WorldWideScience

Sample records for diseases involving oxidative

  1. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Diseases: Involvement of Nrf2 Antioxidant Redox Signaling in Macrophage Foam Cells Formation

    Bee Kee Ooi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an important risk factor contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress that results from excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS production accounts for impaired endothelial function, a process which promotes atherosclerotic lesion or fatty streaks formation (foam cells. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a transcription factor involved in cellular redox homeostasis. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Nrf2 is dissociated from its inhibitor Keap-1 and translocated into the nucleus, where it results in the transcriptional activation of cell defense genes. Nrf2 has been demonstrated to be involved in the protection against foam cells formation by regulating the expression of antioxidant proteins (HO-1, Prxs, and GPx1, ATP-binding cassette (ABC efflux transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1 and scavenger receptors (scavenger receptor class B (CD36, scavenger receptor class A (SR-A and lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1. However, Nrf2 has also been reported to exhibit pro-atherogenic effects. A better understanding on the mechanism of Nrf2 in oxidative stress-induced cardiac injury, as well as the regulation of cholesterol uptake and efflux, are required before it can serve as a novel therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases prevention and treatment.

  2. Ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of ethanolic extract of propolis during Celiac Disease: involvement of nitric oxide pathway.

    Medjeber, Oussama; Touri, Kahina; Rafa, Hayet; Djeraba, Zineb; Belkhelfa, Mourad; Boutaleb, Amira Fatima; Arroul-Lammali, Amina; Belguendouz, Houda; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2018-03-07

    Celiac Disease (CeD) is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy, in which dietary gluten induces an inflammatory reaction, predominantly in the duodenum. Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by honeybees from various plant sources. Propolis is well-known for its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and immunomodulatory effects, due to its major compounds, polyphenols and flavonoids. The aim of our study was to assess the ex vivo effect of ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) upon the activity and expression of iNOS, along with IFN-γ and IL-10 production in Algerian Celiac patients. In this context, PBMCs isolated from peripheral blood of Celiac patients and healthy controls were cultured with different concentrations of EEP. NO production was measured using the Griess method, whereas quantitation of IFN-γ and IL-10 levels was performed by ELISA. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, NFκB and pSTAT-3 activity were analyzed by immunofluorescence assay. Our results showed that PBMCs from Celiac patients produced high levels of NO and IFN-γ compared with healthy controls (HC). Interestingly, EEP reduced significantly, NO and IFN-γ levels and significantly increased IL-10 levels at a concentration of 50 µg/mL. Importantly, EEP downmodulated the iNOS expression as well as the activity of NFκB and pSTAT-3 transcription factors. Altogether, our results highlight the immunomodulatory effect of propolis on NO pathway and on pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, we suggest that propolis may constitute a potential candidate to modulate inflammation during Celiac Disease and has a potential therapeutic value.

  3. Cardiopulmonary involvement in Fabry's disease.

    Koskenvuo, Juha W; Kantola, Ilkka M; Nuutila, Pirjo; Knuuti, Juhani; Parkkola, Riitta; Mononen, Ilkka; Hurme, Saija; Kalliokoski, Riikka; Viikari, Jorma S; Wendelin-Saarenhovi, Maria; Kiviniemi, Tuomas O; Hartiala, Jaakko J

    2010-04-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme activity. Decreased enzyme activity leads to accumulation of glycosphingolipid in different tissues, including endothelial and smooth-muscle cells and cardiomyocytes. There is controversial data on cardiopulmonary involvement in Fabry's disease, because many reports are based on small and selected populations with Fabry's disease. Furthermore, the aetiology of cardiopulmonary symptoms in Fabry's disease is poorly understood. We studied cardiopulmonary involvement in seventeen patients with Fabry's disease (20-65 years, 6 men) using ECG, bicycle stress, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, spirometry, diffusing capacity and pulmonary high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) tests. Cardiopulmonary symptoms were compared to observed parameters in cardiopulmonary tests. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and reduced exercise capacity are the most apparent cardiac changes in both genders with Fabry's disease. ECG parameters were normal when excluding changes related to LVH. Spirometry showed mild reduction in vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV I), and mean values in diffusing capacity tests were within normal limits. Generally, only slight morphological pulmonary changes were detected using pulmonary HRCT, and they were not associated with changes in pulmonary function. The self-reported amount of pulmonary symptoms associated only with lower ejection fraction (P routine cardiopulmonary evaluation in Fabry's disease using echocardiography is maybe enough when integrated to counselling for aerobic exercise training.

  4. Nitric oxide bioavailability dysfunction involves in atherosclerosis.

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Ye, Zi-Xin; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Chang, Jian; Yang, Mei-Wen; Zhong, Hua-Hua; Hong, Fen-Fang; Yang, Shu-Long

    2018-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of atherosclerosis (AS) include lipid accumulation, fibrosis formation and atherosclerotic plaque produced in artery intima, which leads to vascular sclerosis, lumen stenosis and irritates the ischemic changes of corresponding organs. Endothelial dysfunction was closely associated with AS. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of metabolic and cardiovascular homeostasis. NO is also a potent endogenous vasodilator and enters for the key processes that suppresses the formation vascular lesion even AS. NO bioavailability indicates the production and utilization of endothelial NO in organisms, its decrease is related to oxidative stress, lipid infiltration, the expressions of some inflammatory factors and the alteration of vascular tone, which plays an important role in endothelial dysfunction. The enhancement of arginase activity and the increase in asymmetric dimethylarginine and hyperhomocysteinemia levels all contribute to AS by intervening NO bioavailability in human beings. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, chronic kidney disease and smoking, etc., also participate in AS by influencing NO bioavailability and NO level. Here, we reviewed the relationship between NO bioavailability and AS according the newest literatures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Renal involvement in behcet's disease

    Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Noshad, Hamid; Sadreddini, Shahram; Ebrahimi, Aliasghar; Molaeefard, Mahsheed; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Shoja, Mohammadali Mohajel

    2009-01-01

    There are conflicting reports about the renal involvement in Behcet's disease (BD). In this study we aimed to study the frequency and type of renal involvement in a group of patients with BD in Azerbaijan province that is one of the prevalent areas of BD in Iran. All cases of BD were prospectively followed between June 2004 and January 2007, and evaluated for renal dys-function (serum creatinine > 1.7 mg/dL), glomerular hematuria and proteinuria. Those patients with proteinuria > 500 mg/day and serum creatinine level > 2 mg/dL, underwent renal biopsy. From a total number of 100 patients, six patients (6%) had obvious renal involvements. Four patients had glomerular hematuria and proteinuria. Renal biopsy in two of them revealed measangial proliferative glumerulonephritis with IgA deposit in one of them and membranoproliferative glumerolonephritis in another one. Two remaining patients had serum creatinine > 2 mg/dL without any hematuria or proteinuria. Serologic study for viral agents and collagen vascular disease were negative in all patients with renal involvements. In conclusion, renal involvement in BD is not infrequent, although in most cases it is mild in nature and may be missed. (author)

  6. Behcet's disease involving the breast

    Soleto, Maria Jesus; Marcos, Lourdes

    2002-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown origin that was traditionally defined by oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. We describe a case of a patient with a diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome who presented a palpable lesion in the right breast with inflammatory signs. X-ray findings posed a differential diagnosis between tumoral and inflammatory pathology. The pathological findings confirmed a small-vessel vasculitis. We found two reports of breast involvement by this disease in the literature. Our patient was studied by mammogram and sonogram which together with clinical history are important to prevent delay in diagnosis and unnecessary therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  7. Oxidative stress, aging, and diseases

    Liguori I

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ilaria Liguori,1 Gennaro Russo,1 Francesco Curcio,1 Giulia Bulli,1 Luisa Aran,1 David Della-Morte,2,3 Gaetano Gargiulo,4 Gianluca Testa,1,5 Francesco Cacciatore,1,6 Domenico Bonaduce,1 Pasquale Abete1 1Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3San Raffaele Roma Open University, Rome, Italy; 4Division of Internal Medicine, AOU San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi di Aragona, Salerno, Italy; 5Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy; 6Azienda Ospedaliera dei Colli, Monaldi Hospital, Heart Transplantation Unit, Naples, Italy Abstract: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS are produced by several endogenous and exogenous processes, and their negative effects are neutralized by antioxidant defenses. Oxidative stress occurs from the imbalance between RONS production and these antioxidant defenses. Aging is a process characterized by the progressive loss of tissue and organ function. The oxidative stress theory of aging is based on the hypothesis that age-associated functional losses are due to the accumulation of RONS-induced damages. At the same time, oxidative stress is involved in several age-related conditions (ie, cardiovascular diseases [CVDs], chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer, including sarcopenia and frailty. Different types of oxidative stress biomarkers have been identified and may provide important information about the efficacy of the treatment, guiding the selection of the most effective drugs/dose regimens for patients and, if particularly relevant from a pathophysiological point of view, acting on a specific therapeutic target. Given the important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of many clinical conditions and aging, antioxidant therapy could positively affect the natural history of

  8. [Liver involvement in coeliac disease].

    Riestra, S; Fernández, E; Rodrigo, L

    1999-12-01

    Coeliac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy in which, genetic, immunologic and environmental factors are implied. Several extradigestive diseases have been described in association with coeliac disease, which share most of the times an immunologic mechanism. The liver is damaged in coeliac disease, and it has been considered by some authors as an extraintestinal manifestation of the disease. In the present revision we discuss the different hepatic diseases related with the coeliac disease, as well as the best approach to diagnosis and therapy of choice. At diagnosis, it is very frequent to find an asymptomatic hipertransaminasemia, which frequently disappears after gluten suppression; the morphological substratum found in this alteration is a non-specific reactive hepatitis in the majority of cases. Coeliac disease is a demonstrated cause of cryptogenic hipertransaminasemia. In a small percentage of patient with coeliac disease an association has been found with other immunological liver diseases, such as primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune hepatitis. Few studies exist that include a large number of patient, and the results on occasions are discordant. Nevertheless, the strongest association is with autoimmune hepatitis and with primary biliary cirrhosis. Several communications of isolated cases of rare hepatic diseases, which probably, only reflect a fortuitous association, have been cited in the literature.

  9. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

    Rajib Paul

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia.

  10. Cholesterol contributes to dopamine-neuronal loss in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunctions and oxidative stress.

    Paul, Rajib; Choudhury, Amarendranath; Kumar, Sanjeev; Giri, Anirudha; Sandhir, Rajat; Borah, Anupom

    2017-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a known contributor to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease while its role in the occurrence of Parkinson's disease (PD) is only conjecture and far from conclusive. Altered antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial functions are the key mechanisms in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the midbrain in PD. Hypercholesterolemia is reported to cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain in rodents. However, the impact of hypercholesterolemia on the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in animal models of PD remains elusive. We tested the hypothesis that hypercholesterolemia in MPTP model of PD would potentiate dopaminergic neuron loss in SN by disrupting mitochondrial functions and antioxidant homeostasis. It is evident from the present study that hypercholesterolemia in naïve animals caused dopamine neuronal loss in SN with subsequent reduction in striatal dopamine levels producing motor impairment. Moreover, in the MPTP model of PD, hypercholesterolemia exacerbated MPTP-induced reduction of striatal dopamine as well as dopaminergic neurons in SN with motor behavioral depreciation. Activity of mitochondrial complexes, mainly complex-I and III, was impaired severely in the nigrostriatal pathway of hypercholesterolemic animals treated with MPTP. Hypercholesterolemia caused oxidative stress in the nigrostriatal pathway with increased generation of hydroxyl radicals and enhanced activity of antioxidant enzymes, which were further aggravated in the hypercholesterolemic mice with Parkinsonism. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of increased vulnerability of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons in PD with hypercholesterolemia.

  11. Renal involvement in Gaucher's disease.

    Siegal, A.; Gutman, A.; Shapiro, M. S.; Griffel, B.

    1981-01-01

    A patient with chronic Gaucher's disease is described who developed glomerulopathy 24 years after splenectomy terminating in renal failure. The pathological changes of this very rare complication of Gaucher's disease are described. The few similar cases reported in the literature are reviewed and the possible pathogenetic pathways discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7301691

  12. Disturbed nitric oxide and homocysteine production are involved in the increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in the F1 offspring of maternal obesity and malnutrition.

    Moussa, Y Y; Tawfik, S H; Haiba, M M; Saad, M I; Hanafi, M Y; Abdelkhalek, T M; Oriquat, G A; Kamel, M A

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the changes in levels of different independent risk factors for vascular diseases in the rat offspring of maternal obesity and malnutrition as maternal health disturbances are thought to have direct consequences on the offspring health. The effect of postnatal diet on the offspring was also assessed. Three groups of female Wistar rats were used (control, obese and malnourished). After the pregnancy and delivery, the offspring were weaned to control diet or high-caloric (HCD) diet and followed up for 30 weeks. Every 5 weeks postnatal, 20 pups (10 males and 10 females) of each subgroup were sacrificed after overnight fasting, the blood sample was obtained, and the rats were dissected out to obtain heart muscle. The following parameters were assessed; lipid profile, NEFA, homocysteine (Hcy), nitric oxide end product (NOx) and myocardial triglyceride content. Maternal obesity and malnutrition caused significant elevation in the body weight, triglycerides, NEFA, Hcy and NOx in the F1 offspring especially those maintained under HCD. Also, the male offspring showed more prominent changes than female offspring. Maternal malnutrition and obesity may increase the risk of the development of cardiovascular diseases in the offspring, especially the male ones.

  13. Genomic variants in the ASS1 gene, involved in the nitric oxide biosynthesis and signaling pathway, predict hydroxyurea treatment efficacy in compound sickle cell disease/β-thalassemia patients.

    Chalikiopoulou, Constantina; Tavianatou, Anastasia-Gerasimoula; Sgourou, Argyro; Kourakli, Alexandra; Kelepouri, Dimitra; Chrysanthakopoulou, Maria; Kanelaki, Vasiliki-Kaliopi; Mourdoukoutas, Evangelos; Siamoglou, Stavroula; John, Anne; Symeonidis, Argyris; Ali, Bassam R; Katsila, Theodora; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Patrinos, George P

    2016-03-01

    Hemoglobinopathies exhibit a remarkable phenotypic diversity that restricts any safe association between molecular pathology and clinical outcomes. Herein, we explored the role of genes involved in the nitric oxide biosynthesis and signaling pathway, implicated in the increase of fetal hemoglobin levels and response to hydroxyurea treatment, in 119 Hellenic patients with β-type hemoglobinopathies. We show that two ASS1 genomic variants (namely, rs10901080 and rs10793902) can serve as pharmacogenomic biomarkers to predict hydroxyurea treatment efficacy in sickle cell disease/β-thalassemia compound heterozygous patients. These markers may exert their effect by inducing nitric oxide biosynthesis, either via altering splicing and/or miRNA binding, as predicted by in silico analysis, and ultimately, increase γ-globin levels, via guanylyl cyclase targeting.

  14. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s Disease

    Javier eBlesa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in Parkinson’s Disease. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, insecticides like rotenone, pesticides like Paraquat, dopamine itself and genetic mutations in Parkinson’s Disease related proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process.

  15. [Pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disease].

    Bartosiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    The connective tissue diseases are a variable group of autoimmune mediated disorders characterized by multiorgan damage. Pulmonary complications are common, usually occur after the onset of joint symptoms, but can also be initially presenting complaint. The respiratory system may be involved in all its component: airways, vessels, parenchyma, pleura and respiratory muscles. Lung involvement is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in the connective tissue diseases. Clinical course is highly variable - can range from mild to rapidly progressive, some processes are reversible, while others are irreversible. Thus, the identification of reversible disease , and separately progressive disease, are important clinical issues. The frequency, clinical presentation, prognosis and responce to therapy are different, depending on the pattern of involvement as well as on specyfic diagnostic method used to identify it. High- resolution computed tompography plays an important role in identifying patients with respiratory involvement. Pulmonary function tests are a sensitive tool detecting interstitial lung disease. In this article, pulmonary lung involvement accompanying most frequently apperaing connective tissue diseases - rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, Sjögrens syndrome and mixed connective tissue disaese are reviewed.

  16. Meningeal involvement in Behcet's disease: MRI

    Guma, A.; Aguilera, C.; Pons, L.; Acebes, J.; Arruga, J.

    1998-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease that involves the central nervous system up to half of cases. Presentation with neurologic symptoms occurs in 5 % of cases and cerebral venous thrombosis is one of its major manifestations. A feature not previously reported is progressive meningeal thickening with involvement of both optic nerves. We report a patient with cerebral venous thrombosis, meningeal thickening and contrast enhancement on MRI. This patient had two other unusual features: positive antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and later development of central diabetes insipidus. (orig.)

  17. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  18. Radiologically- detectable sacroiliac involvement in behcet's disease

    Nadji, A.; Shabani, M.; Jamshidi, A.; Shahram, F.; Davatchi, F.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The association of Behcet's disease and ankylosing spondylitis is still a matter of debate. Objective: As the presence of sacroiliac joint involvement is an essential criterion in diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis . We decided to determined the prevalence of sacroiliac joint involvement in Behcet's disease and compare it with that of a control group. Patients and Methods: We randomly selected two groups of 199 Behcet's disease patients and 168 non- Behcet's disease cases (the controls). All cases were over 20 years of ages. Standard anteroposterior radiographs of the sacroiliac joint were obtained and interpreted by two rheumatologists and a radiologists blinded to the diagnosis. To determined the severity of the condition, the following 5-point scale was employed: Normal (O), pseudo-widening (1), sclerosis (2), erosion (3), and bony fusion (4). The eliminate any doubt, only grades 3 and 4 were considered as sacroiliitis. Both group were separately evaluated for age (≤ 30, and ≥ 30), and gender. Results were compared using Chi square test. Results: The groups were matched for age and sex: There were 98 (49.2%) females in Behcet's disease vs. 91 (54.2%) in the control group (p=O.35). The mean ±SD age was 35±8.3 years in Behcet's disease and 35 ±10 in control group (p=1). The sacroiliac joint was involved in 9 (4.6%) patients in Behcet's disease and 7 (4.2%) patients in control group (p=O.93). Comparisons between the results of the unisexual cohorts revealed to significance either (p=O.68 for males, and p=O.64 for females). The age subdivisions (under- and over-30) again showed no significant difference (p=O.96 and p=O.69 for under- and over -30 patients, respectively). Conclusion: The presence of radiographic signs of sacroiliac joint involvement is not mandatory for the diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis

  19. Involvement of Endogenous Retroviruses in Prion Diseases

    Yong-Sun Kim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available For millions of years, vertebrates have been continuously exposed to infection by retroviruses. Ancient retroviral infection of germline cells resulted in the formation and accumulation of inherited retrovirus sequences in host genomes. These inherited retroviruses are referred to as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs, and recent estimates have revealed that a significant portion of animal genomes is made up of ERVs. Although various host factors have suppressed ERV activation, both positive and negative functions have been reported for some ERVs in normal and abnormal physiological conditions, such as in disease states. Similar to other complex diseases, ERV activation has been observed in prion diseases, and this review will discuss the potential involvement of ERVs in prion diseases.

  20. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  1. Lung involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases

    Plavec Goran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Systemic connective tissue diseases (SCTD are chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders of unknown cause that can involve different organs and systems. Their course and prognosis are different. All of them can, more or less, involve the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of respiratory symptoms, lung function disorders, radiography and high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT abnormalities, and their correlation with the duration of the disease and the applied treatment. Methods. In 47 non-randomized consecutive patients standard chest radiography, HRCT, and lung function tests were done. Results. Hypoxemia was present in nine of the patients with respiratory symptoms (20%. In all of them chest radiography was normal. In five of these patients lung fibrosis was established using HRCT. Half of all the patients with SCTD had symptoms of lung involvement. Lung function tests disorders of various degrees were found in 40% of the patients. The outcome and the degree of lung function disorders were neither in correlation with the duration of SCTD nor with therapy used (p > 0.05 Spearmans Ro. Conclusion. Pulmonary fibrosis occurs in about 10% of the patients with SCTD, and possibly not due to the applied treatment regimens. Hypoxemia could be a sing of existing pulmonary fibrosis in the absence of disorders on standard chest radiography.

  2. Involvement of Gaucher Disease Mutations in Parkinson Disease.

    Vilageliu, Lluisa; Grinberg, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder, caused by mutations in the GBA gene. The frequency of Gaucher disease patients and heterozygote carriers that developed Parkinson disease has been found to be above that of the control population. This fact suggests that mutations in the GBA gene can be involved in Parkison's etiology. Analysis of large cohorts of patients with Parkinson disease has shown that there are significantly more cases bearing GBA mutations than those found among healthy individuals. Functional studies have proven an interaction between α-synuclein and GBA, the levels of which presented an inverse correlation. Mutant GBA proteins cause increases in α-synuclein levels, while an inhibition of GBA by α-synuclein has been also demonstrated. Saposin C, a coactivator of GBA, has been shown to protect GBA from this inhibition. Among the GBA variants associated with Parkinson disease, E326K seems to be one of the most prevalent. Interestingly, it is involved in Gaucher disease only when it forms part of a double-mutant allele, usually with the L444P mutation. Structural analyses have revealed that both residues (E326 and L444) interact with Saposin C and, probably, also with α-synuclein. This could explain the antagonistic role of these two proteins in relation to GBA. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  4. Cranial involvement in sickle cell disease

    Alkan, Ozlem, E-mail: yalinozlem@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Ebru, E-mail: ebru90@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman, E-mail: ebos90@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yildirim, Tulin, E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Karaca, Sibel, E-mail: sibelkaraca@hotmail.com [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Yeral, Mahmut, E-mail: mahmutyeral@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Kasar, Mutlu, E-mail: mutlukasar@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey); Ozdogu, Hakan, E-mail: hakanozdogu@hotmail.com [Department of Hematology, Faculty of Medicine, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate cranial findings in patients with neurologically symptomatic sickle cell disease (SCD). Materials and methods: We studied 50 consecutive patients with SCD and neurologic symptoms. All patients underwent brain MR examinations: all 50 underwent classic MR imaging; 42, diffusion-weighted MR imaging; 10, MR angiography; four, MR venography; and three patients, digital subtraction angiography. Results: Of the 50 SCD patients, 19 (38%) had normal MR findings, and 31 (62%) showed abnormalities on brain MR images. Of the 50 patients, 16 (32%) had ischemic lesions; two (4%), subarachnoid hemorrhage; one (2%), moya-moya pattern; one (2%), posterior reversible encephalopathy; one (2%), dural venous sinus thrombosis; 12 (24%), low marrow signal intensity and thickness of the diploic space; 12 (24%), cerebral atrophy; and two (4%), osteomyelitis. Twenty-seven patients (54%) presented with headache, which was the most common clinical finding. Conclusions: The cranial involvement is one of the most devastating complications of SCD. Early and accurate diagnosis is important in the management of cranial complications of SCD.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Oral Diseases: Understanding Its Relation with Other Systemic Diseases

    Jaya Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress occurs in diabetes, various cancers, liver diseases, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic inflammation, and other degenerative diseases related to the nervous system. The free radicals have deleterious effect on various organs of the body. This is due to lipid peroxidation and irreversible protein modification that leads to cellular apoptosis or programmed cell death. During recent years, there is a rise in the oral diseases related to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in oral disease is related to other systemic diseases in the body such as periodontitis, cardiovascular, pancreatic, gastric, and liver diseases. In the present review, we discuss the various pathways that mediate oxidative cellular damage. Numerous pathways mediate oxidative cellular damage and these include caspase pathway, PERK/NRF2 pathway, NADPH oxidase 4 pathways and JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway. We also discuss the role of inflammatory markers, lipid peroxidation, and role of oxygen species linked to oxidative stress. Knowledge of different pathways, role of inflammatory markers, and importance of low-density lipoprotein, fibrinogen, creatinine, nitric oxide, nitrates, and highly sensitive C-reactive proteins may be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis and plan better treatment for oral diseases which involve oxidative stress.

  6. Primary Pelvic Involvement of Hydatid Disease

    Migraci Tosun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by larval stage of a parasite named as Echinococcus. To diagnose this condition may be challenging without surgery and postoperative pathological examination due to limited value of serological studies but imaging techniques may give a clue when hydatid disease is suspected and hydatid disease shall be considered for differential diagnosis in pelvic mass. In the present case, we present a 75-year-old postmenopausal woman with pelvic hydatosis.

  7. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disease involving the pituitary gland.

    Meriden, Zina; Bullock, Grant C; Bagg, Adam; Bonatti, Hugo; Cousar, John B; Lopes, M Beatriz; Robbins, Mark K; Cathro, Helen P

    2010-11-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are heterogeneous lesions with variable morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular characteristics. Multiple distinct primary lesions can occur in PTLD, rarely with both B-cell and T-cell characteristics. Lesions can involve both grafted organs and other sites; however, PTLD involving the pituitary gland has not been previously reported. We describe a patient who developed Epstein-Barr virus-negative PTLD 13 years posttransplantation involving the terminal ileum and pituitary, which was simultaneously involved by a pituitary adenoma. Immunohistochemistry of the pituitary lesion showed expression of CD79a, CD3, and CD7 with clonal rearrangements of both T-cell receptor gamma chain (TRG@) and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH@) genes. The terminal ileal lesion was immunophenotypically and molecularly distinct. This is the first report of pituitary PTLD and illustrates the potentially complex nature of PTLD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Central nervous system involvement in Whipple's disease

    Ludwig, B.; Bohl, J.; Heferkamp, G.

    1981-01-01

    A case of Whipple's disease is presented manifesting itself predominantly with neurological and mental symptoms but without gastrointestinal complaints. Although the first cranial CT in the fourth year of the disease was normal, the second, 1.5 years later, revealed intensive hypodensity of the white matter and cortical enhancement. CT findings are compared with autopsy results and a review of the pertinent literature is given. (orig.)

  9. Influence of oxidative stress on disease development

    Božić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is ever increasing data indicating the vmast contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, stroke, rheumatoid arthritis, and others. Thus, in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis the primary role is held by reactive oxygen species that are synthetized by endothelial cells of arterial blood vessels, leukocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, native particles of lipoproteins of small density become atherogenic through oxidation caused by reactive oxygen species. The oxidation of small-density lipoproteins stimulates the inflammatory process, and it in turn steps up adhesion and the inflow of monocytes and affects the synthesis and release of numerous proinflammatory cytokines involved in the further course of the process. One of the reasons for the development of arterial hypertension is the simultaneous activation of NAD(PH oxidase and 12/15-lipoxygenase, since it results in the stepped up production of reactive oxygen species. These stimulate the production of matrix metalloproteinase 2, which lead to vascular remodelling and to increased apoptosis of heart muscle cells. Stepped up apoptosis is linked with myocardial infarction, cardiomyopathies and the development of heart failure. The sensitivity of β-cells of the endocrine part of the pancreas to reactive oxygen species favor the naturally low concentrations of the collectors of free radicals in them, as well as an increase in the concentration of proinflammatory cytokines, glucosis and lipids that induce a reduction in the mass and function of β-cells. Hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus causes tissue damage through non-enzyme glycosylation of intracellular and extracellular proteins, which results in: reduced enzyme activity, damaged nucleic acid, disrupted natural decomposition of proteins, and activation of cytotoxic pathways. These processes are the basis of the pathogenesis of numerous

  10. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  11. Obesity in aging exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption, neuroinflammation, and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus: effects on expression of genes involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Gautam, Tripti; Mitschelen, Matthew; Koller, Akos; Szalai, Gabor; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan; Csiszar, Anna

    2014-10-01

    There is growing evidence that obesity has deleterious effects on the brain and cognitive function in the elderly population. However, the specific mechanisms through which aging and obesity interact to promote cognitive decline remain unclear. To test the hypothesis that aging exacerbates obesity-induced cerebromicrovascular damage and neuroinflammation, we compared young (7 months) and aged (24 months) high fat diet-fed obese C57BL/6 mice. Aging exacerbated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and blood-brain barrier disruption, as indicated by the increased circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased presence of extravasated immunoglobulin G in the hippocampus, respectively. Obesity-induced blood-brain barrier damage was associated with microglia activation, upregulation of activating Fc-gamma receptors and proinflammatory cytokines, and increased oxidative stress. Treatment of cultured primary microglia with sera derived from aged obese mice resulted in significantly more pronounced microglia activation and oxidative stress, as compared with treatment with young sera. Serum-induced activation and oxidative stress were also exacerbated in primary microglia derived from aged animals. Hippocampal expression of genes involved in regulation of the cellular amyloid precursor protein-dependent signaling pathways, beta-amyloid generation, and the pathogenesis of tauopathy were largely unaffected by obesity in aged mice. Collectively, obesity in aging is associated with a heightened state of systemic inflammation, which exacerbates blood-brain barrier disruption. The resulting neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the mouse hippocampus likely contribute to the significant cognitive decline observed in aged obese animals. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Subclinical pulmonary involvement in collagen vascular diseases

    Dansin, E.; Wallaert, B.; Jardin, M.R.; Remy, J.; Hatron, P.Y.; Tonnel, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    A recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into alveolar spaces has been reported in patients with collagen vascular diseases (CVD) and a normal chest radiograph. These findings defined the concept of subclinical alveolitis (SCA). To determine whether SCA may be associated with CT signs of interstitial lung disease (ILD), the authors of this paper compared bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) findings and high-resolution (HRCT) scans in 36 patients with CVD and normal chest radiographs (systemic sclerosis [SS, n = 21], rheumatoid arthritis [RA, n = 9], primary Sjogren's syndrome [PS, n = 6]). HRCT scans were obtained in supine and prone positions. Results of BAL revealed SCA in 17/36 patients (47%); lymphocyte SCA in 4/36 (24%); neutrophil SCA in 7/36 (41%); and mixed SCA in 6/36 (35%)

  13. Liver involvement in Gaucher disease - Review and clinical approach.

    Adar, Tomer; Ilan, Yaron; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari

    2018-02-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), one of the most prevalent lysosomal storage diseases, is associated with glucocerebroside accumulation in cells of the monocyte-macrophage system in various organs, including the liver. Evaluating and managing liver disease in patients with Gaucher disease may be challenging. While hepatic involvement is common in Gaucher disease, its severity, and clinical significance span a wide spectrum, ranging from sub-clinical involvement to liver cirrhosis with its associated complications including portal hypertension. Apart from liver involvement in Gaucher disease, patients with may also suffer from other comorbidities involving the liver. That Gaucher disease itself can mimic hepatic lesions, affect laboratory tests used to characterize liver disease, and may be associated with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension, complicates the diagnostic approach even more. Better understanding of liver involvement in Gaucher disease can spare patients unnecessary invasive testing, and assist physicians in decision making when evaluating patients with Gaucher disease suspected for significant liver disease. This review describes the various clinical manifestations, laboratory and imaging abnormalities that may be encountered when following patients with Gaucher disease for liver involvement. The mechanism for liver disease are discussed, as well as the possible hepato-protective effect of glucocerebroside, and the a diagnostic and treatment approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s Disease

    Javier eBlesa; Javier eBlesa; Javier eBlesa; Ines eTrigo-Damas; Ines eTrigo-Damas; Anna eQuiroga-Varela; Vernice Ruffin Jackson-Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in Parkinson’s Disease. Environmental factors, such as neuro...

  15. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  16. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Turgut, A.T. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ahmettuncayturgut@yahoo.com; Altinok, T. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Meram Faculty of Medicine, Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey); Topcu, S. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kocaeli University, Izmit (Turkey); Kosar, U. [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  17. Local complications of hydatid disease involving thoracic cavity: Imaging findings

    Turgut, A.T.; Altinok, T.; Topcu, S.; Kosar, U.

    2009-01-01

    Hydatid disease, a worldwide zoonosis, is caused by the larval stage of the Echinococcus tapeworm. Although it can involve almost every organ of the body, lung involvement follows in frequency the hepatic infestation in adults and is the predominating site in children. Radiologically, hydatidosis usually demonstrates typical findings, but many patients are at risk of developing various complications of hydatid disease with atypical imaging findings and these are rarely described in the literature. In this pictorial review, the imaging features of local complications of hydatid disease involving the thorax including intrapulmonary or pleural rupture, infection of the ruptured cysts, reactions of the adjacent tissues, thoracic wall invasion and iatrogenic involvement of pleura are described. Additionally, imaging characteristics of transdiaphragmatic thoracic involvement of hepatic hydatid disease are presented. To prevent the development of subsequent catastrophic results, all radiologists need to be aware of the atypical imaging appearances of complications of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  18. X-Ray semiotics of cranial involvement in endocrine diseases

    Spuzyak, M.I.; Kramnoj, I.E.; Belaya, L.M.; Tyazhelova, O.V.; Litvinenko, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    The incidence and type of X-ray semeiotics of the skull involvement were studied in 703 patients with endocrine diseases. Craniorgam analysis involved study of the thickness and structure of the vault bones, shape and size of the skull, status of the sutures, internal plate relief, changes of the base of the skull, of the sella turcica first of all, and facial bone. The characteristic X-ray symprom complexes of the involvement of the skull in some endocrine diseases were distinguished

  19. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  20. Gaucher disease with jawbone involvement: a case report.

    Ahmadieh, Azadeh; Farnad, Fariborz; Sedghizadeh, Parish P

    2014-11-05

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive systemic condition, and the most common of the lysosomal storage disorders. It is characterized by lipid accumulation in certain cells and organs, particularly macrophages, which appear on light microscopy as 'Gaucher cells' or vacuolated lipid-laden reticuloendothelial cells. Long bone involvement is common in Gaucher disease, whereas craniofacial bone involvement is extremely rare. Reports confirming the diagnoses of Gaucher disease involving craniofacial bones by histopathologic evidence are even rarer. A 46-year-old Caucasian Ashkenazi Jewish woman with Gaucher disease presented with jawbone pain and lytic radiographic lesions of her mandible. Surgical biopsy of a mandibular lesion revealed Gaucher cells infiltrating the mandible, which correlated with radiographic and clinical findings, supporting a diagnosis of Gaucher disease with jawbone involvement. Lysosomal storage diseases can have head and neck manifestations, and bone involvement in Gaucher disease is common. Therefore, careful consideration of signs and symptoms and medical history, with a thorough review of systems, is important when evaluating patients with lysosomal storage disorders to rule out head and neck involvement of disease. Biopsy may be warranted in some cases for more definitive diagnosis of painful jawbone lesions and to rule out other odontogenic and non-odontogenic conditions in the differential diagnosis.

  1. Oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome: which mechanisms are involved?

    Thalia M. T. Avelar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTMetabolic syndrome (MS is a combination of cardiometabolic risk factors, including obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension. Several studies report that oxidative condition caused by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS plays an important role in the development of MS. Our body has natural antioxidant system to reduce oxidative stress, which consists of numerous endogenous and exogenous components and antioxidants enzymes that are able to inactivate ROS. The main antioxidant defense enzymes that contribute to reduce oxidative stress are superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and gluthatione peroxidase (GPx. The high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c is also associated with oxidative stress because it presents antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. HDL-c antioxidant activity may be attributed at least in part, to serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1 activity. Furthermore, derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs also stand out as acting in cardiovascular disease and diabetes, by the imbalance in ROS production, and close relationship with inflammation. Recent reports have indicated the gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT as a promising biomarker for diagnosis of MS, because it is related to oxidative stress, since it plays an important role in the metabolism of extracellular glutathione. Based on this, several studies have searched for better markers for oxidative stress involved in development of MS.

  2. Involvement of the nitric oxide in melatonin-mediated protection against injury.

    Fan, Wenguo; He, Yifan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gu, Wenzhen; Wu, Zhi; Zhu, Xiao; Huang, Fang; He, Hongwen

    2018-05-01

    Melatonin is a hormone mainly synthesized by the pineal gland in vertebrates and known well as an endogenous regulator of circadian and seasonal rhythms. It has been demonstrated that melatonin is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes showing antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical gas in the biological system, which is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family. NO acts as a biological mediator and plays important roles in different systems in humans. The NO/NOS system exerts a broad spectrum of signaling functions. Accumulating evidence has clearly revealed that melatonin regulates NO/NOS system through multiple mechanisms that may influence physiological and pathophysiological processes. This article reviews the latest evidence for the effects of melatonin on NO/NOS regulation in different organs and disease conditions, the potential cellular mechanisms by which melatonin is involved in organ protection are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    Sagai Masaru

    2011-12-01

    moderate oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted.

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France); Salle, Valéry [Internal Medicine, North Hospital University, Place Victor Pauchet, Amiens 80000 (France); INSERM U1088 (EA 4292), SFR CAP-Santé (FED 4231), University of Picardie – Jules Verne (France); Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude [Biochemistry Laboratory, South Hospital University, René Laennec Avenue, Amiens 80000 (France)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  5. Parkinson's disease associated with impaired oxidative phosphorylation

    Finsterer, J.; Jarius, C.; Baumgartner, M.

    2001-01-01

    Parkinson's disease may be due to primary or secondary oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects. In a 76-year-old man with Parkinson's disease since 1992, slightly but recurrently elevated creatine phosphokinase, recurrently elevated blood glucose, thickening of the left ventricular myocardium, bifascicular block and hypacusis were found. Cerebral MRI showed atrophy, periventricular demyelination, multiple, disseminated, supra- and infratentorial lacunas, and haemosiderin deposits in both posterior horns. Muscle biopsy showed typical features of an OXPHOS defect. Whether the association of Parkinson's disease and impaired OXPHOS was causative or coincidental remains unknown. Possibly, the mitochondrial defect acted as an additional risk factor for Parkinson's disease or the OXPHOS defect worsened the preexisting neurological impairments by a cumulative or synergistic mechanism. In conclusion, this case shows that Parkinson's disease may be associated with a mitochondrially or nuclearly encoded OXPHOS defect, manifesting as hypacusis, myopathy, axonal polyneuropathy, cardiomyopathy and recurrent subclinical ischaemic strokes and haemorrhages. (orig.)

  6. Metal-Oxide Film Conversions Involving Large Anions

    Pretty, S.; Zhang, X.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Wren, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of my research is to establish the mechanism and kinetics of metal-oxide film conversions involving large anions (I - , Br - , S 2- ). Within a given group, the anions will provide insight on the effect of anion size on the film conversion, while comparison of Group 6 and Group 7 anions will provide insight on the effect of anion charge. This research has a range of industrial applications, for example, hazardous radioiodine can be immobilized by reaction with Ag to yield AgI. From the perspective of public safety, radioiodine is one of the most important fission products from the uranium fuel because of its large fuel inventory, high volatility, and radiological hazard. Additionally, because of its mobility, the gaseous iodine concentration is a critical parameter for safety assessment and post-accident management. A full kinetic analysis using electrochemical techniques has been performed on the conversion of Ag 2 O to (1) AgI and (2) AgBr. (authors)

  7. Metal-Oxide Film Conversions Involving Large Anions

    Pretty, S.; Zhang, X.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Wren, J.C. [The University of Western Ontario, Chemistry Department, 1151 Richmond St., N6A 5B7, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The main objective of my research is to establish the mechanism and kinetics of metal-oxide film conversions involving large anions (I{sup -}, Br{sup -}, S{sup 2-}). Within a given group, the anions will provide insight on the effect of anion size on the film conversion, while comparison of Group 6 and Group 7 anions will provide insight on the effect of anion charge. This research has a range of industrial applications, for example, hazardous radioiodine can be immobilized by reaction with Ag to yield AgI. From the perspective of public safety, radioiodine is one of the most important fission products from the uranium fuel because of its large fuel inventory, high volatility, and radiological hazard. Additionally, because of its mobility, the gaseous iodine concentration is a critical parameter for safety assessment and post-accident management. A full kinetic analysis using electrochemical techniques has been performed on the conversion of Ag{sub 2}O to (1) AgI and (2) AgBr. (authors)

  8. LARGE VESSEL INVOLVEMENT IN BEHCET’S DISEASE

    AR. Jamshidi F. Davatchi

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Large vessel involvement is one of the hallmarks of Behcet’s disease (BD but its prevalence varies widely due to ethnic variation or environmental factors. The aim of this study is to find the characteristics of vasculo-Behcet (VB in Iran. In a cohort of 4769 patients with BD, those with vascular involvement were selected. Different manifestations of disease were compared with the remaining group of patients. A confidence interval at 95% (CI was calculated for each item. Vascular involvement was seen in 409 cases (8.6%; CI, 0.8. Venous involvement was seen in 396 cases, deep vein thrombosis in 294 (6.2%; CI, 0.7, superficial phlebitis in 108 (2.3%; CI, 0.4 and large vein thrombosis in 45 (0.9%; CI, 0.3. Arterial involvement was seen in 28 patients (25 aneurysms and 4 thromboses. Thirteen patients showed both arterial and venous involvement. The mean age of the patients with VB was slightly higher (P<0.03, but the disease duration was significantly longer (P<0.0003. VB was more common in men. As the presenting sign, ocular lesions were less frequent in VB (P<0.0006, while skin lesions were over 2 times more common in these cases (P<0.000001. VB was associated with a higher frequency of genital aphthosis, skin involvement, joint manifestations, epididymitis, CNS lesions and GI involvement. The juvenile form was less common in VB (P<0.03. High ESR was more frequent in VB (P=0.000002, but the frequency of false positive VDRL, pathergy phenomenon, HLA-B5 or HLA-B27 showed no significant difference between the two groups. In Iranian patients with BD, vascular involvement is not common and large vessel involvement is rare. It may be sex-related, and is more common in well-established disease with multiple organ involvement and longer disease duration.

  9. Isolated lacrimal gland involvement in Rosai-Dorfman-Destombes disease

    Gulwani Hanni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman-Destombes (sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy disease is an uncommon disease characterized by benign proliferation of histiocytes, with painless lymph node enlargement and frequent extranodal disease. Orbital involvement occurs in 9-11% of cases. However, isolated Rosai-Dorfman-Destombes disease of the lacrimal gland without any systemic involvement is very rare with only three case reports. We describe here one such young male patient with unilateral lacrimal gland swelling. Excision biopsy revealed almost complete replacement of the lacrimal gland by lymphocytes, plasma cells and large pale histiocytes. The latter exhibited emperipolesis and stained positive for S-100 and CD68 on immunohistochemistry. Patient is well and has no other manifestation or recurrence of the disease during a follow-up of 24 months.

  10. Increased 5S rRNA oxidation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Ding, Qunxing; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhang, Bing; Soriano, Augusto; Burns, Roxanne; Markesbery, William R

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that oxidative stress is involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is one of the most abundant molecules in most cells and is affected by oxidative stress in the human brain. Previous data have indicated that total rRNA levels were decreased in the brains of subjects with AD and mild cognitive impairment concomitant with an increase in rRNA oxidation. In addition, level of 5S rRNA, one of the essential components of the ribosome complex, was significantly lower in the inferior parietal lobule (IP) brain area of subjects with AD compared with control subjects. To further evaluate the alteration of 5S rRNA in neurodegenerative human brains, multiple brain regions from both AD and age-matched control subjects were used in this study, including IP, superior and middle temporal gyro, temporal pole, and cerebellum. Different molecular pools including 5S rRNA integrated into ribosome complexes, free 5S rRNA, cytoplasmic 5S rRNA, and nuclear 5S rRNA were studied. Free 5S rRNA levels were significantly decreased in the temporal pole region of AD subjects and the oxidation of ribosome-integrated and free 5S rRNA was significantly increased in multiple brain regions in AD subjects compared with controls. Moreover, a greater amount of oxidized 5S rRNA was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus of AD subjects compared with controls. These results suggest that the increased oxidation of 5S rRNA, especially the oxidation of free 5S rRNA, may be involved in the neurodegeneration observed in AD.

  11. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease.

    Chia-Hsiang Fu

    Full Text Available Unilateral sinus disease (USD can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS without nasal polyps (n = 13, CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12 and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22. nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0% and specificity (87.2% for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery.

  12. Isolated lingual involvement in Wilson′s disease

    Neera Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lingual involvement can occur in a variety of neurological disorders including pyramidal, extrapyramidal and lower motor neuron disorders. It can be seen in the form of tremor, bradykinesia, dystonia, atrophy and weakness of tongue movements and can clinically present as difficulty in swallowing and dysarthria which can be a source of great discomfort to the patient. We describe a patient who presented with isolated lingual involvement and was diagnosed to have Wilsons′s disease. This case emphasizes the clinical variability in presentation of Wilson′s disease and importance of early clinical diagnosis.

  13. Darier disease with oral and esophageal involvement: A case report

    Magesh Karuppur Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old man presented with itchy papular eruptions all over the body since 15 years. Intraoral examination revealed raised papular lesions on the labial mucosa, hard palate, and tongue. The histopathology of the oral and skin lesions was confirmative of Darier disease (DD. This patient also showed esophageal involvement, which was confirmed histopathologically. Such a presentation of DD, with oral and esophageal involvement, is rare.

  14. Graves’ Disease With Unilateral Involvement: A Rare Entity

    Gülsüm Gönülalan; Mehtap Çakır

    2011-01-01

    Graves’ disease usually affects both lobes of the gland, thus, unilateral Graves’ hyperthyroidism has been reported very rarely. Here, we report a case of Graves’ disease presenting with unilateral involvement of the thyroid gland. Thyroid function tests revealed thyrotoxicosis and scintigraphy with technetium-99m showed increased diffuse unilateral radioisotope uptake in the right lobe with suppressed activity in the left lobe. The patient underwent oral antithyroid drug treatment. Graves’ ...

  15. Mechanisms involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy induced by oxidative stress.

    Guzman, David Calderón; Olguín, Hugo Juárez; García, Ernestina Hernández; Peraza, Armando Valenzuela; de la Cruz, Diego Zamora; Soto, Monica Punzo

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the main complications in patients with diabetes and has been the leading cause of visual loss since 1990. Oxidative stress is a biological process resulting from excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This process contributes to the development of many diseases and disease complications. ROS interact with various cellular components to induce cell injury. Fortunately, there is an antioxidan t system that protects organisms against ROS. Indeed, when ROS exceed antioxidant capacity, the resulting cell injury can cause diverse physiological and pathological changes that could lead to a disease like DR. This paper reviews the possible mechanisms of common and novel biomarkers involved in the development of DR and explores how these biomarkers could be used to monitor the damage induced by oxidative stress in DR, which is a significant complication in people with diabetes. The poor control of glucemy in pacients with DB has been shown contribute to the development of complications in eyes as DR.

  16. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-01-01

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  17. Early Renal Involvement in a Girl with Classic Fabry Disease.

    Perretta, Fernando; Antongiovanni, Norberto; Jaurretche, Sebastián

    2017-01-01

    Fabry disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from the deficiency or absence of the enzyme alpha galactosidase A; this defect leads to the systemic accumulation of globotriaosylceramide and its metabolites. Organic involvement in men is well known, but in women it is controversial, mainly due to the random X-chromosome inactivation in each of their cells (Lyon hypothesis). This would explain why women (heterozygotes) present a wide variability in the severity of their phenotype. The manifestations are multisystemic and begin in early childhood, reaching a severe compromise in adulthood. Typical acroparesthesia in hands and feet, gastrointestinal symptoms, angiokeratomas, dyshidrosis, hearing loss, arrhythmias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular accidents, and renal failure can be observed. Nephropathy is one of the major complications of Fabry disease. Glomerular and vascular changes are present before progression to overt proteinuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate, even in pediatric patients. A case of incipient renal involvement in a girl with classic Fabry disease is reported.

  18. Oxidation of phosphine by sulfur or selenium involving a catalytic ...

    Administrator

    P NMR spec- troscopy. Such interconversion with the participation of breaking of bridging copper-µ3-sulfur bond with the formation of new copper–phosphorous bond led to the development of a catalytic cycle using excess. PPh3 and S or Se as the reacting substrates. The turnover number for the oxidation of PPh3 by S ...

  19. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    Kreuz, Sarah; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences

  20. Isolated pulmonary involvement in Erdheim–Chester disease

    Enambir Singh Josan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Erdheim–Chester disease is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytic disorder. It is primarily a disease of the long bones. Pulmonary involvement in systemic disease is detected in about half the reported cases. Isolated lung involvement is extremely rare with no clear recommendations for treatment. A 52-year-old caucasian male was evaluated for 1.9 cm × 1.6 cm spiculated nodule in the right upper lobe. Pulmonary function testing and bronchoscopy with endobronchial ultrasound, transbronchial biopsy, and microbiology were inconclusive. Positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT was significant for the avidity in same lung nodule along with mediastinal and hilar adenopathy but no bone involvement. Wedge resection with histopathology and immunohistochemistry reported a fibrohistiocytic infiltrate in bronchovascular distribution which was positive for CD68 and negative for CD1A, S100, and BRAF V600E mutation. Magnetic resonance imaging brain ruled out central nervous system involvement. The rarity of the condition along with the complex pathology makes it difficult to diagnose and hence intervene appropriately.

  1. Large vessel involvement by IgG4-related disease

    Perugino, Cory A.; Wallace, Zachary S.; Meyersohn, Nandini; Oliveira, George; Stone, James R.; Stone, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an immune-mediated fibroinflammatory condition that can affect multiple organs and lead to tumefactive, tissue-destructive lesions. Reports have described inflammatory aortitis and periaortitis, the latter in the setting of retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), but have not distinguished adequately between these 2 manifestations. The frequency, radiologic features, and response of vascular complications to B cell depletion remain poorly defined. We describe the clinical features, radiology findings, and treatment response in a cohort of 36 patients with IgG4-RD affecting large blood vessels. Methods: Clinical records of all patients diagnosed with IgG4-RD in our center were reviewed. All radiologic studies were reviewed. We distinguished between primary large blood vessel inflammation and secondary vascular involvement. Primary involvement was defined as inflammation in the blood vessel wall as a principal focus of disease. Secondary vascular involvement was defined as disease caused by the effects of adjacent inflammation on the blood vessel wall. Results: Of the 160 IgG4-RD patients in this cohort, 36 (22.5%) had large-vessel involvement. The mean age at disease onset of the patients with large-vessel IgG4-RD was 54.6 years. Twenty-eight patients (78%) were male and 8 (22%) were female. Thirteen patients (36%) had primary IgG4-related vasculitis and aortitis with aneurysm formation comprised the most common manifestation. This affected 5.6% of the entire IgG4-RD cohort and was observed in the thoracic aorta in 8 patients, the abdominal aorta in 4, and both the thoracic and abdominal aorta in 3. Three of these aneurysms were complicated by aortic dissection or contained perforation. Periaortitis secondary to RPF accounted for 27 of 29 patients (93%) of secondary vascular involvement by IgG4-RD. Only 5 patients demonstrated evidence of both primary and secondary blood vessel involvement. Of those treated with

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium celatum disease with prolonged pulmonary involvement

    Patsche, Cecilie Blenstrup; Svensson, Erik; Wejse, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a rare cause of human infection, causing disseminated disease in immunosuppressed individuals. Infections localized to the lungs and the lymph nodes have also been reported in immunocompetent individuals. The existing literature on the subject is limited as are experiences...... with treatment regimens and durations. In the case presented herein, two different treatment regimens were applied to an immunocompromised HIV-negative patient with primary skin involvement and extensive pulmonary involvement due to suspected relapse on isoniazid, ethambutol, and clarithromycin treatment....... The treatment regimen was changed to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and pyrazinamide and the treatment duration was prolonged to a total of 24 months, with good effect....

  3. Carbon monoxide exposure enhances arrhythmia after cardiac stress: involvement of oxidative stress.

    André, Lucas; Gouzi, Fares; Thireau, Jérôme; Meyer, Gregory; Boissiere, Julien; Delage, Martine; Abdellaoui, Aldja; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacampagne, Alain; Obert, Philippe; Reboul, Cyril; Fauconnier, Jérémy; Hayot, Maurice; Richard, Sylvain; Cazorla, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Arrhythmias following cardiac stress are a key predictor of death in healthy population. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous pollutant promoting oxidative stress and associated with hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and cardiac mortality. We investigated the effect of chronic CO exposure on the occurrence of arrhythmic events after a cardiac stress test and the possible involvement of related oxidative stress. Wistar rats exposed chronically (4 weeks) to sustained urban CO pollution presented more arrhythmic events than controls during recovery after cardiac challenge with isoprenaline in vivo. Sudden death occurred in 22% of CO-exposed rats versus 0% for controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of lipid peroxidation, was increased in left ventricular tissue of CO-exposed rats. Cardiomyocytes isolated from CO-exposed rats showed higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (measured with MitoSox Red dye), higher diastolic Ca(2+) resulting from SR calcium leak and an higher occurrence of irregular Ca(2+) transients (measured with Indo-1) in comparison to control cells after a high pacing sequence. Acute treatment with a ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine, 20 mmol/L, 1 h) prevented this sequence of alterations and decreased the number of arrhythmic cells following high pacing. Chronic CO exposure promotes oxidative stress that alters Ca(2+) homeostasis (through RYR2 and SERCA defects) and thereby mediates the triggering of ventricular arrhythmia after cardiac stress that can lead to sudden death.

  4. Behcet's disease involving the breast

    Soleto, Maria Jesus; Marcos, Lourdes [Department of Radiology, Hospital de la Princesa, Universidad Autonoma, Diego de Leon 62, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a vasculitis of unknown origin that was traditionally defined by oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. We describe a case of a patient with a diagnosis of Behcet's syndrome who presented a palpable lesion in the right breast with inflammatory signs. X-ray findings posed a differential diagnosis between tumoral and inflammatory pathology. The pathological findings confirmed a small-vessel vasculitis. We found two reports of breast involvement by this disease in the literature. Our patient was studied by mammogram and sonogram which together with clinical history are important to prevent delay in diagnosis and unnecessary therapeutic procedures. (orig.)

  5. Compensatory responses induced by oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    PAULA I MOREIRA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer disease, significantly before the development of the pathologic hallmarks, neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. In the first stage of development of the disease, amyloid-β deposition and hyperphosphorylated tau function as compensatory responses and downstream adaptations to ensure that neuronal cells do not succumb to oxidative damage. These findings suggest that Alzheimer disease is associated with a novel balance in oxidant homeostasis.

  6. Sublethal RNA Oxidation as a Mechanism for Neurodegenerative Disease

    Mark A. Smith

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Although cellular RNA is subjected to the same oxidative insults as DNA and other cellular macromolecules, oxidative damage to RNA has not been a major focus in investigations of the biological consequences of free radical damage. In fact, because it is largely single-stranded and its bases lack the protection of hydrogen bonding and binding by specific proteins, RNA may be more susceptible to oxidative insults than is DNA. Oxidative damage to protein-coding RNA or non-coding RNA will, in turn, potentially cause errors in proteins and/or dysregulation of gene expression. While less lethal than mutations in the genome, such sublethal insults to cells might be associated with underlying mechanisms of several chronic diseases, including neurodegenerative disease. Recently, oxidative RNA damage has been described in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, and prion diseases. Of particular interest, oxidative RNA damage can be demonstrated in vulnerable neurons early in disease, suggesting that RNA oxidation may actively contribute to the onset of the disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that, mechanistically speaking, the detrimental effects of oxidative RNA damage to protein synthesis are attenuated, at least in part, by the existence of protective mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of the damaged ribonucleotides into the translational machinery. Further investigations aimed at understanding the processing mechanisms related to oxidative RNA damage and its consequences may provide significant insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative and other degenerative diseases and lead to better therapeutic strategies.

  7. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine.

  8. Chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement.

    Vereckei, András; Fazakas, Adám; Baló, Timea; Fekete, Béla; Molnár, Mária Judit; Karádi, István

    2013-04-01

    The authors report a case of rare chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) manifested suddenly as third degree A-V block with QT(c) interval prolongation and short torsade de pointes runs ultimately degenerating into ventricular fibrillation. Immunological tests suggested an MCTD flare, implying that cardiac arrest had resulted from myocardial involvement by MCTD. However, QT(c) prolongation is not a characteristic of cardiomyopathy caused by connective tissue disease, unless anti-Ro/SSA positivity is present, but that was not the case. Therefore, looking for another cause of QT(c) prolongation the possibility of chloroquine cardiotoxicity emerged, which the patient had been receiving for almost two years in supramaximal doses. Biopsy of the deltoid muscle was performed, because in chloroquine toxicity, specific lesions are present both in the skeletal muscle and in the myocardium, and electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of cytoplasmic curvilinear bodies, which are specific to antimalarial-induced myocyte damage and are absent in all other muscle diseases, except neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Thus, the diagnosis of chloroquine cardiotoxicity was established. It might be advisable to supplement the periodic ophthalmological examination, which is currently the only recommendation for patients on long-term chloroquine therapy, with ECG screening.

