WorldWideScience

Sample records for diseases including diabetic

  1. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group ... eye diseases that can threaten your sight are Diabetic retinopathy The retina is the inner lining at ...

  2. Diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Merlin C; Brownlee, Michael; Susztak, Katalin; Sharma, Kumar; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M; Zoungas, Sophia; Rossing, Peter; Groop, Per-Henrik; Cooper, Mark E

    2015-07-30

    The kidney is arguably the most important target of microvascular damage in diabetes. A substantial proportion of individuals with diabetes will develop kidney disease owing to their disease and/or other co-morbidity, including hypertension and ageing-related nephron loss. The presence and severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) identify individuals who are at increased risk of adverse health outcomes and premature mortality. Consequently, preventing and managing CKD in patients with diabetes is now a key aim of their overall management. Intensive management of patients with diabetes includes controlling blood glucose levels and blood pressure as well as blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system; these approaches will reduce the incidence of diabetic kidney disease and slow its progression. Indeed, the major decline in the incidence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) over the past 30 years and improved patient prognosis are largely attributable to improved diabetes care. However, there remains an unmet need for innovative treatment strategies to prevent, arrest, treat and reverse DKD. In this Primer, we summarize what is now known about the molecular pathogenesis of CKD in patients with diabetes and the key pathways and targets implicated in its progression. In addition, we discuss the current evidence for the prevention and management of DKD as well as the many controversies. Finally, we explore the opportunities to develop new interventions through urgently needed investment in dedicated and focused research. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/NKHDzg.

  3. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 29,2018 The following ... clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent ...

  4. Diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... chronic dialysis or transplantation due to significant extrarenal disease, mainly .... including coronary heart disease, silent myocardial ischaemia and left ... diabetics and should be kept in mind: • renal papillary necrosis.

  5. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia during day time fasting or hyperglycemia during the night. Patient with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan may be better managed with fast-acting insulin. They should have basic knowledge of carbohydrate metabolism, the standard principles of diabetes care, and pharmacology of various antidiabetic drugs. This Consensus Statement describes the management of the various diabetic emergencies that may occur during Ramadan.

  6. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Jamal; Pathan, Md Faruque; Jaleel, Mohammed Abdul; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Raza, Syed Abbas; Khan, A. K. Azad; Ishtiaq, Osama; Sheikh, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia during day time fasting or hyperglycemia during the night. Patient with type 1 diabetes who fast during Ramadan may be better managed with fast-acting insulin. They should have basic knowledge of carbohydrate metabolism, the standard principles of diabetes care, and pharmacology of various antidiabetic drugs. This Consensus Statement describes the management of the various diabetic emergencies that may occur during Ramadan. PMID:22837906

  7. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  8. Diabetic emergencies including hypoglycemia during Ramadan

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Ahmad; Md Faruque Pathan; Mohammed Abdul Jaleel; Farah Naaz Fathima; Syed Abbas Raza; A K Azad Khan; Osama Ishtiaq; Aisha Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Majority of physicians are of the opinion that Ramadan fasting is acceptable for well-balanced type 2 patients conscious of their disease and compliant with their diet and drug intake. Fasting during Ramadan for patients with diabetes carries a risk of an assortment of complications. Islamic rules allow patients not to fast. However, if patient with diabetes wish to fast, it is necessary to advice them to undertake regular monitoring of blood glucose levels several times a day, to reduce the ...

  9. Bone disease in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V.; Hansen, Stinus; Frost, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are generally accepted to be associated with increased bone fracture risk. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms of diabetic bone disease are poorly understood, and whether the associated increased skeletal fragility is a comorbidity or a complication of diabetes...... remains under debate. Although there is some indication of a direct deleterious effect of microangiopathy on bone, the evidence is open to question, and whether diabetic osteopathy can be classified as a chronic, microvascular complication of diabetes remains uncertain. Here, we review the current...... knowledge of potential contributory factors to diabetic bone disease, particularly the association between diabetic microangiopathy and bone mineral density, bone structure, and bone turnover. Additionally, we discuss and propose a pathophysiological model of the effects of diabetic microvascular disease...

  10. Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et.al. Clinical manifestations of kidney disease among US adults with diabetes. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2016;316( ... of Washington, Associate Director, Kidney Research Institute ... The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Health Information Center ...

  11. Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some in the family will have celiac disease. • Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in persons ... Abnormal labs XX Diabetes and Celiac Disease | continued CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms... Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. ...

  12. CKD in diabetes: diabetic kidney disease versus nondiabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Huber, Tobias B; Isermann, Berend; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has prompted research efforts to tackle the growing epidemic of diabetic kidney disease (DKD; also known as diabetic nephropathy). The limited success of much of this research might in part be due to the fact that not all patients diagnosed with DKD have renal dysfunction as a consequence of their diabetes mellitus. Patients who present with CKD and diabetes mellitus (type 1 or type 2) can have true DKD (wherein CKD is a direct consequence of their diabetes status), nondiabetic kidney disease (NDKD) coincident with diabetes mellitus, or a combination of both DKD and NDKD. Preclinical studies using models that more accurately mimic these three entities might improve the ability of animal models to predict clinical trial outcomes. Moreover, improved insights into the pathomechanisms that are shared by these entities - including sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) and renin-angiotensin system-driven glomerular hyperfiltration and tubular hyper-reabsorption - as well as those that are unique to individual entities might lead to the identification of new treatment targets. Acknowledging that the clinical entity of CKD plus diabetes mellitus encompasses NDKD as well as DKD could help solve some of the urgent unmet medical needs of patients affected by these conditions.

  13. Diabetes and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a systemic disease characterized by increased blood glucose levels and abnormalities of lipid metabolism due to absence or decreased level of insulin. It affects all the body organs and their functions either directly or indirectly. Every dentist should have a basic understanding of the etiopathogenesis, oral and systemic manifestations of this disease. The periodontal diseases are a consequence of extension of the gingival inflammation into the underlying supporting structures of the periodontium, initiated by the presence of plaque and its products on the surfaces of the teeth and the adjoining structures. The progression of periodontal disease is influenced by variety of factors like microorganisms, host response, systemic background, and genetic makeup of the host. Amongst them, diabetes mellitus tops the list. Diabetes and periodontitis influence the clinical outcome of each other and control of both influences the clinical improvement of each.

  14. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, A.; Sortso, C.; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup

    2016-01-01

    We present an investigation of the occurrence of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes in Denmark 2000 through 2011. The Diabetes Impact Study 2013 is based on all registrants in the Danish National Diabetes Register as of July 3rd 2013 (n=497,232). Record linkage with the Danish...... National Patient Register was used to defining the first date of experiencing a cardiovascular event by means of a discharge diagnosis and/or having performed a coronary bypass operation or revascularization of the coronary arteries. The proportion of patients with already established CVD at the diagnosis...

  15. Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets in Your Meal Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes nutrition: Including sweets in your meal plan Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods, but sweets aren't necessarily ... your meal plan. By Mayo Clinic Staff Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods. But you can eat ...

  16. Diabetes in Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, G; Formenti, A M; Frara, S; Maffezzoni, F; Doga, M; Giustina, A

    2017-05-01

    This review focuses on the pathophysiological and clinical aspects of diabetes mellitus occurring in patients with Cushing disease (CD). Insulin resistance and impairment in insulin secretion are both involved in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes. Correction of glucocorticoid excess does not always resolve abnormalities of glucose homeostasis, and correction of hyperglycaemia is specifically required. In fact, insulin resistance may persist even after correction of glucocorticoid excess and diabetes needs to be treated for long term. On the other hand, emerging drugs used in the treatment of CD, such as the novel somatostatin analog pasireotide, may have direct effects on glucose homeostasis regardless of control of cortisol excess. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent and early complication of CD with important diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications. Specifically, diagnosis of CD in patients with diabetes may be difficult due to potential misinterpretation of markers of cortisol hypersecretion. Moreover, diabetes mellitus is often difficult to be controlled in CD requiring a careful and dedicated therapeutic approach. Finally, the coexistence of diabetes may influence the therapeutic decision making in CD, since drugs used in this setting may variably influence glucose homeostasis regardless of control of hypercortisolism.

  17. Diabetes mellitus and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Gennaro; Polychronis, Sotirios; Wilson, Heather; Giordano, Beniamino; Ferrara, Nicola; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2018-05-08

    To investigate whether diabetes mellitus is associated with Parkinson-like pathology in people without Parkinson disease and to evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus on markers of Parkinson pathology and clinical progression in drug-naive patients with early-stage Parkinson disease. We compared 25 patients with Parkinson disease and diabetes mellitus to 25 without diabetes mellitus, and 14 patients with diabetes mellitus and no Parkinson disease to 14 healthy controls (people with no diabetes mellitus or Parkinson disease). The clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus was confirmed by 2 consecutive fasting measurements of serum glucose levels >126 mL/dL. Over a 36-month follow-up period, we then investigated in the population with Parkinson disease whether the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression or cognitive decline. The presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with higher motor scores ( p Parkinson disease. In patients with diabetes but without Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with lower striatal dopamine transporter binding ( p Parkinson disease, the presence of diabetes mellitus was associated with faster motor progression (hazard ratio = 4.521, 95% confidence interval = 1.468-13.926; p Parkinson-like pathology, and when present in patients with Parkinson disease, can induce a more aggressive phenotype. © 2018 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Approximately 20% to 40% of patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus develop diabetic kidney disease. This is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria (> 300 mg/24 h, or > 300 mg/g creatinine), a relentless decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), raised arterial...... sign of diabetic nephropathy, the first symptom is usually peripheral edema, which occurs at a very late stage. Regular, systematic screening for diabetic kidney disease is needed in order to identify patients at risk of or with presymptomatic diabetic kidney disease. Annual monitoring of urinary...

  19. Investigations of Diabetic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jakob Starup

    measures in patients with diabetes. This PhD thesis reports the results of two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis, a state-of-the-art intervention study, a clinical cross-sectional study and a registry-based study all examining the relationship between diabetes, glucose, and bone. Patients with type 2......Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fracture with and current fracture predictors underestimate fracture risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Thus, further understanding of the underlying causes of diabetic bone disease may lead to better fracture predictors and preventive...... diabetes had lower bone turnover markers compared to patients with type 1 diabetes and bone mineral density and tissue stiffness were increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. The bone turnover markers were inversely associated with blood glucose in patients with diabetes and both an oral glucose...

  20. Telemedicine and Diabetic Eye Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    We know that the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults is eye disease related to poorly managed diabetes. In a prevention research study, telemedicine was shown to increase the number of people getting screened for diabetic eye disease.

  1. Understanding type 2 diabetes: including the family member's perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological and social factors and diabetes outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes and their family members. METHODS: A total of 153 patients with type 2 diabetes were assessed at a diabetes outpatient clinic and postal questionnaires were sent to nominated family members. The measures examined were diabetes knowledge, social support, well-being, and illness perceptions. RESULTS: When compared with those with diabetes, family members reported lower positive well-being and lower levels of satisfaction with support. They also perceived diabetes as a more cyclical illness, which was controlled more by treatment than by the individual. Family members also reported that the person with diabetes was more emotionally distressed and knew more about diabetes than the patient had actually reported himself or herself. There were no differences between the family members of those in good or poor glycaemic control. CONCLUSIONS: This study reinforces the importance of understanding social context and illness beliefs in diabetes management. It also highlights the potential for including family members in discussions and education about diabetes management.

  2. Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Syndrome Rather Than a Single Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Giorgina B.; Grassi, Giorgio; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Nazha, Marta; Roggero, Simona; Capizzi, Irene; De Pascale, Agostino; Priola, Adriano M.; Di Vico, Cristina; Maxia, Stefania; Loi, Valentina; Asunis, Anna M.; Pani, Antonello; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The term "diabetic kidney" has recently been proposed to encompass the various lesions, involving all kidney structures that characterize protean kidney damage in patients with diabetes. While glomerular diseases may follow the stepwise progression that was described several decades ago, the tenet that proteinuria identifies diabetic nephropathy is disputed today and should be limited to glomerular lesions. Improvements in glycemic control may have contributed to a decrease in the prevalence of glomerular lesions, initially described as hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy, and revealed other types of renal damage, mainly related to vasculature and interstitium, and these types usually present with little or no proteinuria. Whilst glomerular damage is the hallmark of microvascular lesions, ischemic nephropathies, renal infarction, and cholesterol emboli syndrome are the result of macrovascular involvement, and the presence of underlying renal damage sets the stage for acute infections and drug-induced kidney injuries. Impairment of the phagocytic response can cause severe and unusual forms of acute and chronic pyelonephritis. It is thus concluded that screening for albuminuria, which is useful for detecting "glomerular diabetic nephropathy", does not identify all potential nephropathies in diabetes patients. As diabetes is a risk factor for all forms of kidney disease, diagnosis in diabetic patients should include the same combination of biochemical, clinical, and imaging tests as employed in non-diabetic subjects, but with the specific consideration that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may develop more rapidly and severely in diabetic patients. PMID:26676663

  3. Statin use before diabetes diagnosis and risk of microvascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of statins in the development of microvascular disease in patients with diabetes is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that statin use increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, and gangrene of the foot in individuals with diabetes...... the cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, or gangrene of the foot in statin users versus non-statin users. We analysed data with Cox regression models, adjusted for covariates including sex, age at diabetes diagnosis, and method of diabetes diagnosis. To address...... diabetic neuropathy, 1248 developed diabetic nephropathy, and 2392 developed gangrene of the foot. Compared with non-statin users, statin users had a lower cumulative incidence of diabetic retinopathy (hazard ratio 0·60, 95% CI 0·54-0·66; pdiabetic neuropathy (0·66, 0·57-0·75; p

  4. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  5. Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Diabetes, Gum Disease, & Other Dental Problems How can diabetes affect my mouth? Too ... What if my mouth is sore after my dental work? A sore mouth is common after dental ...

  6. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Kayama

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  7. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Tarzia, Olinda; Jovanovič, Lois; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the English and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in English and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes-related complications.

  8. Periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    NEGRATO, Carlos Antonio; TARZIA, Olinda; JOVANOVIČ, Lois; CHINELLATO, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro

    2013-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is one of the most commonly known human chronic disorders. The relationship between PD and several systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM) has been increasingly recognized over the past decades. Objective: The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with knowledge concerning the relationship between PD and DM. Many articles have been published in the english and Portuguese literature over the last 50 years examining the relationship between these two chronic diseases. Data interpretation is often confounded by varying definitions of DM, PD and different clinical criteria were applied to determine the prevalence, extent and severity of PD, levels of glycemic control and diabetes-related complications. Methods: This paper provides a broad overview of the predominant findings from research conducted using the BBO (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia), MEDLINE, LILACS and PubMed for Controlled Trials databases, in english and Portuguese languages published from 1960 to October 2012. Primary research reports on investigations of relationships between DM/DM control, PD/periodontal treatment and PD/DM/diabetes-related complications identified relevant papers and meta-analyses published in this period. Results: This paper describes the relationship between PD and DM and answers the following questions: 1- The effect of DM on PD, 2- The effects of glycemic control on PD and 3- The effects of PD on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Conclusions: The scientific evidence reviewed supports diabetes having an adverse effect on periodontal health and PD having an adverse effect on glycemic control and on diabetes-related complications. Further research is needed to clarify these relationships and larger, prospective, controlled trials with ethnically diverse populations are warranted to establish that treating PD can positively influence glycemic control and possibly reduce the burden of diabetes

  9. Diabetes and the risk of developing Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schernhammer, Eva; Hansen, Johnni; Rugbjerg, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    Insulin contributes to normal brain function. Previous studies have suggested associations between midlife diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Using Danish population registers, we investigated whether a history of diabetes or the use of antidiabetes drugs...... was associated with Parkinson's disease....

  10. The prevalence of diabetic foot disease in the Waikato region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, C; McClintock, J; Lawrenson, R

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of diabetic foot disease by utilising the retinal eye screening register in the Waikato region of New Zealand. Understanding both the prevalence and the degree of foot disease across the general diabetes population will help to determine what podiatry services are required for people with diabetes. 2192 people aged 15years and over, who attended the Waikato Regional Diabetes Service mobile retinal photo screening service for the six-month period between May and November 2014, consented to a foot screen including testing for sensation and pedal pulses. A digital image was taken of the dorsal and plantar aspect of each foot for review by a registered Podiatrist. Thirteen percent of the study sample was identified as having a high-risk foot including active foot complications. 65% were categorised as low risk and a further 22% at moderate risk of diabetic foot disease. Factors identified as significant included age, type of diabetes, duration of diabetes, and smoking. These factors placed people at greater risk of diabetic foot disease. A significant number of people with diabetes are at risk of diabetic foot disease. This study has highlighted the need for targeted podiatry services to address diabetic foot disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Peripheral artery disease in type II diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Z.; Ahmed, S.M.; Bhutto, A.R.; Chaudhry, A.; Munir, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in type 2 diabetic patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Diabetes Clinic, Medical Unit III, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from January to June 2010. Methodology:Three hundred and eighty seven (387) type II diabetic patients of either gender and any age were included. Patients with a previous history of trauma to the arterial vasculature, pregnancy and those who underwent in the study arterial graft procedures were excluded. Non-purposive convenient sampling technique was used to enroll patients in the study. PAD was diagnosed when ankle-brachial index (ABI) was less than 0.9. Ap-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Out of 387 studied patients, 128 were males (33.1%) and 259 were females (66.9%). Mean age was 52.22 +- 6.39 years. PAD was detected in 152 9.671 (22 - 76) years in the entire cohort. Mean duration of diabetes was 9.38 +- (39.28%) of the total study subjects. Thirty-one of 128 male patients (24.22%) had PAD disease while 121 out of 259 female patients (46.71%) had evidence of PAD (p = 0.001). Hypertension was a significantly associated factor (p = 0.002). Conclusion: A high frequency of PAD was observed in the diabetic population particularly with hypertension and more prevalent in females. (author)

  12. The diagnosis and management of cerebrovascular disease in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Michael S; Jastreboff, Ania M; Furie, Karen; Kernan, Walter N

    2012-06-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes. Compared with nondiabetic patients, diabetic patients have at least twice the risk for stroke, earlier onset of symptoms, and worse functional outcomes. Approximately 20 % of diabetic patients will die from stroke, making it one of the leading causes of death in this population. Effective strategies for primary and secondary prevention of stroke have been developed in research cohorts that included both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Nevertheless, prevention in diabetes has some specific considerations. In this paper, we summarize evidence to guide the diagnosis and management of stroke in diabetic patients. We propose that diabetic stroke patients should have a robust risk assessment to target interventions, like other patients with cerebrovascular disease, but with special attention to glycemic control and lifestyle modification.

  13. Organising care for people with diabetes and renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John

    2012-02-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the commonest long-term conditions. One-fifth of patients with diabetes will have CKD, and diabetes is the commonest cause of advanced kidney disease. For most patients these comorbidities will be managed in primary care with the focus on cardiovascular prevention. Many patients with more advanced disease and complications require joint care from multidisciplinary specialist teams in diabetes and renal disease to ensure that care is consistent and coordinated. Models of joint speciality care, include joint registry management, parallel clinics, shared consulting and case discussion, but require more evaluation than has currently been performed. These underpin more informal interactions between the specialist teams. A local model of care for diabetes and renal disease that incorporates the roles of primary care, members of multidisciplinary teams and speciality care should be agreed, resourced appropriately and its effectiveness monitored. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  14. Determinants of severe periodontal disease among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with severe periodontal disease among diabetic patients. Design: Cross sectional study. Study subjects and methods: Diabetes mellitus patients visiting their regularly scheduled medical review at NCH Diabetic clinic participated in the study. Data collection was ...

  15. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make it hard to breathe. Certain vaccinepreventable diseases can also increase swelling of your airways and lungs. The combination of the two can lead to pneumonia and other serious respiratory illnesses. Vaccines are one of the safest ways ...

  16. Diseases of the abdomen including the pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, C.; Tanaka, H.

    1983-01-01

    This book discusses the following diseases: fatty liver; cystic disease of the liver; liver abscess; liver cirrhosis; hepatic hemangioma; cholelithiasis; primary liver cancer; cholangioma; cancer of the common bile duct; pancreatic cyst; pancreatic calculi; chronic pancreatitis; pancreatic pseudocyst; chronic pancreatitis: pancreatic fatty degeneration; cancer of the pancreas; nonfunctioning kidney: chalk kidney; polycystic kidney; perirenal calcified abscess; renal infarct; cancer of the renal pelvis; adrenal pheochromocytoma; adenoma of the adrenal cortex; leiomyosarcoma of the stomach; malignant mesothelioma; intraperitoneal abscess; perityphlic abscess; retroperitoneal reticulum cell sarcoma; and retroperitoneal cyst

  17. Insulin and Alzheimer disease: type 3 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Jagua Gualdrón

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer Disease is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system whose incidence will increase in next years. Recent investigations relate alzheimer with insulin signaling defects in neurons. Is alzheimer Disease a type 3 diabetes? In this communication write a brief article about evidences from this alzheimer‘s disease model.

  18. Appraisal Of Quality Of Life Of Diabetic Patients, Including Life ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The review showed that patients with diabetes mellitus had signi cantly low ... of life (physical health, psychological health, social relations, and environment). ... of quality of life regarding gender, age, or the level of education of the patients. ... neuropathy, impaired vision, elevated blood lipids and amputation of toes or feet.

  19. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Follow Us National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases NIDDK conducts and supports research ... to improve health. Learn more Health Topics Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic ...

  20. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Yaqub

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in diabetics worldwide, yet most patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus are not formally evaluated with a renal biopsy. The diagnosis is almost always based on clinical grounds. A wide spectrum of non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD is reported to occur in patients with type-2 diabetes. It has been estimated that up to one-third of all diabetic patients who present with proteinuria are suffering from NDRD. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the prevalence and etiology of NDRD in patients with type-2 diabetes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with type-2 diabetes who underwent kidney biopsy on clinical suspicion of NDRD (absence of diabetic retinopathy and/or neuropathy; short duration of diabetes, i.e. less than five years from January 2003 through December 2007 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Based on the biopsy findings, patients were grouped as Group-I, isolated NDRD; Group-II, NDRD with underlying DN; and Group-III, isolated DN. Of 68 patients studied, 75% were males and the mean age was 56 years. The mean duration of diabetes was nine years. Group-I included 34 patients (52%, Group-II included 11 patients (17% and Group-III included 23 patients (31%. Among the Group-I patients, the mean age was 56 years (41-77 years. The most common NDRDs were acute interstitial nephritis (32%, diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (17%; membranous nephropathy (12% and crescentic glomerulonephritis (12%. Among Group-II, the mean age was 60 years (46-71 years, and the most common lesion was interstitial nephritis superimposed on underlying DN (63% cases. Among Group-III, the mean age was 53 years (42- 80 years. The mean proteinuria was 5, 6.3 and 7.3 g/24 h of urine collection in Groups I, II and III, respectively (P = NS. The mean duration of diabetes was 7.3, 11.7 and 10.7 years in Groups I, II and III, respectively. The duration of

  3. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

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    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  5. Diabetic kidney disease: a report from an ADA Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Bakris, George L; Bilous, Rudolf W; Chiang, Jane L; de Boer, Ian H; Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Narva, Andrew S; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Patel, Uptal D; Ratner, Robert E; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Molitch, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus have grown significantly throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 diabetes. This overall increase in the number of people with diabetes has had a major impact on development of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), one of the most frequent complications of both types of diabetes. DKD is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), accounting for approximately 50% of cases in the developed world. Although incidence rates for ESRD attributable to DKD have recently stabilized, these rates continue to rise in high-risk groups such as middle-aged African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics. The costs of care for people with DKD are extraordinarily high. In the Medicare population alone, DKD-related expenditures among this mostly older group were nearly $25 billion in 2011. Due to the high human and societal costs, the Consensus Conference on Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes was convened by the American Diabetes Association in collaboration with the American Society of Nephrology and the National Kidney Foundation to appraise issues regarding patient management, highlighting current practices and new directions. Major topic areas in DKD included (1) identification and monitoring, (2) cardiovascular disease and management of dyslipidemia, (3) hypertension and use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, (4) glycemia measurement, hypoglycemia, and drug therapies, (5) nutrition and general care in advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, (6) children and adolescents, and (7) multidisciplinary approaches and medical home models for health care delivery. This current state summary and research recommendations are designed to guide advances in care and the generation of new knowledge that will meaningfully improve life for people with DKD. Copyright © 2014 American Diabetes Association and the National Kidney Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. A cross-sectional survey to study the relationship of periodontal disease with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Harish, Yashoda; Hiremath, Shivalingaswamy; Puranik, Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, liver cirrhosis, bacterial pneumonia, nutritional deficiencies, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The present study assessed the periodontal disease among patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes, CVD, and respiratory disease. The study population consisted of 220 patients each of CVD, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus, making a total of 660 patients in the systemic disease group. A control group of 340 subjects were also included in the study for comparison purpose. The periodontal status of the patients with these confirmed medical conditions was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITNs) index. The prevalence of CPITN code 4 was found to be greater among the patients with respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants with score 4 was found to be greater among the patients with diabetes mellitus and CVD. The treatment need 0 was found to be more among the controls (1.18%) whereas the treatment need 1, 2, and 3 were more among the patients with respiratory disease (100%, 97.73%, and 54.8%), diabetes mellitus (100%, 100% and 46.4%), and CVD (100%, 97.73%, and 38.1%), in comparison to the controls (6.18%). From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that diabetes mellitus, CVD, and respiratory disease are associated with a higher severity of periodontal disease.

  7. A cross-sectional survey to study the relationship of periodontal disease with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal deterioration has been reported to be associated with systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes mellitus, respiratory disease, liver cirrhosis, bacterial pneumonia, nutritional deficiencies, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Aim: The present study assessed the periodontal disease among patients with systemic conditions such as diabetes, CVD, and respiratory disease. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 220 patients each of CVD, respiratory disease, and diabetes mellitus, making a total of 660 patients in the systemic disease group. A control group of 340 subjects were also included in the study for comparison purpose. The periodontal status of the patients with these confirmed medical conditions was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITNs index. Results: The prevalence of CPITN code 4 was found to be greater among the patients with respiratory disease whereas the mean number of sextants with score 4 was found to be greater among the patients with diabetes mellitus and CVD. The treatment need 0 was found to be more among the controls (1.18% whereas the treatment need 1, 2, and 3 were more among the patients with respiratory disease (100%, 97.73%, and 54.8%, diabetes mellitus (100%, 100% and 46.4%, and CVD (100%, 97.73%, and 38.1%, in comparison to the controls (6.18%. Conclusion: From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that diabetes mellitus, CVD, and respiratory disease are associated with a higher severity of periodontal disease.

