychiatry and psychiatric disorders. Medical students from the University of Bordeaux were recruited during their 4-year course at the beginning of the academic education program in psychiatry. Medical students who were concomitantly in a clinical posting in wards of psychiatry or neurology were invited to participate in the study. The medical student version of the scale Mental Illness: Clinicians' Attitudes (MICA) was used to measure their attitudes towards psychiatry and persons with psychiatric disorder. This 16-item scale is designed to measure attitudes of health care professionals towards people with mental illness, a higher score indicating more stigmatizing attitudes. Items exploring history of psychiatric disorders in close persons were added at the end of the MICA scale. The questionnaire was completed twice by each student, at the beginning and the end of the 11-week clinical posting. All questionnaires were strictly anonymized. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify the variables independently associated with MICA total score. At the beginning of the education program and clinical posting, 174 students completed the MICA scale: the mean MICA total score was equal to 46.4 (SD 6.9) in students in clinical posting in psychiatry (n=72) and 45.1 (SD 7.01) in those in neurology (n=102). At the end of the academic and clinical training, 138 students again completed the questionnaire, with mean MICA total scores equal to 41.4 (SD 8.1) in students in clinical posting in psychiatry (n=51) and 43.5 (SD 7.3) in those in neurology (n=87). Multivariate analyses showed that lower total MICA scores were independently associated with the time of assessment (lower scores at the end of education program and clinical posting) (b=-2.8; P=0.001), female gender (b=-1.8; P=0

  18. Gender confirming medical interventions and eating disorder symptoms among transgender individuals.

    Testa, Rylan J; Rider, G Nicole; Haug, Nancy A; Balsam, Kimberly F

    2017-10-01

    Studies indicate that transgender individuals may be at risk of developing eating disorder symptoms (EDS). Elevated risk may be attributed to body dissatisfaction and/or societal reactions to nonconforming gender expression, such as nonaffirmation of a person's gender identity (e.g., using incorrect pronouns). Limited research suggests that gender-confirming medical interventions (GCMIs) may prevent or reduce EDS among transgender people. Participants included 154 transfeminine spectrum (TFS) and 288 transmasculine spectrum (TMS) individuals who completed the Trans Health Survey. Serial multiple mediation analyses controlling for age, education, and income were used to examine whether body satisfaction and nonaffirmation mediate any found relationships between various GCMIs (genital surgery, chest surgery, hormone use, hysterectomy, and hair removal) and EDS. For TFS individuals, the nonaffirmation to body satisfaction path mediated relationships between all GCMIs and EDS, although body satisfaction alone accounted for more of the indirect effects than this path for chest surgery. For TMS individuals, relationships between all GCMIs and EDS were mediated by the nonaffirmation to body satisfaction path. Findings support the hypothesis that GCMIs reduce experiences of nonaffirmation, which increases body satisfaction and thus decreases EDS. Among TFS participants, the relationship between chest surgery and lower levels of EDS was mediated most strongly by body satisfaction alone, suggesting that satisfaction with one's body may result in lower EDS even if affirmation from the external world is unchanged. Implications of these findings for intervention, policy, and legal efforts are discussed, and future research recommendations are provided. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. The use of medication against attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Denmark: a drug use study from a national perspective

    Pottegård, Anton; Bjerregaard, Bine Kjøller; Glintborg, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the study was to characterize the utilization of medication against attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in Denmark between 1995 and 2011 from a national perspective, by using population-based prescription data. Methods National data on drug use in Denmark between...... and lacking evidence of heavy users. However, the prescriber profile for incident users and the large regional variances raise concerns. It is therefore vital that the use of ADHD drugs is closely monitored....

  20. The Quality of Medication Treatment for Mental Disorders in the Department of Veterans Affairs and in Private-Sector Plans.

    Watkins, Katherine E; Smith, Brad; Akincigil, Ayse; Sorbero, Melony E; Paddock, Susan; Woodroffe, Abigail; Huang, Cecilia; Crystal, Stephen; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2016-04-01

    The quality of mental health care provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) was compared with care provided to a comparable population treated in the private sector. Two cohorts of individuals with mental disorders (schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, major depression, and substance use disorders) were created with VA administrative data (N=836,519) and MarketScan data (N=545,484). The authors computed VA and MarketScan national means for seven process-based quality measures related to medication evaluation and management and estimated national-level performance by age and gender. In every case, VA performance was superior to that of the private sector by more than 30%. Compared with individuals in private plans, veterans with schizophrenia or major depression were more than twice as likely to receive appropriate initial medication treatment, and veterans with depression were more than twice as likely to receive appropriate long-term treatment. Findings demonstrate the significant advantages that accrue from an organized, nationwide system of care. The much higher performance of the VA has important clinical and policy implications.

  1. Mobile phones as medical devices in mental disorder treatment: an overview

    Gravenhorst, Franz; Muaremi, Amir; Bardram, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorders can have a significant, negative impact on sufferers’ lives, as well as on their friends and family, healthcare systems and other parts of society. Approximately 25 % of all people in Europe and the USA experience a mental disorder at least once in their lifetime. Currently......, monitoring mental disorders relies on subjective clinical self-reporting rating scales, which were developed more than 50 years ago. In this paper, we discuss how mobile phones can support the treatment of mental disorders by (1) implementing human–computer interfaces to support therapy and (2) collecting...... relevant data from patients’ daily lives to monitor the current state and development of their mental disorders. Concerning the first point, we review various systems that utilize mobile phones for the treatment of mental disorders. We also evaluate how their core design features and dimensions can...

  2. The medicalization of society: on the transformation of human conditions into treatable disorders

    Conrad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    ... 197This page intentionally left blank PrefacePreface I have been interested in the medicalization of society for a long time. My Ph.D. dissertation was a participant observation study of the medicalization of hyperactivity in children (Conrad, 1976). This was followed by a more historical account of the medicalization of deviance, coau...

  3. Priapism associated with the use of stimulant medications and atomoxetine for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children.

    Eiland, Lea S; Bell, Edward A; Erramouspe, John

    2014-10-01

    To review the association of priapism with stimulant medications and atomoxetine commonly used in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A comprehensive literature search was conducted through PubMed (1966-May 15, 2014) using the search terms priapism, methylphenidate, amphetamine, atomoxetine, attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity, and pediatrics. Google Scholar, Scopus, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Web site were also searched. References from identified literature were also reviewed. All identified literature focused on ADHD treatment. Literature regarding priapism caused by methylphenidate, amphetamines, and atomoxetine were included. Stimulant medications and atomoxetine have been linked to the occurrence of priapism in children. Specifically, methylphenidate has been implicated in a recent FDA safety announcement warning as a result of 15 case reports (mean age = 12.5 years), and thus, the drug label and medication guides have been updated to reflect this concern. Prolonged erections and priapism occurred with immediate- and long-acting products, dose increases, and drug withdrawal periods. Priapism has also occurred in 4 patients taking amphetamines and one 11-year-old patient taking atomoxetine for ADHD. Priapism has been associated with stimulants, amphetamines, and atomoxetine use for ADHD in children. Providers and health care practitioners should educate male patients prescribed these ADHD medications as well as caregivers regarding the signs, symptoms, and complications with priapism. Discontinuation and evaluation of the medication is warranted if this adverse drug reaction occurs. Depending on the priapism subtype, other products may be initiated or medications not associated with priapism may be utilized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Risk factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and shoulder in the personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    Madadizadeh, Farzan; Vali, Leila; Rafiei, Sima; Akbarnejad, Zahra

    2017-05-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the neck and shoulder are the most common and most influential factors causing disorder in the performance and absenteeism of work in administrative personnel. To identify risk factors which affect musculoskeletal disorders of neck and shoulder areas in headquarters staff of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 282 headquarters personnel of Kerman University of Medical Sciences (Kerman, Iran). The desired headquarters staff were selected from seven Deputy Vice-Chancellors of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, including Deputy of Health; Deputy of Treatment; Deputy of Education; Deputy of Students and Cultural Affairs; Deputy of Food and Drugs; Deputy of Management Development and Resource Planning; Deputy of Research and Technology, and data were gathered by using a standard Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire NMQ (Nordic) and were analyzed by using SPSS version 16. The impact of various factors on the most common complications (neck and shoulder pains) was analyzed separately through logistic regression analysis and detailed Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated for each individual. The occurrence of neck and shoulder pains in headquarters staff were 42.14% and 40.71%, respectively. In the prevalence of neck pain variables such as marital status (single than married p=0.01, OR=0.24), work experience (p=0.03, OR=1.07 ), education (bachelor's degree and lower than master's degree and higher p=0.003, OR=2.69), right / left-handedness (left than right p=0.03, OR=0.33), weight (p=0.04, OR=1.04), place of work (prisk factors and some of which were identified and an amount of their influence in this study was found. Therefore, it is suggested by considering the risk factors and planning control programs, a major step is taken in reducing the musculoskeletal disorders of office staff.

  5. Medications Used for Cognitive Enhancement in Patients With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Parkinson’s Disease

    Wen-Yu Hsu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/aimsCognitive impairment, which frequently occurs in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease, has a significant impact on the daily lives of both patients and their family. Furthermore, since the medications used for cognitive enhancement have limited efficacy, the issue of cognitive enhancement still remains a clinically unsolved challenge.Sampling and methodsWe reviewed the clinical studies (published between 2007 and 2017 that focused on the efficacy of medications used for enhancing cognition in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease.ResultsAcetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the standard treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Some studies have reported selective cognitive improvement in patients with schizophrenia following galantamine treatment. Newer antipsychotics, including paliperidone, lurasidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, and BL-1020, have also been reported to exert cognitive benefits in patients with schizophrenia. Dopaminergic medications were found to improve language function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, no beneficial effects on cognitive function were observed with dopamine agonists in patients with schizophrenia. The efficacies of nicotine and its receptor modulators in cognitive improvement remain controversial, with the majority of studies showing that varenicline significantly improved the cognitive function in schizophrenic patients. Several studies have reported that N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR enhancers improved the cognitive function in patients with chronic schizophrenia. NMDAR enhancers might also have cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has also been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on attention, processing

  6. Advances in Sleep Studies | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... and other neurological disorders. New evidence indicates that sleep is also important to maternal and fetal health during pregnancy. Untreated ... a sleep disorder and how severe it is. Sleep studies are important because untreated sleep disorders can raise your risk ...

  7. Period prevalence of concomitant psychotropic medication usage among children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder during 2009.

    Betts, Keith A; Sikirica, Vanja; Hodgkins, Paul; Zhou, Zhou; Xie, Jipan; DeLeon, Anthony; Erder, M Haim; Wu, Eric Q

    2014-06-01

    Stimulants are recommended as a first-line treatment for attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); however, a subset of the patient population augments their stimulant treatment with other medications. The objective of this study was to estimate the 1 year period prevalence of concomitant psychotropic medication use among children and adolescents with ADHD during 2009. Patients 6-17 years of age with one or more primary ADHD diagnoses between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009 and one or more stimulant prescription fills during 2009 were identified from a large United States commercial claims database. Concomitant psychotropic medication use, defined as 30 days of continuous medication supply overlap between the augmenting agent and stimulant, was evaluated for 14 distinct psychotropic medication categories (6 with a United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indication for ADHD, 8 without an indication for ADHD). The 1 year period prevalence of concomitant psychotropic medication use (both overall and within each medication category) was calculated and compared between patients with and without psychiatric or neurologic comorbidities. Children (6-12 years) and adolescents (13-17 years) were evaluated separately. A total of 71,201 children and 49,959 adolescents met the inclusion criteria. The 1 year period prevalence of concomitant psychotropic medication use among children and adolescents was 20.3% and 23.4%, with 5.7% and 6.7% augmenting with two or more medication categories, respectively. The most common concomitant medication categories were selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (children: 6.2%; adolescents: 11.4%), atypical antipsychotics (5.8%; 6.8%) and clonidine immediate release (5.4%; 2.9%). Children and adolescents with psychiatric or neurologic comorbidities had higher rates of augmentation than did those without comorbidities (all p<0.001). This epidemiologic study found that the prevalence of concomitant psychotropic

  8. Poverty and severe psychiatric disorder in the U.S.: evidence from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey.

    Vick, Brandon; Jones, Kristine; Mitra, Sophie

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that persons with severe psychiatric disorders are more likely to be poor and face disparities in education and employment outcomes. Poverty rates, the standard measure of poverty, give no information on how far below the poverty line this group falls. This paper compares the poverty rate, poverty depth (distance from the poverty line) and poverty severity (inequality of incomes below the poverty line) of households with and without a working-age member with severe psychiatric disorder in the United States using data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). First, we perform multivariate analysis of the association between severe disorder and poverty depth using MEPS data. Second, we calculate poverty rates, depth, and severity for the subgroup of households having a member with disorder and compare to the subgroup of households without such a member. In multivariate regressions, the presence of a household member with severe psychiatric disorder predicts a 52-percentage point increase in poverty depth and 3.10 times the odds of being poor. Poverty rate, depth, and severity are significantly greater for households of persons with disorder. Mean total incomes are lower for households of persons with severe disorder compared to other households while mean health expenditures are similar. Severe psychiatric disorder is associated with greater depth of poverty and likelihood of being poor. We identify groups who are the most disadvantaged according to severity of income poverty among households with severe psychiatric disorder. These include households whose head has no high school education, who has been without work for the entire year, and who is black or Hispanic. While these characteristics are related to poverty for the overall sample, they correlate to heightened poverty severity when combined with severe disorder. Families face less severity than single persons but poverty rate, depth, and severity increase for both

  9. The impact of conduct disorder and stimulant medication on later substance use in an ethnically diverse sample of individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in childhood.