  9. White matter involvement in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Caverzasi, Eduardo; Mandelli, Maria Luisa; DeArmond, Stephen J; Hess, Christopher P; Vitali, Paolo; Papinutto, Nico; Oehler, Abby; Miller, Bruce L; Lobach, Irina V; Bastianello, Stefano; Geschwind, Michael D; Henry, Roland G

    2014-12-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is considered primarily a disease of grey matter, although the extent of white matter involvement has not been well described. We used diffusion tensor imaging to study the white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease compared to healthy control subjects and to correlated magnetic resonance imaging findings with histopathology. Twenty-six patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and nine age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects underwent volumetric T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging. Six patients had post-mortem brain analysis available for assessment of neuropathological findings associated with prion disease. Parcellation of the subcortical white matter was performed on 3D T1-weighted volumes using Freesurfer. Diffusion tensor imaging maps were calculated and transformed to the 3D-T1 space; the average value for each diffusion metric was calculated in the total white matter and in regional volumes of interest. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis was also performed to investigate the deeper white matter tracts. There was a significant reduction of mean (P=0.002), axial (P=0.0003) and radial (P=0.0134) diffusivities in the total white matter in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity was significantly lower in most white matter volumes of interest (PCreutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Mean diffusivity reduction reflected concomitant decrease of both axial and radial diffusivity, without appreciable changes in white matter anisotropy. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis showed significant reductions of mean diffusivity within the white matter of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, mainly in the left hemisphere, with a strong trend (P=0.06) towards reduced mean diffusivity in most of the white matter bilaterally. In contrast, by visual assessment there was no white matter abnormality either on T2-weighted or diffusion-weighted images. Widespread reduction in white matter mean

  10. Inactivation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase involves oxidative modifications.

    Barlow, J N; Zhang, Z; John, P; Baldwin, J E; Schofield, C J

    1997-03-25

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) oxidase catalyzes the final step in the biosynthesis of the plant signaling molecule ethylene. It is a member of the ferrous iron dependent family of oxidases and dioxygenases and is unusual in that it displays a very short half-life under catalytic conditions, typically less than 20 min, and a requirement for CO2 as an activator. The rates of inactivation of purified, recombinant ACC oxidase from tomato under various combinations of substrates and cofactors were measured. Inactivation was relatively slow in the presence of buffer alone (t1/2 > 1 h), but fast in the presence of ferrous iron and ascorbate (t1/2 approximately 10 min). The rate of iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was increased by the addition of ACC, unaffected by the addition of CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate) but decreased by the addition of catalase or ACC + CO2 at saturation (supplied as bicarbonate). Iron/ascorbate-mediated inactivation was accompanied by partial proteolysis as observed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The fragmentation pattern was altered when ACC was also included, suggesting that ACC can bind to ACC oxidase in the absence of bicarbonate. N-terminal sequencing of fragments resulted in identification of an internal cleavage site which we propose is proximate to active-site bound iron. Thus, ACC oxidase inactivates via relatively slow partial unfolding of the catalytically active conformation, oxidative damage mediated via hydrogen peroxide which is catalase protectable and oxidative damage to the active site which results in partial proteolysis and is not catalase protectable.

  11. Oxidative Stress as an Important Factor in the Pathophysiology of alzheimer's Disease

    Tanise Gemelli,

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been associated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Alzheimer's disease is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, which is recognized as the most common form of dementia. In this article, the aim was to review the involvement of oxidative stress on Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid-? peptide and loss of synapses. Moreover, the brain and the nervous system are more prone to oxidative stress and oxidative damage influences the neurodegenerative diseases. However, increased oxidative damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of oxidized aggregated proteins, inflammation, and defects in proteins constitute complex intertwined pathologies that lead to neuronal cell death. Mitochondrial mutations on deoxyribonucleic acid and oxidative stress contribute to aging, affecting different cell signaling systems, as well as the connectivity and neuronal cell death may lead to the largest risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease.

  12. Celiac Disease, Inflammation and Oxidative Damage: A Nutrigenetic Approach

    Letizia Saturni

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a common heritable chronic inflammatory condition of the small intestine caused by permanent intolerance to gluten/gliadin (prolamin, is characterized by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Developments in proteomics have provided an important contribution to the understanding of the biochemical and immunological aspects of the disease and the mechanisms involved in toxicity of prolamins. It has been demonstrated that some gliadin peptides resistant to complete proteolytic digestion may directly affect intestinal cell structure and functions by modulating gene expression and oxidative stress. In recent years, the creation of the two research fields Nutrigenomics and Nutrigenetics, has enabled the elucidation of some interactions between diet, nutrients and genes. Various dietary components including long chain ω-3 fatty acids, plant flavonoids, and carotenoids have been demonstrated to modulate oxidative stress, gene expression and production of inflammatory mediators. Therefore their adoption could preserve intestinal barrier integrity, play a protective role against toxicity of gliadin peptides and have a role in nutritional therapy of celiac disease.

  13. Alzheimer's disease: Cerebrovascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and advanced clinical therapies

    Marlatt, M.W.; Lucassen, P.J.; Perry, G.; Smith, M.A.; Zhu, X.

    2008-01-01

    Many lines of independent research have provided convergent evidence regarding oxidative stress, cerebrovascular disease, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical studies spurred by these findings engage basic and clinical communities with tangible results regarding molecular targets and

  14. Radiological aspects in pulmonary involvement of Behcet disease

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Im, Jung Gi; Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the pulmonary manifestations of Behcet disease, authors reviewed the chest radiographs of 130 cases of Behcet disease diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital from January 1980 to December 1987 retrospectively. Of the 130 cases, 6 cases (4.6%) showed pulmonary abnormalities that were considered as a manifestation of Behcet disease. Two cases showed round masses near the hila on chest radiographs which were confirmed as pulmonary artery aneurysms on angiographies. Two cases showed pulmonary infiltrates due to pulmonary infarcts. Others were a case of unilateral pulmonary edema due to compression og the contralateral pulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a compulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of esophageal ulcer. Though its occurrence is rare, nodular and/or infiltrative pulmonary lesions in patients with Behcet disease should be suspected as a vascular involvement of the disease itself until proven otherwise.

  15. Radiological aspects in pulmonary involvement of Behcet disease

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Im, Jung Gi; Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    To evaluate the pulmonary manifestations of Behcet disease, authors reviewed the chest radiographs of 130 cases of Behcet disease diagnosed at Seoul National University Hospital from January 1980 to December 1987 retrospectively. Of the 130 cases, 6 cases (4.6%) showed pulmonary abnormalities that were considered as a manifestation of Behcet disease. Two cases showed round masses near the hila on chest radiographs which were confirmed as pulmonary artery aneurysms on angiographies. Two cases showed pulmonary infiltrates due to pulmonary infarcts. Others were a case of unilateral pulmonary edema due to compression og the contralateral pulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a compulmonary artery by aortic aneurysm and a case of lung abscess due to esophagobronchial fistula as a complication of esophageal ulcer. Though its occurrence is rare, nodular and/or infiltrative pulmonary lesions in patients with Behcet disease should be suspected as a vascular involvement of the disease itself until proven otherwise.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  17. Neuro-otological and peripheral nerve involvement in Fabry disease

    Sergio Carmona

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease, with multisystemic glycosphingolipids deposits. Neuro-otological involvement leading to hearing loss and vestibular dysfunctions has been described, but there is limited information about the frequency, site of lesion, or the relationship with peripheral neuropathy. The aim was to evaluate the presence of auditory and vestibular symptoms, and assess neurophysiological involvement of the VIII cranial nerve, correlating these findings with clinical and neurophysiological features of peripheral neuropathy. We studied 36 patients with FD with a complete neurological and neuro-otological evaluation including nerve conduction studies, quantitative sensory testing (to evaluate small fiber by warm and cold threshold detection and cold and heat pain, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, videonistagmography, audiometry and brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Neuro-otologic symptoms included hearing loss (22.2%, vertigo (27.8% or both (25%. An involvement of either cochlear or vestibular function was identified in most patients (75%. In 70% of our patients the involvement of both cochlear and vestibular function could not be explained by a neural or vascular mechanism. Small fiber neuropathy was identified in 77.7%. There were no significant associations between neurootological and QST abnormalities. Neuro-otologic involvement is frequent and most likely under-recognized in patients with FD. It lacks a specific neural or vascular pattern, suggesting multi-systemic, end organ damage. Small fiber neuropathy is an earlier manifestation of FD, but there is no correlation between the development of neuropathy and neuro-otological abnormalities.

  18. Changes in brain oxysterols at different stages of Alzheimer's disease: Their involvement in neuroinflammation

    Gabriella Testa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a gradually debilitating disease that leads to dementia. The molecular mechanisms underlying AD are still not clear, and at present no reliable biomarkers are available for the early diagnosis. In the last several years, together with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain has become increasingly implicated in AD progression. A significant body of evidence indicates that oxidized cholesterol, in the form of oxysterols, is one of the main triggers of AD. The oxysterols potentially most closely involved in the pathogenesis of AD are 24-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol, respectively deriving from cholesterol oxidation by the enzymes CYP46A1 and CYP27A1. However, the possible involvement of oxysterols resulting from cholesterol autooxidation, including 7-ketocholesterol and 7β-hydroxycholesterol, is now emerging. In a systematic analysis of oxysterols in post-mortem human AD brains, classified by the Braak staging system of neurofibrillary pathology, alongside the two oxysterols of enzymatic origin, a variety of oxysterols deriving from cholesterol autoxidation were identified; these included 7-ketocholesterol, 7α-hydroxycholesterol, 4β-hydroxycholesterol, 5α,6α-epoxycholesterol, and 5β,6β-epoxycholesterol. Their levels were quantified and compared across the disease stages. Some inflammatory mediators, and the proteolytic enzyme matrix metalloprotease-9, were also found to be enhanced in the brains, depending on disease progression. This highlights the pathogenic association between the trends of inflammatory molecules and oxysterol levels during the evolution of AD. Conversely, sirtuin 1, an enzyme that regulates several pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory response, was reduced markedly with the progression of AD, supporting the hypothesis that the loss of sirtuin 1 might play a key role in AD. Taken together, these results strongly support the

  19. Involvement of inositol biosynthesis and nitric oxide in the mediation of UV-B induced oxidative stress

    Dmytro I Lytvyn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of NO-signaling in ultraviolet B (UV-B induced oxidative stress in plants is an open question. Inositol biosynthesis contributes to numerous cellular functions, including the regulation of plants tolerance to stress. This work reveals the involvement of inositol-3-phosphate synthase 1 (IPS1, a key enzyme for biosynthesis of myo-inositol and its derivatives, in the response to NO-dependent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis. Homozygous mutants deficient for IPS1 (atips1 and wild-type plants were transformed with a reduction-oxidation-sensitive green fluorescent protein 2 (grx1-rogfp2 and used for the dynamic measurement of UV-B-induced and SNP (sodium nitroprusside-mediated oxidative stresses by confocal microscopy. atips1 mutants displayed greater tissue-specific resistance to the action of UV-B than the wild type. SNP can act both as an oxidant or repairer depending on the applied concentration, but mutant plants were more tolerant than the wild type to nitrosative effects of high concentration of SNP. Additionally, pretreatment with low concentrations of SNP (10, 100 μM before UV-B irradiation resulted in a tissue-specific protective effect that was enhanced in atips1. We conclude that the interplay between nitric oxide and inositol signaling can be involved in the mediation of UV-B-initiated oxidative stress in the plant cell.

  20. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis.

  1. Autophagy-Related Deubiquitinating Enzymes Involved in Health and Disease

    Fouzi El Magraoui

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that delivers diverse cytoplasmic components to the lysosomal compartment for either recycling or degradation. This involves the removal of protein aggregates, the turnover of organelles, as well as the elimination of intracellular pathogens. In this situation, when only specific cargoes should be targeted to the lysosome, the potential targets can be selectively marked by the attachment of ubiquitin in order to be recognized by autophagy-receptors. Ubiquitination plays a central role in this process, because it regulates early signaling events during the induction of autophagy and is also used as a degradation-tag on the potential autophagic cargo protein. Here, we review how the ubiquitin-dependent steps of autophagy are balanced or counteracted by deubiquitination events. Moreover, we highlight the functional role of the corresponding deubiquitinating enzymes and discuss how they might be involved in the occurrence of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases or infection with pathogenic bacteria.

  2. Dietary antioxidents and oxidative stress in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    L Gupta, Krishan; Sahni, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Dietary antioxidants are important in protecting against human diseases. Oxidative stress, a non- traditional risk factors of cardio-vascular disease is far more prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients than in normal subjects. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Oxidative stress could be a consequence of an increase in reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in antioxidant defenses. Among the important factors that can be involved in triggering oxidative stress is insufficient dietary intake of antioxidants. Malnourished CKD patients are reported to have more oxidative stress than well nourished ones. Moving beyond the importance of assessment of dietary protein and energy in pre dialysis CKD patients to the assessment of dietary antioxidants is of utmost importance to help combat enhanced oxidative stress levels in such patients.

  3. Visual System Involvement in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Parkinson Disease.

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Milardi, Demetrio; Mormina, Enricomaria; Rania, Laura; Postorino, Elisa; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Anastasi, Giuseppe Pio; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Aragona, Pasquale; Quartarone, Angelo; Gaeta, Michele

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To assess intracranial visual system changes of newly diagnosed Parkinson disease in drug-naïve patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson disease and 20 age-matched control subjects were recruited. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging) was performed with a 3-T MR imager. White matter changes were assessed by exploring a white matter diffusion profile by means of diffusion-tensor imaging-based parameters and constrained spherical deconvolution-based connectivity analysis and by means of white matter voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Alterations in occipital gray matter were investigated by means of gray matter VBM. Morphologic analysis of the optic chiasm was based on manual measurement of regions of interest. Statistical testing included analysis of variance, t tests, and permutation tests. Results In the patients with Parkinson disease, significant alterations were found in optic radiation connectivity distribution, with decreased lateral geniculate nucleus V2 density (F, -8.28; P Parkinson disease and that the entire intracranial visual system can be involved. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease and Oxidative Stress

    Marco Antonio Meraz-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in elderly adults. It is estimated that 10% of the world’s population aged more than 60–65 years could currently be affected by AD, and that in the next 20 years, there could be more than 30 million people affected by this pathology. One of the great challenges in this regard is that AD is not just a scientific problem; it is associated with major psychosocial and ethical dilemmas and has a negative impact on national economies. The neurodegenerative process that occurs in AD involves a specific nervous cell dysfunction, which leads to neuronal death. Mutations in APP, PS1, and PS2 genes are causes for early onset AD. Several animal models have demonstrated that alterations in these proteins are able to induce oxidative damage, which in turn favors the development of AD. This paper provides a review of many, although not all, of the mutations present in patients with familial Alzheimer’s disease and the association between some of these mutations with both oxidative damage and the development of the pathology.

  5. Pasteurella multocida Involved in Respiratory Disease of Wild Chimpanzees

    Köndgen, Sophie; Leider, Michaela; Lankester, Felix; Bethe, Astrid; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ewers, Christa

    2011-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida can cause a variety of diseases in various species of mammals and birds throughout the world but nothing is known about its importance for wild great apes. In this study we isolated P. multocida from wild living, habituated chimpanzees from Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. Isolates originated from two chimpanzees that died during a respiratory disease outbreak in 2004 as well as from one individual that developed chronic air-sacculitis following this outbreak. Four isolates were subjected to a full phenotypic and molecular characterisation. Two different clones were identified using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) enabled the identification of previous unknown alleles and two new sequence types, ST68 and ST69, were assigned. Phylogenetic analysis of the superoxide dismutase (sodA) gene and concatenated sequences from seven MLST-housekeeping genes showed close clustering within known P. multocida isolated from various hosts and geographic locations. Due to the clinical relevance of the strains described here, these results make an important contribution to our knowledge of pathogens involved in lethal disease outbreaks among endangered great apes. PMID:21931664

  6. Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Highlight Early Involvement of the Choroid Plexus in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    Jason M. Millward

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier. Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging, in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles reveal CNS (central nervous system lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset.

  7. Involvement of purinergic signaling on nitric oxide production by neutrophils stimulated with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Bonan, Carla Denise; Tasca, Tiana

    2012-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasite from the human urogenital tract that causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The neutrophil infiltration has been considered to be primarily responsible for cytological changes observed at infection site, and the chemoattractants can play an important role in this leukocytic recruitment. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most widespread mediator compounds, and it is implicated in modulation of immunological mechanisms. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are signaling molecules involved in several processes, including immune responses and control of leukocyte trafficking. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase members, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ectoADA) have been characterized in T. vaginalis. Herein, we investigated the effects of purinergic system on NO production by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis. The trophozoites were able to induce a high NO synthesis by neutrophils through iNOS pathway. The extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, and ATPγS (a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog) showed no significant change in NO secretion. In contrast, adenosine and its degradation product, inosine, promoted a low production of the compound. The immunosuppressive effect of adenosine upon NO release by neutrophils occurred due to adenosine A(2A) receptor activation. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity displayed by T. vaginalis was shown to be important in adenosine generation, indicating the efficiency of purinergic cascade. Our data suggest the influence of purinergic signaling, specifically adenosinergic system, on NO production by neutrophils in T. vaginalis infection, contributing to the immunological aspects of disease.

  8. Appendiceal involvement in a patient with Gaucher disease.

    Kocic, Marija; Djuricic, Slavisa M; Djordjevic, Maja; Savic, Djordje; Kecman, Bozica; Sarajlija, Adrijan

    2018-02-01

    Almost any anatomical compartment may be involved in Gaucher disease (GD). Abdominal lymphadenopathy occurred during enzyme replacement therapy in more than a dozen children with GD so far. A fourteen-year-old boy from Serbia developed clinical signs of acute appendicitis six years after the onset of GD type 3 related abdominal lymphadenopathy. Ultrasound examination showed diffuse thickening of the intestinal wall in the ileocoecal region with periappendicular infiltration. An appendectomy was performed four months after conservative treatment with antibiotics. Histopathology revealed macrophages with cytological characteristics of Gaucher cells densely crammed in mesoappendiceal adipose tissue. Also the multifocal replacement of subserosal tissue by Gaucher cells and their infiltration to a variable depth of muscularis propria of the appendix were verified. Frank infiltration of the vermiform appendix with Gaucher cells represents a novel observation in a wide spectrum of manifestations reported in GD. A possible causative relationship of this infiltration with appendicitis is considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Omics Approach to Identify Factors Involved in Brassica Disease Resistance.

    Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo; Bhadauria, Vijai; Cartea, Maria E; Rodríguez, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    Understanding plant's defense mechanisms and their response to biotic stresses is of fundamental meaning for the development of resistant crop varieties and more productive agriculture. The Brassica genus involves a large variety of economically important species and cultivars used as vegetable source, oilseeds, forage and ornamental. Damage caused by pathogens attack affects negatively various aspects of plant growth, development, and crop productivity. Over the last few decades, advances in plant physiology, genetics, and molecular biology have greatly improved our understanding of plant responses to biotic stress conditions. In this regard, various 'omics' technologies enable qualitative and quantitative monitoring of the abundance of various biological molecules in a high-throughput manner, and thus allow determination of their variation between different biological states on a genomic scale. In this review, we have described advances in 'omic' tools (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics) in the view of conventional and modern approaches being used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie Brassica disease resistance.

  10. Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Crohn Disease: Histopathologic and Endoscopic Findings.

    Diaz, Liege; Hernandez-Oquet, Rafael Enrique; Deshpande, Amar R; Moshiree, Baharak

    2015-11-01

    Studies describing the prevalence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) Crohn disease (CD) and its histopathologic changes have been inconsistent as a result of different definitions used for upper GI involvement, diverse populations, and varying indications for endoscopy. We reviewed the literature describing endoscopic findings and histologic lesions in gastric and duodenal mucosa of patients with established CD. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched for gastroduodenal biopsy findings in patients with CD from 1970 to 2014. We included all retrospective and prospective studies in adults. We calculated the prevalence of the most common endoscopic and histopathological findings among patients with overall CD and upper GI CD. Of the 385 articles identified, 20 eligible studies were included. A total of 2511 patients had CD and 815 had upper GI CD. In the CD group, the most common histopathological finding was nonspecific gastric inflammation in 32% of patients, followed by gastric granuloma in 7.9%. Focal gastritis was prevalent in 30.9% of patients. In the upper GI CD group, gastric inflammation was present in 84% of patients, followed by duodenal inflammation in 28.2% and gastric granuloma in 23.2%. The most common gastric endoscopic finding in patients with CD was erythema in 5.9%, followed by erosions in 3.7%. Duodenal endoscopic findings included ulcers and erythema in 5.3% and 3.0% of patients, respectively. We found a prevalence of 34% for CD involving the upper GI tract across these 20 studies. Routine upper endoscopy with biopsies of the upper GI tract in the diagnostic workup of patients with CD can correctly classify the distribution and extent of the disease.

  11. Inner ear involvement in Behçet's disease.

    Süslü, Ahmet Emre; Polat, Mualla; Köybaşi, Serap; Biçer, Yusuf Ozgür; Funda, Yasemin Ongun; Parlak, Ali Haydar

    2010-06-01

    To assess cochlear involvement and hearing loss in patients with Behçet's disease (BD). Forty-two patients with BD and 24 sex and age matched healthy subjects were included in the study. pure-tone audiometry including high frequencies (250-16000Hz) and DPOAE were performed to all participants. Results of the audiological evaluation were compared and correlation between the audiologic status and clinical manifestations of the BD were investigated. Bilateral sensorineural hearing loss was detected in 27 (64.3%) patients. Hearing thresholds were found to be higher in patients with BD at all of the frequencies except at 500Hz when compared to control group (phigh frequencies. Compared with control group, distortion products and SNR of the BD patients were lower in all of the tested frequencies (phigh frequencies and decreased signal-noise ratios (SNR) in distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) indicate a cochlear involvement in patients with BD. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deformability of Erythrocytes and Oxidative Damage in Alzheimer Disease

    Mukerrem Betul Yerer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lowered cerebral perfusion as a consequence of hemodynamic microcirculatory insufficiency is one of the factors underlying in Alzheimer's disease, which is a neurodegenerative disorder leading to progressive cognitive impairment. Erythrocyte deformability is one of the major factors affecting the microcirculatory hemodynamics which is closely related to the oxidative damage. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the erythrocyte deformability, nitric oxide levels and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease. Methods: The blood samples of 30 elderly people in three groups consisting of healthy control and different severities of the disease (low and severe were used. Then the erythrocytes were isolated and the deformability of erythrocytes was determined by Rheodyne SSD evaluating the elongation indexes of the erythrocytes under different shear stress. The catalase, glutathione peroxidase and plasma nitric oxide levels were measured spectrophotometric ally. Results: The plasma nitric oxide levels, catalase activities were found significantly higher and glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly lower in severe Alzheimer's disease patients compared to the control group. However, the deformability of erythrocytes was not significantly affected from these alterations. Conclusion: the oxidant-antioxidant status is dramatically changed in Alzheimer's disease patients with the severity of the disease and similar alterations were seen in the nitric oxide levels without any significant change in erythrocyte deformability. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 65-75

  13. Mode of action of nifurtimox and N-oxide-containing heterocycles against Trypanosoma cruzi: is oxidative stress involved?

    Boiani, Mariana; Piacenza, Lucia; Hernández, Paola; Boiani, Lucia; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Denicola, Ana

    2010-06-15

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and threatens millions of lives in South America. As other neglected diseases there is almost no research and development effort by the pharmaceutical industry and the treatment relies on two drugs, Nifurtimox and Benznidazole, discovered empirically more than three decades ago. Nifurtimox, a nitrofurane derivative, is believed to exert its biological activity through the bioreduction of the nitro-group to a nitro-anion radical which undergoes redox-cycling with molecular oxygen. This hypothesis is generally accepted, although arguments against it have been presented. In the present work we studied the ability of Nifurtimox and five N-oxide-containing heterocycles to induce oxidative stress in T. cruzi. N-Oxide-containing heterocycles represent a promising group of new trypanosomicidal agents and their mode of action is not completely elucidated. The results here obtained argue against the oxidative stress hypothesis almost for all the studied compounds, including Nifurtimox. A significant reduction in the level of parasitic low-molecular-weight thiols was observed after Nifurtimox treatment; however, it was not linked to the production of reactive oxidant species. Besides, redox-cycling is only observed at high Nifurtimox concentrations (>400microM), two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration required for anti-proliferative activity (5microM). Our results indicate that an increase in oxidative stress is not the main mechanism of action of Nifurtimox. Among the studied N-oxide-containing heterocycles, benzofuroxan derivatives strongly inhibited parasite dehydrogenase activity and affected mitochondrial membrane potential. The indazole derivative raised intracellular oxidants production, but it was the least effective as anti-T. cruzi. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Ailton Melo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND increase with life expectancy. This paper reviews the role of oxidative stress (OS in ND and pharmacological attempts to fight against reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced neurodegeneration. Several mechanisms involved in ROS generation in neurodegeneration have been proposed. Recent articles about molecular pathways involved in ROS generation were reviewed. The progress in the development of neuroprotective therapies has been hampered because it is difficult to define targets for treatment and determine what should be considered as neuroprotective. Therefore, the attention was focused on researches about pharmacological targets that could protect neurons against OS. Since it is necessary to look for genes as the ultimate controllers of all biological processes, this paper also tried to identify gerontogenes involved in OS and neurodegeneration. Since neurons depend on glial cells to survive, recent articles about the functioning of these cells in aging and ND were also reviewed. Finally, clinical trials testing potential neuroprotective agents were critically reviewed. Although several potential drugs have been screened in in vitro and in vivo models of ND, these results were not translated in benefit of patients, and disappointing results were obtained in the majority of clinical trials.

  15. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in arsenite-induced oxidative injury in rat brain

    Lin, Anya M.Y.; Chao, P.L.; Fang, S.F.; Chi, C.W.; Yang, C.H.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism underlying sodium arsenite (arsenite)-induced neurotoxicity was investigated in rat brain. Arsenite was locally infused in the substantia nigra (SN) of anesthetized rat. Seven days after infusion, lipid peroxidation in the infused SN was elevated and dopamine level in the ipsilateral striatum was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner (0.3-5 nmol). Furthermore, local infusion of arsenite (5 nmol) decreased GSH content and increased expression of heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 in the infused SN. Aggregation of α-synuclein, a putative pathological protein involved in several CNS neurodegenerative diseases, was elevated in the arsenite-infused SN. From the breakdown pattern of α-spectrin, both necrosis and apoptosis were involved in the arsenite-induced neurotoxicity. Pyknotic nuclei, cellular shrinkage and cytoplasmic disintegration, indicating necrosis, and TUNEL-positive cells and DNA ladder, indicating apoptosis was observed in the arsenite-infused SN. Arsenite-induced apoptosis was mediated via two different organelle pathways, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). For mitochondrial activation, cytosolic cytochrome c and caspase-3 levels were elevated in the arsenite-infused SN. In ER pathway, arsenite increased activating transcription factor-4, X-box binding protein 1, C/EBP homologues protein (CHOP) and cytosolic immunoglobulin binding protein levels. Moreover, arsenite reduced procaspase 12 levels, an ER-specific enzyme in the infused SN. Taken together, our study suggests that arsenite is capable of inducing oxidative injury in CNS. In addition to mitochondria, ER stress was involved in the arsenite-induced apoptosis. Arsenite-induced neurotoxicity clinically implies a pathophysiological role of arsenite in CNS neurodegeneration

  17. Involvement of the Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases processes.

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Meiqing; Li, Lanfang; Chen, Linxi

    2018-04-01

    Warburg effect, as an energy shift from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, is extensively found in various cancers. Interestingly, increasing researchers show that Warburg effect plays a crucial role in non-tumor diseases. For instance, inhibition of Warburg effect can alleviate pulmonary vascular remodeling in the process of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Interference of Warburg effect improves mitochondrial function and cardiac function in the process of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Additionally, the Warburg effect induces vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and contributes to atherosclerosis. Warburg effect may also involve in axonal damage and neuronal death, which are related with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, Warburg effect significantly promotes cell proliferation and cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease (PKD). Besides, Warburg effect relieves amyloid β-mediated cell death in Alzheimer's disease. And Warburg effect also improves the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Finally, we also introduce some glycolytic agonists. This review focuses on the newest researches about the role of Warburg effect in non-tumor diseases, including PH, tuberculosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), failing heart, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's diseases, multiple sclerosis, and PKD. Obviously, Warburg effect may be a potential therapeutic target for those non-tumor diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Isoprostanes and Neuroprostanes as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Elżbieta Miller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data shows that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative disorders. The literature data indicate that in vivo or postmortem cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue levels of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs especially F4-neuroprotanes (F4-NPs are significantly increased in some neurodegenerative diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Central nervous system is the most metabolically active organ of the body characterized by high requirement for oxygen and relatively low antioxidative activity, what makes neurons and glia highly susceptible to destruction by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and neurodegeneration. The discovery of F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as markers of lipid peroxidation caused by the free radicals has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the relationship between F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as biomarkers of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the knowledge of these novel biomarkers of oxidative stress and the advantages of monitoring their formation to better define the involvement of oxidative stress in neurological diseases.

  19. The Role of Oxidative Stress on the Pathogenesis of Graves' Disease

    Miloš Žarković

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is an autoimmune disease, and autoimmune process induces an inflammatory reaction, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs are among its products. When balance between oxidants and antioxidants is disturbed, in favour of the oxidants it is termed “oxidative stress” (OS. Increased OS characterizes Graves' disease. It seems that the level of OS is increased in subjects with Graves' ophthalmopathy compared to the other subjects with Graves' disease. Among the other factors, OS is involved in proliferation of orbital fibroblasts. Polymorphism of the 8-oxoG DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1 involved in repair of the oxidative damaged DNA increases in the risk for developing Grave's disease. Treatment with glucocorticoids reduces levels of OS markers. A recent large clinical trial evaluated effect of selenium on mild Graves' ophthalmopathy. Selenium treatment was associated with an improved quality of life and less eye involvement and slowed the progression of Graves' orbitopathy, compared to placebo.

  20. Eales′ disease: Oxidant stress and weak antioxidant defence

    Ramakrishnan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Eales′ disease (ED is an idiopathic retinal periphlebitis characterized by capillary non-perfusion and neovascularization. In addition to the existing system, a new staging system has been proposed by Saxena et al . Immunological, molecular biological and biochemical studies have indicated the role of human leucocyte antigen, retinal S antigen autoimmunity, Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, free radical damage and possibly hyperhomocysteinemia in its etiopathogenesis, which appears multifactorial. Oxidant stress has been shown by increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (lipid oxidation in the vitreous, erythrocytes, platelets, and monocytes. A decrease in vitamins E and C both in active and healed vasculitis, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase showed a weakened antioxidant defence. Epiretinal membrane from patients of ED who underwent surgery showed, by immunolocalization, presence of carboxy methyl lysine, an advanced glycation end product formed by glycoxidation and is involved in angiogenesis. OH· free radical accumulation in monocytes has been directly shown by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radical damage to DNA and of protein was shown by the accumulation of 8 hydroxy 2 deoxyguanosine (in leucocytes and nitrotyrosine (in monocytes, respectively. Nitrosative stress was shown by increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in monocytes in which levels of iron and copper were increased while those of zinc decreased. A novel 88 kDa protein was found in serum and vitreous in inflammatory condition and had antioxidant function. Platelet fluidity was also affected. Oral, methotrexate in low dosage (12.5 mg/week for 12 weeks as well as oral vitamin E (400 IU and C (500 mg daily for 8 weeks are reported to have beneficial effects.

  1. The intestinal barrier function and its involvement in digestive disease

    Eloísa Salvo-Romero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal mucosal surface is lined with epithelial cells representing an effective barrier made up with intercellular junctions that separate the inner and the outer environments, and block the passage of potentially harmful substances. However, epithelial cells are also responsible for the absorption of nutrients and electrolytes, hence a semipermeable barrier is required that selectively allows a number of substances in while keeping others out. To this end, the intestine developed the "intestinal barrier function", a defensive system involving various elements, both intra- and extracellular, that work in a coordinated way to impede the passage of antigens, toxins, and microbial byproducts, and simultaneously preserves the correct development of the epithelial barrier, the immune system, and the acquisition of tolerance against dietary antigens and the intestinal microbiota. Disturbances in the mechanisms of the barrier function favor the development of exaggerated immune responses; while exact implications remain unknown, changes in intestinal barrier function have been associated with the development of inflammatory conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. This review details de various elements of the intestinal barrier function, and the key molecular and cellular changes described for gastrointestinal diseases associated with dysfunction in this defensive mechanism.

  2. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease?

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of ( 3 H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of ( 3 H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of ( 3 H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens

  3. Esophageal involvement and interstitial lung disease in mixed connective tissue disease.

    Fagundes, M N; Caleiro, M T C; Navarro-Rodriguez, T; Baldi, B G; Kavakama, J; Salge, J M; Kairalla, R; Carvalho, C R R

    2009-06-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease is a systemic inflammatory disorder that results in both pulmonary and esophageal manifestations. We sought to evaluate the relationship between esophageal dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. We correlated the pulmonary function data and the high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial lung disease with the results of esophageal evaluation in manometry, 24-hour intraesophageal pH measurements, and the presence of esophageal dilatation on computed tomography scan. Fifty consecutive patients with mixed connective tissue disease, according to Kasukawa's classification criteria, were included in this prospective study. High-resolution computed tomography parenchymal abnormalities were present in 39 of 50 patients. Esophageal dilatation, gastroesophageal reflux, and esophageal motor impairment were also very prevalent (28 of 50, 18 of 36, and 30 of 36, respectively). The presence of interstitial lung disease on computed tomography was significantly higher among patients with esophageal dilatation (92% vs. 45%; pmotor dysfunction (90% vs. 35%; pesophageal and pulmonary involvement, our series revealed a strong association between esophageal motor dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

  4. [Cutaneous involvement in chronic inflammatory bowel disease : Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis].

    Richter, L; Rappersberger, K

    2016-12-01

    Over recent decades, both the incidence and prevalence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease have continued to rise in industrialized countries; the disease is frequently associated with extracutaneous involvement and comorbidity. The purpose of this work was to investigate the frequency and specificity of mucocutaneous manifestations in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). An extensive search in peer-reviewed journals via PubMed was performed; presented is a summary and analysis of various studies and data, including data of patients treated at our department. CD and UC are frequently associated with mucocutaneous symptoms; however, primary/specific disease-associations are exclusively seen in CD patients. These include peri-anal and -stomal fistulas and ulcerations, "metastatic" Crohn's disease as well as oral granulomatous disease. Moreover, in both CD and UC, there occur several other inflammatory skin conditions such as erythema nodosum, pyoderma gangrenosum, hidradenitis suppurativa, chronic oral aphthous disease, Sweet syndrome, pyostomatitis vegetans, and bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome. Malnutrition syndromes (zinc and vitamin deficiencies) are only rarely observed. On skin and oral/genital mucous membranes various different inflammatory manifestations may be observed during the course of CD or UC. However, most data about a direct pathogenic relationship of the gastrointestinal and dermatologic disorders are quite heterogeneous or even contradictory. Nevertheless, knowledge of these conditions and their possible association with CD and UC could be crucial for early diagnosis and initiation of an appropriate therapy and thus be essential to prevent secondary tissue damage.

  5. Study of mechanism involved in synthesis of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide from graphene nanoplatelets

    Sharma, Bhasha; Shekhar, Shashank; Malik, Parul; Jain, Purnima

    2018-06-01

    Graphene, a wonder material has inspired quest among researchers due to its numerous applications and exceptional properties. This paper highlights the mechanism and chemistry behind the fabrication of graphene oxide by using phosphoric acid. Chemical functionalization is of prime importance which avoids agglomeration of nanoparticles to attain inherent properties. As non-homogeneous dispersion limits its utilization due to interfacial interactions which restrict reactive sites to produce intercalated network. Thus, chemically functionalized graphene leads to stable dispersion and enhances thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the resultant polymer composite materials. Solubility of graphene in aqueous solution is the major issue because graphene is hydrophobic, to rectify this oxygen containing hydrophilic groups must be introduced to make it compatible and this can be attained by covalent functionalization. Among all nanofiller GO has shown average particle size i.e. 95 nm and highest surface charge density. The characteristic changes were estimated using Raman spectra.

  6. Oxidative Stress: A Pathogenic Mechanism for Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Mary Carmen Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease is a neurovisceral atypical lipid storage disorder involving the accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in the late endocytic pathway. The pathogenic mechanism that links the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol with cell death in NPC disease in both the CNS and the liver is currently unknown. Oxidative stress has been observed in the livers and brains of NPC mice and in different NPC cellular models. Moreover, there is evidence of an elevation of oxidative stress markers in the serumof NPC patients. Recent evidence strongly suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in NPC pathogenesis and that mitochondria could be a significant source of oxidative stress in this disease. In this context, the accumulation of vitamin E in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments in NPC could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability and could be another possible cause of oxidative damage. Another possible source of reactive species in NPC is the diminished activity of different antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, because NPC is mainly caused by the accumulation of free cholesterol, oxidized cholesterol derivatives produced by oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Identification and Heterologous Expression of Genes Involved in Anaerobic Dissimilatory Phosphite Oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans▿

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W.; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays. PMID:20622064

  8. Identification and heterologous expression of genes involved in anaerobic dissimilatory phosphite oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans.

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays.

  9. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: a possibility for prevention.

    Bonda, David J; Wang, Xinglong; Perry, George; Nunomura, Akihiko; Tabaton, Massimo; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is at the forefront of Alzheimer disease (AD) research. While its implications in the characteristic neurodegeneration of AD are vast, the most important aspect is that it seems increasingly apparent that oxidative stress is in fact a primary progenitor of the disease, and not merely an epiphenomenon. Moreover, evidence indicates that a long "dormant period" of gradual oxidative damage accumulation precedes and actually leads to the seemingly sudden appearance of clinical and pathological AD symptoms, including amyloid-beta deposition, neurofibrillary tangle formation, metabolic dysfunction, and cognitive decline. These findings provide important insights into the development of potential treatment regimens and even allude to the possibility of a preventative cure. In this review, we elaborate on the dynamic role of oxidative stress in AD and present corresponding treatment strategies that are currently under investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of sulfiredoxin in systemic diseases influenced by oxidative stress

    Asha Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfiredoxin is a recently discovered member of the oxidoreductases family which plays a crucial role in thiol homoeostasis when under oxidative stress. A myriad of systemic disorders have oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species as the key components in their etiopathogenesis. Recent studies have evaluated the role of this enzyme in oxidative stress mediated diseases such as atherosclerosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a wide array of carcinomas. Its action is responsible for the normal functioning of cells under oxidative stress and the promotion of cell survival in cancerous cells. This review will highlight the cumulative effects of sulfiredoxin in various systemic disorders with a strong emphasis on its target activity and the factors influencing its expression in such conditions.

  11. Myopathic involvement and mitochondrial pathology in Kennedy disease and in other motor neuron diseases.

    Orsucci, D; Rocchi, A; Caldarazzo Ienco, E; Alì, G; LoGerfo, A; Petrozzi, L; Scarpelli, M; Filosto, M; Carlesi, C; Siciliano, G; Bonuccelli, U; Mancuso, M

    2014-01-01

    Kennedy disease (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, or SBMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by a CAG expansion in the androgen-receptor (AR) gene. Increasing evidence shows that SBMA may have a primary myopathic component and that mitochondrial dysfunction may have some role in the pathogenesis of this disease. In this article, we review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) in SBMA, and we present the illustrative case of a patient who presented with increased CK levels and exercise intolerance. Molecular analysis led to definitive diagnosis of SBMA, whereas muscle biopsy showed a mixed myopathic and neurogenic process with "mitochondrial features" and multiple mtDNA deletions, supporting some role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of the myopathic component of Kennedy disease. Furthermore, we briefly review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in two other motor neuron diseases (namely spinal muscular atrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Most likely, in most cases mtDNA does not play a primary role and it is involved subsequently. MtDNA deletions may contribute to the neurodegenerative process, but the exact mechanisms are still unclear. It will be important to develop a better understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in motoneuron diseases, since it may lead to the development of more effective strategies for the treatment of this devastating disorder.

  12. Specific oxidative stress parameters differently correlate with nailfold capillaroscopy changes and organ involvement in systemic sclerosis.

    Riccieri, Valeria; Spadaro, Antonio; Fuksa, Leos; Firuzi, Omidreza; Saso, Luciano; Valesini, Guido

    2008-02-01

    Oxidative stress is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). The aim of the present study was to clarify such a hypothesis by determination of four different plasmatic parameters of oxidative stress, and to define its role in the microvascular damage, assessed by nailfold capillaroscopy (NC). Plasma samples of 18 patients with SSc were analyzed. The biomarkers measured were: total antioxidant capacity, hydroperoxides (ROOHs), and sulfhydryl (SH) and carbonyl (CO) groups. Each patient had a detailed clinical assessment and underwent an NC. The results showed significantly increased ROOHs in SSc patients compared to control group (5.02 +/- 0.24 vs 3.28 +/- 0.19 micromol/l; p capillaroscopy semiquantitative rating scale score (p < 0.05) and with the rating system for avascular areas (p < 0.03). The levels of CO groups inversely correlated with modified Rodnan's skin score (p < 0.039) and were lower in patients with pulmonary fibrosis (p < 0.045), while the levels of SH groups were lower in those presenting gastrointestinal involvement (p < 0.029). The obtained data indicate augmented free radical-mediated injury in SSc and also show correlations among oxidative abnormalities, some clinical findings, and signs of a more severe microvascular involvement. These results give more evidence to the connection between oxidative impairment and SSc.

  13. Acrolein toxicity involves oxidative stress caused by glutathione depletion in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Kwolek-Mirek, M; Bednarska, S; Bartosz, G; Biliński, T

    2009-08-01

    Exposure of yeast cells to allyl alcohol results in intracellular production of acrolein. The toxicity of so formed acrolein involves oxidative stress, as (1) strains deficient in antioxidant defense are hypersensitive to allyl alcohol, (2) exposure to allyl alcohol increases the level of thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances and decreases glutathione level in the cells, (3) hypoxic and anoxic atmosphere and antioxidants protect against allyl alcohol toxicity, and (4) allyl alcohol causes activation of Yap1p. No increased formation of reactive oxygen species was detected in cells exposed to allyl alcohol, so oxidative stress is due to depletion of cellular thiols and thus alteration in the redox state of yeast cells.

  14. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Montemagno, C.D.; Peters, R.W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  15. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Montemagno, C. D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Peters, R. W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-07-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  16. Cortical involvement of marchiafava-bignami disease: a case report

    Jang, Han Won [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease is a rare complication of chronic alcoholism and this malady typically manifests as callosal lesion. I report here on one patient with Marchiafava-bignami disease (MBD) who has symmetric restricted diffusion in both lateral-frontal cortices, in addition to the callosal lesion.

  17. Mechanism of oxidative stress involved in the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles against eukaryotic cells

    M. Saliani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO NPs (zinc oxide nanoparticles has generated significant scientific interest as a novel antibacterial and anticancer agent. Since oxidative stress is a critical determinant of ZnO NPs-induced damage, it is necessary to characterize their underlying mode of action. Different structural and physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs such as particle surface, size, shape, crystal structure, chemical position, and presence of metals can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS (reactive oxygen species production. However, there are some inconsistencies in the literature on the relation between the physicochemical features of ZnO NPs and their plausible oxidative stress mechanism. Herein, the possible oxidative stress mechanism of ZnO NPs was reviewed. This is worthy of further detailed evaluations in order to improve our understanding of vital NPs characteristics governing their toxicity. Therefore, this study focuses on the different reported oxidative stress paradigms induced by ZnO NPs including ROS generated by NPs, oxidative stress due to the NPs-cell interaction, and role of the particle dissolution in the oxidative damage. Also, this study tries to characterize and understand the multiple pathways involved in oxidative stress induced by ZnO NPs. Knowledge about different cellular signaling cascades stimulated by ZnO NPs lead to the better interpretation of the toxic influences induced by the cellular and acellular parameters. Regarding the potential benefits of toxic effects of ZnO NPs, in-depth evaluation of their toxicity mechanism and various effects of these nanoparticles would facilitate their implementation for biomedical applications.

  18. Isolation of microorganisms involved in reduction of crystalline iron(III) oxides in natural environments.

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Aoyagi, Tomo; Itoh, Hideomi; Narihiro, Takashi; Oikawa, Azusa; Suzuki, Kiyofumi; Ogata, Atsushi; Friedrich, Michael W; Conrad, Ralf; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of crystalline Fe(III) oxides is one of the most important electron sinks for organic compound oxidation in natural environments. Yet the limited number of isolates makes it difficult to understand the physiology and ecological impact of the microorganisms involved. Here, two-stage cultivation was implemented to selectively enrich and isolate crystalline iron(III) oxide reducing microorganisms in soils and sediments. Firstly, iron reducers were enriched and other untargeted eutrophs were depleted by 2-years successive culture on a crystalline ferric iron oxide (i.e., goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, or magnetite) as electron acceptor. Fifty-eight out of 136 incubation conditions allowed the continued existence of microorganisms as confirmed by PCR amplification. High-throughput Illumina sequencing and clone library analysis based on 16S rRNA genes revealed that the enrichment cultures on each of the ferric iron oxides contained bacteria belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria (mainly Geobacteraceae), followed by Firmicutes and Chloroflexi, which also comprised most of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified. Venn diagrams indicated that the core OTUs enriched with all of the iron oxides were dominant in the Geobacteraceae while each type of iron oxides supplemented selectively enriched specific OTUs in the other phylogenetic groups. Secondly, 38 enrichment cultures including novel microorganisms were transferred to soluble-iron(III) containing media in order to stimulate the proliferation of the enriched iron reducers. Through extinction dilution-culture and single colony isolation, six strains within the Deltaproteobacteria were finally obtained; five strains belonged to the genus Geobacter and one strain to Pelobacter. The 16S rRNA genes of these isolates were 94.8-98.1% identical in sequence to cultured relatives. All the isolates were able to grow on acetate and ferric iron but their physiological characteristics differed considerably in

  19. For better or worse: Immune system involvement in Alzheimer's Disease

    Emma L. Walton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the Biomedical Journal, we explore the key role of the immune system in the development of Alzheimer's disease. We also learn more about the link between two disorders related to metabolic imbalances, with findings that could help to inform future screening programs. Finally, we would like to highlight some big news for our journal: the Biomedical Journal will be indexed in the Science Citation Index and receive its first official impact factor from this year. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Tau, Immune responses, Subclinical hypothyroidism, Metabolic disease

  20. Nutritional and metabolic diseases involving the nervous system.

    Kopcha, M

    1987-03-01

    This article will discuss eight diseases that alter normal nervous system function: hypovitaminosis A, water deprivation/salt toxicity, ammonia toxicosis, hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, nervous ketosis, hepatoencephalopathy, and rumen metabolic acidosis.

  1. Classifying oxidative stress by F2-isoprostane levels across human diseases: A meta-analysis.

    van 't Erve, Thomas J; Kadiiska, Maria B; London, Stephanie J; Mason, Ronald P

    2017-08-01

    The notion that oxidative stress plays a role in virtually every human disease and environmental exposure has become ingrained in everyday knowledge. However, mounting evidence regarding the lack of specificity of biomarkers traditionally used as indicators of oxidative stress in human disease and exposures now necessitates re-evaluation. To prioritize these re-evaluations, published literature was comprehensively analyzed in a meta-analysis to quantitatively classify the levels of systemic oxidative damage across human disease and in response to environmental exposures. In this meta-analysis, the F 2 -isoprostane, 8-iso-PGF 2α , was specifically chosen as the representative marker of oxidative damage. To combine published values across measurement methods and specimens, the standardized mean differences (Hedges' g) in 8-iso-PGF 2α levels between affected and control populations were calculated. The meta-analysis resulted in a classification of oxidative damage levels as measured by 8-iso-PGF 2α across 50 human health outcomes and exposures from 242 distinct publications. Relatively small increases in 8-iso-PGF 2α levels (ganalysis of published data. This analysis provides knowledge on the true involvement of oxidative damage across human health outcomes as well as utilizes past research to prioritize those conditions requiring further scrutiny on the mechanisms of biomarker generation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Autophagy induction by SIRT6 is involved in oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage

    Jiaxiang Shao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SIRT6 is a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase and has been implicated in the regulation of genomic stability, DNA repair, metabolic homeostasis and several diseases. The effect of SIRT6 in cerebral ischemia and oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD has been reported, however the role of SIRT6 in oxidative stress damage remains unclear. Here we used SH-SY5Y neuronal cells and found that overexpression of SIRT6 led to decreased cell viability and increased necrotic cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS production under oxidative stress. Mechanistic study revealed that SIRT6 induced autophagy via attenuation of AKT signaling and treatment with autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or knockdown of autophagy-related protein Atg5 rescued H2O2-induced neuronal injury. Conversely, SIRT6 inhibition suppressed autophagy and reduced oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage. These results suggest that SIRT6 might be a potential therapeutic target for neuroprotection.

  3. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Hermann, G. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Shaprio, R.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Abdelwahab, I.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  4. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Hermann, G.; Shaprio, R.S.; Abdelwahab, I.F.; Grabowski, G.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  5. Studies involving direct heating of uranium and plutonium oxides by microwaves

    Mallik, G K; Malav, R K; Karande, A P; Bhargava, V K; Kamath, H S [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India). Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility

    1997-08-01

    Nuclear fuel fabrication and recovery of nuclear materials from scraps generated during fabrication involve heating steps like dewaxing, sintering, roasting of scraps, calcination, etc. The dielectric properties of uranium and plutonium oxides place them in the category of materials which are susceptible to absorption of microwaves. The studies were carried out to explore the microwave heating technique for these steps required in nuclear fuel fabrication and scrap recovery laboratories. (author). 1 ref.

  6. Diabetic retinopathy pathogenesis and the ameliorating effects of melatonin; involvement of autophagy, inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Dehdashtian, Ehsan; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Yousefi, Bahman; Hosseinzadeh, Azam; Reiter, Russel J; Safa, Majid; Ghaznavi, Habib; Naseripour, Masood

    2018-01-15

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), remains as one of the major causes of vision loss worldwide. The release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the adhesion of leukocytes to retinal capillaries are initial events in DR development. Inflammation, ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy are major causative factors involved in the pathogenesis of DR. Diabetes associated hyperglycemia leads to mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction culminating in a rise in ROS generation. Since mitochondria are the major source of ROS production, oxidative stress induced by mitochondrial dysfunction also contributes to the development of diabetic retinopathy. Autophagy increases in the retina of diabetic patients and is regulated by ER stress, oxidative stress and inflammation-related pathways. Autophagy functions as a double-edged sword in DR. Under mild stress, autophagic activity can lead to cell survival while during severe stress, dysregulated autophagy results in massive cell death and may have a role in initiation and exacerbation of DR. Melatonin and its metabolites play protective roles against inflammation, ER stress and oxidative stress due to their direct free radical scavenger activities and indirect antioxidant activity via the stimulation antioxidant enzymes including glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase. Melatonin also acts as a cell survival agent by modulating autophagy in various cell types and under different conditions through amelioration of oxidative stress, ER stress and inflammation. Herein, we review the possible effects of melatonin on diabetic retinopathy, focusing on its ability to regulate autophagy processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Matching Diabetes and Alcoholism: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Neurogenesis Are Commonly Involved

    Jorge M. Barcia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and alcohol misuse are two of the major challenges in health systems worldwide. These two diseases finally affect several organs and systems including the central nervous system. Hippocampus is one of the most relevant structures due to neurogenesis and memory-related processing among other functions. The present review focuses on the common profile of diabetes and ethanol exposure in terms of oxidative stress and proinflammatory and prosurvival recruiting transcription factors affecting hippocampal neurogenesis. Some aspects around antioxidant strategies are also included. As a global conclusion, the present review points out some common hits on both diseases giving support to the relations between alcohol intake and diabetes.

  8. Auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism

    Cai, Weiming; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang; Cui, Dayong; Cai, Weiming

    Gravitropism is the asymmetric growth or curvature of plant organs in response to gravistimulation. There is a complex signal transduction cascade which involved in the differential growth of plants in response to changes in the gravity vector. The role of auxin in gravitropism has been demonstrated by many experiments, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. In our studies before, mediation of the gravitropic bending of soybean roots and rice leaf sheath bases by nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins, are induced by auxin. The asymmetrical distribution of nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins resulted from the asymmetrical synthesis of them in bending sites. In soybean roots, inhibitions of NO and cGMP synthesis reduced differential NO and cGMP accumulation respectively, which both of these effects can lead to the reduction of gravitropic bending. Gibberellin-induced OsXET, OsEXPA4 and OsRWC3 were also found involved in the gravitropic bending. These data indicated that auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism. More experiments need to prove the more detailed mechanism of them.

  9. Simultaneous lymph node involvement by Castleman disease and Kaposi sarcoma

    Luciana Wernersbach Pinto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Both multicentric Castleman disease and Kaposi sarcoma are more frequently observed in HIV infected patients. The coexistence of these Human herpesvirus 8 related lesions, in the same tissue, has been observed, but literature reports are scant. On the other hand, the expression of HHV-8-LANA-1 is easily demonstrable by immunohistochemistry. This has been shown to be a powerful tool for the diagnosis of these entities. The aim of this report is to communicate our experience with a case of multicentric Castleman disease occurring in the setting of HIV infection, which demonstrated microscopic Kaposi sarcoma in the same lymph node during the pathological work-up

  10. Maternal periodontal disease is associated with oxidative stress during pregnancy.

    Hickman, M Ashley; Boggess, Kim A; Moss, Kevin L; Beck, James D; Offenbacher, Steven

    2011-03-01

    We sought to determine if maternal periodontal disease is associated with oxidative stress as measured by serum 8-isoprostane. A secondary analysis was conducted using prospective data from the Oral Conditions and Pregnancy Study. Healthy women enrolled at periodontal disease status was categorized as healthy, mild, or moderate to severe by clinical criteria. Maternal serum was analyzed for 8-isoprostane using ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Elevated 8-isoprostane level was defined as ≥ 75th percentile. Maternal factors associated with elevated 8-isoprostane were determined using chi-square or T test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess association between elevated 8-isoprostane and maternal factors. Seven hundred ninety-one women had complete data. Median (interquartile) 8-isoprostane serum level was 1806 (16 to 81,870) pg/dL. Using bivariate analysis, maternal age, race, marital status, utilization of public assistance, and mild or moderate to severe periodontal disease were associated with elevated serum 8-isoprostane. Using logistic regression, moderate to severe periodontal disease (adjusted odds ratio 2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 5.0) remained significantly associated with an elevated serum 8-isoprostane level. Maternal periodontal disease is associated with oxidative stress during pregnancy. Further study is needed to determine the role of maternal oxidative stress in periodontal disease-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  11. The role of oxidative stress in corneal diseases and injuries

    Čejková, Jitka; Čejka, Čestmír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 8 (2015), s. 893-900 ISSN 0213-3911 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S Keywords : Diseased corneas * Immunohistochemistry * Oxidative stress Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.875, year: 2015

  12. Role of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in renal disease

    Heeringa, P; Tervaert, JWC

    Accelerated atherosclerosis is often observed in patients with chronic renal failure. In the present review we summarize and discuss the recent literature on the pathogenic role of low-density lipoproteins modified by oxidative processes in atherosclerosis and the possible role in renal diseases.

  13. Dietary Phytochemicals: Natural Swords Combating Inflammation and Oxidation-Mediated Degenerative Diseases.

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Solayman, Md; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe. Phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenes) from natural products such as dietary fruits, vegetables, and spices are potential sources of alternative medications to attenuate the oxidative stress and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Based on in vitro , in vivo , and clinical trials, some of these active compounds have shown good promise for development into novel agents for treating RA, DM, and CVD by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. In this review, phytochemicals from natural products with the potential of ameliorating degenerative disease involving the bone, metabolism, and the heart are described.

  14. Dietary Phytochemicals: Natural Swords Combating Inflammation and Oxidation-Mediated Degenerative Diseases

    Md. Asiful Islam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, diabetes mellitus (DM, and cardiovascular disease (CVD. Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe. Phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenes from natural products such as dietary fruits, vegetables, and spices are potential sources of alternative medications to attenuate the oxidative stress and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Based on in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials, some of these active compounds have shown good promise for development into novel agents for treating RA, DM, and CVD by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. In this review, phytochemicals from natural products with the potential of ameliorating degenerative disease involving the bone, metabolism, and the heart are described.

  15. Autophagy-Related Deubiquitinating Enzymes Involved in Health and Disease

    El Magraoui, Fouzi; Reidick, Christina; Meyer, Hemut E.; Platta, Harald W.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that delivers diverse cytoplasmic components to the lysosomal compartment for either recycling or degradation. This involves the removal of protein aggregates, the turnover of organelles, as well as the elimination of intracellular pathogens. In this situation, when only specific cargoes should be targeted to the lysosome, the potential targets can be selectively marked by the attachment of ubiquitin in order to be recognized by autophagy-recep...

  16. Glucocerebrosidase involvement in Parkinson Disease and other Synucleinopathies

    Maria Rosario Almeida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the both copies (homozygous or compound heterozygous of the gene encoding the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which cleaves the glycolipid glucocerebroside into glucose and ceramide causes Gaucher Disease. However, multiple independent studies have also reported an association between GBA mutations and Parkinsonism with an increased frequency of heterozygous GBA mutations in various cohorts of patients with parkinsonism and other Lewy body disorders. Furthermore, GBA mutation carriers exhibit diverse parkinsonian phenotypes and present a diffuse pattern of Lewy body distribution in the cerebral cortex. This review provides an overview of the genetic basis for this association in various diseases with dysfunction of the central nervous system in which affected individuals developed Parkinsonian symptoms. The emerging clinical, pathological and genetic studies in neuronal synucleinopathies suggest a common underlying mechanism in the etiology of these neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Imaging of pulmonary involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases

    Matcovschi, S.; Volcovschi, E.; Obada, A.; Cuciuc, S.