  8. Circulating CXCL16 in Diabetic Kidney Disease

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    Usama Elewa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic kidney disease and, specifically, diabetic kidney disease, is among the fastest increasing causes of death worldwide. A better understanding of the factors contributing to the high mortality may help design novel monitoring and therapeutic approaches. CXCL16 is both a cholesterol receptor and a chemokine with a potential role in vascular injury and inflammation. We aimed at identifying predictors of circulating CXCL16 levels in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. Methods: We have now studied plasma CXCL16 in 134 European patients with diabetic kidney disease with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR categories G1-G4 and albuminuria categories A1-A3, in order to identify factors influencing plasma CXCL16 in this population. Results: Plasma CXCL16 levels were 4.0±0.9 ng/ml. Plasma CXCL16 increased with increasing eGFR category from G1 to G4 (that is, with decreasing eGFR values and with increasing albuminuria category. Plasma CXCL16 was higher in patients with prior cardiovascular disease (4.33±1.03 vs 3.88±0.86 ng/ml; p=0.013. In multivariate analysis, eGFR and serum albumin had an independent and significant negative correlation with plasma CXCL16. Conclusion: In diabetic kidney disease patients, GFR and serum albumin independently predicted plasma CXCL16 levels.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  10. Cyclodextrin Protects Podocytes in Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merscher-Gomez, Sandra; Guzman, Johanna; Pedigo, Christopher E.; Lehto, Markku; Aguillon-Prada, Robier; Mendez, Armando; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Yoo, TaeHyun; Villarreal, Rodrigo; Maiguel, Dony; Johnson, Kevin; Goldberg, Ronald; Nair, Viji; Randolph, Ann; Kretzler, Matthias; Nelson, Robert G.; Burke, George W.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Fornoni, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease despite multifactorial intervention. We demonstrated that increased cholesterol in association with downregulation of ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1 occurs in normal human podocytes exposed to the sera of patients with type 1 diabetes and albuminuria (DKD+) when compared with diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria (DKD−) and similar duration of diabetes and lipid profile. Glomerular downregulation of ABCA1 was confirmed in biopsies from patients with early DKD (n = 70) when compared with normal living donors (n = 32). Induction of cholesterol efflux with cyclodextrin (CD) but not inhibition of cholesterol synthesis with simvastatin prevented podocyte injury observed in vitro after exposure to patient sera. Subcutaneous administration of CD to diabetic BTBR (black and tan, brachiuric) ob/ob mice was safe and reduced albuminuria, mesangial expansion, kidney weight, and cortical cholesterol content. This was followed by an improvement of fasting insulin, blood glucose, body weight, and glucose tolerance in vivo and improved glucose-stimulated insulin release in human islets in vitro. Our data suggest that impaired reverse cholesterol transport characterizes clinical and experimental DKD and negatively influences podocyte function. Treatment with CD is safe and effective in preserving podocyte function in vitro and in vivo and may improve the metabolic control of diabetes. PMID:23835338

  11. Epidemiology of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutens, Anne T

    2013-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes has led to DKD becoming the leading cause of ESRD in many regions. The economic cost of DKD will grow to prohibitive amounts unless strategies to prevent its onset or progression are urgently implemented. In type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the presence of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria confers increased risk of developing ESRD and of death. Comparison of recent studies with earlier historical studies shows that the incidence of ESRD and death has decreased in DKD. Increased risk of albuminuria has been identified in certain non-European ethnic groups. However, the initial concept of progression of DKD as an albuminuric phenotype involving development of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, and then ESRD has had to be modified. Albumin excretion frequently regresses, and GFR can decline without abnormality in albumin excretion. There is emerging evidence that changes in renal function occurring early in the course of diabetes predict future outcomes. The major challenges are to prevent DKD onset, to detect it early, and to improve DKD outcomes globally. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The cost-effectiveness of gestational diabetes screening including prevention of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marseille, Elliot; Lohse, Nicolai; Jiwani, Aliya

    2013-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with elevated risks of perinatal complications and type 2 diabetes mellitus, and screening and intervention can reduce these risks. We quantified the cost, health impact and cost-effectiveness of GDM screening and intervention in India and Israel,...

  13. Use of Readily Accessible Inflammatory Markers to Predict Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Winter

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and is the primary cause of end-stage renal disease in developed countries. Early detection of diabetic kidney disease will facilitate early intervention aimed at reducing the rate of progression to end-stage renal disease. Diabetic kidney disease has been traditionally classified based on the presence of albuminuria. More recently estimated glomerular filtration rate has also been incorporated into the staging of diabetic kidney disease. While albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is well described, the phenotype of non-albuminuric diabetic kidney disease is now widely accepted. An association between markers of inflammation and diabetic kidney disease has previously been demonstrated. Effector molecules of the innate immune system including C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are increased in patients with diabetic kidney disease. Furthermore, renal infiltration of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes are observed in renal biopsies of patients with diabetic kidney disease. Similarly high serum neutrophil and low serum lymphocyte counts have been shown to be associated with diabetic kidney disease. The neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio is considered a robust measure of systemic inflammation and is associated with the presence of inflammatory conditions including the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a link between high levels of the above inflammatory biomarkers and diabetic kidney disease. Further longitudinal studies will be required to determine if these readily available inflammatory biomarkers can accurately predict the presence and prognosis of diabetic kidney disease, above and beyond albuminuria, and estimated glomerular filtration rate.

  14. Epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; Baba, Mendel; Lazzarini, Peter A

    2017-05-18

    Diabetic foot disease is associated with major morbidity, mortality, costs, and reduction of a person's quality of life. Investigating the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease is the backbone of diabetic foot research and clinical practice, yet the full burden of diabetic foot disease in Australia is unknown. This study aims to describe the protocol for a systematic review of the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia. The systematic review will be performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines. PubMed and EMBASE will be searched for publications in any language and without restrictions to date. Two independent investigators will screen publications for eligibility, with publications reporting Australian population-based incidence or prevalence of diabetic foot disease or diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation to be included. Additionally, a forward literature search will be performed in Google Scholar, and a grey literature search will be performed to identify government publications. Quality assessment will be performed using customised checklists. The summary statistic used for each study will be an incidence or prevalence proportion of diabetic foot disease or diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation. The standard error for each proportion will be calculated. A meta-analysis will be performed when three or more publications of adequate quality, reporting on similar outcomes and in similar populations, are identified. The results of this systematic review can be used to adequately inform stakeholders in the field of diabetic foot disease on the extent of the problem in incidence and prevalence of diabetic foot disease in Australia, and to help guide appropriate use of resources to reduce the burden of this disease. PROSPERO CRD42016050740.

  15. Review of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punjabi, Paawan; Hira, Angela; Prasad, Shanti; Wang, Xiangbing; Chokhavatia, Sita

    2015-09-01

    This article reviews the known pathophysiological mechanisms of comorbid gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the diabetic patient, discusses therapeutic options in care, and provides an approach to its evaluation and management. We searched for review articles published in the past 10 years through a PubMed search using the filters diabetes mellitus, GERD, pathophysiology, and management. The search only yielded a handful of articles, so we independently included relevant studies from these review articles along with related citations as suggested by PubMed. We found diabetic patients are more prone to developing GERD and may present with atypical manifestations. A number of mechanisms have been proposed to elucidate the connection between these two diseases. Studies involving treatment options for comorbid disease suggest conflicting drug-drug interactions. Currently, there are no published guidelines specifically for the evaluation and management of GERD in the diabetic patient. Although there are several proposed mechanisms for the higher prevalence of GERD in the diabetic patient, this complex interrelationship requires further research. Understanding the pathophysiology will help direct diagnostic evaluation. In our review, we propose a management algorithm for GERD in the diabetic patient. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Prevention of metabolic diseases: fruits (including fruit sugars) vs. vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jessica N; Schmidt, Kelsey A; Kratz, Mario

    2017-07-01

    To discuss recent evidence from observational and intervention studies on the relationship between fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption and metabolic disease. Observational studies have consistently demonstrated a modest inverse association between the intake of fruit and leafy green vegetables, but not total vegetables, and biomarkers of metabolic disease as well as incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. This is in contrast to limited evidence from recently published randomized controlled dietary intervention trials, which - in sum - suggests little to no impact of increased F&V consumption on biomarkers of metabolic disease. Evidence from observational studies that fruit and leafy green vegetable intake is associated with lower type 2 diabetes risk and better metabolic health could not be confirmed by dietary intervention trials. It is unclear whether this discrepancy is because of limitations inherent in observational studies (e.g., subjective dietary assessment methods, residual confounding) or due to limitations in the few available intervention studies (e.g., short duration of follow-up, interventions combining whole fruit and fruit juice, or lack of compliance). Future studies that attempt to address these limitations are needed to provide more conclusive insight into the impact of F&V consumption on metabolic health.

  17. Diabetes mellitus, a complex and heterogeneous disease, and the role of insulin resistance as a determinant of diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalliedde, Janaka; Gnudi, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasingly recognized as a heterogeneous condition. The individualization of care and treatment necessitates an understanding of the individual patient's pathophysiology of DM that underpins their DM classification and clinical presentation. Classical type-2 diabetes mellitus is due to a combination of insulin resistance and an insulin secretory defect. Type-1 diabetes is characterized by a near-absolute deficiency of insulin secretion. More recently, advances in genetics and a better appreciation of the atypical features of DM has resulted in more categories of diabetes. In the context of kidney disease, patients with DM and microalbuminuria are more insulin resistant, and insulin resistance may be a pathway that results in accelerated progression of diabetic kidney disease. This review summarizes the updated classification of DM, including more rarer categories and their associated renal manifestations that need to be considered in patients who present with atypical features. The benefits and limitations of the tests utilized to make a diagnosis of DM are discussed. We also review the putative pathways and mechanisms by which insulin resistance drives the progression of diabetic kidney disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Diabetes propels the risk for cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepen, van Janna A.; Thiem, Kathrin; Stienstra, Rinke; Riksen, Niels P.; Tack, Cees J.; Netea, Mihai G.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes strongly predisposes to cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of mortality in these patients, as well as in the entire population. Hyperglycemia is an important cardiovascular risk factor as shown by the observation that even transient periods of hyperglycemia, despite return

  19. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy, is it an autoimmune disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janahi, Noor M; Santos, Derek; Blyth, Christine; Bakhiet, Moiz; Ellis, Mairghread

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmunity has been identified in a significant number of neuropathies, such as, proximal neuropathies, and autonomic neuropathies associated with diabetes mellitus. However, possible correlations between diabetic peripheral neuropathy and autoimmunity have not yet been fully investigated. This study was conducted to investigate whether autoimmunity is associated with the pathogenesis of human diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A case-control analysis included three groups: 30 patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, 30 diabetic control patients without neuropathy, and 30 healthy controls. Blood analysis was conducted to compare the percentages of positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) between the three groups. Secondary analysis investigated the correlations between the presence of autoimmune antibodies and sample demographics and neurological manifestations. This research was considered as a pilot study encouraging further investigations to take place in the near future. Antinuclear antibodies were significantly present in the blood serum of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in comparison to the control groups (pneuropathy group were 50 times higher when compared to control groups. Secondary analysis showed a significant correlation between the presence of ANA and the neurological manifestation of neuropathy (Neuropathy symptom score, Neuropathy disability score and Vibration Perception Threshold). The study demonstrated for the first time that human peripheral diabetic neuropathy may have an autoimmune aetiology. The new pathogenic factors may lead to the consideration of new management plans involving new therapeutic approaches and disease markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease in the Eastern Mediterranean Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokdad, Ali H

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We used findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study to update our previous publication on the burden of diabetes and chronic kidney disease due to diabetes (CKD-DM) during 1990-2015. METHODS: We extracted GBD 2015 estimates for prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted ......OBJECTIVES: We used findings from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 study to update our previous publication on the burden of diabetes and chronic kidney disease due to diabetes (CKD-DM) during 1990-2015. METHODS: We extracted GBD 2015 estimates for prevalence, mortality, and disability......-adjusted life years (DALYs) of diabetes (including burden of low vision due to diabetes, neuropathy, and amputations and CKD-DM for 22 countries of the EMR from the GBD visualization tools. RESULTS: In 2015, 135,230 (95% UI 123,034-148,184) individuals died from diabetes and 16,470 (95% UI 13,977-18,961) from...

  1. [Diabetes and autoimmune diseases: prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mont-Serrat, Camila; Hoineff, Claudio; Meirelles, Ricardo M R; Kupfer, Rosane

    2008-12-01

    Determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) in attendance in Instituto Estadual de Diabetes e Endocrinologia Luiz Capriglione (IEDE). Blood samples were analyzed in 120 children and adolescents with DM1 from IEDE Diabetes Clinic for the IgA antitissue-transglutaminase antibody and dosage of the seric IgA. Those with positive serology were guided for upper endoscopy with small-bowel biopsy to confirm the celiac disease. The antibody was positive in 3 of the 120 patients. The small-bowel biopsy was confirmatory in all of the positive patients, leading to a prevalence of celiac disease of 2.5% in the studied group. The prevalence of celiac disease is increased in children and adolescents with DM1 when compared with normality. As most are asymptomatic, it is recommended periodical screening of celiac disease in children with DM1.

  2. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishabh Kapila

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine pathway may lead to diabetes and an increased severity of periodontal disease in diabetic patients, thus linking both diabetes and periodontal disease.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Tryptophan has been found in significant amount in saliva in diabetic individuals in some studies, particularly tryptophan metabolites like kynurenine and anthranilic acid. Moreover, altered tryptophan metabolism has also been reported in the onset of periodontal disease. Thus, this correlation between diabetes mellitus, periodontal disease and salivary tryptophan metabolite levels could be related to the impaired kynurenine pathway metabolism of tryptophan.

  3. Pooled analysis of the CONFIRM registries: safety outcomes in diabetic patients treated with orbital atherectomy for peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Yang, Tae; Adams, George

    2014-04-01

    To compare the acute outcomes of orbital atherectomy treatment in diabetic vs. non-diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The CONFIRM registry series contained 1842 diabetic patients (1111 men; mean age 70.6±10.2 years) with 2819 lesions and 1247 non-diabetic patients (732 men; mean age 72.9±10.7 years) with 1885 lesions. The composite rate of procedure-related complications, including dissection, perforation, slow flow, vessel closure, spasm, embolism, and thrombus formation, was analyzed for the diabetic and non-diabetic groups. Diabetics were younger but had a higher prevalence of coronary artery disease (patherectomy resulted in similar low procedure-related complication rates in both the diabetic and non-diabetic groups, despite diabetics having more unfavorable baseline clinical and lesion characteristics. This study suggests that orbital atherectomy is a safe and effective treatment modality in both the diabetic and the non-diabetic populations.

  4. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... Percent of visits to office-based physicians with COPD indicated on the medical record: 3.2% Source: ...

  5. Sirtuins and renal diseases: relationship with aging and diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kume, Shinji; Takeda-Watanabe, Ai; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    Sirtuins are members of the Sir2 (silent information regulator 2) family, a group of class III deacetylases. Mammals have seven different sirtuins, SIRT1-SIRT7. Among them, SIRT1, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are induced by calorie restriction conditions and are considered anti-aging molecules. SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied. SIRT1 deacetylates target proteins using the coenzyme NAD+ and is therefore linked to cellular energy metabolism and the redox state through multiple signalling and survival pathways. SIRT1 deficiency under various stress conditions, such as metabolic or oxidative stress or hypoxia, is implicated in the pathophysiologies of age-related diseases including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disorders and renal diseases. In the kidneys, SIRT1 may inhibit renal cell apoptosis, inflammation and fibrosis, and may regulate lipid metabolism, autophagy, blood pressure and sodium balance. Therefore the activation of SIRT1 in the kidney may be a new therapeutic target to increase resistance to many causal factors in the development of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. In addition, SIRT3 and SIRT6 are implicated in age-related disorders or longevity. In the present review, we discuss the protective functions of sirtuins and the association of sirtuins with the pathophysiology of renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Periodontal Disease Behavior in Children and Adolescents with Diabetes in Cienfuegos in 2008

    OpenAIRE

    Arasay Calzada Bandomo; Esther María Castillo Betancourt

    2011-01-01

    Background: chronic inflammatory periodontal diseases are a set of entities of multifactorial etiology. Diabetes mellitus is one of the conditions with a great impact on the periodontium and its interaction with microorganisms. Objective: to characterize the behaviour of periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes in Cienfuegos in 2008. Method: an epidemiological, descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted. The sample included diabetic children and adolescents under...

  7. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. This chapter deals with the possible association between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus which is believed...

  8. Compromised quality of life in patients with both Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, S F; Pouwer, F; Tushuizen, M E; Hoogma, R P; Mulder, C J; Simsek, S

    2013-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease are two chronic illnesses associated with each other. Both diseases and their treatments can seriously impair quality of life. The objective of the present study was to investigate health-related quality of life in adult patients diagnosed with both Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease and compare this with healthy control subjects and control subjects who have Type 1 diabetes only. A generic measure of health-related quality of life (RAND-36) and a measure of diabetes-specific quality of life (DQOL) questionnaires were sent to patients diagnosed with both Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. The control group consisted of patients with Type 1 diabetes without coeliac disease matched for age, gender and socio-economic status. Generic quality of life scores were compared with data from healthy Dutch control subjects. Fifty-seven patients with Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease were included and no associations between clinical characteristics and quality of life were observed. Women reported a lower quality of life in social functioning, vitality and mental health than men (all P coeliac disease compared with patients with Type 1 diabetes. Compared with healthy control subjects, quality of life in patients with Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease was significantly lower, particularly social functioning (Cohen's d = 0.76) and general health perception (Cohen's d = 0.86). The additional diagnosis of coeliac disease and treatment by gluten-free diet in adult patients with Type 1 diabetes has a considerable, negative impact on quality of life and diabetes-specific quality of life. Women are particularly affected and social functioning and general health perception is compromised. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  9. Patients With Diabetic Foot Disease Fear Major Lower-Extremity Amputation More Than Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Raspovic, Katherine M; Suder, Natalie C

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most-feared complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), comparing those with diabetic foot pathology with those without diabetic foot pathology. We determined the frequency of patients ranking major lower-extremity amputation (LEA) as their greatest fear in comparison to blindness, death, diabetic foot infection (DFI), or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring dialysis. We further categorized the study group patients (N = 207) by their pathology such as diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), Charcot neuroarthropathy, foot infection, or acute neuropathic fractures and dislocations. The control group (N = 254) was comprised of patients with diabetes who presented with common non-diabetes-related foot pathology. A total of 461 patients were enrolled in this study and included 254 patients without diabetic foot complications and 207 patients with diabetic foot problems. When comparing patients with and without diabetic disease, no significant differences were observed with regard to their fear of blindness, DFI, or ESRD requiring dialysis. Patients with diabetic foot disease (61 of 207, 31.9%) were 136% more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 2.36; 95% CI = 1.51-3.70; P = .002] to rank major LEA as their greatest fear when compared with diabetic patients without foot disease (42 of 254, 16.5%) and were 49% less likely (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.34-0.79; P = .002) to rank death as their greatest fear compared with patients without diabetic foot disease. Patients with diabetic foot pathology fear major LEA more than death, foot infection, or ESRD. Variables that were associated with ranking LEA as the greatest fear were the presence of a diabetic-related foot complication, duration of DM ≥10 years, insulin use, and the presence of peripheral neuropathy. Level II: Prospective, Case controlled study.

  10. Life versus disease in difficult diabetes care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Vibeke Zoffmann

    2005-01-01

    Conflicts in problem solving are known from diabetes research on patients with good glycemic control but have rarely been studied in the care of patients with poor glycemic control. Equally, the different perspectives of health care providers and patients have not been a focus in previous studies....... The authors studied the interactions between health care providers and 11 diabetes patients with poor glycemic control in a grounded theory study at a Danish university hospital. Keeping Life and Disease Apart was identified as a core category. It involved a pattern of conflicts both between and within...... patients and health professionals, which disempowered them in problem solving. Three approaches to problem solving were identified: A compliance-expecting approach kept the pattern unchanged, a failure-expecting approach deadlocked the pattern, and a mutuality-expecting approach appeared to neutralize...

  11. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  12. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2015-05-13

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  13. Factors Associated with Periodontal Disease in Pregnant Diabetic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, N; Zaman, N; Nimmi, N; Chowdhury, T A; Khan, M H

    2016-04-01

    There have been an association between systemic diseases and hormonal changes particularly diabetes which has been cited as a risk factor in the progression of periodontitis in pregnant women. The incidence and severity of periodontal diseases are increasing at a higher rate and a common condition in pregnant diabetic women among Bangladeshi population. This cross sectional study included 200 pregnant women who were selected from gynecological department and examined at the dental unit. The clinical parameters used were the Silness and Loe plaque index (PI), gingival scores and periodontal status and any relationship to socio demographic variables (age, occupation, level of education and urban or rural residence) and clinical variables (gestation period, previous pregnancy, type of diabetes and periodontal maintenance) were evaluated. The results showed that these clinical parameters increased concomitantly with an increase in the stage of pregnancy and in women with multiple pregnancies. Increased age, lower level of education, unemployment and patients residing in rural areas were associated with significantly higher gingival scores and periodontal measures. Women with increased age and multiple pregnancies usually have less interest to frequent periodontal maintenance showing a significant statistical relation between an increased age and changes in gingival and periodontal status; however no significant association was found between increased age and plaque index. It is concluded that gingival inflammatory symptoms are aggravated during pregnancy in diabetic women and are related to different clinical and demographic variables.

  14. Serum and Urinary Progranulin in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletto, Bruna Bellincanta; Krolikowski, Thaiana Cirino; Crispim, Daisy; Canani, Luis Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Progranulin has been recognized as an adipokine related to obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are scarce data regarding progranulin and kidney disease, but there are some data linking diabetic kidney disease (DKD) and increased progranulin levels. We aimed to better describe the relationship between serum and urinary progranulin levels and DKD in T2DM. This is a case-control study including four groups of subjects: 1) Advanced DKD cases: T2DM patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) Progranulin was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One hundred and fourteen patients were included (23 advanced DKD cases, 25 albuminuric DKD cases, 40 diabetic controls and 26 non-diabetic controls). Serum progranulin was increased in advanced DKD compared to other groups [70.84 (59.04-83.16) vs. albuminuric cases 57.16 (42.24-67.38), diabetic controls 57.28 (42.08-70.47) and non-diabetic controls 44.54 (41.44-53.32) ng/mL; pprogranulin was decreased in advanced DKD cases compared to albuminuric cases [10.62 (6.30-16.08) vs. 20.94 (12.35-30.22); diabetic controls 14.06 (9.88-20.82) and non-diabetic controls 13.51 (7.94-24.36) ng/mL; p = 0.017]. There was a positive correlation between serum progranulin and body mass index (r = 0.27; p = 0.004), waist circumference (r = 0.25; p = 0.007); body fat percentage (r = 0.20; p = 0.042), high-sensitive C reactive protein (r = 0.35; pprogranulin was positively associated with albuminuria (r = 0.25; p = 0.010). In conclusion, progranulin is affected by a decrease in eGFR, being at a higher concentration in serum and lower in urine of DKD patients with T2DM and eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. It is also associated with markers of obesity and inflammation.

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Mariko; Miwa, Takashi; Kawai, Takashi; Odawara, Masato

    2015-03-01

    Some studies report that complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occur more frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) than in non-diabetic patients. This study used transnasal endoscopy to elucidate the current status of concurrent GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to examine the associations between intraesophageal pressure and GERD, as well as other neuropathic conditions. The study included 57 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mean age was 67 years and the duration of DM was 13 years. The mean hemoglobin A1c was 6.8%. Transnasal endoscopic evaluation items were (i) the presence or absence of esophagitis and its severity; (ii) intraesophageal pressure; and (iii) Helicobacter pylori status, which was evaluated by endoscopic findings, such as the presence or absence of gastritis and peptic ulcer, and by urea breath test. Of 57 patients, 24 (42.1%) were given a diagnosis of GERD based on endoscopy. Patients with concurrent GERD were younger, had shorter duration of DM, and were taller and heavier. Interestingly, no difference in body mass index was observed. There was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and diabetic complications, including peripheral neuropathy, and infection or non-infection with H. pylori. Although there was no significant association between the presence of concurrent GERD and intraesophageal pressure values, we found aging, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and the presence of autonomic nerve symptoms to correlate with reduced intraesophageal pressure. The results of this study could be used to answer the question of whether or not endoscopic GERD is a diabetic complication; however, further study is required. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Diabetes and the Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease in Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Schernhammer, Eva S; Hansen, Johnni; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Wermuth, Lene; Ritz, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Insulin contributes to normal brain function. Previous studies have suggested associations between midlife diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease. Using Danish population registers, we investigated whether a history of diabetes or the use of antidiabetes drugs was associated with Parkinson’s disease. Research Design and Methods: From the nationwide Danish Hospital Register hospital records, we identified 1,931 patients with a first-time diagnosis of ...

  17. Carotid disease in diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Abid, A.R.; Dar, M.A.; Noeman, A.; Amin, S.; Azhar, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the severity of carotid artery disease in diabetic and non-diabetic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: From January to June 2008, 379 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery were preoperatively evaluated for the presence of carotid stenoses by duplex scanning. Patients were divided into two groups, Group I, 156 (41.2%) diabetic patients and Group II, 223 (58.8%) non-diabetic patients. Results: There were 314 (82.8%) males and 65 (17.2%) females with a mean age of 57.2+-9.1 years. In diabetic group there were 125 (80.1%) males and 31 (19.9%) females with a mean age of 56.3+-8.9 years. Left main stem stenosis was present in 59 (37.8%) diabetics and 45 (20.2%) non-diabetics (p 70% stenosis was present in 20 (5.3%) with 13 (8.3%) diabetics and 7 (3.1%) non-diabetics (p<0.025). Stenosis of 50-70% was observed in 30 (7.9%) of which 17 (10.9%) were diabetics and 13 (5.8%) were non-diabetics. Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus is associated with diffuse coronary artery disease and significant carotid artery disease in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. (author)

  18. Glucose Transporters in Diabetic Kidney Disease-Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Anita A; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is a major microvascular complication of diabetes and a common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. DKD manifests as an increased urinary protein excretion (albuminuria). Multiple studies have shown that insulin resistance correlates with the development of albuminuria in non-diabetic and diabetic patients. There is also accumulating evidence that glomerular epithelial cells or podocytes are insulin sensitive and that insulin signaling in podocytes is essential for maintaining normal kidney function. At the cellular level, the mechanisms leading to the development of insulin resistance include mutations in the insulin receptor gene, impairments in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway, or perturbations in the trafficking of glucose transporters (GLUTs), which mediate the uptake of glucose into cells. Podocytes express several GLUTs, including GLUT1, GLUT2, GLUT3, GLUT4, and GLUT8. Of these, the most studied ones are GLUT1 and GLUT4, both shown to be insulin responsive in podocytes. In the basal state, GLUT4 is preferentially located in perinuclear and cytosolic vesicular structures and to a lesser extent at the plasma membrane. After insulin stimulation, GLUT4 is sorted into GLUT4-containing vesicles (GCVs) that translocate to the plasma membrane. GCV trafficking consists of several steps, including approaching of the GCVs to the plasma membrane, tethering, and docking, after which the lipid bilayers of the GCVs and the plasma membrane fuse, delivering GLUT4 to the cell surface for glucose uptake into the cell. Studies have revealed novel molecular regulators of the GLUT trafficking in podocytes and unraveled unexpected roles for GLUT1 and GLUT4 in the development of DKD, summarized in this review. These findings pave the way for better understanding of the mechanistic pathways associated with the development and progression of DKD and aid in the development of new treatments for this devastating disease.