    Harty, Seth C; Ivanov, Iliyan; Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Halperin, Jeffrey M

    2011-08-01

    To examine late adolescent substance use outcomes in relation to childhood conduct disorder (CD) and psychostimulant treatment in urban youth found to have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood. Ninety-seven adolescents, evaluated during childhood, were seen for follow-up on average 9.30 (SD = 1.65) years later along with a well-matched never-ADHD control group. Stimulant treatment history was coded: Never (n = 28), up to 1 year (n = 19), 1 to 5 years (n = 28), and greater than 5 years (n = 22). Substance use at outcome was coded dimensionally for severity (frequency × intensity) and categorically for substance use disorders (SUDs). Individuals with ADHD+CD in childhood had significantly higher rates of SUD and substance use severity than those with childhood ADHD and controls. The ADHD and control groups did not differ significantly. Among those with childhood ADHD, there were no significant differences in SUD status or substance use severity as a function of medication history. Within an ethnically diverse urban sample, the increased rate of substance use associated with ADHD was fully accounted for by the presence of CD. These results extend previous findings indicating little impact of psychostimulant treatment on later substance use to an ethnically diverse urban sample and to individuals who received treatment for up to 12 years.

  10. The Genetic Intersection of Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Shared Medical Comorbidities – Relations that Translate from Bench to Bedside

    Jamsine Plummer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most psychiatric disorders are considered neurodevelopmental, and the associated genes often are expressed in tissues outside of the brain. This suggests a biological relatedness with medical co-occurrences that could have broad clinical implications for diagnosis and patient management over a lifetime. A qualitative integration of public data from genetic consortia of psychiatric disorders and medical comorbidities explores the question of whether genetically associated psychiatric illnesses present with co-occurring disturbances can be used to define specific mental-physical health relations. Novel patterns of gene-disorder relations appear with approximately one-third of conservatively defined, consortia-generated candidate risk genes with multiple psychiatric diagnoses. Moreover, nearly as many genes overlap with non-psychiatric phenotypes, including cardiovascular, renal, respiratory and metabolic disturbances. While the landscape of genetic risk will change as study populations are expanded and biological confirmations accrue, the current relationships suggest that a mostly siloed perspective of gene relatedness to one categorical psychiatric diagnosis is not clinically useful. The future holds the promise that once candidates are fully validated, genome screening and mutation identification will bring more precision for predicting the risk for complex health conditions. Our view is that as genetic data is refined, continuing to decipher a shared pattern of genetic risk for brain and peripheral organ pathophysiology is not simply an academic exercise. Rather, determining relatedness will impact predictions of multifaceted health risks, patient treatment and management.

  11. Married...with Food Allergies | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Food Allergies Married...with Food Allergies Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Photo: ... life together and a common problem—severe food allergies. NIH MedlinePlus magazine’s Naomi Miller caught up with ...

  12. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/alphafetoproteinafptest.html Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is an Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) Test? Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a protein ...

  13. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/hemoglobina1chba1ctest.html Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test? A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test measures ...

  14. High school peer tutors teach MedlinePlus: a model for Hispanic outreach*

    Warner, Debra G.; Olney, Cynthia A.; Wood, Fred B.; Hansen, Lucille; Bowden, Virginia M.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to introduce the MedlinePlus Website to the predominantly Hispanic residents of the Lower Rio Grande Valley region of Texas by partnering with a health professions magnet high school (known as Med High). Methods: Community assessment was used in the planning stages and included pre-project focus groups with students and teachers. Outreach methods included peer tutor selection, train-the-trainer sessions, school and community outreach, and pre- and posttests of MedlinePlus training sessions. Evaluation methods included Web statistics; end-of-project interviews; focus groups with students, faculty, and librarians; and end-of-project surveys of students and faculty. Results: Four peer tutors reached more than 2,000 people during the project year. Students and faculty found MedlinePlus to be a useful resource. Faculty and librarians developed new or revised teaching methods incorporating MedlinePlus. The project enhanced the role of school librarians as agents of change at Med High. The project continues on a self-sustaining basis. Conclusions: Using peer tutors is an effective way to educate high school students about health information resources and, through the students, to reach families and community members. PMID:15858628

  15. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/carbondioxideco2inblood.html Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Blood Test? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an ...

  16. Recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians after rigorous medical record case extraction Results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    Janssen, Evelien H. C.; van de Ven, Peter M.; Terluin, Berend; Verhaak, Peter F. M.; van Marwijk, Harm W. J.; Smolders, Mirrian; van der Meer, Klaas; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Hout, Hein P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies reported low and inconsistent rates of recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians (FPs). Our objectives were to examine (a) which combination of indications within medical records most accurately reflects recognition of anxiety disorders and (b) whether patient

  17. Recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians after rigorous medical record case extraction: results of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety.

    Janssen, E.H.C.; Ven, P.M. van de; Terluin, B.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Marwijk, H.W.J. van; Smolders, M.; Meer, K. van der; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Hout, H.P.J. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Previous studies reported low and inconsistent rates of recognition of anxiety disorders by family physicians (FPs). Our objectives were to examine (a) which combination of indications within medical records most accurately reflects recognition of anxiety disorders and (b) whether patient

  18. Effects of motivation and medication on electrophysiological markers of response inhibition in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Groom, Madeleine J; Scerif, Gaia; Liddle, Peter F; Batty, Martin J; Liddle, Elizabeth B; Roberts, Katherine L; Cahill, John D; Liotti, Mario; Hollis, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Theories of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) posit either executive deficits and/or alterations in motivational style and reward processing as core to the disorder. Effects of motivational incentives on electrophysiological correlates of inhibitory control and relationships between motivation and stimulant medication have not been explicitly tested. Children (9-15 years) with combined-type ADHD (n = 28) and matched typically developing children (CTRL) (n = 28) performed a go/no-go task. Electroencephalogram data were recorded. Amplitude of two event-related potentials, the N2 and P3 (markers of response conflict and attention), were measured. The ADHD children were all stimulant responders tested on and off their usual dose of methylphenidate; CTRLs were never medicated. All children performed the task under three motivational conditions: reward; response cost; and baseline, in which points awarded/deducted for inhibitory performance varied. There were effects of diagnosis (CTRL > ADHD unmedicated), medication (on > off), and motivation (reward and/or response cost > baseline) on N2 and P3 amplitude, although the N2 diagnosis effect did not reach statistical significance (p = .1). Interactions between motivation and diagnosis/medication were nonsignificant (p > .1). Motivational incentives increased amplitudes of electrophysiological correlates of response conflict and attention in children with ADHD, towards the baseline (low motivation) amplitudes of control subjects. These results suggest that, on these measures, motivational incentives have similar effects in children with ADHD as typically developing CTRLs and have additive effects with stimulant medication, enhancing stimulus salience and allocation of attentional resources during response inhibition. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. US Adult Illicit Cannabis Use, Cannabis Use Disorder, and Medical Marijuana Laws: 1991-1992 to 2012-2013.

    Hasin, Deborah S; Sarvet, Aaron L; Cerdá, Magdalena; Keyes, Katherine M; Stohl, Malka; Galea, Sandro; Wall, Melanie M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last 25 years, illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders have increased among US adults, and 28 states have passed medical marijuana laws (MML). Little is known about MML and adult illicit cannabis use or cannabis use disorders considered over time. To present national data on state MML and degree of change in the prevalence of cannabis use and disorders. Differences in the degree of change between those living in MML states and other states were examined using 3 cross-sectional US adult surveys: the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey (NLAES; 1991-1992), the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC; 2001-2002), and the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III; 2012-2013). Early-MML states passed MML between NLAES and NESARC ("earlier period"). Late-MML states passed MML between NESARC and NESARC-III ("later period"). Past-year illicit cannabis use and DSM-IV cannabis use disorder. Overall, from 1991-1992 to 2012-2013, illicit cannabis use increased significantly more in states that passed MML than in other states (1.4-percentage point more; SE, 0.5; P = .004), as did cannabis use disorders (0.7-percentage point more; SE, 0.3; P = .03). In the earlier period, illicit cannabis use and disorders decreased similarly in non-MML states and in California (where prevalence was much higher to start with). In contrast, in remaining early-MML states, the prevalence of use and disorders increased. Remaining early-MML and non-MML states differed significantly for use (by 2.5 percentage points; SE, 0.9; P = .004) and disorder (1.1 percentage points; SE, 0.5; P = .02). In the later period, illicit use increased by the following percentage points: never-MML states, 3.5 (SE, 0.5); California, 5.3 (SE, 1.0); Colorado, 7.0 (SE, 1.6); other early-MML states, 2.6 (SE, 0.9); and late-MML states, 5.1 (SE, 0.8). Compared with never-MML states, increases in use were

  20. Lower Frequency of co-Morbid Medical Disorders Related to Poor Impulse Control in Parkinson's than Alzheimer's Disease.

    Saito, Erin K; Diaz, Natalie; Morrow, Julia; Chung, Julia; McMurtray, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with progressive degeneration of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons that are involved in reward-based behavior learning, including rewarding effects of food consumption and drugs of abuse. The importance of this pathway in development of addictive behaviors led us to hypothesize that medical disorders related to poor impulse control may occur less frequently among patients with Parkinson's disease than those with other progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Retrospective cross-sectional study of all patients treated for Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease in a community based clinic during a two-year period. Associations were summarized using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) estimated from logistic regression models, adjusted for differences in gender distribution between the groups. A total of 106 patients with Parkinson's disease and 72 patients with Alzheimer's disease were included. Patients with Parkinson's disease were less likely to have either past substance use (adjusted OR = 0.035, 95% CI = 0.009 - 0.130) or presence of co-morbid medical conditions related to poor dietary choices (adjusted OR = 0.157, 95% CI = 0.062 - 0.397). Co-morbid medical conditions related to poor impulse control occur less frequently among those with Parkinson's disease than those with Alzheimer's disease. These findings are consistent with dysfunction of dopamine dependent pathways involved in addiction during the presymptomatic phase of Parkinson's disease and support a biological basis for addiction.

  1. Association of social anxiety disorder with depression and quality of life among medical undergraduate students

    Ratnani, Imran Jahangirali; Vala, Ashok Ukabhai; Panchal, Bharat Navinchandra; Tiwari, Deepak Sachchidanand; Karambelkar, Smruti S.; Sojitra, Milankumar G.; Nagori, Nidhi N.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Social anxiety disorder (SAD), (also known as social phobia), is characterized by intense fear of social interaction and often associated with social avoidance and impairments. There is high risk for depression, substance use disorder, and suicide among them. Subjects and Methods: It is an observational, cross-sectional, single centered, questionnaire-based study assessing the frequency of SAD and depression and their possible association with quality of life among 290 consenting m...

  2. Processing speed can monitor stimulant-medication effects in adults with attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity.

    Nielsen, Niels Peter; Wiig, Elisabeth H; Bäck, Svante; Gustafsson, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Treatment responses to methylphenidate by adults with ADHD are generally monitored against DSM-IV/DSM-V symptomatology, rating scales or interviews during reviews. To evaluate the use of single- and dual-dimension processing-speed and efficiency measures to monitor the effects of pharmacological treatment with methylphenidate after a short period off medication. A Quick Test of Cognitive Speed (AQT) monitored the effects of immediate-release methylphenidate in 40 previously diagnosed and medicated adults with ADHD. Processing speed was evaluated with prior prescription medication, without medication after a 2-day period off ADHD medication, and with low-dose (10/20 mg) and high-dose (20/40 mg) methylphenidate hydrochloride (Medikinet IR). Thirty-three participants responded to the experimental treatments. One-way ANOVA with post-hoc analysis (Scheffe) indicated significant main effects for single dimension colour and form and dual-dimension colour-form naming. Post-hoc analysis indicated statistical differences between the no- and high-dose medication conditions for colour and form, measures of perceptual speed. For colour-form naming, a measure of cognitive speed, there was a significant difference between no- and low-dose medication and between no- and high-dose medications, but not between low- and high-dose medications. Results indicated that the AQT tests effectively monitored incremental effects of the methylphenidate dose on processing speed after a 2-day period off medication. Thus, perceptual (colour and form) and cognitive speed (two-dimensional colour-form naming) and processing efficiency (lowered shift costs) increased measurably with high-dose medication. These preliminary findings warrant validation with added measures of associated behavioural and cognitive changes.

  3. Psychiatric and medical disorders in the after math of the uttarakhand disaster: assessment, approach, and future challenges.

    Channaveerachari, Naveen Kumar; Raj, Aneel; Joshi, Suvarna; Paramita, Prajna; Somanathan, Revathi; Chandran, Dhanya; Kasi, Sekar; Bangalore, N Roopesh; Math, Suresh Bada

    2015-01-01

    To present the descriptive data on the frequency of medical and psychiatric morbidity and also to discuss various pertinent issues relevant to the disaster management, the future challenges and psychosocial needs of the 2013 floods in Uttarakhand, India. Observation was undertaken by the disaster management team of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences in the worst affected four districts of Uttarakhand. Qualified psychiatrists diagnosed the patients using the International Classification of Diseases-10 criteria. Data were collected by direct observation, interview of the survivors, group sessions, individual key-informant interview, individual session, and group interventions. Patients with physical health problems formed the majority of treatment seekers (39.6%) in this report. Only about 2% had disaster induced psychiatric diagnoses. As was expected, minor mental disorders in the form of depressive disorders and anxiety disorders formed majority of the psychiatric morbidity. Substance use disorders appear to be very highly prevalent in the community; however, we were not able to assess the morbidity systematically. The mental health infrastructure and manpower is abysmally inadequate. There is an urgent need to implement the National Mental Health Program to increase the mental health infrastructure and services in the four major disaster-affected districts.