    2007-01-01

    Conjunctive tissue pathology obtains special aspect, by affecting most workable contingent - young and middle-age persons. In clinical practice special value has early diagnostic of these processes that permits to use in time adequate methods of treatment. In connection with appearance of new methods of imaging diagnostic, appears necessity of estimation of its diagnostic possibilities with main aim to optimize early diagnostic of these diseases. (authors)

  18. Autoimmune Disease with Cardiac Valves Involvement: Libman-Sacks Endocarditis.

    Ginanjar, Eka; Yulianto, Yulianto

    2017-04-01

    This case study aim to evaluate the response of steroid treatment for autoimmune endocarditis. Valvular heart disease is relatively rising in both congenital and acquired cases, but the autoimmune endocarditis remains rare. In this case, a 34 year old woman with clinical manifestation resembling systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is diagnosed with Libman-sacks Endocarditis. After six months of steroid treatment, her clinical manifestations and heart structure improved.

  19. Oxidative stress drivers and modulators in obesity and cardiovascular disease: from biomarkers to therapeutic approach.

    Santilli, F; Guagnano, M T; Vazzana, N; La Barba, S; Davi, G

    2015-01-01

    This review article is intended to describe how oxidative stress regulates cardiovascular disease development and progression. Epigenetic mechanisms related to oxidative stress, as well as more reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress, are emerging over the last years as potentially useful tools to design therapeutic approaches aimed at modulating enhanced oxidative stress "in vivo", thereby mitigating the consequent atherosclerotic burden. As a paradigm, we describe the case of obesity, in which the intertwining among oxidative stress, due to caloric overload, chronic low-grade inflammation induced by adipose tissue dysfunction, and platelet activation represents a vicious cycle favoring the progression of atherothrombosis. Oxidative stress is a major player in the pathobiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS)- dependent signaling pathways prompt transcriptional and epigenetic dysregulation, inducing chronic low-grade inflammation, platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, several oxidative biomarkers have been proposed with the potential to improve current understanding of the mechanisms underlying CVD. These include ROS-generating and/or quenching molecules, and ROS-modified compounds, such as F2-isoprostanes. There is also increasing evidence that noncoding micro- RNA (mi-RNA) are critically involved in post- transcriptional regulation of cell functions, including ROS generation, inflammation, regulation of cell proliferation, adipocyte differentiation, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These molecules have promising translational potential as both markers of disease and site of targeted interventions. Finally, oxidative stress is a critical target of several cardioprotective drugs and nutraceuticals, including antidiabetic agents, statins, renin-angiotensin system blockers, polyphenols and other antioxidants. Further understanding of ROS-generating mechanisms, their biological role as well as potential therapeutic

  20. Sporotrichosis with Bone Involvement: An Alert to an Occupational Disease

    Felipe de Carvalho Aguinaga

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic mycosis caused by a fungus of the genus Sporothrix, which is found in soil. It can be acquired by trauma to the skin. Bone and joint lesions are very rare. The city of Rio de Janeiro is undergoing an epidemic transmitted by cats, and this should be an alert for the risk to professionals in contact with these animals. The patient was a veterinarian who developed occupational sporotrichosis with osteoarticular involvement transmitted by a cat during a consultation.

  1. Oxidative conditions prevail in severe IUGR with vascular disease and Doppler anomalies.

    Maisonneuve, Emeline; Delvin, Edgard; Edgard, Annie; Morin, Lucie; Dubé, Johanne; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Moutquin, Jean-Marie; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Klam, Stephanie; Levy, Emile; Leduc, Line

    2015-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and prenatal exposure to oxidative stress are thought to lead to increased risks of cardiovascular disease later in life. The objective of the present study was to document whether cord blood oxidative stress biomarkers vary with the severity of IUGR and of vascular disease in the twin pregnancy model in which both fetuses share the same maternal environment. This prospective cohort study involved dichorionic twin pairs, with one co-twin with IUGR. Oxidative stress biomarkers were measured in venous cord blood samples from each neonate of 32 twin pairs, and compared, according to severity of IUGR (IUGR <5th percentile), Doppler anomalies of the umbilical artery and early onset IUGR (in the second trimester) of the growth restricted twin. Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) and Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were increased proportionally in cases of severe IUGR. OxLDL concentrations were also increased in cases of IUGR with Doppler anomaly. Our data indicate that severe IUGR, is related to a derangement in redox balance, illustrated by increased venous cord blood oxidative stress biomarkers concentrations. Severe IUGR and IUGR with abnormal Doppler can be translated into conditions with intense oxidative stress.

  2. Vitamin D endocrine system involvement in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Pizzorni, Carmen; Sulli, Alberto

    2011-12-01

    Vitamin D is synthesized from cholesterol in the skin (80-90%) under the sunlight and then metabolized into an active D hormone in liver, kidney and peripheral immune/inflammatory cells. These endocrine-immune effects include also the coordinated activities of the vitamin D-activating enzyme, 1alpha-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) on cells of the immune system in mediating intracrine and paracrine actions. Vitamin D is implicated in prevention and protection from chronic infections (i.e. tubercolosis), cancer (i.e. breast cancer) and autoimmune rheumatic diseases since regulates both innate and adaptive immunity potentiating the innate response (monocytes/macrophages with antimicrobial activity and antigen presentation), but suppressing the adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocyte functions). Vitamin D has modulatory effects on B lymphocytes and Ig production and recent reports have demonstrated that 1,25(OH)2D3 does indeed exert direct effects on B cell homeostasis. A circannual rhythm of trough vitamin D levels in winter and peaks in summer time showed negative correlation with clinical status at least in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, the onset of symptoms of early arthritis during winter or spring have been associated with greater radiographic evidence of disease progression at 12 months possibly are also related to seasonal lower vitamin D serum levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset

    Valcárcel-Ocete, Leire; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Iriondo, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    age (motor AO or mAO). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample......Age of onset (AO) of Huntington disease (HD) is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp) in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim...... of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO), and the first motor symptoms...

  4. Glial hemichannels and their involvement in aging and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Orellana, Juan A; von Bernhardi, Rommy; Giaume, Christian; Sáez, Juan C

    2012-01-26

    During the last two decades, it became increasingly evident that glial cells accomplish a more important role in brain function than previously thought. Glial cells express pannexins and connexins, which are member subunits of two protein families that form membrane channels termed hemichannels. These channels communicate intra- and extracellular compartments and allow the release of autocrine/paracrine signaling molecules [e.g., adenosine triphosphate (ATP), glutamate, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and prostaglandin E2] to the extracellular milieu, as well as the uptake of small molecules (e.g., glucose). An increasing body of evidence has situated glial hemichannels as potential regulators of the beginning and maintenance of homeostatic imbalances observed in diverse brain diseases. Here, we review and discuss the current evidence about the possible role of glial hemichannels on neurodegenerative diseases. A subthreshold pathological threatening condition leads to microglial activation, which keeps active defense and restores the normal function of the central nervous system. However, if the stimulus is deleterious, microglial cells and the endothelium become overactivated, both releasing bioactive molecules (e.g., glutamate, cytokines, prostaglandins, and ATP), which increase the activity of glial hemichannels, reducing the astroglial neuroprotective functions, and further reducing neuronal viability. Because ATP and glutamate are released via glial hemichannels in neurodegenerative conditions, it is expected that they contribute to neurotoxicity. More importantly, toxic molecules released via glial hemichannels could increase the Ca2+ entry in neurons also via neuronal hemichannels, leading to neuronal death. Therefore, blockade of hemichannels expressed by glial cells and/or neurons during neuroinflammation might prevent neurodegeneration.

  5. Cadmium-induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in rainbow trout hepatocytes: involvement of oxidative stress

    Risso-de Faverney, C.; Orsini, N.; Sousa, G. de; Rahmani, R.

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in trout hepatocytes. We therefore investigated the involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in the initiation of apoptosis and the possible role of oxidative stress in that process. This study demonstrates that hepatocyte exposure to Cd (2, 5 and 10 μM) triggers significant caspase-3, but also caspase-8 and -9 activation in a dose-dependent manner. Western-blot analysis of hepatocyte mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions revealed that cytochrome c (Cyt c) was released in the cytosol in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was redistributed to mitochondria after 24 and 48 h exposure. We also found that the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL, known to be regulated under mild oxidative stress to protect cells from apoptosis, did not change after 3 and 6 h exposure to Cd, then increased after 24 and 48 h exposure to 10 μM Cd. In the second part of this work, two antioxidant agents, 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl (TEMPO) (100 μM) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 100 μM) were used to determine the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Cd-induced apoptosis. Simultaneously exposing trout hepatocytes to Cd and TEMPO or NAC significantly reduced caspase-3 activation after 48 h and had a suppressive effect on caspase-8 and -9 also, mostly after 24 h. Lastly, the presence of either one of these antioxidants in the treatment medium also attenuated Cd-induced Cyt c release in cytosol and the level of Bax in the mitochondria after 24 and 48 h, while high Bcl-xL expression was observed. Taken together, these data clearly evidenced the key role of mitochondria in the cascade of events leading to trout hepatocyte apoptosis in response to Cd and the relationship that exists between oxidative stress and cell death

  6. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    T.I. Omotayo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump.

  7. Ethical issues in Alzheimer's disease research involving human subjects.

    Davis, Dena S

    2017-12-01

    As we aggressively pursue research to cure and prevent Alzheimer's disease, we encounter important ethical challenges. None of these challenges, if handled thoughtfully, would pose insurmountable barriers to research. But if they are ignored, they could slow the research process, alienate potential study subjects and do damage to research recruits and others. These challenges are (1) the necessity of very large cohorts of research subjects, recruited for lengthy studies, probably ending only in the subjects' death; (2) the creation of cohorts of 'study ready' volunteers, many of whom will be competent to consent at the beginning of the process, but move into cognitive impairment later; (3) reliance on adaptive trial design, creating challenges for informed consent, equipoise and justice; (4) the use of biomarkers and predictive tests that describe risk rather than certainty, and that can threaten participants' welfare if the information is obtained by insurance companies or long-term care providers; (5) the use of study partners that creates unique risks of harm to the relationship of subject and study partner. We need greater attention, at all levels, to these complex ethical issues. Work on these issues should be included in research plans, from the federal to the local, and should be supported through NIH in the same way that it supported work on the ethical, legal and social implications of genetic research. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Involvement of central airways in vibroacoustic disease patients

    José Reis Ferreira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD is the whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. For the past 25 years, it has been know that low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz, including infrasound targets the respiratory system. In LFN-exposed rodents, the morphological changes of respiratory tract tissue partially explained some respiratory symptoms reported by VAD patients. However, many questions remain unanswered. Recently, some volunteer VAD patients underwent bronchoscopy in order to ascertain possible damage that could be associated with their respiratory complaints. Methods. Fourteen fully-informed and volunteer VAD patients were submitted to bronchoscopy, and biopsies were removed for analysis. Results. All patients exhibited small submucosal vascular-like lesions near the spurs, consisting of increased collagen and elastin fibres. Histology disclosed cilliary abnormalities, basal membrane hyperplasia, and thickening of vessel walls. In five patients, collagen bundles appeared degenerative and disrupted. No inflammatory process was ever identified, and no differences were seen between smokers and non-smokers. Discussion. Data is in accordance with what was observed in LFN-exposed animal models and also in 8 VAD patients who developed lung tumours. Collagen disruption and degeneration was also observed in electron microscopy images of the respiratory tract of LFN-exposed rodents. Thickened blood and lymphatic vessel walls have been consistently seen in images of VAD patients and of LFN-exposed rodents. During bronchoscopy performed by other reasons, this sort of structural aspects is not frequently seen. Taken together, it is strongly suggested that these findings could be VAD-specific. Resumo: Nos últimos vinte cinco anos constatou-se que o aparelho respiratório constitui um alvo do ruído de baixa frequência (RFB <500Hz, incluindo infra-sons. Denomina-se doença vibroacústica (VAD a patologia sistémica causada pela

  9. Oxidative Stress in Kidney Diseases: The Cause or the Consequence?

    Krata, Natalia; Zagożdżon, Radosław; Foroncewicz, Bartosz; Mucha, Krzysztof

    2018-06-01

    Exaggerated oxidative stress (OS) is usually considered as a disturbance in regular function of an organism. The excessive levels of OS mediators may lead to major damage within the organism's cells and tissues. Therefore, the OS-associated biomarkers may be considered as new diagnostic tools of various diseases. In nephrology, researchers are looking for alternative methods replacing the renal biopsy in patients with suspicion of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Currently, CKD is a frequent health problem in world population, which can lead to progressive loss of kidney function and eventually to end-stage renal disease. The course of CKD depends on the primary disease. It is assumed that one of the factors influencing the course of CKD might be OS. In the current work, we review whether monitoring the OS-associated biomarkers in nephrology patients can support the decision-making process regarding diagnosis, prognostication and treatment initiation.

  10. Oxidative Stress, Synaptic Dysfunction, and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Tönnies, Eric; Trushina, Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder without a cure. Most AD cases are sporadic where age represents the greatest risk factor. Lack of understanding of the disease mechanism hinders the development of efficacious therapeutic approaches. The loss of synapses in the affected brain regions correlates best with cognitive impairment in AD patients and has been considered as the early mechanism that precedes neuronal loss. Oxidative stress has been recognized as a contributing factor in aging and in the progression of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with age- and disease-dependent loss of mitochondrial function, altered metal homeostasis, and reduced antioxidant defense directly affect synaptic activity and neurotransmission in neurons leading to cognitive dysfunction. In addition, molecular targets affected by ROS include nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, lipids, proteins, calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial dynamics and function, cellular architecture, receptor trafficking and endocytosis, and energy homeostasis. Abnormal cellular metabolism in turn could affect the production and accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, which independently could exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS production, thereby contributing to a vicious cycle. While mounting evidence implicates ROS in the AD etiology, clinical trials with antioxidant therapies have not produced consistent results. In this review, we will discuss the role of oxidative stress in synaptic dysfunction in AD, innovative therapeutic strategies evolved based on a better understanding of the complexity of molecular mechanisms of AD, and the dual role ROS play in health and disease.

  11. Implication of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming of Cardiovascular Disease

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; Ramiro-Cortijo, David; Reyes-Hernández, Cynthia G.; López de Pablo, Angel L.; González, M. Carmen; Arribas, Silvia M.

    2018-01-01

    Lifestyle and genetic background are well known risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A third contributing factor is suboptimal fetal development, due to nutrient or oxygen deprivation, placental insufficiency, or exposure to toxic substances. The fetus adapts to adverse intrauterine conditions to ensure survival; the immediate consequence is low birth weight (LBW) and the long-term effect is an increased susceptibility to develop CVD in adult life. This process is known as Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) or fetal programming of CVD. The influence of fetal life for the future cardiovascular health of the individual has been evidenced by numerous epidemiologic studies in populations suffering from starvation during intrauterine life. Furthermore, experimental animal models have provided support and enabled exploring the underlying mechanisms. Oxidative stress seems to play a central role in fetal programming of CVD, both in the response of the feto-placental unit to the suboptimal intrauterine environment and in the alterations of physiologic systems of cardiovascular control, ultimately leading to disease. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on the alterations in oxidative balance in response to fetal stress factors covering two aspects. Firstly, the evidence from human studies of the implication of oxidative stress in LBW induced by suboptimal conditions during intrauterine life, emphasizing the role of the placenta. In the second part we summarize data on specific redox alterations in key cardiovascular control organs induced by exposure to known stress factors in experimental animals and discuss the emerging role of the mitochondria. PMID:29875698

  12. Effect of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Adults at Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review

    Jenni Suen; Jolene Thomas; Amelia Kranz; Simon Vun; Michelle Miller

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory processes initiate the first stage of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Flavonoid consumption has been related to significantly improved flow-mediated dilation and blood pressure. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms are thought to be involved. The effect of flavonoids on markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, in at risk individuals is yet to be reviewed. Systematic literature searches were conducted in MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and SC...

  13. Selective inhibition of extracellular oxidants liberated from human neutrophils--A new mechanism potentially involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of hydroxychloroquine.

    Jančinová, Viera; Pažoureková, Silvia; Lucová, Marianna; Perečko, Tomáš; Mihalová, Danica; Bauerová, Katarína; Nosáľ, Radomír; Drábiková, Katarína

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxychloroquine is used in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis or lupus erythematosus. Although these diseases are often accompanied by activation of neutrophils, there are still few data relating to the impact of hydroxychloroquine on these cells. We investigated the effect of orally administered hydroxychloroquine on neutrophil oxidative burst in rats with adjuvant arthritis. In human neutrophils, extra- and intracellular formation of oxidants, mobilisation of intracellular calcium and the phosphorylation of proteins regulating NADPH oxidase assembly were analysed. Administration of hydroxychloroquine decreased the concentration of oxidants in blood of arthritic rats. The inhibition was comparable with the reference drug methotrexate, yet it was not accompanied by a reduction in neutrophil count. When both drugs were co-applied, the effect became more pronounced. In isolated human neutrophils, treatment with hydroxychloroquine resulted in reduced mobilisation of intracellular calcium, diminished concentration of external oxidants and in decreased phosphorylation of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C isoforms PKCα and PKCβII, which regulate activation of NADPH oxidase on plasma membrane. On the other hand, no reduction was observed in intracellular oxidants or in the phosphorylation of p40(phox) and PKCδ, two proteins directing the oxidase assembly to intracellular membranes. Hydroxychloroquine reduced neutrophil-derived oxidants potentially involved in tissue damage and protected those capable to suppress inflammation. The observed effects may represent a new mechanism involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of this drug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative stress in sickle cell disease; pathophysiology and potential implications for disease management.

    Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; Otten, Hans-Martin; Brandjes, Dees P; Schnog, John-John B

    2011-06-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hemoglobinopathy characterized by hemolytic anemia, increased susceptibility to infections and vaso-occlusion leading to a reduced quality of life and life expectancy. Oxidative stress is an important feature of SCD and plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of hemolysis, vaso-occlusion and ensuing organ damage in sickle cell patients. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the (end-)products of their oxidative reactions are potential markers of disease severity and could be targets for antioxidant therapies. This review will summarize the role of ROS in SCD and their potential implication for SCD management. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Oxidative stress induced damage in benign and malignant breast diseases: histopathological and biochemical aspects

    Seema Khanna

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidences indicate involvement of free radicals in the pathogenesis of benign and malignant breast diseases. Free radicals are highly reactive molecules and react with non–radicals in chain reaction leading to formation of new free radicals. If the defense mechanism of body fails to combat them, these free radicals pose a threat of injuring tissues by reacting with cell lipids. Lipids in the cell membrane undergo degradation to form hydroperoxides, which decompose to form a variety of products including malondialdehyde (MDA. MDA therefore was used as a marker to assess oxidative damage of cells and tissues. The aim of the present study was to assess the status of oxidative stress in the patients of benign and malignant breast diseases. Study has been made on the blood samples of 25 cases of benign breast disease and on an equal number of breast carcinoma patients. 20 healthy subjects were taken as the control cases.Mean MDA levels were significantly raised with depletion of antioxidant activity in all the patients in comparison to their control group suggesting the role of oxidative damage in the aetiopathogenesis of disease.

  16. Oxidized cholesterol as the driving force behind the development of Alzheimer’s disease

    Paola eGamba

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common neurodegenerative disorder associated with dementia, is typified by the pathological accumulation of amyloid β peptides and neurofibrillary tangles within the brain. Considerable evidence indicates that many events contribute to AD progression, including oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered cholesterol metabolism.The brain’s high lipid content makes it particularly vulnerable to oxidative species, with the consequent enhancement of lipid peroxidation and cholesterol oxidation, and the subsequent formation of end products, mainly 4-hydroxynonenal and oxysterols, respectively from the two processes. The chronic inflammatory events observed in the AD brain include activation of microglia and astrocytes, together with enhancement of inflammatory molecule and free radical release. Along with glial cells, neurons themselves have been found to contribute to neuroinflammation in the AD brain, by serving as sources of inflammatory mediators. Oxidative stress is intimately associated with neuroinflammation, and a vicious circle has been found to connect oxidative stress and inflammation in AD. Alongside oxidative stress and inflammation, altered cholesterol metabolism and hypercholesterolemia also significantly contribute to neuronal damage and to progression of AD. Increasing evidence is now consolidating the hypothesis that oxidized cholesterol is the driving force behind the development of AD, and that oxysterols are the link connecting the disease to altered cholesterol metabolism in the brain and hypercholesterolemia; this is because of the ability of oxysterols, unlike cholesterol, to cross the blood brain barrier. The key role of oxysterols in AD pathogenesis has been strongly supported by research pointing to their involvement in modulating neuroinflammation, Aβ accumulation, and cell death.This review highlights the key role played by cholesterol and oxysterols in the brain in AD pathogenesis.

  17. Toxicological and pharmacological concerns on oxidative stress and related diseases

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh [Medicinal Plants Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417614411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad@TUMS.Ac.Ir [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417614411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are generated as the natural byproduct of normal oxygen metabolism, they can create oxidative damage via interaction with bio-molecules. The role of oxidative stress as a remarkable upstream part is frequently reported in the signaling cascade of inflammation as well as chemo attractant production. Even though hydrogen peroxide can control cell signaling and stimulate cell proliferation at low levels, in higher concentrations it can initiate apoptosis and in very high levels may create necrosis. So far, the role of ROS in cellular damage and death is well documented with implicating in a broad range of degenerative alterations e.g. carcinogenesis, aging and other oxidative stress related diseases (OSRDs). Reversely, it is cleared that antioxidants are potentially able to suppress (at least in part) the immune system and to enhance the normal cellular protective responses to tissue damage. In this review, we aimed to provide insights on diverse OSRDs, which are correlated with the concept of oxidative stress as well as its cellular effects that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Resveratrol, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, nebivolol and carvedilol, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, and plant-derived drugs (alone or combined) are the potential medicines that can be used to control OSRD.

  18. Resveratrol Ameliorates Experimental Alcoholic Liver Disease by Modulating Oxidative Stress

    He Peiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effects of resveratrol in alcoholic liver disease (ALD. Alcohol was administered to healthy female rats starting from 6% (v/v and gradually increased to 20% (v/v by the fifth week. After 16 weeks of intervention, liver enzymes (aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and alanine aminotransferase [ALT] were analyzed using a chemistry analyzer, while hepatic antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress markers, and caspase 3 activity were assessed using ELISA kits. Furthermore, hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels and mRNA levels of antioxidant and inflammation-related genes were determined using western blotting and RT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that resveratrol significantly attenuated alcohol-induced elevation of liver enzymes and improved hepatic antioxidant enzymes. Resveratrol also attenuated alcohol-induced CYP2E1 increase, oxidative stress, and apoptosis (caspase 3 activity. Moreover, genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation were regulated by resveratrol supplementation. Taken together, the results suggested that resveratrol alleviated ALD through regulation of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation, which was mediated at the transcriptional level. The data suggests that resveratrol is a promising natural therapeutic agent against chronic ALD.

  19. Toxicological and pharmacological concerns on oxidative stress and related diseases

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are generated as the natural byproduct of normal oxygen metabolism, they can create oxidative damage via interaction with bio-molecules. The role of oxidative stress as a remarkable upstream part is frequently reported in the signaling cascade of inflammation as well as chemo attractant production. Even though hydrogen peroxide can control cell signaling and stimulate cell proliferation at low levels, in higher concentrations it can initiate apoptosis and in very high levels may create necrosis. So far, the role of ROS in cellular damage and death is well documented with implicating in a broad range of degenerative alterations e.g. carcinogenesis, aging and other oxidative stress related diseases (OSRDs). Reversely, it is cleared that antioxidants are potentially able to suppress (at least in part) the immune system and to enhance the normal cellular protective responses to tissue damage. In this review, we aimed to provide insights on diverse OSRDs, which are correlated with the concept of oxidative stress as well as its cellular effects that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Resveratrol, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, nebivolol and carvedilol, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, and plant-derived drugs (alone or combined) are the potential medicines that can be used to control OSRD

  20. Involvement of oxidative stress in 4-vinylcyclohexene-induced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Abolaji, Amos Olalekan; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Lugokenski, Thiago Henrique; Nascimento, Thallita Kalar; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; Farombi, Ebenezer Olatunde; Loreto, Élgion Lúcio da Silva; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira

    2014-06-01

    4-Vinylcyclohexene (VCH) is a dimer of 1,3-butadiene produced as a by-product of pesticides, plastic, rubber, flame retardants, and tire production. Although, several studies have reported the ovotoxicity of VCH, information on a possible involvement of oxidative stress in the toxicity of this occupational chemical is scarce. Hence, this study was carried out to investigate further possible mechanisms of toxicity of VCH with a specific emphasis on oxidative stress using a Drosophila melanogaster model. D. melanogaster (both genders) of 1 to 3 days old were exposed to different concentrations of VCH (10 µM-1 mM) in the diet for 5 days. Subsequently, the survival and negative geotaxis assays and the quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were determined. In addition, we evaluated RT-PCR expressions of selected oxidative stress and antioxidant mRNA genes (HSP27, 70, and 83, SOD, Nrf-2, MAPK2, and catalase). Furthermore, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), delta aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA-D), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. VCH exposure impaired negative geotaxic behavior and induced the mRNA of SOD, Nrf-2, and MAPK2 genes expressions. There were increases in catalase and ROS production, as well as inhibitions of GST, δ-ALA-D, and AChE activities (Pbalance, and possible neurotoxic consequences due to decreased AChE activity, and impairments in negative geotaxic behavior. Thus, we conclude that D. melanogaster is a useful model for investigating the toxicity of VCH exposure, and here, we have provided further insights on the mechanism of VCH-induced toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating nitric oxide signalling involvement in the antidepressant action of ketamine

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA-R’s) may underlie a primary mechanism in the physiology that leads to depression, and ketamine, an NMDA-R antagonist, has been shown to rapidly relieve depression in humans. A number of downstream mechanisms...... have been suggested to mediate the antidepressant action of ketamine, including the activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (or Akt) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). However, the mechanism(s) that are affected immediately downstream of NMDA......-R’s remain unclear. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is directly coupled to and activated by NMDA-R’s, and the uncoupling of the nNOS-NMDA-R complex prevents NMDA-R-mediated excitotoxicity. Therefore, we investigated whether the antidepressant mechanism of ketamine involves the inhibition of nitric...

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  4. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    Paola Massi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  5. Oxidative stress may be involved in distant organ failure in tourniquet shock model mice.

    Nishikata, Rie; Kato, Naho; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2014-03-01

    Crush syndrome is characterized by prolonged shock resulting from extensive muscle damage and multiple organ failure. However, the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure has not yet been completely elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the molecular biological and histopathological aspects of distant organ injury in crush syndrome by using tourniquet shock model mice. DNA microarray analysis of the soleus muscle showed an increase in the mRNA levels of Cox-2, Hsp70, c-fos, and IL-6, at 3h after ischemia/reperfusion injury at the lower extremity. In vivo staining with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) showed edema and degeneration in the soleus muscle, but no change in the distant organs. Immunohistological staining of the HSP70 protein revealed nuclear translocation in the soleus muscle, kidney, liver, and lung. The c-fos mRNA levels were elevated in the soleus muscle, kidney, and liver, displaying nuclear translocation of c-FOS protein. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) analysis suggested the involvement of apoptosis in ischemia/reperfusion injury in the soleus muscle. Apoptotic cells were not found in greater quantities in the kidney. Oxidative stress, as determined using a free radical elective evaluator (d-ROM test), markedly increased after ischemia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, examination of immunohistological changes and determination of oxidative stress are proposed to be useful in evaluating the extent of tourniquet shock, even before changes are observed by HE staining. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of nitric oxide in granisetron improving effect on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice.

    Javadi-Paydar, Mehrak; Zakeri, Marjan; Norouzi, Abbas; Rastegar, Hossein; Mirazi, Naser; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-06

    Granisetron, a serotonin 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, widely used as an antiemetic drug following chemotherapy, has been found to improve learning and memory. In this study, effects of granisetron on spatial recognition memory and fear memory and the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) have been determined in a Y-maze and passive avoidance test. Granisetron (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to scopolamine-induced memory-impaired mice prior to acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases, either in the presence or in the absence of a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, l-NAME (3, 10mg/kg, intraperitoneally); a specific inducible NO synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); and a NO precursor, l-arginine (750 mg/kg). It is demonstrated that granisetron improved memory acquisition in a dose-dependent manner, but it was ineffective on consolidation and retrieval phases of memory. The beneficial effect of granisetron (10mg/kg) on memory acquisition was significantly reversed by l-NAME (10mg/kg) and aminoguanidine (100mg/kg); however, l-arginine (750 mg/kg) did not potentiate the effect of sub-effective dose of granisetron (3mg/kg) in memory acquisition phase. It is concluded that nitric oxide is probably involved in improvement of memory acquisition by granisetron in both spatial recognition memory and fear memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled The Cognitive Neuroscience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nitric oxide as a potential biomarker in inflammatory bowel disease

    Nesina Avdagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate changes in serum nitric oxide (NO concentration in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD patients and its use as potential biomarker in differential diagnosis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn's disease (CD and in disease activity assessment. In 60 patients of both genders - 30 with ulcerative colitis and 30 with Crohn's disease - and 30 controls serum nitric oxide concentration was determined by measuring nitrite concentration, a stable metabolic product of NO with oxygen. Conversion of nitrates (NO3- to nitrites (NO2- was done with elementary zinc. The nitrite concentration was determined by classic colorimetrical Griess reaction. Median serum NO concentration was statistically different (p=0,0005 between UC patients (15.25 µmol/L; 13.47 - 19.88 µmol/L, CD patients (14.54 µmol/L; 13.03 -16.32 µmol/L and healthy controls (13.29 µmol/L; 12.40 - 13.92 µmol/L. When active UC and CD patients were compared with inactive UC and CD patients respectively a significant difference in serum NO level was found (p=0.0005. With a cut-off level of 17.39 µmol/L NO had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% in discriminating between active and inactive UC patients. With cut-off value of 14.01 µmol/L serum NO level had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 69% in distinguishing between patients with active CD and inactive CD. Serum NO concentration is a minimally invasive and rapid tool for discriminating between active and inactive IBD patients and could be used as useful biomarker in monitoring of disease activity in IBD patients.

  8. Determination of dehydrogenase activities involved in D-glucose oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter strains

    Florencia Sainz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria (AAB are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane bound dehydrogenases (membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH, D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains. Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites (GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the A. malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h, which coincided with glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of G. oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition.Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter were

  9. Nitric Oxide Manipulation: A Therapeutic Target for Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    Gareth Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Risk factor modification and endovascular and surgical revascularisation are the main treatment options at present. However, a significant number of patients still require major amputation. There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO and its endogenous inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA play significant roles in the pathophysiology of PAD. This paper reviews experimental work implicating the ADMA-DDAH-NO pathway in PAD, focussing on both the vascular dysfunction and effects within the ischaemic muscle, and examines the potential of manipulating this pathway as a novel adjunct therapy in PAD.

  10. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    Colucci, Roberta; Dragoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss. In this scenario, associated thyroid autoimmunity might play an active and important role in triggering and maintaining the depigmentation process of vitiligo. PMID:25838868

  11. Proteomic Insights into the Protective Mechanisms of an In Vitro Oxidative Stress Model of Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    Bauereis, Brian; Haskins, William E.; LeBaron, Richard G.; Renthal, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) models suggest that early events along the path to neurodegeneration involve activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), and the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, in both the sporadic and familial forms of the disease, and thus ER stress may be a common feature. Furthermore, impairments in protein degradation have been linked to oxidative stress as well as pathways associated wit...

  12. Nodal involvement in Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma assessed by magnetic resonance

    Tesoro Tess, J.D.; Balzarini, L.; Ceglia, E.; Petrillo, R.; Musumeci, R.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) demonstrates a good capability in distinguishing nodal involvement in hodgkin disease and nonhodgkin lymphoma both in the chest and in the retroperitoneal areas the initial presentation of the disease. However CT and lymphangiography demonstrated comparable or superior values of accuracy and sensitivity. (H.W.) 4 refs.; 2 tabs

  13. Chemical and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by Diplodia species, fungi involved in forest plants diseases

    Masi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, numerous studies have been initiated in order to understand what are the microorganisms involved in forest plants diseases and the role played by phytotoxins produced in the pathogenesis processes. The aim of the present thesis was to study the fungi and the phytotoxins associated with canker disease of the Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L.) and the branch dieback of juniper (Juniperus phoenicea L.) which are plant diseases with noteworthy social and economical impli...

  14. Lipid Involvement in Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Motor System: Insights from Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    Dodge, James C

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic diseases that are frequently triggered by the accumulation of lipids inside organelles of the endosomal-autophagic-lysosomal system (EALS). There is now a growing realization that disrupted lysosomal homeostasis (i.e., lysosomal cacostasis) also contributes to more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease (PD). Lipid deposition within the EALS may also participate in the pathogenesis of some additional neurodegenerative diseases of the motor system. Here, I will highlight the lipid abnormalities and clinical manifestations that are common to LSDs and several diseases of the motor system, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), atypical forms of spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), PD and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Elucidating the underlying basis of intracellular lipid mislocalization as well as its consequences in each of these disorders will likely provide innovative targets for therapeutic research.

  15. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs.-host disease

    McDonald, G.B.; Sullivan, K.M.; Plumley, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder

  16. Tumefactive immunoglobulin G4-related disease involving the dura mater: A case report and literature review

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Ji Hoon; Ko, Yong; Paik, Seoung Sam; Lee, Young Jun; Park, Dong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a well-known disorder characterized by an inflammatory reaction with an increase in the number of IgG4-positive plasma cells associated with sclerosis. IgG4-related disease often affects the dura mater with a pattern of diffuse thickening when the central nervous system is involved. However, some nodular dural thickening requires discrimination from tumors because of obviously different treatment options. We report of a case of IgG4-related disease with tumefactive dural involvement

  17. Exhaled nitric oxide in diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases

    Abba Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of biomarkers in exhaled breath constituents has recently become of great interest in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of many respiratory conditions. Of particular interest is the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO in breath. Its measurement is noninvasive, easy and reproducible. The technique has recently been standardized by both American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society. The availability of cheap, portable and reliable equipment has made the assay possible in clinics by general physicians and, in the near future, at home by patients. The concentration of exhaled nitric oxide is markedly elevated in bronchial asthma and is positively related to the degree of esinophilic inflammation. Its measurement can be used in the diagnosis of bronchial asthma and titration of dose of steroids as well as to identify steroid responsive patients in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In primary ciliary dyskinesia, nasal NO is diagnostically low and of considerable value in diagnosis. Among lung transplant recipients, FENO can be of great value in the early detection of infection, bronchioloitis obliterans syndrome and rejection. This review discusses the biology, factors affecting measurement, and clinical application of FENO in the diagnosis and management of respiratory diseases.

  18. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of intrinsically disordered proteins involved in the oxidative stress response.

    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are abundant in cells and have central roles in protein-protein interaction networks. Interactions between the IDP Prothymosin alpha (ProTα and the Neh2 domain of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, with a common binding partner, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1(Keap1, are essential for regulating cellular response to oxidative stress. Misregulation of this pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases, premature aging and cancer. In order to understand the mechanisms these two disordered proteins employ to bind to Keap1, we performed extensive 0.5-1.0 microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics (MD simulations and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments to investigate the structure/dynamics of free-state ProTα and Neh2 and their thermodynamics of bindings. The results show that in their free states, both ProTα and Neh2 have propensities to form bound-state-like β-turn structures but to different extents. We also found that, for both proteins, residues outside the Keap1-binding motifs may play important roles in stabilizing the bound-state-like structures. Based on our findings, we propose that the binding of disordered ProTα and Neh2 to Keap1 occurs synergistically via preformed structural elements (PSEs and coupled folding and binding, with a heavy bias towards PSEs, particularly for Neh2. Our results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms Neh2 and ProTα bind to Keap1, information that is useful for developing therapeutics to enhance the oxidative stress response.

  19. Ceruloplasmin Oxidation, a Feature of Parkinson's Disease CSF, Inhibits Ferroxidase Activity and Promotes Cellular Iron Retention

    Olivieri, S.; Conti, A.; Iannaccone, S.; Cannistraci, C. V.; Campanella, A.; Barbariga, M.; Codazzi, F.; Pelizzoni, I.; Magnani, G.; Pesca, M.; Franciotta, D.; Cappa, S. F.; Alessio, M.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by oxidative stress and CNS iron deposition. Ceruloplasmin is an extracellular ferroxidase that regulates cellular iron loading and export, and hence protects tissues from oxidative

  20. Proteins oxidation and autoantibodies' reactivity against hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde -oxidized thyroid antigens in patients' plasmas with Graves' disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Mseddi, Malek; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Gargouri, Bochra; Mnif, Fatma; El Ghawi, Samir; Hammami, Boutheina; Ghorbel, Abdelmonem; Abid, Mohamed; Lassoued, Saloua

    2017-06-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate proteins oxidation in plasmas of two autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD): Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto Thyroiditis (HT), and to determine whether oxidative modification of thyroid antigens (T.Ag) enhanced the reactivity of autoantibodies in plasmas of AITD patients compared with the reactivity towards native T.Ag. Carbonyl and thiol groups and MDA-protein adducts were assessed spectrophotometric methods in plasmas of 74 AITD patients and 65 healthy controls. The reactivities immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies towards malondialdéhyde (MDA)-modified T.Ag, hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 )-modified T.Ag, native T.Ag and native derm were checked by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Evaluation of oxidized proteins exhibited high levels of MDA bound to proteins and carbonyl groups, as well as reduced thiol level in plasmas of AITD patients by comparison to healthy controls (p thyroid stimulating hormone level in HT patients in the other (r = 0.65, p < 0.001). The data suggest that high production of H 2 O 2 probably occurred during hormone synthesis could contribute to protein oxidation in AITD and to create neoepitopes responsible for autoantibody reactivity's to H 2 O 2 -oxidized T.Ag enhancement. These results provide support to the involvement of oxidative stress in AITD development and/or exacerbation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A systematic review of observational studies on oxidative/nitrosative stress involvement in dengue pathogenesis

    Castro, Raimundo; Pinzón, Hernando Samuel; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to systematically review the published observational research related to the role of oxidative-nitrosative stress in pathogenesis of dengue. Methods: We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, The COCHRANE library, ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS via Virtual Health Library, Google Scholar) using the term: dengue, dengue virus, severe dengue, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, antioxidants, oxidants, free radicals, oxidized lipid products, lipid per...

  2. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor (LOX-1) in sickle cell disease vasculopathy

    Chen, Mingyi; Qiu, Hong; Lin, Xin; Nam, David; Ogbu-Nwobodo, Lucy; Archibald, Hannah; Joslin, Amelia; Wun, Ted; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Green, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1 (LOX-1) is an endothelial receptor for oxidized LDL. Increased expression of LOX-1 has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic lesions and diabetic vasculopathy. In this study, we investigate the expression of LOX-1 receptor in sickle cell disease (SCD) vasculopathy. Expression of LOX-1 in brain vascular endothelium is markedly increased and LOX-1 gene expression is upregulated in cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells by incubation with SCD erythrocytes. Also, the level of circulating soluble LOX-1 concentration is elevated in the plasma of SCD patients. Increased LOX-1 expression in endothelial cells is potentially involved in the pathogenesis of SCD vasculopathy. Soluble LOX-1 concentration in SCD may provide a novel biomarker for risk stratification of sickle cell vascular complications. PMID:27519944

  3. Activation of Alveolar Macrophages after Plutonium Oxide Inhalation in Rats: Involvement in the Early Inflammatory Response

    Van der Meeren, A.; Tourdes, F.; Gremy, O.; Grillon, G.; Abram, M.C.; Poncy, J.L.; Griffiths, N. [CEA, DSV, DRR, SRCA, Centre DAM Ile de France, F-91297 Bruyeres Le Chatel, Arpajon (France)

    2008-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages play an important role in the distribution, clearance and inflammatory reactions after particle inhalation, which may influence long-term events such as fibrosis and tumorigenesis. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the early inflammatory events after plutonium oxide inhalation in rats and involvement of alveolar macrophages. Lung changes were studied from 3 days to 3 months after inhalation of PuO{sub 2} or different isotopic compositions (70% or 97% {sup 239}Pu) and initial lung deposits (range 2.1 to 43.4 kBq/rat). Analyses of bronchoalveolar lavages showed early increases in the numbers of granulocytes, lymphocytes and multi-nucleated macrophages. The activation of macrophages was evaluated ex vivo by measurement of inflammatory mediator levels in culture supernatants. TNF-alpha and chemokine MCP-1, MIP-2 and CINC-1 production was elevated from 7 days after inhalation and remained so up to 3 months. In contrast, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-10 production was unchanged. At 6 weeks, pulmonary macrophage numbers and activation state were increased as observed from an immunohistochemistry study of lung sections with anti-ED1. Similarly, histological analyses of lung sections also showed evidence of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results indicate early inflammatory changes in the lungs of PuO{sub 2}-contaminated animals and the involvement of macrophages in this process. A dose-effect relationship was observed between the amount of radionuclide inhaled or retained at the time of analysis and inflammatory mediator production by alveolar macrophages 14 days after exposure. For similar initial lung deposits, the inflammatory manifestation appears higher for 97% {sup 239}Pu than for 70% {sup 239}Pu. (authors)

  4. Effects of long-term football training on the expression profile of genes involved in muscle oxidative metabolism

    Alfieri, A; Martone, D; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2015-01-01

    and a muscle biopsy from the vastus lateralis were collected at T0 (pre intervention) and at T1 (post intervention). Gene expression was measured by RTqPCR on RNA extracted from muscle biopsies. The expression levels of the genes principally involved in energy metabolism (PPARγ, adiponectin, AMPKα1/α2, TFAM...... to improve the expression of muscle molecular biomarkers that are correlated to oxidative metabolism in healthy males....... are directly or indirectly involved in the glucose and lipid oxidative metabolism. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fat percentage was independently associated with NAMPT, PPARγ and adiponectin expression. In conclusion, long-term recreational football training could be a useful tool...

  5. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Andrew Bottley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  6. Nitric oxide, human diseases and the herbal products that affect the nitric oxide signalling pathway.

    Achike, Francis I; Kwan, Chiu-Yin

    2003-09-01

    1. Nitric oxide (NO) is formed enzymatically from l-arginine in the presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Nitric oxide is generated constitutively in endothelial cells via sheer stress and blood-borne substances. Nitric oxide is also generated constitutively in neuronal cells and serves as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator in non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic nerve endings. Furthermore, NO can also be formed via enzyme induction in many tissues in the presence of cytokines. 2. The ubiquitous presence of NO in the living body suggests that NO plays an important role in the maintenance of health. Being a free radical with vasodilatory properties, NO exerts dual effects on tissues and cells in various biological systems. At low concentrations, NO can dilate the blood vessels and improve the circulation, but at high concentrations it can cause circulatory shock and induce cell death. Thus, diseases can arise in the presence of the extreme ends of the physiological concentrations of NO. 3. The NO signalling pathway has, in recent years, become a target for new drug development. The high level of flavonoids, catechins, tannins and other polyphenolic compounds present in vegetables, fruits, soy, tea and even red wine (from grapes) is believed to contribute to their beneficial health effects. Some of these compounds induce NO formation from the endothelial cells to improve circulation and some suppress the induction of inducible NOS in inflammation and infection. 4. Many botanical medicinal herbs and drugs derived from these herbs have been shown to have effects on the NO signalling pathway. For example, the saponins from ginseng, ginsenosides, have been shown to relax blood vessels (probably contributing to the antifatigue and blood pressure-lowering effects of ginseng) and corpus cavernosum (thus, for the treatment of men suffering from erectile dysfunction; however, the legendary aphrodisiac effect of ginseng may be an overstatement). Many plant extracts or

  7. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L'Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-03-02

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development.

  8. Exhaled nitric oxide in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Beg Mohammed F S; Alzoghaibi, Mohammad A; Habib, Syed S; Abba, Abdullah A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is elevated in nonsmoking subjects with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compare it with the results in patients with asthma and a control population. Pulmonology Clinic at a University Hospital. Twenty five control subjects, 25 steroid naive asthmatics and 14 COPD patients were studied. All the patients were nonsmokers and stable at the time of the study. All subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent spirometry. Exhaled nitric oxide was measured online by chemiluminescence, using single-breath technique. All the study subjects were males. Subjects with stable COPD had significantly higher values of FENO than controls (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 22.00 + -6.69; P =0.0001) but lower than the subjects with asthma (56.54+ - 28.01 vs 84.78+ - 39.32 P 0.0285). The FENO values in COPD subjects were inversely related to the FEV 1 /FVC ratio. There was a significant overlap between the FENO values in COPD and the control subjects. There is a significant elevation in FENO in patients with stable COPD, but the elevation is less than in asthmatic subjects. Its value in clinical practice may be limited by the significant overlap with control subjects. (author)

  9. Rate of cardiovascular system involvement and gender distribution in Behcets disease

    Yalcin Bas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Behcets disease is a systemic vasculitis affecting arteries and veins. According to the International Working Group on diagnostic criteria, a clinical description of other non-recurrent oral ulceration, at least two of findings of their examinations; genital ulceration, eye lesions, skin lesions and pathergy test positivity to be accompanied. Vascular involvement is very important symptom in determining the prognosis of the disease that is commonly observed. In this study, 581 Behcets patients who were treated between 1993-2009 were reviewed. 52 patients with cardiovascular involvement retrospectively reviewed. Total cardiovascular system involvements were found to be 9% in Behcets disease patients. 41 thrombophlebit, 11 deep venous thrombosis, 4 aneurysm cases were found. Pulmonary artery aneurysms in 2 of them, 1 in the abdominal aorta, 1 of which was found in the femoral artery. All of aneurysm and deep vein thrombosis and 77% of thrombophlebitis were male. As a result, together with common skin and mucosal involvement severe systemic symptoms such as the cardiovascular system involvement were significantly found in Behcets disease. Moreover, a high percentage of these findings is seen in men have been identified. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 46-49

  10. Heterocyclic N-oxides - A Promising Class of Agents Against Tuberculosis, Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases.

    Dos Santos Fernandes, Guilherme Felipe; Pavan, Aline Renata; Dos Santos, Jean Leandro

    2018-04-17

    Heterocyclic N-oxides have emerged as promising agents against a number of diseases and disorders, especially infectious diseases. This review analyzes the emergence and development of this scaffold in the medicinal chemistry, focusing mainly on the discovery of new heterocyclic N-oxide compounds with potent activity against tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases (i.e. leishmaniasis and Chagas disease). A number of heterocyclic N-oxide are described herein, nevertheless, the following chemical classes deserve to be highlighted due to the large number of reports in the literature about their promising pharmacological effects: furoxan, benzofuroxan, quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxide, indolone N-oxide and benzimidazole N-oxide. In order to describe those most promising compounds, we included in this review only those most biologically active heterocyclic N-oxide published since 2000. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. IgG4-related disease with sinonasal involvement: A case series

    Prabhu, Shailesh M; Yadav, Vikas; Irodi, Aparna; Mani, Sunithi; Varghese, Ajoy Mathew

    2014-01-01

    We present the imaging findings in two cases of IgG4-related disease involving the sinonasal region in the pediatric age group. Imaging findings in IgG4-related disease affecting the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses have been rarely reported in literature. The diagnosis is made by a combination of clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings. Radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings of this condition to ensure early diagnosis and treatment

  12. Getting to NO Alzheimer’s Disease: Neuroprotection versus Neurotoxicity Mediated by Nitric Oxide

    Rachelle Balez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder involving the loss of neurons in the brain which leads to progressive memory loss and behavioral changes. To date, there are only limited medications for AD and no known cure. Nitric oxide (NO has long been considered part of the neurotoxic insult caused by neuroinflammation in the Alzheimer’s brain. However, focusing on early developments, prior to the appearance of cognitive symptoms, is changing that perception. This has highlighted a compensatory, neuroprotective role for NO that protects synapses by increasing neuronal excitability. A potential mechanism for augmentation of excitability by NO is via modulation of voltage-gated potassium channel activity (Kv7 and Kv2. Identification of the ionic mechanisms and signaling pathways that mediate this protection is an important next step for the field. Harnessing the protective role of NO and related signaling pathways could provide a therapeutic avenue that prevents synapse loss early in disease.

  13. Biogenesis and Turnover of Peroxisomes Involved in the Concurrent Oxidation of Methanol and Methylamine in Hansenula polymorpha

    Veenhuis, M.; Zwart, K.B.; Harder, W.

    1981-01-01

    Growth of Hansenula polymorpha in shake flasks and chemostat cultures in the presence of methanol as the sole source of carbon and methylamine as the sole source of nitrogen was associated with the development of peroxisomes in the cells. The organelles were involved in the concurrent oxidation of

  14. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management

    Sardar, Abul Hasan; Jardim, Armando; Ghosh, Ayan Kumar; Mandal, Abhishek; Das, Sushmita; Saini, Savita; Abhishek, Kumar; Singh, Ruby; Verma, Sudha; Kumar, Ajay; Das, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS) plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL). There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed environments

  15. Genetic Manipulation of Leishmania donovani to Explore the Involvement of Argininosuccinate Synthase in Oxidative Stress Management.

    Abul Hasan Sardar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS produced by the phagocytic cells are the most common arsenals used to kill the intracellular pathogens. However, Leishmania, an intracellular pathogen, has evolved mechanisms to survive by counterbalancing the toxic oxygen metabolites produced during infection. Polyamines, the major contributor in this anti-oxidant machinery, are largely dependent on the availability of L-arginine in the intracellular milieu. Argininosuccinate synthase (ASS plays an important role as the rate-limiting step required for converting L-citrulline to argininosuccinate to provide arginine for an assortment of metabolic processes. Leishmania produce an active ASS enzyme, yet it has an incomplete urea cycle as it lacks an argininosuccinate lyase (ASL. There is no evidence for endogenous synthesis of L-arginine in Leishmania, which suggests that these parasites salvage L-arginine from extracellular milieu and makes the biological function of ASS and the production of argininosuccinate in Leishmania unclear. Our previous quantitative proteomic analysis of Leishmania promastigotes treated with sub-lethal doses of ROS, RNS, or a combination of both, led to the identification of several differentially expressed proteins which included ASS. To assess the involvement of ASS in stress management, a mutant cell line with greatly reduced ASS activity was created by a double-targeted gene replacement strategy in L. donovani promastigote. Interestingly, LdASS is encoded by three copies of allele, but Western blot analysis showed the third allele did not appear to express ASS. The free thiol levels in the mutant LdASS-/-/+ cell line were decreased. Furthermore, the cell viability in L-arginine depleted medium was greatly attenuated on exposure to different stress environments and was adversely impacted in its ability to infect mice. These findings suggest that ASS is important for Leishmania donovani to counterbalance the stressed

  16. Methylmercury decomposition in sediments and bacterial cultures: Involvement of methanogens and sulfate reducers in oxidative demethylation

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Winfrey, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    The biogeochemical cycling of mercury has received considerable attention because of the toxicity of methylmercury, its bioaccumulation in biota, and its biomagnification in aquatic food chains. The formation of methylmercury is mediated primarily by microorganisms. Demethylation of monomethylmercury in freshwater and estuarine sediments and in bacterial cultures was investigated with 14 CH 3 HgI. Under anaerobiosis, results with inhibitors indicated partial involvement of both sulfate reducers and methanogens, the former dominated estuarine sediments, while both were active in freshwaters. Aerobes were the most significant demethylators in estuarine sediments, but were unimportant in freshwater sediments. Products of anaerobic demthylation were mainly 14 CO 2 as well as lesser amounts of 14 CH 4 . Acetogenic activity resulted in fixation of some 14 CO 2 produced from 14 CH 3 HgI into acetate. Aerobic demethylation in estuarine sediments produced only 14 CH 4 , while aerobic demethylation in freshwater sediments produced small amounts of both 14 CH 4 and 14 CO 2 . Two species of Desulfovibrio produced only traces of 14 CH 4 from 14 CH 3 HgI, while a culture of a methylotrophic methanogen formed traces of 14 CO 2 and 14 CH 4 when grown on trimethylamine in the presence of the 14 CH 3 HgI. These results indicate that both aerobes and anaerobes demethylate mercury in sediments, but that either group may dominate in a particular sediment type. Aerobic demethylation in the estuarine sediments appeared to proceed by the previously characterized organomercurial-lyase pathway, because methane was the sole product. This indicates the presence of an oxidative pathway, possibly one in which methylmercury serves as an analog of one-carbon substrates

  17. Denitrification coupled with methane anoxic oxidation and microbial community involved identification

    Renata Medici Frayne Cuba

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the biological denitrification associated with anoxic oxidation of methane and the microbial diversity involved were studied. Kinetic tests for nitrate (NO3- and nitrite (NO2- removal and methane uptake were carried out in 100 mL batch reactors incubated in a shaker (40 rpm at 30 ºC. Denitrificant/methanotrophic biomass was taken from a laboratory scale reactor fed with synthetic nitrified substrates (40 mgN L-1 of NO3- and subsequently NO2- and methane as carbon source. Results obtained from nitrate removal followed a first order reaction, presenting a kinetic apparent constant (kNO3 of 0.0577±0.0057d-1. Two notable points of the denitrification rate (0.12gNO3--N g-1 AVS d-1 and 0.07gNO3--N g-1 AVS d-1 were observed in the beginning and on the seventh day of operation. When nitrite was added as an electron acceptor, denitrification rates were improved, presenting an apparent kinetic constant (kNO2 of 0.0722±0.0044d-1, a maximum denitrification rate of 0.6gNO2--N g-1AVS d-1, and minimum denitrification rate of 0.1gNO2--N g-1AVS d-1 at the beginning and end of the test, respectively. Endogenous material supporting denitrification and methane concentration dissolved in the substrate was discarded from the control experiments in the absence of methane and seed, respectively. Methylomonas sp. was identified in the reactors fed with nitrate and nitrite as well as uncultured bacterium.

  18. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Bothropoides insularis Venom Biological Effects on Murine Macrophages In Vitro.

    Ramon R P P B de Menezes

    Full Text Available Viperidae venom has several local and systemic effects, such as pain, edema, inflammation, kidney failure and coagulopathy. Additionally, bothropic venom and its isolated components directly interfere on cellular metabolism, causing alterations such as cell death and proliferation. Inflammatory cells are particularly involved in pathological envenomation mechanisms due to their capacity of releasing many mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO. NO has many effects on cell viability and it is associated to the development of inflammation and tissue damage caused by Bothrops and Bothropoides venom. Bothropoides insularis is a snake found only in Queimada Grande Island, which has markedly toxic venom. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the biological effects of Bothropoides insularis venom (BiV on RAW 264.7 cells and assess NO involvement. The venom was submitted to colorimetric assays to identify the presence of some enzymatic components. We observed that BiV induced H2O2 production and showed proteolytic and phospholipasic activities. RAW 264.7 murine macrophages were incubated with different concentrations of BiV and then cell viability was assessed by MTT reduction assay after 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours of incubation. A time- and concentration-dependent effect was observed, with a tendency to cell proliferation at lower BiV concentrations and cell death at higher concentrations. The cytotoxic effect was confirmed after lactate dehydrogenase (LDH measurement in the supernatant from the experimental groups. Flow cytometry analyses revealed that necrosis is the main cell death pathway caused by BiV. Also, BiV induced NO release. The inhibition of both proliferative and cytotoxic effects with L-NAME were demonstrated, indicating that NO is important for these effects. Finally, BiV induced an increase in iNOS expression. Altogether, these results demonstrate that B. insularis venom have proliferative and cytotoxic effects on macrophages, with

  19. Proteinopathy, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction: cross talk in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease

    Ganguly G

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gargi Ganguly,1 Sasanka Chakrabarti,2 Uttara Chatterjee,1 Luciano Saso3 1Department of Pathology, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, 2Department of Biochemistry, ICARE Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Haldia, West Bengal, India; 3Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “Vittorio Erspamer”, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are two common neurodegenerative diseases of the elderly people that have devastating effects in terms of morbidity and mortality. The predominant form of the disease in either case is sporadic with uncertain etiology. The clinical features of Parkinson’s disease are primarily motor deficits, while the patients of Alzheimer’s disease present with dementia and cognitive impairment. Though neuronal death is a common element in both the disorders, the postmortem histopathology of the brain is very characteristic in each case and different from each other. In terms of molecular pathogenesis, however, both the diseases have a significant commonality, and proteinopathy (abnormal accumulation of misfolded proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the cardinal features in either case. These three damage mechanisms work in concert, reinforcing each other to drive the pathology in the aging brain for both the diseases; very interestingly, the nature of interactions among these three damage mechanisms is very similar in both the diseases, and this review attempts to highlight these aspects. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, the peptide amyloid beta (Aβ is responsible for the proteinopathy, while α-synuclein plays a similar role in Parkinson’s disease. The expression levels of these two proteins and their aggregation processes are modulated by reactive oxygen radicals and transition metal ions in a similar manner. In turn, these proteins – as oligomers or in aggregated forms – cause

  20. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage

    Hong, Chang-Won; Lee, Joon-Ho; Kim, Suwan; Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Young-Mee; Pyo, Hongryull; Lee, Sunyoung

    2013-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To understand the mechanisms underlying radiation-induced vascular dysfunction, we employed two models. First, we examined the effect of X-ray irradiation on vasodilation in rabbit carotid arteries. Carotid arterial rings were irradiated with 8 or 16 Gy using in vivo and ex vivo methods. We measured the effect of acetylcholine-induced relaxation after phenylephrine-induced contraction on the rings. In irradiated carotid arteries, vasodilation was significantly attenuated by both irradiation methods. The relaxation response was completely blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a potent inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase. Residual relaxation persisted after treatment with L-N ω -nitroarginine (L-NA), a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), but disappeared following the addition of aminoguanidine (AG), a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS (iNOS). The relaxation response was also affected by tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor activity. In the second model, we investigated the biochemical events of nitrosative stress in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We measured iNOS and nitrotyrosine expression in HUVECs exposed to a dose of 4 Gy. The expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine was greater in irradiated HUVECs than in untreated controls. Pretreatment with AG, L-N 6 -(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (a selective inhibitor of iNOS), and L-NA attenuated nitrosative stress. While a selective target of radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage was not definitely determined, these results suggest that NO generated from iNOS could contribute to vasorelaxation. These studies highlight a potential role of iNOS inhibitors in ameliorating radiation-induced vascular endothelial damage. (author)

  1. A novel strategy involved in [corrected] anti-oxidative defense: the conversion of NADH into NADPH by a metabolic network.