  19. Latest data on metabolic diseases: Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota Mitrou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With such a high cost in money and human lives, diabetes mellitus (DM is a major challenge for health care systems and an obstacle to sustainable economic growth. The pathophysiological disorders of diabetes include, besides the defect in pancreatic insulin secretion and insulin resistance in peripheral tissues (liver, muscle and adipose tissue, increased lipolysis, increased glucagon secretion, impaired secretion and action of incretin hormones, increased glucose resorption by the kidney and defects in the central nervous system. The therapeutic intervention must be timely and personalized. Lifestyle interventions (diet, exercise, smoking cessation are the cornerstone of treatment. Treatment should begin with metformin unless there is a contraindication (eg renal failure or intolerance (eg, gastrointestinal disorders. If HbA1c remains off target a second or a third treatment may be added, orally (glitazone, DPP-4 inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors, sulfonylurea or by injection (GLP-1 agonist or basal insulin. On failure to achieve glycemic target combinations of injectable treatments (combination of agonist GLP-1 with basal insulin, intensified insulin therapy or in some cases insulin mixtures are recommended. New treatments (weekly administered GLP-1 analogs, combination of a basal insulin / GLP-1 in one injection, SGLT-2 inhibitors, long acting basal insulins in combination with the old tried treatments (e.g. metformin, pioglitazone, inhibitors DPP-4 can contribute to human-centered and individualized management of patients with diabetes. The cardiovascular safety of antidiabetic treatment should be considered. There is a need for early diagnosis and treatment of glucose metabolism disorders during pregnancy (before 24 to 28 weeks of gestation in women at high risk for developing gestational diabetes.

  20. Coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Szaflarska-Popławska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    There is a selective review of the literature concerning the coexistence of coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus. This review focuses on the principles of serological tests towards coeliac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and metabolic control measures as a result of a gluten-free diet.

  1. Comprehensive Diabetes and Non-Communicable Disease Educator in the Low-Resource Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M D

    2016-01-01

    The role of self-management education in diabetes and other major non-communicable diseases is clearly evident. To take care of and educate people with diabetes and other major NCD under the supervision of medical professionals and for education of other health care professionals, Comprehensive Diabetes and NCD Educators are needed in the routine service in peripheral health clinics and hospitals. The areas of training of CDNCD educator should match with the cost-effective interventions for diabetes and other major NCD that are feasible and planned for implementation in primary care in the low resource settings. Most of such interventions are part of diabetes education as required for Diabetes Self-Management Education programmes and traditional Diabetes Educator. The addition of use of inhaled steroids and bronchodilator in chronic respiratory disease and identification of presenting features of cancer, also required for many people with diabetes with various such common co-morbidities, will complete the areas of training of traditional Diabetes Educator as that of CDNCD Educator. Staff nurse and health assistants, who are as such already providing routine clinical service to all patients including with diabetes and major NCD in peripheral health clinics and hospitals, are most appropriate for CDNCD Educator training. The training of CDNCD Educator, like that of traditional Diabetes Educator, requires fulfilment of sufficient hours of practical work experience under supervision and achievement of the essential competencies entailing at least 6 month or more of intensive training schedules to be eligible to appear in its final certifying examination.

  2. The Kynurenine Pathway: a Proposed Mechanism Linking Diabetes and Periodontal Disease in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rishabh Kapila; KS Nagesh; Asha R. Iyengar; Subash BV. Adiga

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characte-rized by dysregulation of carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Diabetes could result, in part, in activation of tryptophan metabolism. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to gingivitis and periodontitis than healthy subjects. The salivary kynurenine derivatives are also implicated in the onset and development of periodontal dis-ease in humans.The hypothesis: We propose that the tryptophan metabolites via kynurenine path...

  3. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  4. Gallstone disease and type-2 diabetes mellitus-the link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olokoba, A.B.; Bojuwoye, B.J.; Olokoba, K.B.; Braimoh, K.T.; Inikori, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the factors predisposing patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus to gallstone disease. One hundred type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age and gender-matched controls underwent real time ultrasonography to study factors predisposing patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus to gallstone disease. The age, gender, body mass index (BMI), duration of diabetes mellitus and serum lipids were determined in the individuals enrolled for the study. Fifteen percent of the diabetic patients had ultrasound evidence of gallstone disease as compared to 7% in non-diabetic controls. There was a steady increase in the incidence of gallstone disease in diabetic patients with age with a peak incidence in the seventh decade i.e. 60-69 years, and a decline in the eighth decade i.e. 70 - 79 years. The average age of the diabetic patients with gallstone disease - 59.1+ 9.5 years was significantly higher than in those without gallstone disease - 51.8 + 10.5 years (p 0.014). The mean duration of disease in the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was 5.0 + 4.9 years compared with 4.5 + 3.8 years in the diabetic patients without gallstone disease (p=0.772). The mean serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels - 4.3 + 1.3 mmol/L and 1.5 + 0.8 mmol/L respectively in the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was higher than in those without gallstone disease - 3.4 + 0.5 mmol/L (p=0.0941) and 1.4 + 0.7 mmol/L (p=0.712) respectively. The mean body mass index for the diabetic patients with gallstone disease was 26.2 + 5.5 kg /m 2 compared with 25.7 + 6.7 kg/m2 in those without gallstone disease (p=0.755) . Increasing age is a risk factor for gallstone disease in diabetic patients. Hyperlipidaemia, female gender, heavier weight and a longer duration of diabetes mellitus appear to be associated risk factors. (author)

  5. Bidirectional relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease: Review of Evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, B.A.Q.; Syed, A.; Izhar, F.; Ali Khan, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Presently there are 170 million diabetic patients worldwide. Pakistan ranks sixth in the world with approximately 6.2 million in the 20-79 year age affected by the diabetes. 6-10% of the 35-44 year old diabetic patients have been reported to be affected by moderate form of periodontal disease in Pakistan. Periodontal disease is referred to as sixth complication of diabetes. The association between diabetes and periodontal disease has been reported for more than 40 years but reverse has not been the focus of researchers until recently. Studies have suggested a bidirectional relationship between periodontal disease and glycemic control with each disease having a potential impact on the other. (author)

  6. The Relationship between Ischemic Heart Disease and Diabete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Mette Lykke

    2012-01-01

    THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES ON THE SUBJECT: The relationship between ischemic heart disease and diabetes: 1. To examine the short- and long-term risk of death and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with incident diabetes and in patients with first-time MI during a 10 year period in Denmark, using the general...... diabetes increases with increasing severity of heart failure. Focus on the development of diabetes in patients with ischemic heart disease with or without the presence of heart failure still compose a public health matter, because early and aggressive evidence-based therapy is thought to reduce......Diabetes is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is common among patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), where the prevalence is as high as 20%. Patients with diabetes requiring glucose-lowering medication (GLM) have been reported as having the same long-term risk...

  7. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  8. Medical care of type 2 diabetes in German disease management programmes: a population-based evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Reneé G; Schunk, Michaela V; Meisinger, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Leidl, Reiner; Holle, Rolf

    2011-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes disease management programmes (DDMPs) are offered by German social health insurance to promote healthcare consistent with evidence-based medical guidelines. The aim of this study was to compare healthcare quality and medical endpoints between diabetes management programme participants and patients receiving usual care designated as controls. All patients with type 2 diabetes (age range: 36-81) in a cross-sectional survey of a cohort study, performed by the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg, received a self-administered questionnaire regarding their diabetes care. Physical examination and laboratory tests were also performed. The analysis only included patients with social health insurance and whose participation status in a diabetes disease management program was validated by the primary physician (n = 166). Regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex, education, diabetes duration, baseline waist circumference and clustering regarding primary physician were conducted. Evaluation of healthcare processes showed that those in diabetes disease management programmes (n = 89) reported medical examination of eyes and feet and medical advice regarding diet [odds ratio (OR): 2.39] and physical activity (OR: 2.87) more frequently, received anti-diabetic medications (OR: 3.77) and diabetes education more often (OR: 2.66) than controls. Both groups had satisfactory HbA(1c) control but poor low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control. Blood pressure goals (management programmes (OR: 2.21). German diabetes disease management programmes are associated with improved healthcare processes and blood pressure control. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol control must be improved for all patients with diabetes. Further research will be required to assess the long-term effects of this diabetes disease management programme. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Gender disparities in diabetes and coronary heart disease medication among patients with type 2 diabetes: results from the DIANA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krämer Heike U

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is one of the most common long-term complications in people with type 2 diabetes. We analyzed whether or not gender differences exist in diabetes and CHD medication among people with type 2 diabetes. Methods The study was based on data from the baseline examination of the DIANA study, a prospective cohort study of 1,146 patients with type 2 diabetes conducted in South-West Germany. Information on diabetes and CHD medication was obtained from the physician questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression were employed in order to assess associations between gender and prescribed drug classes. Results In total, 624 men and 522 women with type 2 diabetes with a mean age of 67.2 and 69.7 years, respectively, were included in this analysis. Compared to women, men had more angiopathic risk factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption and worse glycemic control, and had more often a diagnosed CHD. Bivariate analyses showed higher prescription of thiazolidinediones and oral combination drugs as well as of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers and aspirin in men than in women. After full adjustment, differences between men and women remained significant only for ACE inhibitors (OR = 1.44; 95%-confidence interval (CI: 1.11 – 1.88 and calcium channel blockers (OR = 1.42, 95%-CI: 1.05 – 1.91. Conclusions These findings contribute to current discussions on gender differences in diabetes care. Men with diabetes are significantly more likely to receive oral combination drugs, ACE inhibitors and calcium channel blockers in the presence of coronary heart disease, respectively. Our results suggest, that diabetic men might be more thoroughly treated compared to women. Further research is needed to focus on reasons for these differences mainly in treatment of cardiovascular diseases to improve quality of care.

  10. [Vacuum-assisted therapy for various wound types including diabetic foot ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Raymond; Gantus, Maher; Kogan, Leonid

    2011-03-01

    Vacuum is a noninvasive system that creates a localized controlled negative pressure environment. In this study, vacuum was provided by the V.A.C. Therapy system, which promotes wound healing by delayed primary or secondary intention through creating a moist wound environment, preparing the wound bed for closure, reducing edema, and promoting formation and perfusion of granulation tissue. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy is indicated for use in all care settings and for a variety of wound types including diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate safety and clinical efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) compared with advanced moist wound therapy and standard treatment to treat foot ulcers in diabetic patients. This trial enrolled 43 patients; most of them were diabetic patients at any age with various skin ulcers and diabetic foot. These patients were divided into two groups, 17 patients were treated with vacuum and the 26 patients in the control group were treated with standard therapy including debridement. A greater proportion of foot and skin ulcers achieved complete ulcer closure with vacuum-assisted therapy p<0.001 compared with the standard therapy. Vacuum therapy significantly decreased the duration and frequency of admission p=0.032 and decreased the rate of amputation p<0.001. Results of our trial support other studies and demonstrate that vacuum is as safe as and more efficacious than standard therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. A significantly greater number of patients achieved complete ulcer closure and granulation tissue formation with this therapy. The study group showed a significant reduction in the median time needed to heal ulcers, reduction of the number of admissions and amputation frequency.

  11. Attitudes and behaviour of adult pakistani diabetic population towards their disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, A.; Mahmood, A.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the variations in attitudes and behaviour towards the disease process and interaction with the social environment of the diabetic persons due to long standing disease. Methods: This cross sectional study included four hundred participants of both gender, with confirmed type II diabetes for at least 5 years. A pre-validated questionnaire was used to evaluate the effects of the disease sufferings on the attitudes and behaviours towards social environment and disease. Frequency analysis was used to analyze the data using SPSS version 16.0. Results: 31.07% of diabetic population never noticed the change in their behaviour while 43.93% and 25% sometimes and always acknowledged the change in their behaviour, respectively. Less than one third consult their physicians regularly to manage their disease. 47.5% have no hope for their cure and 40% think that they have become a liability to their co-workers. Only 25.5% realize the importance of exercise in disease management. 27.5% of people undergo depression due to diabetes. More than half of the participants had to change their lifestyles after being diagnosed for diabetes. Significantly, less people (5%) believe that their disease has affected their married life. Conclusion: Sufferings of the diabetic individuals alter their behaviour towards their social environment along with their attitude. The study provides a substantial preliminary data to evaluate the effects of disease process on one's personality which may help to manage the disease more effectively. (author)

  12. Celiac Disease Autoimmunity in Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes and Thyroid Disease among Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available The prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA amongst patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD in the Chinese population remains unknown. This study examined the rate of celiac disease autoimmunity amongst patients with T1D and AITD in the Chinese population. The study included 178 patients with type 1 diabetes and 119 with AITD where 36 had both T1D and AITD, classified as autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 variant (APS3v. The study also included 145 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D, 97 patients with non-autoimmune thyroid disease (NAITD, and 102 healthy controls. Serum islet autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies and TGA were measured by radioimmunoassay. TGA positivity was found in 22% of patients with either type 1 diabetes or AITD, much higher than that in patients with T2D (3.4%; p< 0.0001 or NAITD (3.1%; P < 0.0001 or healthy controls (1%; p<0.0001. The patients with APS3v having both T1D and AITD were 36% positive for TGA, significantly higher than patients with T1D alone (p = 0.040 or with AITD alone (p = 0.017. T1D and AITD were found to have a 20% and 30% frequency of overlap respectively at diagnosis. In conclusion, TGA positivity was high in the Chinese population having existing T1D and/or AITD, and even higher when both diseases were present. Routine TGA screening in patients with T1D or AITD will be important to early identify celiac disease autoimmunity for better clinical care of patients.

  13. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vani Gopal; T Mangaiyarkarasi; R Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes different types of health care-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and meningitis. We report here a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease. A middle-aged man with a known case of diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease presented with the complaints of blurred vision in the left eye and the patient was found to have cataract. Pati...

  14. Risk predictive modelling for diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; Masconi, Katya; Mbanya, Vivian Nchanchou; Lekoubou, Alain; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin Basile; Matsha, Tandi E

    2014-02-01

    Absolute risk models or clinical prediction models have been incorporated in guidelines, and are increasingly advocated as tools to assist risk stratification and guide prevention and treatments decisions relating to common health conditions such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus. We have reviewed the historical development and principles of prediction research, including their statistical underpinning, as well as implications for routine practice, with a focus on predictive modelling for CVD and diabetes. Predictive modelling for CVD risk, which has developed over the last five decades, has been largely influenced by the Framingham Heart Study investigators, while it is only ∼20 years ago that similar efforts were started in the field of diabetes. Identification of predictive factors is an important preliminary step which provides the knowledge base on potential predictors to be tested for inclusion during the statistical derivation of the final model. The derived models must then be tested both on the development sample (internal validation) and on other populations in different settings (external validation). Updating procedures (e.g. recalibration) should be used to improve the performance of models that fail the tests of external validation. Ultimately, the effect of introducing validated models in routine practice on the process and outcomes of care as well as its cost-effectiveness should be tested in impact studies before wide dissemination of models beyond the research context. Several predictions models have been developed for CVD or diabetes, but very few have been externally validated or tested in impact studies, and their comparative performance has yet to be fully assessed. A shift of focus from developing new CVD or diabetes prediction models to validating the existing ones will improve their adoption in routine practice.

  15. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  16. Cost-Utility Analysis of Extending Public Health Insurance Coverage to Include Diabetic Retinopathy Screening by Optometrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Katwyk, Sasha; Jin, Ya-Ping; Trope, Graham E; Buys, Yvonne; Masucci, Lisa; Wedge, Richard; Flanagan, John; Brent, Michael H; El-Defrawy, Sherif; Tu, Hong Anh; Thavorn, Kednapa

    2017-09-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness in Canada. Eye examinations play an important role in early detection. However, DR screening by optometrists is not always universally covered by public or private health insurance plans. This study assessed whether expanding public health coverage to include diabetic eye examinations for retinopathy by optometrists is cost-effective from the perspective of the health care system. We conducted a cost-utility analysis of extended coverage for diabetic eye examinations in Prince Edward Island to include examinations by optometrists, not currently publicly covered. We used a Markov chain to simulate disease burden based on eye examination rates and DR progression over a 30-year time horizon. Results were presented as an incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. A series of one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists was associated with higher costs ($9,908,543.32) and improved QALYs (156,862.44), over 30 years, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $1668.43/QALY gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential determinants of the results were the cost of optometric screening and selected utility scores. At the commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY, the probability that the new policy was cost-effective was 99.99%. Extending public health coverage to eye examinations by optometrists is cost-effective based on a commonly used threshold of $50,000/QALY. Findings from this study can inform the decision to expand public-insured optometric services for patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection. At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

  18. Can diabetes be treated as an indirectly work-related disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Marcinkiewicz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article the authors attempted to analyze the arguments for considering diabetes as a work-related disease. An overview of literature has been done out of articles published in the years 1980–2016, with the use of combination of key words referring to employment, workplace, and diabetes. The PubMed database was the source of data. The authors indicate that the following arguments are in favor of diabetes being recognized as a work-related disease: diabetes is not an occupational disease, it is not directly related to the work environment or the way the work is performed, but there are observed adverse effects of occupational work-related nuisances, such as night shift work, long work hours, job strain or workplace standing time, which influence its development and course. The number of publications on diabetes, including the problem of occupational work is comparable to the number of analogous publications concerning work-related diseases such as hypertension or ischemic heart disease. Moreover, some aspects of professional activity and diabetes were also included in clinical recommendations for the workplace, which is uncommon in the case of other diseases, even those generally recognized as work-related. Data from medical references, indicating the effectiveness of workplace interventions aimed at preventing diabetes development and/or worsening of its course should be considered as an argument for the inclusion of diabetes into the group of work-related diseases. This should also support the need for further research and practical actions aimed at preventing diabetes at the workplace. Med Pr 2017;68(5:667–675

  19. Periodontal disease and type I diabetes mellitus: Associations with glycemic control and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajita Meenawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate periodontal health status in patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and to establish a correlation between metabolic control and periodontal health status. Materials and Methods: Periodontal health parameters namely plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depth (PPD and clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded in 28 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and 20 healthy controls. Diabetes history was recorded based on the information provided by the physician and it included date of diagnosis, duration, age of diagnosis, latest values of glycosylated haemoglobin and existing diabetic complications. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease and the appearance of complications. Results: The periodontal health in the diabetic group was compromised and they had greater bleeding index (P < 0.001, probing pocket depth (P < 0.001 and clinical attachment level (P = 0.001. Patients diagnosed for diabetes for shorter duration of time (4-7 years showed bleeding index-disease severity correlation to be 1.760 ΁ 0.434. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and periodontal inflammation is greatly increased in subjects with longer disease course, poor metabolic control and diabetic complications.

  20. Defining the research agenda to reduce the joint burden of disease from diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harries, Anthony D; Murray, Megan B; Jeon, Christie Y

    2010-01-01

    diseases, to address research gaps and to develop a research agenda. Ten key research questions were identified, of which 4 were selected as high priority: (i) whether, when and how to screen for TB in patients with diabetes mellitus and vice versa; (ii) the impact of diabetes mellitus and non......The steadily growing epidemic of diabetes mellitus poses a threat for global tuberculosis (TB) control. Previous studies have identified an important association between diabetes mellitus and TB. However, these studies have limitations: very few were carried out in low-income countries, with none...... and monitoring tests, including measurements of blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) for patients with diabetes mellitus. Implementation of this research agenda will benefit the control of both diseases....

  1. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alsahli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  2. Kidney Disease and Diabetes - What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Kidney Disease and Diabetes: What You Need to Know ... page please turn Javascript on. March is National Kidney Month , a good time to check if you ...

  3. Clinico-pathological features of kidney disease in diabetic cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, Kengo; Shimizu, Miho; Okada, Hirokazu; Narita, Ichiei; Wada, Takashi

    2018-03-21

    Diabetic kidney disease is the major cause of end-stage kidney disease in developed countries. However, the onset of kidney disorder and the progression pattern of kidney dysfunction and proteinuria greatly vary cases by cases. Therefore, risk classification with clinical data and pathological findings is important. Recent clinico-pathological study with kidney biopsy samples from diabetic patients revealed that pathological changes of diabetic nephropathy are characteristic and have special impacts on prognosis in each clinical stage. Moreover, comparison of the clinico-pathological findings of diabetic nephropathy with hypertensive nephrosclerosis revealed that there are few differences in their pathological findings in cases with low albuminuria and preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Because it is so difficult to clearly distinguish pure kidney lesions caused by diabetes and kidney lesions due to effects other than diabetes, it is vital that these overlapped pathological findings be confirmed on kidney biopsy in cases of early stage diabetes. Further research is warranted regarding the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy and indication of kidney biopsy in diabetic cases.

  4. Periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haseeb, M.; Khawaja, K.I.; Ataullah, K.; Munir, M.B.; Fatima, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the periodontal status in well controlled and poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients compared with normal healthy individuals. Methodology: Forty well controlled and forty poorly controlled type 2 diabetic subjects having good oral hygiene (scored according to simplified oral hygiene index) were compared with a control group of forty normal healthy individuals. Probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), and attachment loss (AL) were recorded to obtain the periodontal status of each tooth, using a Michigan probe '0' with Williams marking. Glycemic control was evaluated by glycated Hb value. Using ANOVA and independent sample t-test, mean probing depth and attachment loss in each tooth type (incisors, canines, premolars and molars) were compared. Results: Mean age of diabetic subjects was 58.86 +- 6.21 years and that of control group was 56.92 +- 6.91 years; 60% were females. Probing depth was greater in patients with poorly controlled diabetes compared to well controlled diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls (4.21 mm vs. 3.72 mm and 2.93 mm respectively, p 0.05). Number of sites and mean percentage of sites with attachment loss of greater or equal to 4 and greater or equal to 6 mm was also significantly higher in poorly controlled diabetes compared to the control group (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusion: Periodontal status as estimated by probing depth and degree of attachment loss deteriorates significantly with poor glycemic control in diabetes. (author)

  5. Relationship Between Diabetes Mellitus And Thyroid Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent findings have evidenced the intricate bond between subclinical hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus that contributes to major complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy. Insulin resistance has also been shown to play an indispensable role in connecting type 2 diabetes mellitus and thyroid dysfunction.

  6. Effect of Sex Hormones on Progression of Diabetic Renal Disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Sex Hormones on Progression of Diabetic Renal Disease in Experimental Model of Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats. ... into five groups 8 rats each, normal control, diabetic, gonadectomized diabetic, 17 beta estradiol is given to female and testosterone propionate to male diabetic and gonadectomized diabetic.

  7. Global metabolomic analysis of human saliva and plasma from healthy and diabetic subjects, with and without periodontal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia M Barnes

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that periodontal disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are bi-directionally associated. Identification of a molecular signature for periodontitis using unbiased metabolic profiling could allow identification of biomarkers to assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of both diabetes and periodontal disease. This cross-sectional study identified plasma and salivary metabolic products associated with periodontitis and/or diabetes in order to discover biomarkers that may differentiate or demonstrate an interaction of these diseases. Saliva and plasma samples were analyzed from 161 diabetic and non-diabetic human subjects with a healthy periodontium, gingivitis and periodontitis. Metabolite profiling was performed using Metabolon's platform technology. A total of 772 metabolites were found in plasma and 475 in saliva. Diabetics had significantly higher levels of glucose and α-hydroxybutyrate, the established markers of diabetes, for all periodontal groups of subjects. Comparison of healthy, gingivitis and periodontitis saliva samples within the non-diabetic group confirmed findings from previous studies that included increased levels of markers of cellular energetic stress, increased purine degradation and glutathione metabolism through increased levels of oxidized glutathione and cysteine-glutathione disulfide, markers of oxidative stress, including increased purine degradation metabolites (e.g. guanosine and inosine, increased amino acid levels suggesting protein degradation, and increased ω-3 (docosapentaenoate and ω-6 fatty acid (linoleate and arachidonate signatures. Differences in saliva between diabetic and non-diabetic cohorts showed altered signatures of carbohydrate, lipid and oxidative stress exist in the diabetic samples. Global untargeted metabolic profiling of human saliva in diabetics replicated the metabolite signature of periodontal disease progression in non-diabetic patients and revealed unique metabolic

  8. What part of the total care consumed by type 2 diabetes patients is directly related to diabetes? Implications for disease management programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel van Dijk

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disease management programs (DMP aim at improving coordination and quality of care and reducing healthcare costs for specific chronic diseases. This paper investigates to what extent total healthcare utilization of type 2 diabetes patients is actually related to diabetes and its implications for diabetes management programs.Research design and methods: Healthcare utilization for diabetes patients was analyzed using 2008 self-reported data (N=316 and data from electronic medical records (EMR (N=9023, and divided whether or not care was described in the Dutch type 2 diabetes multidisciplinary healthcare standard.Results: On average 4.3 different disciplines of healthcare providers were involved in the care for diabetes patients. 96% contacted a GP-practice and 63% an ophthalmologist, 24% an internist, 32% a physiotherapist and 23% a dietician. Diabetes patients had on average 9.3 contacts with GP-practice of which 53% were included in the healthcare standard. Only a limited part of total healthcare utilization of diabetes patients was included in the healthcare standard and therefore theoretically included in DMPs.Conclusion: Organizing the care for diabetics in a DMP might harm the coordination and quality of all healthcare for diabetics. DMPs should be integrated in the overall organization of care.

  9. Nondiabetic renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikram Mami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the major complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The diagnosis of DN is mostly clinical. Kidney biopsy is indicated only if nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD is suspected. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of NDRD and to determine predictor and prognostic factors of DN, NDRD. It was a retrospective analytic study including T2DM patients in whom renal biopsies were performed at our department from 1988 to 2014. Seventy-five patients were included. Mean age was 52.7 years with sex ratio at 1.56. Renal biopsy findings were isolated NDRD in 33 cases, NDRD superimposed on DN in 24 cases, and isolated DN in 18 cases. Most common NDRD found were focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (21% and membranous nephropathy (19%. Multivariate analysis showed that the absence of ischemic heart disease [odds ratio (OR = 0.178, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.041–0.762], absence of peripheral vascular disease (OR = 0.173, 95% CI = 0.045–0.669, and presence of hematuria (OR = 7.200, 95%CI = 0.886–58.531 were independent predictors of NDRD. 24 patients reached end-stage renal disease 55% in DN group, 16% in DN associated to NDRD group, and 30% in NDRD group. The prevalence of NDRD found in our study confirmed usefulness of renal biopsy in patients with T2DM, especially in those without degenerative complications, hypertension, and insulin therapy.