  4. Effect of Medical Education on Students' Attitudes toward Psychiatry and Individuals with Mental Disorders

    Hofmann, Marzellus; Harendza, Sigrid; Meyer, Jelka; Drabik, Anna; Reimer, Jens; Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to explore the effect of medical education on students' attitudes toward psychiatry and psychiatric patients, and examined the usefulness of a new evaluation tool: the 6-item Psychiatric Experience, Attitudes, and Knowledge (PEAK-6). Method: Authors studied the attitudes of 116 medical students toward psychiatry…

  5. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... turn Javascript on. Welcome to the NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Donald ... about their efforts to cure disease. Lastly, the magazine's lively graphics, fun quizzes and practical tips have ...

  6. National Library of Medicine Celebrates 30 Years of Progress and Charts the Future | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... described the genesis of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI); the Visible Human Project (a digital ... expand the publication and distribution of NIH MedlinePlus magazine, thousands and thousands more people will gain valuable, ...

  7. Texas Medication Algorithm Project: development and feasibility testing of a treatment algorithm for patients with bipolar disorder.

    Suppes, T; Swann, A C; Dennehy, E B; Habermacher, E D; Mason, M; Crismon, M L; Toprac, M G; Rush, A J; Shon, S P; Altshuler, K Z

    2001-06-01

    Use of treatment guidelines for treatment of major psychiatric illnesses has increased in recent years. The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) was developed to study the feasibility and process of developing and implementing guidelines for bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia in the public mental health system of Texas. This article describes the consensus process used to develop the first set of TMAP algorithms for the Bipolar Disorder Module (Phase 1) and the trial testing the feasibility of their implementation in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings across Texas (Phase 2). The feasibility trial answered core questions regarding implementation of treatment guidelines for bipolar disorder. A total of 69 patients were treated with the original algorithms for bipolar disorder developed in Phase 1 of TMAP. Results support that physicians accepted the guidelines, followed recommendations to see patients at certain intervals, and utilized sequenced treatment steps differentially over the course of treatment. While improvements in clinical symptoms (24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) were observed over the course of enrollment in the trial, these conclusions are limited by the fact that physician volunteers were utilized for both treatment and ratings. and there was no control group. Results from Phases 1 and 2 indicate that it is possible to develop and implement a treatment guideline for patients with a history of mania in public mental health clinics in Texas. TMAP Phase 3, a recently completed larger and controlled trial assessing the clinical and economic impact of treatment guidelines and patient and family education in the public mental health system of Texas, improves upon this methodology.

  8. Men Who Have Sex With Men in Peru: Acceptability of Medication-Assisted Therapy for Treating Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Brown, Shan-Estelle; Vagenas, Panagiotis; Konda, Kelika A; Clark, Jesse L; Lama, Javier R; Gonzales, Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge; Duerr, Ann C; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-07-01

    In Peru, the HIV epidemic is concentrated in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TGW). Multiple studies correlate alcohol use disorders (AUDs) with risky sexual behaviors among Peruvian MSM. Qualitative research was used to inform a clinical trial on the acceptability of medication-assisted therapies to assist management of AUDs and improve antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among MSM/TGW in Peru. Three focus groups involving HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected MSM/TGW ( n = 26) with AUDs (AUDIT ≥ 8) were transcribed, translated from Spanish into English, and analyzed using thematic content analysis. Despite having an AUD, participants considered themselves "social" drinkers, minimized their drinking behaviors, and differed about whether or not alcohol problems could be treated. Participants expressed skepticism about medication for treating AUDs. Three concepts emerged as necessary components of a treatment program for alcohol problems: cost, family support, and the potential to drink less alcohol without attaining total abstinence. This study reveals important areas of education to increase potential acceptability of a medication for treating AUDs among MSM/TGW. Given the social conditions and knowledge base of the participants, medication-assisted therapies using naltrexone may be a beneficial strategy for MSM with AUDs.

  9. Frontal-insula gray matter deficits in first-episode medication-naïve patients with major depressive disorder.

    Lai, Chien-Han; Wu, Yu-Te

    2014-05-01

    This study is designed to investigate the gray matter volume (GMV) deficits in patients with first-episode medication-naïve major depressive disorder (MDD). We enrolled 38 patients with first-episode medication-naïve MDD and 27 controls in this project. Voxel-based morphometry was used to compare GMV differences between two groups. Besides, the relationship between GMV of patients and the severity of clinical symptoms was estimated to confirm the role of GMV deficits in clinical symptoms. The correlation between total GMV and illness duration was also performed to elucidate the impacts of untreated duration on the GMV. We found that first-episode medication-naïve MDD patients had significant GMV deficits in bilateral superior frontal gyri, left middle frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus and left insula. The GMV of patient group was negatively correlated with the severity of clinical symptoms and the illness duration. A pattern of GMV deficits in fronto-insula might represent the biomarker for first-episode medication-naïve MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Telephone-administered psychotherapy in combination with antidepressant medication for the acute treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Corruble, Emmanuelle; Swartz, Holly A; Bottai, Thierry; Vaiva, Guillaume; Bayle, Frank; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Courtet, Philippe; Frank, Ellen; Gorwood, Philip

    2016-01-15

    Telephone-administered psychotherapies (T-P) provided as an adjunct to antidepressant medication may improve response rates in major depressive disorder (MDD). The goal of this study was to compare telephone-administered social rhythm therapy (T-SRT) and telephone-administered intensive clinical management (T-ICM) as adjuncts to antidepressant medication for MDD. A secondary goal was to compare T-P with Treatment as Usual (TAU) as adjunctive treatment to medication for MDD. 221 adult out-patients with MDD, currently depressed, were randomly assigned to 8 sessions of weekly T-SRT (n=110) or T-ICM (n=111), administered as an adjunct to agomelatine. Both psychotherapies were administered entirely by telephone, by trained psychologists who were blind to other aspects of treatment. The 221 patients were a posteriori matched with 221 depressed outpatients receiving TAU (controls). The primary outcome measure was the percentage of responders at 8 weeks post-treatment. No significant differences were found between T-SRT and T-ICM. But T-P was associated with higher response rates (65.4% vs 54.8%, p=0.02) and a trend toward higher remission rates (33.2% vs 25.1%; p=0.06) compared to TAU. Short term study. This study is the first assessing the short-term effects of an add-on, brief, telephone-administered psychotherapy in depressed patients treated with antidepressant medication. Eight sessions of weekly telephone-delivered psychotherapy as an adjunct to antidepressant medication resulted in improved response rates relative to medication alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment Patterns and Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Among Commercially Insured Patients With Schizoaffective Disorder in the United States

    Joshi, Kruti; Lin, Jay; Lingohr-Smith, Melissa; Fu, Dong-Jing; Muser, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study assessed real-world treatment patterns and antipsychotic (AP) medication adherence among commercially insured US patients with schizoaffective disorder (SCA). Continuously insured adults aged 18 years or older with a diagnosis of SCA from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2012, were identified from the Clinformatics Data Mart database. Patients were categorized into 2 cohorts: incident or prevalent SCA. Demographics and clinical characteristics were evaluated during the baseline period. Use of psychiatric medications and adherence to AP medications were evaluated during a 12-month follow-up period after index diagnosis of SCA. Of the overall study population (N = 2713; mean age, 40.2 y; 52.7% female), 1961 patients (72.3%) (mean age, 38.7 y; 51.3% female) had incident SCA, and 752 patients (27.7%) (mean age, 43.9 y; 56.5% female) had prevalent SCA. Antipsychotics were used by 74.8% of patients in the overall study population during the follow-up period. The most commonly prescribed oral AP was risperidone (23.9%), followed by quetiapine (21.4%) and aripiprazole (20.4%). Use of any long-acting injectable APs in the overall study population during the follow-up period was less than 3%. A total of 49.0% and 38.0% of the overall study population had medication possession ratios and proportion of days covered for APs of 80% or greater, respectively. Overall use of long-acting injectable APs for the treatment of SCA is low, and adherence to AP medications, measured by both medication possession ratio and proportion of days covered, is suboptimal among patients with SCA in the real-world setting. PMID:27525965

  12. Application of medical cannabis in patients with central nerve system disorders

    Lidia Kotuła

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis sativa is an annual plant in the Cannabaceae family, species of the genus Cannabis. Cannabis contains active elements, including Δ9-tetrahydrocanabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Neurological disorders are typically associated with neurodegeneration. It means that there is no causal treatment. Usually we can only modulate disease. It is very necessary to patients to reduce pain sensation or excessive muscle tension. The paper contains a description of therapeutic possibilities treatment of cannabis in neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Tourette syndrome and spasticity.

  13. Machine learning classification of medication adherence in patients with movement disorders using non-wearable sensors.

    Tucker, Conrad S; Behoora, Ishan; Nembhard, Harriet Black; Lewis, Mechelle; Sterling, Nicholas W; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-11-01

    Medication non-adherence is a major concern in the healthcare industry and has led to increases in health risks and medical costs. For many neurological diseases, adherence to medication regimens can be assessed by observing movement patterns. However, physician observations are typically assessed based on visual inspection of movement and are limited to clinical testing procedures. Consequently, medication adherence is difficult to measure when patients are away from the clinical setting. The authors propose a data mining driven methodology that uses low cost, non-wearable multimodal sensors to model and predict patients' adherence to medication protocols, based on variations in their gait. The authors conduct a study involving Parkinson's disease patients that are "on" and "off" their medication in order to determine the statistical validity of the methodology. The data acquired can then be used to quantify patients' adherence while away from the clinic. Accordingly, this data-driven system may allow for early warnings regarding patient safety. Using whole-body movement data readings from the patients, the authors were able to discriminate between PD patients on and off medication, with accuracies greater than 97% for some patients using an individually customized model and accuracies of 78% for a generalized model containing multiple patient gait data. The proposed methodology and study demonstrate the potential and effectiveness of using low cost, non-wearable hardware and data mining models to monitor medication adherence outside of the traditional healthcare facility. These innovations may allow for cost effective, remote monitoring of treatment of neurological diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Utilization of never-medicated bipolar disorder patients towards development and validation of a peripheral biomarker profile.

    Catherine L Clelland

    Full Text Available There are currently no biological tests that differentiate patients with bipolar disorder (BPD from healthy controls. While there is evidence that peripheral gene expression differences between patients and controls can be utilized as biomarkers for psychiatric illness, it is unclear whether current use or residual effects of antipsychotic and mood stabilizer medication drives much of the differential transcription. We therefore tested whether expression changes in first-episode, never-medicated BPD patients, can contribute to a biological classifier that is less influenced by medication and could potentially form a practicable biomarker assay for BPD. We employed microarray technology to measure global leukocyte gene expression in first-episode (n=3 and currently medicated BPD patients (n=26, and matched healthy controls (n=25. Following an initial feature selection of the microarray data, we developed a cross-validated 10-gene model that was able to correctly predict the diagnostic group of the training sample (26 medicated patients and 12 controls, with 89% sensitivity and 75% specificity (p<0.001. The 10-gene predictor was further explored via testing on an independent cohort consisting of three pairs of monozygotic twins discordant for BPD, plus the original enrichment sample cohort (the three never-medicated BPD patients and 13 matched control subjects, and a sample of experimental replicates (n=34. 83% of the independent test sample was correctly predicted, with a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% (although this result did not reach statistical significance. Additionally, 88% of sample diagnostic classes were classified correctly for both the enrichment (p=0.015 and the replicate samples (p<0.001. We have developed a peripheral gene expression biomarker profile, that can classify healthy controls from patients with BPD receiving antipsychotic or mood stabilizing medication, which has both high sensitivity and specificity

  15. Differences in behavioral health disorders and unmet treatment needs between medical marijuana users and recreational marijuana users: Results from a national adult sample.

    Park, Ji-Yeun; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2017-11-01

    Available data suggest that medical marijuana users may have more mental health problems than recreational marijuana users. There is limited information about differences in behavioral health disorders and unmet treatment needs between medical and recreational marijuana users. We compared past-year prevalence of behavioral health disorders and unmet treatment needs across three marijuana subgroups (recreational use only, medical use only, and both). Sex-stratified logistic regression was performed to determine their associations with marijuana use status. We analyzed data from adults (≥18 years) who used marijuana in the past year (N=15,440) from 2013 to 2014 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health. Among 15,440 past-year marijuana users, 90.2% used recreational marijuana only, 6.2% used medical marijuana only, and 3.6% used both. Both users had the highest prevalence of behavioral health disorders and unmet treatment needs overall, with no significant sex differences. In the sex-specific logistic regression analysis, medical only users and both users showed somewhat different patterns of associations (reference group=recreational only users). Medical only users had decreased odds of alcohol or drug use disorders, and unmet need for alcohol or drug treatment among males and females. Additionally, female medical only users had decreased odds of opioid use disorder. Both users had increased odds of major depressive episode, hallucinogen use disorder, and unmet need for mental health services among males, and cocaine use disorder among females. Different approaches tailored to individuals' sex and motives for marijuana use is needed for the prevention and treatment of behavioral health problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Informed consent and stimulant medication: adolescents' and parents' ability to understand information about benefits and risks of stimulant medication for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Schachter, Debbie; Tharmalingam, Sukirtha; Kleinman, Irwin

    2011-04-01

    This study of informed consent examines understanding of information needed to consent to stimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The understanding of adolescents with ADHD, their parents, control adolescents, and their parents is compared. Fifty-eight ADHD and 64 control adolescents between the ages of 12 and 16 and their parents were studied. Baseline understanding of information was determined. Subjects received information relevant to informed consent for stimulation medication and afterward were evaluated on their recall understanding and their final understanding. Knowledge was increased after the information session for all subjects. There was no significant difference between unadjusted baseline, recall, and final knowledge of control adolescents and parents. Although unadjusted baseline, recall, and final knowledge of ADHD adolescents is significantly less than that of parents, 78% of ADHD adolescents had final understanding scores within 2 standard deviations of parents' scores. After controlling for baseline understanding and cognitive variables, there was no significant difference between understanding of ADHD adolescents and ADHD parents, whereas control adolescents understanding scores were higher than that of their parents. Understanding was highly associated with mathematics achievement in all groups. The majority of adolescents with ADHD, both with and without a history of stimulant medication treatment, have understanding that is similar to their parents and their inclusion in the informed consent process should be encouraged. Extra care should be afforded to those adolescents with low numeracy or literacy to ensure their understanding.