    Ranji Singh

    Full Text Available The reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH is pivotal to the cellular anti-oxidative defence strategies in most organisms. Although its production mediated by different enzyme systems has been relatively well-studied, metabolic networks dedicated to the biogenesis of NADPH have not been fully characterized. In this report, a metabolic pathway that promotes the conversion of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, a pro-oxidant into NADPH has been uncovered in Pseudomonas fluorescens exposed to oxidative stress. Enzymes such as pyruvate carboxylase (PC, malic enzyme (ME, malate dehydrogenase (MDH, malate synthase (MS, and isocitrate lyase (ICL that are involved in disparate metabolic modules, converged to create a metabolic network aimed at the transformation of NADH into NADPH. The downregulation of phosphoenol carboxykinase (PEPCK and the upregulation of pyruvate kinase (PK ensured that this metabolic cycle fixed NADH into NADPH to combat the oxidative stress triggered by the menadione insult. This is the first demonstration of a metabolic network invoked to generate NADPH from NADH, a process that may be very effective in combating oxidative stress as the increase of an anti-oxidant is coupled to the decrease of a pro-oxidant.

  2. Research involving subjects with Alzheimer's disease in Italy: the possible role of family members.

    Porteri, Corinna; Petrini, Carlo

    2015-03-04

    Alzheimer's disease is a very common, progressive and still incurable disease. Future possibilities for its cure lie in the promotion of research that will increase our knowledge of the disorder's causes and lead to the discovery of effective remedies. Such research will necessarily involve individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease. This raises the controversial issue of whether patients with Alzheimer's disease are competent to give their consent for research participation. We discuss the case of subjects with Alzheimer's disease who may have impaired decision-making capacity and who could be involved in research protocols, taking into consideration aspects of the Italian normative framework, which requires a court-appointed legal representative for patients who are not able to give consent and does not recognise the legal value of advance directives. We show that this normative framework risks preventing individuals with Alzheimer's disease from taking part in research and that a new policy that favours research while promoting respect for patients' well-being and rights needs to be implemented. We believe that concerns about the difficulty of obtaining fully valid consent of patients with Alzheimer's disease should not prevent them from participating in clinical trials and benefiting from scientific progress. Therefore, we argue that the requirement for patients to have a legal representative may not be the best solution in all countries and clinical situations, and suggest promoting the role of patients' family members in the decision-making process. In addition, we outline the possible role of advance directives and ethics committees.

  3. Cardiovascular involvement in systemic rheumatic diseases: An integrated view for the treating physicians.

    Lee, Kwang Seob; Kronbichler, Andreas; Eisenhut, Michael; Lee, Keum Hwa; Shin, Jae Il

    2018-03-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can affect various kinds of organs including the kidney, the skin, soft tissue and the bone. Among others, cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases has been shown to affect myocardium, pericardium, cardiac vessels, conduction system and valves, eventually leading to increased mortality. In general, underlying chronic inflammation leads to premature atherosclerosis, but also other manifestations such as arrhythmia and heart failure may have a 'silent' progress. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors play a secondary role, while disease-specific factors (i.e. disease duration, severity, antibody positivity, persistent disease activity) can directly influence the cardiovascular system. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical to optimize management and to control inflammatory activity and recent data suggest that risk factors (i.e. hypercholesterolemia and hypertension) need intensive treatment as well. With the advent of immunosuppressive agents, most rheumatic diseases are well controlled on treatment, but information related to their cardioprotective efficacy is not well-defined. In this review, we focus on cardiovascular involvement in rheumatic diseases and highlight current evidence which should be of help for the treating physicians. Moreover, cardiotoxicity of immunosuppressive drugs is a rare issue and such potential adverse events will be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Management of Cardiac Involvement Associated With Neuromuscular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Feingold, Brian; Mahle, William T; Auerbach, Scott; Clemens, Paula; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Jefferies, John L; Judge, Daniel P; Lal, Ashwin K; Markham, Larry W; Parks, W James; Tsuda, Takeshi; Wang, Paul J; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-09-26

    For many neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), cardiac disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The management of cardiac disease in NMDs is made challenging by the broad clinical heterogeneity that exists among many NMDs and by limited knowledge about disease-specific cardiovascular pathogenesis and course-modifying interventions. The overlay of compromise in peripheral muscle function and other organ systems, such as the lungs, also makes the simple application of endorsed adult or pediatric heart failure guidelines to the NMD population problematic. In this statement, we provide background on several NMDs in which there is cardiac involvement, highlighting unique features of NMD-associated myocardial disease that require clinicians to tailor their approach to prevention and treatment of heart failure. Undoubtedly, further investigations are required to best inform future guidelines on NMD-specific cardiovascular health risks, treatments, and outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of

  6. A comparative genomic analysis of the oxidative enzymes potentially involved in lignin degradation by Agaricus bisporus

    Harshavardhan Doddapaneni; Venkataramanan Subramanian; Bolei Fu; Dan Cullen

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative enzymatic machinery for degradation of organic substrates in Agaricus bisporus (Ab) is at the core of the carbon recycling mechanisms in this fungus. To date, 156 genes have been tentatively identified as part of this oxidative enzymatic machinery, which includes 26 peroxidase encoding genes, nine copper radical oxidase [including three...

  7. Sensitive Electrochemical Detection of Native and Aggregated x-Synuclein Protein Involved in Parkinson's Disease

    Masarik, Michal; Stobiecka, Agata; Kizek, René; Jelen, Frantisek; Pechan, Zdenk; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Subramaniam, Vinod; Palecek, Emil

    2004-01-01

    The aggregation of α-synuclein, a 14 kDa protein, is involved in several human neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. We studied native and in vitro aggregated α-synuclein by circular dichroism (CD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrochemical methods. We used constant

  8. Posterior cerebral artery involvement in moyamoya disease: initial infarction and angle between PCA and basilar artery.

    Lee, Ji Yeoun; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Choi, Jung Won; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, In-One; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2013-12-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic cerebrovascular occlusive disease, and progressive involvement of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has been reported. However, majority of MMD articles are presenting classic anterior circulation related issues. This study investigates the preoperative factors related to the long-term outcome of posterior circulation in MMD. Retrospective review of 88 MMD patients (166 PCAs in either hemisphere) without symptomatic disease involvement of PCA at initial diagnosis was done. Data at initial diagnosis regarding age, presence of infarction, status of the PCA, type of posterior communicating artery, and the angle between PCA and basilar artery were reviewed. Progressive stenosis of PCA was evaluated by symptom or radiological imaging during follow up. During an average follow up of 8.3 years, 29 out of 166 (18 %) evaluated PCAs showed progressive disease involvement. The average time of progression from the initial operation was 4.9 years, with the latest onset at 10.8 years. The patients who showed progressive stenosis of the PCA tended to be younger, present with infarction, have smaller angle between PCA and basilar artery, and have asymptomatic stenosis of the PCA at initial presentation. However, multivariate analysis confirmed only the presence of initial infarction and a smaller angle between PCA and basilar artery to be significantly associated with progressive stenosis of PCA. Involvement of PCA in MMD may occur in a delayed fashion, years after the completion of revascularization of anterior circulation. Persistent long-term follow-up regarding the posterior circulation is recommended.

  9. Peripheral Tissue Involvement in Sporadic, Iatrogenic, and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Head, Mark W.; Ritchie, Diane; Smith, Nadine; McLoughlin, Victoria; Nailon, William; Samad, Sazia; Masson, Stephen; Bishop, Matthew; McCardle, Linda; Ironside, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Human prion diseases are rare fatal neurodegenerative conditions that occur as acquired, familial, or idiopathic disorders. A key event in their pathogenesis is the accumulation of an altered form of the prion protein, termed PrPSc, in the central nervous system. A novel acquired human prion disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is thought to result from oral exposure to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent. This disease differs from other human prion diseases in its neurological, neuropathological, and biochemical phenotype. We have used immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques to analyze the tissue distribution and biochemical properties of PrPSc in peripheral tissues in a unique series of nine cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We have compared this with the distribution and biochemical forms found in all of the major subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in a case of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with growth hormone therapy. The results show that involvement of the lymphoreticular system is a defining feature of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but that the biochemical isoform of PrPSc found is influenced by the cell type in which it accumulates. PMID:14695328

  10. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Homologs of Human DJ-1 Are Stationary Phase-Associated Proteins That Are Involved in Autophagy and Oxidative Stress Resistance.

    Yang Su

    Full Text Available The Parkinson's disease protein DJ-1 is involved in various cellular functions including detoxification of dicarbonyl compounds, autophagy and oxidative stress response. DJ-1 homologs are widely found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, constituting a superfamily of proteins that appear to be involved in stress response. Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six DJ-1 homologs, designated Hsp3101-Hsp3105 and Sdj1 (previously named SpDJ-1. Here we show that deletion of any one of these six genes somehow affects autophagy during prolonged stationary phase. Furthermore, deletions of each of these DJ-1 homologs result in reduced stationary phase survival. Deletion of sdj1 also increases the sensitivity of stationary-phase cells to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 whereas overexpression of sdj1 has the opposite effect. Consistent with their role in stationary phase, expression of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1, and to a lesser extent hsp3103 and hsp3104, is increased in stationary phase. The induction of hsp3101, hsp3102, hsp3105 and sdj1 involves the Sty1-regulated transcription factor Atf1 but not the transcription factor Pap1. Our results firmly establish that S. pombe homologs of DJ-1 are stationary-phase associated proteins and are likely involved in autophagy and antioxidant defense in stationary phase of S. pombe cells.

  11. [Sinus histiocytosis (Destombes-Rosai-Dorfman disease) revealed by extranodal spinal involvement].

    Bernard, F; Sarran, N; Serre, I; Baldet, P; Callamand, P; Margueritte, G; Astruc, J

    1999-02-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive cervical lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease) is a non-neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder. Extranodal involvement, especially of the nervous system, is unusual. We report a case revealed by neurological symptoms. A 10-year-old girl presented with paraparesis due to a dural extramedullary mass on magnetic resonance imaging. Massive cervical lymphadenopathy appeared secondarily. Radiological investigations showed mediastinal, paranasal sinus and lower eyelid involvement. The diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease was established histologically and by immunohistochemical studies of nodal lesions by the demonstration of characteristic sinus histiocytosis with sheets of S-100 protein and CD-68 positive large histiocytes displaying lymphocyte phagocytosis. A dramatic response occurred with complete resolution of all clinical findings after treatment with corticosteroids and etoposide, although neurological lesions were unchanged on magnetic resonance imaging. Despite its rarity, this case underlines the unknown pathogenesis of this disease (immune dysfunction?) and the difficulties of treatment (choice of chemotherapeutic agents, duration).

  12. Diagnostic imaging of digestive tract involvement in cystic fibrosis. Part 1: hepatobiliary disease

    Miralles, M.; Gonzalez, G.; Serrano, C.; Manzanares, J.; Berrocal, T.

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a severe hereditary disease characterized by epithelial chloride channel dysfunction, leading to the production of abnormally thick secretions. The abnormal gene is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. Hepatobiliary involvement derives from ductal obstruction causing cholestasis, steatosis, cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Biliary sludge, cholelithiasis and gallbladder sclerosis and atrophy are common findings. As the correlation between the hepatobiliary changes and their clinical and analytical impact is very limited, imaging techniques are essential in this disease. Ultrasound is the basic imaging tool, both for initial evaluation and follow-up of the hepatic and biliary involvement, although other techniques such as radionuclide imaging, magnetic resonance and computed tomography can be highly useful. Given the long-term, chronic nature of this disease, the use of aggressive techniques or irradiation should be carefully weighed. (Author) 38 refs

  13. Linking Alzheimer's disease to insulin resistance: the FoxO response to oxidative stress.

    Manolopoulos, K N; Klotz, L-O; Korsten, P; Bornstein, S R; Barthel, A

    2010-11-01

    Oxidative stress is an important determinant not only in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but also in insulin resistance (InsRes) and diabetic complications. Forkhead box class O (FoxO) transcription factors are involved in both insulin action and the cellular response to oxidative stress, thereby providing a potential integrative link between AD and InsRes. For example, the expression of intra- and extracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as manganese-superoxide dismutase and selenoprotein P, is regulated by FoxO proteins, as is the expression of important hepatic enzymes of gluconeogenesis. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of AD and InsRes and discuss the function of FoxO proteins in these processes. Both InsRes and oxidative stress may promote the transcriptional activity of FoxO proteins, resulting in hyperglycaemia and a further increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The consecutive activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases and inhibition of Wingless (Wnt) signalling may result in the formation of β-amyloid plaques and τ protein phosphorylation. Wnt inhibition may also result in a sustained activation of FoxO proteins with induction of apoptosis and neuronal loss, thereby completing a vicious circle from oxidative stress, InsRes and hyperglycaemia back to the formation of ROS and consecutive neurodegeneration. In view of their central function in this model, FoxO proteins may provide a potential molecular target for the treatment of both InsRes and AD.

  14. The role of oxidative stress in the development of alcoholic liver disease.

    Galicia-Moreno, M; Gutiérrez-Reyes, G

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most accepted addictive substance worldwide and its consumption is related to multiple health, economic, and social problems. The liver is the organ in charge of ethanol metabolism and it is susceptible to alcohol's toxic effects. To provide a detailed review of the role of oxidative stress in alcoholic liver disease and the mechanisms of damage involved, along with current information on the hepatoprotective effectiveness of the molecules that have been studied. A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the following keywords oxidative stress, alcoholic liver damage, alcoholic cirrhosis, and antioxidants. There was no time limit for gathering all available information on the subject at hand. According to the literature reviewed, oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver damage. Molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), formed during ethanol metabolism, structurally and functionally modify organic molecules. Consequently, biologic processes are altered and hepatocytes are sensitized to the action of cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-α, as well as to the action of endotoxins, activating signaling pathways such as those controlled by nuclear factor kappa B, extracellular signal regulated kinases, and mitogen activated protein kinase. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of liver damage resulting from alcohol consumption. The molecules that have currently displayed a hepatoprotective effect in preclinical and clinical trials must be studied further so that their effectiveness can be confirmed and they can possibly be used as adjuvant treatments for this disease. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Fecal Calprotectin in Evaluating Intestinal Involvement of Behçet’s Disease

    Burak Özşeker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the regions of involvement of Behçet’s disease (BD, a systematic inflammatory vasculitis with unknown etiology, is the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy, and capsule endoscopy are frequently used methods to diagnose the intestinal involvement of BD. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of fecal calprotectin (FC in the evaluation of intestinal involvement in BD. Material and Method. A total of 30 patients who were diagnosed with BD and had no GI symptoms and 25 individuals in the control group were included in this study. Results. Levels of FC were statistically significantly higher in patients with BD compared to the control group (p<0.001. The correlation analysis performed including FC and markers of disease activity revealed a positive and statistically significant correlation between FC level and CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r: 0.255, p<0.049, and r: 0.404, p<0.001, resp.. FC levels in patients who were detected to have ulcers in the terminal ileum and colon in the colonoscopic examination were statistically significantly higher compared to the patients with BD without intestinal involvement (p=0.01. Conclusion. The measurement of FC levels, in patients with BD who are asymptomatic for GI involvement, may be helpful to detect the possible underlying intestinal involvement.

  16. Pancreatic involvement in Korean patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Lee, Kwang-Hyuck; Lee, Jae-Seung; Kim, Bum-Jin; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Kim, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Taek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pancreatic involvement in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease and to document the changes that occur in pancreatic lesions. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and CT scans of 18 VHL patients who were diagnosed between 1994 and 2007 at the Samsung Medical Center. The clinical history with a detailed family history, biochemical test results, and imaging studies of the pancreas, adrenal glands, and kidneys were reviewed. Genetic analysis was performed in 12 patients. The changes in pancreatic lesions, such as an increase in cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct, were analyzed in patients who had CT scans at least 1 year apart. Pancreatic lesions existed in 89% (16/18) of the patients. All 16 patients had multiple cystic lesions. Two patients had co-existing neuroendocrine tumors (NET), and two patients had co-existing serous cystadenomas (SCA). At least one of three features of pancreatic lesions (cystic lesions, calcifications, and dilatation of the pancreatic duct) progressed in all nine patients who had CT scans 1 year apart. Pancreatic involvement in VHL disease was relatively common in Korean patients. The most common type of pancreatic involvement was a multiple cystic lesion. NET and SCA existed in approximately 10% of VHL patients with pancreatic involvement. Pancreatic lesions in VHL disease progressed, at least according to radiological images. (author)

  17. [Nutritional approaches to modulate oxidative stress that induce Alzheimer's disease. Nutritional approaches to prevent Alzheimer's disease].

    Lara, Humberto Herman; Alanís-Garza, Eduardo Javier; Estrada Puente, María Fernanda; Mureyko, Lucía Liliana; Alarcón Torres, David Alejandro; Ixtepan Turrent, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the world; symptoms first appear after age 65 and have a progressive evolution. Expecting an increase on its incidence and knowing there is currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease, it is a necessity to prevent progression. The change in diet due to globalization may explain the growth of the incidence in places such as Japan and Mediterranean countries, which used to have fewer incidences. There is a direct correlation between disease progression and the increased intake of alcohol, saturated fats, and red meat. Therefore, we find obesity and higher serum levels in cholesterol due to saturated fat as a result. A way to decrease the progression of Alzheimer's is through a diet rich in polipheno/es (potent antioxidants), unsaturated fats (monounsaturated and polyunsaturated), fish, vegetable fa t, fruits with low glycemic index, and a moderate consumption of red wine. Through this potent antioxidant diet we accomplish the prevention of dementia and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This article emphasizes the food and other components that have been demonstrated to decrease the oxidative stress related to these progressive diseases.

  18. Ceruloplasmin Oxidation, a Feature of Parkinson's Disease CSF, Inhibits Ferroxidase Activity and Promotes Cellular Iron Retention

    Olivieri, S.

    2011-12-14

    Parkinson\\'s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by oxidative stress and CNS iron deposition. Ceruloplasmin is an extracellular ferroxidase that regulates cellular iron loading and export, and hence protects tissues from oxidative damage. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we investigated ceruloplasmin patterns in the CSF of human Parkinson\\'s disease patients. Parkinson\\'s disease ceruloplasmin profiles proved more acidic than those found in healthy controls and in other human neurological diseases (peripheral neuropathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer\\'s disease); degrees of acidity correlated with patients\\' pathological grading. Applying an unsupervised pattern recognition procedure to the two-dimensional electrophoresis images, we identified representative pathological clusters. In vitro oxidation of CSF in two-dimensional electrophoresis generated a ceruloplasmin shift resembling that observed in Parkinson\\'s disease and co-occurred with an increase in protein carbonylation. Likewise, increased protein carbonylation was observed in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF, and the same modification was directly identified in these samples on ceruloplasmin. These results indicate that ceruloplasmin oxidation contributes to pattern modification in Parkinson\\'s disease. From the functional point of view, ceruloplasmin oxidation caused a decrease in ferroxidase activity, which in turn promotes intracellular iron retention in neuronal cell lines as well as in primary neurons, which are more sensitive to iron accumulation. Accordingly, the presence of oxidized ceruloplasmin in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF might be used as a marker for oxidative damage and might provide new insights into the underlying pathological mechanisms.

  19. Antioxidant activity of mulberry stem extract: A potential used as supplement for oxidative stress-related diseases

    Phi Phuong Pham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of reactive oxygen species is involved in many diseases, including cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, viral and bacterial infections as well as osteoarthritis. Although antioxidant activity of Morus alba L. has been investigated in various parts of this plant, a little attention has been paid to the stems of this plant. Therefore, the present study was designed to systematically investigate the antioxidant activity of M. alba stem extract using various in vitro antioxidant assay systems. The present data showed that the stem extract of M. alba exhibited a hydrogen-donating ability, an ability to quench hydroxyl radicals, having superoxide and nitric oxide scavenging activity as well as iron reducing capacity. This study highlights the potential of this plant for further development as a natural source of antioxidant or as an alternative treatment for oxidative stress-related diseases.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  1. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MRI assessment of bone marrow involvement in Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Tesoro Tess, J.D.; Balzarini, L.; Ceglia, E.; Petrillo, R.; Musumeci, R.

    1990-01-01

    In order to evaluate the possible role of MRI in detecting lymphomatous marrow involvement, a MRI examination was performed in newly diagnosed patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) and nonHodgkin lymphoma (NHL). From this the authors concluded that MRI should not be used as a replacement for bone marrow biopsies in HD and NHL, but rather as a complementary tool utilizing the panoramic view offered by MRI which permit to disclose focal areas of bone involvement different from the sacrum, thus not valuable with routine biopsies. (author). 4 refs.; 1 tab

  3. Parallels between major depressive disorder and Alzheimer's disease: role of oxidative stress and genetic vulnerability.

    Rodrigues, Roberto; Petersen, Robert B; Perry, George

    2014-10-01

    The thesis of this review is that oxidative stress is the central factor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The major elements involved are inflammatory cytokines, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal, and arginine vasopressin systems, which induce glucocorticoid and "oxidopamatergic" cascades when triggered by psychosocial stress, severe life-threatening events, and mental-affective and somatic diseases. In individuals with a genomic vulnerability to depression, these cascades may result in chronic depression-anxiety-stress spectra, resulting in MDD and other known depressive syndromes. In contrast, in subjects with genomic vulnerability to AD, oxidative stress-induced brain damage triggers specific antioxidant defenses, i.e., increased levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) and aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau, resulting in paired helical filaments and impaired functions related to the ApoEε4 isoform, leading to complex pathological cascades culminating in AD. Surprisingly, all the AD-associated molecular pathways mentioned in this review have been shown to be similar or analogous to those found in depression, including structural damage, i.e., hippocampal and frontal cortex atrophy. Other interacting molecular signals, i.e., GSK-3β, convergent survival factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor and heat shock proteins), and transition redox metals are also mentioned to emphasize the vast array of intermediates that could interact via comparable mechanisms in both MDD and AD.

  4. Brain rust: recent discoveries on the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    de Oliveira, Diêgo Madureira; Ferreira Lima, Rute Maria; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and damages due to excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common causes of injuries to cells and organisms. The prevalence of neurodegenerative diseases (ND) increases with aging and much of the research involving ROS and OS has emerged from works in this field. This text reviews some recent published articles about the role of OS in ND. Since there are many reviews in this field, the focus was centered in articles published recently. The Scientific Journals Directory supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Education Office for the Coordination of Higher Educational Personnel Improvement (CAPES) was used to search, download, and review articles. The search engine looked for the terms 'oxidative stress AND neurodegenerative diseases AND nutrition' in 10 different scientific collections. Biochemical markers for ND lack sensitivity or specificity for diagnosis or for tracking response to therapy today. OS has an intimate connection with ND, albeit low levels of ROS seem to protect the brain. Deleterious changes in mitochondria, OS, calcium, glucocorticoids, inflammation, trace metals, insulin, cell cycle, protein aggregation, and hundreds to thousands of genes occur in ND. The interaction of genes with their environment, may explain ND. Although OS has received much attention over the years, which increased the number of scientific works on antioxidant interventions, no one knows how to stop or delay ND at present. Interventions in vitro, in vivo, and in humans will continue to contribute for a better understanding of these pathologies.

  5. Oxidative stress and inflammation in cerebral cavernous malformation disease pathogenesis: Two sides of the same coin.

    Retta, Saverio Francesco; Glading, Angela J

    2016-12-01

    Cerebral Cavernous Malformation (CCM) is a vascular disease of proven genetic origin, which may arise sporadically or is inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and highly variable expressivity. CCM lesions exhibit a range of different phenotypes, including wide inter-individual differences in lesion number, size, and susceptibility to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Lesions may remain asymptomatic or result in pathological conditions of various type and severity at any age, with symptoms ranging from recurrent headaches to severe neurological deficits, seizures, and stroke. To date there are no direct therapeutic approaches for CCM disease besides the surgical removal of accessible lesions. Novel pharmacological strategies are particularly needed to limit disease progression and severity and prevent de novo formation of CCM lesions in susceptible individuals. Useful insights into innovative approaches for CCM disease prevention and treatment are emerging from a growing understanding of the biological functions of the three known CCM proteins, CCM1/KRIT1, CCM2 and CCM3/PDCD10. In particular, accumulating evidence indicates that these proteins play major roles in distinct signaling pathways, including those involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress, inflammation and angiogenesis, pointing to pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the function of CCM proteins may be relevant in preventing vascular dysfunctions triggered by these events. Indeed, emerging findings demonstrate that the pleiotropic roles of CCM proteins reflect their critical capacity to modulate the fine-tuned crosstalk between redox signaling and autophagy that govern cell homeostasis and stress responses, providing a novel mechanistic scenario that reconciles both the multiple signaling pathways linked to CCM proteins and the distinct therapeutic approaches proposed so far. In addition, recent studies in CCM patient cohorts suggest that genetic susceptibility

  6. Involvement of catalase in the protective benefits of metformin in mice with oxidative liver injury.

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Mingwei; Ai, Qing; Lin, Ling; Wu, Kunwei; Deng, Xinyu; Jing, Yuping; Jia, Mengying; Wan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Li

    2014-06-05

    Metformin is a commonly used anti-diabetic drug with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent hypoglycemic activities. Recent studies have revealed its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. In the present study, the anti-oxidative potential of metformin and its potential mechanisms were investigated in a mouse model with carbon tetrachloride (CCl₂)-induced severe oxidative liver injury. Our results showed that treatment with metformin significantly attenuated CCl₂-induced elevation of serum aminotransferases and hepatic histological abnormalities. The alleviated liver injury was associated with decreased hepatic contents of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). In addition, metformin treatment dose-dependently enhanced the activities of catalase (CAT) and decreased CCl₄-induced elevation of hepatic H₂O₂ levels, but it had no obvious effects on the protein level of CAT. We also found that metformin increased the level of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), but treatment with AMPK activator AICAR had no obvious effects on CAT activity. A molecular docking analysis indicated that metformin might interact with CAT via hydrogen bonds. These data suggested that metformin effectively alleviated CCl₄-induced oxidative liver injury in mice and these hepatoprotective effects might be associated with CAT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Involvement of oxidative stress in SAMP10 mice with age-related neurodegeneration.

    Wang, Jun; Lei, Hongtao; Hou, Jincai; Liu, Jianxun

    2015-05-01

    Age-related changes in the brain tissue are reflected in many aspects. We sought to determine the morphology, Nissl bodies, behavioral appearance and oxidative stress in the brain using SAMP10 mice, a substrain of the senescence-accelerated mouse. SAMP10 mice groups divided by different ages (3, 5, 8 and 14 months) were compared with those of control groups with the above corresponding ages. Cortical thickness, Nissl bodies, behavioral appearance and oxidative stress were evaluated through image software, thionine staining, step-down test and colorimetry, respectively. The weight and cortical thickness of the brain in SAMP10 mice significantly reduced from 8 months of age. The results showed that the number of Nissl bodies decreased or Nissl bodies shrank with dark staining in histology. The same result appeared in a step-down test. As the SAMP10 mice grew older, the oxidative stress-related markers superoxide dismutase decreased and malondialdehyde increased after 8 months. Glutathione peroxidase activities showed no age-related changes. The changes of brain morphology and productions of oxidative stress in the brain tissue might contribute to the behavioral abnormality. Deceleration of age-related production of oxidative stress might be expected to be a potent strategy for anti-aging interventions.

  8. Neuroimmune regulation of microglial activity involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases.

    González, Hugo; Elgueta, Daniela; Montoya, Andro; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2014-09-15

    Neuroinflammation constitutes a fundamental process involved in the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. Microglial cells play a central role in neuroinflammation, promoting neuroprotective or neurotoxic microenvironments, thus controlling neuronal fate. Acquisition of different microglial functions is regulated by intercellular interactions with neurons, astrocytes, the blood-brain barrier, and T-cells infiltrating the central nervous system. In this study, an overview of the regulation of microglial function mediated by different intercellular communications is summarised and discussed. Afterward, we focus in T-cell-mediated regulation of neuroinflammation involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitric oxide signaling pathways involved in the inhibition of spontaneous activity in the guinea pig prostate.

    Dey, Anupa; Lang, Richard J; Exintaris, Betty

    2012-06-01

    We investigated nitric oxide mediated inhibition of spontaneous activity recorded in young and aging guinea pig prostates. Conventional intracellular microelectrode and tension recording techniques were used. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (10 μM) abolished spontaneous contractions and slow wave activity in 5 young and 5 aging prostates. Upon adding the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (10 μM) the frequency of spontaneous contractile and electrical activity was significantly increased in each age group. This increase was significantly larger in 4 to 8 preparations of younger vs aging prostates (about 40% to 50% vs about 10% to 20%, 2-way ANOVA pguinea pig prostates (Student paired t test pproduction. This may further explain the increase in prostatic smooth muscle tone observed in age related prostate specific conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidative Stress and Huntington's Disease: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly.

    Kumar, Amit; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2016-10-01

    Redox homeostasis is crucial for proper cellular functions, including receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, protein folding, and xenobiotic detoxification. Under basal conditions, there is a balance between oxidants and antioxidants. This balance facilitates the ability of oxidants, such as reactive oxygen species, to play critical regulatory functions through a direct modification of a small number of amino acids (e.g. cysteine) on signaling proteins. These signaling functions leverage tight spatial, amplitude, and temporal control of oxidant concentrations. However, when oxidants overwhelm the antioxidant capacity, they lead to a harmful condition of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress has long been held to be one of the key players in disease progression for Huntington's disease (HD). In this review, we will critically review this evidence, drawing some intermediate conclusions, and ultimately provide a framework for thinking about the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of HD.

  11. Modulation of parathion toxicity by glucose feeding: Is nitric oxide involved?

    Liu Jing; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Goad, John T.; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey

    2007-01-01

    Glucose feeding can markedly exacerbate the toxicity of the anticholinesterase insecticide, parathion. We determined the effects of parathion on brain nitric oxide and its possible role in potentiation of toxicity by glucose feeding. Adult rats were given water or 15% glucose in water for 3 days and challenged with vehicle or parathion (18 mg/kg, s.c.) on day 4. Functional signs, plasma glucose and brain cholinesterase, citrulline (an indicator of nitric oxide production) and high-energy phosphates (HEPs) were measured 1-3 days after parathion. Glucose feeding exacerbated cholinergic toxicity. Parathion increased plasma glucose (15-33%) and decreased cortical cholinesterase activity (81-90%), with no significant differences between water and glucose treatment groups. In contrast, parathion increased brain regional citrulline (40-47%) and decreased HEPs (18-40%) in rats drinking water, with significantly greater changes in glucose-fed rats (248-363% increase and 31-61% decrease, respectively). We then studied the effects of inhibiting neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by 7-nitroindazole (7NI, 30 mg/kg, i.p. x4) on parathion toxicity and its modulation by glucose feeding. Co-exposure to parathion and 7NI led to a marked increase in cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality, regardless of glucose intake. Thus, glucose feeding enhanced the accumulation of brain nitric oxide following parathion exposure, but inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis was ineffective at counteracting increased parathion toxicity associated with glucose feeding. Evidence is therefore presented to suggest that nitric oxide may play both toxic and protective roles in cholinergic toxicity, and its precise contribution to modulation by glucose feeding requires further investigation

  12. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  13. Involvement of formate as an interspecies electron carrier in a syntrophic acetate-oxidizing anaerobic microorganism in coculture with methanogens.

    Hattori, S; Luo, H; Shoun, H; Kamagata, Y

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether formate is involved in interspecies electron transfer between substrate-oxidizing bacteria and hydrogenotrophic microorganisms under anaerobic conditions, a syntrophic acetate-oxidizing bacterium Thermacetogenium phaeum strain PB was cocultured either with a formate /H2-utilizing methanogen strain TM (designated as PB/TM coculture), or an H2-utilizing methanogen strain deltaH (designated as PB/deltaH coculture). Acetate oxidation and subsequent methanogenesis in PB/TM coculture were found to be significantly faster than in PB/deltaH coculture. Formate dehydrogenase and hydrogenase were both detected in strains PB and TM. H2 partial pressures in the PB/TM coculture were kept lower (20 to 40 Pa) than those of the PB/deltaH coculture (40 to 60 Pa) during the exponential growth phase. Formate was also detected in both PB/TM and PB/deltaH cocultures, and the concentration of formate was maintained at a lower level in the PB/TM coculture (5 to 9 microM) than in the PB/deltaH coculture. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that the concentrations of both H2 and formate severely affect the syntrophic oxidation of acetate. These results strongly indicate that not only H2 but also formate may be involved in interspecies electron transfer.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Finding of Acute Marchiafava-Bignami Disease with Diffuse Involvement: A Case Report

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin

    2011-01-01

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare toxic disorder strongly associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The process may extend to neighboring white matter and subcortical regions. We report a case of MBD in which fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging revealed symmetrical hyperintense lesions with diffuse involvement of the corpus callosum, white matter, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, and middle cerebellar peduncle.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Finding of Acute Marchiafava-Bignami Disease with Diffuse Involvement: A Case Report

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong; In, Hyun Sin [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare toxic disorder strongly associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by progressive demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. The process may extend to neighboring white matter and subcortical regions. We report a case of MBD in which fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and diffusion-weighted imaging revealed symmetrical hyperintense lesions with diffuse involvement of the corpus callosum, white matter, corticospinal tract, internal capsule, and middle cerebellar peduncle.

  16. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Niland, Joyce C.; Vora, Nayana; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  17. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    Victoria J. Orphan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2 found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to

  18. Involvement of nitric oxide in anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine on marble-burying behaviour in mice.

    Gawali, Nitin B; Chowdhury, Amrita A; Kothavade, Pankaj S; Bulani, Vipin D; Nagmoti, Dnyaneshwar M; Juvekar, Archana R

    2016-01-05

    In view of the reports that nitric oxide modulates the neurotransmitters implicated in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), patients with OCD exhibit higher plasma nitrate levels, and drugs useful in OCD influence nitric oxide. Agmatine is a polyamine and widely distributed in mammalian brain which interacts with nitrergic systems. Hence, the present study was carried out to understand the involvement of nitrergic systems in the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine. We used marble-burying behaviour (MBB) of mice as the animal model of OCD, and nitric oxide levels in hippocampus (HC) and cortex homogenate were measured. Results revealed that, agmatine (20 and 40mg/kg, i.p) significantly inhibited the MBB. Intraperitoneal administration of nitric oxide enhancers viz. nitric oxide precursor - l-arginine (l-ARG) (400mg/kg and 800mg/kg) increased MBB as well as brain nitrites levels, whereas treatment with N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (30mg/kg and 50mg/kg, i.p.) and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) (20mg/kg and 40mg/kg) attenuated MBB and nitrites levels in brain. Further, in combination studies, the anticompulsive-like effect of agmatine (20mg/kg, ip) was exacerbated by prior administration of l-ARG (400mg/kg) and conversely l-NAME (15mg/kg) or 7-NI (10.0mg/kg) attenuated OCD-like behaviour with HC and cortex changes in the levels of NO. None of the above treatment had any significant influence on locomotor activity. In conclusion, Agmatine is effective in ameliorating the compulsive-like behaviour in mice which appears to be related to nitric oxide in brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The involvement of wheat F-box protein gene TaFBA1 in the oxidative stress tolerance of plants.

    Shu-Mei Zhou

    Full Text Available As one of the largest gene families, F-box domain proteins have been found to play important roles in abiotic stress responses via the ubiquitin pathway. TaFBA1 encodes a homologous F-box protein contained in E3 ubiquitin ligases. In our previous study, we found that the overexpression of TaFBA1 enhanced drought tolerance in transgenic plants. To investigate the mechanisms involved, in this study, we investigated the tolerance of the transgenic plants to oxidative stress. Methyl viologen was used to induce oxidative stress conditions. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis revealed that TaFBA1 expression was up-regulated by oxidative stress treatments. Under oxidative stress conditions, the transgenic tobacco plants showed a higher germination rate, higher root length and less growth inhibition than wild type (WT. The enhanced oxidative stress tolerance of the transgenic plants was also indicated by lower reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, malondialdehyde (MDA content and cell membrane damage under oxidative stress compared with WT. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX and peroxidase (POD, were observed in the transgenic plants than those in WT, which may be related to the upregulated expression of some antioxidant genes via the overexpression of TaFBA1. In others, some stress responsive elements were found in the promoter region of TaFBA1, and TaFBA1 was located in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. These results suggest that TaFBA1 plays an important role in the oxidative stress tolerance of plants. This is important for understanding the functions of F-box proteins in plants' tolerance to multiple stress conditions.

  20. Parenting goals: predictors of parent involvement in disease management of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Iannotti, Ronald J; Schneider, Stefan; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Sobel, Douglas O

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of diabetes-specific parenting goals for parents of children with type 1 diabetes and to examine whether parenting goals predict a change in parenting involvement in disease management. An independent sample of primary caretakers of 87 children aged 10 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes completed the measure of parenting goals (diabetes-specific and general goals); both parent and child completed measures of parent responsibility for diabetes management at baseline and 6 months. Parents ranked diabetes-specific parenting goals as more important than general parenting goals, and rankings were moderately stable over time. Parenting goals were related to parent responsibility for diabetes management. The relative ranking of diabetes-specific parenting goals predicted changes in parent involvement over 6 months, with baseline ranking of goals predicting more parental involvement at follow-up. Parenting goals may play an important role in family management of type 1 diabetes.

  1. Opportunities for involving men and families in chronic disease management: a qualitative study from Chiapas, Mexico.

    Fort, Meredith P; Castro, Maricruz; Peña, Liz; López Hernández, Sergio Hernán; Arreola Camacho, Gabriel; Ramírez-Zea, Manuel; Martínez, Homero

    2015-10-05

    A healthy lifestyle intervention was implemented in primary care health centers in urban parts of Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico with an aim of reducing cardiovascular disease risk for patients with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension. During implementation, research questions emerged. Considerably fewer men participated in the intervention than women, and an opportunity was identified to increase the reach of activities aimed at improving disease self-management through strategies involving family members. A qualitative study was conducted to identify strategies to involve men and engage family members in disease management and risk reduction. Nine men with hypertension and/or type 2 diabetes with limited to no participation in disease self-management and health promotion activities, six families in which at least one family member had a diagnosis of one or both conditions, and nine health care providers from four different government health centers were recruited for the study. Participants took part in semi-structured interviews. During interviews with families, genograms and eco-maps were used to diagram family composition and structure, and capture the nature of patients' relationships to the extended family and community resources. Transcripts were coded and a general inductive analytic approach was used to identify themes related to men's limited participation in health promotion activities, family support and barriers to disease management, and health care providers' recommendations. Participants reported barriers to men's participation in chronic disease management and healthy lifestyle education activities that can be grouped into two categories: internal and external factors. Internal factors are those for which they are able to make the decision on their own and external factors are those that are not related solely to their decision to take part or not. Four primary aspects were identified related to families' relationships with disease: different

  2. Phosphatidylinositol-glycan-phospholipase D is involved in neurodegeneration in prion disease.

    Jae-Kwang Jin

    Full Text Available PrPSc is formed from a normal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI-anchored prion protein (PrPC by a posttranslational modification. Most GPI-anchored proteins have been shown to be cleaved by GPI phospholipases. Recently, GPI-phospholipase D (GPI-PLD was shown to be a strictly specific enzyme for GPI anchors. To investigate the involvement of GPI-PLD in the processes of neurodegeneration in prion diseases, we examined the mRNA and protein expression levels of GPI-PLD in the brains of a prion animal model (scrapie, and in both the brains and cerebrospinal fluids (CSF of sporadic and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD patients. We found that compared with controls, the expression of GPI-PLD was dramatically down-regulated in the brains of scrapie-infected mice, especially in the caveolin-enriched membrane fractions. Interestingly, the observed decrease in GPI-PLD expression levels began at the same time that PrPSc began to accumulate in the infected brains and this decrease was also observed in both the brain and CSF of CJD patients; however, no differences in expression were observed in either the brains or CSF specimens from Alzheimer's disease patients. Taken together, these results suggest that the down-regulation of GPI-PLD protein may be involved in prion propagation in the brains of prion diseases.

  3. A case of disseminated hydatid disease by surgery involving multiple organs

    Asli Tanrivermis Sayit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is the most common parasitic infection in the world, and is caused by the parasite Echinococcus granulosus. The most common site of this disease is the liver (75%, followed by the lungs, kidney, bones, and brain. Multiple abdominal organ and peritoneal involvement can also be seen in some cases. The dissemination of hydatid cyst disease can develop spontaneously or secondary to trauma or surgery. Here, we present the case of a 69-year-old man with multiple cyst hydatidosis, who underwent surgery for acute appendicitis approximately 20 years previously. Computed tomography of the abdomen shows the multiple active and inactive cystic lesions in the liver, spleen, right kidney, and mesentery. This patient required surgery several times, as well as medical treatment, after the rupture of a mesenteric hydatid cyst during the appendectomy. Combined anthelmintic treatment was recommended to the patient who refused further surgical treatment.

  4. Prevalence and patterns of renal involvement in imaging of malignant lymphoproliferative diseases

    Bach, Andreas Gunter; Behrmann, Curd; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Surov, Alexey; Holzhausen, Hans Jurgen; Katzer, Michaela; Arnold, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Background: Renal involvement in patients with lymphoproliferative disease is an uncommon radiological finding. Purpose: To determine its prevalence and radiological appearances in a patient population. Material and Methods: All forms of lymphoproliferative disease (ICD: C81-C96) were considered. From January 2005 to January 2010, 668 consecutive patients with lymphoproliferative disease were identified with the help of the radiological database and patient records. Inclusion criteria were complete staging including appropriate CT scan and/or MRI. All stored images (initial staging and follow-up examinations) were reviewed. Results: Review of all stored images revealed renal infiltration in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (11 of 364 = 3.0%; median age = 65 years, m:f = 6:5) but also multiple myeloma (2 of 162 = 1.2%; median age = 72 years; m:f = 1:1) and leukemia (5 of 101 4.9%; median age = 12 years; m:f = 2:3). There were no cases of renal infiltration in 41 patients with Hodgkin's disease. In total there were six patients with solitary lesions, five patients with diffuse renal enlargement, four patients with perirenal lesions, and two patients with direct invasion of the kidney. Conclusion: In leukemia the most common imaging pattern is diffuse enlargement. In the other subtypes of lymphoproliferative disease no specific correlation between typical CT patterns and subtype of lymphoproliferative disease can be found. The prevalence of renal involvement is in line with earlier studies. Contrary to earlier reports, multiple lesions were not found to be a common pattern

  5. Oxidative stress and nitrosative stress are involved in different stages of proteolytic pulmonary emphysema.

    Lanzetti, Manuella; da Costa, Cristiane Aguiar; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Barroso, Marina Valente; Martins, Vanessa; Victoni, Tatiana; Lagente, Vincent; Pires, Karla Maria Pereira; e Silva, Patrícia Machado Rodrigues; Resende, Angela Castro; Porto, Luis Cristóvão; Benjamim, Cláudia Farias; Valença, Samuel Santos

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the role of oxidative stress in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to pancreatic porcine elastase (PPE) instillation (0.05 or 0.5 U per mouse, i.t.) to induce pulmonary emphysema. Lungs were collected on days 7, 14, and 21 after PPE instillation. The control group was sham injected. Also, mice treated with 1% aminoguanidine (AMG) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) knockout mice received 0.5 U PPE (i.t.), and lungs were analyzed 21 days after. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage, biochemical analyses of oxidative stress, and lung stereology and morphometry assays. Emphysema was observed histologically at 21 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment; tissues from these mice exhibited increased alveolar linear intercept and air-space volume density in comparison with the control group. TNF-α was elevated at 7 and 14 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment, concomitant with a reduction in the IL-10 levels at the same time points. Myeloperoxidase was elevated in all groups treated with 0.5 U PPE. Oxidative stress was observed during early stages of emphysema, with increased nitrite levels and malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity at 7 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment. Glutathione peroxidase activity was increased in all groups treated with 0.5 U PPE. The emphysema was attenuated when iNOS was inhibited using 1% AMG and in iNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, proteolytic stimulation by PPE enhanced the expression of nitrotyrosine and iNOS, whereas the PPE+AMG group showed low expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine. PPE stimulus also induced endothelial (e) NOS expression, whereas AMG reduced eNOS. Our results suggest that the oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways are triggered by nitric oxide production via iNOS expression in pulmonary emphysema. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxidative stress is involved in Dasatinib-induced apoptosis in rat primary hepatocytes

    Xue, Tao; Luo, Peihua; Zhu, Hong; Zhao, Yuqin [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wu, Honghai; Gai, Renhua; Wu, Youping [Center for Drug Safety Evaluation and Research of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Bo [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Xiaochun, E-mail: yangxiaochun@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Center for Drug Safety Evaluation and Research of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); He, Qiaojun, E-mail: qiaojunhe@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Center for Drug Safety Evaluation and Research of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Dasatinib, a multitargeted inhibitor of BCR–ABL and SRC kinases, exhibits antitumor activity and extends the survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, some patients suffer from hepatotoxicity, which occurs through an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we found that Dasatinib could induce hepatotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Dasatinib reduced the cell viability of rat primary hepatocytes, induced the release of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, and triggered the ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes in Sprague–Dawley rats in vivo. Apoptotic markers (chromatin condensation, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP) were detected to indicate that the injury induced by Dasatinib in hepatocytes in vitro was mediated by apoptosis. This result was further validated in vivo using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Here we found that Dasatinib dramatically increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatocytes, reduced the intracellular glutathione (GSH) content, attenuated the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), generated malondialdehyde (MDA), a product of lipid peroxidation, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) related to oxidative stress and survival. These results confirm that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in Dasatinib-mediated hepatotoxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a typical antioxidant, can scavenge free radicals, attenuate oxidative stress, and protect hepatocytes against Dasatinib-induced injury. Thus, relieving oxidative stress is a viable strategy for reducing Dasatinib-induced hepatotoxicity. -- Highlights: ►Dasatinib shows potential hepatotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. ►Apoptosis plays a vital role in Dasatinib

  7. Identification of Oxidative Stress Related Proteins as Biomarkers for Lung Cancer and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    Amancio Carnero

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer (LC and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD commonly coexist in smokers, and the presence of COPD increases the risk of developing LC. Cigarette smoke causes oxidative stress and an inflammatory response in lung cells, which in turn may be involved in COPD and lung cancer development. The aim of this study was to identify differential proteomic profiles related to oxidative stress response that were potentially involved in these two pathological entities. Protein content was assessed in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL of 60 patients classified in four groups: COPD, COPD and LC, LC, and control (neither COPD nor LC. Proteins were separated into spots by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE and examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF. A total of 16 oxidative stress regulatory proteins were differentially expressed in BAL samples from LC and/or COPD patients as compared with the control group. A distinct proteomic reactive oxygen species (ROS protein signature emerged that characterized lung cancer and COPD. In conclusion, our findings highlight the role of the oxidative stress response proteins in the pathogenic pathways of both diseases, and provide new candidate biomarkers and predictive tools for LC and COPD diagnosis.

  8. A review of scoring systems for ocular involvement in chronic cutaneous bullous diseases.

    Lee, Brendon W H; Tan, Jeremy C K; Radjenovic, Melissa; Coroneo, Minas T; Murrell, Dedee F

    2018-05-22

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) describe a group of rare chronic dermatoses characterized by cutaneous fragility and blistering. Although uncommon, significant ocular surface disease (OSD) may occur in both and require ophthalmological assessment. Disease scoring systems have a critical role in providing objective and accurate assessment of disease severity. The objectives of this report were, firstly, to document the prevalence and severity of ocular involvement in EB/AIBD. Secondly, to review and evaluate existing ocular and systemic scoring systems for EB/AIBD. Finally, to identify areas where further development of ocular specific tools in EB/AIBD could be pursued. A literature search was performed in October 2017 utilising Medline, Embase, and Scopus databases. The results were restricted by date of publication, between 01.01.1950 and 31.10.2017. The reference lists of these articles were then reviewed for additional relevant publications. Articles of all languages were included if an English translation was available. Articles were excluded if they were duplicates, had no reference to ocular involvement in EB/AIBD or described ocular involvement in other diseases. Descriptions of ocular involvement in EB/AIBD were identified in 88 peer-reviewed journal articles. Findings reported include but are not limited to: cicatrising conjunctivitis, meibomian gland dysfunction, dry eye disease, trichiasis, symblepharon, fornix fibrosis, keratopathy, ectropion/entropion, ankyloblepharon, corneal ulceration, visual impairment and blindness. Although scoring systems exist for assessment of OSD in mucous membrane pemphigoid, no such tools exist for the other AIBD subtypes or for EB. Several systemic scoring systems exist in the dermatological literature that are efficacious in grading overall EB/AIBD severity, but have limited inclusion of ocular features. To the best of our knowledge, there is no recognised or validated scoring systems

  9. ROSAI-DORFMAN DISEASE WITH CERVICAL LYMPHADENOPATHY AND ORBITAL INVOLVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Sameer Saleem, Sundas Younas, Kamran Qayyum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD, which is also called as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML, is a rare histiocytic disorder which occurs due to the over-production of non Langerhans sinus histiocytes. It is a nonmalignant disorder that most frequently affects children and young adults and typically presents with fever, night sweats, nonpainful cervical lymphadenopathy, leukocytosis and an elevated ESR. Extranodal involvement may also occur, thus a variety of organs in the body can be affected. Although some viral etiology has been implicated, the disease generally is considered to have an unknown cause. RDD can often be misdiagnosed as lymphoma, leukemia or tuberculosis, so it is imperative to distinguish it from these conditions as well as other forms of histiocytosis because of difference in the modes of treatment. Diagnosis of Rosai-Dorfman disease is based on biopsy of affected tissue. Biopsy showing the presence of emperipolesis, or the engulfment of lymphocytes and other immune cells by histiocytes that express S-100 antigen is diagnostic of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Once diagnosed, further workup including imaging studies are undertaken in order to determine the extent of the disease. In majority of cases, the disease resolves on its own however, treatments including corticosteroids, chemotherapy, surgical treatment or radiotherapy are carried out in severe or persistent disease or when organ function is at stake (e.g. breathing obstruction, kidney failure, visual problems. The case we report is that of a 16 year old girl who presented with a 6 month history of gradual onset drooping of left upper eyelid with mild proptosis of the left eye alongwith mild drooping of right upper eyelid, low grade fever, night sweats and cervical lymphadenopathy. Blood workup showed increased ESR, CT scan of orbits showed superior orbital masses and diagnostic biopsy revealed Rosai-Dorfman disease.

  10. Cerebral involvement in a patient with Goodpasture's disease due to shortened induction therapy: a case report

    Preul Christoph

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Goodpasture's disease is a rare immunological disease with formation of pathognomonic antibodies against renal and pulmonary basement membranes. Cerebral involvement has been reported in several cases in the literature, yet the pathogenetic mechanism is not entirely clear. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian man with Goodpasture's disease and end-stage renal disease presented with two generalized seizures after a period of mild cognitive disturbance. Blood pressure and routine laboratory tests did not exceed the patient's usual values, and examination of cerebrospinal fluid was unremarkable. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed multiple cortical and subcortical lesions on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. Since antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were found to be positive with high titers, plasmapheresis was started. In addition, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was given on day 13. Encephalopathy and MRI lesions disappeared during this therapy, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibodies were significantly reduced. Previous immunosuppressive therapy was performed without corticosteroids and terminated early after 3 months. The differential diagnostic considerations were cerebral vasculitis and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Vasculitis could be seen as an extrarenal manifestation of the underlying disease. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, on the other hand, can be triggered by immunosuppressive therapy and may appear without a hypertensive crisis. Conclusion A combination of central nervous system symptoms with a positive antiglomerular basement membrane test in a patient with Goodpasture's disease should immediately be treated as an acute exacerbation of the disease with likely cross-reactivity of antibodies with the choroid plexus. In our patient, a discontinuous strategy of immunosuppressive therapy may have favored recurrence of Goodpasture's disease.

  11. Nitric oxide in health and disease of the respiratory system

    Ricciardolo, Fabio L. M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Gaston, Benjamin; Folkerts, Gert

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade a plethora of studies have unravelled the multiple roles of nitric oxide (NO) in airway physiology and pathophysiology. In the respiratory tract, NO is produced by a wide variety of cell types and is generated via oxidation of l-arginine that is catalyzed by the enzyme NO

  12. Cardiac involvement in genotype-positive Fabry disease patients assessed by cardiovascular MR.

    Kozor, Rebecca; Grieve, Stuart M; Tchan, Michel C; Callaghan, Fraser; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Denaro, Charles; Moon, James C; Figtree, Gemma A

    2016-02-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) has the potential to provide early detection of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease. We aimed to gain further insight into this by assessing a cohort of Fabry patients using CMR. Fifty genotype-positive Fabry subjects (age 45±2 years; 50% male) referred for CMR and 39 matched controls (age 40±2 years; 59% male) were recruited. Patients had a mean Mainz severity score index of 15±2 (range 0-46), reflecting an overall mild degree of disease severity. Compared with controls, Fabry subjects had a 34% greater left ventricular mass (LVM) index (82±5 vs 61±2 g/m(2), p=0.001) and had a significantly greater papillary muscle contribution to total LVM (13±1 vs 6±0.5%, pgadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 15 Fabry subjects (9/21 males and 6/23 females). The most common site for LGE was the basal inferolateral wall (93%, 14/15). There was a positive association between LVM index and LGE. Despite this, there were two males and three females with no LVH that displayed LGE. Of Fabry subjects who were not on enzyme replacement therapy at enrolment (n=28), six were reclassified as having cardiac involvement (four LVH-negative/LGE-positive, one LVH-positive/LGE-positive and one LVH-positive/LGE-negative). CMR was able to detect cardiac involvement in 48% of this Fabry cohort, despite the overall mild disease phenotype of the cohort. Of those not on ERT, 21% were reclassified as having cardiac involvement allowing improved risk stratification and targeting of therapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Urine proteome analysis in Dent's disease shows high selective changes potentially involved in chronic renal damage.