  10. Design of Knowledge Management System for Diabetic Complication Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiarni, Cut

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how to develop a Model for Knowledge Management System (KMS) for diabetes complication diseases. People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing a series of serious health problems. Each patient has different condition that could lead to different disease and health problem. But, with the right information, patient could have early detection so the health risk could be minimized and avoided. Hence, the objective of this research is to propose a conceptual framework that integrates social network model, Knowledge Management activities, and content based reasoning (CBR) for designing such a diabetes health and complication disease KMS. The framework indicates that the critical knowledge management activities are in the process to find similar case and the index table for algorithm to fit the framework for the social media. With this framework, KMS developers can work with healthcare provider to easily identify the suitable IT associated with the CBR process when developing a diabetes KMS.

  11. Congenital Heart Diseases in the Newborns of Diabetic Mothers: an Echocardiographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rahimpour

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the discovery of insulin and current improvement in diabetics care, congenital malformations in diabetics are still more frequent than in the general population. The aim of this study was to identify congenital heart dieases (CHD in the newborns of diabetic mothers (IDMS. Methods: In our prospective study, color doppler echocardiography was performed in 75 consecutive full- term newborns of diabetic mothers by GE Vivid3 echocardiographic device. Newborns were classified into two subgroups according to the type of the mothers’ diabetes: pre-gestational and gestational. They were also those were classified into three subgroups according to their birth weight: appropriate, large and small for gestational age. Data analysis was made by Fisher exact test and Chi-Square test. Results: Forty nine (65% and thirty six (35% of subjects were infants of gestational (IGDM and pre-gestational diabetic mothers (IPDM, respectively. Fifty five Newborns (73% were apropriate, fourteen (19% were large and six (8% were small for gestational age. The most common echocardiographic findings included: patent ductus arteriosus (PDA: 54.7%, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP: 24%, ventricular septal defect (VSD: 4%, atrial septal defect (ASD: 2.7%, transposition of great arteries (TGA: 1.3% and coarctation of the Aorta (COA: 1.3%. Overall incidence of congenital heart diseases was 9.3 after exclusion of PDA and HCMP cases. The incidence of congenital heart diseases was higher in macrosomic than nonmacrosomic infants of diabetic mothers (P<0.001. Congenital heart diseases were more common in infants of pre-gestational than gestational diabetic mothers (P=0.004. Conclusion: Our results showed that diabetic mothers are at increased risk of giving birth to a newborn with congenital heart disease, and transthoracic echocardiography is recommended for all infants of diabetic mothers.

  12. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  13. Metformin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Lipska, Kasia J.; Mayo, Helen; Bailey, Clifford J.; McGuire, Darren K.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Metformin is widely viewed as the best initial pharmacological option to lower glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the drug is contraindicated in many individuals with impaired kidney function because of concerns of lactic acidosis. OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of lactic acidosis associated with metformin use in individuals with impaired kidney function. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION In July 2014, we searched the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases for English-language articles pertaining to metformin, kidney disease, and lactic acidosis in humans between 1950 and June 2014. We excluded reviews, letters, editorials, case reports, small case series, and manuscripts that did not directly pertain to the topic area or that met other exclusion criteria. Of an original 818 articles, 65 were included in this review, including pharmacokinetic/metabolic studies, large case series, retrospective studies, meta-analyses, and a clinical trial. RESULTS Although metformin is renally cleared, drug levels generally remain within the therapeutic range and lactate concentrations are not substantially increased when used in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rates, 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m2). The overall incidence of lactic acidosis in metformin users varies across studies from approximately 3 per 100 000 person-years to 10 per 100 000 person-years and is generally indistinguishable from the background rate in the overall population with diabetes. Data suggesting an increased risk of lactic acidosis in metformin-treated patients with chronic kidney disease are limited, and no randomized controlled trials have been conducted to test the safety of metformin in patients with significantly impaired kidney function. Population-based studies demonstrate that metformin may be prescribed counter to prevailing guidelines suggesting a renal risk in up to 1 in 4 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

  14. Non-diabetic renal disease in patients with type 2 diabetes: a single centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jian-Zhen; Wang, Rong

    2018-04-01

    Non-diabetic renal disease (NDRD) has been widely known in diabetic patients. The clinical differentiation between diabetic nephropathy (DN) and NDRD is still not so clear and effective. To analyse the pathological characteristics and distribution of renal injury in selected type 2 diabetic patients. Comparison between DN and NDRD in clinical characteristics, to find important predictors for NDRD. To conduct retrospective analysis of clinical, laboratory and pathohistological data of type 2 diabetic patients in whom renal biopsies were performed from March 2010 to September 2014 in Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University (n = 88). According to the findings of renal biopsy, the incidences of DN, NDRD and DN complicated with NDRD were 20.46, 72.73 and 6.82% respectively. The most common NDRD found were: membranous nephropathy, followed by IgA nephropathy and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In multivariate logistic-analysis, fasting blood glucose (odds ratio (OR) 0.714; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.543-0.939; P = 0.016) and absence of diabetic retinopathy (OR 18.602; 95% CI = 2.176-159.018; P = 0.003) were independent predictors of NDRD. This study confirmed a considerably high prevalence of NDRD in type 2 diabetic patients with renal injury. As some cases of NDRD are readily treatable or remittable, we should consider renal biopsy in selected diabetic patients with renal involvement, especially in those with effective blood glucose control and the absence of diabetic retinopathy. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  15. 78 FR 50428 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK Ancillary R01 Studies on Liver... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Diabetic Ketoacidosis. Date: September...

  16. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Katie L.; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D. PMID:22947656

  17. Biomarker for early renal microvascular and diabetic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrakul, Narisa; Futrakul, Prasit

    2017-11-01

    Recognition of early stage of diabetic kidney disease, under common practice using biomarkers, namely microalbuminuria, serum creatinine level above 1 mg/dL and accepted definition of diabetic kidney disease associated with creatinine clearance value below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , is unlikely. This would lead to delay treatment associated with therapeutic resistance to vasodilator due to a defective vascular homoeostasis. Other alternative biomarkers related to the state of microalbuminuria is not sensitive to screen for early diabetic kidney disease (stages I, II). In this regard, a better diagnostic markers to serve for this purpose are creatinine clearance, fractional excretion of magnesium (FE Mg), cystatin C. Recently, renal microvascular disease and renal ischemia have been demonstrated to correlate indirectly with the development of diabetic kidney disease and its function. Among these are angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, namely VEGF, VEGF receptors, angiopoietins and endostatin. With respect to therapeutic prevention, implementation of treatment at early stage of diabetic and nondiabetic kidney disease is able to restore renal perfusion and function.

  18. Current Concepts in Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Liver Disease: Clinical Outcomes, Hepatitis C Virus Association, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Compeán, Diego; González-González, José Alberto; Lavalle-González, Fernando Javier; González-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor J

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for chronic liver disease, and ~30 % of patients with liver cirrhosis develop diabetes. Diabetes mellitus has been associated with cirrhotic and non-cirrhotic hepatitis C virus liver infection, can aggravate the course the liver infection, and can induce a lower sustained response to antiviral treatment. Evidences that HCV may induce metabolic and autoimmune disturbances leading to hypobetalipoproteinemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, thyroid disease, and gonadal dysfunction have been found. Prospective studies have demonstrated that diabetes increases the risk of liver complications and death in patients with cirrhosis. However, treatment of diabetes in these patients is complex, as antidiabetic drugs can promote hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis. There have been few therapeutic studies evaluating antidiabetic treatments in patients with liver cirrhosis published to date; thus, the optimal treatment for diabetes and the impact of treatment on morbidity and mortality are not clearly known. As numbers of patients with chronic liver disease and diabetes mellitus are increasing, largely because of the global epidemics of obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, evaluation of treatment options is becoming more important. This review discusses new concepts on hepatogenous diabetes, the diabetes mellitus–hepatitis C virus association, and clinical implications of diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, the effectiveness and safety of old and new antidiabetic drugs, including incretin-based therapies, will be described.

  19. A Bayesian approach to assess heart disease mortality among persons with diabetes in the presence of missing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Betsy L; Boyle, James P; Tierney, Edward F; Thompson, Theodore J

    2007-09-01

    Some states' death certificate form includes a diabetes yes/no check box that enables policy makers to investigate the change in heart disease mortality rates by diabetes status. Because the check boxes are sometimes unmarked, a method accounting for missing data is needed when estimating heart disease mortality rates by diabetes status. Using North Dakota's data (1992-2003), we generate the posterior distribution of diabetes status to estimate diabetes status among those with heart disease and an unmarked check box using Monte Carlo methods. Combining this estimate with the number of death certificates with known diabetes status provides a numerator for heart disease mortality rates. Denominators for rates were estimated from the North Dakota Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Accounting for missing data, age-adjusted heart disease mortality rates (per 1,000) among women with diabetes were 8.6 during 1992-1998 and 6.7 during 1999-2003. Among men with diabetes, rates were 13.0 during 1992-1998 and 10.0 during 1999-2003. The Bayesian approach accounted for the uncertainty due to missing diabetes status as well as the uncertainty in estimating the populations with diabetes.

  20. Action on diabetic macular oedema: achieving optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R; Scanlon, P H; Evans, M; Ghanchi, F; Yang, Y; Silvestri, G; Freeman, M; Maisey, A; Napier, J

    2017-05-01

    This paper identifies best practice recommendations for managing diabetes and sight-threatening diabetic eye disease. The authors provide an update for ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals on key aspects of diabetes management, supported by a review of the pertinent literature, and recommend practice principles for optimal patient management in treating visual impairment due to diabetic eye disease. In people with diabetes, early optimal glycaemic control reduces the long-term risk of both microvascular and macrovascular complications. The authors propose more can and should be done to maximise metabolic control, promote appropriate behavioural modifications and encourage timely treatment intensification when indicated to ameliorate diabetes-related complications. All people with diabetes should be screened for sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy promptly and regularly. It is shown that attitudes towards treatment adherence in diabetic macular oedema appear to mirror patients' views and health behaviours towards the management of their own diabetes. Awareness of diabetic macular oedema remains low among people with diabetes, who need access to education early in their disease about how to manage their diabetes to delay progression and possibly avoid eye-related complications. Ophthalmologists and allied healthcare professionals play a vital role in multidisciplinary diabetes management and establishment of dedicated diabetic macular oedema clinics is proposed. A broader understanding of the role of the diabetes specialist nurse may strengthen the case for comprehensive integrated care in ophthalmic practice. The recommendations are based on round table presentations and discussions held in London, UK, September 2016.

  1. Risk factors for periodontal diseases among Yemeni type II diabetic patients. A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic periodontal diseases are one of diabetes mellitus complications. The present study aims to compare the periodontal status of type II diabetic patients to a control group and assess the role of risk factors in both groups. Materials and methods: A case-control study was conducted of 270 individuals (132 type II diabetics and 138 non-diabetics. Full mouth periodontal examination including plaque index, gingival bleeding, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss (CAL, tooth mobility, furcation involvement and the number of missing teeth. The case group was subdivided according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c status (poorly controlled HbA1c >8 and well controlled HbA1c≤8 Likewise, the duration of diabetes mellitus as short or long duration (DM≤10 or >10. The diabetic group was also subdivided according to smoking and Khat chewing habits. Result: The severity of periodontal disease among type II diabetic patients were significantly higher compared to the control group regarding the plaque index 2.6 (1.6-4.3, bleeding on probing 3.5 (2.3-13.0, gingival recession 2.0 (1.2-3.4, furcation involvement 4.0 (2.3-6.7, clinical attachment loss 5.7 (3.1-10.5, tooth mobility 2.0 (1.2-3.4, and number of missing teeth 4.4 (2.3-8.5. In addition, poorly controlled type II DM and long duration had higher CAL and number of missing teeth than well-controlled DM and short duration. No significant differences were found between smokers/nonsmokers and Khat chewers/non-chewers among the diabetic group. Conclusion: Type II diabetic patients have severe periodontal destruction and tooth loss compared to non-diabetic people and there were no differences within the diabetic group in regards to smoking and Khat chewing habits.

  2. Cadmium, diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, Joshua R.; Prozialeck, Walter C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between exposure to the environmental pollutant cadmium (Cd) and the incidence and severity of diabetes. In this review, we examine the literature suggesting a relationship between Cd exposure, elevated blood glucose levels, and the development of diabetes. In addition we review human and animal studies indicating that Cd potentiates or exacerbates diabetic nephropathy. We also review the various possible cellular mechanisms by which Cd may alter blood glucose levels. In addition, we present some novel findings from our own laboratories showing that Cd elevates fasting blood glucose levels in an animal model of subchronic Cd exposure before overt signs of renal dysfunction are evident. These studies also show that Cd reduces insulin levels and has direct cytotoxic effects on the pancreas. Together, these findings indicate that Cd may be a factor in the development of some types of diabetes and they raise the possibility that Cd and diabetes-related hyperglycemia may act synergistically to damage the kidney.

  3. Increased salivary oxidative stress parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes: Relation with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Carlos; Moreno-Fernández, Ana María; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; Morales-Portillo, Cristóbal; Serrano-Olmedo, Isabel; de la Cuesta Mayor, M Carmen; Martín Hernández, Tomás

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in salivary oxidative stress between patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) and healthy non-diabetic patients, and whether this oxidative stress is associated with the presence of periodontal disease in diabetic patients. This observational study included 70 patients divided into three groups according to metabolic control levels: 19 non-diabetic patients (control group); 24 patients with good metabolic control (HbA1c7%). The following oxidative stress parameters were measured in all subjects: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRd), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Periodontal health was determined by means of the community periodontal index (CPI) recommended by the WHO. The diabetic group with good metabolic control showed a significant increase in GPx and GRd activity in comparison with the control group (Pperiodontal health. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Arterial diseases of lower extremities in diabetic patients: current state and prospects of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery diseases (PAD are most serious diabetic complications responsible for the high risk of amputation of lower extremities. The occurrenceof PAD in diabetic patients is much higher than in subjects with undisturbed carbohydrate metabolism. PAD in diabetic patients is frequentlyan asymptomatic condition affecting distal portions of arterial segments and associated with pronounced mediacalcinosis. Standard diagnostic proceduresfor the screening of arterial lesions must be supplemented by non-invasive visualization and measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tensionin patients at risk of PAD and persisting foot ulcers. Of special importance is early diagnosis of critical limb ischemia and prevention of foot lesions.Combined treatment of diabetic foot syndrome in patients with critical limb ischemia includes normalization of foot circulation, surgical interventionand conservative therapy of the wound, monitoring concomitant micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications?

  5. Asymptomatic coronary artery disease in Type-2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.S.F.; Othman, S.; Meo, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To select a subgroup of type-2 diabetics with two additional pre specified risk factors to see that whether there is any benefit of screening such patients. Methodology: Five hundred twenty six patients were sent for treadmill stress test or thallium scan. Those who had abnormal results were advised coronary angiography. The angiographically proven CAD was correlated with various risk factors to find the relationship between the disease and variables. Results: Two hundred thirty five (48%) patients had abnormal results and among them 158 (67%)underwent coronary angiography. Among these 21% had evidence of CAD. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was performed in 35(33%) patients, catheter based intervention (PCI) in 44(40%) patients and 30(27%) patients were not suitable for intervention. Duration of diabetes, smoking, diabetic retinopathy, albuminuria, and peripheral vascular disease were significant predictor of asymptomatic CAD. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated strong relationship between risk factors and asymptomatic CAD in type 2 diabetics. (author)

  6. Diabetic nephropathy. Is end-stage renal disease inevitable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusky, R T

    1983-10-01

    The appearance of proteinuria in an insulin-dependent diabetic patient is an ominous sign. Proteinuria heralds the presence of diabetic nephropathy and early death, or chronic renal failure requiring dialysis or transplantation, in 50% of patients. The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is unknown. Adequate insulin administration is the most important preventive measure. Hypertension, if present, should be aggressively treated to delay progression of renal disease. Good nutrition, prompt treatment of urinary tract infections, and caution in the use of radiocontrast agents are other important preventive measures. Hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and transplantation are options for patients with end-stage renal disease. No matter which is selected, the patient may still have multiple amputations, blindness, congestive heart failure, infections, and uncontrolled glycemia. Advancements are being made, however, that promise a better future for insulin-dependent diabetics.

  7. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponťuch, Peter

    The number of type 2 diabetic patients is increasing world-wide and a prediction of prevalence of chronic kidney disease up to 2025 in European diabetic population is alarming. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate are cardinal biochemical parameters in diagnostics of diabetic nephropathy. Following diagnostic methods are also used: renal ultrasonography, ophthalmoscopy and in not clarified cases renal biopsy. Long-term optimal glycemic control, efficient antihypertensive treatment by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker and recommended protein intake is a cornerstone of therapy. The research is presently focused on new pathophysiological mechanisms, as analysis of genome, microRNA, kidney injury biomarkers and proteomes.Key words: chronic kidney disease - type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2012-02-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  9. Charcot-marie-tooth disease complicating type 2 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Win, Htet Htet Ne

    2011-07-01

    Although both conditions are relatively common, there are very few descriptions of type 2 diabetes mellitus coexisting with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). This case report and literature review describes a 53-year-old Irish man who presented with type 2 diabetes and significant neuropathy, and who was subsequently diagnosed with CMT type 1A. This case report will also discuss how to differentiate diabetic neuropathy from a progressive hereditary neuropathy and how coexistence aggravates the progression of neuropathy thus necessitating early diagnosis.

  10. Drug-induced Liver Disease in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna, Klyarytskaya; Helen, Maksymova; Elena, Stilidi

    2016-01-01

    The study presented here was accomplished to assess the course of drug-induced liver diseases in patient’s rheumatoid arthritis receiving long-term methotrexate therapy. Diabetes mellitus was revealed as the most significant risk factor. The combination of diabetes mellitus with other risk factors (female sex) resulted in increased hepatic fibrosis, degree of hepatic encephalopathy and reduction of hepatic functions. The effectiveness and safety of ursodeoxycholic acid and cytolytic type-with...

  11. Correlation of chronic kidney disease, diabetes and peripheral artery disease with cardiovascular events in patients using stress myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru; Moroi, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies generally suggest an excellent prognosis for cardiovascular events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes and peripheral artery disease (PAD) have been established as the risk factors for cardiovascular events. However, whether these risk factors significantly predict cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of these risk factors in patients with normal stress MPI. Patients with normal stress MPI (n=372, male=215 and female=157, age=69 years, CKD without hemodialysis=95, diabetes=99, PAD=19, previous coronary artery disease=116) were followed up for 14 months. Normal stress MPI was defined as a summed stress score of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiovascular events included cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 20 of 372 patients (5.4%). In univariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, insulin use, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, CKD, left ventricular ejection fraction and pharmacological stress tests were significant predictors of cardiovascular events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes and CKD were independent and significant predictors for cardiovascular events, and their number was the strongest predictor for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio=21.7, P<0.001). PAD, diabetes and CKD are coexisting, independent and significant risk factors for cardiovascular events, CKD being the strongest predictor. The number of coexisting risk factors is important in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI. (author)

  12. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho HY

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsiu-Yu Ho,1,2 Mei-Hui Chen,2,3 Meei-Fang Lou1 1School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 2Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University of Medical Technology, 3National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Sciences, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods: A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results: The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1 expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines; 2 comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals; 3 inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice; 4 impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress; and 5 weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support. Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion: This study found that the experience of older adults

  13. PGE2, Kidney Disease, and Cardiovascular Risk: Beyond Hypertension and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrallah, Rania; Hassouneh, Ramzi

    2016-01-01

    An important measure of cardiovascular health is obtained by evaluating the global cardiovascular risk, which comprises a number of factors, including hypertension and type 2 diabetes, the leading causes of illness and death in the world, as well as the metabolic syndrome. Altered immunity, inflammation, and oxidative stress underlie many of the changes associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, and recent efforts have begun to elucidate the contribution of PGE2 in these events. This review summarizes the role of PGE2 in kidney disease outcomes that accelerate cardiovascular disease, highlights the role of cyclooxygenase-2/microsomal PGE synthase 1/PGE2 signaling in hypertension and diabetes, and outlines the contribution of PGE2 to other aspects of the metabolic syndrome, particularly abdominal adiposity, dyslipidemia, and atherogenesis. A clearer understanding of the role of PGE2 could lead to new avenues to improve therapeutic options and disease management strategies. PMID:26319242

  14. Toward tailored disease management for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elissen, Arianne M J; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Spreeuwenberg, Cor; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2012-10-01

    To assess the differentiated effects of population-based disease management programs (DMPs) for type 2 diabetes on intermediary clinical outcomes in The Netherlands. Data covering a period from 20 to 24 months between January 2008 and December 2010 were collected from 18 Dutch care groups (primary care provider networks that have bundled payment contracts for delivery of diabetes DMPs). Meta-analysis and meta-regression methods were used to conduct differentiated analyses of these programs' effects over time on 4 clinical indicators: glycated hemoglobin, lowdensity lipoprotein, systolic blood pressure, and body mass index. Heterogeneous average results were stratified according to various patient and process characteristics to investigate whether differences in these features could explain variation in outcomes. Between 56% and 71% of patients (N = 105,056) had valid first- and second-year measurements of the study outcomes. Although average changes in these measures over time were small, stratified analyses demonstrated that clinically relevant improvements were achieved in patients with poor first-year health values. Interactions with age, disease duration, comorbidity, and smoking status were not consistent across outcomes; nonetheless, heterogeneity in results decreased considerably when simultaneously correcting for known patient characteristics. Positive effects tended to diminish with longer length of follow-up, while greater measurement frequency was associated with improved results, especially in patients with poor health. Our data suggest that tailored disease management, in which not only evidencebased guidelines but also patient characteristics directly determine care processes, including self-management support, has great potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of current chronic care delivery.

  15. [Increased risk of type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease after gestational diabetes mellitus: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Tara-Eileen J P; van Houten, Chantal B; Kasius, Annemieke; Kouznetsova, Ouliana I; Nguyen, Ly A; Rooijmans, Sanne V; Voormolen, Daphne N; van Vliet, Elvira O G; Franx, Arie; Koster, M P H Wendy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term risk of developing type II diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) for women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Two search strategies were used in PubMed and Embase to determine the long-term risks of developing T2D and CVD after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes mellitus. After critical appraisal of the papers found, 11 papers were included, involving a total of 328,423 patients. Absolute and relative risks (RRs) were calculated. Eight studies (n=276,829) reported on the long-term risk of T2D and 4 (n=141,048) on the long-term risk of CVD. Follow-up ranged from 3.5 to 11.5 years for T2D and from 1.2 to 74.0 years for CVD. Women with gestational diabetes had a risk of T2D varying between 9.5% and 37.0% and a risk of CVD of between 0.28% and 15.5%. Women with gestational diabetes were at increased risk of T2D (weighted RR: 13.2; 95% CI: 8.5-20.7) and CVD (weighted RR: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.7) compared to women without gestational diabetes. Women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus have a significantly increased risk of developing T2D and CVD. It is very important that gestational diabetes is recognised as a cardiovascular risk factor in daily practice. It would be desirable to screen this group of women for the presence of hyperglycaemia and other cardiovascular risk factors. Further research is required to be able to specify the long-term risk of T2D and CVD and to demonstrate whether such screening is cost-effective.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  17. Hospital-based prevalence of chronic kidney disease among the newly registered patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is proved to be a major public health issue worldwide and an important contributor to the overall non-communicable disease burden. It increases risk of mortality, end-stage renal disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD. Diabetes is the biggest contributor to CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. In Bangladesh, very few data on CKD is available. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients at BIRDEM (Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, a referral center for diabetes in Bangladesh. Methods: The study included all diabetic patients aged 18 - 80 years and were registered in the year 2012. Socio-demographic (age, sex, residence, income, literacy, clinical (obesity, blood pressure and biochemical (blood glucose, lipids, eGFR information were collected from the BIRDEM registry. CKD was defined according to the K/ DOQI guidelines. Results: A total of 1317 type 2 diabetic patients of age 18 to 80 years were studied. Of them, men and women were 54.7% and 45.3%, respectively. The overall prevalence of CKD (eGFR ≤60 (ml/min/m2 was 13.9%. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than men (21.3 v. 7.8%, p50y, higher sBP (≥140mmHg and taking oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA were significant. Conclusions: Thus, the study concludes that the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients is quite high in Bangladesh. The female diabetic patients with older age and with higher SBP bear the brunt of CKD. Considering high prevalence of CKD with severe lifelong complications it is of utmost importance for early detection and intervention at the primary health care (PHC level.

  18. Comorbidity between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Backer, Vibeke; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with several systemic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that comorbidity between COPD and type 2 diabetes is due to shared genetic factors. AIM: To examine...... the relationship between type 2 diabetes and chronic bronchitis and COPD in adult twins, and to examine to what extent comorbidity between these diseases is explained by shared genetic or environmental factors. METHODS: Questionnaire data on chronic bronchitis and hospital discharge data on diagnosed COPD in 13.......5 vs. 2.3%), OR = 1.57 (1.10-2.26), p = 0.014, and in individuals with diagnosed COPD than in those without the diagnosis (6.6 vs. 2.3%), OR = 2.62 (1.63-4.2), p chronic...

  19. Serum Cystatin C as an Early Diagnostic Biomarker of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Ayesha; Hayat, Asma; Ahmad, Tariq Mahmood; Khan, Alamgir; Hasnat, Mohammad Najam Ul; Tahir, Sufyan

    2018-04-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy and cut-off values of serum cystatin C as early diagnostic biomarker of diabetic kidney disease. Cross-sectional analytical study. Department of Pathology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Endocrinology Department, Military Hospital (MH), Rawalpindi from November 2015 to November 2016. One hundred and nineteen diagnosed patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the study from the outpatient Endocrinology Department of the MH Rawalpindi. Fifty disease-free controls were also included. Fasting blood samples of the patients and controls were analysed for creatinine by Jaffé's kinetic method and estimated GFR was calculated using MDRD-based equation for GFR. Serum cystatin C was estimated by quantitative turbidimetric method. Serum cystatin C was higher in the diabetic group (mean = 1.022 ±0.33 mg/dl) as compared to the control group (mean = 0.63 ±0.14 mg/dl). ROC curve analysis, keeping less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 GFR (CKD-MDRD based) as reference value of the stat variable/gold standard; revealed an area under the curve of 0.914 (95% CI 0.85-0.98) and at optimal sensitivity of 88.2% and specificity of 84.8% the established cut-off of serum cystatin C was 1.26 mg/L. Cystatin C is an accurate biomarker of diabetic kidney disease with good sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Analysis of risk factors in obese patients with coronary artery disease, with and without diabetes mellitus type two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Danjela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 2 is one of the leading chronic diseases in the world and in our country, which is an important risk factor for development of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Objective. The aim of this research was making the estimation of risk factors in the etiology of coronary heart disease in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. The study included 82 obese patients, of which 52 with diabetes mellitus and 30 without diabetes mellitus, in all of them coronary artery disease proven by coronary angiography. All were examined by clinical examination, laboratory tests and echocardiography. Based on the test results we found that the distribution of risk factors such as hypertension, family burden coronary artery disease, smoking, alcohol intake was the same in the obese patients with diabetes mellitus, and of those without diabetes mellitus. Echocardiography showed significantly larger left ventricle, lower ejection fraction, larger left atrium and significant mitral regurgitation. Also, in a group of patients with diabetes mellitus, there was significantly higher number of patients with multiple vessel coronary disease. Despite the small sample, we can conclude that the present of diabetes mellitus in obese patients is crucial for severe forms of coronary artery disease. Severity is expressed through significant structural and functional changes in the left ventricle and the number of diseased coronary arteries.