  17. Use of evidence-based assessments for childhood anxiety disorders within a regional medical system.

    Sattler, Adam F; Ale, Chelsea M; Nguyen, Kristin; Gregg, Melissa S; Geske, Jennifer R; Whiteside, Stephen P H

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety disorders represent a common and serious threat to mental health in children and adolescents. To effectively treat anxiety in children, clinicians must conduct accurate assessment of patients' symptoms. However, despite the importance of assessment in the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders, the literature lacks a thorough analysis of the practices used by clinicians' when evaluating such disorders in community settings. Thus, the current study examines the quality of assessment for childhood anxiety disorders in a large regional health system. The results suggest that clinicians often provide non-specific diagnoses, infrequently document symptoms according to diagnostic criteria, and rarely administer rating scales and structured diagnostic interviews. Relatedly, diagnostic agreement across practice settings was low. Finally, the quality of assessment differed according to the setting in which the assessment was conducted and the complexity of the patient's symptomatology. These results highlight the need to develop and disseminate clinically feasible evidence-based assessment practices that can be implemented within resource-constrained service settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Treatment of Whiplash-Associated Disorders - Part II: Medical and Surgical Interventions

    Anne Conlin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD is a term used to describe injury due to an acceleration-deceleration mechanism at the neck. In 1995, the Quebec Task Force published a report that contained evidence-based recommendations regarding the treatment of WAD based on studies completed before 1993 and consensus-based recommendations.

  19. The use of medication against attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in Denmark

    Pottegård, Anton; Bjerregaard, Bine Kjøller; Glintborg, D.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Our aim was to characterize utilization patterns for drugs used to treat attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the level of the individual patient among Danish users, focusing on treatment duration, doses used, and concurrent use of ADHD and non-ADHD drugs. METHODS: Using...

  20. 78 FR 7659 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Congenital Disorders That Affect Multiple Body Systems

    2013-02-04

    .... People with non- mosaic Down syndrome may also have congenital heart disease, impaired vision, hearing..., or interference, as well as the resulting functional limitations and their progression, may vary... senses and speech, neurological, or mental disorders. Otherwise, we evaluate the specific functional...

  1. 76 FR 66006 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Congenital Disorders That Affect Multiple Body Systems

    2011-10-25

    ... term ``extreme'' in our rules for determining functional equivalence for children.\\5\\ \\5\\ See 20 CFR... may also have congenital heart disease, impaired vision, hearing problems, and other disorders. We... like them, the degree of deviation, interruption, or interference, as well as the resulting functional...

  2. Antiepileptic Medications in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Hirota, Tomoya; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Hollander, Eric; Kishi, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalogram-recorded epileptiform activity is common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), even without clinical seizures. A systematic literature search identified 7 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in ASD (total n = 171), including three of valproate, and one each of lamotrigine,…

  3. Orbitofrontal cortex volumes in medication naïve children with major depressive disorder: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Chen, Hua-Hsuan; Rosenberg, David R; MacMaster, Frank P; Easter, Philip C; Caetano, Sheila C; Nicoletti, Mark; Hatch, John P; Nery, Fabiano G; Soares, Jair C

    2008-12-01

    Adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) are reported to have reduced orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) volumes, which could be related to decreased neuronal density. We conducted a study on medication naïve children with MDD to determine whether abnormalities of OFC are present early in the illness course. Twenty seven medication naïve pediatric Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4(th) edition (DSM-IV) MDD patients (mean age +/- SD = 14.4 +/- 2.2 years; 10 males) and 26 healthy controls (mean age +/- SD = 14.4 +/- 2.4 years; 12 males) underwent a 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 3D spoiled gradient recalled acquisition. The OFC volumes were compared using analysis of covariance with age, gender, and total brain volume as covariates. There was no significant difference in either total OFC volume or total gray matter OFC volume between MDD patients and healthy controls. Exploratory analysis revealed that patients had unexpectedly larger total right lateral (F = 4.2, df = 1, 48, p = 0.05) and right lateral gray matter (F = 4.6, df = 1, 48, p = 0.04) OFC volumes compared to healthy controls, but this finding was not significant following statistical correction for multiple comparisons. No other OFC subregions showed a significant difference. The lack of OFC volume abnormalities in pediatric MDD patients suggests the abnormalities previously reported for adults may develop later in life as a result of neural cell loss.

  4. Influence of stimulant medication and response speed on lateralization of movement-related potentials in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Stephan Bender

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperactivity is one of the core symptoms in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, it remains unclear in which way the motor system itself and its development are affected by the disorder. Movement-related potentials (MRP can separate different stages of movement execution, from the programming of a movement to motor post-processing and memory traces. Pre-movement MRP are absent or positive during early childhood and display a developmental increase of negativity. METHODS: We examined the influences of response-speed, an indicator of the level of attention, and stimulant medication on lateralized MRP in 16 children with combined type ADHD compared to 20 matched healthy controls. RESULTS: We detected a significantly diminished lateralisation of MRP over the pre-motor and primary motor cortex during movement execution (initial motor potential peak, iMP in patients with ADHD. Fast reactions (indicating increased visuo-motor attention led to increased lateralized negativity during movement execution only in healthy controls, while in children with ADHD faster reaction times were associated with more positive amplitudes. Even though stimulant medication had some effect on attenuating group differences in lateralized MRP, this effect was insufficient to normalize lateralized iMP amplitudes. CONCLUSIONS: A reduced focal (lateralized motor cortex activation during the command to muscle contraction points towards an immature motor system and a maturation delay of the (pre- motor cortex in children with ADHD. A delayed maturation of the neuronal circuitry, which involves primary motor cortex, may contribute to ADHD pathophysiology.

  5. Dissociable attentional and affective circuits in medication-naïve children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Posner, Jonathan; Rauh, Virginia; Gruber, Allison; Gat, Inbal; Wang, Zhishun; Peterson, Bradley S

    2013-07-30

    Current neurocognitive models of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that neural circuits involving both attentional and affective processing make independent contributions to the phenomenology of the disorder. However, a clear dissociation of attentional and affective circuits and their behavioral correlates has yet to be shown in medication-naïve children with ADHD. Using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) in a cohort of medication naïve children with (N=22) and without (N=20) ADHD, we demonstrate that children with ADHD have reduced connectivity in two neural circuits: one underlying executive attention (EA) and the other emotional regulation (ER). We also demonstrate a double dissociation between these two neural circuits and their behavioral correlates such that reduced connectivity in the EA circuit correlates with executive attention deficits but not with emotional lability, while on the other hand, reduced connectivity in the ER circuit correlates with emotional lability but not with executive attention deficits. These findings suggest potential avenues for future research such as examining treatment effects on these two neural circuits as well as the potential prognostic and developmental significance of disturbances in one circuit vs the other. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal deactivation of the inferior frontal gyrus during implicit emotion processing in youth with bipolar disorder: attenuated by medication.

    Hafeman, Danella M; Bebko, Genna; Bertocci, Michele A; Fournier, Jay C; Bonar, Lisa; Perlman, Susan B; Travis, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Holland, Scott K; Kowatch, Robert A; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David; Horwitz, Sarah M; Arnold, L Eugene; Fristad, Mary A; Frazier, Thomas W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Findling, Robert L; Drevets, Wayne; Phillips, Mary L

    2014-11-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies of youth with bipolar disorder (BD) have identified abnormalities in emotion regulation circuitry. Using data from the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms Cohort (a clinical sample recruited for behavioral and emotional dysregulation), we examined the impact of BD and medication on activation in these regions. Functional neuroimaging data were obtained from 15 youth with BD who currently were unmedicated with a mood stabilizer or antipsychotic (U-BD), 19 youth with medicated BD (M-BD), a non-bipolar clinical sample with high rates of disruptive behavioral disorders (non-BD, n = 59), and 29 healthy controls (HC) while they were shown task-irrelevant morphing emotional faces and shapes. Whole brain analysis was used to identify clusters that showed differential activation to emotion vs. shapes across group. To assess pair-wise comparisons and potential confounders, mean activation data were extracted only from clusters within regions previously implicated in emotion regulation (including amygdala and ventral prefrontal regions). A cluster in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) showed group differences to emotion vs. shapes (159 voxels, corrected p abnormally decreased right IFG activation to negative emotions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression in the Context of Medical Disorders: New Pharmacological Pathways Revisited

    Undine E. Lang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The depressive state has been characterised as one of elevated inflammation, changed cardiovascular parameters and a deranged metabolic situation all of which holds promise for a better understanding and handling of treatment-resistance in affective disorders as well as for future developments in treatment algorithms. In this context several biomarkers are differentially regulated by antidepressant treatment and connected to metabolic, inflammatory, cardiovascular and apoptotic components of the pathophysiology, i.e. adiponectin, apolipoprotein-B, B-type natriuretic peptide, cortisol, CRP, cysteine, homocysteine, fibrinogen, adiponectin, BMI, glycated hemoglobin A1c, leptin, interferon-gamma, high-density lipoprotein, interleukin interleukin-1alpha, -1beta, -2, -4, -5, -6, -8, -10, -12, -13, -17, insulin-like growth factor-1, low-density lipoprotein, myeloperoxidase, osteoprotegerin, tumour necrosis factor alpha, troponins, triglycerides etc. In this context antidepressants exert different modulatory effects on the outcome, incidence and mortality concerning several severe disorders, i.e. cancer, diabetes, stroke, inflammation, stroke and cardiovascular risk. Vice versa different drugs used in the treatment of these disorders have a favourable effect in depressive states, e.g. statins, aspirine, NSAIDs, pioglitazone, celecoxib, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma agonists and minocycline. In this review, actions of different antidepressant treatment strategies on cancer, stroke, diabetes and cardiovascular disorders are shown and the influence on the outcome of the disorders is differentially discussed. In conclusion a hypothetic model for the implication of actual findings in everyday clinical practice is proposed. In this context personalized treatment could be used to tailor treatment to specific individuals according to their clinical endophenotypes. Moreover a potential target for the development of novel intervention

  8. The impact of severe mental disorders and psychotropic medications on sexual health and its implications for clinical management

    Montejo, Angel L.; Montejo, Laura; Baldwin, David S.

    2018-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction often accompanies severe psychiatric illness and can be due to both the mental disorder itself and the use of psychotropic treatments. Many sexual symptoms resolve as the mental state improves, but treatment‐related sexual adverse events tend to persist over time, and are unfortunately under‐recognized by clinicians and scarcely investigated in clinical trials. Treatment‐emergent sexual dysfunction adversely affects quality of life and may contribute to reduce treatment adherence. There are important differences between the various compounds in the incidence of adverse sexual effects, associated with differences in mechanisms of action. Antidepressants with a predominantly serotonergic activity, antipsychotics likely to induce hyperprolactinaemia, and mood stabilizers with hormonal effects are often linked to moderate or severe sexual dysfunction, including decreased libido, delayed orgasm, anorgasmia, and sexual arousal difficulties. Severe mental disorders can interfere with sexual function and satisfaction, while patients wish to preserve a previously satisfactory sexual activity. In many patients, a lack of intimate relationships and chronic deterioration in mental and physical health can be accompanied by either a poor sexual life or a more frequent risky sexual behaviour than in the general population. Here we describe the influence of psychosis and antipsychotic medications, of depression and antidepressant drugs, and of bipolar disorder and mood stabilizers on sexual health, and the optimal management of patients with severe psychiatric illness and sexual dysfunction. PMID:29352532

  9. Long-Term Effects of Chemical Warfare on Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, Depression, and Chronic Medical Conditions in Veterans.

    Safi-Aghdam, Hamideh; Shafie, Mehrzad; Khoshdel, Alireza; Moazen-Zadeh, Ehsan; Avakh, Farhad; Rahmani, Arash

    2018-04-24

    We investigated the association between exposure to chemical warfare and chronic mental/physical conditions. This was a secondary analysis of data from a case-control study on Iranian male veterans. Participants with neuropsychiatric disorders other than depressive/anxiety disorders, anatomical defects, or malignancies were excluded. Compared to non-exposed veterans, exposed veterans demonstrated significantly higher odds of PTSD [OR (95% CI) = 5.23 (1.98-13.85)], hypertension [OR (95% CI) = 5.57 (1.68-18.48)], coronary heart disease [OR (95% CI) = 6.8 (1.62-28.49)], and diabetes [OR (95% CI) = 3.88 (1.35-11.16)], and marginally higher odds of moderate to severe depressive symptoms [OR (95% CI) = 2.21 (0.93-5.28)]. This study provides preliminary evidence on association of exposure to chemical warfare with long-term mental disorders as well as chronic medical conditions.