    Santucci, Laura; Candiano, Giovanni; Anglani, Franca; Bruschi, Maurizio; Tosetto, Enrica; Cremasco, Daniela; Murer, Luisa; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Petretto, Andrea; Caridi, Gianluca; Rossi, Roberta; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Definition of the urinary protein composition would represent a potential tool for diagnosis in many clinical conditions. The use of new proteomic technologies allows detection of genetic and post-trasductional variants that increase sensitivity of the approach but complicates comparison within a heterogeneous patient population. Overall, this limits research of urinary biomarkers. Studying monogenic diseases are useful models to address this issue since genetic variability is reduced among first- and second-degree relatives of the same family. We applied this concept to Dent's disease, a monogenic condition characterised by low-molecular-weight proteinuria that is inherited following an X-linked trait. Results are presented here on a combined proteomic approach (LC-mass spectrometry, Western blot and zymograms for proteases and inhibitors) to characterise urine proteins in a large family (18 members, 6 hemizygous patients, 6 carrier females, and 6 normals) with Dent's diseases due to the 1070G>T mutation of the CLCN5. Gene ontology analysis on more than 1000 proteins showed that several clusters of proteins characterised urine of affected patients compared to carrier females and normal subjects: proteins involved in extracellular matrix remodelling were the major group. Specific analysis on metalloproteases and their inhibitors underscored unexpected mechanisms potentially involved in renal fibrosis. Studying with new-generation techniques for proteomic analysis of the members of a large family with Dent's disease sharing the same molecular defect allowed highly repetitive results that justify conclusions. Identification in urine of proteins actively involved in interstitial matrix remodelling poses the question of active anti-fibrotic drugs in Dent's patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Trace Metal Requirements for Microbial Enzymes Involved in the Production and Consumption of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are heavily influenced by microbiological activity. Microbial enzymes involved in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases often contain metal cofactors. While extensive research has examined the influence of Fe bioavailability on microbial CO2 cycling, fewer studies have explored metal requirements for microbial production and consumption of the second- and third-most abundant greenhouse gases, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we review the current state of biochemical, physiological, and environmental research on transition metal requirements for microbial CH4 and N2O cycling. Methanogenic archaea require large amounts of Fe, Ni, and Co (and some Mo/W and Zn). Low bioavailability of Fe, Ni, and Co limits methanogenesis in pure and mixed cultures and environmental studies. Anaerobic methane oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) likely occurs via reverse methanogenesis since ANME possess most of the enzymes in the methanogenic pathway. Aerobic CH4 oxidation uses Cu or Fe for the first step depending on Cu availability, and additional Fe, Cu, and Mo for later steps. N2O production via classical anaerobic denitrification is primarily Fe-based, whereas aerobic pathways (nitrifier denitrification and archaeal ammonia oxidation) require Cu in addition to, or possibly in place of, Fe. Genes encoding the Cu-containing N2O reductase, the only known enzyme capable of microbial N2O conversion to N2, have only been found in classical denitrifiers. Accumulation of N2O due to low Cu has been observed in pure cultures and a lake ecosystem, but not in marine systems. Future research is needed on metalloenzymes involved in the production of N2O by enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizing archaea, biological mechanisms for scavenging scarce metals, and possible links between metal bioavailability and greenhouse gas fluxes in anaerobic environments where metals may be limiting due to sulfide

  15. Mitochondrial enzymes and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores as targets of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Gibson, Gary E; Huang, Hsueh-Meei

    2004-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative stress accompanies age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Specific mechanisms by which oxidative stress leads to neurodegeneration are unknown. Two targets of oxidative stress that are known to change in neurodegenerative diseases are the mitochondrial enzyme alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. KGDHC activities are diminished in all common neurodegenerative diseases and the changes are particularly well documented in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A second change that occurs in cells from AD patients is an exaggerated endoplasmic reticulum calcium store [i.e., bombesin-releasable calcium stores (BRCS)]. H(2)O(2), a general oxidant, changes both variables in the same direction as occurs in disease. Other oxidants selectively alter these variables. Various antioxidants were used to help define the critical oxidant species that modifies these responses. All of the antioxidants diminish the oxidant-induced carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (cDCF) detectable reactive oxygen species (ROS), but have diverse actions on these cellular processes. For example, alpha-keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) diminishes the H(2)O(2) effects on BRCS, while trolox and DMSO exaggerate the response. Acute trolox treatment does not alter H(2)O(2)-induced changes in KGDHC, whereas chronic treatment with trolox increases KGDHC almost threefold. The results suggest that KGDHC and BRCS provide targets by which oxidative stress may induce neurodegeneration and a useful tool for selecting antioxidants for reversing age-related neurodegeneration.

  16. Management of Patients with Graves’ Disease and Orbital Involvement: Role of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Alice Bruscolini

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the role of choroidal thickness evaluation with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT and enhanced depth imaging (EDI technique in the management of patients with Graves’ disease and orbitopathy (GO. Methods. Thirty-six eyes of 18 patients with GO and 36 eyes of 18 age-matched control subjects were included in this retrospective observational study. All the subjects underwent a complete ophthalmological evaluation, including clinical activity score (CAS and exophthalmometry. The SDOCT images of the choroid were obtained by EDI modality. Results. Choroidal thickness was significantly increased in GO than in control eyes (p<0.01. A significant correlation was found between choroidal thickness and CAS, proptosis, and the duration of disease (p<0.05. Conclusion. This study shows that choroidal thickness, evaluated with EDI-OCT, is significantly increased in patients with GO and correlates with the activity of the disease, proptosis, and duration of the disease. The choroidal thickening may reflect the ocular hemodynamic changes, and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography may be a useful tool for the evaluation of orbital congestion and management of patients with Graves’ disease and orbital involvement.

  17. Polymorphisms in miRNA genes and their involvement in autoimmune diseases susceptibility.

    Latini, Andrea; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola

    2017-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that negatively regulate the expression of multiple protein-encoding genes at the post-transcriptional level. MicroRNAs are involved in different pathways, such as cellular proliferation and differentiation, signal transduction and inflammation, and play crucial roles in the development of several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. They have recently been recognized to play a role also in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although the majority of studies are focused on miRNA expression profiles investigation, a growing number of studies have been investigating the role of polymorphisms in miRNA genes in the autoimmune diseases development. Indeed, polymorphisms affecting the miRNA genes can modify the set of targets they regulate or the maturation efficiency. This review is aimed to give an overview about the available studies that have investigated the association of miRNA gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility to various autoimmune diseases and to their clinical phenotypes.

  18. JNK and NADPH Oxidase Involved in Fluoride-Induced Oxidative Stress in BV-2 Microglia Cells

    Ling Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive fluoride may cause central nervous system (CNS dysfunction, and oxidative stress is a recognized mode of action of fluoride toxicity. In CNS, activated microglial cells can release more reactive oxygen species (ROS, and NADPH oxidase (NOX is the major enzyme for the production of extracellular superoxide in microglia. ROS have been characterized as an important secondary messenger and modulator for various mammalian intracellular signaling pathways, including the MAPK pathways. In this study we examined ROS production and TNF-α, IL-1β inflammatory cytokines releasing, and the expression of MAPKs in BV-2 microglia cells treated with fluoride. We found that fluoride increased JNK phosphorylation level of BV-2 cells and pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 markedly reduced the levels of intracellular and NO. NOX inhibitor apocynin and iNOS inhibitor SMT dramatically decreased NaF-induced ROS and NO generations, respectively. Antioxidant melatonin (MEL resulted in a reduction in JNK phosphorylation in fluoride-stimulated BV-2 microglia. The results confirmed that NOX and iNOS played an important role in fluoride inducing oxidative stress and NO production and JNK took part in the oxidative stress induced by fluoride and meanwhile also could be activated by ROS in fluoride-treated BV-2 cells.

  19. JNK and NADPH Oxidase Involved in Fluoride-Induced Oxidative Stress in BV-2 Microglia Cells

    Yan, Ling; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Chen; Wang, Fei; Song, Yingli; Yan, Nan; Xi, Shuhua; Liu, Ziyou; Sun, Guifan

    2013-01-01

    Excessive fluoride may cause central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, and oxidative stress is a recognized mode of action of fluoride toxicity. In CNS, activated microglial cells can release more reactive oxygen species (ROS), and NADPH oxidase (NOX) is the major enzyme for the production of extracellular superoxide in microglia. ROS have been characterized as an important secondary messenger and modulator for various mammalian intracellular signaling pathways, including the MAPK pathways. In this study we examined ROS production and TNF-α, IL-1β inflammatory cytokines releasing, and the expression of MAPKs in BV-2 microglia cells treated with fluoride. We found that fluoride increased JNK phosphorylation level of BV-2 cells and pretreatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 markedly reduced the levels of intracellular O2 ·− and NO. NOX inhibitor apocynin and iNOS inhibitor SMT dramatically decreased NaF-induced ROS and NO generations, respectively. Antioxidant melatonin (MEL) resulted in a reduction in JNK phosphorylation in fluoride-stimulated BV-2 microglia. The results confirmed that NOX and iNOS played an important role in fluoride inducing oxidative stress and NO production and JNK took part in the oxidative stress induced by fluoride and meanwhile also could be activated by ROS in fluoride-treated BV-2 cells. PMID:24072958

  20. Involvement of the Acr3 and DctA anti-porters in arsenite oxidation in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A.

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shi, Zunji; Bothner, Brian; Wang, Gejiao; McDermott, Timothy R

    2015-06-01

    Microbial arsenite (AsIII) oxidation forms a critical piece of the arsenic cycle in nature, though our understanding of how and why microorganisms oxidize AsIII remains rudimentary. Our model organism Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A contains two distinct ars operons (ars1 and ars2) that are similar in their coding region content. The ars1 operon is located nearby the aio operon that is essential for AsIII oxidation. The AsIII/H(+) anti-porters encoded by acr3-1 and acr3-2 are required for maximal AsIII and antimonite (SbIII) resistance, but acr3-1 (negatively regulated by ArsR-1) appears more active in this regard and also required for AsIII oxidation and expression of aioBA. A malate-phosphate anti-porter DctA is regulated by RpoN and AsIII, and is required for normal growth with malate as a sole carbon source. Qualitatively, a ΔdctA mutant was normal for AsIII oxidation and AsIII/SbIII resistance at metalloid concentrations inhibitory to the Δacr3-1 mutant; however, aioBA induction kinetics was significantly phase-shift delayed. Acr3 involvement in AsIII/SbIII resistance is reasonably well understood, but the role of Acr3 and DctA anti-porters in AsIII oxidation and its regulation is unexpected, and suggests that controlled AsIII trafficking across the cytoplasmic membrane is important to a process understood to occur in the periplasm. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Whole-body muscle MRI in 20 patients suffering from late onset Pompe disease: Involvement patterns.

    Carlier, Robert-Yves; Laforet, Pascal; Wary, Claire; Mompoint, Dominique; Laloui, Kenza; Pellegrini, Nadine; Annane, Djillali; Carlier, Pierre G; Orlikowski, David

    2011-11-01

    To describe muscle involvement on whole-body MRI scans in adult patients at different stages of late-onset Pompe disease. Twenty patients aged 37 to 75 were examined. Five were bedridden and required ventilatory support. Axial and coronal T1 turbo-spin-echo sequences were performed on 1.5T or 3T systems. MRI was scored for 47 muscles using Mercuri's classification. Whole-body scans were obtained with a mean in-room time of 29 min. Muscle changes consisted of internal bright signals of fatty replacement without severe retraction of the muscles' corpus. Findings were consistent with previous descriptions of spine extensors and pelvic girdle, but also provided new information on recurrent muscle changes particularly in the tongue and subscapularis muscle. Moreover thigh involvement was more heterogeneous than previously described, in terms of distribution across muscles as well as with respect to the overall clinical presentation. Whole-body MRI provides a very evocative description of muscle involvement in Pompe disease in adults. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval tests for gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs

    Xue Fuzhong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic association study is currently the primary vehicle for identification and characterization of disease-predisposing variant(s which usually involves multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs available. However, SNP-wise association tests raise concerns over multiple testing. Haplotype-based methods have the advantage of being able to account for correlations between neighbouring SNPs, yet assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE and potentially large number degrees of freedom can harm its statistical power and robustness. Approaches based on principal component analysis (PCA are preferable in this regard but their performance varies with methods of extracting principal components (PCs. Results PCA-based bootstrap confidence interval test (PCA-BCIT, which directly uses the PC scores to assess gene-disease association, was developed and evaluated for three ways of extracting PCs, i.e., cases only(CAES, controls only(COES and cases and controls combined(CES. Extraction of PCs with COES is preferred to that with CAES and CES. Performance of the test was examined via simulations as well as analyses on data of rheumatoid arthritis and heroin addiction, which maintains nominal level under null hypothesis and showed comparable performance with permutation test. Conclusions PCA-BCIT is a valid and powerful method for assessing gene-disease association involving multiple SNPs.

  3. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    Antonio Mancini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions.

  4. Solute carrier family 2 member 1 is involved in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Vazquez-Chantada, Mercedes; Gonzalez-Lahera, Aintzane; Martinez-Arranz, Ibon

    2013-01-01

    ,414 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) cases and 4,567 controls were genotyped. Liver expression of the associated gene was measured and the effect of its potential role was studied by silencing the gene in vitro. Whole genome expression, oxidative stress (OS), and the consequences of oleic acid (OA......Susceptibility to develop nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has genetic bases, but the associated variants are uncertain. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic variants that could help to prognose and further understand the genetics and development of NAFLD. Allele frequencies...... association with NAFLD, but not with T2DM, being the haplotype containing the minor allele of SLC2A1 sequence related to the susceptibility to develop NAFLD. Gene-expression analysis demonstrated a significant down-regulation of SLC2A1 in NAFLD livers. Enrichment functional analyses of transcriptome profiles...

  5. How bimetallic electrocatalysts does work for reactions involved in fuel cells? Example of ethanol oxidation and comparison to methanol

    Leger, J.-M.; Rousseau, S.; Coutanceau, C.; Hahn, F.; Lamy, C. [UMR 6503, Electrocatalysis Group, CNRS - University of Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex (France)

    2005-09-05

    Carbon-supported Pt-based nanosized electrocatalysts can be synthesized for methanol and ethanol electrooxidation. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt can be greatly enhanced by using Pt-Ru/C for methanol oxidation or Pt-Sn/C for ethanol oxidation. In situ IR reflectance spectroscopy is a convenient tool to better understand the importance of the different adsorption steps involved in the mechanisms of electrooxidation. With Pt/C, it appears clearly that linearly adsorbed CO is the poisoning species formed during methanol and ethanol oxidation. In the case of methanol, even with Pt-Ru/C (the most active catalyst), adsorbed CO is also a reactive intermediate. The enhancement of activity observed in such a case is due to the possibility to activate water at lower potentials in the presence of Ru. With Pt-Sn/C, the mechanism of the electrooxidation of ethanol is strongly modified. If at low potentials, poisoning with adsorbed CO still exists (as with Pt/C), the oxidation of ethanol at potentials greater than 0.4 V versus RHE occurs through an adsorbed acetyl species which can lead to the formation of acetaldehyde and acetic acid as final products in addition to carbon dioxide. (author)

  6. Sonic hedgehog promotes neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons under oxidative stress: Involving of mitochondria and energy metabolism.

    He, Weiliang; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Xiangjian; He, Junna; Xie, Yanzhao; Chen, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been demonstrated to be involved in the etiology of several neurobiological disorders. Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a secreted glycoprotein factor, has been implicated in promoting several aspects of brain remodeling process. Mitochondria may play an important role in controlling fundamental processes in neuroplasticity. However, little evidence is available about the effect and the potential mechanism of Shh on neurite outgrowth in primary cortical neurons under oxidative stress. Here, we revealed that Shh treatment significantly increased the viability of cortical neurons in a dose-dependent manner, which was damaged by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Shh alleviated the apoptosis rate of H 2 O 2 -induced neurons. Shh also increased neuritogenesis injuried by H 2 O 2 in primary cortical neurons. Moreover, Shh reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased the activities of SOD and and decreased the productions of MDA. In addition, Shh protected mitochondrial functions, elevated the cellular ATP levels and amelioratesd the impairment of mitochondrial complex II activities of cortical neurons induced by H 2 O 2 . In conclusion, all these results suggest that Shh acts as a prosurvival factor playing an essential role to neurite outgrowth of cortical neuron under H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative stress, possibly through counteracting ROS release and preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP as well as mitochondrial complex II activities against oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  8. The SloR metalloregulator is involved in the Streptococcus mutans oxidative stress response.

    Crepps, S C; Fields, E E; Galan, D; Corbett, J P; Von Hasseln, E R; Spatafora, G A

    2016-12-01

    SloR, a 25-kDa metalloregulatory protein in Streptococcus mutans modulates the expression of multiple genes, including the sloABC operon that encodes essential Mn 2+ transport and genes that promote cariogenesis. In this study, we report on SloC- and SloR-deficient strains of S. mutans (GMS284 and GMS584, respectively) that demonstrate compromised survivorship compared with their UA159 wild-type progenitor and their complemented strains (GMS285 and GMS585, respectively), when challenged with streptonigrin and/or in growth competition experiments. The results of streptonigrin assays revealed significantly larger zones of inhibition for GMS584 than for either UA159 or GMS585, indicating weakened S. mutans survivorship in the absence of SloR. Competition assays revealed a compromised ability for GMS284 and GMS584 to survive peroxide challenge compared with their SloC- and SloR-proficient counterparts. These findings are consistent with a role for SloC and SloR in S. mutans aerotolerance. We also predicted differential expression of oxidative stress tolerance genes in GMS584 versus UA159 and GMS585 when grown aerobically. The results of quantitative RT-PCR experiments revealed S. mutans sod, tpx, and sloC expression that was upregulated in GMS584 compared with UA159 and GMS585, indicating that the impact of oxidative stress on S. mutans is more severe in the absence of SloR than in its presence. The results of electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicate that SloR does not bind to the sod or tpx promoter regions directly, implicating intermediaries that may arbitrate the SloR response to oxidative stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress in the Etiopathogenesis of Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy Disease

    Kaplan Mustafa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective here is to examine the role of overall oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of gluten-sensitive enteropathy disease and its relationship with gluten free diet and autoantibodies.

  10. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    Ivan Verrastro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease.

  12. Involvement of Werner syndrome protein in MUTYH-mediated repair of oxidative DNA damage

    Kanagaraj, R.; Parasuraman, P.; Mihaljevic, B.; van Loon, B.; Burdová, Kamila; König, C.; Furrer, A.; Bohr, V.A.; Hübscher, U.; Janscak, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 17 (2012), s. 8449-8459 ISSN 0305-1048 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747/1; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 3100-109312/2; Oncosuisse(CH) KLS-02344-02-2009; NIH(US) Z01-AG000726-17 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA repair * oxidative stress * MUTYH * WRN * Pol lambda Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.278, year: 2012

  13. A novel mechanism involved in the coupling of mitochondrial biogenesis to oxidative phosphorylation

    Jelena Ostojić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential organelles that are central to a multitude of cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, which produces most of the ATP in animal cells. Thus it is important to understand not only the mechanisms and biogenesis of this energy production machinery but also how it is regulated in both physiological and pathological contexts. A recent study by Ostojić et al. [Cell Metabolism (2013 18, 567-577] has uncovered a regulatory loop by which the biogenesis of a major enzyme of the OXPHOS pathway, the respiratory complex III, is coupled to the energy producing activity of the mitochondria.

  14. Involved field (IF) irradiation with or without chemotherapy in the management of children with Hodgkin's disease

    Jereb, B.; Tan, C.; Bretsky, S.; He, S.Q.; Exelby, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present policy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) of treating children with Hodgkin's disease [HD] is as follows: involved field (IF) irradiation only (3,600 rad) for Stages IA and IIA; IF irradiation (2,400 or 2,000 rad) combined with multidrug chemotherapy (MDP) protocol for all other stages. A somewhat higher recurrence rate is accepted for Stages IA and IIA in view of the good salvage rate for these recurrences and in view of side effects of more aggressive types of radiation treatment. One hundred forty-two patients with HD, 2-19 years of age, were treated at MSKCC between 1970 and 1981; 98 of these were treated according to the present policy (SP group), and 44 (NP group) were treated differently. All SP patients underwent staging laparotomy. The follow-up time was 12 to 146 months with a median of 65 months; two patients were lost to follow-up. For the SP group, all stages, 10-year disease-free survival is 77%, and 10-year survival is 93%. By comparison, in the NP group 10-year disease-free survival is 64%, and 10-year survival is 80%. The disease-free survival of SP patients in Stages IA and IIA treated with IF radiation alone is 72%, and survival is 95%. The disease-free survival of SP patients in advanced stages treated with combined radiation and chemotherapy is 87%; the salvage rate of recurrent disease in these stages is poor. The survival was apparently better in the SP group as compared to the NP group. All 6 patients of the SP group who died had a nodular sclerosing type of HD. None of the patients in the SP group have developed secondary malignancies, and no severe bone growth retardations or late effects to other organs were observed

  15. Integrative analysis for finding genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases

    Bergholdt, R.; Størling, Zenia, Marian; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an integrative analysis method combining genetic interactions, identified using type 1 diabetes genome scan data, and a high-confidence human protein interaction network. Resulting networks were ranked by the significance of the enrichment of proteins from interacting regions. We...... identified a number of new protein network modules and novel candidate genes/proteins for type 1 diabetes. We propose this type of integrative analysis as a general method for the elucidation of genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases....

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in the development of memory and their involvement in certain neurological diseases.

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Ochoa-Hernández, A B; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    Today, scientists accept that the central nervous system of an adult possesses considerable morphological and functional flexibility, allowing it to perform structural remodelling processes even after the individual is fully developed and mature. In addition to the vast number of genes participating in the development of memory, different known epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal and pathological modifications to neurons and therefore also affect the mechanisms of memory development. This study entailed a systematic review of biomedical article databases in search of genetic and epigenetic factors that participate in synaptic function and memory. The activation of gene expression in response to external stimuli also occurs in differentiated nerve cells. Neural activity induces specific forms of synaptic plasticity that permit the creation and storage of long-term memory. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in synaptic modification processes and in the creation and development of memory. Changes in these mechanisms result in the cognitive and memory impairment seen in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease) and in neurodevelopmental disorders (Rett syndrome, fragile X, and schizophrenia). Nevertheless, results obtained from different models are promising and point to potential treatments for some of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Noboru Toda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic nerves and nitric oxide (NO liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD.

  18. Blocked muscle fat oxidation during exercise in neutral lipid storage disease

    Laforêt, Pascal; Ørngreen, Mette; Preisler, Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role.......To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role....

  19. No Signs of Inflammation during Knee Surgery with Ischemia: A Study Involving Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    Lars Hållström

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide donors and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO may decrease ischemia/reperfusion injury as reported in animal and human models. We investigated whether the attenuation of reperfusion injury, seen by others, in patients undergoing knee arthroplasty could be reproduced when patients had spinal anesthesia. 45 consecutive patients were randomized into three groups (n=15. Groups 1 and 3 were receiving iNO 80 ppm or placebo (nitrogen, N2 throughout the entire operation, and group 2 only received iNO in the beginning and at the end of the operation. Blood samples were collected before surgery, at the end of the surgery, and 2 hours postoperatively. Muscle biopsies were taken from quadriceps femoris muscle before and after ischemia. There were no increases in plasma levels of soluble adhesion molecules: ICAM, VCAM, P-selectin, E-selectin, or of HMGB1, in any of the groups. There were low numbers of CD68+ macrophages and of endothelial cells expression of ICAM, VCAM, and P-selectin in the muscle analyzed by immunohistochemistry, prior to and after ischemia. No signs of endothelial cell activation or inflammatory response neither systemically nor locally could be detected. The absence of inflammatory response questions this model of ischemia/reperfusion, but may also be related to the choice of anesthetic method EudraCTnr.

  20. Effect of agmatine on locus coeruleus neuron activity: possible involvement of nitric oxide

    Ruiz-Durántez, Eduardo; Ruiz-Ortega, José A; Pineda, Joseba; Ugedo, Luisa

    2002-01-01

    To investigate whether agmatine (the proposed endogenous ligand for imidazoline receptors) controls locus coeruleus neuron activity and to elucidate its mechanism of action, we used single-unit extracellular recording techniques in anaesthetized rats. Agmatine (10, 20 and 40 μg, i.c.v.) increased in a dose-related manner the firing rate of locus coeruleus neurons (maximal increase: 95±13% at 40 μg). I1-imidazoline receptor ligands stimulate locus coeruleus neuron activity through an indirect mechanism originated in the paragigantocellularis nucleus via excitatory amino acids. However, neither electrolytic lesions of the paragigantocellularis nucleus nor pretreatment with the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid (1 μmol, i.c.v.) modified agmatine effect (10 μg, i.c.v.). After agmatine administration (20 μg, i.c.v.), dose-response curves for the effect of clonidine (0.625 – 10 μg kg−1 i.v.) or morphine (0.3 – 4.8 mg kg−1 i.v.) on locus coeruleus neurons were not different from those obtained in the control groups. Pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors Nω-nitro-L-arginine (10 μg, i.c.v.) or Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) but not with the less active stereoisomer Nω-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) completely blocked agmatine effect (10 and 40 μg, i.c.v.). Similarly, when agmatine (20 pmoles) was applied into the locus coeruleus there was an increase that was blocked by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 μg, i.c.v.) in the firing rate of the locus coeruleus neurons (maximal increase 53±11% and 14±10% before and after nitric oxide synthase inhibition, respectively). This study demonstrates that agmatine stimulates the firing rate of locus coeruleus neurons via a nitric oxide synthase-dependent mechanism located in this nucleus. PMID:11877321

  1. Brain MRI and SPECT in the diagnosis of early neurological involvement in Wilson's disease

    Piga, Mario; Satta, Loredana; Serra, Alessandra; Loi, Gianluigi; Murru, Alessandra; Demelia, Luigi; Sias, Alessandro; Marrosu, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of brain MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in early detection of central nervous system abnormalities in patients affected by Wilson's disease (WD) with or without neurological involvement. Out of 25 consecutive WD patients, 13 showed hepatic involvement, ten hepatic and neurological manifestations, and twp hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric symptoms, including mainly movement disorders, major depression, and psychosis. Twenty-four healthy, age-gender matched subjects served as controls. All patients underwent brain MRI and 99m Tc-ethyl-cysteinate dimer (ECD) SPECT before starting specific therapy. Voxel-by-voxel analyses were performed using statistical parametric mapping to compare differences in 99m Tc-ECD brain uptake between the two groups. Brain MRI showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in seven patients (28%), six of whom were affected by hepatic and neurological forms. Brain perfusion SPECT showed pathological data in 19 patients (76%), revealing diffuse or focal hypoperfusion in superior frontal (Brodmann area (BA) 6), prefrontal (BA 9), parietal (BA 40), and occipital (BA 18, BA 39) cortices in temporal gyri (BA 37, BA 21) and in caudatus and putamen. Moreover, hepatic involvement was detected in nine subjects; eight presented both hepatic and neurological signs, while two exhibited WD-correlated hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric alterations. All but one patient with abnormal MRI matched with abnormal ECD SPECT. Pathologic MRI findings were obtained in six out of ten patients with hepatic and neurological involvement while abnormal ECD SPECT was revealed in eight patients. Both patients with hepatic, neurological, and psychiatric involvement displayed abnormal ECD SPECT and one displayed an altered MRI. These findings suggest that ECD SPECT might be useful in detecting early brain damage in WD, not only in the perspective of assessing and treating motor impairment but also in evaluating better the

  2. Polydatin Protects Bone Marrow Stem Cells against Oxidative Injury: Involvement of Nrf 2/ARE Pathways

    Meihui Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polydatin, a glucoside of resveratrol, has been reported to possess potent antioxidative effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of polydatin in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs death caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, imitating the microenvironment surrounding transplanted cells in the injured spinal cord in vitro. In our study, MTT results showed that polydatin effectively prevented the decrease of cell viability caused by H2O2. Hochest 33258, Annexin V-PI, and Western blot assay showed H2O2-induced apoptosis in BMSCs, which was attenuated by polydatin. Further studies indicated that polydatin significantly protects BMSCs against apoptosis due to its antioxidative effects and the regulation of Nrf 2/ARE pathway. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin could be used in combination with BMSCs for the treatment of spinal cord injury by improving the cell survival and oxidative stress microenvironments.

  3. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrogen Gas Is Involved in Auxin-Induced Lateral Root Formation by Modulating Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    Zeyu Cao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolism of molecular hydrogen (H2 in bacteria and algae has been widely studied, and it has attracted increasing attention in the context of animals and plants. However, the role of endogenous H2 in lateral root (LR formation is still unclear. Here, our results showed that H2-induced lateral root formation is a universal event. Naphthalene-1-acetic acid (NAA; the auxin analog was able to trigger endogenous H2 production in tomato seedlings, and a contrasting response was observed in the presence of N-1-naphthyphthalamic acid (NPA, an auxin transport inhibitor. NPA-triggered the inhibition of H2 production and thereafter lateral root development was rescued by exogenously applied H2. Detection of endogenous nitric oxide (NO by the specific probe 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR analyses revealed that the NO level was increased in both NAA- and H2-treated tomato seedlings. Furthermore, NO production and thereafter LR formation induced by auxin and H2 were prevented by 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO; a specific scavenger of NO and the inhibitor of nitrate reductase (NR; an important NO synthetic enzyme. Molecular evidence confirmed that some representative NO-targeted cell cycle regulatory genes were also induced by H2, but was impaired by the removal of endogenous NO. Genetic evidence suggested that in the presence of H2, Arabidopsis mutants nia2 (in particular and nia1 (two nitrate reductases (NR-defective mutants exhibited defects in lateral root length. Together, these results demonstrated that auxin-induced H2 production was associated with lateral root formation, at least partially via a NR-dependent NO synthesis.

  5. Deep sequencing of foot-and-mouth disease virus reveals RNA sequences involved in genome packaging.

    Logan, Grace; Newman, Joseph; Wright, Caroline F; Lasecka-Dykes, Lidia; Haydon, Daniel T; Cottam, Eleanor M; Tuthill, Tobias J

    2017-10-18

    Non-enveloped viruses protect their genomes by packaging them into an outer shell or capsid of virus-encoded proteins. Packaging and capsid assembly in RNA viruses can involve interactions between capsid proteins and secondary structures in the viral genome as exemplified by the RNA bacteriophage MS2 and as proposed for other RNA viruses of plants, animals and human. In the picornavirus family of non-enveloped RNA viruses, the requirements for genome packaging remain poorly understood. Here we show a novel and simple approach to identify predicted RNA secondary structures involved in genome packaging in the picornavirus foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). By interrogating deep sequencing data generated from both packaged and unpackaged populations of RNA we have determined multiple regions of the genome with constrained variation in the packaged population. Predicted secondary structures of these regions revealed stem loops with conservation of structure and a common motif at the loop. Disruption of these features resulted in attenuation of virus growth in cell culture due to a reduction in assembly of mature virions. This study provides evidence for the involvement of predicted RNA structures in picornavirus packaging and offers a readily transferable methodology for identifying packaging requirements in many other viruses. Importance In order to transmit their genetic material to a new host, non-enveloped viruses must protect their genomes by packaging them into an outer shell or capsid of virus-encoded proteins. For many non-enveloped RNA viruses the requirements for this critical part of the viral life cycle remain poorly understood. We have identified RNA sequences involved in genome packaging of the picornavirus foot-and-mouth disease virus. This virus causes an economically devastating disease of livestock affecting both the developed and developing world. The experimental methods developed to carry out this work are novel, simple and transferable to the

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis vs. pulmonary involvement of collagen vascular disease: HRCT findings

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Im, Jung Gi; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Seon Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and pulmonary involvement of collagen vascular disease (CVD) are well known cause of diffuse interstitial lung disease which lead to fibrosis and honeycombing. We analyzed HRCT findings of 33 patients with IPF and 14 patients with CVD in terms of predominant pattern, site of involvement, mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural change and pulmonary volume loss. Criteria of mediastinal lymph node enlargement and pleural thickening were 15 mm in long diameter and 3 mm, respectively. Volume loss of the lung was measured by using hilar height ratio (apex to hilum/hilum to diaphragmatic dome). Mean age was 61 years for IPF and 46 years for CVD and male: female ratio was 27:6, 4:10, respectively. Predominant HRCT pattern was honeycombing for IPF (63%), and ground-glass opacity for CVD (66%) (p=0.001). Predominantly, subpleural involvement was seen in 90% for IPF and 74% for CVD. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement was seen in 47% of the patient with IPF and 14% with CVD (p=0.004). Pleural thickening was seen in 97% of the patients with IPF and 42% with CVD (p=0.002). Pleural effusion was seen in 10% of the patients with IPF and 36% with CVD (p=0.009). Hilar height ratio of more than 1.5 was seen in 84% of the patients with IPF and 29% with CVD. In conclusion, our study shows that patients with IPF are prone to have more progressed stage of pulmonary fibrosis than the patients with CVD on HRCT

  7. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis vs. pulmonary involvement of collagen vascular disease: HRCT findings

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Im, Jung Gi; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Seon Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    Both idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and pulmonary involvement of collagen vascular disease (CVD) are well known cause of diffuse interstitial lung disease which lead to fibrosis and honeycombing. We analyzed HRCT findings of 33 patients with IPF and 14 patients with CVD in terms of predominant pattern, site of involvement, mediastinal lymph node enlargement, pleural change and pulmonary volume loss. Criteria of mediastinal lymph node enlargement and pleural thickening were 15 mm in long diameter and 3 mm, respectively. Volume loss of the lung was measured by using hilar height ratio (apex to hilum/hilum to diaphragmatic dome). Mean age was 61 years for IPF and 46 years for CVD and male: female ratio was 27:6, 4:10, respectively. Predominant HRCT pattern was honeycombing for IPF (63%), and ground-glass opacity for CVD (66%) (p=0.001). Predominantly, subpleural involvement was seen in 90% for IPF and 74% for CVD. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement was seen in 47% of the patient with IPF and 14% with CVD (p=0.004). Pleural thickening was seen in 97% of the patients with IPF and 42% with CVD (p=0.002). Pleural effusion was seen in 10% of the patients with IPF and 36% with CVD (p=0.009). Hilar height ratio of more than 1.5 was seen in 84% of the patients with IPF and 29% with CVD. In conclusion, our study shows that patients with IPF are prone to have more progressed stage of pulmonary fibrosis than the patients with CVD on HRCT.

  8. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Roca, M.; Mota, J.; Alfonso, P.; Pocovi, M.; Giraldo, P.

    2007-01-01

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r 2 = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease

  9. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Roca, M. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Mota, J. [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Medimagen, Barcelona (Spain); Alfonso, P. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Pocovi, M. [Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Zaragoza University (Spain); Giraldo, P. [Haematology Department, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: pgiraldo@salud.aragon.es

    2007-04-15

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r {sup 2} = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease.

  10. Possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in protective effect of melatonin against sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice.

    Kumar, Anil; Singh, Anant

    2009-08-01

    Sleep is an important physiological process responsible for the maintenance of physical, mental and emotional health of a living being. Sleep deprivation is considered risky for several pathological diseases such as anxiety and motor and cognitive dysfunctions. Sleep deprivation has recently been reported to cause oxidative damage. This study has been designed to explore the possible involvement of the GABAergic mechanism in protective effects of melatonin against 72-h sleep deprivation-induced behaviour modification and oxidative damage in mice. Mice were sleep-deprived for a period of 72 h using the grid over water suspended method. Animals were divided into groups of 6-8 animals each. Melatonin (5 and 10 mg/kg), flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg), picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) and muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) were administered for 5 days starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioural tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber, actophotometer) and body weight assessment followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were carried out. The 72-h sleep deprivation caused significant anxiety-like behaviour, weight loss, impaired locomotor activity and oxidative damage as compared with naïve (without sleep deprivation). Treatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, ip) significantly improved locomotor activity, weight loss and antianxiety effect as compared with control (sleep-deprived). Biochemically, melatonin treatment significantly restored reduced glutathione, catalase activity, attenuated lipid peroxidation and nitrite level as compared with control animals (72-h sleep-deprived). Flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg) and picrotoxin (0.5 mg/kg) pretreatments with a lower dose of melatonin (5 mg/kg) significantly antagonized the protective effect of melatonin. However, muscimol (0.05 mg/kg) pretreatment with melatonin (5 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the protective effect of melatonin which was significant as compared with their

  11. Families Affected by Huntington's Disease Report Difficulties in Communication, Emotional Involvement, and Problem Solving.

    Jona, Celine M H; Labuschagne, Izelle; Mercieca, Emily-Clare; Fisher, Fiona; Gluyas, Cathy; Stout, Julie C; Andrews, Sophie C

    2017-01-01

    Family functioning in Huntington's disease (HD) is known from previous studies to be adversely affected. However, which aspects of family functioning are disrupted is unknown, limiting the empirical basis around which to create supportive interventions. The aim of the current study was to assess family functioning in HD families. We assessed family functioning in 61 participants (38 HD gene-expanded participants and 23 family members) using the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD; Epstein, Baldwin and Bishop, 1983), which provides scores for seven domains of functioning: Problem Solving; Communication; Affective Involvement; Affective Responsiveness; Behavior Control; Roles; and General Family Functioning. The most commonly reported disrupted domain for HD participants was Affective Involvement, which was reported by 39.5% of HD participants, followed closely by General Family Functioning (36.8%). For family members, the most commonly reported dysfunctional domains were Affective Involvement and Communication (both 52.2%). Furthermore, symptomatic HD participants reported more disruption to Problem Solving than pre-symptomatic HD participants. In terms of agreement between pre-symptomatic and symptomatic HD participants and their family members, all domains showed moderate to very good agreement. However, on average, family members rated Communication as more disrupted than their HD affected family member. These findings highlight the need to target areas of emotional engagement, communication skills and problem solving in family interventions in HD.

  12. Families Affected by Huntington’s Disease Report Difficulties in Communication, Emotional Involvement, and Problem Solving

    Jona, Celine M.H.; Labuschagne, Izelle; Mercieca, Emily-Clare; Fisher, Fiona; Gluyas, Cathy; Stout, Julie C.; Andrews, Sophie C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Family functioning in Huntington’s disease (HD) is known from previous studies to be adversely affected. However, which aspects of family functioning are disrupted is unknown, limiting the empirical basis around which to create supportive interventions. Objective: The aim of the current study was to assess family functioning in HD families. Methods: We assessed family functioning in 61 participants (38 HD gene-expanded participants and 23 family members) using the McMaster Family Assessment Device (FAD; Epstein, Baldwin and Bishop, 1983), which provides scores for seven domains of functioning: Problem Solving; Communication; Affective Involvement; Affective Responsiveness; Behavior Control; Roles; and General Family Functioning. Results: The most commonly reported disrupted domain for HD participants was Affective Involvement, which was reported by 39.5% of HD participants, followed closely by General Family Functioning (36.8%). For family members, the most commonly reported dysfunctional domains were Affective Involvement and Communication (both 52.2%). Furthermore, symptomatic HD participants reported more disruption to Problem Solving than pre-symptomatic HD participants. In terms of agreement between pre-symptomatic and symptomatic HD participants and their family members, all domains showed moderate to very good agreement. However, on average, family members rated Communication as more disrupted than their HD affected family member. Conclusion: These findings highlight the need to target areas of emotional engagement, communication skills and problem solving in family interventions in HD. PMID:28968240

  13. Corpus callosum involvement: a useful clue for differentiating Fabry disease from multiple sclerosis

    Cocozza, Sirio; Olivo, Gaia; Pontillo, Giuseppe; Ugga, Lorenzo; De Rosa, Dario; Imbriaco, Massimo; Brunetti, Arturo; Tedeschi, Enrico; Riccio, Eleonora; Migliaccio, Silvia; Pisani, Antonio; Russo, Camilla; Feriozzi, Sandro; Veroux, Massimiliano; Battaglia, Yuri; Concolino, Daniela; Pieruzzi, Federico; Tuttolomondo, Antonino; Caronia, Aurelio; Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Lanzillo, Roberta; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed as a possible differential diagnosis for Fabry disease (FD). The aim of this work was to evaluate the involvement of corpus callosum (CC) on MR images and its possible role as a radiological sign to differentiate between FD and MS. In this multicentric study, we retrospectively evaluated the presence of white matter lesions (WMLs) on the FLAIR images of 104 patients with FD and 117 patients with MS. The incidence of CC-WML was assessed in the two groups and also in a subgroup of 37 FD patients showing neurological symptoms. WMLs were detected in 50 of 104 FD patients (48.1%) and in all MS patients. However, a lesion in the CC was detected in only 3 FD patients (2.9%) and in 106 MS patients (90.6%). In the FD subgroup with neurological symptoms, WMLs were present in 26 of 37 patients (70.3%), with two subjects (5.4%) showing a definite callosal lesion. FD patients have a very low incidence of CC involvement on conventional MR images compared to MS, independently from the clinical presentation and the overall degree of WM involvement. Evaluating the presence of CC lesions on brain MR scans can be used as a radiological sign for a differential diagnosis between MS and FD, rapidly addressing the physician toward a correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment options. (orig.)

  14. Corpus callosum involvement: a useful clue for differentiating Fabry disease from multiple sclerosis

    Cocozza, Sirio; Olivo, Gaia; Pontillo, Giuseppe; Ugga, Lorenzo; De Rosa, Dario; Imbriaco, Massimo; Brunetti, Arturo; Tedeschi, Enrico [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Riccio, Eleonora; Migliaccio, Silvia; Pisani, Antonio [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Public Health, Nephrology Unit, Naples (Italy); Russo, Camilla [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Feriozzi, Sandro [Belcolle Hospital, Nephrology and Dialysis Department, Viterbo (Italy); Veroux, Massimiliano [University Hospital of Catania, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies, Catania (Italy); Battaglia, Yuri [St. Anna Hospital-University, Department of Specialized Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Ferrara (Italy); Concolino, Daniela [University Magna Graecia, Department of Pediatrics, Catanzaro (Italy); Pieruzzi, Federico [University of Milano-Bicocca, Nephrology Unit, Milan (Italy); Tuttolomondo, Antonino [University of Palermo, Internal Medicine, DiBiMIS, Palermo (Italy); Caronia, Aurelio [Triolo Zancia Care Home, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Cinzia Valeria; Lanzillo, Roberta; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo [University ' ' Federico II' ' , Department of Neurosciences and Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2017-06-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been proposed as a possible differential diagnosis for Fabry disease (FD). The aim of this work was to evaluate the involvement of corpus callosum (CC) on MR images and its possible role as a radiological sign to differentiate between FD and MS. In this multicentric study, we retrospectively evaluated the presence of white matter lesions (WMLs) on the FLAIR images of 104 patients with FD and 117 patients with MS. The incidence of CC-WML was assessed in the two groups and also in a subgroup of 37 FD patients showing neurological symptoms. WMLs were detected in 50 of 104 FD patients (48.1%) and in all MS patients. However, a lesion in the CC was detected in only 3 FD patients (2.9%) and in 106 MS patients (90.6%). In the FD subgroup with neurological symptoms, WMLs were present in 26 of 37 patients (70.3%), with two subjects (5.4%) showing a definite callosal lesion. FD patients have a very low incidence of CC involvement on conventional MR images compared to MS, independently from the clinical presentation and the overall degree of WM involvement. Evaluating the presence of CC lesions on brain MR scans can be used as a radiological sign for a differential diagnosis between MS and FD, rapidly addressing the physician toward a correct diagnosis and subsequent treatment options. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of cochlear involvement by distortion product otoacoustic emission in Behçet's disease.

    Dagli, Muharrem; Eryilmaz, Adil; Tanrikulu, Salih; Aydin, Acar; Gonul, Muzeyyen; Gul, Ulker; Gocer, Celil

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cochlear involvement in patients with Behçet's disease. Twenty-six Behçet's disease patients (52 ears) and 24 sex and age-matched healthy control subjects (48 ears) were included in the study. Pure-tone audiometry at frequencies 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000 Hz, immittance measures including tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing and DPOAE (distortion product otoacoustic emission) testing were performed in the patients and controls. A sensorineural hearing loss was found in eight patients (30.7%) as it was bilateral in five and unilateral in three patients. Although no typical audiometric configuration was found, one patient had a flat type audiogram, and the others had a high frequency hearing loss. The DPOAE responses of the patients and controls were significantly different in all frequencies (p<0.05). These results indicate that cochlea is affected by damage of outer hair cells in Behçet's disease.

  16. Association between Age at Diagnosis of Graves' Disease and Variants in Genes Involved in Immune Response

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Ploski, Rafal; Kula, Dorota; Krol, Aleksandra; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kolosza, Zofia; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background Graves' disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. Methods 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. Results Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. Conclusions HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in polish population. PMID:23544060

  17. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone

    Tomomi Masuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR, and retinal vein occlusion (RVO. An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress.

  18. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone)

    Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:28194256

  19. Sidestream cigarette smoke effects on cardiovascular responses in conscious rats: involvement of oxidative stress in the fourth cerebral ventricle

    Valenti Vitor E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette exposure increases brain oxidative stress. The literature showed that increased brain oxidative stress affects cardiovascular regulation. However, no previous study investigated the involvement of brain oxidative stress in animals exposed to cigarette and its relationship with cardiovascular regulation. We aimed to evaluate the effects of central catalase inhibition on baroreflex and cardiovascular responses in rats exposed to sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS. Methods We evaluated males Wistar rats (320-370 g, which were implanted with a stainless steel guide cannula into the fourth cerebral ventricle (4th V. Femoral artery and vein were cannulated for mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR measurement and drug infusion, respectively. Rats were exposed to SSCS during three weeks, 180 minutes, 5 days/week (CO: 100-300 ppm. Baroreflex was tested with a pressor dose of phenylephrine (PHE, 8 μg/kg, bolus to induce bradycardic reflex and a depressor dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 50 μg/kg, bolus to induce tachycardic reflex. Cardiovascular responses were evaluated before, 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (ATZ, catalase inhibitor, 0.001 g/100 μL injection into the 4th V. Results Central catalase inhibition increased basal HR in the control group during the first 5 minutes. SSCS exposure increased basal HR and attenuated bradycardic peak during the first 15 minutes. Conclusion We suggest that SSCS exposure affects cardiovascular regulation through its influence on catalase activity.

  20. Involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanism of p,p'-DDT-induced nephrotoxicity in adult rats.

    Marouani, Neila; Hallegue, Dorsaf; Sakly, Mohsen; Benkhalifa, Moncef; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2017-07-01

    The 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p'-DDT) is an organochlorine pesticide that persists in the environment and has a risk to human health. We investigated whether p,p'-DDT-induces nephrotoxicity in rats and whether oxidative stress and apoptosis are involved in the pathogenesis of this process. Male rats received the pesticide at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg for 10 days. Renal damage was evaluated by histopathological examination and serum markers. The oxidative stress was evaluated by lipid peroxidation (LPO), metallothioneins (MTs) and protein carbonyl levels. Antioxidant enzymes were assessed by determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Glutathione-dependent enzymes and reducing power in kidney were evaluated by glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. Renal tubular cells apoptosis was assessed through the TUNEL assay. After 10 days of treatment, an increase of serum creatinine and urea levels occurred, LPO and protein carbonyl levels were increased, while MTs level, SOD and CAT activities were decreased. Besides, the GPx, GR, GST, and GSH activities were decreased. Histological alterations in kidney tissue and intense apoptosis in renal tubular cells were observed. These results suggest that DDT sub-acute treatment causes oxidative stress and apoptosis, which may be the chief mechanisms of DDT-induced nephrotoxicity.

  1. Brain imaging for oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases

    Okazawa, H.; Tsujikawa, T.; Kiyono, Y.; Ikawa, M.; Yoneda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, one of the most probable molecular mechanisms for neuronal impairment, is reported to occur in the affected brain regions of various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, many studies showed evidence of a link between oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage and neuronal degeneration. Basic in vitro experiments and postmortem studies demonstrated that biomarkers for oxidative damage can be observed in the pathogenic regions of the brain and the affected neurons. Model animal studies also showed oxidative damage associated with neuronal degeneration. The molecular imaging method with positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to delineate oxidatively stressed microenvironments to elucidate pathophysiological changes of the in vivo brain; however, only a few studies have successfully demonstrated enhanced stress in patients. Radioisotope copper labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) may be the most promising candidate for this oxidative stress imaging. The tracer is usually known as a hypoxic tissue imaging PET probe, but the accumulation mechanism is based on the electron rich environment induced by mitochondrial impairment and/or microsomal over-reduction, and thus it is considered to represent the oxidative stress state correlated with the degree of disease severity. In this review, Cu-ATSM PET is introduced in detail from the basics to practical methods in clinical studies, as well as recent clinical studies on cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Several other PET probes are also introduced from the point of view of neuronal oxidative stress imaging. These molecular imaging methods should be promising tools to reveal oxidative injuries in various brain diseases

  2. Serum nitric oxide metabolites and disease activity in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    Mok, Mo Yin; Fung, Peter Chin Wah; Ooi, Clara; Tse, Hung Fat; Wong, Yik; Lam, Yui Ming; Wong, Woon Sing; Lau, Chak Sing

    2008-03-01

    There is no surrogate marker in serum for defining disease activity in scleroderma (SSc). Nitric oxide (NO), which regulates vasodilation and possesses pro-inflammatory actions, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SSc. We compared serum NO(x) (total nitrate and nitrite) level in SSc patients to healthy controls and evaluated its correlation with detailed symptomatology and scoring systems for various organ involvement. Symptoms and physical findings that suggested disease activity in regard to various organs were documented. Lung function test, high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scan of thorax and echocardiography were performed. Serum NO(x) was measured by chemiluminescence. Serum NO(x) levels in SSc (n = 43) were significantly higher (72.4 +/- 47.8 microM) than age- and sex-matched controls (n = 41; 37.1 +/- 13.5 microM; p n = 9; OR 145.3, p = 0.01) were predictive factors for elevated serum NO(x). Prednisolone use was associated with lower serum NO(x) level (OR 0.06, p = 0.04). Elevated PAP of increasing severity was found to be associated with higher level of serum NO(x) (p = 0.004 by trend). Serum NO(x) in SSc patients were elevated compared to healthy controls. Serum NO(x) level was determined by multiple factors including age, prednisolone use, and elevated PAP.

  3. Is nitric oxide signalling involved in the antidepressant action of ketamine?

    Liebenberg, Nico; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may underlie a major mechanism in the pathophysiology that leads to depression, while ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect in depre......Background and Aim: Stress-induced excessive glutamate transmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors may underlie a major mechanism in the pathophysiology that leads to depression, while ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce a rapid antidepressant effect...... in depressed patients following a single intravenous administration that is sustained for ± 7 days. A number of downstream cellular mechanisms appear to mediate the antidepressant action of ketamine, and the majority of evidence point to a rapid activation of protein translation leading to increased synaptic...... receptors, while the uncoupling of the nNOS-NMDA receptor complex prevents NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Thus, it is possible that the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) signalling underlies a key upstream mechanism in the antidepressant action of ketamine. Methods: We used a genetic rat model of depression...

  4. Noscapine protects OLN-93 oligodendrocytes from ischemia-reperfusion damage: Calcium and nitric oxide involvement.

    Nadjafi, S; Ebrahimi, S-A; Rahbar-Roshandel, N

    2015-12-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of noscapine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from opium poppy, on oligodendrocyte during ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury. Changes in intracellular calcium levels due to chemical ischemia and nitric oxide (NO) production during ischemia/reperfusion were evaluated as the hallmarks of ischemia-derived excitotoxic event. OLN-93 cell line (a permanent immature rat oligodendrocyte) was used as a model of oligodendrocyte. 30- or 60-minute-oxygen-glucose deprivation/24 hours reperfusion were used to induce excitotoxicity. MTT (3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay was used to evaluate cell viability. Ratiometric fluorescence microscopy using Ca(2+)-sensitive indicator Fura-2/AM was utilized to assess intracellular calcium levels. NO production was evaluated by Griess method. Noscapine (4 μM) significantly attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) elevation (P < 0.001). Also, noscapine significantly decreased NO production during a 30-minute oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (P < 0.01). The inhibitory effect of noscapine (4 μM) on intracellular Ca(2+) was greater than ionotropic glutamate receptors antagonists. Noscapine is protective against ischemia/reperfusion-induced excitotoxic injury in OLN-93 oligodendrocyte. This protective effect seems to be related to attenuation of intracellular Ca(2+) overload and NO production.

  5. Involvement of Syk kinase in TNF-induced nitric oxide production by airway epithelial cells

    Ulanova, Marina; Marcet-Palacios, Marcelo; Munoz, Samira; Asfaha, Samuel; Kim, Moo-Kyung; Schreiber, Alan D.; Befus, A. Dean

    2006-01-01

    We have recently found that Syk is widely expressed in lung epithelial cells (EC) and participates in β1 integrin signaling. In this study, we assessed the role of Syk in regulation of NO production. Stimulation of human bronchial EC line HS-24 by TNF caused an increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Inhibition of Syk using siRNA or piceatannol down-regulated the iNOS expression and reduced NO production. This effect occurred in EC simultaneously stimulated via β1 integrins, suggesting that TNF and β1 integrins provide co-stimulatory signals. Inhibition of Syk down-regulated TNF-induced p38 and p44/42 MAPK phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB. Thus, TNF-induced activation of pro-inflammatory signaling in EC leading to enhanced expression of iNOS and NO production was dependent on Syk. Syk-mediated signaling regulates NO production at least partly via activating the MAPK cascade. Understanding the role of Syk in airway EC may help in developing new therapeutic tools for inflammatory lung disorders

  6. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

    M.P. da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1 the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2 synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON.

  7. Heme degrading protein HemS is involved in oxidative stress response of Bartonella henselae.

    MaFeng Liu

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are hemotropic bacteria, agents of emerging zoonoses. These bacteria are heme auxotroph Alphaproteobacteria which must import heme for supporting their growth, as they cannot synthesize it. Therefore, Bartonella genome encodes for a complete heme uptake system allowing the transportation of this compound across the outer membrane, the periplasm and the inner membranes. Heme has been proposed to be used as an iron source for Bartonella since these bacteria do not synthesize a complete system required for iron Fe³⁺ uptake. Similarly to other bacteria which use heme as an iron source, Bartonellae must transport this compound into the cytoplasm and degrade it to allow the release of iron from the tetrapyrrole ring. For Bartonella, the gene cluster devoted to the synthesis of the complete heme uptake system also contains a gene encoding for a polypeptide that shares homologies with heme trafficking or degrading enzymes. Using complementation of an E. coli mutant strain impaired in heme degradation, we demonstrated that HemS from Bartonella henselae expressed in E. coli allows the release of iron from heme. Purified HemS from B. henselae binds heme and can degrade it in the presence of a suitable electron donor, ascorbate or NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Knocking down the expression of HemS in B. henselae reduces its ability to face H₂O₂ induced oxidative stress.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of ebselen following forebrain ischemia: involvement of glutamate and nitric oxide.

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Fujisawa, Hirosuke; Suehiro, Eiichi; Shirao, Satoshi; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-01-01

    Ebselen is a mimic of glutathione peroxidase that reacts with peroxynitrite and inhibits nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Ebselen has beneficial effects on the neurological outcome of patients with stroke. In this study, the mechanisms by which ebselen can elicit neuroprotective effects against ischemic brain injury were investigated in male Wistar rats. Experimental forebrain ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion with hemorrhagic hypotension. Ebselen was administered to animals in the treatment group 2 hours prior to the induction of forebrain ischemia, and placebo was administered in the control group. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by the hydrogen clearance method. Cortical extracellular levels of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) and NO were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Neuronal damage in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus was assessed in brains harvested after a 24-hour period of survival. CBF did not recover to normal physiological levels after ischemic insults in either the control or treatment groups. The differences in the sequential changes in extracellular EAA and NO levels between groups were not statistically significant. There was a significantly larger mean density of intact, undamaged neurons in the CA1 subfield in the treatment group than in the control group. The neuroprotective effects of ebselen were reflected in the histological findings, without significant inhibition of glutamate release or NO synthesis during the acute phase of experimentally induced cerebral ischemia.

  9. Solely lung-involved IgG4-related disease : a case report and review of the literature.

    Zhang, Xiao-Qin; Chen, Guo-Ping; Wu, Sheng-Chang; Yu, Sa; Wang, Hong; Chen, Xuan-Yi; Ren, Zhuo-Chao

    2016-12-23

    By analyzing the clinical data of 1 case of IgG4-related lung disease(IgG4-RLD) and the review of literature, the author investigated the clinical characteristics of IgG4-RLD. IgG4-RLD is a rare disease characterized by significant elevation of serum IgG4 and infiltration of a large number of IgG4+ plasma cells. The clinical manifestations of the disease were nonspecific, and the imaging features were mixed with several types. The disease can only be involved in the lung, but also multiple organ involvement. Solely lung-involved IgG4-RD is not only extremely rare but also easily misdiagnosed as tuberculosis, lung cancer, lymphoma and other common pulmonary diseases. Histopathological examination is the key to the diagnosis of the disease. Corticosteroids are the first choice of treatment, and the overall prognosis is good.

  10. Skeletal involvement in Gaucher disease: An observational multicenter study of prognostic factors in the Argentine Gaucher disease patients.