  1. 76 FR 36931 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-23

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Liver Disease and Transplantation... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Urinary Tract Dysfunction P01...

  2. 78 FR 3903 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Diseases Advisory Council, Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Subcommittee. Date: February 13, 2013... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Advisory Council. The meetings will be open to the public as...

  3. Biomarkers of Renal Disease and Progression in Patients with Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Hojs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes prevalence is increasing worldwide, mainly due to the increase in type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy occurs in up to 40% of people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It is important to identify patients at risk of diabetic nephropathy and those who will progress to end stage renal disease. In clinical practice, most commonly used markers of renal disease and progression are serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria or albuminuria. Unfortunately, they are all insensitive. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the prognostic value and benefits of targeting some novel risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy and its progression. It is focused mainly on tubular biomarkers (neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin, kidney injury molecule 1, liver-fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase, markers of inflammation (pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-α and tumour necrosis factor-α receptors, adhesion molecules, chemokines and markers of oxidative stress. Despite the promise of some of these new biomarkers, further large, multicenter prospective studies are still needed before they can be used in everyday clinical practice.

  4. Diabetic Kidney Disease: From Epidemiology to Clinical Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol Whee Park

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With worldwide epidemic of diabetes mellitus, diabetic nephropathy which is one of the major causes of microvascular complication has become a serious concern in Korea as well as the rest of the world. In view of its significance, there is an urgent and paramount need for proper managements that could either deter or slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Despite advances in care, ever increasing number of patients suffering from diabetic kidney disease and from end-stage renal disease implies that the current management is not adequate in many aspects. The reasons for these inadequacies compromise lack of early diagnosis, failure to intervene with timely and aggressive manner, and lack of understanding on the kind of interventions required. Another issue equally important for the adequate care of patients with diabetic nephropathy is an understanding of past, present and future epidemiology of diabetic nephropathy which serves, especially in Korea, as a material determining standard diagnosis and treatment and a national health-policy decision.

  5. The progress of research on myocardial perfusion imaging in diabetic coronary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qian; Li Juan

    2007-01-01

    The morbidity of diabetes mellitus is gradually increasing. It's most important complication is cardiovascular disease. The coronary disease is the main cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus. The stress myocardial perfusion imaging help diagnose diabetic coronary disease and prognosis judgement and risk assessment. So it can improve the living standard of patients with diabetes mellitus, and decrease the mortality of diabetes mellitus. (authors)

  6. IWGDF guidance on the diagnosis, prognosis and management of peripheral artery disease in patients with foot ulcers in diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinchliffe, R. J.; Brownrigg, J. R. W.; Apelqvist, J.; Boyko, E. J.; Fitridge, R.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Schaper, N. C.

    2016-01-01

    Recommendations Examine a patient with diabetes annually for the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD); this should include, at a minimum, taking a history and palpating foot pulses. (GRADE strength of recommendation: strong; quality of evidence: low) Evaluate a patient with diabetes and a

  7. The relationship between patients' knowledge of diabetes therapeutic goals and self-management behaviour, including adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheedi, Mohammad; Awad, Abdelmoneim; Hatoum, Hind T; Enlund, Hannes

    2017-02-01

    Background The Middle East region has one the highest prevalence rates of diabetes in the world. Little is known about the determinants of adherence and the role of knowledge in diabetes self-management within these populations. Objective To investigate the relationship between patients knowledge of diabetes therapeutic targets with adherence to self-care measures in a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes in Kuwait. Setting Primary care chronic care clinics within the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. Methods A cross sectional survey was carried out with 238 patients from six clinics. A multistage stratified clustered sampling method was used to first randomly select the clinics and the patients. Self-reported adherence to three behaviours: medication taking, diet and physical activity. Results Respondents were able to correctly report a mean (SD) of 1.6 (1.3) out of 5 of the pre-specified treatment targets. Optimal adherence to physical activity, diet and medications was reported in 25, 33 and 47 % of the study cohort, respectively. A structural equation model analysis showed better knowledge of therapeutic goals and own current levels translated into better adherence to medications, diet and physical activity. Conclusion Knowledge of therapeutic goals and own recent levels is associated with adherence to medications, diet, or physical activity in this Kuwaiti cohort of patients with diabetes. Low adherence to self-care management and poor overall knowledge of diabetes is a big challenge to successful diabetes care in Kuwait.

  8. Exploring the experiences of older Chinese adults with comorbidities including diabetes: surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Mei-Hui

    2018-01-01

    Background Many people with diabetes have comorbidities, even multimorbidities, which have a far-reaching impact on the older adults, their family, and society. However, little is known of the experience of older adults living with comorbidities that include diabetes. Aim The aim of this study was to explore the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes. Methods A qualitative approach was employed. Data were collected from a selected field of 12 patients with diabetes mellitus in a medical center in northern Taiwan. The data were analyzed by Colaizzi’s phenomenological methodology, and four criteria of Lincoln and Guba were used to evaluate the rigor of the study. Results The following 5 themes and 14 subthemes were derived: 1) expecting to heal or reduce the symptoms of the disease (trying to alleviate the distress of symptoms and trusting in health practitioners combining the use of Chinese and Western medicines); 2) comparing complex medical treatments (differences in physician practices and presentation, conditionally adhering to medical treatment, and partnering with medical professionals); 3) inconsistent information (inconsistent health information and inconsistent medical advice); 4) impacting on daily life (activities are limited and hobbies cannot be maintained and psychological distress); and 5) weighing the pros and cons (taking the initiative to deal with issues, limiting activity, adjusting mental outlook and pace of life, developing strategies for individual health regimens, and seeking support). Surmounting these challenges in order to live a normal life was explored. Conclusion This study found that the experience of older adults living with comorbidities including diabetes was similar to that of a single disease, but the extent was greater than a single disease. The biggest difference is that the elderly think that their most serious problem is not diabetes, but rather, the comorbidities causing life limitations

  9. Risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Catherine A; Denny, Clark H; Greenlund, Kurt J; Benjamin, Stephanie M; Strine, Tara W; Balluz, Lina S; Mokdad, Ali H

    2005-01-01

    To determine whether disabled diabetic persons have a higher prevalence of risk factors for heart disease and stroke than do diabetic persons without disability. RESEARCH, DESIGN, AND METHODS: Data were analyzed for noninstitutionalized adults in 27 states and the District of Columbia that participated in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 2001 and/or 2003. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the adjusted prevalence and odds ratios of disabled diabetic persons, by sociodemographic characteristics. The logit form of each model was used to estimate conditional marginal probabilities of risk factors for heart disease and stroke among diabetic persons, by disability status. Diabetic persons with disability were more likely than those without disability to have more risk factors for heart disease and stroke, including insufficient leisure-time physical activity or inactivity (adjusted prevalence: 75.2% vs. 63.3%; Pvs. 43.3%; Pvs. 48.4%; P=.038), and hypertension (63.9% vs. 56.6%; Ptwo or more, three or more, and four or more risk factors (97.2% vs. 95.6%, 83.5% vs. 74.0%, 56.5% vs. 41.1%, and 22.2% vs. 13.6%, respectively; Pstroke. Health care guidelines specifically targeting diabetic patients with disability may be needed to aid health care providers in addressing these risk factors.

  10. YKL-40 - an emerging biomarker in cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathcke Camilla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several inflammatory cytokines are involved in vascular inflammation resulting in endothelial dysfunction which is the earliest event in the atherosclerotic process leading to manifest cardiovascular disease. YKL-40 is an inflammatory glycoprotein involved in endothelial dysfunction by promoting chemotaxis, cell attachment and migration, reorganization and tissue remodelling as a response to endothelial damage. YKL-40 protein expression is seen in macrophages and smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaques with the highest expression seen in macrophages in the early lesion of atherosclerosis. Several studies demonstrate, that elevated serum YKL-levels are independently associated with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease and even higher YKL-40 levels are documented in patients with myocardial infarction. Moreover, elevated serum YKL-40 levels have also been found to be associated with all-cause as well as cardiovascular mortality. Finally, YKL-40 levels are elevated both in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, known to be at high risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, when compared to non-diabetic persons. A positive association between elevated circulating YKL-40 levels and increasing levels of albuminuria have been described in patients with type 1 diabetes indicating a role of YKL-40 in the progressing vascular damage resulting in microvascular disease. This review describes the present knowledge about YKL-40 and discusses its relation to endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and diabetes and look ahead on future perspectives of YKL-40 research.

  11. The nutritional geometry of liver disease including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Stephen J; Raubenheimer, David; Cogger, Victoria C; Macia, Laurence; Solon-Biet, Samantha M; Le Couteur, David G; George, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    Nutrition has a profound effect on chronic liver disease, especially non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Most observational studies and clinical trials have focussed on the effects of total energy intake, or the intake of individual macronutrients and certain micronutrients, such as vitamin D, on liver disease. Although these studies have shown the importance of nutrition on hepatic outcomes, there is not yet any unifying framework for understanding the relationship between diet and liver disease. The Geometric Framework for Nutrition (GFN) is an innovative model for designing nutritional experiments or interpreting nutritional data that can determine the effects of nutrients and their interactions on animal behaviour and phenotypes. Recently the GFN has provided insights into the relationship between dietary energy and macronutrients on obesity and ageing in mammals including humans. Mouse studies using the GFN have disentangled the effects of macronutrients on fatty liver and the gut microbiome. The GFN is likely to play a significant role in disentangling the effects of nutrients on liver disease, especially NAFLD, in humans. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetes mellitus, fasting blood glucose concentration, and risk of vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarwar, N; Gao, P; Seshasai, S R Kondapally

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainties persist about the magnitude of associations of diabetes mellitus and fasting glucose concentration with risk of coronary heart disease and major stroke subtypes. We aimed to quantify these associations for a wide range of circumstances. METHODS: We undertook a meta-analysis...... of individual records of diabetes, fasting blood glucose concentration, and other risk factors in people without initial vascular disease from studies in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. We combined within-study regressions that were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, systolic blood pressure, and body......-mass index to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for vascular disease. FINDINGS: Analyses included data for 698 782 people (52 765 non-fatal or fatal vascular outcomes; 8.49 million person-years at risk) from 102 prospective studies. Adjusted HRs with diabetes were: 2.00 (95% CI 1.83-2.19) for coronary heart...

  13. Diabetes, sleep apnea, obesity and cardiovascular disease: Why not address them together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surani, Salim R

    2014-06-15

    Obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are some of the most common diseases encountered by the worldwide population, with high social and economic burdens. Significant emphasis has been placed on obtaining blood pressure, body mass index, and placing importance on screening for signs and symptoms pointing towards cardiovascular disease. Symptoms related to sleep, or screening for sleep apnea has been overlooked by cardiac, diabetic, pulmonary and general medicine clinics despite recommendations for screening by several societies. In recent years, there is mounting data where obesity and obstructive sleep apnea sit at the epicenter and its control can lead to improvement and prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular complications. This editorial raises questions as to why obstructive sleep apnea screening should be included as yet another vital sign during patient initial inpatient or outpatient visit.

  14. Perceptions of risk of coronary heart disease among people living with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammouri, Ali Ahmad; Abu Raddaha, Ahmad H; Natarajan, Jansi; D'Souza, Melba Sheila

    2018-02-01

    Our aim is to assess perception of risk of developing coronary heart disease and to examine its associations with individuals' characteristics and health behaviours among Omani people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Evaluating perceptions of being at risk of developing a disease may give insight into health promotion behaviours. People with diabetes are at high risk of coronary heart disease. The management of diabetes mellitus should include prevention and control of coronary heart disease. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted. A convenience sample of 160 adults with T2DM was invited to participate in this study between November 2014 and March 2015. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed to examine associations between study variables. Perception of risk of developing coronary heart disease was significantly associated with low educational level (β = 0.191, P diabetes mellitus (β = 0.200, P healthy diet more frequently. Teaching people with T2DM about the risk of developing coronary heart disease is essential as it could motivate them to perform health promotion behaviours, which may assist in controlling and reducing coronary heart disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. The Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease in the Diabetic (Compared to the Non-Diabetic) Population: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narres, Maria; Claessen, Heiner; Droste, Sigrid; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Koch, Michael; Kuss, Oliver; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) in diabetes is a life threatening complication resulting in a poor prognosis for patients as well as high medical costs. The aims of this systematic review were (1) to evaluate the incidence of ESRD due to all causes and due to diabetic nephropathy in the diabetic population and differences between incidences of ESRD with respect to sex, ethnicity, age and regions, (2) to compare incidence rates in the diabetic and non-diabetic population, and (3) to investigate time trends. The systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA group guidelines by performing systematic literature searches in the biomedical databases until January 3rd 2015; thirty-two studies were included. Among patients with incident type 1 diabetes the 30-year cumulative incidence ranged from 3.3% to 7.8%. Among patients with prevalent diabetes, incidence rates of ESRD due to all causes ranged from 132.0 to 167.0 per 100,000 person-years, whereas incidence rates of ESRD due to diabetic nephropathy varied from 38.4 to 804.0 per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of ESRD in the diabetic population was higher compared to the non-diabetic population, and relative risks varied from 6.2 in the white population to 62.0 among Native Americans. The results regarding time trends were inconsistent. The review conducted demonstrates the considerable variation of incidences of ESRD among the diabetic population. Consistent findings included an excess risk when comparing the diabetic to the non-diabetic population and ethnic differences. We recommend that newly designed studies should use standardized methods for the determination of ESRD and population at risk. PMID:26812415

  16. Burden of cardiovascular risk factors and disease among patients with type 1 diabetes: results of the Australian National Diabetes Audit (ANDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Anthony; Earnest, Arul; Ranasinha, Sanjeeva; Nanayakkara, Natalie; Liew, Danny; Wischer, Natalie; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Zoungas, Sophia

    2018-06-02

    Cardiovascular risk stratification is complex in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesised that traditional and diabetes-specific cardiovascular risk factors were prevalent and strongly associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) among adults with type 1 diabetes attending Australian diabetes centres. De-identified, prospectively collected data from patients with type 1 diabetes aged ≥ 18 years in the 2015 Australian National Diabetes Audit were analysed. The burden of cardiovascular risk factors [age, sex, diabetes duration, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure, lipid profile, body mass index, smoking status, retinopathy, renal function and albuminuria] and associations with CVD inclusive of stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft surgery/angioplasty and peripheral vascular disease were assessed. Restricted cubic splines assessed for non-linearity of diabetes duration and likelihood ratio test assessed for interactions between age, diabetes duration, centre type and cardiovascular outcomes of interest. Discriminatory ability of multivariable models were assessed with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Data from 1169 patients were analysed. Mean (± SD) age and median diabetes duration was 40.0 (± 16.7) and 16.0 (8.0-27.0) years respectively. Cardiovascular risk factors were prevalent including hypertension (21.9%), dyslipidaemia (89.4%), overweight/obesity (56.4%), ever smoking (38.5%), albuminuria (31.1%), estimated glomerular filtration rate  7.0% (53 mmol/mol) (81.0%). Older age, longer diabetes duration, smoking and antihypertensive therapy use were positively associated with CVD, while high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure were negatively associated (p < 0.05). Association with CVD and diabetes duration remained constant until 20 years when a linear increase was noted. Longer diabetes duration also had the highest population attributable risk of 6.5% (95% CI 1

  17. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolkit No. 1 All About Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease What does prediabetes have to do with type 2 diabetes and heart disease? When you have prediabetes, your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than ...

  18. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Nancy S. Elbarbary. Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. Background. Diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM) is a complex disease resulting from the interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors.1 Worldwide,. T1DM epidemic represents an increasing global.

  19. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease : A Bermuda Triangle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the complex relationship between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus (DM), and periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). It was observed that a substantial number of suspected new DM patients could be

  20. Diabetes mellitus and inflammatory pulpal and periapical disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, S M F; Grisi, D C; Kogawa, E M; Franco, O L; Peixoto, V C; Gonçalves-Júnior, J F; Arruda, M P; Rezende, T M B

    2013-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common metabolic disorders. DM is characterized by hyperglycaemia, resulting in wound healing difficulties and systemic and oral manifestations, which have a direct effect on dental pulp integrity. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated a higher prevalence of periapical lesions in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. The influence of DM on periapical bone resorption and its impact on dental intervention of such patients are reviewed, and its aetiology and pathogenesis are analysed at molecular level. Pulps from patients with diabetes have the tendency to present limited dental collateral circulation, impaired immune response, increased risk of acquiring pulp infection (especially anaerobic ones) or necrosis, besides toothache and occasional tendency towards pulp necrosis caused by ischaemia. In regard to molecular pathology, hyperglycaemia is a stimulus for bone resorption, inhibiting osteoblastic differentiation and reducing bone recovery. The relationship between poorly controlled diabetes and bone metabolism is not clearly understood. Molecular knowledge about pulp alterations in patients with diabetes could offer new therapeutic directions. Knowledge about how diabetes affects systemic and oral health has an enduring importance, because it may imply not only systemic complications but also a higher risk of oral diseases with a significant effect on pulp and periapical tissue. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Benefits of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise on albuminuria in diabetic and non-diabetic Japanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Kabasawa, Keiko; Hosojima, Michihiro; Yata, Yusuke; Saito, Mariko; Tanaka, Noriko; Tanaka, Junta; Tanabe, Naohito; Narita, Ichiei; Arakawa, Masaaki; Saito, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Albuminuria is a biomarker for chronic kidney disease and an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. A recent meta-analysis concluded that these risks increase with urinary albumin concentration, even when below the microalbuminuria threshold. Thus, minimizing urinary albumin may be a valuable therapeutic goal regardless of disease status. We investigated the benefits and safety of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise for reducing albuminuria in 295 normoalbuminuric or microalbuminuric Japanese adults, including 30 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 104 with metabolic syndrome (MS), and 145 with hypertension (HT). In the study population, the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) was reduced significantly (ΔUACR -3.8 ± 16.8 mg/g, P < 0.001) with no change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (ΔeGFR -0.4 ± 7.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.343). The reduction in UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05). The UACR was also reduced in the T2DM, MS, and HT groups with no change in eGFR. Reduced UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose in the MS group and decreased systolic blood pressure in the HT group. The UACR was also reduced in 46 subjects using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with no change in eGFR. Our 12-week lifestyle modification program reduced UACR, maintained eGFR, and improved multiple fitness findings in Japanese subjects including T2DM, MS, and HT patients.

  2. Predictors of postnatal complications and congenital cardiac diseases in infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirpençe, Savaş; Demirpençe, Banu İnce; Meşe, Timur; Arslanoğlu, Sertaç; Tavlı, Vedide; Çalkavur, Şebnem; Olukman, Özgür; Firuzan, Ali Rıza

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the postnatal problems of infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes and the clinical properties of infants who were found to have congenital cardiac disease. We retrospectively examined the records of 337 newborns who were followed up with a diagnosis of infant of diabetic mother between January 2010 and January 2012 in our Neonatology Unit. The demographic data of the diabetic mothers and their babies, the postnatal problems of the babies of diabetic mothers and congenital heart diseases found on transthoracic echocardiography were examined. The patients were classified as group A, B and C in accordance with the recommendations of The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) according to the type of diabetes. The most common postnatal problems included hyperbilirubinemia, respiratory distress, hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia. The rate of congenital heart disease was found be 17.3% in group A, 50% in group B and 9% in group C. No correlation was found between congenital heart disease and gender, multiple pregnancy, diabetes type, diet treatment, use of oral antidiabetic drugs and drug usage. A positive significant correlation was found between congenital heart disease and genetic disease, murmur, cyanosis and presence of gestational hypertension. It was shown that use of insulin, genetic disease and presence of gestational diabetes increased the risk of congenital heart disease. In our study, the overall incidence of congenital heart disease was found to be 24% in infants of diabetic mothers. It should be kept in mind that it is important to investigate the infants of mothers with pregestational and gestational diabetes in terms of the risk of congenital heart disease.

  3. ACE and SGLT2 inhibitors: the future for non-diabetic and diabetic proteinuric renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Norberto; Ruggenenti, Piero; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    Most chronic nephropathies progress relentlessly to end-stage kidney disease. Research in animals and humans has helped our understanding of the mechanisms of chronic kidney disease progression. Current therapeutic strategies to prevent or revert renal disease progression focus on reduction of urinary protein excretion and blood pressure control. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers is the most effective treatment to achieve these purposes in non-diabetic and diabetic proteinuric renal diseases. For those individuals in which nephroprotection by RAS blockade is only partial, sodium-glucose linked cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors could be a promising new class of drugs to provide further renoprotective benefit when added on to RAS blockers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 75 FR 61766 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Liver PPG Application. Date... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Nutrition Obesity...

  5. 75 FR 11188 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Liver Disease Ancillary Studies. Date... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the.... (301) 594-8895. [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute of Diabetes and...

  6. 75 FR 69685 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Liver Ancillary Studies. Date: December... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Special Emphasis Panel for R01...

  7. 76 FR 63313 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Liver Cell Membrane Proteins. Date... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the..., Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849...

  8. 77 FR 9671 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Liver Tissue and Cell Distribution... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases...

  9. 78 FR 9401 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Liver Related Ancillary... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Beta-Cell Function and Cognition. Date...

  10. Effects of cancer comorbidity on disease management: making the case for diabetes education (a report from the SOAR program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Lauren; Li, Qijuan E; Duncan, Ian; Thurston, Andrew L; Fitzner, Karen A; Edwards, Beatrice J; McKoy-Bent, Judith M; Tulas, Katrina M; McKoy, June M

    2013-02-01

    Individuals with type II diabetes have an increased risk of cancer diagnosis (relative risk [RR]=1.12-2.50) and mortality (RR=1.4) compared to normoglycemic individuals. Biologic mechanisms, including mitogenic effects of insulin, hyperglycemia, and increased oxidative stress, as well as behavioral factors (eg, difficulty managing the comorbidity) may explain the elevated risk. To investigate the effects of the comorbidity on disease management, the authors compared diabetes education utilization in individuals with diabetes-cancer co-morbidity to utilization by individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer. The effect of diabetes education on outcomes was further assessed in the subset of individuals with diabetes-cancer comorbidity. Administrative claims data were used for this analysis. The study population included individuals >60 years of age and members of both commercial and Medicare Advantage health plans from a private national database of payer data, but excluded Medicare fee for service and Medicaid patients. Most of these individuals were eligible to receive reimbursement for diabetes education. Diabetes education utilization was identified using procedure codes. Outcomes were assessed for a 3-year time period. There was little difference in diabetes education utilization between individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer (3.8% utilization) and those with diabetes-cancer comorbidity (3.5% utilization). Individuals who receive diabetes education are more likely to have multiple HbA1c tests per year, fewer emergency department visits, fewer hospital admissions, and lower care-associated costs (except for outpatient and pharmacy averages). When diabetes coexists with cancer, management of diabetes often lags, making diabetes education an imperative.

  11. Relationship of adiponectin level with lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, S.; Jan, M.R.; Shah, J.; Khan, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebro-vascular disease is a commonest long term complication of type-2 diabetes mellitus. The study was done to determine concentration of serum adiponectin and lipid profile in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the region of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KPK), and to find possible relationship between them. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study comprising of randomly selected thirty six healthy adult males and thirty six type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease. Their fasting blood samples were analysed for serum adiponectin, fasting blood glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin and lipid profile which included total cholesterol (T-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The relationship of adiponectin with other variables in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease was determined with Pearson correlations coefficient (r). Results: Type-2 diabetic males with coronary heart disease when compared to healthy males showed significantly low levels of serum adiponectin (p=<0.001) and HDL-C (p=<0.001) and significantly high level of FBG (p=<0.001), HbA1c (p=<0.001), TC (p=<0.05), TG (p=<0.05) and LDL-C (p=<0.05). Serum adiponectin level showed a significant negative correlation with FBG (r = -0.332; p= 0.04), HbA1c (r = -0.818; p=<0.01) and TG (r = -0.640; p=<0.01) in type-2 diabetic men with coronary heart disease. Adiponectin showed a significant positive association with HDL-C in controls (r = 0.948; p=<0.01) and patients of type-2 diabetes with CHD (r = 0.650; p=<0.01). Conclusion: Serum adiponectin concentration is markedly decreased in patients of type-2 diabetes with coronary heart disease. Hypoadiponectinemia is related with deranged lipid profile, i.e., high TG and low HDL-C levels in type-2 diabetic men with CHD. Moreover, adiponectin is associated positively with HDL-C and negatively with HbA1c and TG levels in the studied population. (author)

  12. Impact of Diabetes on Cardiovascular Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Saldanha de Mattos Matheus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are the most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The proposed mechanisms that can link accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk in this population are poorly understood. It has been suggested that an association between hyperglycemia and intracellular metabolic changes can result in oxidative stress, low-grade inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Recently, epigenetic factors by different types of reactions are known to be responsible for the interaction between genes and environment and for this reason can also account for the association between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The impact of clinical factors that may coexist with diabetes such as obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension are also discussed. Furthermore, evidence that justify screening for subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic patients is controversial and is also matter of this review. The purpose of this paper is to describe the association between poor glycemic control, oxidative stress, markers of insulin resistance, and of low-grade inflammation that have been suggested as putative factors linking diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Bamberg, Fabian [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lochner, Elena [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Findeisen, Hannes M. [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Cardiology and Angiology, Muenster (Germany); Parhofer, Klaus G. [Ludwig Maximilians University, Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Internal Medicine II, Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  14. Whole-body MR imaging including angiography: Predicting recurrent events in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertheau, Robert C.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L.; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M.; Parhofer, Klaus G.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.

    2016-01-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30 %) developed one, 8 (13 %) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75 %, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63 %, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63 %, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88 %, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. (orig.)

  15. Control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: data from the Adult Diabetes Control and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, Shariff-Ghazali; Mastura, Ismail; Ahmad, Zaiton; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Adam, Bujang-Mohamad; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Lee, Ping-Yein; Syed-Alwi, Syed-Abdul-Rahman; Chew, Boon-How; Sriwahyu, Taher

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the control of glycemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors, and the association between age and these controls among older adults with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was carried out using cases notified to the Adult Diabetes Control and Management database between 1 January and 31 December 2009. A total of 10 363 people aged over 60 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the analyses. A standard online case report form was used to record demographic data, clinical factors (diabetes duration, comorbid condition and treatment modalities), cardiovascular disease risk factors, diabetes complications and laboratory assessments. The cardiovascular disease risk factors controls assessed included glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) control of cardiovascular disease risk factors was suboptimal in older adults with type 2 diabetes. The oldest elderly were more likely to achieve target HbA(1c) (<7.0%) and triglycerides (<1.7 mmol/L) than older adults aged 60-69 years. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. YKL-40--an emerging biomarker in cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, Camilla N; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Several inflammatory cytokines are involved in vascular inflammation resulting in endothelial dysfunction which is the earliest event in the atherosclerotic process leading to manifest cardiovascular disease. YKL-40 is an inflammatory glycoprotein involved in endothelial dysfunction by promoting....... Several studies demonstrate, that elevated serum YKL-levels are independently associated with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease and even higher YKL-40 levels are documented in patients with myocardial infarction. Moreover, elevated serum YKL-40 levels have also been found to be associated...... with all-cause as well as cardiovascular mortality. Finally, YKL-40 levels are elevated both in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, known to be at high risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, when compared to non-diabetic persons. A positive association between elevated circulating YKL...