  10. Multiprofessional teamwork in work-related medical rehabilitation for patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

    Schwarz, Betje; Neuderth, Silke; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews indicate the effectiveness of multimodal rehabilitation. In Germany this has been shown, in particular, for work-related medical rehabilitation. A recently published guideline on work-related medical rehabilitation supports the dissemination of these programmes. The feasibility of this guideline was examined in a multicentre study. This paper presents findings on the relevance of multiprofessional teamwork for the implementation of successful work-related medical rehabilitation. Focus groups were conducted with 7 inpatient orthopaedic rehabilitation teams and examined using qualitative content analysis. Multiprofessional teamwork emerged inductively as a meaningful theme. All teams described multiprofessional teamwork as a work-related medical rehabilitation success factor, referring to its relevance for holistic treatment of multifactorially impaired patients. Although similar indicators of successful multiprofessional teamwork were named, the teams realized multiprofessional teamwork differently. We found 3 team types, corresponding to multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary team models. These types and models constitute a continuum of collaborative practice, which seems to be affected by context-related factors. The significance of multiprofessional teamwork for successful multimodal rehabilitation was underlined. Indicators of ideal multiprofessional teamwork and contextual facilitators were specified. The contingency approach to teamwork, as well as the assumption of multiprofessional teamwork as a continuum of collaborative practice, is supported. Stronger consideration of multiprofessional teamwork in the work-related medical rehabilitation guideline is indicated.

  11. Don't Panic! | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Phobias and Anxiety Disorders Don't Panic! Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Phobias and other anxiety disorders affect millions of Americans. ...

  12. Co-prescription of medication for bipolar disorder and diabetes mellitus: a nationwide population-based study with focus on gender differences

    Svendal Gjertrud

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown a correlation between bipolar disorder and diabetes mellitus. It is unclear if this correlation is a part of common pathophysiological pathways, or if medication for bipolar disorder has negative effects on blood sugar regulation. Methods The Norwegian prescription database was analyzed. Prescriptions for lithium, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and valproate were used as proxies for bipolar disorder. Prescriptions for insulin and oral anti-diabetic agents were used as proxies for diabetes mellitus. We explored the association between medication for bipolar disorder and diabetes medication by logistic regression Results We found a strong association between concomitant use of medication to treat diabetes mellitus and mood stabilizers for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Females had a 30% higher risk compared to men of being treated for both disorders. Persons using oral anti-diabetic agents had higher odds of receiving valproate than either lithium or lamotrigine. Use of insulin as monotherapy seemed to have lower odds than oral anti-diabetic agents of co-prescription of mood stabilizers, compared to the general population. Conclusions This study showed a strong association between the use of mood stabilizers and anti-diabetic agents. The association was stronger among women than men.

  13. Combined treatment: impact of optimal psychotherapy and medication in bipolar disorder.

    Parikh, Sagar V; Hawke, Lisa D; Velyvis, Vytas; Zaretsky, Ari; Beaulieu, Serge; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; MacQueen, Glenda; Young, L Trevor; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Cervantes, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    The current study investigated the longitudinal course of symptoms in bipolar disorder among individuals receiving optimal treatment combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, as well as predictors of the course of illness. A total of 160 participants with bipolar disorder (bipolar I disorder: n = 115; bipolar II disorder: n = 45) received regular pharmacological treatment, complemented by a manualized, evidence-based psychosocial treatment - that is, cognitive behavioral therapy or psychoeducation. Participants were assessed at baseline and prospectively for 72 weeks using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) scale scores for mania/hypomania and depression, as well as comparison measures (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00188838). Over a 72-week period, patients spent a clear majority (about 65%) of time euthymic. Symptoms were experienced more than 50% of the time by only a quarter of the sample. Depressive symptoms strongly dominated over (hypo)manic symptoms, while subsyndromal symptoms were more common than full diagnosable episodes for both polarities. Mixed symptoms were rare, but present for a minority of participants. Individuals experienced approximately six significant mood changes per year, with a full relapse on average every 7.5 months. Participants who had fewer depressive symptoms at intake, a later age at onset, and no history of psychotic symptoms spent more weeks well over the course of the study. Combined pharmacological and adjunctive psychosocial treatments appeared to provide an improved course of illness compared to the results of previous studies. Efforts to further improve the course of illness beyond that provided by current optimal treatment regimens will require a substantial focus on both subsyndromal and syndromal depressive symptoms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Methodological aspects of a study of medical service satisfaction in patients with borderline mental disorders].

    Malygin, Ya V; Tsygankov, B D

    The authors discussed a methodology of the study of medical service satisfaction and it's factors: moment of assessment, methodology of data collection, format of data, bench-marking, principles of inclusion of questions into a questionnaire, organizing and frequency of conducting studies.

  15. Associations between Medication Use and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Population-Based Study

    Choung, Rok Seon; Locke, G. Richard.; Schleck, Cathy D.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional GI syndromes are known to be very prevalent but this may be associated with unrecognized medications use. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of PPI, antidepressant, and narcotic use in the general population, and evaluate the association between each medication and functional GI syndromes adjusting for potential confounders. Methods In 2008 and 2009, newly revised versions of a validated bowel disease questionnaire were mailed to a community based cohort (total mailed=8006) of Olmsted County, MN residents; 3831 returned the questionnaire (response rate=48.0%). Medication usage, specifically PPIs, narcotics, and antidepressants in the last year, was elicited via three separate questions on the questionnaire. The association between each medication and GI symptom complexes was assessed using multiple variable logistic regression models. Results A total of 3515 of the respondents (92%) had complete data (mean age: 61±15; 54% female). The overall proportion reporting PPI use was 20% (95% CI: 19, 22), narcotic use 12% (95% CI: 11, 13), and antidepressant use 15% (95% CI: 14, 16). PPI use was significantly associated with IBS status (OR=1.4, 95% CI 1.1, 1.7) as well as with GERD (OR=3.5, 95% CI 2.7, 4.4) and dyspepsia (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.5, 2.7). The association of PPI use with IBS was not explained by coexistent GERD or dyspepsia. Antidepressant use was significantly associated only with bloating (OR=1.6, 1.1, 2.2). Conclusions Some medications that may alter intestinal transit or bowel flora are commonly utilized by the general population, and PPI use appears to be linked to IBS. PMID:23360217

  16. International study of expert judgment on therapeutic use of benzodiazepines and other psychotherapeutic medications: VI. Trends in recommendations for the pharmacotherapy of anxiety disorders, 1992-1997.

    Uhlenhuth, E H; Balter, M B; Ban, T A; Yang, K

    1999-01-01

    To assemble expert clinical experience and judgment regarding the treatment of anxiety disorders in a systematic, quantitative manner, particularly with respect to changes during the preceding five years. A panel of 73 internationally recognized experts in the pharmacotherapy of anxiety and depression was constituted by multistage peer nomination. Sixty-six completed a questionnaire in 1992, and 51 of those completed a follow-up questionnaire in 1997. This report focuses on the experts' responses to questions about therapeutic options relevant to seven vignettes describing typical cases of different anxiety disorders. The preferred initial treatment strategy in 1992 was a combination of medication with a psychological therapy for all vignettes except simple phobia, where a psychological procedure alone was favored. There was little change in 1997, primarily some decrease in the choice of psychological therapy and some increase in the choice of medication for social phobia. Experts recommending a medication in 1992 most often chose as first-line treatment a benzodiazepine anxiolytic (BZ) for panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), simple phobia, and adjustment disorder. They recommended a beta-blocker most often for social phobia and a tricyclic anti-depressant (TCA) for agoraphobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Nearly a fourth chose a combination of medications, usually a TCA plus a BZ. In 1997, the expert panel's most frequent recommendation for agoraphobia, PD, and OCD changed to a specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI); and they also recommended these compounds more often for GAD, social phobia, and simple phobia. Fewer experts chose BZs or TCAs. However, in 1997 many again chose a combination of medications, often a BZ plus a SSRI, so that, overall, there was only a small decline in recommendations for BZs. As second-line medications (1997 only), the experts recommended SSRIs most often for most vignettes, but a TCA for PD and

  17. Occupational factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior medical doctors.

    Pougnet, R; Di Costanzo, Laurence Pougnet; Kerrien, Margaux; Jousset, D; Loddé, B; Dewitte, J D; Garlantézec, R

    2015-09-09

    Junior doctors are exposed to multiple occupational risks. The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors and protective factors for mood and anxiety disorders among junior doctors. We conducted a cross-sectional study via an anonymous online questionnaire between October 2011 and June 2012. All the junior doctors in our faculty were included. The questionnaire inquired about demographic and health data. It contained four validated scales: the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), the Spielberger anxiety questionnaire, the WHO quality of life (WHO - QOL) questionnaire and the Job Content Questionnaire. Finally, it sought to clarify the conditions of professional practice and the interactions between university programmes and junior doctorate students (change of specialty, pregnancy, leave of absence, etc.). 192 juniors doctors participated in the study, 68.2% of whom were women. Out of the group, 13.0% presented a depressive syndrome, while 28.7% presented an anxiety disorder, 32.8% were experiencing Job Strain and 29.7% Iso Strain. The risk factor for anxiety was competition between junior doctors: OR=4.23 (1.06 ‒ 16.82). The protective factors for mood disorders were the help provided by senior physicians and the respect shown by patients: OR=0.21 (0.06-0.74) and 0.20 (0.06-0.75), respectively. This study demonstrated the impact of the relationships with senior physicians and patients on junior doctors' health at work. Consequently, prevention should not be focused uniquely on work organization, but should increase physicians' awareness of the importance of this relationship.

  18. Gender Differences in the Prevalence of Fibromyalgia and in Concomitant Medical and Psychiatric Disorders: A National Veterans Health Administration Study.

    Arout, Caroline A; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Bastian, Lori A; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2018-04-02

    Fibromyalgia is a poorly understood, chronically disabling pain syndrome. While research has focused on its clinical presentation and treatment, less is known about fibromyalgia's clinical epidemiology in real-world healthcare systems. Gender differences have been difficult to study because relatively few males are diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Veterans Health Administration (VHA) patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia nationwide in FY 2012 were compared to Veterans with other pain diagnoses on sociodemographic characteristics, medical and psychiatric diagnoses, health service use, and opioid and psychotropic prescription fills. Additional analyses compared characteristics of men and women diagnosed with fibromyalgia. Risk ratios and Cohen's d were used for bivariate comparisons, followed by logistic regression analyses to identify independent factors associated with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia in the VHA. Altogether, 77,087 of 2,216,621 Veterans with pain diagnoses (3.48%) were diagnosed with fibromyalgia. They were more likely to be female, younger than patients with other pain conditions, more likely to have multiple psychiatric comorbidities and other types of pain, and used more medical outpatient services. Women diagnosed with fibromyalgia were younger and more likely to have headaches, connective tissue diseases (CTD), and psychiatric comorbidities, while men had more comorbid medical conditions. In this large, predominantly older male sample of Veterans with pain diagnoses, those with fibromyalgia were far more likely to be women. Gender comparisons showed women with fibromyalgia were more likely to be diagnosed with psychiatric disorders and CTD, while males were more likely to be diagnosed with medical conditions. Fibromyalgia shows a striking, gender-dependent picture of multimorbidity, which should be considered in treatment.

  19. Effects of psycho-educational training and stimulant medication on visual perceptual skills in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Antigone S Papavasiliou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigone S Papavasiliou, Irene Nikaina, Ioanna Rizou, Stratos AlexandrouDepartment of Neurology, Pendeli Children’s Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is treated with stimulants and psycho-educational remedial programs despite limited literature support for the latter. This study aimed to examine changes in a “Test of Visual Perceptual Skills” (TVPS that has not been previously reported in children with ADHD enrolled in such a program.Methods: Sixteen children, 7–11 years old, with ADHD were involved in occupational therapy and special education geared towards attention training. Six months later methylphenidate 1 mg/kg/day was prescribed. It was not taken by eight children because of family choice. The TVPS was given twice, upon diagnosis, and 8 months post-intervention. The groups were compared by a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA with medication as a between groups factor and test-retest scores as within factor.Results: All children demonstrated increases in total scores in the second measurement. Medicated children scored higher but ANOVA showed a nonsignificant F for the two groups, medicated and unmedicated (F = 0.0031, p = 0.9563, indicating a non-differential effect of the two levels of treatment. It revealed a significant F for the pre- and post-treatment total TVPS scores (F = 30.91, p < 0.0001 indicating a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment tests. The interaction between pre-post treatment and level of treatment (medicated–unmedicated was nonsignificant (F = 2.20, p = 0.1604.Conclusion: TVPS scores improved in all children following intervention. Medicated children did better, but differences were nonsignificant.Keywords: ADHD, stimulants, psycho-educational therapy, TVPS

  20. Sleeping Disturbances/Disorders in Medical Students of King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh

    Danish Hasan Qaiser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: College students are at risk of many sleep disorders that may affect their performance. We conducted this study to identify the sleeping patterns, poor sleep quality factors among medical students, and to observe if there is any relationship between the student’s grades and their level of distress. METHODS: This study was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, College of Medicine (male campus, Riyadh. We included 101 (2nd, 3rd, and 4th year male medical students who completed a self-administered questionnaire. The students sleeping disturbances were evaluated by using Epworth Sleeping Scale (ESS, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and their distress was evaluated by the Subjective Units of Distress Scale (SUD. A relationship between student’s distress and their grade was determined by using one-way ANOVA. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 21. RESULTS: The mean ±SD of the number of hours medical students slept was 5.6±2.6 hours. The most common cause of disturbed sleep was not being able to fall asleep within 30 minutes after going to bed. The mean score for ESS was 8.2 ±5.4. Most students had an ESS score <10 indicating that they had a normal amount of daytime sleepiness and good sleep. There was a relationship between the academic year and ESS; a higher percentage of the students in 3rd and 4th year were sleepy (ESS ≥ 10 than 2nd year (P = 0.04. There was no relation between the student’s grades and their level of distress (P = 0.37. CONCLUSION: Medical students got less actual sleep hours than the optimal sleep duration. However, most had normal day time sleepiness. There was no relation between the student’s grades and their level of distress.

  1. Verification of whiplash-associated disorders in forensic medical practice. part I--assessment of the injury circumstances and biomechanics.