    Drelichman, Guillermo; Fernández Escobar, Nicolás; Basack, Nora; Aversa, Luis; Larroude, María Silvia; Aguilar, Gabriela; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Fynn, Alcyra; Cuello, María Fernanda; Aznar, Marcela; Fernández, Ramiro; Ruiz, Alba; Reichel, Paola; Guelbert, Norberto; Robledo, Hugo; Watman, Nora; Bolesina, Moira; Elena, Graciela; Veber, S Ernesto; Pujal, Graciela; Galván, Graciela; Chain, Juan José; Arizo, Adriana; Bietti, Julieta; Bar, Daniel; Dragosky, Marta; Marquez, Marisa; Feldman, Leonardo; Muller, Katja; Zirone, Sandra; Buchovsky, Greogorio; Lanza, Victoria; Sanabria, Alba; Fernández, Ignacio; Jaureguiberry, Rossana; Contte, Marcelo; Barbieri María, Angie; Maro, Alejandra; Zárate, Graciela; Fernández, Gabriel; Rapetti, María Cristina; Donato, Hugo; Degano, Adriana; Kantor, Gustavo; Albina, Roberto; Á Lvarez Bollea, María; Brun, María; Bacciedoni, Viviana; Del Río, Francis; Soberón, Bárbara; Boido, Nazario; Schweri, Maya; Borchichi, Sandra; Welsh, Victoria; Corrales, Marcela; Cedola, Alejandra; Carvani, Analía; Diez, Blanca; Richard, Lucía; Baduel, Ccecilia; Nuñez, Gabriela; Colimodio, Rubén; Barazzutti, Lucía; Medici, Hugo; Meschengieser, Susana; Damiani, Germán; Nucifora, María; Girardi, Beatriz; Gómez, Sergio; Papucci, Maura; Verón, David; Quiroga, Luis; Carro, Gustavo; De Ambrosio, Patricia; Ferro, José; Pujol, Marcelo; Castella, Cristina Cabral; Franco, Liliana; Nisnovich, Gisela; Veloso, María; Pacheco, Isabel; Savarino, Mario; Marino, Andrés; Saavedra, José Luis

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Gaucher type 1 (GD1) throughout Argentina were enrolled in the Argentine bone project to evaluate bone disease and its determinants. We focused on presence and predictors of bone lesions (BL) and their relationship to therapeutic goals (TG) with timing and dose of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). A total of 124 patients on ERT were enrolled in a multi-center study. All six TG were achieved by 82% of patients: 70.1% for bone pain and 91.1% for bone crisis. However, despite the fact that bone TGs were achieved, residual bone disease was present in 108 patients on ERT (87%) at time 0. 16% of patients showed new irreversible BL (bone infarcts and avascular osteonecrosis) despite ERT, suggesting that they appeared during ERT or were not detected at the moment of diagnosis. We observed 5 prognostic factors that predicted a higher probability of being free of bone disease: optimal ERT compliance; early diagnosis; timely initiation of therapy; ERT initiation dose ≥45 UI/kg/EOW; and the absence of history of splenectomy. Skeletal involvement was classified into 4 major phenotypic groups according to BL: group 1 (12.9%) without BL; group 2 (28.2%) with reversible BL; group 3 (41.9%) with reversible BL and irreversible chronic BL; and group 4 (16.9%) with acute irreversible BL. Our study identifies prognostic factors for achieving best therapeutic outcomes, introduces new risk stratification for patients and suggests the need for a redefinition of bone TG. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E448-E453, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Prohibitin Is Involved in Patients with IgG4 Related Disease.

    Hongwu Du

    Full Text Available IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD is a chronic systemic disease involved in many organs and tissues. As only limited autoantigens have been found since the beginning of this century, the aim of this study was to reveal new candidate autoantigens of IgG4-RD.Multiple cell lines including HT-29, EA.hy926, HEK 293 and HepG2 were used to test the binding ability of circulating autoantibodies from IgG4-RD sera. The amino-acid sequence was then analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem (MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. After the cloning and expression of recombinant putative autoantigen in a bacterial expression system, the corresponding immuno assay was set up and utilized to observe the prevalence of serum autoantibodies in a large set of confirmed clinical samples.One positive autoantigen was identified as prohibitin. ELISA analysis showed that a majority of patients with IgG4-RD have antibodies against prohibitin. Anti-prohibitin antibodies were present in the sera of patients with definite autoimmune pancreatitis (25/34; 73.5%, Mikulicz's disease (8/15; 53.3%, retroperitoneal fibrosis (6/11; 54.5%, other probable IgG4-RD (26/29; 89.7% and Sjögren's syndrome (4/30; 13.3% but not in apparently healthy donors (1/70; 1.4%.An association between prohibitin and patients with some IgG4-RD was observed, although the results were quite heterogeneous among different individuals within autoimmune pancreatitis, Mikulicz's disease and retroperitoneal fibrosis.

  12. Elevated oxidative stress among coronary artery disease patients on statin therapy: A cross sectional study

    Sabitha Palazhy

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: Though coronary artery disease subjects had healthy lipid profile, oxidative stress, a recognized risk factor for coronary events, was still elevated among this patient group. Novel risk factors were not found to be major predictors for coronary artery disease among the study subjects.

  13. Evaluation of haemato-biochemical and oxidative indices in naturally infected concomitant tick borne intracellular diseases in dogs

    Kalyan Sarma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore haemato-biochemical and oxidative stress indices due to concomitant tick borne intracellular diseases in dogs presented at Referral Veterinary Polyclinic, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly during May 2010 to May 2012. Methods: Microscopy of Giemsa blood smear and ELISA test (SNAP 4D伊 were carried out in suspected cases to confirm haemo-parasitic infection. Blood and serum samples were analyzed for oxidative stress indices and haemato-biochemical changes. All the ailing conditions were recorded to investigate the clinical pattern of concomitant tick borne diseases. Ultrasonographic study was carried out to obtain the hepatic involvement. Results: Examination of 3 650 dogs revealed that 2.77% dog were positive for various tick borne diseases, out of which 21.78% were with concomitant infection. Clinical symptoms were noted with overall mean clinical score of 9.95依0.30. Ultrasonographic examination revealed hepatomegaly, distension of gall bladder, and ascites. Haemato-biochemical evaluation confirmed anaemia, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia, hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia and hyperbilirubinemia with increased serum alanine amino transferase, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase in concomitant infected dogs. The lipid peroxidation level of concomitant infection was significantly higher (P<0.05 than healthy group whereas superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reduced and catalase activity in concomitant infected group were decreased. Conclusions: The severity of infection was more pronounced in dogs harboring Ehrlichia, Babesia and Hepatozoon and the oxidative stress may have a pathophysiological role in concomitant infection in dogs.

  14. Fungal-associated NO is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress during rehydration in lichen symbiosis

    Reig-Armiñana Jose

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are normally produced in respiratory and photosynthetic electron chains and their production is enhanced during desiccation/rehydration. Nitric oxide (NO is a ubiquitous and multifaceted molecule involved in cell signaling and abiotic stress. Lichens are poikilohydrous organisms that can survive continuous cycles of desiccation and rehydration. Although the production of ROS and NO was recently demonstrated during lichen rehydration, the functions of these compounds are unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the role of NO during rehydration of the lichen Ramalina farinacea (L. Ach., its isolated photobiont partner Trebouxia sp. and Asterochloris erici (Ahmadjian Skaloud et Peksa (SAG 32.85 = UTEX 911. Results Rehydration of R. farinacea caused the release of ROS and NO evidenced by the fluorescent probes DCFH2-DA and DAN respectively. However, a minimum in lipid peroxidation (MDA was observed 2 h post-rehydration. The inhibition of NO in lichen thalli with c-PTIO resulted in increases in both ROS production and lipid peroxidation, which now peaked at 3 h, together with decreases in chlorophyll autofluorescence and algal photobleaching upon confocal laser incidence. Trebouxia sp. photobionts generate peaks of NO-endproducts in suspension and show high rates of photobleaching and ROS production under NO inhibition which also caused a significant decrease in photosynthetic activity of A. erici axenic cultures, probably due to the higher levels of photo-oxidative stress. Conclusions Mycobiont derived NO has an important role in the regulation of oxidative stress and in the photo-oxidative protection of photobionts in lichen thalli. The results point to the importance of NO in the early stages of lichen rehydration.

  15. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  16. Physiological and Molecular Mechanism of Nitric Oxide (NO Involved in Bermudagrass Response to Cold Stress.

    Jibiao Fan

    Full Text Available Bermudagrass is widely utilized in parks, lawns, and golf courses. However, cold is a key factor limiting resource use in bermudagrass. Therefore, it is meaningful to study the mechanism of bermudagrass response to cold. Nitric oxide (NO is a crucial signal molecule with multiple biological functions. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate whether NO play roles in bermudagrass response to cold. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP was used as NO donor, while 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramentylimidazoline-l-oxyl-3-xide (PTIO plus NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME were applied as NO inhibitor. Wild bermudagrass was subjected to 4 °C in a growth chamber under different treatments (Control, SNP, PTIO + L-NAME. The results indicated lower levels of malondialdehyde (MDA content and electrolyte leakage (EL, higher value for chlorophyll content, superoxide dismutase (SOD and peroxidase (POD activities after SNP treatment than that of PTIO plus L-NAME treatments under cold stress. Analysis of Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence transient displayed that the OJIP transient curve was higher after treatment with SNP than that of treated with PTIO plus L-NAME under cold stress. The values of photosynthetic fluorescence parameters were higher after treatment with SNP than that of treated with PTIO plus L-NAME under cold stress. Expression of cold-responsive genes was altered under cold stress after treated with SNP or PTIO plus L-NAME. In summary, our findings indicated that, as an important strategy to protect bermudagrass against cold stress, NO could maintain the stability of cell membrane, up-regulate the antioxidant enzymes activities, recover process of photosystem II (PSII and induce the expression of cold-responsive genes.

  17. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Mohammad, Mohammad K; Avila, Diana; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. PMID:23026831

  18. Pathological involvement of chymase-dependent angiotensin II formation in the development of cardiovascular disease

    Hidenori Urata

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Chymase is a potent and specific angiotensin II (Ang II-forming enzyme in vitro. There is also strong evidence to suggest its importance in vivo. Recent clinical studies have suggested that high serum cholesterol levels are associated with increased vascular chymase activity and this may assist in the development of atherosclerosis. This clinical finding has been reproduced in hamster models. Studies with transgenic mice overexpressing the human chymase gene suggest a direct association between vascular chymase upregulation and atherogenesis. There is also increased chymase activity following various cardiac diseases such as myocardial ischaemia, volume overload cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy and viral myocarditis, suggesting that increased cardiac chymase activity appears to be involved in cardiac remodelling.

  19. Pathological involvement of chymase-dependent angiotensin II formation in the development of cardiovascular disease

    Hidenori Urata

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Chymase is a potent and specific angiotensin II (Ang II-forming enzyme in vitro. There is also strong evidence to suggest its importance in vivo. Recent clinical studies have suggested that high serum cholesterol levels are associated with increased vascular chymase activity and this may assist in the development of atherosclerosis. This clinical finding has been reproduced in hamster models. Studies with transgenic mice overexpressing the human chymase gene suggest a direct association between vascular chymase upregulation and atherogenesis. There is also increased chymase activity following various cardiac diseases such as myocardial ischaemia, volume overload cardiac failure, cardiomyopathy and viral myocarditis, suggesting that increased cardiac chymase activity appears to be involved in cardiac remodelling.

  20. The involvement of glycosaminoglycans in airway disease associated with cystic fibrosis.

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-02-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) present with severe airway destruction and extensive bronchiectasis. It has been assumed that these structural airway changes have occurred secondary to infection and inflammation, but recent studies suggest that glycosaminoglycan (GAG) remodelling may be an important independent parallel process. Evidence is accumulating that not only the concentration, but also sulphation of GAGs is markedly increased in CF bronchial cells and tissues. Increased expression of GAGs and, in particular, heparan sulphate, has been linked to a sustained inflammatory response and neutrophil recruitment to the CF airways. This present review discusses the biological role of GAGs in the lung, as well as their involvement in CF respiratory disease, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  1. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  2. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Avila, Diana; Zhang, Jingwen; Barve, Shirish; Arteel, Gavin; McClain, Craig; Joshi-Barve, Swati

    2012-01-01

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  3. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Mohammad, Mohammad K. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Avila, Diana [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Zhang, Jingwen [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Arteel, Gavin [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Robley Rex VAMC, Louisville, KY (United States); Joshi-Barve, Swati, E-mail: s0josh01@louisville.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  4. Total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity and ischemia modified albumin levels in children with celiac disease.

    Sayar, Ersin; Özdem, Sebahat; Uzun, Gülbahar; İşlek, Ali; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    In our study, we aimed to investigate ischemia modified albumin (IMA) as an oxidative stress marker, as well as other oxidant and antioxidant markers that have not been evaluated in children with celiac disease. A total of 37 pediatric patients who were diagnosed with celiac disease (CD) and 29 healthy children were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the IMA, total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, and advanced oxidation protein products in all of the subjects. We also compared the levels at the time of the diagnosis, and following a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the children with CD. While the IMA and the other oxidant marker levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group, the antioxidant marker levels were found to be significantly lower in the patient group, compared to the control group. We also determined that the tissue transglutaminase IgA showed a highly positive correlation, and that the IMA showed a moderately positive correlation with the Marsh-Oberhuber histopathological stage. Additionally, the IMA and other oxidant marker levels were significantly lower, while the antioxidant marker levels were significantly higher after the GFD, compared to the pre-diet period. We detected that oxidative stress played a role in the pathogenesis of CD, and that this could be evaluated using oxidative stress markers, which would regress after the GFD. We also detected that IMA is a marker that shows a correlation with the histopathological stage, and may be used in the diagnosis.

  5. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-01-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium

  6. Multifocal fibrosclerosis and IgG4-related disease involving the cardiovascular system

    Ishizaka, Nobukazu; Terasaki, Fumio; Sakamoto, Aiko; Imai, Yasushi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2012-01-01

    The cardiovascular system may be involved as a target organ of multifocal fibrosclerosis, which may manifest as idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, inflammatory aortic aneurysm, inflammatory periarteritis, and inflammatory pericarditis. These pathological conditions can sometimes occur concomitantly. Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis and inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm are both characterized by the presence of fibro-inflammatory tissue around the abdominal aorta expanding into the surrounding retroperitoneal structures, and together they may be termed 'chronic periaortitis'. Cardiovascular fibrosclerosis has become non-uncommonly encountered condition since imaging modalities have made its diagnosis more feasible. In addition, recent studies have demonstrated that a certain fraction, but not all, of cardiovascular fibrosclerosis may have a link with immunoglobulin-G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD). IgG4-SD is histologically characterized by dense fibrosclerosis and infiltration of lymphocytes and IgG4-positive plasma cells, and these histopathologic findings seem to be essentially similar regardless of the organs involved. In this mini review, we summarize what is known so far about multifocal fibrosclerosis of the cardiovascular system and its association with IgG4-SD, and what remains to be clarified in future investigations. (author)

  7. [Cathepsin K as a biomarker of bone involvement in type 1 Gaucher disease].

    Bobillo Lobato, Joaquín; Durán Parejo, Pilar; Núñez Vázquez, Ramiro J; Jiménez Jiménez, Luis M

    2015-10-05

    Gaucher disease is an inherited disorder caused by deficit of acid β-glucocerebrosidase, responsible for the degradation of glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Although the disorder is primarily hematologic, bone is the second most commonly affected structure. Cathepsin K (CATK) is an enzyme involved in bone remodelling process. It has been proposed that determination of its serum concentrations may provide additional information to other biomarkers. The study included 20 control subjects and 20 Gaucher type 1 patients from Andalusia and Extremadura regions. We analyzed the biomarkers of bone remodelling: the bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP), the N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), the β carboxyterminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx) and the CATK through electrochemiluminescence and immunoassay techniques. There is an increase in levels of CATK, CATK/P1NP and CATK/B-ALP ratios in type 1 Gaucher patients compared to the control group. Considering the existence of skeletal manifestations in the patient group, the CATK and CATK/P1NP ratio showed higher levels in patients with bone damage compared to those without it. Although imaging studies are the gold standard for monitoring bone disease in type 1 Gaucher patients, the utility of CATK should be considered as a possible indicator of bone damage in these patients. Furthermore, this parameter can be used in the monitoring of the treatment of bone pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of Epigenetic Histone Modifications in Diabetic Kidney Disease Involving Renal Fibrosis

    Jing Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the commonest causes of end-stage renal disease is diabetic kidney disease (DKD. Renal fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins in glomerular basement membranes and the tubulointerstitium, is the final manifestation of DKD. The TGF-β pathway triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, which plays a key role in the accumulation of ECM proteins in DKD. DCCT/EDIC studies have shown that DKD often persists and progresses despite glycemic control in diabetes once DKD sets in due to prior exposure to hyperglycemia called “metabolic memory.” These imply that epigenetic factors modulate kidney gene expression. There is evidence to suggest that in diabetes and hyperglycemia, epigenetic histone modifications have a significant effect in modulating renal fibrotic and ECM gene expression induced by TGF-β1, as well as its downstream profibrotic genes. Histone modifications are also implicated in renal fibrosis through its ability to regulate the EMT process triggered by TGF-β signaling. In view of this, efforts are being made to develop HAT, HDAC, and HMT inhibitors to delay, stop, or even reverse DKD. In this review, we outline the latest advances that are being made to regulate histone modifications involved in DKD.

  9. IgG4-Related Disease Presenting as Recurrent Mastoiditis With Central Nervous System Involvement

    April L. Barnado MD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 43-year-old female who presented with right ear fullness and otorrhea. She was initially diagnosed with mastoiditis that was not responsive to multiple courses of antibiotics and steroids. She was then diagnosed with refractory inflammatory pseudotumor, and subsequent treatments included several mastoidectomies, further steroids, and radiation therapy. The patient went on to develop mastoiditis on the contralateral side as well as central nervous system involvement with headaches and right-sided facial paresthesias. Reexamination of the mastoid tissue revealed a significantly increased number of IgG4-positive cells, suggesting a diagnosis of IgG4-related disease. The patient improved clinically and radiographically with rituximab and was able to taper off azathioprine and prednisone. IgG4-related disease should be considered in patients with otologic symptoms and be on the differential diagnosis in patients with inflammatory pseudotumor. Staining for IgG and IgG4 is essential to ensure a prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: A Genetic Disease That Involves Mucociliary Dysfunction of the Peripheral Airways

    Evans, Christopher M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Lynch, David; Kurche, Jonathan; Warg, Laura; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an incurable complex genetic disorder that is associated with sequence changes in 7 genes (MUC5B, TERT, TERC, RTEL1, PARN, SFTPC, and SFTPA2) and with variants in at least 11 novel loci. We have previously found that 1) a common gain-of-function promoter variant in MUC5B rs35705950 is the strongest risk factor (genetic and otherwise), accounting for 30-35% of the risk of developing IPF, a disease that was previously considered idiopathic; 2) the MUC5B promoter variant can potentially be used to identify individuals with preclinical pulmonary fibrosis and is predictive of radiologic progression of preclinical pulmonary fibrosis; and 3) MUC5B may be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis with MUC5B message and protein expressed in bronchiolo-alveolar epithelia of IPF and the characteristic IPF honeycomb cysts. Based on these considerations, we hypothesize that excessive production of MUC5B either enhances injury due to reduced mucociliary clearance or impedes repair consequent to disruption of normal regenerative mechanisms in the distal lung. In aggregate, these novel considerations should have broad impact, resulting in specific etiologic targets, early detection of disease, and novel biologic pathways for use in the design of future intervention, prevention, and mechanistic studies of IPF. PMID:27630174

  11. Hyaline cartilage involvement in patients with gout and calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. An ultrasound study.

    Filippucci, E; Riveros, M Gutierrez; Georgescu, D; Salaffi, F; Grassi, W

    2009-02-01

    The main aim of the present study was to determine the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) in detecting monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals deposits at knee cartilage level using clinical definite diagnosis as standard reference. A total of 32 patients with a diagnosis of gout and 48 patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy were included in the study. Fifty-two patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis or osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited as disease controls. All diagnoses were made using an international clinical criterion. US examinations were performed by an experienced sonographer, blind to clinical and laboratory data. Hyaline cartilage was assessed to detect two US findings recently indicated as indicative of crystal deposits: hyperechoic enhancement of the superficial margin of the hyaline cartilage and hyperechoic spots within the cartilage layer not generating a posterior acoustic shadow. Hyperechoic enhancement of the chondrosynovial margin was found in at least one knee of 14 out of 32 (43.7%) patients with gout and in a single knee of only one patient affected by pyrophosphate arthropathy (specificity=99%). Intra-cartilaginous hyperechoic spots were detected in at least one knee of 33 out of 48 (68.7%) patients with pyrophosphate arthropathy and in two disease controls one with OA and the second with RA (specificity=97.6%). The results of the present study indicate that US may play a relevant role in distinguishing cartilage involvement in patients with crystal-related arthropathy. The selected US findings were found to be highly specific.

  12. Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood. Report of two cases with unusual involvement of the gastric antrum and spleen

    Orduna, M.; Gonzales de Orbe, G.; Gordillo, M.I.; Serrano, C.; Collado, J.M.; Miralles, M.; Fernandez-Epifanio, J.L.

    1989-02-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) of childhood is a rare entity. The disease is characterized by recurrent infections with granuloma and abscess formation caused by an inherited defective neutrophil leukocyte function. The most common sites of involvements are the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, liver, spleen and bones. Rarely are other organs affected. Two children with CGD are presented. The children were cousins, the older with bone, lung and splenic involvement. The younger had circumferential thickening of the gastric antrum. (orig./GDG).

  13. Mechanisms and consequences of oxidative stress in lung disease: therapeutic implications for an aging populace.

    Hecker, Louise

    2018-04-01

    The rapid expansion of the elderly population has led to the recent epidemic of age-related diseases, including increased incidence and mortality of chronic and acute lung diseases. Numerous studies have implicated aging and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases; however, despite recent advances in these fields, the specific contributions of aging and oxidative stress remain elusive. This review will discuss the consequences of aging on lung morphology and physiology, and how redox imbalance with aging contributes to lung disease susceptibility. Here, we focus on three lung diseases for which aging is a significant risk factor: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Preclinical and clinical development for redox- and senescence-altering therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as scientific advancements that may direct current and future therapeutic development. A deeper understanding of how aging impacts normal lung function, redox balance, and injury-repair processes will inspire the development of new therapies to prevent and/or reverse age-associated pulmonary diseases, and ultimately increase health span and longevity. This review is intended to encourage basic, clinical, and translational research that will bridge knowledge gaps at the intersection of aging, oxidative stress, and lung disease to fuel the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for lung diseases that disproportionately afflict the elderly.

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Association With Quality of Life, Disability, and High Disease Activity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Frid, Paula; Nordal, Ellen; Bovis, Francesca; Giancane, Gabriella; Larheim, Tore A; Rygg, Marite; Pires Marafon, Denise; De Angelis, Donato; Palmisani, Elena; Murray, Kevin J; Oliveira, Sheila; Simonini, Gabriele; Corona, Fabrizia; Davidson, Joyce; Foster, Helen; Steenks, Michel H; Flato, Berit; Zulian, Francesco; Baildam, Eileen; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Lahdenne, Pekka; Ravelli, Angelo; Martini, Alberto; Pistorio, Angela; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the demographic, disease activity, disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) differences between children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their healthy peers, and between children with JIA with and without clinical temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement and its determinants. This study is based on a cross-sectional cohort of 3,343 children with JIA and 3,409 healthy peers, enrolled in the Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation HRQOL study or in the methotrexate trial. Potential determinants of TMJ involvement included demographic, disease activity, disability, and HRQOL measures selected through univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Clinical TMJ involvement was observed in 387 of 3,343 children with JIA (11.6%). Children with TMJ involvement, compared to those without, more often had polyarticular disease course (95% versus 70%), higher Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (odds ratio [OR] 4.6), more disability, and lower HRQOL. Children with TMJ involvement experienced clearly more disability and lower HRQOL compared to their healthy peers. The multivariable analysis showed that cervical spine involvement (OR 4.6), disease duration >4.4 years (OR 2.8), and having more disability (Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index >0.625) (OR 1.6) were the most important determinants for TMJ involvement. Clinical TMJ involvement in JIA is associated with higher disease activity, higher disability, and impaired HRQOL. Our findings indicate the need for dedicated clinical and imaging evaluation of TMJ arthritis, especially in children with cervical spine involvement, polyarticular course, and longer disease duration. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Are PTH levels related to oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis?

    Marcel Jaqueto

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Patients at end stage renal disease have higher levels of inflammation and oxidative stress than the general population. Many factors contribute to these issues, and the parathyroid hormone (PTH is also implicated. Objective: The study was conducted in order to assess the relationship between PTH levels and inflammation and oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients. Methods: Cross-sectional study with patients of two hemodialysis facilities in Londrina, Brazil. Patients with other conditions known to generate oxidative stress and inflammation were excluded. Blood levels of PTH and biochemical parameters of inflammation (interleukins 1 and 6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and oxidative stress (total plasma antioxidant capacity, malonic dialdehyde, lipid hydroperoxidation, advanced oxidation protein products, quantification of nitric oxide metabolites, and 8-isoprostane were measured before a dialysis session. Then, we made correlation analyses between PTH levels - either as the continuous variable or categorized into tertiles-, and inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. Results: PTH did not show any correlation with the tested inflammation and oxidative stress parameters, nor as continuous variable neither as categorical variable. Conclusion: In this descriptive study, the results suggest that the inflammation and oxidative stress of hemodialysis patients probably arise from mechanisms other than secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  16. SIRT1 ameliorates oxidative stress induced neural cell death and is down-regulated in Parkinson's disease.

    Singh, Preeti; Hanson, Peter S; Morris, Christopher M

    2017-06-02

    Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD + dependent lysine deacetylases which are conserved from bacteria to humans and have been associated with longevity and lifespan extension. SIRT1, the best studied mammalian SIRT is involved in many physiological and pathological processes and changes in SIRT1 have been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, with SIRT1 having a suggested protective role in Parkinson's disease. In this study, we determined the effect of SIRT1 on cell survival and α-synuclein aggregate formation in SH-SY5Y cells following oxidative stress. Over-expression of SIRT1 protected SH-SY5Y cells from toxin induced cell death and the protection conferred by SIRT1 was partially independent of its deacetylase activity, which was associated with the repression of NF-кB and cPARP expression. SIRT1 reduced the formation of α-synuclein aggregates but showed minimal co-localisation with α-synuclein. In post-mortem brain tissue obtained from patients with Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease with dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer's disease, the activity of SIRT1 was observed to be down-regulated. These findings suggests a negative effect of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disorders and possibly explain the reduced activity of SIRT1 in neurodegenerative disorders. Our study shows that SIRT1 is a pro-survival protein that is downregulated under cellular stress.

  17. Involvement of beta 3-adrenoceptor in altered beta-adrenergic response in senescent heart: role of nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide.

    Birenbaum, Aurélie; Tesse, Angela; Loyer, Xavier; Michelet, Pierre; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Heymes, Christophe; Riou, Bruno; Amour, Julien

    2008-12-01

    In senescent heart, beta-adrenergic response is altered in parallel with beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptor down-regulation. A negative inotropic effect of beta3-adrenoceptor could be involved. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that beta3-adrenoceptor plays a role in beta-adrenergic dysfunction in senescent heart. beta-Adrenergic responses were investigated in vivo (echocardiography-dobutamine, electron paramagnetic resonance) and in vitro (isolated left ventricular papillary muscle, electron paramagnetic resonance) in young adult (3-month-old) and senescent (24-month-old) rats. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunolabeling (confocal microscopy), nitric oxide production (electron paramagnetic resonance) and beta-adrenoceptor Western blots were performed in vitro. Data are mean percentages of baseline +/- SD. An impaired positive inotropic effect (isoproterenol) was confirmed in senescent hearts in vivo (117 +/- 23 vs. 162 +/- 16%; P < 0.05) and in vitro (127 +/- 10 vs. 179 +/- 15%; P < 0.05). In the young adult group, the positive inotropic effect was not significantly modified by the nonselective NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME; 183 +/- 19%), the selective NOS1 inhibitor vinyl-L-N-5(1-imino-3-butenyl)-L-ornithine (L-VNIO; 172 +/- 13%), or the selective NOS2 inhibitor 1400W (183 +/- 19%). In the senescent group, in parallel with beta3-adrenoceptor up-regulation and increased nitric oxide production, the positive inotropic effect was partially restored by L-NAME (151 +/- 8%; P < 0.05) and L-VNIO (149 +/- 7%; P < 0.05) but not by 1400W (132 +/- 11%; not significant). The positive inotropic effect induced by dibutyryl-cyclic adenosine monophosphate was decreased in the senescent group with the specific beta3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37344 (167 +/- 10 vs. 142 +/- 10%; P < 0.05). NOS1 and NOS2 were significantly up-regulated in the senescent rat. In senescent cardiomyopathy, beta3-adrenoceptor overexpression plays an important role in the

  18. Compromiso cardiovascular en la enfermedad de Fabry Cardiovascular involvement in Fabry disease

    Ana M Barón O

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Fabry es una patología de origen genético que se produce por el depósito, a nivel lisosomal, de diferentes productos como globotriazolceramida, glicoesfingolípidos neurales y diagalactosilceramida a nivel sistémico, como consecuencia de la actividad deficiente de la enzima alfa-galactosidasa A. Las manifestaciones clínicas se inician desde la infancia pero son sutiles y suelen confundirse con otras patologías, razón por la cual en la mayoría de los casos la enfermedad se detecta en grados avanzados. En los adultos los órganos más afectados son corazón, riñones y cerebro. El compromiso cardiaco es de gran importancia por tratarse de una de las principales causas de morbi-mortalidad. El depósito de estas moléculas ocurre en todos sus componentes celulares. Genera hipertrofia e isquemia y remodelación miocárdica, o ambas. En la actualidad existe tratamiento específico con agalasidasa A y B recombinante, con el cual se logra una disminución en los depósitos lisosomales. Se recomienda aumentar la vigilancia de la enfermedad para detectar los casos e iniciar el tratamiento lo más temprano posible.Fabry disease is a genetic condition that causes lysosomal storage of products like glotriaosylceramide, neural glycosphingolipids and diagalactosylceramide, as a consequence of alpha-galactosidase A enzyme deficiency. Clinical manifestations begin in childhood, but they are subtle, and can mimic other pathologies, delaying the diagnosis until the second or third decade of life, when the disease is in an advanced stage. In adults the most affected organs are heart, kidneys and brain. Cardiac involvement is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality. Deposits of these molecules occur in every component of the heart, leading to hypertrophy, ischemia and myocardial remodeling. Nowadays there is specific enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant agalacidase A and B that decreases lysosomal deposits and

  19. New Pathogenic Concepts and Therapeutic Approaches to Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio

    2016-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease inflammatory processes and stimulation of immune cells result in overproduction of free radicals. In combination with a reduced antioxidant capacity this causes oxidative stress. This review focuses on current pathogenic concepts of oxidative stress for the decline...... and pharmacologic therapies for hyperuricemia are discussed. Finally, we review some new therapy options in diabetic nephropathy including antidiabetic agents (noninsulin dependent), plant antioxidants, and food components as alternative antioxidant therapies....

  20. Colonic Oxidative and Mitochondrial Function in Parkinson’s Disease and Idiopathic REM Sleep Behavior Disorder

    Morén, C.; González-Casacuberta, Í.; Navarro-Otano, J.; Juárez-Flores, D.; Vilas, D.; Garrabou, G.; Milisenda, J. C.; Pont-Sunyer, C.; Catalán-García, M.; Guitart-Mampel, M.; Tobías, E.; Cardellach, F.; Valldeoriola, F.; Iranzo, A.; Tolosa, E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine potential mitochondrial and oxidative alterations in colon biopsies from idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects. Methods Colonic biopsies from 7 iRBD subjects, 9 subjects with clinically diagnosed PD, and 9 healthy controls were homogenized in 5% w/v mannitol. Citrate synthase (CS) and complex I (CI) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Oxidative damage was assessed either by lipid peroxidation, through malondialdehyde and h...

  1. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. Methods. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC)...

  2. Effect of liver disease on dextromethorphan oxidation capacity and phenotype: a study in 107 patients.

    Larrey, D; Babany, G; Tinel, M; Freneaux, E; Amouyal, G; Habersetzer, F; Letteron, P; Pessayre, D

    1989-01-01

    1. The O-demethylation of dextromethorphan to dextrorphan exhibits a genetically-controlled polymorphism, co-segregating with that of debrisoquine hydroxylation. Dextromethorphan has been proposed as a test compound to assess drug oxidation polymorphism. 2. We studied the effects of liver disease of varying severity on dextromethorphan oxidation capacity. Phenotyping was performed using the urinary dextromethorphan/dextrorphan metabolic ratio after oral administration of 40 mg dextromethorpha...

  3. The Protective Role of Selenium on Scopolamine-Induced Memory Impairment, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in Aged Rats: The Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    Balaban, Hasan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Demirci, Kadir; Övey, İshak Suat

    2017-05-01

    Inhibition of Ca 2+ entry into the hippocampus and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) through inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist drugs is the current standard of care in neuronal diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, dementia, and peripheral pain. Oxidative stress activates Ca 2+ -permeable TRPM2 and TRPV1, and recent studies indicate that selenium (Se) is a potent TRPM2 and TRPV1 channel antagonist in the hippocampus and DRG. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective properties of Se in primary hippocampal and DRG neuron cultures of aged rats when given alone or in combination with scopolamine (SCOP). Thirty-two aged (18-24 months old) rats were divided into four groups. The first and second groups received a placebo and SCOP (1 mg/kg/day), respectively. The third and fourth groups received intraperitoneal Se (1.5 mg/kg/ over day) and SCOP + Se, respectively. The hippocampal and DRG neurons also were stimulated in vitro with a TRPV1 channel agonist (capsaicin) and a TRPM2 channel agonist (cumene hydroperoxide). We found that Se was fully effective in reversing SCOP-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 current densities as well as errors in working memory and reference memory. In addition, Se completely reduced SCOP-induced oxidative toxicity by modulating lipid peroxidation, reducing glutathione and glutathione peroxidase. The Se and SCOP + Se treatments also decreased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, intracellular free Ca 2+ concentrations, apoptosis, and caspase 3, caspase 9, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the current study reports on the cellular level for SCOP and Se on the different endocytotoxic cascades for the first time. Notably, the research indicates that Se can result in remarkable neuroprotective and memory impairment effects in the hippocampal neurons of rats. Graphical abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of selenium (Se) in scopolamine (SCOP) induced

  4. Oxidative stress mediated mitochondrial and vascular lesions as markers in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Aliev, G; Priyadarshini, M; Reddy, V P; Grieg, N H; Kaminsky, Y; Cacabelos, R; Ashraf, G Md; Jabir, N R; Kamal, M A; Nikolenko, V N; Zamyatnin, A A; Benberin, V V; Bachurin, S O

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plausibly underlies the aging-associated brain degeneration. Mitochondria play a pivotal role in cellular bioenergetics and cell-survival. Oxidative stress consequent to chronic hypoperfusion induces mitochondrial damage, which is implicated as the primary cause of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) mediated Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mitochondrial function deteriorates with aging, and the mitochondrial damage correlates with increased intracellular production of oxidants and pro-oxidants. The prolonged oxidative stress and the resultant hypoperfusion in the brain tissues stimulate the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes, which further drives the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The ROS and RNS collectively contributes to the dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and damage to the brain parenchymal cells. Delineating the molecular mechanisms of these processes may provide clues for the novel therapeutic targets for CVA and AD patients.

  5. Involvement of Cholinergic Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in the Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Learning and Memory in Rats

    Wang, Qiong; Lv, Ke; Wang, Tingmei; Wang, Yanli; Ji, Guohua; Cao, Hongqing; Kan, Guanghan

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine how the learning and memory gradually change with the prolonged hindlimb unloading (HU) treatment in rats. Different HU durations (7 d, 14 d, 21 d, and 28 d) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were implemented. Cognitive function was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM) and the shuttle box test. Additionally, parameters about cholinergic activity and oxidative stress were tested. Results showed that longer-than-14 d HU led to the inferior performances in the behavioral tasks. Besides, acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) level in brain, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations of HU rats were significantly increased. Furthermore, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activity in brain were notably attenuated. Most of these effects were more pronounced after longer exposure (21 d and 28 d) to HU, although some indicators had their own characteristics of change. These results indicate that cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative damage were involved in the learning and memory impairments induced by longer-than-14 d HU. Moreover, the negative effects of HU tend to be augmented as the HU duration becomes longer. The results may be helpful to present possible biochemical targets for countermeasures development regarding the memory deficits under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:29581965

  6. Involvement of Cholinergic Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in the Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Learning and Memory in Rats

    Yongliang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine how the learning and memory gradually change with the prolonged hindlimb unloading (HU treatment in rats. Different HU durations (7 d, 14 d, 21 d, and 28 d in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were implemented. Cognitive function was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM and the shuttle box test. Additionally, parameters about cholinergic activity and oxidative stress were tested. Results showed that longer-than-14 d HU led to the inferior performances in the behavioral tasks. Besides, acetylcholine esterase (AChE activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level in brain, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG concentrations of HU rats were significantly increased. Furthermore, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT activity in brain were notably attenuated. Most of these effects were more pronounced after longer exposure (21 d and 28 d to HU, although some indicators had their own characteristics of change. These results indicate that cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative damage were involved in the learning and memory impairments induced by longer-than-14 d HU. Moreover, the negative effects of HU tend to be augmented as the HU duration becomes longer. The results may be helpful to present possible biochemical targets for countermeasures development regarding the memory deficits under extreme environmental conditions.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer’s Disease: Why Did Antioxidant Therapy Fail?

    Torbjörn Persson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly, with increasing prevalence and no disease-modifying treatment available yet. A remarkable amount of data supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress is an early and important pathogenic operator in AD. However, all clinical studies conducted to date did not prove a clear beneficial effect of antioxidant treatment in AD patients. In the current work, we review the current knowledge about oxidative stress in AD pathogeny and we suggest future paths that are worth to be explored in animal models and clinical studies, in order to get a better approach of oxidative imbalance in this inexorable neurodegenerative disease.

  8. Radical Roles for RAGE in the Pathogenesis of Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Diseases and Beyond

    Radha Ananthakrishnan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a central mechanism by which the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE mediates its pathological effects. Multiple experimental inquiries in RAGE-expressing cultured cells have demonstrated that ligand-RAGE interaction mediates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequent downstream signal transduction and regulation of gene expression. The primary mechanism by which RAGE generates oxidative stress is via activation of NADPH oxidase; amplification mechanisms in the mitochondria may further drive ROS production. Recent studies indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin mDia1 provide further support for the critical roles of this pathway in oxidative stress; mDia1 was required for activation of rac1 and NADPH oxidase in primary murine aortic smooth muscle cells treated with RAGE ligand S100B. In vivo, in multiple distinct disease models in animals, RAGE action generates oxidative stress and modulates cellular/tissue fate in range of disorders, such as in myocardial ischemia, atherosclerosis, and aneurysm formation. Blockade or genetic deletion of RAGE was shown to be protective in these settings. Indeed, beyond cardiovascular disease, evidence is accruing in human subjects linking levels of RAGE ligands and soluble RAGE to oxidative stress in disorders such as doxorubicin toxicity, acetaminophen toxicity, neurodegeneration, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, preeclampsia, rheumatoid arthritis and pulmonary fibrosis. Blockade of RAGE signal transduction may be a key strategy for the prevention of the deleterious consequences of oxidative stress, particularly in chronic disease.

  9. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing, E-mail: tianbing@zju.edu.cn; Hua, Yuejin, E-mail: yjhua@zju.edu.cn

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans.

  10. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H 2 O 2 and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H 2 O 2 stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans

  11. Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease and Candidate Risk Genes Involved in Endolysosomal Transport.

    Kunkle, Brian W; Vardarajan, Badri N; Naj, Adam C; Whitehead, Patrice L; Rolati, Sophie; Slifer, Susan; Carney, Regina M; Cuccaro, Michael L; Vance, Jeffery M; Gilbert, John R; Wang, Li-San; Farrer, Lindsay A; Reitz, Christiane; Haines, Jonathan L; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden R; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Mayeux, Richard P; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2017-09-01

    Mutations in APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2 lead to early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) but account for only approximately 11% of EOAD overall, leaving most of the genetic risk for the most severe form of Alzheimer disease unexplained. This extreme phenotype likely harbors highly penetrant risk variants, making it primed for discovery of novel risk genes and pathways for AD. To search for rare variants contributing to the risk for EOAD. In this case-control study, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed in 51 non-Hispanic white (NHW) patients with EOAD (age at onset 65 years) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium. The study was conducted from January 21, 2013, to October 13, 2016. Alzheimer disease diagnosed according to standard National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke and the Alzheimer Disease and Related Disorders Association criteria. Association between Alzheimer disease and genetic variants and genes was measured using logistic regression and sequence kernel association test-optimal gene tests, respectively. Of the 1524 NHW patients with EOAD, 765 (50.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 60.0 (4.9) years; of the 7046 NHW patients with LOAD, 4171 (59.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years; and of the 7001 NHW controls, 4215 (60.2%) were women and mean (SD) age was 77.4 (8.6) years. The gene PSD2, for which multiple unrelated NHW cases had rare missense variants, was significantly associated with EOAD (P = 2.05 × 10-6; Bonferroni-corrected P value [BP] = 1.3 × 10-3) and LOAD (P = 6.22 × 10-6; BP = 4.1 × 10-3). A missense variant in TCIRG1, present in a NHW patient and segregating in 3 cases of a Hispanic family, was more frequent in EOAD cases (odds ratio [OR], 2.13; 95% CI, 0.99-4.55; P = .06; BP = 0.413), and significantly associated with LOAD (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.37-3.62; P = 7.2 × 10-4; BP = 5.0 × 10-3). A missense variant in the LOAD risk

  12. Steroid-responsive IgG4-related disease with isolated prostatic involvement: An unusual presentation with elevated serum PSA

    Vikas Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune prostatitis is known to occur as a part of multisystem fibro-inflammatory disorder known as IgG4 related disease (IgG4 RD. The usual presentation is with symptoms of gastro-intestinal disease with prostatic involvement presenting as lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease responds to corticosteroids. We report an asymptomatic young man who was diagnosed to have IgG4 related prostatitis on TRUS-guided prostate biopsy done for elevated serum PSA, in the absence of any other systemic involvement. The treatment with steroid resulted in normalization of S PSA levels.

  13. Hypophyseal Involvement in Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease: A Retrospective Study from a Single Tertiary Center

    Yang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to outline the clinical features and outcomes of IgG4-related hypophysitis (IgG4-RH patients in a tertiary medical center. We reviewed clinical manifestations and imaging and pituitary function tests at baseline, as well as during follow-up. Ten patients were included. The mean age at diagnosis of IgG4-RH was 48.4 (16.0–64.0 years. An average of 3 (0–9 extrapituitary organs were involved. Five patients had panhypopituitarism, three had only posterior hypopituitarism, one had only anterior hypopituitarism, and one had a normal pituitary function. One patient in our study had pituitary mass biopsy, lacking IgG4-positive cells despite lymphocyte infiltration forming an inflammatory pseudotumor. Five patients with a clinical course of IgG4-RH less than nine months and a whole course of IgG4-RD less than two years were managed with glucocorticoids, while three patients with a longer history were administered glucocorticoids plus immunosuppressive agents. One patient went through surgical excision, and one patient was lost to follow-up. All patients showed a prompt response clinically, but only three patients had normalized serum IgG4 levels. Two patients who took medications for less than six months relapsed. Conclusions. IgG4-RD is a broad disease, and all physicians involved have to be aware of the possibility of pituitary dysfunction. Younger patients should be expected. The histopathological feature of pituitary gland biopsy could be atypical. For patients with a longer history, the combination of GC and immunosuppressive agents is favorable. Early and adequate courses of treatment are crucial for the management of IgG4-RH. With GC and/or immunosuppressant treatment, however, pituitary function or diabetes insipidus did not improve considerably.

  14. Deconstructing IgG4-related disease involvement of midline structures: Comparison to common mimickers.

    Lanzillotta, Marco; Campochiaro, Corrado; Trimarchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Gianluigi; Gerevini, Simonetta; Milani, Raffaella; Bozzolo, Enrica; Biafora, Matteo; Venturini, Elena; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Stone, John H; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Della-Torre, Emanuel

    2017-07-01

    A series of destructive and tumefactive lesions of the midline structures have been recently added to the spectrum of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). We examined the clinical, serological, endoscopic, radiological, and histological features that might be of utility in distinguishing IgG4-RD from other forms of inflammatory conditions with the potential to involve the sinonasal area and the oral cavity. We studied 11 consecutive patients with erosive and/or tumefactive lesions of the midline structures referred to our tertiary care center. All patients underwent serum IgG4 measurement, flow cytometry for circulating plasmablast counts, nasal endoscopy, radiological studies, and histological evaluation of tissue specimens. The histological studies included immunostaining studies to assess the number of IgG4 + plasma cells/HPF for calculation of the IgG4+/IgG + plasma cell ratio. Five patients with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), three with cocaine-induced midline destructive lesions (CIMDL), and three with IgG4-RD were studied. We found no clinical, endoscopic, or radiological findings specific for IgG4-RD. Increased serum IgG4 and plasmablasts levels were not specific for IgG4-RD. Rather, all 11 patients had elevated blood plasmablast concentrations, and several patients with GPA and CIMDL had elevated serum IgG4 levels. Storiform fibrosis and an IgG4+/IgG + plasma cell ratio >20% on histological examination, however, were observed only in patients with IgG4-RD. Histological examination of bioptic samples from the sinonasal area and oral cavity represents the mainstay for the diagnosis of IgG4-RD involvement of the midline structures.

  15. Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and Carbonylated Proteins as Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Selected Atherosclerosis-Mediated Diseases

    Bogna Gryszczyńska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The main question of this study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative protein modification shown as advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP and carbonylated proteins, expressed as protein carbonyl content (C=O in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA, aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD, and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design and Methods. The study was carried out in a group of 35 AAA patients and 13 AIOD patients. However, CKD patients were divided into two groups: predialysis (PRE included 50 patients or hemodialysis (HD consisted of 34 patients. AOPP and C=O were measured using colorimetric assay kit, while C-reactive protein concentration was measured by high-sensitivity assay (hsCRP. Results. The concentration of AOPP in both AAA and AIOD groups was higher than in PRE and HD groups according to descending order: AAA~AIOD > HD > PRE. The content of C=O was higher in the PRE group in comparison to AIOD and AAA according to the descending order: PRE~HD > AAA~AIOD. Conclusions. AAA, AIOD, and CKD-related atherosclerosis (PRE and HD contribute to the changes in the formation of AOPP and C=O. They may promote modification of proteins in a different way, probably due to the various factors that influence oxidative stress here.

  16. Grapevine yellows diseases in Spain: eight year survey of disease spread and molecular characterization of phytoplasmas involved

    Torres, Ester

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Among grapevine yellows phytoplasma diseases in Europe, flavescence dorée (FD is the most devastating and in the last decade has reached Spanish vineyards, mainly in Catalonia. An eight-year survey was carried out in the areas where the disease has spread (Alt Empordà, Catalonia, Northern Spain and in the remaining vine-growing areas of Catalonia. Sequence analyses of a portion of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA cistron, from selected grapevine samples from Catalonia, showed that the phytoplasmas involved in grapevine yellows belong to 16S ribosomal subgroups V-D (flavescence dorée, FD and XII-A (bois noir, BN. A set of Spanish FD isolates collected during these years were further studied by RFLP analyses of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA fragment, as well as the rpS3 and SecY genes. All the FD phytoplasma strains studied were related to phytoplasmas belonging to ribosomal protein subgroup rp-E.La flavescencia dorada (FD es la enfermedad más agresiva de entre todas las enfermedades de fitoplasmas que causan amarilleos de vid en Europa, y que en la última década ha alcanzado también a los viñedos de España, principalmente en Cataluña. Se ha realizado un seguimiento durante ocho años en las zonas donde la enfermedad se había difundido (Alt Empordà, Cataluña y en el resto de zonas con cultivo de vid de Cataluña. El análisis del fragmento del gen DNA ribosomal 16S-23S, de una selección de muestras de vides de Cataluña, indica que los fitoplasmas que están implicados en los amarilleos de vid pertenecen a los subgrupos ribosomales 16S V-D (flavescencia dorada, FD y XII-A (bois noir, BN. Una selección de aislados españoles de FD obtenidos durante estos años se ha examinado mediante análisis RFLP del fragmento del gen ribosomal 16S-23S, y de los genes rpS3 y SecY. Todos los aislamientos de fitoplasmas FD estudiados están relacionados con fitoplasmas pertenecientes al subgrupo de proteína ribosomal rp-E.

  17. Arginine de novo and nitric oxide production in disease states

    Luiking, Yvette C.; Ten Have, Gabriella A. M.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine is derived from dietary protein intake, body protein breakdown, or endogenous de novo arginine production. The latter may be linked to the availability of citrulline, which is the immediate precursor of arginine and limiting factor for de novo arginine production. Arginine metabolism is highly compartmentalized due to the expression of the enzymes involved in arginine metabolism in various organs. A small fraction of arginine enters the NO synthase (NOS) pathway. Tetrahydrobiopterin ...

  18. Role of oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease outcomes following exposure to ambient air pollution.

    Kelly, Frank J; Fussell, Julia C

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. These are manifested through several, likely overlapping, pathways including at the functional level, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, pro-coagulation and alterations in autonomic nervous system balance and blood pressure. At numerous points within each of these pathways, there is potential for cellular oxidative imbalances to occur. The current review examines epidemiological, occupational and controlled exposure studies and research employing healthy and diseased animal models, isolated organs and cell cultures in assessing the importance of the pro-oxidant potential of air pollution in the development of cardiovascular disease outcomes. The collective body of data provides evidence that oxidative stress (OS) is not only central to eliciting specific cardiac endpoints, but is also implicated in modulating the risk of succumbing to cardiovascular disease, sensitivity to ischemia/reperfusion injury and the onset and progression of metabolic disease following ambient pollution exposure. To add to this large research effort conducted to date, further work is required to provide greater insight into areas such as (a) whether an oxidative imbalance triggers and/or worsens the effect and/or is representative of the consequence of disease progression, (b) OS pathways and cardiac outcomes caused by individual pollutants within air pollution mixtures, or as a consequence of inter-pollutant interactions and (c) potential protection provided by nutritional supplements and/or pharmacological agents with antioxidant properties, in susceptible populations residing in polluted urban cities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The microglial NADPH oxidase complex as a source of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Landreth Gary E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, and manifests as progressive cognitive decline and profound neuronal loss. The principal neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are the senile plaques and the neurofibrillary tangles. The senile plaques are surrounded by activated microglia, which are largely responsible for the proinflammatory environment within the diseased brain. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells in the brain. In response to contact with fibrillar beta-amyloid, microglia secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory molecules. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress emanating from activated microglia contribute to the neuronal loss characteristic of this disease. The source of fibrillar beta-amyloid induced reactive oxygen species is primarily the microglial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase. The NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme complex that, upon activation, produces the highly reactive free radical superoxide. The cascade of intracellular signaling events leading to NADPH oxidase assembly and the subsequent release of superoxide in fibrillar beta-amyloid stimulated microglia has recently been elucidated. The induction of reactive oxygen species, as well as nitric oxide, from activated microglia can enhance the production of more potent free radicals such as peroxynitrite. The formation of peroxynitrite causes protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, which ultimately lead to neuronal cell death. The elimination of beta-amyloid-induced oxidative damage through the inhibition of the NADPH oxidase represents an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. The exhausted CD4+CXCR5+ T cells involve the pathogenesis of human tuberculosis disease.

    Bosco, Munyemana Jean; Wei, Ming; Hou, Hongyan; Yu, Jing; Lin, Qun; Luo, Ying; Sun, Ziyong; Wang, Feng

    2018-06-21

    The CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells have been previously established. However, their decreased frequency during tuberculosis (TB) disease is partially understood. The aim of this study was to explore the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in human TB. The frequency and function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells were evaluated in active TB (ATB) patients and healthy control (HC) individuals. The function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was determined after blockade of inhibitory receptors. The frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was decreased in ATB patients. The expression of activation markers (HLA-DR and ICOS) and inhibitory receptors (Tim-3 and PD-1) on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells was increased in ATB group. TB-specific antigen stimulation induced higher expression of inhibitory receptors than phytohemagglutinin stimulation in ATB group. In contrast, TB antigen stimulation did not induce a significantly increased expression of IL-21 and Ki-67 on CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells. However, blockade of inhibitory receptors Tim-3 and PD-1 not only increased the frequency of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, but also restored their proliferation and cytokine secretion potential. An increased expression of inhibitory receptors involves the depletion of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells, and blockade of inhibitory receptors can restore the function of CD4 + CXCR5 + T cells in ATB patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A review of the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of eye diseases

    O. A. Oduntan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, referred to as oxidants are molecules in the body with unpaired electrons, hence are unstable and ready to bond with other molecules with unpaired electrons.  They include Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS such as superoxide anion radicals (·O¯, hydrogen peroxide (H202, and hydroxyl free radicals (·OH.  Endogenous sources of ROS include metabolic and other organic processes, while exogenous sources include ultraviolet radiation and environmental toxins such as smoke.  Antioxidants (oxidant scavengers such as ascorbate, alpha-tocopherol and glutathione as well as various enzymatic compounds such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase and glutathione reductase are also present in the body and in manyfoods or food supplements.  An imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidantsis termed oxidative stress and can lead to cell or tissue damage and aging. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many serious systemic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and neurological disorders.  Also, laboratory and epidemiological studies have implicated oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the majority of common serious eye diseases such as cataract, primary open angle glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration. In this article, we reviewed the current information on the roles of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various eye diseases and the probable roles of antioxidants.  Eye care practitioners will find this article useful as it provides information on the pathogenesis of common eye diseases. (S Afr Optom 2011 70(4 182-190

  2. Perfluorononanoic acid-induced apoptosis in rat spleen involves oxidative stress and the activation of caspase-independent death pathway

    Fang, Xuemei; Feng, Yixing; Wang, Jianshe; Dai, Jiayin

    2010-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acid (PFAA)-induced apoptosis has been reported in many cell types. However, minimal information on its mode of action is available. This study explored the possible involvement of apoptotic signaling pathways in a nine-carbon-chain length PFAA-perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA)-induced splenocyte apoptosis. After a 14-day exposure to PFNA, rat spleens showed dose-dependent levels of apoptosis. The production of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was significantly increased and decreased, respectively. However, protein levels of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD), caspase 8 and caspase 3, which are involved in inflammation-related and caspase-dependent apoptosis, were discordant. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha (PPARα) and PPARγ genes expression was up-regulated in rats treated with 3 or 5 mg/kg/day of PFNA, and the level of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) increased concurrently in rats treated with the highest dose. Moreover, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and Bcl-2 protein levels were dramatically decreased in spleens after treatment with 3 and 5 mg/kg/day of PFNA. However, protein levels of Bax were unchanged. Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), an initiator of caspase-independent apoptosis, was significantly increased in all PFNA-dosed rats. Thus, oxidative stress and the activation of a caspase-independent apoptotic signaling pathway contributed to PFNA-induced apoptosis in rat splenocytes.

  3. Interactome analysis of transcriptional coactivator multiprotein bridging factor 1 unveils a yeast AP-1-like transcription factor involved in oxidation tolerance of mycopathogen Beauveria bassiana.

    Chu, Xin-Ling; Dong, Wei-Xia; Ding, Jin-Li; Feng, Ming-Guang; Ying, Sheng-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Oxidation tolerance is an important determinant to predict the virulence and biocontrol potential of Beauveria bassiana, a well-known entomopathogenic fungus. As a transcriptional coactivator, multiprotein bridging factor 1 mediates the activity of transcription factor in diverse physiological processes, and its homolog in B. bassiana (BbMBF1) contributes to fungal oxidation tolerance. In this study, the BbMBF1-interactomes under oxidative stress and normal growth condition were deciphered by mass spectrometry integrated with the immunoprecipitation. BbMBF1p factor has a broad interaction with proteins that are involved in various cellular processes, and this interaction is dynamically regulated by oxidative stress. Importantly, a B. bassiana homolog of yeast AP-1-like transcription factor (BbAP-1) was specifically associated with the BbMBF1-interactome under oxidation and significantly contributed to fungal oxidation tolerance. In addition, qPCR analysis revealed that several antioxidant genes are jointly controlled by BbAP-1 and BbMBF1. Conclusively, it is proposed that BbMBF1p protein mediates BbAP-1p factor to transcribe the downstream antioxidant genes in B. bassiana under oxidative stress. This study demonstrates for the first time a proteomic view of the MBF1-interactome in fungi, and presents an initial framework to probe the transcriptional mechanism involved in fungal response to oxidation, which will provide a new strategy to improve the biocontrol efficacy of B. bassiana.

  4. Inhibition of the Fe(III)-catalyzed dopamine oxidation by ATP and its relevance to oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    Jiang, Dianlu; Shi, Shuyun; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Lin; Ding, Bingrong; Zhao, Bingqing; Yagnik, Gargey; Zhou, Feimeng

    2013-09-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic cells, which implicates a role of dopamine (DA) in the etiology of PD. A possible DA degradation pathway is the Fe(III)-catalyzed oxidation of DA by oxygen, which produces neuronal toxins as side products. We investigated how ATP, an abundant and ubiquitous molecule in cellular milieu, affects the catalytic oxidation reaction of dopamine. For the first time, a unique, highly stable DA-Fe(III)-ATP ternary complex was formed and characterized in vitro. ATP as a ligand shifts the catecholate-Fe(III) ligand metal charge transfer (LMCT) band to a longer wavelength and the redox potentials of both DA and the Fe(III) center in the ternary complex. Remarkably, the additional ligation by ATP was found to significantly reverse the catalytic effect of the Fe(III) center on the DA oxidation. The reversal is attributed to the full occupation of the Fe(III) coordination sites by ATP and DA, which blocks O2 from accessing the Fe(III) center and its further reaction with DA. The biological relevance of this complex is strongly implicated by the identification of the ternary complex in the substantia nigra of rat brain and its attenuation of cytotoxicity of the Fe(III)-DA complex. Since ATP deficiency accompanies PD and neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) induced PD, deficiency of ATP and the resultant impairment toward the inhibition of the Fe(III)-catalyzed DA oxidation may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Our finding provides new insight into the pathways of DA oxidation and its relationship with synaptic activity.