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida Marcelino de Nazareth

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Both Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM are two common forms of disease worldwide and many studies indicate that people with diabetes, especially DM, are at higher risk of developing AD. AD is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ forming senile plaques. DM is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia in the context of insulin resistance and relative lack of insulin. Both diseases also share common characteristics such as loss of cognitive function and inflammation. Inflammation resulting from Aβ further induces production of Aβ1-42 peptides. Inflammation due to overnutrition induces insulin resistance and consequently DM. Memory deficit and a decrease in GLUT4 and hippocampal insulin signaling have been observed in animal models of insulin resistance. The objective of this review was to show the shared characteristics of AD and DM.

  18. Abnormal ankle brachial indices may predict cardiovascular disease among diabetic patients without known heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Christie B; Hall, Patrick Ax

    2005-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of diabetes-associated morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have failed to provide accurate, inexpensive, screening techniques to detect cardiovascular disease in diabetics. Ankle brachial indices (ABI) testing may be an effective screening technique for diabetics. The aim of this 100-subject clinical study was to determine cardiovascular disease prevalence, via perfusion stress testing, in diabetic patients having abnormal ABI (<0.90) and without known heart disease who were referred to the South Carolina Heart Center, Columbia, SC for nuclear perfusion stress testing. Study data were analyzed using frequency and descriptive statistics and 2-sample T-testing. Mean subject age was 62+/-11 years, ABI 0.76+/-13, and ejection fraction 60+/-12%. Perfusion stress testing detected 49 abnormal electrocardiograms, 36 subjects with coronary ischemia, 20 with diminished left ventricular function, and 26 subjects having significant thinning of the myocardium. There were 71 subjects who tested positive for at least one form of cardiovascular disease. The sole predictive variable reaching significance for the presence of cardiovascular disease was an ABI score <0.90 (p< or =0.0001). Cardiovascular disease may be predicted among diabetic patients via ABI scores and confirmed by nuclear perfusion testing.

  19. Role of the Immune System in Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Fionnuala B; Martin, Finian

    2018-03-12

    The purpose of this review is to examine the proposed role of immune modulation in the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Diabetic kidney disease has not historically been considered an immune-mediated disease; however, increasing evidence is emerging in support of an immune role in its pathophysiology. Both systemic and local renal inflammation have been associated with DKD. Infiltration of immune cells, predominantly macrophages, into the kidney has been reported in a number of both experimental and clinical studies. In addition, increased levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been linked to disease progression. Consequently, a variety of therapeutic strategies involving modulation of the immune response are currently being investigated in diabetic kidney disease. Although no current therapies for DKD are directly based on immune modulation many of the therapies in clinical use have anti-inflammatory effects along with their primary actions. Macrophages emerge as the most likely beneficial immune cell target and compounds which reduce macrophage infiltration to the kidney have shown potential in both animal models and clinical trials.

  20. Novel combined management approaches to patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, J

    2017-03-01

    Most patients we care for today suffer from more than one chronic disease, and multimorbidity is a rapidly growing challenge. Concomitant cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes represent a large proportion of all patients in cardiology, nephrology and diabetology. These entities commonly overlap due to their negative effects on vascular function and an accelerated atherosclerosis progression. At the same time, a progressive subspecialisation has caused the cardiologist to treat 'only' the heart, nephrologists 'only' the kidneys and endocrinologists' 'only' diabetes. Studies and guidelines follow the same pattern. This often requires patients to visit specialists for each field, with a risk of both under-diagnosis and under-treatment. From the patient's perspective, there is a great need for coordination and facilitation of the care, not only to reduce disease progression but also to improve quality of life. Person-centred integrated clinics for patients with cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes are a promising approach for complex chronic disease management.

  1. RISK FACTORS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC RENAL DISEASE AND DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataradžija, Amra; Resić, Halima; Rašić, Senija; Kukavica, Nihad; Masnić, Fahrudin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal disease. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with various stages of chronic renal disease (CRD), with or without diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients and methods: The study included 98 patients with different stages of the CRD, with creatinine clearance homocysteine, BNP, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HbA1c, Body Mass Index (BMI). First group comprised 49 patients with DM, age 50-82 years, M 28/F 21. Second group comprised 49 patients without DM, age 35-80 years, M 18/F 31. The IMT (intima media thickness) was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and all patients had echocardiography examination done by 2D Doppler ultrasonography. Results: The IMT values in diabetic patients had statistically significant positive correlation with homocysteine values of r=0,9393, p0,05). 47,4% of diabetics had arteriosclerotic changes on carotid arteries, 8,5% had stenosis of ACC, and 22,0% had rhythm abnormalities on ECG. A positive correlation between IMT and BMI was found in diabetics, but was not statistically significant r=0,111, p>0,05. In the diabetics group a significantly higher (phomocystein, BNP and cholesterol. PMID:20433431

  2. Cardiovascular diseases and diabetes as economic and developmental challenges in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Andre Pascal; June-Rose McHiza, Zandile; Amoah, Albert George Baidoe; Mbanya, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Current estimates and projections suggest that the burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), diabetes and related risk factors in African countries is important, somewhat unique and rapidly growing. Various segments of the population are affected; however, the group mostly affected is young adults residing in urban areas, and increasingly those in the low socioeconomic strata. The African milieu/environment is compounded by weak health systems, which are unable to cope with the looming double burden of communicable and chronic non-communicable diseases. This review discusses the economic and developmental challenges posed by CVDs and diabetes in countries in Africa. Using several lines of evidence, we demonstrate that the cost of care for major CVDs and diabetes is beyond the coping capacities of individuals, households, families and governments in most African countries. We have reviewed modeling studies by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and other major international agencies on the current and projected impact that CVDs and diabetes have on the economy and development of countries in the region. Locally, appropriate strategies to limit the impact of the conditions on the economies and development of countries in Africa are suggested and discussed. These include monitoring diseases and risk factors, and primordial, primary and secondary preventions implemented following a life-course perspective. Structural, logistic, human capacity and organizational challenges to be surmounted during the implementations of these strategies will be reviewed. © 2013.

  3. Adherence to dietary recommendations in diabetes mellitus: disease acceptance as a potential mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Mariusz; Panczyk, Mariusz; Cedro, Małgorzata; Kucharska, Alicja

    2018-01-01

    Adherence by diabetic patients to dietary recommendations is important for effective therapy. Considering patients' expectations in case of diet is significant in this regard. The aim of this paper was to analyze the relationship between selected independent variables (eg, regular blood glucose testing) and patients' adherence to dietary recommendations, bearing in mind that the degree of disease acceptance might play a mediation role. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 91 patients treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus in a public medical facility. Paper-and-pencil interviewing was administered ahead of the planned visit with a diabetes specialist. Two measures were applied in the study: the Acceptance and Action Diabetes Questionnaire and the Patient Diet Adherence in Diabetes Scale. Additionally, data related to sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle-related factors, and the course of the disease (management, incidence of complications, and dietician's supervision) were also collected. The regression method was used in the analysis, and Cohen's methodology was used to estimate partial mediation. Significance of the mediation effect was assessed by the Goodman test. P -values of diet and concomitant oral medicines and/or insulin therapy. Effective dietary education should include activities promoting a more positive attitude toward the disease. This may be obtained by individual counseling, respecting the patient's needs, and focus on regular blood glucose testing.

  4. Grading and disease management in national screening for diabetic retinopathy in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, S; Greenwood, R; Aldington, S; Gibson, J; Owens, D; Taylor, R; Kohner, E; Scanlon, P; Leese, G

    2003-12-01

    A National Screening Programme for diabetic eye disease in the UK is in development. We propose a grading and early disease management protocol to detect sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy and any retinopathy, which will allow precise quality assurance at all steps while minimizing false-positive referral to the hospital eye service. Expert panel structured discussions between 2000 and 2002 with review of existing evidence and grading classifications. Principles of the protocol include: separate grading of retinopathy and maculopathy, minimum number of steps, compatible with central monitoring, expandable for established more complex systems and for research, no lesion counting, no 'questionable' lesions, attempt to detect focal exudative, diffuse and ischaemic maculopathy and fast track referral from primary or secondary graders. Sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy is defined as: preproliferative retinopathy or worse, sight-threatening maculopathy and/or the presence of photocoagulation. In the centrally reported minimum data set retinopathy is graded into four levels: none (R0), background (R1), preproliferative (R2), proliferative (R3). Maculopathy and photocoagulation are graded as absent (M0, P0) or present (M1, P1). The protocol developed by the Diabetic Retinopathy Grading and Disease Management Working Party represents a new consensus upon which national guidelines can be based leading to the introduction of quality-assured screening for people with diabetes.

  5. Whole-Body MR Imaging Including Angiography: Predicting Recurrent Events in Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, Robert C; Bamberg, Fabian; Lochner, Elena; Findeisen, Hannes M; Parhofer, Klaus G; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Weckbach, Sabine; Schlett, Christopher L

    2016-05-01

    Whether whole-body MRI can predict occurrence of recurrent events in patients with diabetes mellitus. Whole-body MRI was prospectively applied to 61 diabetics and assessed for arteriosclerosis and ischemic cerebral/myocardial changes. Occurrence of cardiocerebral events and diabetic comorbidites was determined. Patients were stratified whether no, a single or recurrent events arose. As a secondary endpoint, events were stratified into organ system-specific groups. During a median follow-up of 70 months, 26 diabetics developed a total of 39 events; 18 (30%) developed one, 8 (13%) recurrent events. Between diabetics with no, a single and recurrent events, a stepwise higher burden was observed for presence of left ventricular (LV) hypo-/akinesia (3/28/75%, p < 0.0001), myocardial delayed-contrast-enhancement (17/33/63%, p = 0.001), carotid artery stenosis (11/17/63%, p = 0.005), peripheral artery stenosis (26/56/88%, p = 0.0006) and vessel score (1.00/1.30/1.76, p < 0.0001). After adjusting for clinical characteristics, LV hypo-/akinesia (hazard rate ratio = 6.57, p < 0.0001) and vessel score (hazard rate ratio = 12.29, p < 0.0001) remained independently associated. Assessing organ system risk, cardiac and cerebral MR findings predicted more strongly events in their respective organ system. Vessel-score predicted both cardiac and cerebral, but not non-cardiocerebral, events. Whole-body MR findings predict occurrence of recurrent events in diabetics independent of clinical characteristics, and may concurrently provide organ system-specific risk. • Patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus are at high risk for recurrent events. • Whole-body MRI predicts occurrence of recurrent events independently of clinical characteristics. • The vessel score derived from whole-body angiography is a good general risk-marker. • Whole-body MRI may also provide organ-specific risk assessment. • Current findings may indicate benefits of

  6. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  7. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2009-11-01

    India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

  8. Pancreatic Response to Gold Nanoparticles Includes Decrease of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation In Autistic Diabetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar E. Selim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have a wide range of applications in various fields. This study provides an understanding of the modulatory effects of AuNPs on an antioxidant system in male Wistar diabetic rats with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Normal littermates fed by control mothers were injected with citrate buffer alone and served as normal, untreated controls controlin this study. Diabetes mellitus (DM was induced by administering a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ (100 mg/kg to the pups of (ND diabetic group, which had been fasted overnight. Autistic pups from mothers that had received a single intraperitoneal injection of 600 mg/kg sodium valproate on day 12.5 after conception were randomly divided into 2 groups (n 2 7/group as follow; administering single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ ( (100 mg/kg to the overnight fasted autistic pups of (AD autistic diabetic group. The treatment was started on the 5th day after STZ injection with the same dose as in group II and it was considered as 1st day of treatment with gold nanoparticles for 7 days to each rat of (group IV treated autistic diabetic group(TAD at a dosage of 2.5 mg/kg. b. wt. Results: At this dose of administration AuNPs, the activities of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase were greater in group TAD compared with the control group (P 0.05 in the liver of autistic diabetic AuNPs -supplemented rats, whereas reduced glutathione was markedly higher than in control rats, especially after administration of AuNPs. Moreover, the kidney functions in addition to the fat profile scoring supported the protective potential of that dose of AuNPs. The beta cells revealed euchromatic nuclei with no evidence of separation of nuclear membrane. Conclusions: Our results showed that AuNPs improved many of the oxidative stress parameters (SOD, GPx and, CAT, plasma antioxidant capacity (ORAC and lipid profile

  9. Rural-urban disparities in the prevalence of diabetes and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A; Wellenius, G

    2012-10-01

    To examine the rural-urban differences in the prevalence of diabetes and coronary heart disease, and the extent to which they are explained by the presence of established risk factors including poverty. Cross-sectional study of more than 214,000 respondents using data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Logistic regression models were utilized; prevalence odds ratios with corresponding confidence intervals and P-values are provided. The crude prevalence rates of diabetes and coronary heart disease were 8.6% (P = 0.001) and 38.8% (P rural areas compared with urban areas, respectively. The higher prevalence in rural areas of many of the common risk factors for these conditions, including poverty (P rural areas [prevalence odds ratio (POR) = 0.94, P = 0.032], but the prevalence of coronary heart disease was higher (POR = 1.09, P = 0.011). The higher prevalence of diabetes and coronary heart disease in rural populations in the USA presents a formidable public health challenge. It exacerbates many of the pre-existing rural health disparities, including a lack of access to financial resources and primary care providers. Copyright © 2012 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of RI protein chip system for measurement of ADMA as risk factor of liver disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gil Hong; An, Sin Ae; Choi, Hyun Mi; Cheong, Kyung Ah; Chang, Yeon Soo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    ADMA (asymmetric dimethylarginine) is an endogenous competitive NOS (nitric oxide synthase) inhibitor. Elevation of ADMA level in body fluid is related to various diseases including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, chronic heart failure, and hypertension. Our goal was to elucidate the role for ADMA and protein arginine methylation in the pathogenesis of diabetes and develop RI protein chip system for easy determination of ADMA levels in blood or tissues. As a result, ADMA regulated by protein arginine methylation, DDAH1, and NOS was demonstrated to play some role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and arginine methylation of some proteins indicated their possible involvement in the change in ADMA levels. The concept of the RI protein chip system was devised such that firstly, ADMA was acylated by radio-labelled succinic acid, and followed by binding of the complex to anti-acyl ADMA-specific antibody coated on chip. Acylation condition of ADMA with radio-labelled succinic acid was established

  11. Development of RI protein chip system for measurement of ADMA as risk factor of liver disease, cardiovascular disease and diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Gil Hong; An, Sin Ae; Choi, Hyun Mi; Cheong, Kyung Ah; Chang, Yeon Soo

    2010-05-01

    ADMA (asymmetric dimethylarginine) is an endogenous competitive NOS (nitric oxide synthase) inhibitor. Elevation of ADMA level in body fluid is related to various diseases including diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, chronic heart failure, and hypertension. Our goal was to elucidate the role for ADMA and protein arginine methylation in the pathogenesis of diabetes and develop RI protein chip system for easy determination of ADMA levels in blood or tissues. As a result, ADMA regulated by protein arginine methylation, DDAH1, and NOS was demonstrated to play some role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and arginine methylation of some proteins indicated their possible involvement in the change in ADMA levels. The concept of the RI protein chip system was devised such that firstly, ADMA was acylated by radio-labelled succinic acid, and followed by binding of the complex to anti-acyl ADMA-specific antibody coated on chip. Acylation condition of ADMA with radio-labelled succinic acid was established

  12. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s dis...

  13. The role of SIRT1 in diabetic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi eYacoub

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sirtuins (SIRTs are members of the silent information regulator 2 (Sir2 family. In mammals, of the seven known SIRTs, SIRT1 function is most studied and has been shown to regulate wide range of cellular functions that affect metabolic homeostasis and aging. SIRT1 exerts anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects against cellular injury, and protects the cells through the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, autophagy, and metabolism in response to the cellular energy and redox status. SIRT1 also promotes vasodilation and protects vascular tissues. In humans and animal models with diabetic kidney disease, its expression tends to be decreased in renal cells, and increased expression of SIRT1 was found to play a renal protective role in animal models with diabetic kidney disease. In this review we discuss the role and potential mechanisms by which SIRT1 protects against DKD.

  14. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is not Related to the Incidence of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shan Bi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the association between non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and the incidence of diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes, the incidence of diabetic nephropathy was assessed in 413 type 2 diabetic patients, by testing the 24 h urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER. The NAFLD was diagnosed based on patient’s medical history and liver ultrasound. The difference in diabetic nephropathy incidence between patients with and without NAFLD was tested by χ2. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the factors associated with diabetic nephropathy among type 2 diabetic patients. Total 363 out of 413 type 2 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. The incidences of NAFLD and diabetic nephropathy in participants were approximately 56% (202/363 and 38% (137/363 respectively, and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy between patients with and without NAFLD (37.1% vs. 38.5%, p = 0.787. The duration of diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.014–1.120, p = 0.012, waist circumference (OR 1.077, 95% CI 1.040–1.116, p = 0.000, and fasting blood glucose (FBG; OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023–1.1262, p = 0.017 were significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy, whereas sex, high blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, and ankle brachial pressure index (ABI were not significantly associated with the disorder. The present results suggest that NAFLD is not related to the incidence of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes, but the duration of diabetes, waist circumference, and FBG are important factors for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes.

  15. Periodontitis, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease: A Bermuda Triangle

    OpenAIRE

    Teeuw, W.J.

    2017-01-01

    The research presented in this thesis contributes to the understanding of the complex relationship between periodontitis and diabetes mellitus (DM), and periodontitis and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD). It was observed that a substantial number of suspected new DM patients could be found in patients with periodontitis. Furthermore, periodontitis patients showed increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and more arterial stiffness compared to controls, reflecting an increased at...

  16. 76 FR 64358 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-18

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, PAR09-247: Ancillary Studies in Liver... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, [[Page 64359

  17. 75 FR 38817 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Acute Liver Failure Study. Date: July 22... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive...

  18. 77 FR 36564 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Planning Grants in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: July 12, 2012. Time: 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...

  19. 78 FR 36554 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials in Type 1 Diabetes (UC4) Meeting A. Date: July 17, 2013. Time: 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials in Type 1...

  20. 76 FR 30370 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... Emphasis Panel; RFA-DK-10-012 Type 1 Diabetes Impact Award (DP3). Date: July 11, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; NIDDK KUH-Fellowship Review... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Meetings Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of...

  1. 77 FR 28396 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Training in Behavioral Research in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: June 11, 2012. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Improving Adherence in Type 1...

  2. 77 FR 38075 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Type 1 Diabetes Mouse Resource. Date: July 23, 2012. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...

  3. 78 FR 18358 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... Emphasis Panel; Biomarkers in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: April 10, 2013. Time: 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Agenda... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Review of U34 Clinical Trial Planning... of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Review of U34 Clinical Trial...

  4. Connection Between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea-Călin Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the commonest liver condition in the world, accounting for 20-30% of the adult population, and encompasses a spectrum of liver disorders characterized by fat accumulation within the liver, associated or not with varying degrees of hepatic inflammation and liver fibrosis through to cirrhosis. The prevalence of NAFLD increases significantly in the presence of obesity (60-80% and type 2 diabetes (60%. NAFLD is associated with metabolic disorders (type 2 diabetes, obesity and hyperlipidemia grouped together as the metabolic syndrome (MetS. It is now regarded as the hepatic manifestation of this syndrome and is closely linked to insulin resistance (IR.The presence of NAFLD predicts the development of type 2 diabetes independent of established risk factors. NAFLD patients should therefore be screened for diabetes, including by the Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT if there any abnormalities of fasting blood glucose (FBG and given appropriate lifestyle advice. Early diagnosis with the institution of lifestyle measures could help prevent or retard the onset of these metabolic disorders. Type 2 diabetes causes more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients with diabetes have an increased risk for cirrhosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC

  5. Diabetes mellitus: new therapeutic approaches to treat an old disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gabanyi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Diabetes mellitus is a widespread disease whose frequency increases constantly and is expected to reach alarming levels by the year 2025. Introduction of insulin therapy represented a major breakthrough; however, a very strict regimen is required to maintain blood glucose levels within the normal range and to prevent or postpone chronic complications associated with this disease. Frequent hyper- and hypoglycemia seriously affect the quality of life of these patients. Reversion of this situation can only be achieved through whole organ (pancreas transplant or pancreatic islet transplant, the former being a high-risk surgical procedure, while the latter is a much simpler and may be accomplished in only 20-40 min. The advantages and perspectives of islet cell transplantation will be discussed, in the light of tissue engineering and gene therapy. Ongoing research carried out in our laboratory, aimed at developing clinical cell and molecular therapy protocols for diabetes will also be focused. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, cell and molecular therapy, human pancreatic islets, degenerative diseases, recombinant biopharmaceuticals.

  6. Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes by Race/Ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Vishnu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We examined the association between insufficient rest/sleep and cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus separately among non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, Hispanic Americans, and other races in a contemporary sample of US adults. Methods. Multiethnic, nationally representative, cross-sectional survey (2008 BRFSS participants who were >20 years of age (n=369, 217; 50% women. Self-reported insufficient rest/sleep in the previous month was categorized into: zero, 1–13, 14–29, and all 30 days. Outcomes were: (1 any CVD, (2 coronary artery disease (CHD, (3 stroke, and (4 diabetes mellitus. Results. Insufficient rest/sleep was found to be positively associated with (1 any CVD, (2 CHD, and (3 stroke among all race-ethnicities. In contrast, insufficient rest/sleep was positively associated with diabetes mellitus in all race-ethnicities except non-Hispanic blacks. The odds ratio of diabetes association with insufficient rest/sleep for all 30 days was 1.37 (1.26–1.48 among non-Hispanic whites, 1.11 (0.90–1.36 among non-Hispanic blacks, 1.88 (1.46–2.42 among Hispanic Americans, and 1.48 (1.10–2.00 among other race/ethnicities. Conclusion. In a multiethnic sample of US adults, perceived insufficient rest/sleep was associated with CVD, among all race-ethnicities. However, the association between insufficient rest/sleep and diabetes mellitus was present among all race-ethnicities except non-Hispanic blacks.

  7. KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE OF THE DIABETIC EYE DISEASES AMONGST PERSONS WITH DIABETES- A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahuya Chattopadhyay

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND India is home to second most populous country with diabetes. As more and more people with diabetes are leading normal life with the help of drugs, the burden of diabetic retinopathy is increasing. The awareness about the problem is not keeping pace with the burden of the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a teaching hospital of West Bengal wherein diabetics attending the lifestyle and diabetic clinics were asked about the different aspects of diabetic retinopathy. RESULTS There were 307 females (58.4%. The mean (SD age of the respondent was 53.7 (11.5 years. 30% of the participants said that at least one of their first-degree relative (either parent or sibling is a known diabetic. The median duration of the diabetes of the respondents was 4 years. 79% of the participants were on any oral hypoglycaemic agent. 285 (54.2% participants knew that diabetes can affect eye. 134 (25.6% individuals have belief that diabetes can affect eye even if the blood sugar is under control. 82 (15.6% were not feeling the need to visit an eye doctor even if they are diabetic. 270 (51.3% did not know whether it is essential to visit an eye specialist for periodic checkups if a person has diabetes. Sex and occupation was not significantly associated with awareness about the eye diseases. More educated participants had better knowledge about diabetic retinopathy. CONCLUSION Though, the awareness about the diabetic retinopathy is average, the actual practice of visiting an eye specialist for regular eye checkups is very low in diabetic patients attending a teaching hospital of West Bengal.

  8. Gender Differences in Metabolic Disorders and Related Diseases in Spontaneously Diabetic Torii-Leprfa Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Spontaneously Diabetic Torii Leprfa (SDT fatty rat is a novel type 2 diabetic model wherein both male and female rats develop glucose and lipid abnormalities from a young age. In this study, we investigated gender differences in abnormalities and related complications in SDT fatty rats. Food intake was higher in males compared to female rats; however, body weight was not different between genders. Progression of diabetes, including increases in blood glucose and declines in blood insulin, was observed earlier in male rats than in females, and diabetic grade was more critical in male rats. Blood lipids tended to increase in female rats. Gonadal dysfunction was observed in both male and female rats with aging. Microangiopathies, such as nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, and osteoporosis, were seen in both genders, and pathological grade and progression were more significant in males. Qualitative and quantitative changes were observed for metabolic disease gender differences in SDT fatty rats. The SDT fatty rat is a useful model for researching gender differences in metabolic disorders and related diseases in diabetes with obesity.