    Teresiński, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    For many years, researchers involved in automotive industry and forensic medicine, as well as insurance companies have shown great interest in the issues of etiology and prevention of cervical spine distortion. The etiopathogenesis of whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) remains controversial and its morphological determinants have not been explicitly determined to date. The subjective nature of complaints causes great difficulties in objective assessment of the consequences of acceleration-deceleration injuries and in verification of compensation claims. The objective of the study was to present biomechanical relationships and circumstances accompanying WADs using population-based studies, statistical data of insurance companies and analysis of recordings of event data recorders installed by vehicle producers. The knowledge of technical aspects of WAD circumstances should facilitate medical assessment of the above-mentioned consequences.

  2. [Voxel-Based Morphometry in Medicated-naive Boys with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder(ADHD)].

    Liu, Qi; Chen, Lizhou; Li, Fei; Chen, Ying; Guo, Lanting; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi

    2016-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD)is one of the most common neuro-developmental disorders occurring in childhood,characterized by symptoms of age-inappropriate inattention,hyperactivity/impulsivity,and the prevalence is higher in boys.Although gray matter volume deficits have been frequently reported for ADHD children via structural magnetic resonance imaging,few of them had specifically focused on male patients.The present study aimed to explore the alterations of gray matter volumes in medicated-naive boys with ADHD via a relatively new voxel-based morphometry technique.According to the criteria of DSM-IV-TR,43medicated-naive ADHD boys and 44age-matched healthy boys were recruited.The magnetic resonance image(MRI)scan was performed via a 3T MRI system with three-dimensional(3D)spoiled gradient recalled echo(SPGR)sequence.Voxel-based morphometry with diffeomorphic anatomical registration through exponentiated lie algebra in SPM8 was used to preprocess the3DT1-weighted images.To identify gray matter volume differences between the ADHD and the controls,voxelbased analysis of whole brain gray matter volumes between two groups were done via two sample t-test in SPM8 with age as covariate,threshold at P<0.001.Finally,compared to the controls,significantly reduced gray matter volumes were identified in the right orbitofrontal cortex(peak coordinates[-2,52,-25],t=4.01),and bilateral hippocampus(Left:peak coordinates[14,0,-18],t=3.61;Right:peak coordinates[-14,15,-28],t=3.64)of ADHD boys.Our results demonstrated obvious reduction of whole brain gray matter volumes in right orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral hippocampus in boys with ADHD.This suggests that the abnormalities of prefrontal-hippocampus circuit may be the underlying cause of the cognitive dysfunction and abnormal behavioral inhibition in medicatednaive boys with ADHD.

  3. Medication adherence and utilization in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder receiving aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge: A retrospective cohort study

    Berger Ariel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are chronic debilitating disorders that are often treated with second-generation antipsychotic agents, such as aripiprazole, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. While patients who are hospitalized for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder often receive these agents at discharge, comparatively little information exists on subsequent patterns of pharmacotherapy. Methods Using a database linking hospital admission records to health insurance claims, we identified all patients hospitalized for schizophrenia (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 295.XX or bipolar disorder (296.0, 296.1, 296.4-296.89 between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2008 who received aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at discharge. Patients not continuously enrolled for 6 months before and after hospitalization (“pre-admission” and “follow-up”, respectively were excluded. We examined patterns of use of these agents during follow-up, including adherence with treatment (using medication possession ratios [MPRs] and cumulative medication gaps [CMGs] and therapy switching. Analyses were undertaken separately for patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. Results We identified a total of 43 patients with schizophrenia, and 84 patients with bipolar disorder. During the 6-month period following hospitalization, patients with schizophrenia received an average of 101 therapy-days with the second-generation antipsychotic agent prescribed at discharge; for patients with bipolar disorder, the corresponding value was 68 therapy-days. Mean MPR at 6 months was 55.1% for schizophrenia patients, and 37.3% for those with bipolar disorder; approximately one-quarter of patients switched to another agent over this period. Conclusions Medication compliance is poor in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who initiate treatment with aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge.

  4. Attitudes of Israeli Rheumatologists to the Use of Medical Cannabis as Therapy for Rheumatic Disorders

    Jacob N. Ablin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background While medical cannabis has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of pain and other symptoms, evidence-based use is limited and practitioners face multiple areas of uncertainty regarding the rational use of these compounds. Nonetheless, an increasing public interest and advocacy in favor of medical cannabis is causing the issue to be encountered ever more frequently by physicians in different fields of medicine and particularly in rheumatology. In view of this situation, we have surveyed the attitudes of Israeli rheumatologists to the use of medical cannabis. Objectives As rheumatologists are specialized in caring for patients presenting with musculoskeletal complaints, the confidence of rheumatologists’ knowledge of cannabinoids was surveyed. Methods All members of the Israeli Society of Rheumatology were surveyed by e-mail for their confidence and knowledge of cannabinoids and their perceived competence to prescribe herbal cannabis. Results A total of 23 out of 119 (19.3% Israeli rheumatologists approached returned the questionnaire. Three-quarters of responders were not confident about their knowledge of cannabinoid molecules or ability to write a prescription for herbal cannabis, and 78% were not confident to write a prescription for herbal cannabis; 74% of responders held the opinion that there was some role for cannabinoids in the management of rheumatic disease. Conclusion Israeli rheumatologists lack confidence in their knowledge of cannabinoids in general, yet are open to the possibility of introducing this treatment. Additional data and guidance are necessary in order to allow rational utilization of cannabinoids for management of rheumatic pain.

  5. Frontal white matter alterations in short-term medicated panic disorder patients without comorbid conditions: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Borah Kim

    Full Text Available The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD. A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD.

  6. Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. I. Prevalence, impact of medications and disparities in health care

    DE HERT, MARC; CORRELL, CHRISTOPH U.; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; COHEN, DAN; ASAI, ITSUO; DETRAUX, JOHAN; GAUTAM, SHIV; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; NDETEI, DAVID M.; NEWCOMER, JOHN W.; UWAKWE, RICHARD; LEUCHT, STEFAN

    2011-01-01

    The lifespan of people with severe mental illness (SMI) is shorter compared to the general population. This excess mortality is mainly due to physical illness. We report prevalence rates of different physical illnesses as well as important individual lifestyle choices, side effects of psychotropic treatment and disparities in health care access, utilization and provision that contribute to these poor physical health outcomes. We searched MEDLINE (1966 – August 2010) combining the MeSH terms of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder with the different MeSH terms of general physical disease categories to select pertinent reviews and additional relevant studies through cross-referencing to identify prevalence figures and factors contributing to the excess morbidity and mortality rates. Nutritional and metabolic diseases, cardiovascular diseases, viral diseases, respiratory tract diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, sexual dysfunction, pregnancy complications, stomatognathic diseases, and possibly obesity-related cancers are, compared to the general population, more prevalent among people with SMI. It seems that lifestyle as well as treatment specific factors account for much of the increased risk for most of these physical diseases. Moreover, there is sufficient evidence that people with SMI are less likely to receive standard levels of care for most of these diseases. Lifestyle factors, relatively easy to measure, are barely considered for screening; baseline testing of numerous important physical parameters is insufficiently performed. Besides modifiable lifestyle factors and side effects of psychotropic medications, access to and quality of health care remains to be improved for individuals with SMI. PMID:21379357

  7. Treatment Outcomes From a Specialist Model for Treating Tobacco Use Disorder in a Medical Center.

    Burke, Michael V; Ebbert, Jon O; Schroeder, Darrell R; McFadden, David D; Hays, J Taylor

    2015-11-01

    Cigarette smoking causes premature mortality and multiple morbidity; stop smoking improves health. Higher rates of smoking cessation can be achieved through more intensive treatment, consisting of medication and extended counseling of patients, but there are challenges to integrating these interventions into healthcare delivery systems. A care model using a master-level counselor trained as a tobacco treatment specialist (TTS) to deliver behavioral intervention, teamed with a supervising physician/prescriber, affords an opportunity to integrate more intensive tobacco dependence treatment into hospitals, clinics, and other medical systems. This article analyzes treatment outcomes and predictors of abstinence for cigarette smokers being treated using the TTS-physician team in a large outpatient clinic over a 7-year period.This is an observational study of a large cohort of cigarette smokers treated for tobacco dependence at a medical center. Patients referred by the primary healthcare team for a TTS consult received a standard assessment and personalized treatment planning guided by a workbook. Medication and behavioral plans were developed collaboratively with each patient. Six months after the initial assessment, a telephone call was made to ascertain a 7-day period of self-reported abstinence. The univariate association of each baseline patient characteristic with self-reported tobacco abstinence at 6 months was evaluated using the chi-squared test. In addition, a multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with self-reported tobacco abstinence as the dependent variable and all baseline characteristics included as explanatory variables.Over a period of 7 years (2005-2011), 6824 cigarette smokers who provided general research authorization were seen for treatment. The 6-month self-reported abstinence rate was 28.1% (95% confidence interval: 27.7-30.1). The patients most likely to report abstinence were less dependent, more motivated to quit, and did not

  8. Smoking dependence and common psychiatric disorders in medical students: Cross-sectional study

    Ashor, A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Exploring the variable effect of the degree of smoking dependence on the level of anxiety and depression symptoms among medical students. Methodology: This cross-section study, conducted in the Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University, Baghdad-Iraq from December 2010 to May 2011, involving 300 medical students selected by cluster random sampling techniques. Those students completed the Hamilton rating scale for anxiety, Zung self-report depression scale and the Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence with a value of six or more regarded as heavy smokers, and a value less than six considered as light smokers. Results: The response rate was 89%, heavy smokers were significantly older and start smoking at an earlier age than non- and light smokers (p=0.001). Heavy smokers associated with high chance of depressive symptoms in comparison with non-smokers (OR=4.8, C.I.=1.752-13.677) and light smokers (OR=4.2, C.I.=1.042-17.161). Regarding anxiety symptoms, heavy smokers demonstrate high chance of anxiety symptoms in comparison with non-smokers (OR=5.2, C.I.=1.826-15.176), and light smokers (OR=4.5, C.I.=1.318-15.526). Conclusions: Heavy smokers differ from non- and light smokers, associated with high risk of anxiety and depression, therefore heavy smoking tends to deteriorate rather than ameliorate these symptoms. (author)

  9. Work-related medical rehabilitation in patients with musculoskeletal disorders: the protocol of a propensity score matched effectiveness study (EVA-WMR, DRKS00009780)

    Neuderth, Silke; Schwarz, Betje; Gerlich, Christian; Schuler, Michael; Markus, Miriam; Bethge, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders are one of the most important causes of work disability. Various rehabilitation services and return-to-work programs have been developed in order to reduce sickness absence and increase sustainable return-to-work. As the effects of conventional medical rehabilitation programs on sickness absence duration were shown to be slight, work-related medical rehabilitation programs have been developed and tested. While such studies proved the efficacy of w...

  10. Investigating the Prevalence of Pervasive Developmental Disorders According to Sex in a Sample of Iranian Children Referred to Medical-Rehabilitation Centers and Psychiatrics Clinics

    K. Khushabi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: According to significance of pervasive developmental disorders (PDD in children and the increasing rate of its prevalence in referred patients to clinic in recent years and due to absence of any report about the rate of PPD in our country, this study was carried out. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of PPD in a sample of Iranian children who referred to medical and rehabilitation centers.Materials & Methods: 248 children who referred to three medical-rehabilitation centers were participated in the research. Accessible sampling with diagnosis of PDD based on DSM-IV criteria was chosen. The obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistics methods such as percent and frequency distribution. Results: Autistics disorder was most prevalent among pervasive developmental disorders. In this research Autistic disorder (proportion 4/1 to 1, Asperger disorder (proportion 3 to 1 and childhood disintegrative disease were more prevalent in boys than girls. Ret disorders was observed only in girls and pervasive developmental disease (NOS was seen in both sexes. Conclusion: The results showed that pervasive developmental disorders are 4 times more prevalent in boys than girls and the findings of this research were consistent with those of previous studies.

  11. Default mode network segregation and social deficits in autism spectrum disorder: Evidence from non-medicated children.

    Yerys, Benjamin E; Gordon, Evan M; Abrams, Danielle N; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Weinblatt, Rachel; Jankowski, Kathryn F; Strang, John; Kenworthy, Lauren; Gaillard, William D; Vaidya, Chandan J

    2015-01-01

    Functional pathology of the default mode network is posited to be central to social-cognitive impairment in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Altered functional connectivity of the default mode network's midline core may be a potential endophenotype for social deficits in ASD. Generalizability from prior studies is limited by inclusion of medicated participants and by methods favoring restricted examination of network function. This study measured resting-state functional connectivity in 22 8-13 year-old non-medicated children with ASD and 22 typically developing controls using seed-based and network segregation functional connectivity methods. Relative to controls the ASD group showed both under- and over-functional connectivity within default mode and non-default mode regions, respectively. ASD symptoms correlated negatively with the connection strength of the default mode midline core-medial prefrontal cortex-posterior cingulate cortex. Network segregation analysis with the participation coefficient showed a higher area under the curve for the ASD group. Our findings demonstrate that the default mode network in ASD shows a pattern of poor segregation with both functional connectivity metrics. This study confirms the potential for the functional connection of the midline core as an endophenotype for social deficits. Poor segregation of the default mode network is consistent with an excitation/inhibition imbalance model of ASD.