  5. PARALLELS BETWEEN MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND GENETIC VULNERABILITY

    Rodrigues, Roberto; Petersen, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    The thesis of this review is that oxidative stress is the central factor in major depressive disorder (MDD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The major elements involved are inflammatory cytokines, the hypothalamic pituitary axis, the hypothalamic pituitary gonadal, and arginine vasopressin systems, which induce glucocorticoid and “oxidopamatergic” cascades when triggered by psychosocial stress, severe life threatening events, and mental-affective and somatic diseases. In individuals with a genomic vulnerability to depression these cascades may result in chronic depression-anxiety-stress spectra, resulting in MDD and other known depressive syndromes. In contrast, in subjects with genomic vulnerability to Alzheimer’s disease, oxidative stress-induced brain damage triggers specific antioxidant defenses, i.e. increased levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) and aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau, resulting in paired helical filaments and impaired functions related to the ApoEε4 isoform, leading to complex pathological cascades culminating in AD. Surprisingly, all the AD associated molecular pathways mentioned in this review have been shown to be similar or analogous to those found in depression, including structural damage, i.e. hippocampal and frontal cortex atrophy. Other interacting molecular signals, i.e. GSK-3β, convergent survival factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor and heat shock proteins), and transition-redox metals are also mentioned to emphasize the vast array of intermediates that could interact via comparable mechanisms in both MDD and AD. PMID:24927694

  6. Significance of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in body fluids as a marker related to diseased conditions.

    Itabe, Hiroyuki; Kato, Rina; Sasabe, Naoko; Obama, Takashi; Yamamoto, Matsuo

    2018-03-06

    Oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to be involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. The presence of oxLDL in the human circulatory system and in atherosclerotic lesions has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Studies have shown the significance of circulating oxLDL in various systemic diseases, including acute myocardial infarction and diabetic mellitus. Several different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures to measure oxLDL were utilized. Evidence has been accumulating that reveals changes in oxLDL levels under certain pathological conditions. Since oxLDL concentration tends to correlate with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, the ratio of oxLDL and LDL rather than oxLDL concentration alone has been focused attention. In addition to circulating plasma, LDL and oxLDL are found in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), where the ratio of oxLDL to LDL in GCF is much higher than in plasma. LDL and oxLDL levels in GCF show an increase in diabetic patients and periodontal patients, suggesting that GCF might be useful in examining systemic conditions. GCF oxLDL increased when the teeth were affected by periodontitis. It is likely that oxLDL levels in plasma and GCF could reflect oxidative stress and transfer efficacy in circulatory system. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Oxidative Stress Parameters in Saliva and Its Association with Periodontal Disease and Types of Bacteria.

    Almerich-Silla, Jose Manuel; Montiel-Company, Jose María; Pastor, Sara; Serrano, Felipe; Puig-Silla, Miriam; Dasí, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    To determine the association between oxidative stress parameters with periodontal disease, bleeding, and the presence of different periodontal bacteria. A cross-sectional study in a sample of eighty-six patients, divided into three groups depending on their periodontal status. Thirty-three with chronic periodontitis, sixteen with gingivitis, and thirty-seven with periodontal healthy as control. Oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the activity of two antioxidant enzymes (GPx and SOD) were determined in saliva. Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from the deepest periodontal pocket and PCR was used to determine the presence of the 6 fimA genotypes of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Periodontal disease was found to be associated with increased oxidative stress parameter levels. These levels rose according to the number and type of different periodontal bacteria found in the periodontal pockets. The presence of different types of periodontal bacteria is predictive independent variables in linear regresion models of oxidative stress parameters as dependent variable, above all 8-OHdG. Oxidative stress parameter levels are correlated with the presence of different types of bacteria. Determination of these levels and periodontal bacteria could be a potent tool for controlling periodontal disease development.

  8. Schwann Cell-Mediated Preservation of Vision in Retinal Degenerative Diseases via the Reduction of Oxidative Stress: A Possible Mechanism.

    Mahmoudzadeh, Raziyeh; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed; Lashay, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    After injury to the central nervous system (CNS), regeneration is often inadequate, except in the case of remyelination. This remyelination capacity of the CNS is a good example of a stem/precursor cell-mediated renewal process. Schwann cells have been found to act as remyelinating agents in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), but several studies have highlighted their potential role in remyelination in the CNS too. Schwann cells are able to protect and support retinal cells by secreting growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Retinal degenerative diseases can be highly debilitating, and they are a major concern in countries with an ageing populations. One of the leading causes of permanent loss of vision in the West is a retinal degenerative disease known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the United States, nearly 1.75 million people over the age of 40 have advanced AMD, and it is estimated that this number will increase to approximately 3 million people by 2020. One of the most common pathways involved in the initiation and development of retinal diseases is the oxidative stress pathway. In patients with diabetes, Schwann cells have been shown to be able to secrete large amounts of antioxidant enzymes that protect the PNS from the oxidative stress that results from fluctuations in blood glucose levels. This antioxidant ability may be involved in the mechanism by which Schwann cells are able to promote reconstruction in the CNS, especially in individuals with retinal injuries and degenerative diseases.

  9. Periodontal disease, periodontal treatment and systemic nitric oxide in dogs.

    Nemec, A; Verstraete, F J M; Jerin, A; Šentjurc, M; Kass, P H; Petelin, M; Pavlica, Z

    2013-06-01

    Thirty-two client-owned dogs treated for periodontal disease were divided in group 1 if no periodontitis, group 2 if ≤25%, and group 3 if >25% of the teeth present were affected with periodontitis. Blood was tested before and 2 weeks after periodontal therapy for nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) levels. No HbNO was detected in any of the animals tested. There was no significant difference in the NOx plasma levels within each group or across the groups before and after the treatment, but a noticeable increase in NOx plasma levels was observed in group 3 after the treatment. Plasma NT was detected in only one third of the animals. NO levels varied greatly across individual dogs. The data are suggestive of an overall increase in systemic NO response 2 weeks after periodontal treatment in dogs with advanced periodontal disease, but the response is greatly individually-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response in colonies of the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri exposed to various environmental conditions

    Tasselli, Stefano; Ballin, Francesca; Franchi, Nicola; Fabbri, Elena; Ballarin, Loriano

    2017-03-01

    Environmental stress conditions are ultimately related to the induction of oxidative stress in organisms, as a consequence of an increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This could be exploited to study sub-lethal effects induced by the environment in the organisms. In the present work, we evaluate the possibility to use the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri as a bioindicator, to assess the environmental quality in the Lagoon of Venice. Three colony batches were immersed, for 22 days, at two sites (1 and 2) with different grades of hydrodynamics and anthropogenic impact and physico-chemical features of seawater; a control batch was kept in a large tank with continuous seawater flow at the Marine Station of the Department of Biology, University of Padova, in Chioggia (site 3). Seawater at site 2 had higher pH and temperature than site 1. Colonies were then retrieved, their mRNA was extracted and the level of transcription of genes involved in oxidative stress response (glutathione synthase, γ-glutamyl-cysteine ligase, modulatory subunit, two isoforms of glutathione peroxidases and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase) was evaluated. In colonies from sites 1 and 2, most genes showed significantly increased transcriptional levels with respect to control values. Spectrophotometric analyses of colony homogenates revealed that the enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase was higher in colonies from site 2 as compared to site 1, allowing us to speculate that colonies in site 2 were under higher stress level than those in site 1. Overall, we can conclude that B. schlosseri seems a good indicator of the ecological status of the Lagoon environment, within a range of pH and temperature in which colonies are used to live.

  11. Detection and localization of markers of oxidative stress by in situ methods: application in the study of Alzheimer disease.

    Moreira, Paula I; Sayre, Lawrence M; Zhu, Xiongwei; Nunomura, Akihiko; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a key factor involved in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease (AD), and it is well documented that free radical oxidative damage, particularly of neuronal lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and sugars, is extensive in brains of AD patients. The complex chemistry of peroxynitrite has been the subject of intense study and is now evident that there are two principal pathways for protein modification: the first one involves homolytic hydroxyl radical-like chemistry that results in protein-based carbonyls and the second involves electrophilic nitration of vulnerable side chains, in particular the electron-rich aromatic rings of Tyr and Trp. In the presence of buffering bicarbonate, peroxynitrite forms a CO(2) adduct, which augments its reactivity. Formation of 3-nitrotyrosine by this route has become the classical protein marker specifically for the presence of peroxynitrite. Protein-based carbonyls can be detected by two methods: (i) derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and detection of the protein-bound hydrazones using an enzyme-linked anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibody and (ii) derivatization with biotin-hydrazide and detection of the protein-bound acyl hydrazone with enzyme-linked avidin or streptavidin. Glycation of proteins by reducing sugars (Maillard reaction) results in a profile of time-dependent adduct evolution rendering susceptibility to oxidative elaboration. In addition, oxidative stress can result in oxidized sugar derivatives which can subsequently modify protein through a process known as glycoxidation. Of more general importance, oxidative stress results in lipid peroxidation and the production of a range of electrophilic and mostly bifunctional aldehydes that modify numerous proteins. The more important protein modifications are referred to as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs). Protein modification can result in both non-cross-link and cross-link AGEs

  12. Diabetes and Alzheimer Disease, Two Overlapping Pathologies with the Same Background: Oxidative Stress

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several oxidative stress-related pathways interconnecting Alzheimer’s disease and type II diabetes, two public health problems worldwide. Coincidences are so compelling that it is attractive to speculate they are the same disorder. However, some pathological mechanisms as observed in diabetes are not necessarily the same mechanisms related to Alzheimer’s or the only ones related to Alzheimer’s pathology. Oxidative stress is inherent to Alzheimer’s and feeds a vicious cycle with other key pathological features, such as inflammation and Ca2+ dysregulation. Alzheimer’s pathology by itself may lead to insulin resistance in brain, insulin resistance being an intervening variable in the neurodegenerative disorder. Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance from diabetes, overlapping with the Alzheimer’s pathology, aggravate the progression of the neurodegenerative processes, indeed. But the same pathophysiological background is behind the consequences, oxidative stress. We emphasize oxidative stress and its detrimental role in some key regulatory enzymes.

  13. Increased salivary oxidative stress parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes: Relation with periodontal disease.

    Arana, Carlos; Moreno-Fernández, Ana María; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Morales-Portillo, Cristóbal; Serrano-Olmedo, Isabel; de la Cuesta Mayor, M Carmen; Martín Hernández, Tomás

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in salivary oxidative stress between patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and healthy non-diabetic patients, and whether this oxidative stress is associated with the presence of periodontal disease in diabetic patients. This observational study included 70 patients divided into three groups according to metabolic control levels: 19 non-diabetic patients (control group); 24 patients with good metabolic control (HbA1c7%). The following oxidative stress parameters were measured in all subjects: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRd), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Periodontal health was determined by means of the community periodontal index (CPI) recommended by the WHO. The diabetic group with good metabolic control showed a significant increase in GPx and GRd activity in comparison with the control group (Pperiodontal health. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative stress and dopamine deficiency in a genetic mouse model of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Visser, J.E.; Smith, D.W.; Moy, S.S.; Breese, G.R.; Friedmann, T.; Rothstein, J.D.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease, a neurogenetic disorder caused by congenital deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, is associated with a prominent loss of striatal dopamine. The current studies address the hypothesis that oxidant stress causes damage or

  15. Reductive Stress in Inflammation-Associated Diseases and the Pro-Oxidant Effect of Antioxidant Agents

    Israel Pérez-Torres

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Reductive stress (RS is the counterpart oxidative stress (OS, and can occur in response to conditions that shift the redox balance of important biological redox couples, such as the NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, and GSH/GSSG, to a more reducing state. Overexpression of antioxidant enzymatic systems leads to excess reducing equivalents that can deplete reactive oxidative species, driving the cells to RS. A feedback regulation is established in which chronic RS induces OS, which in turn, stimulates again RS. Excess reducing equivalents may regulate cellular signaling pathways, modify transcriptional activity, induce alterations in the formation of disulfide bonds in proteins, reduce mitochondrial function, decrease cellular metabolism, and thus, contribute to the development of some diseases in which NF-κB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor, participates. Here, we described the diseases in which an inflammatory condition is associated to RS, and where delayed folding, disordered transport, failed oxidation, and aggregation are found. Some of these diseases are aggregation protein cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, muscular dystrophy, pulmonary hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and metabolic syndrome, among others. Moreover, chronic consumption of antioxidant supplements, such as vitamins and/or flavonoids, may have pro-oxidant effects that may alter the redox cellular equilibrium and contribute to RS, even diminishing life expectancy.

  16. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OXIDATIVE INJURY AND COMPENSATORY MECHANISMS: INSIGHTS FROM RODENT MODELS

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the number one cause for human mortality and nearly 25% of the population develops chronic CVD at an age of 65 years or older. Environmental and genetic interactions govern pathogenesis. Increased oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant stat...

  17. The role of oxidative stress in the development of alcoholic liver disease

    M. Galicia-Moreno

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of liver damage resulting from alcohol consumption. The molecules that have currently displayed a hepatoprotective effect in preclinical and clinical trials must be studied further so that their effectiveness can be confirmed and they can possibly be used as adjuvant treatments for this disease.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis and p53: how oxidative stress might alter the course of inflammatory diseases

    Tak, P. P.; Zvaifler, N. J.; Green, D. R.; Firestein, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress at sites of chronic inflammation can cause permanent genetic changes. The development of mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene and other key regulatory genes could help convert inflammation into chronic disease in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders

  19. Effects of L-carnitine against oxidative stress in human hepatocytes: involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha

    Li Jin-Lian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation have been demonstrated to play important roles in the production of liver damage. L-carnitine is a natural substance and acts as a carrier for fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for subsequent beta-oxidation. It is also an antioxidant that reduces metabolic stress in the cells. Recent years L-carnitine has been proposed for treatment of various kinds of disease, including liver injury. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effect of L-carnitine against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced cytotoxicity in a normal human hepatocyte cell line, HL7702. Methods We analyzed cytotoxicity using MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release. Antioxidant activity and lipid peroxidation were estimated by reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, activities and protein expressions of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA formation. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-alpha and its target genes were evaluated by RT-PCR or western blotting. The role of PPAR-alpha in L-carnitine-enhanced expression of SOD and CAT was also explored. Statistical analysis was performed by a one-way analysis of variance, and its significance was assessed by Dennett's post-hoc test. Results The results showed that L-carnitine protected HL7702 cells against cytotoxity induced by H2O2. This protection was related to the scavenging of ROS, the promotion of SOD and CAT activity and expression, and the prevention of lipid peroxidation in cultured HL7702 cells. The decreased expressions of PPAR-alpha, carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1 and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACOX induced by H2O2 can be attenuated by L-carnitine. Besides, we also found that the promotion of SOD and CAT protein expression induced by L-carnitine was blocked by PPAR-alpha inhibitor MK886. Conclusions Taken together, our findings suggest that L-carnitine could protect HL

  20. Psychological characteristics of systemic sclerosis patients and their correlation with major organ involvement and disease activity.

    Golemati, Christina V; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the psychological characteristics of personality, depression, anxiety, social support and coping strategies of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, their inter-correlations and their association with clinical symptoms. Patients with SSc (n=85) were interviewed and compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (n=120) and healthy controls (HCs [n=125]). Psychological characteristics were assessed by the following psychometric scales: centre of epidemiological studies of depression (CES-D), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD), Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ), short form of social support (SSq), life experiences survey (LES) and ways of coping (WoC). Clinical data were collected at the same time of the interview. Both control groups were matched to SSc patients in terms of gender, age and educational status. Data were analysed with SPSS software. Compared to control groups, SSc patients expressed more symptoms of depression and anxiety, showed less extraversion and reported more negative life events. They coped less often with positive reappraisal, problem solving, seeking of support and assertiveness, while they sought more often divine help, and they expressed wishing and denial. Inactive disease was associated with a lower probability of reporting depressive symptoms and negative life events and with a higher probability of positively reevaluating a problem. Lung dysfunction, skin involvement, esophageal problems and oral aperture correlated with psychological features. Complications in psychological well-being characterise patients with SSc. This finding, as well as that of psychological characteristics correlating with organic factors, is an indication for designing supportive psycho-educational programmes as complementary therapies.

  1. Adiponectin but not leptin is involved in early hepatic disease in morbidly obese patients.

    Hindle, Anna Katharine; Edwards, Claire; Mendonsa, Alisha; Rojkind, Marcos; McCaffrey, Tim; Fu, Sidney; Brody, Fred

    2010-07-01

    Pathologic changes in the liver are common in morbidly obese patients, and insulin resistance may potentiate the progression of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis to fibrosis and cirrhosis. This study investigates the impact of leptin and adiponectin in morbidly obese diabetic and nondiabetic patients with regard to histopathologic changes in the liver. Thirty-seven morbidly obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery with liver biopsies were enrolled in the study. Fourteen were diabetic and 23 were nondiabetic. Intraoperative liver tissue was sent for histopathologic analysis and extraneous intraoperative tissue was snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Total RNA was extracted and RNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed to determine relative gene expression levels. The data were analyzed using a logarithmic transformation and normalized by 18S ribosome expression. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis with p < or = 0.05 as significant. Adiponectin expression was downregulated 4.4-fold (p < or = 0.05) in liver samples with evidence of inflammation on pathology. When hepatic inflammation was evaluated separately, there were no statistically significant differences in adiponectin levels between the diabetic and nondiabetic patients. However, overall adiponectin levels in hepatic samples of diabetic patients were 3.8-fold higher than those of nondiabetic patients (p < or = 0.05). There were no significant differences in leptin levels regardless of hepatic pathology or diabetic status. This study illustrates that there is a downregulation of adiponectin in morbidly obese patients with inflammatory infiltrates in the liver. Variations in adiponectin levels could be an indicator of disease progression since inflammatory infiltrates are commonly associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in morbidly obese patients. Currently, we are using human myofibroblasts derived from livers of morbidly obese people to further

  2. Microarray Analysis of the Molecular Mechanism Involved in Parkinson’s Disease

    Cheng Tan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease (PD by bioinformatics. Methods. Using the microarray dataset GSE72267 from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 40 blood samples from PD patients and 19 matched controls, differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified after data preprocessing, followed by Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Protein-protein interaction (PPI network, microRNA- (miRNA- target regulatory network, and transcription factor- (TF- target regulatory networks were constructed. Results. Of 819 DEGs obtained, 359 were upregulated and 460 were downregulated. Two GO terms, “rRNA processing” and “cytoplasm,” and two KEGG pathways, “metabolic pathways” and “TNF signaling pathway,” played roles in PD development. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1 was the hub node in the PPI network; hsa-miR-7-5p, hsa-miR-433-3p, and hsa-miR-133b participated in PD pathogenesis. Six TFs, including zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 7A, ovo-like transcriptional repressor 1, GATA-binding protein 3, transcription factor dp-1, SMAD family member 1, and quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1, were related to PD. Conclusions. “rRNA processing,” “cytoplasm,” “metabolic pathways,” and “TNF signaling pathway” were key pathways involved in PD. ICAM1, hsa-miR-7-5p, hsa-miR-433-3p, hsa-miR-133b, and the abovementioned six TFs might play important roles in PD development.

  3. 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT: genetic and pharmacological evidence for an involvement in gastro esophageal reflux disease.

    Johan Jirholt

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is partly caused by genetic factors. The underlying susceptibility genes are currently unknown, with the exception of COL3A1. We used three independent GERD patient cohorts to identify GERD susceptibility genes. Thirty-six families, demonstrating dominant transmission of GERD were subjected to whole genome microsatellite genotyping and linkage analysis. Five linked regions were identified. Two families shared a linked region (LOD 3.9 and 2.0 on chromosome 16. We used two additional independent GERD patient cohorts, one consisting of 219 trios (affected child with parents and the other an adult GERD case control cohort consisting of 256 cases and 485 controls, to validate individual genes in the linked region through association analysis. Sixty six single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers distributed over the nine genes present in the linked region were genotyped in the independent GERD trio cohort. Transmission disequilibrium test analysis followed by multiple testing adjustments revealed a significant genetic association for one SNP located in an intron of the gene 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT (P(adj = 0.027. This association did not replicate in the adult case-control cohort, possibly due to the differences in ethnicity between the cohorts. Finally, using the selective ABAT inhibitor vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA in a dog study, we were able to show a reduction of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs by 57.3 ± 11.4 % (p = 0.007 and the reflux events from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007. Our results demonstrate the direct involvement of ABAT in pathways affecting lower esophageal sphincter (LES control and identifies ABAT as a genetic risk factor for GERD.

  4. 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT): genetic and pharmacological evidence for an involvement in gastro esophageal reflux disease.

    Jirholt, Johan; Asling, Bengt; Hammond, Paul; Davidson, Geoffrey; Knutsson, Mikael; Walentinsson, Anna; Jensen, Jörgen M; Lehmann, Anders; Agreus, Lars; Lagerström-Fermer, Maria

    2011-04-28

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is partly caused by genetic factors. The underlying susceptibility genes are currently unknown, with the exception of COL3A1. We used three independent GERD patient cohorts to identify GERD susceptibility genes. Thirty-six families, demonstrating dominant transmission of GERD were subjected to whole genome microsatellite genotyping and linkage analysis. Five linked regions were identified. Two families shared a linked region (LOD 3.9 and 2.0) on chromosome 16. We used two additional independent GERD patient cohorts, one consisting of 219 trios (affected child with parents) and the other an adult GERD case control cohort consisting of 256 cases and 485 controls, to validate individual genes in the linked region through association analysis. Sixty six single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers distributed over the nine genes present in the linked region were genotyped in the independent GERD trio cohort. Transmission disequilibrium test analysis followed by multiple testing adjustments revealed a significant genetic association for one SNP located in an intron of the gene 4-aminobutyrate aminotransferase (ABAT) (P(adj) = 0.027). This association did not replicate in the adult case-control cohort, possibly due to the differences in ethnicity between the cohorts. Finally, using the selective ABAT inhibitor vigabatrin (γ-vinyl GABA) in a dog study, we were able to show a reduction of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) by 57.3 ± 11.4 % (p = 0.007) and the reflux events from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 0.8 ± 0.4 (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrate the direct involvement of ABAT in pathways affecting lower esophageal sphincter (LES) control and identifies ABAT as a genetic risk factor for GERD.

  5. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals : an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective

    Rijks, J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/151266093; Cito, F; Cunningham, A A; Rantsios, A T; Giovannini, A

    Prioritization of companion animal transmissible diseases was performed by the Companion Animals multisectoriaL interprofessionaL Interdisciplinary Strategic Think tank On zoonoses (CALLISTO) project. The project considered diseases occurring in domesticated species commonly kept as pets, such as

  6. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK INVOLVING CFD AND DATA MINING TOOLS FOR ANALYZING DISEASE IN CAROTID ARTERY BIFURCATION

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fonn, Eivind

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases, like Carotid Artery Disease and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) are associated with the narrowing of artery due to build-up of fatty substances and cholesterol deposits (called plaque). Carotid Artery Disease increases the chances of brain stroke. Hence, the main objective of this work is to apply computational tools to help differentiate between the healthy and unhealthy artery (with 25% stenosis) using a combination of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and data minin...

  7. Differential expression of genes encoding anti-oxidant enzymes in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata (Gould) selected for disease resistance.

    Green, Timothy J; Dixon, Tom J; Devic, Emilie; Adlard, Robert D; Barnes, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) selectively bred for disease resistance (R) and wild-caught control oysters (W) were exposed to a field infection of disseminating neoplasia. Cumulative mortality of W oysters (31.7%) was significantly greater than R oysters (0.0%) over the 118 days of the experiment. In an attempt to understand the biochemical and molecular pathways involved in disease resistance, differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between R and W S. glomerata hemocytes were identified using the PCR technique, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH). Sequencing of 300 clones from two SSH libraries revealed 183 distinct sequences of which 113 shared high similarity to sequences in the public databases. Putative function could be assigned to 64 of the sequences. Expression of nine ESTs homologous to genes previously shown to be involved in bivalve immunity was further studied using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The base-line expression of an extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) and a small heat shock protein (sHsP) were significantly increased, whilst peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and interferon inhibiting cytokine factor (IK) were significantly decreased in R oysters. From these results it was hypothesised that R oysters would be able to generate the anti-parasitic compound, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) faster and to higher concentrations during respiratory burst due to the differential expression of genes for the two anti-oxidant enzymes of ecSOD and Prx6. To investigate this hypothesis, protein extracts from hemolymph were analysed for oxidative burst enzyme activity. Analysis of the cell free hemolymph proteins separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) failed to detect true superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity by assaying dismutation of superoxide anion in zymograms. However, the ecSOD enzyme appears to generate hydrogen peroxide, presumably via another process, which is yet to be elucidated. This

  8. In vivo target bio-imaging of Alzheimer's disease by fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters.

    Lai, Lanmei; Zhao, Chunqiu; Su, Meina; Li, Xiaoqi; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-07-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease which is difficult to cure. When Alzheimer's disease occurs, the level of zinc ions in the brain changes, and the relevant amount of zinc ions continue decreasing in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of Alzheimer's patients with disease exacerbation. In view of these considerations, we have explored a new strategy for the in vivo rapid fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease through target bio-labeling of zinc oxide nanoclusters which were biosynthesized in vivo in the Alzheimer's brain via intravenous injection of zinc gluconate solution. By using three-month-old and six-month-old Alzheimer's model mice as models, our observations demonstrate that biocompatible zinc ions could pass through the blood-brain barrier of the Alzheimer's disease mice and generate fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters (ZnO NCs) through biosynthesis, and then the bio-synthesized ZnO NCs could readily accumulate in situ on the hippocampus specific region for the in vivo fluorescent labeling of the affected sites. This study provides a new way for the rapid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and may have promising prospects in the effective diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Subclinical interstitial lung involvement in rheumatic diseases. Correlations of high-resolution Computed Tomography patterns with functional and cytologic findings

    Salaffi, F.; Baldelli, S.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were to quantify the severity and extent of subclinical interstitial lung disease as depicted on HRCT and to study the relationship between the patterns of lung disease quantified by HRCT and the functional parameters and bronchoalveolar lavage findings in patients with rheumatic diseases. The results confirm that HRCT is a sensitive tool in detecting interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatic diseases with no signs and symptoms of pulmonary involvement. The relationship between the different HRCT patterns and bronchoalveolar lavage cell profiles can identify patients at higher risk of developing irreversible lung fibrosis. A long-term, prospective follow-up study is needed to determine whether these patients will develop over pulmonary disease [it

  10. The involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanisms of damaging cadmium action in bone tissue: A study in a rat model of moderate and relatively high human exposure

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M.; Rogalska, Joanna; Kupraszewicz, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    It was investigated whether cadmium (Cd) may induce oxidative stress in the bone tissue in vivo and in this way contribute to skeleton damage. Total antioxidative status (TAS), antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase), total oxidative status (TOS), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), lipid peroxides (LPO), total thiol groups (TSH) and protein carbonyl groups (PC) as well as Cd in the bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis and femoral diaphysis of the male rats that received drinking water containing 0, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 6 months were measured. Cd, depending on the level of exposure and bone location, decreased the bone antioxidative capacity and enhanced its oxidative status resulting in oxidative stress and oxidative protein and/or lipid modification. The treatment with 5 and 50 mg Cd/l decreased TAS and activities of antioxidative enzymes as well as increased TOS and concentrations of H 2 O 2 and PC at the distal femur. Moreover, at the higher exposure, the concentration of LPO increased and that of TSH decreased. The Cd-induced changes in the oxidative/antioxidative balance of the femoral diaphysis, abundant in cortical bone, were less advanced than at the distal femur, where trabecular bone predominates. The results provide evidence that, even moderate, exposure to Cd induces oxidative stress and oxidative modifications in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations noted between the indices of oxidative/antioxidative bone status, and Cd accumulation in the bone tissue as well as indices of bone turnover and bone mineral status, recently reported by us (Toxicology 2007, 237, 89-103) in these rats, allow for the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanisms of damaging Cd action in the skeleton. The paper is the first report from an in vivo study indicating that Cd may affect bone tissue through disorders in its oxidative/antioxidative balance resulting in oxidative stress.

  11. CSF tau correlates with the degree of cortical involvement in E200K familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Cohen, Oren S; Chapman, Joab; Korczyn, Amos D; Siaw, Oliver L; Warman-Alaluf, Naama; Nitsan, Zeev; Appel, Shmuel; Kahana, Esther; Rosenmann, Hanna; Hoffmann, Chen

    2016-11-10

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau was found to correlate with disease severity and cognitive status in E200K familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD) patients. The objective of the present study was to test whether tau levels in the CSF also correlate with the disease burden as reflected by the degree of cortical involvement in DWI MRI. Forty-four consecutive E200K fCJD patients (25 males, mean age 58.6±7.5, range 48-75 years) were recruited to the study and had a CSF tau examination as well as measurements of the extent of the cortical involvement in the DWI axial MRI. Correlation was tested using Pearson test. A significant correlation (r=0.617 pdisease burden reinforce the notion that tau can be used as a biomarker reflecting the extent of disease in patients with E200K fCJD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxidized Phospholipids and Risk of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    Kamstrup, Pia R.; Hung, Ming Yow; Witztum, Joseph L.

    2017-01-01

    -control study was performed within the Copenhagen General Population Study (n=87 980), including 725 CAVD cases (1977-2013) and 1413 controls free of cardiovascular disease. OxPL carried by apoB (apolipoprotein B-100; OxPL-apoB) or apolipoprotein(a) (OxPL-apo(a)) containing lipoproteins, lipoprotein(a) levels......, LPA kringle IV type 2 repeat, and rs10455872 genetic variants were measured. OxPL-apoB and OxPL-apo(a) levels correlated with lipoprotein(a) levels among cases (r=0.75 and r=0.95; both Plevels associated with risk of CAVD with odds.......001). Corresponding odds ratios for OxPL-apo(a) were 1.2 (95% CI, 1.0-1.5), 1.2(95% CI, 0.9-1.6), 2.1(95% CI, 1.4-3.1), and 2.9(95% CI, 1.9-4.5; trend, Pa) levels and explained 34%, 46%, and 39...

  13. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement

  14. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  15. Implications of red Panax ginseng in oxidative stress associated chronic diseases

    Yoon-Mi Lee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The steaming process of Panax ginseng has been reported to increase its major known bioactive components, ginsenosides, and, therefore, its biological properties as compared to regular Panax ginseng. Biological functions of red Panax ginseng attenuating pro-oxidant environments associated with chronic diseases are of particular interest, since oxidative stress can be a key contributor to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Additionally, proper utilization of various biomarkers for evaluating antioxidant activities in natural products, such as ginseng, can also be important to providing validity to their activities. Thus, studies on the effects of red ginseng against various diseases as determined in cell lines, animal models, and humans were reviewed, along with applied biomarkers for verifying such effects. Limitations and future considerations of studying red ginseng were been discussed. Although further clinical studies are warranted, red ginseng appears to be beneficial for attenuating disease-associated symptoms via its antioxidant activities, as well as for preventing oxidative stress-associated chronic diseases.

  16. Oxidative stress and inflammation mediate the effect of air pollution on cardio- and cerebrovascular disease: A prospective study in nonsmokers.

    Fiorito, Giovanni; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Polidoro, Silvia; Gulliver, John; Galassi, Claudia; Ranzi, Andrea; Krogh, Vittorio; Grioni, Sara; Agnoli, Claudia; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Panico, Salvatore; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Hoek, Gerard; Herceg, Zdenko; Vermeulen, Roel; Ghantous, Akram; Vineis, Paolo; Naccarati, Alessio

    2018-04-01

    Air pollution is associated with a broad range of adverse health effects, including mortality and morbidity due to cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (CCVD), but the molecular mechanisms involved are not entirely understood. This study aims to investigate the involvement of oxidative stress and inflammation in the causal chain, and to identify intermediate biomarkers that are associated retrospectively with the exposure and prospectively with the disease. We designed a case-control study on CCVD nested in a cohort of 18,982 individuals from the EPIC-Italy study. We measured air pollution, inflammatory biomarkers, and whole-genome DNA methylation in blood collected up to 17 years before the diagnosis. The study sample includes all the incident CCVD cases among former- and never-smokers, with available stored blood sample, that arose in the cohort during the follow-up. We identified enrichment of altered DNA methylation in "ROS/Glutathione/Cytotoxic granules" and "Cytokine signaling" pathways related genes, associated with both air pollution (multiple comparisons adjusted p for enrichment ranging from 0.01 to 0.03 depending on pollutant) and with CCVD risk (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03, respectively). Also, Interleukin-17 was associated with higher exposure to NO 2 (P = 0.0004), NO x (P = 0.0005), and CCVD risk (OR = 1.79; CI 1.04-3.11; P = 0.04 comparing extreme tertiles). Our findings indicate that chronic exposure to air pollution can lead to oxidative stress, which in turn activates a cascade of inflammatory responses mainly involving the "Cytokine signaling" pathway, leading to increased risk of CCVD. Inflammatory proteins and DNA methylation alterations can be detected several years before CCVD diagnosis in blood samples, being promising preclinical biomarkers. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 59:234-246, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Role of Tyrosine Isomers in Acute and Chronic Diseases Leading to Oxidative Stress - A Review.

    Molnár, Gergő A; Kun, Szilárd; Sélley, Eszter; Kertész, Melinda; Szélig, Lívia; Csontos, Csaba; Böddi, Katalin; Bogár, Lajos; Miseta, Attila; Wittmann, István

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of a variety of acute and chronic diseases. Measurement of the oxidative stress-related end products may be performed, e.g. that of structural isomers of the physiological para-tyrosine, namely meta- and ortho-tyrosine, that are oxidized derivatives of phenylalanine. Recent data suggest that in sepsis, serum level of meta-tyrosine increases, which peaks on the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days (ptyrosine excretion correlated with both need of daily insulin dose and the insulin-glucose product in non-diabetic septic cases (ptyrosine excretion, urinary meta-tyrosine/para-tyrosine, urinary ortho-tyrosine/para-tyrosine and urinary (meta- + orthotyrosine)/ para-tyrosine proved to be markers of carbohydrate homeostasis. In a chronic rodent model, we tried to compensate the abnormal tyrosine isomers using para-tyrosine, the physiological amino acid. Rats were fed a standard high cholesterol-diet, and were given para-tyrosine or vehicle orally. High-cholesterol feeding lead to a significant increase in aortic wall meta-tyrosine content and a decreased vasorelaxation of the aorta to insulin and the glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, liraglutide, that both could be prevented by administration of para-tyrosine. Concluding, these data suggest that meta- and ortho-tyrosine are potential markers of oxidative stress in acute diseases related to oxidative stress, and may also interfere with insulin action in septic humans. Competition of meta- and ortho-tyrosine by supplementation of para-tyrosine may exert a protective role in oxidative stress-related diseases.

  18. Oxidative stress mediates the pathogenic effect of different Alzheimer's disease risk factors

    Michela Guglielmotto

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting the elderly population. Mechanistically, the major cause of the disease bases on the altered processing of the amyloid-β (Aβ precursor protein (APP, resulting in the accumulation and aggregation of neurotoxic forms of Aβ. Aβ derives from the sequential proteolytic cleavage of the β- and γ-secretases on APP. The causes of Aβ accumulation in the common sporadic form of Alzheimer’s disease are not completely known, but they are likely to include oxidative stress (OS. OS and Aβ are linked to each other since Aβ aggregation induces OS in vivo and in vitro, and oxidant agents increase the production of Aβ. Moreover, OS produces several effects that may contribute to synaptic function and cell death in AD. We and others have shown that the expression and activity of β-secretase (named BACE1; β-site APP cleaving enzyme is increased by oxidant agents and by lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal and that there is a significant correlation between BACE1 activity and oxidative markers in sporadic AD. OS results from several cellular insults such as aging, hyperglycaemia, hypoxic insults that are all well known risk factors for AD development. Thus, our data strengthen the hypothesis that OS is a basic common pathway of Aβ accumulation, common to different AD risk factors.

  19. Effect of Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Replacement Therapies on Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance in Uremic Patients

    Hadja Fatima Tbahriti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress seems to be involved in the path physiology of cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study, we determined the effect of different stages of CKD and substitutive therapies on oxidative stress. One hundred sixty-seven patients (age: 44±06 years; male/female: 76/91 with CKD were divided into 6 groups according to the National Kidney Foundation classification. Prooxidant status was assessed by assaying thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides, and protein carbonyls. Antioxidant defence was performed by analysis of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, vitamin E, Iron, and bilirubin. TBARS and LPO were higher in HD patients compared to other groups (P<0.001, while protein carbonyls were more increased in PD patients. The antioxidant enzymes were declined already at severe stage of CKD and they were declined notably in HD patients (P<0.001. Similar observation was found for vitamin E, Fe, and bilirubin where we observed a significant decrease in the majority of study groups, especially in HD patients (P<0.001. The evolution of CKD was associated with elevated OS. HD accentuates lipid, while PD aggravates protein oxidation. However, the activity of antioxidant enzymes was altered by impaired renal function and by both dialysis treatments.

  20. Genital Involvement In Pre-Pubertal Pediatric Population: A Rare Aspect of Crohn’s Disease

    Qurratul Ann Warsi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation that causes the loss of immune tolerance leading to bizarre inflammatory signals and disruption of mucosal barriers. Environmental triggers and interaction of genetic determinants also play an indispensible role. In this case report, we present a pre-pubertal girl with intermittent and refractory genital swelling. We emphasize that Crohn’s disease must be considered in the differential diagnosis of recurrent, non-tender, erythematous and edematous lesions of the genital area. We conclude with future directions for diagnosing and managing vulvar Crohn’s disease in pediatric population.

  1. Signaling pathways involved in renal oxidative injury: role of the vasoactive peptides and the renal dopaminergic system.

    Rukavina Mikusic, N L; Kravetz, M C; Kouyoumdzian, N M; Della Penna, S L; Rosón, M I; Fernández, B E; Choi, M R

    2014-01-01

    The physiological hydroelectrolytic balance and the redox steady state in the kidney are accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Angiotensin II, atrial natriuretic peptide and intrarenal dopamine play a pivotal role in this interactive network. The balance between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide, by one side, and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system, by the other side, contributes to ensuring the normal function of the kidney. Different pathological scenarios, as nephrotic syndrome and hypertension, where renal sodium excretion is altered, are associated with an impaired interaction between two natriuretic systems as the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide that may be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. The aim of this review is to update and comment the most recent evidences about the intracellular pathways involved in the relationship between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of renal inflammation.

  2. Autophagy and oxidative stress in non-communicable diseases: A matter of the inflammatory state?

    Peña-Oyarzun, Daniel; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Diaz-Vega, Alexis; Aleman, Larissa; Chiong, Mario; Garcia, Lorena; Bambs, Claudia; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Cifuentes, Mariana; Morselli, Eugenia; Ferreccio, Catterina; Quest, Andrew F G; Criollo, Alfredo; Lavandero, Sergio

    2018-05-30

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), also known as chronic diseases, are long-lasting conditions that affect millions of people around the world. Different factors contribute to their genesis and progression; however they share common features, which are critical for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. A persistently altered inflammatory response is typically observed in many NCDs together with redox imbalance. Additionally, dysregulated proteostasis, mainly derived as a consequence of compromised autophagy, is a common feature of several chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss the crosstalk among inflammation, autophagy and oxidative stress, and how they participate in the progression of chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity and type II diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impairment of Akt activity by CYP2E1 mediated oxidative stress is involved in chronic ethanol-induced fatty liver

    Tao Zeng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt plays important roles in the regulation of lipid homeostasis, and impairment of Akt activity has been demonstrated to be involved in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Previous studies suggest that cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1 plays causal roles in the pathogenesis of alcoholic fatty liver (AFL. We hypothesized that Akt activity might be impaired due to CYP2E1-induced oxidative stress in chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis. In this study, we found that chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis was accompanied with reduced phosphorylation of Akt at Thr308 in mice liver. Chronic ethanol exposure had no effects on the protein levels of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K and phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN, and led to a slight decrease of phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK-1 protein level. Ethanol exposure resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE-Akt adducts, which was significantly inhibited by chlormethiazole (CMZ, an efficient CYP2E1 inhibitor. Interestingly, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC significantly attenuated chronic ethanol-induced hepatic fat accumulation and the decline of Akt phosphorylation at Thr308. In the in vitro studies, Akt phosphorylation was suppressed in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 (CYP2E1-HepG2 cells compared with the negative control HepG2 (NC-HepG2 cells, and 4-HNE treatment led to significant decrease of Akt phosphorylation at Thr308 in wild type HepG2 cells. Lastly, pharmacological activation of Akt by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 significantly alleviated chronic ethanol-induced fatty liver in mice. Collectively, these results indicate that CYP2E1-induced oxidative stress may be responsible for ethanol-induced suppression of Akt phosphorylation and pharmacological modulation of Akt in liver may be an effective strategy for the treatment of ethanol-induced fatty liver. Keywords

  4. Nitric oxide is involved in light-specific responses of tomato during germination under normal and osmotic stress conditions.

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Hofman, Jakub; Turecková, Veronika; Novák, Ondrej; Petrivalsky, Marek; Fellner, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the signalling and regulation of plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The photoperiod-sensitive mutant 7B-1 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) showing abscisic acid (ABA) overproduction and blue light (BL)-specific tolerance to osmotic stress represents a valuable model to study the interaction between light, hormones and stress signalling. The role of NO as a regulator of seed germination and ABA-dependent responses to osmotic stress was explored in wild-type and 7B-1 tomato under white light (WL) and BL. Germination data were obtained from the incubation of seeds on germinating media of different composition. Histochemical analysis of NO production in germinating seeds was performed by fluorescence microscopy using a cell-permeable NO probe, and endogenous ABA was analysed by mass spectrometry. The NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione stimulated seed germination, whereas the NO scavenger 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) had an inhibitory effect. Under WL in both genotypes, PTIO strongly suppressed germination stimulated by fluridone, an ABA inhibitor. The stimulatory effect of the NO donor was also observed under osmotic stress for 7B-1 seeds under WL and BL. Seed germination inhibited by osmotic stress was restored by fluridone under WL, but less so under BL, in both genotypes. This effect of fluridone was further modulated by the NO donor and NO scavenger, but only to a minor extent. Fluorescence microscopy using the cell-permeable NO probe DAF-FM DA (4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate) revealed a higher level of NO in stressed 7B-1 compared with wild-type seeds. As well as defective BL signalling, the differential NO-dependent responses of the 7B-1 mutant are probably associated with its high endogenous ABA concentration and related impact on hormonal cross-talk in germinating seeds. These data confirm that light-controlled seed germination and

  5. Calcium and Calmodulin Are Involved in Nitric Oxide-Induced Adventitious Rooting of Cucumber under Simulated Osmotic Stress.

    Niu, Lijuan; Yu, Jian; Liao, Weibiao; Yu, Jihua; Zhang, Meiling; Dawuda, Mohammed M

    2017-01-01

    Osmotic stress is a major form of abiotic stress that adversely affects growth and development of plants and subsequently reduces yield and quality of crops. In this study, the effect of nitric oxide (NO) and calcium (Ca 2+ ) on the process of adventitious rooting in cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) under simulated osmotic stress was investigated. The results revealed that the effect of exogenous NO and Ca 2+ in promoting the development of adventitious roots in cucumber seedlings under simulated osmotic stress was dose-dependent, with a maximal biological response at 10 μM NO donor nitroprusside (SNP) or 200 μM Ca 2+ . The application of Ca 2+ chelators or channel inhibitors and calmodulin (CaM) antagonists significantly reversed NO-induced adventitious rooting, implying that endogenous Ca 2+ /CaM might be involved in NO-induced adventitious rooting under osmotic stress. Moreover, intracellular Ca amount was also increased by NO in cucumber hypocotyls during the development of adventitious roots under osmotic stress. This increase of endogenous Ca 2+ was inhibited by NO specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl) -4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO), nitrate reductase inhibitors tungstate (Na 2 WO 4 ) and sodium azide (NaN 3 ) . This gives an indication that Ca 2+ might be a downstream signaling molecule in the adventitious root development by NO under osmotic condition. The results also show that NO or Ca 2+ play a positive role in improving plant water status and photosynthetic system by increasing chlorophyll content and photochemical activity in leaves. Furthermore, NO and Ca 2+ treatment might alleviate the negative effects of osmotic stress by decreasing membrane damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by enhancing the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Therefore, Ca 2+ /CaM may act as a downstream signaling molecule in NO-induced development of adventitious root

  6. Epiphyseal involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: radiographic and scintigraphic findings in a case with lytic lesions

    Ruiz-Hernandez, G.; Tajahuerce-Romera, G.M.; Latorre-Ibanez, M.D.; Lara-Pomares, A. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Provincial de Castellon (Spain); Vila-Fayos, V. [Servicio de Reumatologia, Hospital Comarcal de Vinaroz (Spain)

    2000-08-01

    We reported a symmetric increase of activity in lower links secondary to Erdheim-Chester disease and demonstrated by bone scans and radiographs. An inusual scintigraphic and radiographic appearance with epiphyseal involvement and lytic lesions is described. Differential diagnosis of bone scan and radiographic findings is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Effects of nerve and fibroblast growth factors on the production of nitric oxide in experimental model of Huntington's disease

    Maksimović Ivana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nitric oxide (NO in neurological diseases represents one of the most studied, yet controversial subjects in physiology. The aim was to examine the effects of intrastriatal injection neurotrophins (nerve growth factors-NGF, fibroblast growth factors-FGF in order to investigate the possible involvement of NO in quinolinic acid (QA induced striatum toxicity in the rat model of Huntington's disease (HD. QA was administered unilaterally into the striatum of adult Wistar rats in a single dose of 150 nM. The other two groups of animals were pretreated immediately before QA application with NGF and FGF, respectively. Control group was treated with 0.9% saline solution in the same manner. Animals were decapitated 7 days after the treatment. Nitrite levels were significantly decreased both in the ipsi- and contra lateral striatum and forebrain cortex of NGF- and FGF-treated animals compared with QA treatment. These results indicated a temporal and spatial propagation of oxidative stress and spread protective effects of NGF and FGF on the forebrain cortex, the distant structure, but tightly connected with striatum, the place of direct neurotoxin damage. Neurotrophins could be the potential neuroprotective agents in HD.

  8. The Implications of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Therapies in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Clinical Aspects and Animal Models

    Balmus, Ioana Miruna; Ciobica, Alin; Trifan, Anca; Stanciu, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by alternating phases of clinical relapse and remission. The etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, although a combination of patient's immune response, genetics, microbiome, and environment plays an important role in disturbing intestinal homeostasis, leading to development and perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade in IBD. As chronic intestinal inflammation is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS), oxidative and nitrosative stress has been proposed as one of the major contributing factor in the IBD development. Substantial evidence suggests that IBD is associated with an imbalance between increased ROS and decreased antioxidant activity, which may explain, at least in part, many of the clinical pathophysiological features of both CD and UC patients. Hereby, we review the presently known oxidant and antioxidant mechanisms involved in IBD-specific events, the animal models used to determine these specific features, and also the antioxidant therapies proposed in IBD patients. PMID:26831601

  9. Toward The identification Of candidate genes involved in black pod disease resistance in Theobroma cacao L.

    Increasing yield, quality and disease resistance are important objectives for cacao breeding programs. Some of the diseases, such as black pod rot (Phytophtora spp), frosty pod (Moniliophthora roreri) and witches’ broom (M. perniciosa), produce significant losses in all or in some of the various pro...

  10. Involvement of interleukin-1 genotypes in the association of coronary heart disease with periodontitis

    Geismar, Karen; Enevold, Christian; Sørensen, Lars Korsbæk

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies demonstrated an association between periodontitis (PE) and coronary heart disease (CHD). The coexistence of the two disease entities could be dependent on mutual risk factors, and polymorphism of the interleukin (IL)-1 gene cluster associated with the severity of PE might also...

  11. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome: mediators involved in the pathophysiology from obesity to coronary heart disease.

    Roos, Cornelis J; Quax, Paul H A; Jukema, J Wouter

    2012-02-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular events and have a higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This worse prognosis is partly explained by the late recognition of coronary heart disease in these patients, due to the absence of symptoms. Early identification of coronary heart disease is vital, to initiate preventive medical therapy and improve prognosis. At present, with the use of cardiovascular risk models, the identification of coronary heart disease in these patients remains inadequate. To this end, biomarkers should improve the early identification of patients at increased cardiovascular risk. The first part of this review describes the pathophysiologic pathway from obesity to coronary heart disease. The second part evaluates several mediators from this pathophysiologic pathway for their applicability as biomarkers for the identification of coronary heart disease.

  12. Polyphenols and Oxidative Stress in Atherosclerosis-Related Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke

    Yu-Chen Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Good nutrition could maintain health and life. Polyphenols are common nutrient mainly derived from fruits, vegetables, tea, coffee, cocoa, mushrooms, beverages, and traditional medicinal herbs. They are potential substances against oxidative-related diseases, for example, cardiovascular disease, specifically, atherosclerosis-related ischemic heart disease and stroke, which are health and economic problems recognized worldwide. In this study, we reviewed the risk factors for atherosclerosis, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cigarette smoking as well as the antioxidative activity of polyphenols, which could prevent the pathology of atherosclerosis, including endothelial dysfunction, low-density lipoprotein oxidation, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, inflammatory process by monocytes, macrophages or T lymphocytes, and platelet aggregation. The strong radical-scavenging properties of polyphenols would exhibit antioxidative and anti-inflammation effects. Polyphenols reduce ROS production by inhibiting oxidases, reducing the production of superoxide, inhibiting OxLDL formation, suppressing VSMC proliferation and migration, reducing platelet aggregation, and improving mitochondrial oxidative stress. Polyphenol consumption also inhibits the development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Despite the numerous in vivo and in vitro studies, more advanced clinical trials are necessary to confirm the efficacy of polyphenols in the treatment of atherosclerosis-related vascular diseases.

  13. Cells, Biomarkers, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evidence for Peripheral Involvement in a Central Disease

    2012-01-01

    oxide production in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis . Clin. Exp. Rheumatol. 27, 452–458. Gotovac K., Sabioncello A., Rabatic S., Berki T. and...Evidence of successful pharmaceutical inhibition of PBMC/microglia function was reported in an animal model of blast-induced TBI (Moochhala et al...related mild traumatic brain injury: mechanisms of injury and impact on clinical care . Mt Sinai J. Med. 76, 111–118. Fagelson M. A. (2007) The

  14. [Adult-onset Still's disease with pulmonary and cardiac involvement and response to intravenous immunoglobulin].

    Neto, Nilton Salles Rosa; Waldrich, Leandro; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary manifestations of adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) include pericarditis, pleural effusion, transient pulmonary infiltrates, pulmonary interstitial disease and myocarditis. Serositis are common but pneumonitis and myocarditis are not and bring elevated risk of mortality. They may manifest on disease onset or flares. Previously reported cases were treated with high-dose glucocorticoids and immunosupressants and, when refractory, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). We report an AOSD patient whose flare presented with severe pleupneumonitis and myopericarditis and, following nonresponse to a methylprednisolone pulse, high dose of prednisone and cyclosporine A, recovered after a 2-day 1g/kg/day IVIG infusion.

  15. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  16. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors are involved in the protection of RAW264.7 macrophages against the oxidative stress: an in vitro study

    Sabrina Giacoppo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in the last decades has widely investigated the anti-oxidant properties of natural products as a therapeutic approach for the prevention and the treatment of oxidative-stress related disorders. In this context, several studies were aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of phytocannabinoids, the bioactive compounds of Cannabis sativa. Here, we examined the anti-oxidant ability of Cannabigerol (CBG, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid, still little known, into counteracting the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative stress in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, we tested selective receptor antagonists for cannabinoid receptors and specifically CB1R (SR141716A and CB2R (AM630 in order to investigate through which CBG may exert its action. Taken together, our in vitro results showed that CBG is able to counteract oxidative stress by activation of CB2 receptors. CB2 antagonist pre-treatment indeed blocked the protective effects of CBG in H2O2 stimulated macrophages, while CB1R was not involved. Specifically, CBG exhibited a potent action in inhibiting oxidative stress, by down-regulation of the main oxidative markers (iNOS, nitrotyrosine and PARP-1, by preventing IκB-α phosphorylation and translocation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and also via the modulation of MAP kinases pathway. On the other hand, CBG was found to increase anti-oxidant defense of cells by modulating superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1 expression and thus inhibiting cell death (results focused on balance between Bax and Bcl-2. Based on its antioxidant activities, CBG may hold great promise as an anti-oxidant agent and therefore used in clinical practice as a new approach in oxidative-stress related disorders.

  17. Serotonin-induced vasodilatation in the human forearm is mediated by the "nitric oxide-pathway": no evidence for involvement of the 5-HT3-receptor

    Bruning, T. A.; Chang, P. C.; Blauw, G. J.; Vermeij, P.; van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The "nitric oxide (NO)-pathway" is presumed to be involved in acetylcholine (ACh)- and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)-mediated vasodilatation. In addition, both the 5-HT-induced transient and persistent vasodilator responses in the forearm vascular bed are abolished by the

  18. Involvement of two uptake mechanisms of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles in a co-exposure scenario using mouse macrophages

    Dimitri Vanhecke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the simultaneous uptake of different engineered nanoparticle types, as it can be expected in our daily life. In order to test such co-exposure effects, murine macrophages (J774A.1 cell line were incubated with gold (AuNPs and iron oxide nanoparticles (FeOxNPs either alone or combined. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that single NPs of both types bound within minutes on the cell surface but with a distinctive difference between FeOxNPs and AuNPs. Uptake analysis studies based on laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed intracellular appearance of both NP types in all exposure scenarios and a time-dependent increase. This increase was higher for both AuNPs and FeOxNPs during co-exposure. Cells treated with endocytotic inhibitors recovered after co-exposure, which additionally hinted that two uptake mechanisms are involved. Cross-talk between uptake pathways is relevant for toxicological studies: Co-exposure acts as an uptake accelerant. If the goal is to maximize the cellular uptake, e.g., for the delivery of pharmaceutical agents, this can be beneficial. However, co-exposure should also be taken into account in the case of risk assessment of occupational settings. The demonstration of co-exposure-invoked pathway interactions reveals that synergetic nanoparticle effects, either positive or negative, must be considered for nanotechnology and nanomedicine in particular to develop to its full potential.

  19. UV-B radiation-induced oxidative stress and p38 signaling pathway involvement in the benthic copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Kyun-Woo; Kim, Min-Jung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation presents an environmental hazard to aquatic organisms. To understand the molecular responses of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus to UV-B radiation, we measured the acute toxicity response to 96 h of UV-B radiation, and we also assessed the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, glutathione (GSH) content, and antioxidant enzyme (GST, GR, GPx, and SOD) activities after 24 h of exposure to UV-B with LD50 and half LD50 values. Also, expression patterns of p53 and hsp gene families with phosphorylation of p38 MAPK were investigated in UV-B-exposed copepods. We found that the ROS level, GSH content, and antioxidant enzyme activity levels were increased with the transcriptional upregulation of antioxidant-related genes, indicating that UV-B induces oxidative stress by generating ROS and stimulating antioxidant enzymatic activity as a defense mechanism. Additionally, we found that p53 expression was significantly increased after UV-B irradiation due to increases in the phosphorylation of the stress-responsive p38 MAPK, indicating that UV-B may be responsible for inducing DNA damage in T. japonicus. Of the hsp family genes, transcriptional levels of hsp20, hsp20.7, hsp70, and hsp90 were elevated in response to a low dose of UV-B radiation (9 kJ m(-2)), suggesting that these hsp genes may be involved in cellular protection against UV-B radiation. In this paper, we performed a pathway-oriented mechanistic analysis in response to UV-B radiation, and this analysis provides a better understanding of the effects of UV-B in the intertidal benthic copepod T. japonicus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidized LDL-induced angiogenesis involves sphingosine 1-phosphate: prevention by anti-S1P antibody.

    Camaré, Caroline; Trayssac, Magali; Garmy-Susini, Barbara; Mucher, Elodie; Sabbadini, Roger; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Neovascularization occurring in atherosclerotic lesions may promote plaque expansion, intraplaque haemorrhage and rupture. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) are atherogenic, but their angiogenic effect is controversial; both angiogenic and anti-angiogenic effects have been reported. The angiogenic mechanism of oxLDL is partly understood, but the role of the angiogenic sphingolipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), in this process is not known. Thus, we investigated whether S1P is involved in the oxLDL-induced angiogenesis and whether an anti-S1P monoclonal antibody can prevent this effect. Angiogenesis was assessed by capillary tube formation by human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) cultured on Matrigel and in vivo by the Matrigel plug assay in C57BL/6 mice. Human oxLDL exhibited a biphasic angiogenic effect on HMEC-1; low concentrations were angiogenic, higher concentrations were cytotoxic. The angiogenic response to oxLDL was blocked by the sphingosine kinase (SPHK) inhibitor, dimethylsphingosine, by SPHK1-siRNA and by an anti-S1P monoclonal antibody. Moreover, inhibition of oxLDL uptake and subsequent redox signalling by anti-CD36 and anti-LOX-1 receptor antibodies and by N-acetylcysteine, respectively, blocked SPHK1 activation and tube formation. In vivo, in the Matrigel plug assay, low concentrations of human oxLDL or murine oxVLDL also triggered angiogenesis, which was prevented by i.p. injection of the anti-S1P antibody. These data highlight the role of S1P in angiogenesis induced by oxLDL both in HMEC-1 cultured on Matrigel and in vivo in the Matrigel plug model in mice, and demonstrate that the anti-S1P antibody effectively blocks the angiogenic effect of oxLDL. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Nitric oxide-induced murine hematopoietic stem cell fate involves multiple signaling proteins, gene expression, and redox modulation.

    Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Dias, Carolina C; Regina, Helena; Segreto, C; Addios, Priscilla C; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Barros, Carlos C; Higa, Elisa M S; Buri, Marcus V; Ferreira, Alice T; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

    2014-11-01

    There are a growing number of reports showing the influence of redox modulation in cellular signaling. Although the regulation of hematopoiesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has been described, their direct participation in the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains unclear. In this work, the direct role of nitric oxide (NO(•)), a RNS, in the modulation of hematopoiesis was investigated using two sources of NO(•) , one produced by endothelial cells stimulated with carbachol in vitro and another using the NO(•)-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) in vivo. Two main NO(•) effects were observed: proliferation of HSCs-especially of the short-term HSCs-and its commitment and terminal differentiation to the myeloid lineage. NO(•)-induced proliferation was characterized by the increase in the number of cycling HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells positive to BrdU and Ki-67, upregulation of Notch-1, Cx43, PECAM-1, CaR, ERK1/2, Akt, p38, PKC, and c-Myc. NO(•)-induced HSCs differentiation was characterized by the increase in granulocytic-macrophage progenitors, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units, mature myeloid cells, upregulation of PU.1, and C/EBPα genes concomitantly to the downregulation of GATA-3 and Ikz-3 genes, activation of Stat5 and downregulation of the other analyzed proteins mentioned above. Also, redox status modulation differed between proliferation and differentiation responses, which is likely associated with the transition of the proliferative to differentiation status. Our findings provide evidence of the role of NO(•) in inducing HSCs proliferation and myeloid differentiation involving multiple signaling. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  2. The genotoxicity and systemic toxicity of a pharmaceutical effluent in Wistar rats may involve oxidative stress induction

    Grace O. Adeoye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is scarcity of information on the possible mechanisms of pharmaceutical effluent induced genotoxicity and systemic toxicity. This study investigated the genotoxicity and systemic toxicity of a pharmaceutical effluent in Wistar rats. Rats were orally treated with 5–50% concentrations of the effluent for 28 days. At post-exposure, blood, liver, kidney and bone marrow cells were examined for alterations in serum biochemical parameters and hematological indices, histopathological lesions and micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes formation (MNPCE. The effluent caused concentration independent significant (p < 0.05 alterations in aspartate (AST and alanine (ALT aminotransferases, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, malondialdehyde (MDA, total and direct bilirubin and creatinine. There was reduction in red blood count (RBC, hemoglobin concentration (HGB, platelets, percentage hematocrit (HCT, white blood count (WBC and mean corpuscle hemoglobin (MCH except mean corpuscle hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, which increased in the treated rats. Histopathological lesions observed in the liver and kidney of the effluent treated rats were thinning of the hepatic cord, kuffer cell hyperplasia, vacuolation of the hepatocytes and renal cells, multifocal inflammatory changes, necrosis and congestion of the renal blood vessels and central vein. MNPCE significantly increase in the bone marrow of the treated rats compared to the negative control. The concentration of some toxic metals and anions in the effluent were above standard permissible limits. These findings showed that the pharmaceutical effluent caused somatic DNA damage and systemic toxicity in rats may involve induction of oxidative stress, suggesting environmental contamination and health risks in wildlife and humans.

  3. Multilocus analysis of the Exophiala jeanselmei clade containing black yeasts involved in opportunistic disease in humans

    Zeng, J.; Feng, P.; Gerrits van den Ende, A.H.G.; Xi, L.; Harrak, M.J.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2014-01-01

    To confirm species delimitations in the ‘jeanselmei-clade’ in the Chaetothyriales, four independent markers were analysed, and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using different algorithms. Reproductive isolation within the complex and reproductive modes in the species involved were determined,

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve; Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas; Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona; Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  6. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    Ren, Xuefeng; Gaile, Daniel P.; Gong, Zhihong; Qiu, Wenting; Ge, Yichen; Zhang, Chuanwu; Huang, Chenping; Yan, Hongtao; Olson, James R.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Wu, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  7. Arsenic responsive microRNAs in vivo and their potential involvement in arsenic-induced oxidative stress

    Ren, Xuefeng, E-mail: xuefengr@buffalo.edu [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gaile, Daniel P. [Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Health Professions, the State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Gong, Zhihong [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Qiu, Wenting [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Ge, Yichen [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Zhang, Chuanwu; Huang, Chenping; Yan, Hongtao [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China); Olson, James R. [Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Biomedical Sciences, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Kavanagh, Terrance J. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Wu, Hongmei, E-mail: hongmeiwwu@hotmail.com [School of Public Health, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Arsenic exposure is postulated to modify microRNA (miRNA) expression, leading to changes of gene expression and toxicities, but studies relating the responses of miRNAs to arsenic exposure are lacking, especially with respect to in vivo studies. We utilized high-throughput sequencing technology and generated miRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from Sprague Dawley (SD) rats exposed to various concentrations of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 mg/L) for 60 days. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the miRNA expression profiles clustered the SD rats into different groups based on the arsenic exposure status, indicating a highly significant association between arsenic exposure and cluster membership (p-value of 0.0012). Multiple miRNA expressions were altered by arsenic in an exposure concentration-dependent manner. Among the identified arsenic-responsive miRNAs, several are predicted to target Nfe2l2-regulated antioxidant genes, including glutamate–cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit (GCLC) and modifier subunit (GCLM) which are involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Exposure to low concentrations of arsenic increased mRNA expression for Gclc and Gclm, while high concentrations significantly reduced their expression, which were correlated to changes in hepatic GCL activity and GSH level. Moreover, our data suggested that other mechanisms, e.g., miRNAs, rather than Nfe2l2-signaling pathway, could be involved in the regulation of mRNA expression of Gclc and Gclm post-arsenic exposure in vivo. Together, our findings show that arsenic exposure disrupts the genome-wide expression of miRNAs in vivo, which could lead to the biological consequence, such as an altered balance of antioxidant defense and oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure induces changes of hepatic miRNA expression profiles. • Hepatic GCL activity and GSH level in rats are altered following arsenic exposure. • Arsenic induced GCL expression change is

  8. Anti-stress effects of human placenta extract: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system in rats.

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Sunyoung; Hahm, Dae Hyun; Lee, Hyejung; Oh, Chang Taek; Han, Hae Jung; Ji, Hyi Jeong; Shim, Insop

    2018-05-08

    Human placenta hydrolysate (hPH) has been utilized to improve menopausal, fatigue, liver function. Its high concentration of bioactive substances is known to produce including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. However, its mechanisms of stress-induced depression remain unknown. The present study examined the effect of hPH on stress-induced depressive behaviors and biochemical parameters in rats. hPH (0.02 ml, 0.2 ml or 1 ml/rat) was injected intravenously 30 min before the daily stress session in male Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to repeated immobilization stress (4 h/day for 7 days). The depressive-like behaviors of all groups were measured by elevated plus maze (EPM) and forced swimming test (FST). After the behavior tests, brain samples of all groups were collected for the analysis of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) staining. Treatment with hPH produced a significant decrease of immobility time in the FST compared to the controls. Additionally, hPH treatment elicited a slightly decreasing trend in anxiety behavior on the EPM. Furthermore, hPH increased the level of GPx protein in the hippocampus, and decreased the expression of NADPH-d in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). This study demonstrated that hPH has anti-stress effects via the regulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase and antioxidant activity in the brain. These results suggest that hPH may be useful in the treatment of stress-related diseases such as chronic fatigue syndrome.

  9. Paternal involvement in pediatric Type 1 diabetes: fathers' and mothers' psychological functioning and disease management.

    Hansen, Jennifer A; Weissbrod, Carol; Schwartz, David D; Taylor, W Patrick

    2012-03-01

    Psychological functioning in fathers of children with Type 1 diabetes has received relatively little attention compared to mothers. This study examined fathers' perceived involvement in their children's diabetes care as it related to mothers' and fathers' pediatric parenting stress, depression, anxiety, marital satisfaction, and sleep, and to their children's diabetes regimen adherence and glycemic control. Eighty-two mothers and 43 fathers completed questionnaires. Multivariate linear regressions were conducted separately for mothers and fathers to determine the relationships between the perceived amount and the perceived helpfulness of father involvement in child diabetes care on parental psychosocial functioning and child diabetes control. Maternal perceptions of father helpfulness and amount of involvement in illness care were related to improved marital satisfaction and fewer depressive symptoms in mothers. In fathers, perception of their own amount of involvement was related to increased pediatric parenting stress and anxiety. Better child regimen adherence was associated with maternal perceptions of father helpfulness but not the amount of their involvement, while paternal perceptions of their own helpfulness were related to poorer glycemic control. These findings suggest that fathers and mothers may react differently to their roles in childhood illness and that perceptions of their involvement may be differently associated with children's glycemic control and regimen adherence.

  10. Liver mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Oliveira C.P.M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondria play a role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. Fatty liver was induced in Wistar rats with a choline-deficient diet (CD; N = 7 or a high-fat diet enriched with PUFAs-omega-3 (H; N = 7 for 4 weeks. The control group (N = 7 was fed a standard diet. Liver mitochondrial oxidation and phosphorylation were measured polarographically and oxidative stress was estimated on the basis of malondialdehyde and glutathione concentrations. Moderate macrovacuolar liver steatosis was observed in the CD group and mild liver steatosis was observed in the periportal area in the H group. There was an increase in the oxygen consumption rate by liver mitochondria in respiratory state 4 (S4 and a decrease in respiratory control rate (RCR in the CD group (S4: 32.70 ± 3.35; RCR: 2.55 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1 when compared to the H and control groups (S4: 23.09 ± 1.53, 17.04 ± 2.03, RCR: 3.15 ± 0.15, 3.68 ± 0.15 ng atoms of O2 min-1 mg protein-1, respectively, P < 0.05. Hepatic lipoperoxide concentrations were significantly increased and the concentration of reduced glutathione was significantly reduced in the CD group. A choline-deficient diet causes moderate steatosis with disruption of liver mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products can impair the flow of electrons along the respiratory chain, causing overreduction of respiratory chain components and enhanced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. These findings are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  11. The involvement of BDNF, NGF and GDNF in aging and Alzheimer’s disease

    Budni, Josiane; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; Mina, Francielle; Garcez, Michelle Lima; Zugno, Alexandra Ioppi

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a normal physiological process accompanied by cognitive decline. This aging process has been the primary risk factor for development of aging-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cognitive deficit is related to alterations of neurotrophic factors level such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). These strong relationship between aging and AD is important to investigate the time which they...

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  13. Role of Oxidants in Interstitial Lung Diseases: Pneumoconioses, Constrictive Bronchiolitis, and Chronic Tropical Pulmonary Eosinophilia

    William N. Rom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidants such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and myeloperoxidase from activated inflammatory cells in the lower respiratory tract contribute to inflammation and injury. Etiologic agents include inorganic particulates such as asbestos, silica, or coal mine dust or mixtures of inorganic dust and combustion materials found in World Trade Center dust and smoke. These etiologic agents are phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages or bronchial epithelial cells and release chemotactic factors that recruit inflammatory cells to the lung. Chemotactic factors attract and activate neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes and further activate macrophages to release more oxidants. Inorganic dusts target alveolar macrophages, World Trade Center dust targets bronchial epithelial cells, and eosinophils characterize tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE caused by filarial organisms. The technique of bronchoalveolar lavage in humans has recovered alveolar macrophages (AMs in dust diseases and eosinophils in TPE that release increased amounts of oxidants in vitro. Interestingly, TPE has massively increased eosinophils in the acute form and after treatment can still have ongoing eosinophilic inflammation. A course of prednisone for one week can reduce the oxidant burden and attendant inflammation and may be a strategy to prevent chronic TPE and interstitial lung disease.

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Oxidative Stress, and Cardiovascular Disease: Evidence from Human Studies

    Hans-Joachim Eisele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a frequent disease mainly affecting obese people and caused by repetitive collapse of the upper airways during sleep. The increased morbidity and mortality of OSA are mainly thought to be the consequence of its adverse effects on cardiovascular (CV health. In this context, oxidative stress induced by nocturnal intermittent hypoxia has been identified to play a major role. This is suggested by biomarker studies in OSA patients showing excessively generated reactive oxygen species from leukocytes, reduced plasma levels of nitrite and nitrate, increased lipid peroxidation, and reduced antioxidant capacity. Biopsy studies complement these findings by demonstrating reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and increased nitrotyrosine immunofluorescence in the vasculature of these patients. Furthermore, oxidative stress in OSA correlates with surrogate markers of CV disease such as endothelial function, intima-media thickness, and high blood pressure. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy reverses oxidative stress in OSA. The same may be true for antioxidants; however, more studies are needed to clarify this issue.

  15. MicroRNA-122 is involved in oxidative stress in isoniazid-induced liver injury in mice.

    Song, L; Zhang, Z R; Zhang, J L; Zhu, X B; He, L; Shi, Z; Gao, L; Li, Y; Hu, B; Feng, F M

    2015-10-27

    Many studies have shown that the pathogenesis of liver injury includes oxidative stress. MicroRNA-122 may be a marker for the early diagnosis of drug-induced liver injury. However, the relationship between microRNA-122 and oxidative stress in anti-tuberculosis drug-induced liver injury remains unknown. We measured changes in tissue microRNA-122 levels and indices of oxidative stress during liver injury in mice after administration of isoniazid, a first-line anti-tuberculosis drug. We quantified microRNA-122 expression and indices of oxidative stress at 7 time points, including 1, 3, and 5 days and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks. The tissue microRNA-122 levels and oxidative stress significantly changed at 3 and 5 days, suggesting that isoniazid-induced liver injury reduces oxidative stress and microRNA-122 expression compared to in the control group (P microRNA-122, began to change at 5 days (P microRNA-122 profile may affect oxidative stress by regulating mitochondrial ribosome protein S11 gene during isoniazid-induced liver injury, which may contribute to the response mechanisms of microRNA-122 and oxidative stress.

  16. The Role of Oxidative Stress-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Amyloid- ? Production in Alzheimer's Disease

    Zuo, Li; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin T.; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Best, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have proposed a strong correlation between reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress (OS) and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). With over five million people diagnosed in the United States alone, AD is the most common type of dementia worldwide. AD includes progressive neurodegeneration, followed by memory loss and reduced cognitive ability. Characterized by the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques as a hallmark, the connection betwee...

  17. Personalized disease-specific protein corona influences the therapeutic impact of graphene oxide

    Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Raheb, Jamshid; Akhavan, Omid; Arjmand, Sareh; Mashinchian, Omid; Rahman, Masoud; Abdolahad, Mohammad; Serpooshan, Vahid; Laurent, Sophie; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-05-01

    The hard corona, the protein shell that is strongly attached to the surface of nano-objects in biological fluids, is recognized as the first layer that interacts with biological objects (e.g., cells and tissues). The decoration of the hard corona (i.e., the type, amount, and conformation of the attached proteins) can define the biological fate of the nanomaterial. Recent developments have revealed that corona decoration strongly depends on the type of disease in human patients from which the plasma is obtained as a protein source for corona formation (referred to as the `personalized protein corona'). In this study, we demonstrate that graphene oxide (GO) sheets can trigger different biological responses in the presence of coronas obtained from various types of diseases. GO sheets were incubated with plasma from human subjects with different diseases/conditions, including hypofibrinogenemia, blood cancer, thalassemia major, thalassemia minor, rheumatism, fauvism, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and pregnancy. Identical sheets coated with varying protein corona decorations exhibited significantly different cellular toxicity, apoptosis, and uptake, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and nitrogen oxide levels. The results of this report will help researchers design efficient and safe, patient-specific nano biomaterials in a disease type-specific manner for clinical and biological applications.The hard corona, the protein shell that is strongly attached to the surface of nano-objects in biological fluids, is recognized as the first layer that interacts with biological objects (e.g., cells and tissues). The decoration of the hard corona (i.e., the type, amount, and conformation of the attached proteins) can define the biological fate of the nanomaterial. Recent developments have revealed that corona decoration strongly depends on the type of disease in human patients from which the plasma is obtained as a protein source for corona formation (referred

  18. Higher oxidative stress in skeletal muscle of McArdle disease patients

    Jan J. Kaczor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available McArdle disease (MCD is an autosomal recessive condition resulting from skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase deficiency. The resultant block in glycogenolysis leads to an increased flux through the xanthine oxidase pathway (myogenic hyperuricemia and could lead to an increase in oxidative stress. We examined markers of oxidative stress (8-isoprostane and protein carbonyls, NAD(PH-oxidase, xanthine oxidase and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity in skeletal muscle of MCD patients (N = 12 and controls (N = 12. Eight-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls were higher in MCD patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05. There was a compensatory up-regulation of catalase protein content and activity (p < 0.05, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD protein content (p < 0.01 and activity (p < 0.05 in MCD patients, yet this increase was not sufficient to protect the muscle against elevated oxidative damage. These results suggest that oxidative stress in McArdle patients occurs and future studies should evaluate a potential role for oxidative stress contributing to acute pathology (rhabdomyolysis and possibly later onset fixed myopathy.

  19. Oxidative stress and APO E polymorphisms in Alzheimer's disease and in mild cognitive impairment.

    Chico, L; Simoncini, C; Lo Gerfo, A; Rocchi, A; Petrozzi, L; Carlesi, C; Volpi, L; Tognoni, G; Siciliano, G; Bonuccelli, U

    2013-08-01

    A number of evidences indicates oxidative stress as a relevant pathogenic factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Considering its recognized major genetic risk factors in AD, apolipoprotein (APO E) has been investigated in several experimental settings regarding its role in the process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The aim of this work has been to evaluate possible relationships between APO E genotype and plasma levels of selected oxidative stress markers in both AD and MCI patients. APO E genotypes were determined using restriction enzyme analysis. Plasma levels of oxidative markers, advanced oxidation protein products, iron-reducing ability of plasma and, in MCI, activity of superoxide dismutases were evaluated using spectrophotometric analysis. We found, compared to controls, increased levels of oxidized proteins and decreased values of plasma-reducing capacity in both AD patients (p < 0.0001) and MCI patients (p < 0.001); the difference between AD and MCI patients was significant only for plasma-reducing capacity (p < 0.0001), the former showing the lowest values. Superoxide dismutase activity was reduced, although not at statistical level, in MCI compared with that in controls. E4 allele was statistically associated (p < 0.05) with AD patients. When comparing different APO E genotype subgroups, no difference was present, as far as advanced oxidation protein products and iron-reducing ability of plasma levels were concerned, between E4 and non-E4 carriers, in both AD and MCI; on the contrary, E4 carriers MCI patients showed significantly decreased (p < 0.05) superoxide dismutase activity with respect to non-E4 carriers. This study, in confirming the occurrence of oxidative stress in AD and MCI patients, shows how it can be related, at least for superoxide dismutase activity in MCI, to APO E4 allele risk factor.

  20. Multifaceted Communication Problems in Everyday Conversations Involving People with Parkinson’s Disease

    Charlotta Saldert

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Parkinson’s disease is often accompanied by a motor speech disorder, which results in impaired communication. However, people with Parkinson’s disease may also have impaired word retrieval (anomia and other communicative problems, which have a negative impact on their ability to participate in conversations with family as well as healthcare staff. The aim of the present study was to explore effects of impaired speech and language on communication and how this is managed by people with Parkinson’s disease and their spouses. Using a qualitative method based on Conversation Analysis, in-depth analyses were performed on natural conversational interaction in five dyads including elderly men who were at different stages of Parkinson’s disease. The findings showed that the motor speech disorder in combination with word retrieval difficulties and adaptations, such as using communication strategies, may result in atypical utterances that are difficult for communication partners to understand. The coexistence of several communication problems compounds the difficulties faced in conversations and individuals with Parkinson’s disease are often dependent on cooperation with their communication partner to make themselves understood.

  1. Multifaceted Communication Problems in Everyday Conversations Involving People with Parkinson’s Disease

    Saldert, Charlotta; Bauer, Malin

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Parkinson’s disease is often accompanied by a motor speech disorder, which results in impaired communication. However, people with Parkinson’s disease may also have impaired word retrieval (anomia) and other communicative problems, which have a negative impact on their ability to participate in conversations with family as well as healthcare staff. The aim of the present study was to explore effects of impaired speech and language on communication and how this is managed by people with Parkinson’s disease and their spouses. Using a qualitative method based on Conversation Analysis, in-depth analyses were performed on natural conversational interaction in five dyads including elderly men who were at different stages of Parkinson’s disease. The findings showed that the motor speech disorder in combination with word retrieval difficulties and adaptations, such as using communication strategies, may result in atypical utterances that are difficult for communication partners to understand. The coexistence of several communication problems compounds the difficulties faced in conversations and individuals with Parkinson’s disease are often dependent on cooperation with their communication partner to make themselves understood. PMID:28946714

  2. Comparison between the radiological manifestations of thoracic involvement in collagen vascular diseases and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Kirova, G.; Rashkov, R.; Georgiev, O.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare the presentation and distribution of lung abnormalities seen in Collagen Vascular Diseases (CVD) with those specifics for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). The HRCT scans of 92 patients fulfilling the ARA criteria's for the diagnosis of four different CVD were reviewed and compared with those of 18 patients with IPF. The presentations of three main patterns of lung disease were assessed into the both groups. In order to find out the trend distribution in each disease, the grade and severity of presentation for the main abnormalities were assessed, using a scoring system.The incidence of reticular lung abnormalities for the group of IPF is 100 % versus 57.3 % for the CVD (p<0.0009). At the same time CVD, except for PSS, had a low incidence of reticular diseases (37 %). The incidence of alveolar abnormalities in CVD (57.3 %) were similar as these in IPF (66.6 %) (p=NS). The severity of the disease was greatest in IPF and PSS without significant difference between them. Nevertheless of uniform character of the abnormalities in the rest of CVD, they were presented with lesser degree and severity. The main abnormalities, seen in pulmonary parenchyma in patients with IPF and CVD were similar but with different grade, severity and distribution. (authors)

  3. Disease Risk Assessments Involving Companion Animals: an Overview for 15 Selected Pathogens Taking a European Perspective.

    Rijks, J M; Cito, F; Cunningham, A A; Rantsios, A T; Giovannini, A

    2016-07-01

    Prioritization of companion animal transmissible diseases was performed by the Companion Animals multisectoriaL interprofessionaL Interdisciplinary Strategic Think tank On zoonoses (CALLISTO) project. The project considered diseases occurring in domesticated species commonly kept as pets, such as dogs and cats, but also included diseases occurring in captive wild animals and production animal species. The prioritization process led to the selection of 15 diseases of prime public health relevance, agricultural economic importance, or both. An analysis was made of the current knowledge on the risk of occurrence and transmission of these diseases among companion animals, and from companion animals to man (zoonoses) or to livestock. The literature was scanned for risk assessments for these diseases. Studies were classified as import risk assessments (IRAs) or risk factor analyses (RFAs) in endemic areas. For those pathogens that are absent from Europe, only IRAs were considered; for pathogens present throughout Europe, only RFAs were considered. IRAs were identified for seven of the eight diseases totally or partially absent from Europe. IRAs for classical rabies and alveolar echinococcosis found an increased risk for introduction of the pathogen into officially disease-free areas as a consequence of abandoning national rules and adopting the harmonized EU rules for pet travel. IRAs for leishmaniosis focused on risk associated with the presence of persistently infected dogs in new geographical areas, taking into consideration the risk of disease establishment should a competent vector arise. IRAs for Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever and West Nile fever indicated that the likelihood of introduction via companion animals was low. IRAs for bluetongue paid no attention to the risk of introduction via companion animals, which was also the case for IRAs for foot-and-mouth disease, the only disease considered to be absent from Europe. RFAs dealing with the risk factors for

  4. Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Syndrome: Cause or Consequence of Alzheimer's Disease?

    Diana Luque-Contreras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a major neurodegenerative disease affecting the elderly. Clinically, it is characterized by a progressive loss of memory and cognitive function. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by the presence of extracellular β-amyloid (Aβ deposited as neuritic plaques (NP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT made of abnormal and hyperphosphorylated tau protein. These lesions are capable of generating the neuronal damage that leads to cell death and cognitive failure through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Evidence indicates the critical role of Aβ metabolism in prompting the oxidative stress observed in AD patients. However, it has also been proposed that oxidative damage precedes the onset of clinical and pathological AD symptoms, including amyloid-β deposition, neurofibrillary tangle formation, vascular malfunction, metabolic syndrome, and cognitive decline. This paper provides a brief description of the three main proteins associated with the development of the disease (Aβ, tau, and ApoE and describes their role in the generation of oxidative stress. Finally, we describe the mitochondrial alterations that are generated by Aβ and examine the relationship of vascular damage which is a potential prognostic tool of metabolic syndrome. In addition, new therapeutic approaches targeting ROS sources and metabolic support were reported.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Disease: Lessons from Animal Studies

    Rio Dumitrascu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular (CV diseases such as arterial hypertension, heart failure, and stroke. Based on human research, sympathetic activation, inflammation, and oxidative stress are thought to play major roles in the pathophysiology of OSA-related CV diseases. Animal models of OSA have shown that endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodelling, and systemic and pulmonary arterial hypertension as well as heart failure can develop in response to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH. The available animal data are clearly in favour of oxidative stress playing a key role in the development of all of these CV manifestations of OSA. Presumably, the oxidative stress is due to an activation of NADPH oxidase and other free oxygen radicals producing enzymes within the CV system as evidenced by data from knockout mice and pharmacological interventions. It is hoped that animal models of OSA-related CV disease will continue to contribute to a deeper understanding of their underlying pathophysiology and will foster the way for the development of cardioprotective treatment options other than conventional CPAP therapy.

  6. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L

    2016-01-01

    McArdle disease (muscle glycogenosis type V) is caused by myophosphorylase deficiency, which leads to impaired glycogen breakdown. We investigated how myophosphorylase deficiency affects muscle physiology, morphology, and glucose metabolism in 20-week-old McArdle mice and compared the findings...... to those in McArdle disease patients. Muscle contractions in the McArdle mice were affected by structural degeneration due to glycogen accumulation, and glycolytic muscles fatigued prematurely, as occurs in the muscles of McArdle disease patients. Homozygous McArdle mice showed muscle fiber disarray...... no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus...

  7. The involvement of multiple thrombogenic and atherogenic markers in premature coronary artery disease

    Antonio P. Mansur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of atherogenic and thrombogenic markers and lymphotoxin-alfa gene mutations with the risk of premature coronary disease. METHODS: This cross-sectional, case-control, age-adjusted study was conducted in 336 patients with premature coronary disease (50% luminal reduction or a previous myocardial infarction. The laboratory data evaluated included thrombogenic factors (fibrinogen, protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III, atherogenic factors (glucose and lipid profiles, lipoprotein(a, and apolipoproteins AI and B, and lymphotoxin-alfa mutations. Genetic variability of lymphotoxin-alfa was determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis. RESULTS: Coronary disease patients exhibited lower concentrations of HDL-cholesterol and higher levels of glucose, lipoprotein(a, and protein S. The frequencies of AA, AG, and GG lymphotoxin-alfa mutation genotypes were 55.0%, 37.6%, and 7.4% for controls and 42.7%, 46.0%, and 11.3% for coronary disease patients (p = 0.02, respectively. Smoking, dyslipidemia, family history, and lipoprotein(a and lymphotoxin-alfa mutations in men were independent variables associated with coronary disease. The area under the curve (C-statistic increased from 0.779 to 0.802 (p<0.05 with the inclusion of lipoprotein(a and lymphotoxin-alfa mutations in the set of conventional risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The inclusion of lipoprotein(a and lymphotoxin-alfa mutations in the set of conventional risk factors showed an additive but small increase in the risk prediction of premature coronary disease.

  8. Progressive white-matter disease with primary cerebellar involvement: a separate entity?

    Yalcinkaya, C. [Division of Child Neurology, Department of Neurology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Arslanoglu, I. [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Paediatrics, Goeztepe Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Islak, C. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Aydin, A. [Division of Metabolic Disease, Department of Paediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Boltshauser, E. [Division of Paediatric Neurology, University Children' s Hospital, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Although its metabolic basis has not yet been clarified, we report a progressive white-matter disease in a Turkish girl, starting in the cerebellum and spreading to supratentorial white matter. The onset was at the age of 2.5 years with diabetes insipidus, followed by ataxia and pyramidal signs resulting in loss of walking. Aqueduct stenosis was first recognised at the age of 8 years. To our knowledge, this MRI and clinical pattern does not correspond to a recognised, well-defined white-matter disease and may indicate a separate entity. (orig.)

  9. Progressive white-matter disease with primary cerebellar involvement: a separate entity?

    Yalcinkaya, C.; Arslanoglu, I.; Islak, C.; Aydin, A.; Boltshauser, E.

    2002-01-01

    Although its metabolic basis has not yet been clarified, we report a progressive white-matter disease in a Turkish girl, starting in the cerebellum and spreading to supratentorial white matter. The onset was at the age of 2.5 years with diabetes insipidus, followed by ataxia and pyramidal signs resulting in loss of walking. Aqueduct stenosis was first recognised at the age of 8 years. To our knowledge, this MRI and clinical pattern does not correspond to a recognised, well-defined white-matter disease and may indicate a separate entity. (orig.)

  10. Immunoglobulin G4-Related Sclerosing Disease Involving the Urethra: Case Report

    Choi, Jin Woo; KIm, Sang Youn; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup; Moon, Kyung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing disease is a systemic disease characterized by extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T-lymphocyte infiltration in various organs. We described the imaging findings of an IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor in the urethra. The urethral mass showed isoattenuation on unenhanced CT images, delayed enhancement on enhanced CT images, iso- to slight hyper-intensity on T1 and T2 weighted magnetic resonance images, diffusion restriction on diffusion weighted images, and heterogeneously low echogeneity on ultrasonography.

  11. A patient with cerebral Whipple disease with gastric involvement but no gastrointestinal symptoms: a consequence of local protective immunity?

    Prüss, Harald; Katchanov, Juri; Zschenderlein, Rolf; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Thomas; Moos, Verena

    2007-08-01

    Whipple disease is a granulomatous infectious disease caused by Tropheryma whipplei. The bacteria accumulate within macrophages, preferentially in the intestinal mucosa. Disease manifestation seems to be linked to immunological abnormalities of macrophages. We describe a patient with cerebral Whipple disease who presented with changes in mental status, confusion, inverse sleep-wake cycle, bilateral ptosis and vertical gaze palsy. Endoscopic biopsy sampling revealed Whipple disease in the gastric antrum but not in the duodenum. Whole blood stimulation displayed reactivity to T. whipplei that was at the lower end of healthy controls while reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes was not diminished. We propose that in cases of neurological symptoms suspicious of Whipple disease with normal duodenal and jenunal findings, biopsy sampling should be extended to the gastric mucosa. The robust reactivity of duodenal lymphocytes may have prevented our patient from developing small bowel disease, whereas the impaired reactivity in peripheral blood lymphocytes might yet explain the bacterial spreading to the central nervous system leading to the rare case of predominant neurological symptoms without relevant systemic involvement.

  12. The role of phospholipid oxidation products in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: evidence from animal models and in humans.

    Leitinger, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) and their implication as modulators of inflammation in cardiovascular disease, roles for these lipid oxidation products have been suggested in many other disease settings. Lipid oxidation products accumulate in inflamed and oxidatively damaged tissue, where they are derived from oxidative modification of lipoproteins, but also from membranes of cells undergoing apoptosis. Thus, increased oxidative stress as well as decreased clearance of apoptotic cells has been implied to contribute to accumulation of OxPL in chronically inflamed tissues.A central role for OxPL in disease states associated with dyslipedemia, including atherosclerosis, diabetes and its complications, metabolic syndrome, and renal insufficiency, as well as general prothrombotic states, has been proposed. In addition, in organs which are constantly exposed to oxidative stress, including lung, skin, and eyes, increased levels of OxPL are suggested to contribute to inflammatory conditions. Moreover, accumulation of OxPL causes general immunmodulation and may lead to autoimmune diseases. Evidence is accumulating that OxPL play a role in lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. Last but not least, a role for OxPL in neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS), Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease has been suggested.This chapter will summarize recent findings obtained in animal models and from studies in humans that indicate that formation of OxPL represents a general mechanism that may play a major role in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  13. Linking vascular disorders and Alzheimer’s disease: Potential involvement of BACE1

    Cole, Sarah L.; Vassar, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) remains unknown. However, specific risk factors have been identified, and aging is the strongest AD risk factor. The majority of cardiovascular events occur in older people and a close relationship between vascular disorders and AD exists. Amyloid plaques, composed of the beta amyloid peptide (Aβ), are hallmark lesions in AD and evidence indicates that Aβ plays a central role in AD pathophysiology. The BACE1 enzyme is essential for Aβ generation, and BACE1 levels are elevated in AD brain. The cause(s) of this BACE1 elevation remains undetermined. Here we review the potential contribution of vascular disease to AD pathogenesis. We examine the putative vasoactive properties of Aβ and how the cellular changes associated with vascular disease may elevate BACE1 levels. Despite increasing evidence, the exact role(s) vascular disorders play in AD remains to be determined. However, given that vascular diseases can be addressed by lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions, the potential benefits of these therapies in delaying the clinical appearance and progression of AD may warrant investigation. PMID:18289733

  14. Association between Organizational Capacity and Involvement in Chronic Disease Prevention Programming among Canadian Public Health Organizations

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement…

  15. Hand involvement in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    Burns, Joshua; Bray, Paula; Cross, Lauren A.; North, Kathryn N.; Ryan, Monique M.; Ouvrier, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), a demyelinating neuropathy characterised by progressive length-dependent muscle weakness and atrophy, is thought to affect the foot and leg first followed some time later by hand weakness and dysfunction. We aimed to characterise hand Strength, function

  16. Hydatid Disease Involving Some Rare Locations in the Body: a Pictorial Essay

    Yuksel, Murvet; Demirpolat, Gulen; Sever, Ahmet; Bakaris, Sevgi; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Elmas, Nevra

    2007-01-01

    Hydatid disease (HD) is an endemic illness in many countries, and it poses an important public health problem that's influenced by peoples' socioeconomic status and migration that spreads this disease. The most common site is the liver (59 75%), followed in frequency by lung (27%), kidney (3%), bone (1 4%) and brain (1 2%). Other sites such as the heart, spleen, pancreas and muscles are very rarely affected. Unusual sites for this disease can cause diagnostic problems. Familiarity with the imaging findings of HD may be helpful in making an accurate diagnosis and preventing potential complications. The occurrence of E. granulosus in some locations of the body is very rare. These anatomic locations may cause difficulties in making the differential diagnosis as E. granulosus is usually not suspected in some locations of the body. Imaging modalities such as US, CT and MRI are helpful in diagnosing this disease. Radiologists, surgeons and physicians should always consider HD in differential diagnosis of a cystic lesion, and especially for the cystic leasions encountered in patients who live in or have come from endemic regions and if any of the previously described imaging features (e.g., calcification, daughter cysts and/or intracystic membranes) are seen. Familiarity with the various imaging appearances of HD may prevent diagnostic delay, and so decrease the risk of life-threatening complications

  17. MRI evidence of cerebellar and hippocampal involvement in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Poon, M.A. [Dept. of Neurology, Alfred Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Stuckey, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Alfred Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Storey, E. [Van Cleef Roet Centre for Nervous Diseases, Monash Univ., Victoria (Australia)

    2001-09-01

    We report a 51-year-old woman with the Brownell-Oppenheimer (cerebellar) variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). She had the typical findings of bilateral basal ganglion changes on MRI, as well as changes in the cerebellum and hippocampus. This case adds further information to the known imaging characteristics of CJD. (orig.)

  18. MRI evidence of cerebellar and hippocampal involvement in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Poon, M.A.; Stuckey, S.; Storey, E.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 51-year-old woman with the Brownell-Oppenheimer (cerebellar) variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). She had the typical findings of bilateral basal ganglion changes on MRI, as well as changes in the cerebellum and hippocampus. This case adds further information to the known imaging characteristics of CJD. (orig.)

  19. Multiple Repair Sequences in Everyday Conversations Involving People with Parkinson's Disease

    Griffiths, Sarah; Barnes, Rebecca; Britten, Nicky; Wilkinson, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background: Features of dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), such as low volume, variable rate of speech and increased pauses, impact speaker intelligibility. Those affected report restricted interactional participation, although this area is under explored. Aims: To examine naturally occurring instances of problems with…

  20. Carboxyhemoglobin formation secondary to nitric oxide therapy in the setting of interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.

    Ruisi, Phillip; Ruisi, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) has been widely recognized as an exogenous poison, although endogenous mechanisms for its formation involve heme-oxygenase (HO) isoforms, more specifically HO-1, in the setting of oxidative stress such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, trauma, and nitric oxide use have been studied. In patients with refractory hypoxemia, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy is used to selectively vasodilate the pulmonary vasculature and improve ventilation-perfusion match. Inhaled nitric oxide is rapidly inactivated on binding to hemoglobin in the formation of nitrosyl- and methemoglobin in the pulmonary vasculature. Hence, inhaled nitric oxide has minimal systemic dissemination. Several experimental design studies involving lab rats have demonstrated increased levels of carboxyhemoglobin and exhaled CO as a result of nitric oxide HO-1 induction.

  1. Identification and Analysis of a Novel Gene Cluster Involves in Fe2+ Oxidation in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270, a Typical Biomining Acidophile.

    Ai, Chenbing; Liang, Yuting; Miao, Bo; Chen, Miao; Zeng, Weimin; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2018-07-01

    Iron-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. are applied worldwide in biomining industry to extract metals from sulfide minerals. They derive energy for survival through Fe 2+ oxidation and generate Fe 3+ for the dissolution of sulfide minerals. However, molecular mechanisms of their iron oxidation still remain elusive. A novel two-cytochrome-encoding gene cluster (named tce gene cluster) encoding a high-molecular-weight cytochrome c (AFE_1428) and a c 4 -type cytochrome c 552 (AFE_1429) in A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was first identified in this study. Bioinformatic analysis together with transcriptional study showed that AFE_1428 and AFE_1429 were the corresponding paralog of Cyc2 (AFE_3153) and Cyc1 (AFE_3152) which were encoded by the extensively studied rus operon and had been proven involving in ferrous iron oxidation. Both AFE_1428 and AFE_1429 contained signal peptide and the classic heme-binding motif(s) as their corresponding paralog. The modeled structure of AFE_1429 showed high resemblance to Cyc1. AFE_1428 and AFE_1429 were preferentially transcribed as their corresponding paralogs in the presence of ferrous iron as sole energy source as compared with sulfur. The tce gene cluster is highly conserved in the genomes of four phylogenetic-related A. ferrooxidans strains that were originally isolated from different sites separated with huge geographical distance, which further implies the importance of this gene cluster. Collectively, AFE_1428 and AFE_1429 involve in Fe 2+ oxidation like their corresponding paralog by integrating with the metalloproteins encoded by rus operon. This study provides novel insights into the Fe 2+ oxidation mechanism in Fe 2+ -oxidizing A. ferrooxidans ssp.

  2. The mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase Ccp1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in conveying an oxidative stress signal to the transcription factor Pos9 (Skn7).

    Charizanis, C; Juhnke, H; Krems, B; Entian, K D

    1999-10-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae two transcription factors, Pos9 (Skn7) and Yap1, are involved in the response to oxidative stress. Fusion of the Pos9 response-regulator domain to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain results in a transcription factor which renders the expression of a GAL1-lacZ reporter gene dependent on oxidative stress. To identify genes which are involved in the oxygen-dependent activation of the Gal4-Pos9 hybrid protein we screened for mutants that failed to induce the heterologous test system upon oxidative stress (fap mutants for factors activating Pos9). We isolated several respiration-deficient and some respiration-competent mutants by this means. We selected for further characterization only those mutants which also displayed an oxidative-stress-sensitive phenotype. One of the respiration-deficient mutants (complementation groupfap6) could be complemented by the ISM1 gene, which encodes mitochondrial isoleucyl tRNA synthetase, suggesting that respiration competence was important for signalling of oxidative stress. In accordance with this notion a rho0 strain and a wild-type strain in which respiration had been blocked (by treatment with antimycin A or with cyanide) also failed to activate Gal4-Pos9 upon imposition of oxidative stress. Another mutant, fap24, which was respiration-competent, could be complemented by CCP1, which encodes the mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase. Mitochondrial cytochrome c peroxidase degrades reactive oxygen species within the mitochondria. This suggested a possible sensor function for the enzyme in the oxidative stress response. To test this we used the previously described point mutant ccp1 W191F, which is characterized by a 10(4)-fold decrease in electron flux between cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. The Ccp1W191F mutant was still capable of activating the Pos9 transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that the signalling function of Ccp1 is independent of electron flux rates.

  3. [Role of cardiac magnetic resonance in cardiac involvement of Fabry disease].

    Serra, Viviana M; Barba, Miguel Angel; Torrá, Roser; Pérez De Isla, Leopoldo; López, Mónica; Calli, Andrea; Feltes, Gisela; Torras, Joan; Valverde, Victor; Zamorano, José L

    2010-09-04

    Fabry disease is a hereditary disorder. Clinical manifestations are multisystemic. The majority of the patients remain undiagnosed until late in life, when alterations could be irreversible. Early detection of cardiac symptoms is of major interest in Fabry's disease (FD) in order to gain access to enzyme replacement therapy. Echo-Doppler tissular imaging (TDI) has been used as a cardiologic early marker in FD. This study is intended to determine whether the cardiac magnetic resonance is as useful tool as TDI for the early detection of cardiac affectation in FD. Echocardiography, tissue Doppler and Cardio magnetic resonance was performed in 20 patients with confirmed Fabry Disease. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as septum and left ventricular posterior wall thickness ≥12 mm. An abnormal TDI velocity was defined as (Sa), (Ea) and/or (Aa) velocities gadolinium-enhanced images sequences were obtained using magnetic resonance. Twenty patients included in the study were divided into three groups: 1. Those without left ventricular hypertrophy nor tissue Doppler impairment 2. Those without left ventricular hypertrophy and tissue Doppler impairment 3. Those with left ventricular hypertrophy and Tissue Doppler impairment. Late gadolinium enhancement was found in only one patient, who has already altered DTI and LVH. Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) is the only diagnostic tool able to provide early detection of cardiac affectation in patients with FD. Magnetic resonance provides information of the disease severity in patients with LVH, but can not be used as an early marker of cardiac disease in patients with FD. However MRI could be of great value for diagnostic stratification. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Is Oxidative Stress Associated with Activation and Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    Yuksel Mahmut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to determine the levels of total antioxidant status (TAS, total oxidant status (TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI and paraoxonase1/arylesterase levels in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, and the relation be - tween these molecules and the activity index of the disease. Methods: Eighty IBD patients (ulcerative colitis (UC/Crohn disease (CD 40/40 and 80 control group participants were included in the study. Oxidative stress parameters were measured using the colorimetric method. As disease activity indexes, the endoscopic activity index (EAI was used for UC and the CD activity index (CDAI was used for CD. Results: In IBD patients, mean TAS (1.3±0.2 vs 1.9±0.2, respectively; p<0.001 and arylesterase (963.9±232.2 vs 1252.9±275, respectively; p<0.001 levels were found to be lower and TOS level (5.6±1.6 vs 4.0±1.0, respectively; p<0.001 and OSI rate (4.5±1.6 vs 2.2±0.8, respectively; p<0.001 were found to be higher compared to the control group. A strong positive correlation was found between EAI and TOS levels (r=0.948, p<0.001 and OSI rate (r=0.894, p<0.001 for UC patients. A very strong positive correlation was found between EAI and TOS levels (r=0.964, p<0.001 and OSI rate (r=0.917, p<0.001 for CD patients. It was found in a stepwise regression model that C-reactive protein, OSI and arylesterase risk factors were predictors of IBD compared to the control group. Conclusion: Increased oxidative stress level in IBD patients and the detection of OSI rate as an independent predictor for disease activity indexes lead to the idea that oxidative stress might be related to the pathogenesis of IBD.

  5. The Prediction of Key Cytoskeleton Components Involved in Glomerular Diseases Based on a Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Ding, Fangrui; Tan, Aidi; Ju, Wenjun; Li, Xuejuan; Li, Shao; Ding, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of the physiological morphologies of different types of cells and tissues is essential for the normal functioning of each system in the human body. Dynamic variations in cell and tissue morphologies depend on accurate adjustments of the cytoskeletal system. The cytoskeletal system in the glomerulus plays a key role in the normal process of kidney filtration. To enhance the understanding of the possible roles of the cytoskeleton in glomerular diseases, we constructed the Glomerular Cytoskeleton Network (GCNet), which shows the protein-protein interaction network in the glomerulus, and identified several possible key cytoskeletal components involved in glomerular diseases. In this study, genes/proteins annotated to the cytoskeleton were detected by Gene Ontology analysis, and glomerulus-enriched genes were selected from nine available glomerular expression datasets. Then, the GCNet was generated by combining these two sets of information. To predict the possible key cytoskeleton components in glomerular diseases, we then examined the common regulation of the genes in GCNet in the context of five glomerular diseases based on their transcriptomic data. As a result, twenty-one cytoskeleton components as potential candidate were highlighted for consistently down- or up-regulating in all five glomerular diseases. And then, these candidates were examined in relation to existing known glomerular diseases and genes to determine their possible functions and interactions. In addition, the mRNA levels of these candidates were also validated in a puromycin aminonucleoside(PAN) induced rat nephropathy model and were also matched with existing Diabetic Nephropathy (DN) transcriptomic data. As a result, there are 15 of 21 candidates in PAN induced nephropathy model were consistent with our predication and also 12 of 21 candidates were matched with differentially expressed genes in the DN transcriptomic data. By providing a novel interaction network and prediction, GCNet

  6. Pyrophosphate scintigraphy and other non-invasive methods in the detection of cardiac involvement in some systemic connective tissue diseases

    Duska, F.; Bradna, P.; Pospisil, M.; Kubicek, J.; Vizda, J.; Kafka, P.; Palicka, V.; Mazurova, Y.

    1987-02-01

    Thirteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 patients with polymyositis, and 6 patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica (Bechterew's disease) underwent clinical cardiologic examination and scintigraphy of the myocardium (/sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate), ECG, echocardiography, polygraphy, and their blood pressure was taken. The aim of the study was to ascertain how such a combination of non-invasive examinations can help in recognizing a cardiac involvement. In systemic lupus erythematosus cases one or more positive findings were revealed in 9 patients (69%), in 4 patients all examinations were negative (31%). Four patients (50%) with polymyosits had positive findings. In patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica positive findings occurred in 2 cases (33%). The study has shown that a combination of non-invasive cardiologic methods increases the probability of detecting cardiac involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases.

  7. Erdheim Chester disease with appendicular skeletal, renal and pleural involvement responding to Zelboraf (BRAF inhibitor) treatment: case report

    Borys, Dariusz; Nystrom, Lucas; Song, Albert; Lomasney, Laurie M.

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim Chester disease is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may involve multiple organs including bone, soft tissue, lungs, cardiovascular system, kidneys (retroperitoneum), skin, and central nervous system. Bone involvement is most common followed by other organs. This case report describes a 58-year-old man who presented with progressive renal dysfunction presumed due to obstruction. The patient failed multiple urinary tract interventions, and clinical course was complicated by recurrent low-grade fevers, and bilateral knee pain. Advanced imaging and histopathological features on bone biopsy were consistent with Erdheim Chester disease. Molecular studies of tissue showed BRAF V600 mutation. This patient was treated with Zelboraf (vemurafenib) BRAF inhibitor with subsequent improvement in renal and pleural dysfunction as well as decreased histiocytic soft tissue masses on CT. (orig.)

  8. Pyrophosphate scintigraphy and other non-invasive methods in the detection of cardiac involvement in some systemic connective tissue diseases

    Duska, F; Bradna, P; Pospisil, M; Kubicek, J; Vizda, J; Kafka, P; Palicka, V; Mazurova, Y

    1987-02-01

    Thirteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 patients with polymyositis, and 6 patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica (Bechterew's disease) underwent clinical cardiologic examination and scintigraphy of the myocardium (/sup 99m/Tc-pyrophosphate), ECG, echocardiography, polygraphy, and their blood pressure was taken. The aim of the study was to ascertain how such a combination of non-invasive examinations can help in recognizing a cardiac involvement. In systemic lupus erythematosus cases one or more positive findings were revealed in 9 patients (69%), in 4 patients all examinations were negative (31%). Four patients (50%) with polymyosits had positive findings. In patients with spondylitis ankylopoetica positive findings occurred in 2 cases (33%). The study has shown that a combination of non-invasive cardiologic methods increases the probability of detecting cardiac involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases.

  9. Erdheim Chester disease with appendicular skeletal, renal and pleural involvement responding to Zelboraf (BRAF inhibitor) treatment: case report

    Borys, Dariusz [Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Department of Pathology, Maywood, IL (United States); Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Departmet of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maywood, IL (United States); Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL (United States); Nystrom, Lucas [Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Departmet of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maywood, IL (United States); Song, Albert [Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Departmet of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maywood, IL (United States); Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Erdheim Chester disease is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may involve multiple organs including bone, soft tissue, lungs, cardiovascular system, kidneys (retroperitoneum), skin, and central nervous system. Bone involvement is most common followed by other organs. This case report describes a 58-year-old man who presented with progressive renal dysfunction presumed due to obstruction. The patient failed multiple urinary tract interventions, and clinical course was complicated by recurrent low-grade fevers, and bilateral knee pain. Advanced imaging and histopathological features on bone biopsy were consistent with Erdheim Chester disease. Molecular studies of tissue showed BRAF V600 mutation. This patient was treated with Zelboraf (vemurafenib) BRAF inhibitor with subsequent improvement in renal and pleural dysfunction as well as decreased histiocytic soft tissue masses on CT. (orig.)

  10. Oxidative stress markers in saliva and periodontal disease status: modulation during pregnancy and postpartum.

    Gümüş, Pınar; Emingil, Gülnur; Öztürk, Veli-Özgen; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Bostanci, Nagihan

    2015-07-08

    Periodontal diseases may affect local and systemic inflammation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. This systemic health burden could compromise the outcome of pregnancy in expectant mothers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxidative stress markers, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and total bacterial loads in the saliva of pregnant and postpartum women, and to investigate their association with periodontal disease severity. A total of 187 women were originally recruited for this case-control study, assigned to the following groups a) pregnant group, b) postpartum group: the pregnant group re-evaluated 6 months after giving birth, c) control group: systemically healthy and non-pregnant women. The levels of the studied oxidative stress markers in saliva were measured by commercially available kits. The levels of salivary 8-OHdG were significantly elevated in the pregnant, compared with the control group. Although salivary 8-OHdG levels slightly decreased after giving birth (postpartum group), the difference did not reach significance. In contrast, the activity of antioxidant enzyme GPx in saliva was significantly lower in the pregnant than the control group. Although no differences in lipid peroxidation (represented by TBARS) were observed between the pregnant and control groups, after giving birth TBARS levels were significantly lowered. Only in the postpartum and control groups did clinical measurements of periodontal disease severity correlate with oxidative stress markers. Interestingly, there were no such correlations with TBARS in the pregnant and postpartum groups. The present study shows changes in the oxidant/antioxidant balance in saliva during pregnancy and after birth, which may be affected by periodontal health status in the latter case. Whether this is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, or not, remains to be elucidated. Early

  11. Environmental Stressors and Their Impact on Health and Disease with Focus on Oxidative Stress.

    Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2018-03-20

    Epidemiological, preclinical and interventional clinical studies have demonstrated that environmental stressors are associated with health problems, namely cardiovascular diseases. According to estimations of the World Health Organization (WHO), environmental risk factors account for an appreciable part of global deaths and life years spent with disability. This Forum addresses the impact of the environmental risk factors such as traffic noise exposure, air pollution by particulate matter (PM), mental stress/loneliness, and the life style risk factor (water-pipe) smoking on health and disease with focus on the cardiovascular system. We will critically discuss the use of observatory/modifiable biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in environmental research on the aforementioned risk factors highlighting the need of exposome studies. Another focus will be on the epigenetic regulation via microRNAs in environmental stress upon exposure to noise and toxins/heavy metals as well as mental stress conditions, providing mechanistic insights into the modulation of microRNA signaling by oxidative stress, and vice versa the contribution of microRNAs to oxidative stress conditions. We will also provide an in-depth overview on the mechanistic pathways that lead to health problems (e.g., cardiovascular diseases) in response to environmental psychosocial stress, air pollution exposure in the form of ambient PM and diesel exhaust, traffic noise exposure, and the life style drug (water-pipe) smoking. Almost all stressors share the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and of the sympathetic nervous system with subsequent onset of inflammation and oxidative stress, defining the here proposed therapeutic (antioxidant and exercise) strategies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 735-740.

  12. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    Hwang, Ji-Young; Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun; Sung, Sun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the litera...

  13. α-Syntrophin is involved in the survival signaling pathway in myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress.

    Lim, Jeong-A; Choi, Su Jin; Moon, Jae Yun; Kim, Hye Sun

    2016-05-15

    Dystrophin-deficient muscle is known to be more vulnerable to oxidative stress, but not much is known about the signaling pathway(s) responsible for this phenomenon. α-Syntrophin, a component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, can function as a scaffold protein because of its multiple protein interaction domains. In this study, we investigated the role of α-syntrophin in C2 myoblasts under menadione-induced oxidative stress. We found that the protein level of α-syntrophin was elevated when cells were exposed to menadione. To investigate the function of α-syntrophin during oxidative stress, we established α-syntrophin-overexpressing and knockdown cell lines. The α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells were resistant to the menadione-induced oxidative stress. In addition, survival signalings such as protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation and the Bcl-2/BAX ratio were increased in these cells. On the other hand, apoptotic signals such as cleavage of caspase-3 and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) were increased in the α-syntrophin knockdown cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)influx, which is known to increase when cells are exposed to oxidative stress, decreased in the α-syntrophin-overexpressing cells, but increased in the knockdown cells. These results suggest that α-syntrophin plays a pivotal role in the survival pathway triggered by menadione-induced oxidative stress in cultured myoblasts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide- and Nitric Oxide-mediated Disease Control of Bacterial Wilt in Tomato Plants

    Jeum Kyu Hong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in tomato plants by Ralstonia solanacearum infection and the role of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ and nitric oxide in tomato bacterial wilt control were demonstrated. During disease development of tomato bacterial wilt, accumulation of superoxide anion (O₂− and H₂O₂ was observed and lipid peroxidation also occurred in the tomato leaf tissues. High doses of H₂O₂and sodium nitroprusside (SNP nitric oxide donor showed phytotoxicity to detached tomato leaves 1 day after petiole feeding showing reduced fresh weight. Both H₂O₂and SNP have in vitro antibacterial activities against R. solanacearum in a dose-dependent manner, as well as plant protection in detached tomato leaves against bacterial wilt by 10⁶ and 10⁷ cfu/ml of R. solanacearum. H₂O₂- and SNP-mediated protection was also evaluated in pots using soil-drench treatment with the bacterial inoculation, and relative ‘area under the disease progressive curve (AUDPC’ was calculated to compare disease protection by H₂O₂ and/or SNP with untreated control. Neither H₂O₂ nor SNP protect the tomato seedlings from the bacterial wilt, but H₂O₂+ SNP mixture significantly decreased disease severity with reduced relative AUDPC. These results suggest that H₂O₂ and SNP could be used together to control bacterial wilt in tomato plants as bactericidal agents.

  15. RNA modifications by oxidation

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  16. The Roles of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Wen-Neng; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Kung, Chia-Te; Su, Yu-Jih; Lin, Wei-Che; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Su, Chih-Min; Chiang, Yi-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper aims to examine whether biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidants could be useful biomarkers in AD, which might form the bases of future clinical studies. Methods. PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science were systematically queried to obtain studies with available data regarding markers of oxidative stress and antioxidants from subjects with AD. Results and Conclusion. Although most ...

  17. Involvement of patients' perspectives on treatment with noninvasive ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Christensen, Helle Marie; Huniche, Lotte; Titlestad, Ingrid L

    2018-01-01

    and hospitalisation. CONCLUSION: Investigation of patient perspectives generated results that were highly productive in facilitating multidisciplinary collaboration and in developing and sustaining new management strategies. Critical psychological practice research facilitated ongoing development of clinical practice...... is needed to develop treatment practices in respiratory medicine. METHOD: This study is based on critical psychological practice research. DESIGN: A co-researcher group comprising diverse health professionals was set up and headed by the principal researcher. The group convened seven times over 12 months......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To clarify chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients' perspectives on treatment with noninvasive ventilation and develop management strategies for the treatment based on these perspectives. BACKGROUND: The effect of treating chronic obstructive pulmon