  9. Optimal medication dosing in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Lori

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Canada. As rates of diabetes rise, so does the prevalence of CKD. Diabetes and CKD are chronic diseases that require multiple medications for their management. Many of the anticipated effects of these medications are altered by the physiologic changes that occur in CKD. Failure to individualize drug dosing in this population may lead to toxicity or decreased therapeutic response, leading to treatment failure. At times this can be challenging for a multitude of reasons, including the limitations of available calculations for estimating renal function, inconsistent dosing recommendations and the lack of dosing recommendations for some medications. Clinicians caring for these patients need to consider an approach of individualized drug therapy that will ensure optimal outcomes. The better understanding that clinicians have of these challenges, the more effective they will be at using the available information as a guide together with their own professional judgement to make appropriate dosing changes. This article discusses the following: 1) physiologic changes that occur in CKD and its impact on drug dosing; 2) advantages and disadvantages of various calculations used for estimating renal function; 3) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of some commonly used medications in diabetes, and finally, 4) an approach to individualized drug dosing for this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Associations of Fetuin-A levels with vascular disease in type 2 diabetes patients with early diabetic nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Marcel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambigous results exist on fetuin-A as marker for vascular disease in type 2 diabetes. This study aims to define the role of fetuin-A as marker for micro- and macrovascular disease in a high risk population of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and early diabetic nephropathy. Methods Fetuin-A serum levels were assessed by ELISA in a cross-sectional setting in 153 patients with type 2 diabetes. Associations of fetuin-A with metabolic, inflammatory and vascular markers were studied. Atherosclerotic burden was assessed by ankle-brachial-index (ABI as well as detection of common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT. Results Levels of fetuin-A were lower in male than in female patients (0.49 ± 0.15 vs. 0.56 ± 0.20 g/L, p = 0.02. In addition, there was an inverse correlation with age (r = -0.20, P = 0.01. Bivariate correlations adjusted for age and gender revealed no significant correlations with metabolic parameters, except for a weak inverse correlation with serum adiponectin (r = -0.19, p = 0.02. Regarding parameters of micro- and macrovascular disease, fetuin-A was significantly associated with ABI (r = 0.18, p = 0.04, while there was no association with IMT (r = -0.07, p = n.s. Patients with an ABI 1.3 (0.43 ± 0.10 vs. 0.52 ± 0.17 vs. 0.54 ± 0.18 g/L p = 0.05. Neither GFR nor albuminuria were associated with fetuin-A serum levels. Patients with prevalent neuropathy did not have altered fetuin-A levels compared to diabetic controls. In step-wise logistic regression analysis including age, gender, HbA1c, total cholesterol, glomerular filtration rate and fetuin-A, only total cholesterol (β = 0.01, p = 0.02 and fetuin-A (β = -5.99, p = 0.03 proved to be independent predictors of an ABI Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that lower fetuin-A levels are associated with macrovascular late complications in high-risk type 2 diabetes patients while there are no associations of fetuin-A with

  11. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation as the standard surgical treatment for diabetes mellitus patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, C M; Chim, Thomas M Y; Leung, K C; Tong, C H; Wong, T F; Leung, Gilberto K K

    2016-02-01

    To review the outcome following simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal disease, as well as those with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and to discuss the applicability of this treatment in this locality. A systematic literature review was performed by searching the PubMed and Elsevier databases. The search terms used were "simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation", "diabetes", "pancreas transplant" and "SPK". Original and major review articles related to simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation were reviewed. Papers published in English after 1985 were included. Clinical outcomes following transplantation were extracted for comparison between different treatment methods. Outcomes of simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant and other transplantation methods were identified and categorised into patient survival, graft survival, diabetic complications, and quality of life. Patient survivals and graft survivals were also compared. Currently available clinical evidence shows good outcomes for type 1 diabetes mellitus in terms of patient survival, graft survival, diabetic complications, and quality of life. For type 2 diabetes mellitus, the efficacy and application of the procedure remain controversial but the outcomes are possibly comparable with those in type 1 diabetes mellitus. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation is a technically demanding procedure that is associated with significant complications, and it should be regarded as a 'last resort' treatment in patients whose diabetic complications have become life-threatening or severely burdensome despite best efforts in maintaining good diabetic control through lifestyle modifications and medications.

  12. SPECTRUM OF DISEASE AND OUTCOME OF PRIMARY AMPUTATION FOR DIABETIC FOOT SEPSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheddie, S; Manneh, C; Zulu, H

    2017-09-01

    Guillotine amputation for diabetic foot sepsis followed by an elective refashioning of the stump is regarded as standard practice. Primary amputation is associated with higher reamputation rates. A prospective cohort study of 85 patients who underwent surgery for diabetic foot sepsis from 2014 to 2016 at Madadeni Provincial Hospital, KwaZulu-Natal was done. Ethical approval was granted. The Wagner classification (Wag) was used to classify disease severity. Outcome measures included length of hospital stay, mortality and re-amputation rates. Of the 85 patients, females (n=45) accounted for 53% of admissions. The mean age was 61 years (range: 29 to 80 years). The majority of patients were African, n=75 (88%). Only 1 patient presented with diabetic ketoacidosis and 18 (21%) presented with renal failure. Most patients presented with advanced disease: [Wag 5, n=66 (78%); Wag 4, n=12 (14%); Wag 3, n=5 (6%); Wag 2, n=2 (2%)]. The levels of vascular occlusion included aortoiliac disease n=2 (2%), femoro-popliteal disease n=18 (21%), tibio-peroneal disease n=65 (76%). Radiographic features included normal findings n=60 (71%); gas gangrene n=11 (13%), osteitis n=8 (9%). The following amputations were done: AKA, n=29 (34%); BKA, n=39 (46%); TMA, n=8 (9%); Toe-ectomy, n=5 (6%) and Debridement, n=4 (5%). The re-amputation rate to above knee amputation was n= 3/39 (8%). All AKA stumps healed well. The overall in-hospital mortality was n=5 (6%) and mean length of hospital stay was 7.8 days ±3.83. The majority of patients presented with advanced disease requiring a major amputation. A definitive one stage primary amputation is a safe and effective procedure for diabetic foot sepsis and is associated with a low re-amputation rate, length of hospital stay and mortality. A guillotine amputation should be reserved for physiologically unstable patients.

  13. 76 FR 80955 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Vitamin D and Diabetes. Date: January 25... Democracy Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20817. Contact Person: Michele L. Barnard, Ph.D., Scientific Review...

  14. Type 3 Diabetes Mellitus: A Novel Implication of Alzheimers Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszek, Jerzy; Trypka, Elzbieta; Tarasov, Vadim V; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-01-01

    The brain of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) showed the evidence of reduced expression of insulin and neuronal insulin receptors, as compared with those of age-matched controls. This event gradually and certainly leads to a breakdown of the entire insulin-signaling pathway, which manifests insulin resistance. This in turn affects brain metabolism and cognitive functions, which are the bestdocumented abnormalities in AD. These observations led Dr. de la Monte and her colleagues to suggest that AD is actually a neuroendocrine disorder that resembles type 2 diabetes mellitus. The truth would be more complex with understanding the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, Aβ derived diffusible ligands, and advanced glycation end products. However, now it known as "brain diabetes" and is called type 3 diabetes mellitus (T3DM). This review provides an overview of "brain diabetes" focusing on the reason why the phenomenon is called T3DM. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Diabetes, Obesity, and Other Medical Diseases - Is Surgery the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Dieter; Bloomenthal, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    For many physicians, the concept of surgery as the best treatment for a medical disease such as diabetes, cardiovascular problems, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, hepatosteatosis, GERD, osteoarthritis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, or infertility, still sounds wrong and just a ploy by surgeons to increase their business. Since 2011, however, several non-surgical societies have recommended Weight Loss Surgery - The International Diabetes Federation, The American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association, and Obesity Society in 2015 for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than 35 and diabetes, and to decrease cardiovascular risk factors.1 The concept is to treat the common underlying problem, which is obesity, with the most effective method for immediate and long-term weight loss, which is surgery. The term "metabolic" surgery was therefore coined to accurately describe the effects of weight loss (bariatric) surgery. Our specialty society named itself the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS). [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-03.asp].

  16. Cardiovascular disease by diabetes status in five ethnic minority groups compared to ethnic Norwegians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The population in Norway has become multi-ethnic due to migration from Asia and Africa over the recent decades. The aim of the present study was to explore differences in the self-reported prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated risk factors by diabetes status in five ethnic minority groups compared to ethnic Norwegians. Methods Pooled data from three population-based cross-sectional studies conducted in Oslo between 2000 and 2002 was used. Of 54,473 invited individuals 24,749 (45.4%) participated. The participants self-reported health status, underwent a clinical examination and blood samples were drawn. A total of 17,854 individuals aged 30 to 61 years born in Norway, Sri-Lanka, Pakistan, Iran, Vietnam or Turkey were included in the study. Chi-square tests, one-way ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, multiple and logistic regression were used. Results Age- and gender-standardized prevalence of self-reported CVD varied between 5.8% and 8.2% for the ethnic minority groups, compared to 2.9% among ethnic Norwegians (p Corresponding CVD prevalence rates among individuals with diabetes were 15.3% vs. 12.6% (p = 0.364). For individuals without diabetes, the odds ratio (OR) for CVD in the ethnic minority groups remained significantly higher (range 1.5-2.6) than ethnic Norwegians (p employment, and body height, except for Turkish individuals. Regardless of diabetes status, obesity and physical inactivity were prevalent in the majority of ethnic minority groups, whereas systolic- and diastolic- blood pressures were higher in Norwegians. In nearly all ethnic groups, individuals with diabetes had higher triglycerides, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and body mass index compared to individuals without diabetes. Age, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and WHR were significant predictors of CVD in both ethnic Norwegians and ethnic minorities, but significant ethnic differences were found for age, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. Conclusions Ethnic differences

  17. A young diabetic with suicidal risk: Rare disease with a rarer presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rare genetic or inherited forms of diabetes can mimic immune mediated type 1 diabetes. Early age of onset and associated features help to differentiate these diseases from type 1 diabetes. Wolfram syndrome, an inherited neuro degenerative disorder, presents as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy and deafness. But less well described features like psychiatric manifestations can be the presentation of this disease. We present such a case. Wolfram syndrome should be considered as a differential diagnosis in insulin dependent diabetic children who present with neuropsychiatric problems.

  18. Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including: Blurry vision Excess thirst Fatigue Frequent urination Hunger Weight loss Because type 2 diabetes develops slowly, ... must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  19. Screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Tavares, Carlos Augusto F.; Wajchjenberg, Bernardo Leo; Rochitte, Carlos; Lerario, Antonio Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Diabetes is a very frequent disease and it is estimated that its prevalence will continuously increase during the next two decades. The arteriosclerotic process in diabetic patients progresses earlier and more diffusely, and it is more accelerated in the diabetic patient than in the overall population. In diabetic subjects, acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke are the leading causes of death, but the presence of arterial disease is not always detected before the development o...

  20. Clinical benefit of a gluten-free diet in type 1 diabetic children with screening-detected celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte; Brock-Jacobsen, Bendt; Lund, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a region comprising 24......% of the Danish population, all patients diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac...... a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children

  1. [The German program for disease management guidelines: type 2 diabetes--diabetic retinopathy/maculopathy guideline 2006. Short review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollenschläger, Günter; Kopp, Ina; Thole, Henning; Lelgemann, Monika

    2007-02-15

    In Germany, the first national consensus between six medical scientific associations on evidence-based recommendations for prevention and therapy of retinopathy/maculopathy in type 2 diabetes was reached in fall 2006. The recommendations' main sources are the NICE Retinopathy Guideline 2002, and existing German guidelines and reviews of recent scientific evidence. The article gives an overview on authors, sources, and key recommendations of the German National Disease Management Guideline Type 2 Diabetes-Retinopathy/Maculopathy 2006 (www.diabetes.versorgungsleitlinien.de).

  2. Screening for Addison's disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and recurrent hypoglycaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhari, Taruna; Magzoub, Saeed; Griffiths, Melanie J; Buch, Harit N

    2007-01-01

    Background Addison's disease may present with recurrent hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus. There are no data, however, on the prevalence of Addison's disease presenting with recurrent hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods Three year retrospective study of diabetic patients with “unexplained” recurrent hypoglycaemia investigated with a short Synacthen test to exclude adrenocortical insufficiency. Results 95 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus were studied. Addison's disease was identified as the cause of recurrent hypoglycaemia in one patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion Addison's disease is a relatively rare but remedial cause of recurrent hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A low threshold for investigating patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and recurrent hypoglycaemia to detect Addison's disease is therefore suggested. PMID:17551075

  3. Screening for Addison's disease in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and recurrent hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhari, Taruna; Magzoub, Saeed; Griffiths, Melanie J; Buch, Harit N; Gama, R

    2007-06-01

    Addison's disease may present with recurrent hypoglycaemia in subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus. There are no data, however, on the prevalence of Addison's disease presenting with recurrent hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes mellitus. Three year retrospective study of diabetic patients with "unexplained" recurrent hypoglycaemia investigated with a short Synacthen test to exclude adrenocortical insufficiency. 95 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus were studied. Addison's disease was identified as the cause of recurrent hypoglycaemia in one patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Addison's disease is a relatively rare but remedial cause of recurrent hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. A low threshold for investigating patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and recurrent hypoglycaemia to detect Addison's disease is therefore suggested.

  4. To vigorously and safely develop the interventional therapy for diabetic peripheral vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jungong; Cheng Yongde

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic critical limb ischemia is one of the most severe complications caused by diabetes mellitus, which carries significant morbidity and mortality. The symptoms related to limb ischemia include intermittent claudication, rest pain, refractory ulcers, infections or even gangrene of the foot or toes. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) can be used to treat arterial stenosis or occlusive disease of the iliac and femoropopliteal arteries. However, PTA has a relatively poor outcome for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries with conventional short coronary balloons. In the past 10 years, infrapopliteal angioplasty with a long over-the-wire (OTW) balloon, subintimal technique, retrograde transdorsal-to-plantar loop, Excimer laser ablation, local delivery of paclitaxel, etc. have been continually developed. The clinical practise has proved that these techniques and devices are feasible and effective for the treatment of severe limb ischemia in diabetic patients. The midterm outcomes seem to be satisfactory and encouraging. (authors)

  5. Diagnosing and Ranking Retinopathy Disease Level Using Diabetic Fundus Image Recuperation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Somasundaram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal fundus images are widely used in diagnosing different types of eye diseases. The existing methods such as Feature Based Macular Edema Detection (FMED and Optimally Adjusted Morphological Operator (OAMO effectively detected the presence of exudation in fundus images and identified the true positive ratio of exudates detection, respectively. These mechanically detected exudates did not include more detailed feature selection technique to the system for detection of diabetic retinopathy. To categorize the exudates, Diabetic Fundus Image Recuperation (DFIR method based on sliding window approach is developed in this work to select the features of optic cup in digital retinal fundus images. The DFIR feature selection uses collection of sliding windows with varying range to obtain the features based on the histogram value using Group Sparsity Nonoverlapping Function. Using support vector model in the second phase, the DFIR method based on Spiral Basis Function effectively ranks the diabetic retinopathy disease level. The ranking of disease level on each candidate set provides a much promising result for developing practically automated and assisted diabetic retinopathy diagnosis system. Experimental work on digital fundus images using the DFIR method performs research on the factors such as sensitivity, ranking efficiency, and feature selection time.

  6. Diagnosing and ranking retinopathy disease level using diabetic fundus image recuperation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, K; Rajendran, P Alli

    2015-01-01

    Retinal fundus images are widely used in diagnosing different types of eye diseases. The existing methods such as Feature Based Macular Edema Detection (FMED) and Optimally Adjusted Morphological Operator (OAMO) effectively detected the presence of exudation in fundus images and identified the true positive ratio of exudates detection, respectively. These mechanically detected exudates did not include more detailed feature selection technique to the system for detection of diabetic retinopathy. To categorize the exudates, Diabetic Fundus Image Recuperation (DFIR) method based on sliding window approach is developed in this work to select the features of optic cup in digital retinal fundus images. The DFIR feature selection uses collection of sliding windows with varying range to obtain the features based on the histogram value using Group Sparsity Nonoverlapping Function. Using support vector model in the second phase, the DFIR method based on Spiral Basis Function effectively ranks the diabetic retinopathy disease level. The ranking of disease level on each candidate set provides a much promising result for developing practically automated and assisted diabetic retinopathy diagnosis system. Experimental work on digital fundus images using the DFIR method performs research on the factors such as sensitivity, ranking efficiency, and feature selection time.

  7. Health, treatment and health care resources consumption profile among Spanish adults with diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Garcia, Rodrigo; de Miguel-Díez, Javier; Rejas-Gutierrez, Javier; Martín-Centeno, Antonio; Gobartt-Vázquez, Elena; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; Gil de Miguel, Angel; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2009-08-01

    To describe the health, treatment and health care resources consumption profile among Spanish adults with diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and compare it with that of non-diabetic COPD patients. An observational and descriptive epidemiological study (EPIDEPOC study). The study included patients with stable COPD and aged > or =40 years, evaluated in primary care. Data were collected relating to sociodemographic variables, health profile, quality of life (SF-12), treatment and health care resources consumption. The results corresponding to diabetic and non-diabetic patients were compared. A total of 10,711 patients (75.6% males) with COPD were evaluated. The prevalence of diabetes was 16.9%. The diabetic patients were significantly older, with a larger percentage of women, and a lesser educational level compared with the non-diabetic patients. In addition, the diabetics were more sedentary, smoked less, and presented a higher percentage of obesity (33.6% versus 19.7%) than the non-diabetic patients. The severity of airways obstruction was greater among the diabetics than in the non-diabetic patients (54.57+/-13.37% versus 57.92+/-13.39%, respectively, pconsumption of drugs for COPD. In addition, they consumed significantly more health care (and thus economical) resources than the non-diabetic patients. The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the variables that were independently associated to COPD among diabetic patients were: higher age, higher BMI, concomitant chronic heart disease, use of inhaled corticoids, SF-12 mental component, SF-12 physical component and total cost of COPD. The presence of diabetes in patients with COPD shows in the bivariate analysis a more severe lung disease, greater co-morbidity, poorer quality of life, and a greater consumption of resources, as well as a less favorable course in the previous year. However, the multivariate logistic regression shows that the variables that are

  8. Placental growth factor and its potential role in diabetic retinopathy and other ocular neovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quan Dong; De Falco, Sandro; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lam, Wai-Ching; Li, Xuri; Reichhart, Nadine; Ricci, Federico; Pluim, Jennifer; Li, William W

    2018-02-01

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), including in retinal vascular diseases, has been well studied, and pharmacological blockade of VEGF is the gold standard of treatment for neovascular age-related macular degeneration, retinal vein occlusion and diabetic macular oedema. Placental growth factor (PGF, previously known as PlGF), a homologue of VEGF, is a multifunctional peptide associated with angiogenesis-dependent pathologies in the eye and non-ocular conditions. Animal studies using genetic modification and pharmacological treatment have demonstrated a mechanistic role for PGF in pathological angiogenesis. Inhibition decreases neovascularization and microvascular abnormalities across different models, including oxygen-induced retinopathy, laser-induced choroidal neovascularization and in diabetic mice exhibiting retinopathies. High levels of PGF have been found in the vitreous of patients with diabetic retinopathy. Despite these strong animal data, the exact role of PGF in pathological angiogenesis in retinal vascular diseases remains to be defined, and the benefits of PGF-specific inhibition in humans with retinal neovascular diseases and macular oedema remain controversial. Comparative effectiveness research studies in patients with diabetic retinal disease have shown that treatment that inhibits both VEGF and PGF may provide superior outcomes in certain patients compared with treatment that inhibits only VEGF. This review summarizes current knowledge of PGF, including its relationship to VEGF and its role in pathological angiogenesis in retinal diseases, and identifies some key unanswered questions about PGF that can serve as a pathway for future basic, translational and clinical research. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation and European Association for Vision & Eye Research.

  9. Concomitant diseases and their effect on disease prognosis in Meniere's disease: diabetes mellitus identified as a negative prognostic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieskä, Teemu; Kotimäki, Jouko; Männikkö, Minna; Sorri, Martti; Hietikko, Elina

    2018-01-01

    To study comorbidities and their effect on the disease progression in Meniere's disease (MD). Retrospective study on 350 definite MD patients diagnosed according to AAO-HNS 1995 criteria using hospital records and postal questionnaire. The prevalence of migraine, hypothyroidism, allergies, coronary heart disease and autoimmune diseases was more common in MD patients than reported in the general population of Finland. Diabetes mellitus was associated with both more severe hearing impairment (p = .033) and more frequent vertigo (p = .028) in MD patients. The number of concomitant diseases was associated with more frequent vertigo (p = .021). A patient's concomitant diseases, especially diabetes, should be treated effectively because they might affect the progression of MD. Further studies on the effects of concomitant diseases on MD prognosis are needed.

  10. Alcohol Consumption in Diabetic Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preya J. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the association between lifetime alcohol consumption and significant liver disease in type 2 diabetic patients with NAFLD. Methods. A cross-sectional study assessing 151 patients with NAFLD at risk of clinically significant liver disease. NAFLD fibrosis severity was classified by transient elastography; liver stiffness measurements ≥8.2 kPa defined significant fibrosis. Lifetime drinking history classified patients into nondrinkers, light drinkers (always ≤20 g/day, and moderate drinkers (any period with intake >20 g/day. Result. Compared with lifetime nondrinkers, light and moderate drinkers were more likely to be male (p=0.008 and to be Caucasian (p=0.007 and to have a history of cigarette smoking (p=0.000, obstructive sleep apnea (p=0.003, and self-reported depression (p=0.003. Moderate drinkers required ≥3 hypoglycemic agents to maintain diabetic control (p=0.041 and fibrate medication to lower blood triglyceride levels (p=0.044. Compared to lifetime nondrinkers, light drinkers had 1.79 (95% CI: 0.67–4.82; p=0.247 and moderate drinkers had 0.91 (95% CI: 0.27–3.10; p=0.881 times the odds of having liver stiffness measurements ≥8.2 kPa (adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index. Conclusions. In diabetic patients with NAFLD, light or moderate lifetime alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with liver fibrosis. The impact of lifetime alcohol intake on fibrosis progression and diabetic comorbidities, in particular obstructive sleep apnea and hypertriglyceridemia, requires further investigation.

  11. Peculiarities of clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with type 2 diabetes and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreeva E.l.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the clinical course of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in patients with type 2 diabetes and evaluation of the parameters of the esophagus 24-hour pH-metry. Material and Methods. In the examination of patients with GERD, three groups of patients were selected for 50 people each. The first group includes patients with GERD with combined course of obesity and type 2 diabetes (mean age 54.6±2.73 year; 32 females and 18 males. The second group included patients with GERD against obesity (mean age 42.3±2.11 year; 30 females and 20 males. The control group consisted of patients with GERD without excess body weight and concomitant pathology (average age43.6±2.11 year; 29 females and 21 males. In addition to collecting complaints and anamnesis, the patients and the control group underwent a 24-hour pH-metric study of the esophagus according to a conventional method. Results. Patients suffering from GERD in the background of type 2 diabetes have a clinically asymptomatic or asymptomatic course; there is a significant increase in the daily pH-metry, indicating a more pronounced nature of the changes. Conclusion. Patients suffering from GERD in the background of type 2 diabetes require a comprehensive examination of the upper digestive tract to identify GERD, even if there are no complaints characteristic of the disease.

  12. STRESS AS PREDISPOSING FACTOR OF SOME CHRONIC DISEASES INCLUDING PERIODONTAL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi-Nurul M Dewi-Nurul

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress is hypothesized as a common pathway for several related chronic diseases of man. Psychosocial stress as modified by perceptions and coping by patients can lead to physical processes. Psychoneuroimmunologic (PNI studies have suggested that psychosocial stress can alter immune function and increase vulnerability to illnesses. The patients also have high sensitivity to periodontal disease (PD. This article describes the association of stress as a physiological response to diseases such as PD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and inflammatory bowel disease. The psychosocial stress can lead to physiological processes through 1 the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis leading to glucocortico-steroid secretion; 2 the autonomic nervous system, resulting in the release of catecholamine; or 3 the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, resulting in the release of sex hormones. These processes may affect chronic diseases. It can be concluded that psychosocial stress in periodontal disease patients must be considered and social support must be provided in order to achieve an optimum periodontal therapy result.

  13. Antioxidant Enzymes Activity in Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease, with and without Presence of Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Jandrić-Balen, Marica; Božikov, Veljko; Bistrović, Dragica; Jandrić, Ivan; Božikov, Jadranka; Romić, Željo; Balen, Ivan

    2003-01-01

    The study evaluated antioxidant status in patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD), with and without concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM). 211 participants were divided into standardized 4 groups: patients with PVD and DM (PVD+DM+), patients with PVD without DM (PVD+DM-), patients without PVD with DM (PVD-DM+) and patients without PVD and DM (PVD-DM-). The diagnosis of PVD was established by Doppler sonography analysis, including determination of the ankle brachial index (...

  14. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, Jeffrey B; Musi, Nicolas; McFarland Horne, Frances; Crandall, Jill P; Goldberg, Andrew; Harkless, Lawrence; Hazzard, William R; Huang, Elbert S; Kirkman, M Sue; Plutzky, Jorge; Schmader, Kenneth E; Zieman, Susan; High, Kevin P

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, driven in part by an absolute increase in incidence among adults aged 65 years and older. Individuals with diabetes are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, and age strongly predicts cardiovascular complications. Inflammation and oxidative stress appear to play some role in the mechanisms underlying aging, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other complications of diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying the age-associated increase in risk for diabetes and diabetes-related cardiovascular disease remain poorly understood. Moreover, because of the heterogeneity of the older population, a lack of understanding of the biology of aging, and inadequate study of the effects of treatments on traditional complications and geriatric conditions associated with diabetes, no consensus exists on the optimal interventions for older diabetic adults. The Association of Specialty Professors, along with the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the American Diabetes Association, held a workshop, summarized in this Perspective, to discuss current knowledge regarding diabetes and cardiovascular disease in older adults, identify gaps, and propose questions to guide future research. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Assessment of prevalence and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasikumar G

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcer(DFU is very common yet challenging complication of diabetes worldwide. These ulcers are biologically compromised majorly by ischemia and neuropathy. Ischemia has gained recognition as a significant cause of DFU. The association of peripheral arterial disease(PAD largely impacts the treatment outcomes of DFU in terms of ulcer healing, lower limb amputations and mortality. The burden of PAD in DFU in South Indian population has not been assessed adequately in the recent years. A multidisciplinary approach to DFU and prompt diagnosis of ischemia will decrease the loss of limb and life. The objective of the study was to assess the peripheral arterial disease and associated risk factors in patients with diabetic foot ulcer. A total of 100 patients were evaluated in this study. The patients were subjected to detailed history and clinical examination which included distal pulse assessment, ankle-brachial index(ABI and duplex scan to evaluate PAD. The data was subjected to statistical analysis to find out association between parameters of interest. The prevalence of PAD in DFU was found to be 36%. It was more prevalent in males and in age>40 years and higher with increasing age. PAD was associated almost equally with plantar and dorsal ulcers, more often whole of foot was involved. There is significant association of PAD with longer diabetic duration(p<0.0001 with mean disease duration of 10 years. Previous studies aimed to study prevalence of PAD in diabetes irrespective of foot ulcer. The present study analyzed various factors coexisting with DFU and PAD. The results conclude that peripheral arterial disease is a potential risk factor for major limb amputations.

  16. Elevated fasting plasma cortisol is associated with ischemic heart disease and its risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Edinburgh type 2 diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M; Labad, Javier; Strachan, Mark W J; Braun, Anke; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Lee, Amanda J; Frier, Brian M; Seckl, Jonathan R; Walker, Brian R; Price, Jackie F

    2010-04-01

    Increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may underlie the metabolic syndrome, but whether circulating cortisol levels predict cardiovascular end points is less clear. People with type 2 diabetes are at increased cardiovascular disease risk and thus are suitable to study associations of plasma cortisol with cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess whether altered HPA axis activity was associated with features of the metabolic syndrome and ischemic heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in the general community, including 919 men and women aged 67.9 (4.2) yr with type 2 diabetes (the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study). We measured fasting morning plasma cortisol. Associations between cortisol levels, features of the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and ischemic heart disease were determined. Elevated plasma cortisol levels were associated with raised fasting glucose and total cholesterol levels (P cortisol levels were associated with prevalent ischemic heart disease (>800 vs. cortisol is also associated with a greater prevalence of ischemic heart disease, independent of conventional risk factors. Understanding the role of cortisol in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease merits further exploration.