  12. Enhanced error related negativity amplitude in medication-naïve, comorbidity-free obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Nawani, Hema; Narayanaswamy, Janardhanan C; Basavaraju, Shrinivasa; Bose, Anushree; Mahavir Agarwal, Sri; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Janardhan Reddy, Y C

    2018-04-01

    Error monitoring and response inhibition is a key cognitive deficit in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Frontal midline regions such as the cingulate cortex and pre-supplementary motor area are considered critical brain substrates of this deficit. Electrophysiological equivalent of the above dysfunction is a fronto-central event related potential (ERP) which occurs after an error called the error related negativity (ERN). In this study, we sought to compare the ERN parameters between medication-naïve, comorbidity-free subjects with OCD and healthy controls (HC). Age, sex and handedness matched subjects with medication-naïve, comorbidity-free OCD (N = 16) and Healthy Controls (N = 17) performed a modified version of the flanker task while EEG was acquired for ERN. EEG signals were recorded from the electrodes FCz and Cz. Clinical severity of OCD was assessed using the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale. The subjects with OCD had significantly greater ERN amplitude at Cz and FCz. There were no significant correlations between ERN measures and illness severity measures. Overactive performance monitoring as evidenced by enhanced ERN amplitude could be considered as a biomarker for OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of post-traumatic stress disorder and work performance: A survey from an emergency medical service, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Kerai, Salima; Pasha, Omrana; Khan, Uzma; Islam, Muhammad; Asad, Nargis; Razzak, Junaid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and work performance of emergency medical services personnel in Karachi, Pakistan. Emergency medical service personnel were screened for potential PTSD using Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). Work performance was assessed on the basis of five variables: number of late arrivals to work, number of days absent, number of days sick, adherence to protocol, and patient satisfaction over a period of 3 months. In order to model outcomes like the number of late arrivals to work, days absent and days late, negative binomial regression was applied, whereas logistic regression was applied for adherence to protocol and linear for patient satisfaction scores. Mean scores of PTSD were 24.0±12.2. No association was found between PTSD and work performance measures: number of late arrivals to work ( RR adj 0.99; 0.98-1.00), days absent ( RR adj 0.98; 0.96-0.99), days sick ( RR adj 0.99; 0.98-1.00), adherence to protocol ( OR adj 1.01; 0.99-1.04) and patient satisfaction ( β 0.001%-0.03%) after adjusting for years of formal schooling, living status, coping mechanism, social support, working hours, years of experience and anxiety or depression. No statistically significant association was found between PTSD and work performance amongst EMS personnel in Karachi, Pakistan.

  14. PubMed search strategies for the identification of etiologic associations between hypothalamic-pituitary disorders and other medical conditions.

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Mattioli, Stefano; Ghigo, Ezio; Gori, Davide

    2013-12-01

    Biomedical literature has enormously grown in the last decades and become broadly available through online databases. Ad-hoc search methods, created on the basis of research field and goals, are required to enhance the quality of searching. Aim of this study was to formulate efficient, evidence-based PubMed search strategies to retrieve articles assessing etiologic associations between a condition of interest and hypothalamic-pituitary disorders (HPD). Based on expert knowledge, 17 MeSH (Medical Subjects Headings) and 79 free terms related to HPD were identified to search PubMed. Using random samples of abstracts retrieved by each term, we estimated the proportion of articles containing pertinent information and formulated two strings (one more specific, one more sensitive) for the detection of articles focusing on the etiology of HPD, that were then applied to retrieve articles identifying possible etiologic associations between HPD and three diseases (malaria, LHON and celiac disease) considered not associated to HPD, and define the number of abstracts needed to read (NNR) to find one potentially pertinent article. We propose two strings: one sensitive string derived from the combination of articles providing the largest literature coverage in the field and one specific including combined terms retrieving ≥40% of potentially pertinent articles. NNR were 2.1 and 1.6 for malaria, 3.36 and 2.29 for celiac disease, 2.8 and 2.2 for LHON, respectively. For the first time, two reliable, readily applicable strings are proposed for the retrieval of medical literature assessing putative etiologic associations between HPD and other medical conditions of interest.

  15. Speech disorders in Parkinson's disease: early diagnostics and effects of medication and brain stimulation.

    Brabenec, L; Mekyska, J; Galaz, Z; Rektorova, Irena

    2017-03-01

    Hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) occurs in 90% of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. It manifests specifically in the areas of articulation, phonation, prosody, speech fluency, and faciokinesis. We aimed to systematically review papers on HD in PD with a special focus on (1) early PD diagnosis and monitoring of the disease progression using acoustic voice and speech analysis, and (2) functional imaging studies exploring neural correlates of HD in PD, and (3) clinical studies using acoustic analysis to evaluate effects of dopaminergic medication and brain stimulation. A systematic literature search of articles written in English before March 2016 was conducted in the Web of Science, PubMed, SpringerLink, and IEEE Xplore databases using and combining specific relevant keywords. Articles were categorized into three groups: (1) articles focused on neural correlates of HD in PD using functional imaging (n = 13); (2) articles dealing with the acoustic analysis of HD in PD (n = 52); and (3) articles concerning specifically dopaminergic and brain stimulation-related effects as assessed by acoustic analysis (n = 31); the groups were then reviewed. We identified 14 combinations of speech tasks and acoustic features that can be recommended for use in describing the main features of HD in PD. While only a few acoustic parameters correlate with limb motor symptoms and can be partially relieved by dopaminergic medication, HD in PD seems to be mainly related to non-dopaminergic deficits and associated particularly with non-motor symptoms. Future studies should combine non-invasive brain stimulation with voice behavior approaches to achieve the best treatment effects by enhancing auditory-motor integration.

  16. Using selected scenes from Brazilian films to teach about substance use disorders, within medical education

    João Mauricio Castaldelli-Maia

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: Themes like alcohol and drug abuse, relationship difficulties, psychoses, autism and personality dissociation disorders have been widely used in films. Psychiatry and psychiatric conditions in various cultural settings are increasingly taught using films. Many articles on cinema and psychiatry have been published but none have presented any methodology on how to select material. Here, the authors look at the portrayal of abusive use of alcohol and drugs during the Brazilian cinema revival period (1994 to 2008. DESIGN AND SETTING: Qualitative study at two universities in the state of São Paulo. METHODS: Scenes were selected from films available at rental stores and were analyzed using a specifically designed protocol. We assessed how realistic these scenes were and their applicability for teaching. One author selected 70 scenes from 50 films (graded for realism and teaching applicability > 8. These were then rated by another two judges. Rating differences among the three judges were assessed using nonparametric tests (P 8 were defined as "quality scenes". RESULTS: Thirty-nine scenes from 27 films were identified as "quality scenes". Alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens and inhalants were included in these. Signs and symptoms of intoxication, abusive/harmful use and dependence were shown. CONCLUSIONS: We have produced rich teaching material for discussing psychopathology relating to alcohol and drug use that can be used both at undergraduate and at postgraduate level. Moreover, it could be seen that certain drug use behavioral patterns are deeply rooted in some Brazilian films and groups.

  17. Using selected scenes from Brazilian films to teach about substance use disorders, within medical education.

    Castaldelli-Maia, João Mauricio; Oliveira, Hercílio Pereira; Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Lotufo-Neto, Francisco; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Themes like alcohol and drug abuse, relationship difficulties, psychoses, autism and personality dissociation disorders have been widely used in films. Psychiatry and psychiatric conditions in various cultural settings are increasingly taught using films. Many articles on cinema and psychiatry have been published but none have presented any methodology on how to select material. Here, the authors look at the portrayal of abusive use of alcohol and drugs during the Brazilian cinema revival period (1994 to 2008). Qualitative study at two universities in the state of São Paulo. Scenes were selected from films available at rental stores and were analyzed using a specifically designed protocol. We assessed how realistic these scenes were and their applicability for teaching. One author selected 70 scenes from 50 films (graded for realism and teaching applicability > 8). These were then rated by another two judges. Rating differences among the three judges were assessed using nonparametric tests (P 8) were defined as "quality scenes". Thirty-nine scenes from 27 films were identified as "quality scenes". Alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens and inhalants were included in these. Signs and symptoms of intoxication, abusive/harmful use and dependence were shown. We have produced rich teaching material for discussing psychopathology relating to alcohol and drug use that can be used both at undergraduate and at postgraduate level. Moreover, it could be seen that certain drug use behavioral patterns are deeply rooted in some Brazilian films and groups.

  18. Aluminum induced enzymatic disorder as an important eco biomarker in seedlings of lens culinaris medic

    Azmat, R.; Qamar, N.; Naz, U.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the Al (Aluminum) induced disorder on the activities of nitrate and nitrite reductase (NR), protease (PA) and proline contents of seedlings of Lens culinaris as some important eco-biomarkers. The seedlings were cultured hydroponically in the nutrient solution with or without AlCl/sub 3/, 6H/sub 2/O (pH = 4.0) for 15 days. The relative toxicity of Al3+ was found to be directly related with Al concentration in the nutrient medium. The reduction in the seedlings growth may be attributed with the poor root growth which in turns related with an inhibition in the cell division. Al treatments for 15 days increased the nitrate reductase activities in the seedlings while protease activity was decreased. Increase in the proline contents may cause a substantial shield to the enzymes against the detrimental effects of the tense components Al. The essential electrolyte like sodium (Na) and potassium (K) contents were found to be decreased, accredited to the rupturing of cell membrane. These results suggest that inhibition of the root growth by Al, closely related to the metabolic changes including an increase in nitrate reductase activity and decline in proteases activity in of the seedlings. (author)

  19. Factitious Disorder

    ... support their claims. Factitious disorder signs and symptoms may include: Clever and convincing medical or psychological problems Extensive knowledge of medical terms and diseases Vague or inconsistent symptoms Conditions that get worse for no apparent ...

  20. Predicting Outcome in Patients With Work-Related Upper Extremity Disorders: A Prospective Study of Medical, Physical, Ergonomic, and Psychosocial Risk Factors

    Huang, Grant D

    1999-01-01

    .... Over the past few decades, empirical investigations have found that medical, physical, ergonomic, and psychosocial factors are correlated with and/or predictive of these disorders (e.g., Armstrong et al., 1993; Bongers et al., 1993; Hales AND Bernard, 1996).

  1. Prevalence of somatoform disorders and medically unexplained symptoms in old age populations in comparison with younger age groups : A systematic review

    Hilderink, P. H.; Collard, R.; Rosmalen, J. G. M.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude

    Objective: To review current knowledge regarding the prevalence of somatization problems in later life by level of caseness (somatoform disorders and medically unexplained symptoms, MUS) and to compare these rates with those in middle-aged and younger age groups. Method: A systematic search of the

  2. Posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression following pregnancies conceived through fertility treatments : the effects of medically assisted conception on postpartum well-being

    Warmelink, J Catja; Stramrood, Claire A I; Paarlberg, K Marieke; Haisma, Hinke H; Vingerhoets, A J J M; Schultz, Willibrord C M Weijmar; van Pampus, Maria G

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the postpartum prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression in women who conceived via medically assisted conception (MAC) and women who conceived naturally. STUDY DESIGN: All women (n = 907) who delivered under supervision of four independent

  3. Medically unexplained physical symptoms and work functioning over 2 years: their association and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics

    Boeft, M. den; Twisk, J.W.; Hoekstra, T.; Terluin, B.; Penninx, B.W.; Wouden, J.C. van der; Numans, M.E.; Horst, H.E. van der

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and may affect work functioning. In this study we aimed to assess the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning over 2 years and the influence of job characteristics and depressive and anxiety disorders

  4. Medically unexplained physical symptoms and work functioning over 2 years : their association and the influence of depressive and anxiety disorders and job characteristics

    den Boeft, Madelon; Twisk, Jos W R; Hoekstra, T.; Terluin, Berend; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van der Wouden, Johannes C; Numans, Mattijs E.; van der Horst, Henriette E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS) are highly prevalent and may affect work functioning. In this study we aimed to assess the longitudinal association between MUPS and work functioning over 2 years and the influence of job characteristics and depressive and anxiety disorders

  5. Predictors of Age of Diagnosis for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of a Consistent Source of Medical Care, Race, and Condition Severity

    Emerson, Natacha D.; Morrell, Holly E. R.; Neece, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Having a consistent source of medical care may facilitate diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This study examined predictors of age of ASD diagnosis using data from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health. Using multiple linear regression analysis, age of diagnosis was predicted by race, ASD severity, having a consistent…

  6. Effect of an Educational Booklet on Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Major Depressive Disorder in Medical Students in Delhi

    Medha Goyal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting people in the world. It is also a growing concern in younger population particularly medical students. There are many pharmaceutical interventions for treatment of depression but there is paucity of data to determine the effect of educational intervention on the knowledge, attitude and help seeking behaviour regarding depression among medical students. Methods: An interventional study was carried out among randomly selected 100 medical students except interns over a period of 6 months from March August 2011 in a medical college in Delhi to assess the effect of educational booklet on knowledge and attitude about depression. Data was collected using pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. Statistical significance in pre and post intervention proportions was determined using Mc Nemar test (MN and for other proportions Chi-square test. Results: The study shown that only 71% of subjects knew that depression is a disease in pre intervention phase, which rose to 88% in post intervention phase (p=0.01. Knowledge of symptoms and treatment significantly improved such as trouble falling asleep or too much sleep (p=0.03, feeling tired or decreased energy (MN=17.6, p=0.01, feeling bad about self (MN=21.8, p=0.01, speaking slowly other can notice (MN=19.1, p=0.01 and can be treated by improving awareness (MN=8.6, p=0.03, and anti-depressants do not cause much of side effects (MN=17.3, p=0.01. Most common reasons for not seeking help were thinking that there is lack of understanding by other people about the depression (63%, lack of confidentiality (49%, social stigma (30%, fear of rejection (26% and time constraints (6%. Majority of students accepted the booklet for their understanding about depression where 63% considered that it improved their knowledge to great extent. Conclusion:Educational interventional booklet should be promoted at bigger

  7. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and glial integrity: S100B, cytokines and kynurenine metabolism - effects of medication

    Schwarz Markus J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD show a marked temporal variability in their display of symptoms and neuropsychological performance. This could be explained in terms of an impaired glial supply of energy to support neuronal activity. Method We pursued one test of the idea with measures of a neurotrophin reflecting glial integrity (S100B and the influences of 8 cytokines on the metabolism of amino-acids, and of tryptophan/kynurenine to neuroprotective or potentially toxic products that could modulate glial function. Serum samples from 21 medication-naïve children with ADHD, 21 typically-developing controls, 14 medicated children with ADHD and 7 healthy siblings were analysed in this preliminary exploration of group differences and associations. Results There were no marked group differences in levels of S100B, no major imbalance in the ratios of pro- to anti-inflammatory interleukins nor in the metabolism of kynurenine to toxic metabolites in ADHD. However, four trends are described that may be worthy of closer examination in a more extensive study. First, S100B levels tended to be lower in ADHD children that did not show oppositional/conduct problems. Second, in medicated children raised interleukin levels showed a trend to normalisation. Third, while across all children the sensitivity to allergy reflected increased levels of IL-16 and IL-10, the latter showed a significant inverse relationship to measures of S100B in the ADHD group. Fourthly, against expectations healthy controls tended to show higher levels of toxic 3-hydroxykynurenine (3 HK than those with ADHD. Conclusions Thus, there were no clear signs (S100B that the glial functions were compromised in ADHD. However, other markers of glial function require examination. Nonetheless there is preliminary evidence that a minor imbalance of the immunological system was improved on medication. Finally, if lower levels of the potentially toxic 3

  8. Retrospective chart review of a referenced EEG database in assisting medication selection for treatment of depression in patients with eating disorders

    Greenblatt JM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available James M Greenblatt1, Craig Sussman1, Mariko Jameson1, Lee Yuan1, Daniel A Hoffman2, Dan V Iosifescu31Comprehensive Psychiatric Resources, Waltham, MA, USA; 2Neuro-Therapy Clinic Inc, Denver, CO, USA; 3Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USABackground: A retrospective chart review was undertaken in a private clinic to examine the clinical outcomes for patients with an eating disorder comorbid with depression or bipolar illness who underwent a referenced electroencephalographic (EEG database analysis to help guide medication selection.Method: We examined 33 charts for patients with the primary psychiatric diagnosis of an eating disorder and comorbid major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder who underwent a quantitative EEG database assessment to provide additional information for choices of medication. The current analysis includes data from 22 subjects who accepted treatments based on information from the referenced-EEG medication database. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Clinical Global Impression-Improvement, and hospitalization data were examined for these patients.Results: Patients whose EEG data was used for clinical treatment reported significant decreases in associated depressive symptoms (HDRS scores, overall severity of illness (Clinical Global Impression-Severity, and overall clinical global improvement (Clinical Global Impression-Improvement. This cohort also reported fewer inpatient, residential, and partial hospitalization program days following referenced-EEG compared with the two-year period prior to treatment.Conclusion: These findings are consistent with previously reported data for patients with eating disorders and suggest the need for future studies using EEG data correlated with those from other patients with similar quantitative EEG features.Keywords: eating disorders, anorexia, bulimia, depression, referenced-EEG, chart review

  9. Facilitators and barriers to initiating change in medical intensive care unit survivors with alcohol use disorders: a qualitative study.

    Clark, Brendan J; Jones, Jacqueline; Cook, Paul; Tian, Karen; Moss, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Alcohol abuse and dependence are collectively referred to as alcohol use disorders (AUD). An AUD is present in up to one third of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). We sought to understand the barriers and facilitators to change in ICU survivors with an AUD to provide a foundation upon which to tailor alcohol-related interventions. We used a qualitative approach with a broad constructivist framework, conducting semistructured interviews in medical ICU survivors with an AUD. Patients were included if they were admitted to 1 of 2 medical ICUs and were excluded if they refused participation, were unable to participate, or did not speak English. Digitally recorded and professionally transcribed interviews were analyzed using a general inductive approach and grouped into themes. Nineteen patients were included, with an average age of 51 (interquartile range, 36-51) years and an average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 9 (interquartile range, 5-13); 68% were white, 74% were male, and the most common reason for admission was alcohol withdrawal (n=8). We identified 5 facilitators of change: empathy of the inpatient health care environment, recognition of accumulating problems, religion, pressure from others to stop drinking, and trigger events. We identified 3 barriers to change: missed opportunities, psychiatric comorbidity, and cognitive dysfunction. Social networks were identified as either a barrier or facilitator to change depending on the specific context. Alcohol-related interventions to motivate and sustain behavior change could be tailored to ICU survivors by accounting for unique barriers and facilitators. © 2013.

  10. Prescribing patterns for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder medications among children and adolescents in Korea, 2007-2011

    Inmyung Song

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES This study analyzed the prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD medication use among children and adolescents in Korea between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011. METHODS Using the Korea National Health Insurance claims database, we identified patients between one and 17 years of age who had at least one medical claim for the diagnosis of ADHD (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision: F90.0. The annual prevalence of ADHD diagnoses was calculated, using national census data from Statistics Korea on the population aged between one and 17 years as the denominator. The prevalence was age-standardized using the 2010 population as the standard population. The number of patients who were treated with methylphenidate and/or atomoxetine and the prevalence of total patients with ADHD that were treated with either drug were also calculated for each year. All analyses were stratified according to gender and age group (1-5 years, 6-12 years, and 13-17 years. RESULTS The number of patients diagnosed with ADHD increased from 72,704 persons (0.71% in 2007 to 85,468 persons (0.93% in 2011. The annual age-standardized prevalence of ADHD diagnoses increased from 0.67% in 2007 to 0.94% in 2011. The prevalence of methylphenidate use among children and adolescents with ADHD decreased from 73.91% in 2007 to 70.33% in 2011, whereas that of atomoxetine use increased from 5.77% in 2009 to 13.09% in 2011. CONCLUSIONS While methylphenidate remains the most commonly prescribed ADHD drug, the use of atomoxetine has increased.

  11. Phase synchronization of oxygenation waves in the frontal areas of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder detected by optical diffusion spectroscopy correlates with medication

    Wigal, Sharon B.; Polzonetti, Chiara M.; Stehli, Annamarie; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effects of pharmacotherapy on children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are well documented. We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methodology to determine reorganization of brain neurovascular properties following the medication treatment. Twenty-six children with ADHD (ages six through 12) participated in a modified laboratory school protocol to monitor treatment response with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX; Vyvanse, Shire US Inc.). All children refrained from taking medication for at least two weeks (washout period). To detect neurovascular reorganization, we measured changes in synchronization of oxy (HbO2) and deoxy (HHb) hemoglobin waves between the two frontal lobes. Participants without medication displayed average baseline HbO2 phase difference at about -7-deg. and HHb differences at about 240-deg.. This phase synchronization index changed after pharmacological intervention. Medication induced an average phase changes of HbO2 after first medication to 280-deg. and after medication optimization to 242-deg.. Instead first medication changed of the average HHb phase difference at 186-deg. and then after medication optimization to 120-deg. In agreement with findings of White et al., and Varela et al., we associated the phase synchronization differences of brain hemodynamics in children with ADHD with lobe specific hemodynamic reorganization of HbO2- and HHB oscillations following medication status.

  12. Medication Use before, during, and after Pregnancy among Women with Eating Disorders: A Study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Angela Lupattelli

    Full Text Available Little is known about medication use among women with eating disorders in relation to pregnancy.To explore patterns of and associations between use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal and analgesic medications and eating disorders in the period before, during and after pregnancy.This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa. A total of 62,019 women, enrolled at approximately 17 weeks' gestation, had valid data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry and completed three MoBa questionnaires. The questionnaires provided diagnostic information on broadly defined anorexia nervosa (AN, bulimia nervosa (BN, binge eating disorder (BED and recurrent self-induced purging in the absence of binge eating (EDNOS-P, along with self-reported use of medication six months before, during, and 0-6 months after pregnancy.The prevalence of eating disorder subtypes before and/or during pregnancy was: 0.09% AN (n = 54, 0.94% BN (n = 585, 0.10% EDNOS-P (n = 61 and 5.00% BED (n = 3104. The highest over-time prevalence of psychotropic use was within the AN (3.7-22.2% and EDNOS-P (3.3-9.8% groups. Compared to controls, BN was directly associated with incident use of psychotropics in pregnancy (adjusted RR: 2.25, 99% CI: 1.17-4.32. Having AN (adjusted RR: 5.11, 99% CI: 1.53-17.01 or EDNOS-P (adjusted RR: 6.77, 99% CI: 1.41-32.53 was directly associated with use of anxiolytics/sedatives postpartum. The estimates of use of analgesics (BED and laxatives (all eating disorders subtypes were high at all time periods investigated.Use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal, and analgesic medications is extensive among women with eating disorders in the period around pregnancy. Female patients with eating disorders should receive evidence-based counseling about the risk of medication exposure versus the risk of untreated psychiatric illness during pregnancy and postpartum.

  13. Medication Use before, during, and after Pregnancy among Women with Eating Disorders: A Study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    Lupattelli, Angela; Spigset, Olav; Torgersen, Leila; Zerwas, Stephanie; Hatle, Marianne; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about medication use among women with eating disorders in relation to pregnancy. Aims To explore patterns of and associations between use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal and analgesic medications and eating disorders in the period before, during and after pregnancy. Method This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). A total of 62,019 women, enrolled at approximately 17 weeks' gestation, had valid data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry and completed three MoBa questionnaires. The questionnaires provided diagnostic information on broadly defined anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED) and recurrent self-induced purging in the absence of binge eating (EDNOS-P), along with self-reported use of medication six months before, during, and 0–6 months after pregnancy. Results The prevalence of eating disorder subtypes before and/or during pregnancy was: 0.09% AN (n = 54), 0.94% BN (n = 585), 0.10% EDNOS-P (n = 61) and 5.00% BED (n = 3104). The highest over-time prevalence of psychotropic use was within the AN (3.7–22.2%) and EDNOS-P (3.3–9.8%) groups. Compared to controls, BN was directly associated with incident use of psychotropics in pregnancy (adjusted RR: 2.25, 99% CI: 1.17–4.32). Having AN (adjusted RR: 5.11, 99% CI: 1.53–17.01) or EDNOS-P (adjusted RR: 6.77, 99% CI: 1.41–32.53) was directly associated with use of anxiolytics/sedatives postpartum. The estimates of use of analgesics (BED) and laxatives (all eating disorders subtypes) were high at all time periods investigated. Conclusions Use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal, and analgesic medications is extensive among women with eating disorders in the period around pregnancy. Female patients with eating disorders should receive evidence-based counseling about the risk of medication exposure versus the risk of untreated psychiatric illness during pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:26200658

  14. Medication Use before, during, and after Pregnancy among Women with Eating Disorders: A Study from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

    Lupattelli, Angela; Spigset, Olav; Torgersen, Leila; Zerwas, Stephanie; Hatle, Marianne; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M; Nordeng, Hedvig

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about medication use among women with eating disorders in relation to pregnancy. To explore patterns of and associations between use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal and analgesic medications and eating disorders in the period before, during and after pregnancy. This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). A total of 62,019 women, enrolled at approximately 17 weeks' gestation, had valid data from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry and completed three MoBa questionnaires. The questionnaires provided diagnostic information on broadly defined anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED) and recurrent self-induced purging in the absence of binge eating (EDNOS-P), along with self-reported use of medication six months before, during, and 0-6 months after pregnancy. The prevalence of eating disorder subtypes before and/or during pregnancy was: 0.09% AN (n = 54), 0.94% BN (n = 585), 0.10% EDNOS-P (n = 61) and 5.00% BED (n = 3104). The highest over-time prevalence of psychotropic use was within the AN (3.7-22.2%) and EDNOS-P (3.3-9.8%) groups. Compared to controls, BN was directly associated with incident use of psychotropics in pregnancy (adjusted RR: 2.25, 99% CI: 1.17-4.32). Having AN (adjusted RR: 5.11, 99% CI: 1.53-17.01) or EDNOS-P (adjusted RR: 6.77, 99% CI: 1.41-32.53) was directly associated with use of anxiolytics/sedatives postpartum. The estimates of use of analgesics (BED) and laxatives (all eating disorders subtypes) were high at all time periods investigated. Use of psychotropic, gastrointestinal, and analgesic medications is extensive among women with eating disorders in the period around pregnancy. Female patients with eating disorders should receive evidence-based counseling about the risk of medication exposure versus the risk of untreated psychiatric illness during pregnancy and postpartum.

  15. Exercise for Seniors: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Exercise and age Related Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Seniors' Health Sports Fitness National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Exercise for Seniors is the National Institute ...

  16. Treating ADHD | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding ADHD Treating ADHD Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Currently available treatments aim at reducing the symptoms of ADHD and improving functioning. Treatments include medication, various types ...

  17. The Visible Humans | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... in contrast to similar images drawn by Leonardo DaVinci around 1500. Photos By: Karl Hoehne, University Medical ... develop products like artificial limbs; or to create tools to help surgeons rehearse operations. They've even ...

  18. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    ... Living With Related Issues Specifics See, Play and Learn Images Videos and Tutorials Research Clinical Trials Journal Articles Resources ... bypass surgery - slideshow (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... is better to reduce postoperative stroke... Article: Blood transfusion and ...

  19. Kids and Concussions | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    ... know the extent of that impact," if it's short-term, long-term, temporary or permanent. NIH neuropsychologist Alison ... later." Post-concussion symptoms include difficulty concentrating, headaches, memory ... medical attention as soon as possible. Keep the child still, ...

  20. Mucus in Urine: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    ... is normal. An excess amount may indicate a urinary tract infection (UTI) or other medical condition. A test called urinalysis ... your urinalysis if you have symptoms of a UTI. These include: Frequent urge to urinate, but little ...