  17. Preserved GLP-1 effects in a diabetic patient with Cushing's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritzel, R A; Kleine, N; Holst, Jens Juul

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: A patient with diabetes mellitus, who participated in a study with intravenous administration of GLP-1, was later found to have Cushing's disease (markedly elevated 24 h urinary cortisol excretion and inadequate suppression of fasting cortisol with 2 mg dexamethasone). His diabetic state...... mellitus due to Cushing's disease with GLP-1 actions in typical type 2 diabetes. DESIGN AND METHODS: GLP-1 (1.2 pmol/kg/min) and placebo had been infused into ten patients with diabetes mellitus over 4 h in the fasting state. The results from the patient with Cushing's disease (C) were compared to the data...... with Cushing's disease compared to those with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The insulinotropic, glucagonostatic and glucose-lowering actions of GLP-1 in a patient with diabetes mellitus due to cortisol excess were similar to actions in typical type 2 diabetes. Therefore incretin mimetics might be a novel...

  18. How perceived quality of GP care and disease knowledge in diabetes patients correlate with disease outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, J.C.; Plass, A.M.C.; Sixma, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In addition to good management by the doctor, for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), good self-management is crucial for preventing debilitating and costly long term complications. However, it is not yet clear what influences disease self management. It is known that knowledge of the

  19. 75 FR 4830 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel. Predictors of Genitourinary Disorders... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Grant Program. Date: March 12, 2010. Time: 2 p.m...

  20. Comparison of carotid and cerebrovascular disease between diabetic and non-diabetic patients using dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Ci; Yang Zhigang; Chu Zhigang; Dong Zhihui; Li Yunming; Shao Heng; Deng Wen

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To clarify the differences of the carotid and cerebrovascular disease between patients with and without type 2 diabetes using dual-source CT angiography. Materials and methods: Dual-source CT angiography of the carotid and cerebrovascular arteries was performed in 79 type 2 diabetic patients and 207 non-diabetic patients. The type, extent and distribution of plaques, and luminal stenosis were compared. Results: Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients had a higher overall incidence of plaque (p 0.05), as well as for the number of diseased segments and the distribution of plaques; both mainly involved the bilateral cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. As for the stenosis, non-obstructive lesions were more common in diabetic patients (p 0.05). Conclusion: Diabetes is associated with a higher incidence of plaque and non-obstructive stenosis. However, no significant differences were observed in the type, extent and distribution of involved plaques between diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

  1. Oral health in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingam Amara Swapna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study is to assess the subjective and objective oral manifestations and salivary pH in diabetic and nondiabetic uremic patients at a nephrology clinic. A total of 194 diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, who were divided into four groups, Group A, B, C, D, and who were attending a nephrology clinic were included in the study. Predialytic unstimulated whole salivary pH was recorded using pH- measuring strips. Subjective and objective findings were evaluated and recorded in the specially designed pro forma. Dental health assessment consisted of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and community periodontal index (CPI. Dysgeusia was found to be significantly more prevalent in nondiabetic patients on dialysis. Uremic odor showed high significance (P <0.05 with 75% patients being positive in diabetic dialysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of tongue coating between the four groups. A statistically high significance was observed with the objective oral manifestation of mucosal petechiae, with P = 0.01. There was an increased periodontal pocket depth among diabetic CKD patients as compared to that in nondiabetic patients. A moderate significance was found, with a CPI score showing P <0.05. Increased prevalence of caries was noticed among the diabetic CKD patients (Groups A, B. Recorded salivary pH showed no significant difference among diabetic and nondiabetic CKD patients. Findings suggest that these patients are at risk of developing complications, related to systemic health causing morbidity and mortality. Hence, these patients are to be motivated for comprehensive professional oral care and self oral hygiene instructions. Additional research is necessary to elucidate and correlate the combined influence of diabetes, CKD, and dialysis on oral health.

  2. Review: An Australian model of care for co-morbid diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Clement; Zimbudzi, Edward; Teede, Helena; Cass, Alan; Fulcher, Greg; Gallagher, Martin; Kerr, Peter G; Jan, Stephen; Johnson, Greg; Mathew, Tim; Polkinghorne, Kevan; Russell, Grant; Usherwood, Tim; Walker, Rowan; Zoungas, Sophia

    2018-02-05

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two of the most prevalent co-morbid chronic diseases in Australia. The increasing complexity of multi-morbidity, and current gaps in health-care delivery for people with co-morbid diabetes and CKD, emphasise the need for better models of care for this population. Previously, proposed published models of care for co-morbid diabetes and CKD have not been co-designed with stake-holders or formally evaluated. Particular components of health-care shown to be effective in this population are interventions that: are structured, intensive and multifaceted (treating diabetes and multiple cardiovascular risk factors); involve multiple medical disciplines; improve self-management by the patient; and upskill primary health-care. Here we present an integrated patient-centred model of health-care delivery incorporating these components and co-designed with key stake-holders including specialist health professionals, general practitioners and Diabetes and Kidney Health Australia. The development of the model of care was informed by focus groups of patients and health-professionals; and semi-structured interviews of care-givers and health professionals. Other distinctives of this model of care are routine screening for psychological morbidity; patient-support through a phone advice line; and focused primary health-care support in the management of diabetes and CKD. Additionally, the model of care integrates with the patient-centred health-care home currently being rolled out by the Australian Department of Health. This model of care will be evaluated after implementation across two tertiary health services and their primary care catchment areas. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Cambodian Refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Grant N; Schell, Terry L; Wong, Eunice C; Berthold, S Megan; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Elliott, Marc N; Bardenheier, Barbara H; Gregg, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    To determine rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees, and to assess the proportion whose conditions are satisfactorily managed in comparison to the general population. Self-report and laboratory/physical health assessment data obtained from a household probability sample of U.S.-residing Cambodian refugees (N = 331) in 2010-2011 were compared to a probability sample of the adult U.S. population (N = 6,360) from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees greatly exceeded rates found in the age- and gender-adjusted U.S. Cambodian refugees with diagnosed hypertension or hyperlipidemia were less likely than their counterparts in the general U.S. population to have blood pressure and total cholesterol within recommended levels. Increased attention should be paid to prevention and management of diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Cambodian refugee community. Research is needed to determine whether this pattern extends to other refugee groups.

  4. Polycystic ovary disease. A risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzone, A; Caruso, A; Di Simone, N; De Carolis, S; Fulghesu, A M; Mancuso, S

    1995-04-01

    We investigated the impact of pregestationally elevated insulin plasma levels on glycemic control in pregnant women with polycystic ovary disease (PCOD). Twelve patients with PCOD who became pregnant within six months following evaluation of their metabolic status were the study subjects. Four were obese and six (two obese) had a hyperinsulinemic response to the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). They were tested with the OGTT at 28-30 weeks of gestation. We also tested 12 normal patients and 10 consecutive patients with gestational diabetes; all were at the same gestational age. Plasma levels of insulin and glucose were determined in the samples collected for a period of four hours after glucose load (100 g). All PCOD patients significantly increased their insulin secretion in pregnancy. The hyperinsulinemic PCOD patients developed gestational diabetes (two patients) and impaired gestational glucose tolerance (three patients). The area under the insulin curve was greater in PCOD patients than in control and gestational diabetes patients (P PCOD may develop a derangement of glycemic control, probably related to their pregestational insulinemic status.

  5. The Role of Glucose Transporters in Brain Disease: Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kaushik; DeSilva, Shanal; Abbruscato, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of altered brain glucose metabolism has long been suggested in both diabetes and Alzheimer’s diseases. However, the preceding mechanism to altered glucose metabolism has not been well understood. Glucose enters the brain via glucose transporters primarily present at the blood-brain barrier. Any changes in glucose transporter function and expression dramatically affects brain glucose homeostasis and function. In the brains of both diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease patients, changes in glucose transporter function and expression have been observed, but a possible link between the altered glucose transporter function and disease progress is missing. Future recognition of the role of new glucose transporter isoforms in the brain may provide a better understanding of brain glucose metabolism in normal and disease states. Elucidation of clinical pathological mechanisms related to glucose transport and metabolism may provide common links to the etiology of these two diseases. Considering these facts, in this review we provide a current understanding of the vital roles of a variety of glucose transporters in the normal, diabetic and Alzheimer’s disease brain. PMID:23202918

  6. 75 FR 78717 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Sample Access (PAR-10-90)-Type 1 Diabetes. Date: January 24, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To... in Diabetes. Date: January 25, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...

  7. 76 FR 20359 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; PA10-067: Stem Cells and Diabetic Skin... Major Ongoing Clinical Research Studies in CKD (R01). Date: May 17, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research...

  8. Audit of Diabetic Soft Tissue Infection and Foot Disease in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Soft tissue infection and foot disease are well known complications among diabetes mellitus patients. With an increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Africa, management of these complications is expected to become a major problem. OBJECTIVE: To audit the surgical management of diabetic

  9. The interdisciplinary approach to the implementation of a diabetes home care disease management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Mary Ann; Lapides, Shawn; Hayden, Corrine; Santangelo, Roxanne

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes is a national epidemic and a leading cause of hospitalizations in the United States. Home care agencies need to be able to provide effective Diabetes Disease Management to help prevent avoidable hospitalizations and assist patients to live a good quality of life. This article describes one organization's journey toward providing patients with better diabetes care resulting in an improved quality of life.

  10. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targher, Giovanni; Lonardo, Amedeo; Byrne, Christopher D

    2018-02-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and diabetes mellitus are common diseases that often coexist and might act synergistically to increase the risk of hepatic and extra-hepatic clinical outcomes. NAFLD affects up to 70-80% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and up to 30-40% of adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The coexistence of NAFLD and diabetes mellitus increases the risk of developing not only the more severe forms of NAFLD but also chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Indeed, substantial evidence links NAFLD with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus. NAFLD is also associated with an increased risk of developing microvascular diabetic complications, especially chronic kidney disease. This Review focuses on the strong association between NAFLD and the risk of chronic vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus or type 2 diabetes mellitus, thereby promoting an increased awareness of the extra-hepatic implications of this increasingly prevalent and burdensome liver disease. We also discuss the putative underlying mechanisms by which NAFLD contributes to vascular diseases, as well as the emerging role of changes in the gut microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and associated vascular diseases.

  11. Risk Factors for Development of Cardiovascular Complications in Patients with Chronic Renal Disease and Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Mataradžija

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cardiovascular diseases are the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic renal disease. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the risk factors of cardiovascular complications in patients with various stages of chronic renal disease (CRD, with or without diabetes mellitus (DM.Patients and methods:The study included 98 patients with different stages of the CRD, with creatinine clearance <60 ml/min/1,73m2, and laboratory parameters monitored: homocysteine, BNP, cholesterol, LDL, HDL, HbA1c, Body Mass Index (BMI. First group comprised 49 patients with DM, age 50-82 years, M 28/F 21. Second group comprised 49 patients without DM, age 35-80 years, M 18/F 31. The IMT (intima media thickness was measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and all patients had echocardiography examination done by 2D Doppler ultrasonography.Results:The IMT values in diabetic patients had statistically significant positive correlation with homocysteine values of r=0,9393, p<0,034, and cholesterol r=0,289, p<0,05, compared to non-diabetics. A significant negative correlation was found between the ejection fraction (EF and BMI in both groups, more prominent in non-diabetics r=0,289, p<0,044 (diabetics r=0,162, p>0,05. 47,4% of diabetics had arteriosclerotic changes on carotid arteries, 8,5% had stenosis of ACC, and 22,0% had rhythm abnormalities on ECG. A positive correlation between IMT and BMI was found in diabetics, but was not statistically significant r=0,111, p>0,05. In the diabetics group a significantly higher (p<0,05 values of BNP, HbA1c, proteinuria, BMI, and cholesterol were found, and significantly lowered EF (p<0,0001.Conclusion:Risk factors for cardiovascular complications in patients with DM are various, and the most pronounced significance was found in the values of homocystein, BNP and cholesterol.

  12. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  13. Diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: the thread of Ariadne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Maria; Milionis, Haralampos

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, the hepatic fat accumulation) and non alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, the aggressive form of liver steatosis plus inflammation and hepatocyte necrosis) are reaching epidemic dimensions in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM). Taking into account that the incidence of DM increases worldwide, these entities represent major health problems. There is accumulating evidence that diabetic subjects with NASH are at increased risk not only for cardiovascular disease compications but also for cirrhosis and hepatocellular cancer. On the other hand, the presence of NAFLD correlates with an increased risk for the development of DM. The most-widely accepted pathophysiological mechanisms relating DM and NAFLD include central obesity and insulin resistanc, but new insights are under scrutiny. Therapeutic modalities used for the management of diabetes have been studied for their impact on NAFLD/NASH and both neutral and beneficial effects have been reported. In this review, we discuss issues regarding the epidemiology, the pathophysiological pathways relating NAFLD with DM and consider strategies that may be useful in the management of NAFLD in the diabetic population.

  14. Egg consumption and cardiovascular disease among diabetic individuals: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran NL

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nga L Tran, Leila M Barraj, Jacqueline M Heilman, Carolyn G ScraffordExponent Center for Chemical Regulation and Food Safety, Washington, DC, USABackground: This study reviewed epidemiological and experimental evidence on the relationship between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease (CVD risks among type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM individuals, and T2DM risk in nondiabetic subjects.Results: Four of the six studies that examined CVD and mortality and egg consumption among diabetics found a statistically significant association. Of the eight studies evaluating incident T2DM and egg consumption, four prospective studies found a statistically significant association. Lack of adjustment for dietary confounders was a common study limitation. A small number of experimental studies examined the relationship between egg intake and CVD risk biomarkers among diabetics or individuals with T2DM risk factors. Studies among healthy subjects found suggestive evidence that dietary interventions that include eggs may reduce the risk of T2DM and metabolic syndrome.Conclusion: Differences in study design, T2DM status, exposure measurement, subject age, control for confounders and follow-up time present significant challenges for conducting a meta-analysis. Conflicting results, coupled with small sample sizes, prevent broad interpretation. Given the study limitations, these findings need to be further investigated.Keywords: type II diabetes mellitus, diet, cardiovascular risk factors, coronary heart disease, stroke

  15. Reimbursement for pediatric diabetes intensive case management: a model for chronic diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Joni K; Logan, Kathy J; Hamm, Robert M; Sproat, Scott M; Musser, Kathleen M; Everhart, Patricia D; McDermott, Harrold M; Copeland, Kenneth C

    2004-01-01

    . Differences between participating and nonparticipating groups included age (participants were of younger age), double-parent households (participants were more likely to be from double parent households), and number of medical visits kept (participants kept more follow-up visits). No differences in duration of diabetes, months followed in the program, sex, or ethnicity were observed. Contracting with third-party payers for pediatric diabetes intensive case management services reduces costs by reducing emergency department and inpatient hospital utilizations, likely a result of intensive education and immediate access to the diabetes health care team for crisis management. Such strategies may prove to be cost saving not only for diabetes management but also for managing other costly and personnel-intensive chronic diseases.

  16. [Management of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients with lower limb critical ischaemia: assessment of operational risk, drug therapy and indications for interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedov, I I; Kalashnikov, V Iu; Terekhin, S A; Melkozerov, K V

    2012-01-01

    Despite obvious progress in management of diabetes mellitus, the DM-related complications rate remains inadmissibly high. Macroangiopathy is known to rank first amongst complications of diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease remains to be the major cause of death. Analysed herein are peculiarities of the clinical course in diabetic patients presenting with coronary artery disease and lower limb critical ischaemia, followed by discussing the issues concerning drug therapy, preoperative examination, and methods of diagnosis in this cohort of patients prior to vascular operations, assessment of the preoperative risk, indications for coronarography and myocardial revascularization. Also presented are the results of the main clinical trials dedicated to preoperative myocardial revascularization, including those in diabetic patients with limb critical ischaemia, and finally highlighting current importance of optimizing approaches to managing and working out algorithms of treatment policy for diabetic patients with a combination of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and critical limb ischaemia.

  17. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vani; Mangaiyarkarasi, T; Gopal, R

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes different types of health care-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and meningitis. We report here a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease. A middle-aged man with a known case of diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease presented with the complaints of blurred vision in the left eye and the patient was found to have cataract. Patient was operated for cataract and Intraocular lens implanted. Patient developed headache and vomiting on the 4th post-operative day. Lumbar puncture was carried out and gram stain of cerebrospinal fluid showed Gram-negative bacilli in the direct smear and culture yielded a heavy growth of K. pneumoniae. The patient was treated with antimicrobials according to the susceptibility pattern. He initially showed improvement but later on developed altered sensorium and hypotension. Patient succumbed to infection in spite of all medical attention.

  18. Celiac Disease and Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes: Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneman Denis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the advent of sensitive and specific serologic testing, routine screening for celiac disease (CD in diabetic populations may not be universal practice, and many clinicians struggle to find the optimal approach to managing CD in pediatric Type 1 diabetes (T1D patients. While some clinicians advocate screening for CD in all patients with T1D, others are unsure whether this is warranted. The diagnosis of patients who present with symptomatic CD, including malabsorption and obvious pathology upon biopsy, remains straightforward, with improvements noted on a gluten-free diet. Many patients identified by screening, however, tend to be asymptomatic. Evidence is inconclusive as to whether the benefits of screening and potentially treating asymptomatic individuals outweigh the harms of managing a population already burdened with a serious illness. This review focuses on current knowledge of CD in children and youth with T1D, highlighting important elements of the disease's pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and diagnostic challenges.

  19. Impact of a diabetes disease management program on diabetes control and patient quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasekaba, Tshepo Mokuedi; Graco, Marnie; Risteski, Chrissie; Jasper, Andrea; Berlowitz, David J; Hawthorne, Graeme; Hutchinson, Anastasia

    2012-02-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes is projected to be 5.4% of the adult population by the year 2025. Diabetes is associated with multiple medical complications that both decrease health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) and contribute to earlier mortality. There is growing evidence for the effectiveness of multidisciplinary disease management programs that incorporate self-management principles in improving patients' long-term outcomes. The aim of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of this approach in improving: (1) glycemic control measured by HbA1c, and (2) HR-QOL measured by the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQOL), at enrollment and at 12-months follow-up. Between 2004 and 2008, a total of 967 patients were enrolled in the program; 545 (56%) of these patients had HbA1c data available at baseline and at 12 months. Mean HbA1c at enrollment was 8.6% (SD 1.9) versus 7.3% (SD 1.2) at 12 months (Pmanagement program for patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes can improve both glycemic control and HR-QOL.

  20. A Genome-Wide Association Study of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zuydam, Natalie R; Ahlqvist, Emma; Sandholm, Niina

    2018-01-01

    complementary dichotomous and quantitative DKD phenotypes: the principal dichotomous analysis involved 5,717 T2D subjects, 3,345 with DKD. Promising association signals were evaluated in up to 26,827 subjects with T2D (12,710 with DKD). A combined (T1D+T2D) GWAS was performed using complementary data available......Identification of sequence variants robustly associated with predisposition to diabetic kidney disease (DKD) has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms responsible. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of DKD in type 2 diabetes (T2D) using eight...... for subjects with T1D, which, with replication samples, involved up to 40,340 diabetic subjects (and 18,582 DKD cases).Analysis of specific DKD phenotypes identified a novel signal near GABRR1 (rs9942471, p=4.5×10-8) associated with 'microalbuminuria' in European T2D cases. However, no replication...

  1. Parenting goals: predictors of parent involvement in disease management of children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elizabeth M; Iannotti, Ronald J; Schneider, Stefan; Nansel, Tonja R; Haynie, Denise L; Sobel, Douglas O

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a measure of diabetes-specific parenting goals for parents of children with type 1 diabetes and to examine whether parenting goals predict a change in parenting involvement in disease management. An independent sample of primary caretakers of 87 children aged 10 to 16 years with type 1 diabetes completed the measure of parenting goals (diabetes-specific and general goals); both parent and child completed measures of parent responsibility for diabetes management at baseline and 6 months. Parents ranked diabetes-specific parenting goals as more important than general parenting goals, and rankings were moderately stable over time. Parenting goals were related to parent responsibility for diabetes management. The relative ranking of diabetes-specific parenting goals predicted changes in parent involvement over 6 months, with baseline ranking of goals predicting more parental involvement at follow-up. Parenting goals may play an important role in family management of type 1 diabetes.

  2. Survival in dialysis patients is not different between patients with diabetes as primary renal disease and patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroijen, Marielle A.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; Grootendorst, Diana C.; Noordzij, Marlies; Romijn, Johannes A.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Apperloo, A. J.; Bijlsma, J. A.; Boekhout, M.; Boer, W. H.; van der Boog, P. J. M.; Büller, H. R.; van Buren, M.; de Charro, F. Th; Doorenbos, C. J.; van den Dorpel, M. A.; van Es, A.; Fagel, W. J.; Feith, G. W.; de Fijter, C. W. H.; Frenken, L. A. M.; van Geelen, J. A. C. A.; Gerlag, P. G. G.; Gorgels, J. P. M. C.; Grave, W.; Huisman, R. M.; Jager, K. J.; Jie, K.; Koning-Mulder, W. A. H.; Koolen, M. I.; Kremer Hovinga, T. K.; Lavrijssen, A. T. J.; Luik, A. J.; van der Meulen, J.; Parlevliet, K. J.; Raasveld, M. H. M.; van der Sande, F. M.; Schonck, M. J. M.; Schuurmans, M. M. J.; Siegert, C. E. H.; Stegeman, C. A.; Stevens, P.; Thijssen, J. G. P.; Valentijn, R. M.; Vastenburg, G. H.; Verburgh, C. A.; Vincent, H. H.; Vos, P. F.

    2011-01-01

    On dialysis, survival among patients with diabetes mellitus is inferior to survival of non-diabetic patients. We hypothesized that patients with diabetes as primary renal disease have worse survival compared to patients with diabetes as a co-morbid condition and aimed to compare all-cause mortality

  3. Comparative analysis of diabetic nephropathy and non-diabetic nephropathy disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuxiang Chen

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Treatment effect of diabetic nephropathy patients is relatively poor compared to that of non-diabetic patients. In clinics, management and prevention of diabetic patients should be strengthened to avoid complication of nephropathy which brings serious injury to patients.

  4. Diet, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes in ischemic heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamideh, S.; Behzad, M.; Hassan, E.; Mojtaba, S.

    2007-01-01

    Ischemic Heart Diseases (IHD) have the highest cause of mortality in the Islamic Republic of Iran. Unhealthy dietary habits as a major threat make our country prone to an epidemic of non-communicable diseases in the next two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the association of diet, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes with risk of developing IHD in Tehran. This case - control study was conducted during 2003 and 2004 in Tehran Heart Center and Tehran Shahid Rajaii Hospital. A sample of 100 IHD patients (cases) and 100 individuals free of cardiovascular symptoms (controls) were entered into the study; the Controls were matched to the IHD patients by age (+- years) and sex. Information was recorded by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). All data were analyzed with the SPSS for windows, version11. Multivariate analysis showed a significant and positive association between Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Diabetes and risk of developing IHD. Odds ratios for these three risk factors with 95% confidence interval (CI) were: 3.9, 12 and 8.6 respectively. In he cases consumption of high dairy fat and fried foods were significantly high, that increased the risk of IHD 9.8 and 54.6 times, respectively. Also low intake of fish was directly associated with increase of the IHD risk (95% CI, OR: 13.9). Moreover low consumption of vegetables and fruits independently increased the risk of IHD 19.8 times in cases group. Hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes have a significant association with development of IHD. High consumption of fatty food and low consumption of fish, vegetables and fruits also contribute to development of IHD. (author)

  5. Cardiovascular disease by diabetes status in five ethnic minority groups compared to ethnic Norwegians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diep Lien M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population in Norway has become multi-ethnic due to migration from Asia and Africa over the recent decades. The aim of the present study was to explore differences in the self-reported prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD and associated risk factors by diabetes status in five ethnic minority groups compared to ethnic Norwegians. Methods Pooled data from three population-based cross-sectional studies conducted in Oslo between 2000 and 2002 was used. Of 54,473 invited individuals 24,749 (45.4% participated. The participants self-reported health status, underwent a clinical examination and blood samples were drawn. A total of 17,854 individuals aged 30 to 61 years born in Norway, Sri-Lanka, Pakistan, Iran, Vietnam or Turkey were included in the study. Chi-square tests, one-way ANOVAs, ANCOVAs, multiple and logistic regression were used. Results Age- and gender-standardized prevalence of self-reported CVD varied between 5.8% and 8.2% for the ethnic minority groups, compared to 2.9% among ethnic Norwegians (p Conclusions Ethnic differences in the prevalence of CVD were prominent for individuals without diabetes. Primary CVD prevention including identification of undiagnosed diabetes should be prioritized for ethnic minorities without known diabetes.

  6. Reporting diet-related health issues through newspapers: portrayal of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellyer, Nicole Elizabeth; Haddock-Fraser, Janet

    2011-02-01

    This study identifies (i) the extent to which newsprint media communicate to their readers the lifestyle factors associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes and (ii) newspaper portrayal of social determinants affecting onset of disease. A content analysis of five leading UK national newspapers and their Sunday equivalents was conducted over a 3-month period between January and March 2008. This study shows that cardiovascular disease had much higher press interest than Type 2 diabetes. 'Middle-market' and 'Quality' papers had higher levels of reporting than the 'Popular' press, but the patterns were more complex when the comprehensiveness of reporting was measured within each article. Social determinants affecting disease onset were poorly reported by newspapers, supporting similar research conducted in other countries. This research identifies that there is potential for newspapers to improve their reporting of lifestyle diseases, by including individual and social determinants of disease onset. Lower social classes who read the popular press receive the lowest frequency of reporting and could benefit most from this information. While the research identifies that newspapers are missing the potential to actively communicate and reinforce government health policy, it recognises that the commercial context of the print media may counter such behaviour.

  7. Adherence to dietary recommendations in diabetes mellitus: disease acceptance as a potential mediator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski M

    2018-01-01

    coefficient =−0.455; P=0.000. However, the lack of regular blood glucose testing and low level of acceptance had only partially negative impacts on adherence to dietary recommendations (Goodman mediation test, Z=1.939; P=0.054. This dependence was not seen in patients treated with diet and concomitant oral medicines and/or insulin therapy.Conclusion: Effective dietary education should include activities promoting a more positive attitude toward the disease. This may be obtained by individual counseling, respecting the patient’s needs, and focus on regular blood glucose testing. Keywords: patient adherence, diabetes mellitus type 2, attitude toward health, glycemic control

  8. The association between cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adults with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Halling-Overgaard, A-S; Andersen, Y M F

    2017-01-01

    databases. Data extraction was done by two independent reviewers. We found a total of 2,855 citations, of which 53 were considered relevant based on title and abstract. Sixteen publications were included in the qualitative analysis, of which 13 were also included in a quantitative meta-analysis of crude...... 0.83-1.56), but a positive association was observed with angina pectoris (OR 1.73; 95% CI 1.27-2.37). Meta-analysis on adjusted data gave similar results. While adults with AD in some populations have increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity and smoking, it is unlikely......Recent studies examining the association between atopic dermatitis (AD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes have shown inconsistent results. We compared the risk of CVD and diabetes between adult patients with and without AD by searching the Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science...

  9. Plasma copeptin as marker of cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bar-Shalom, Dana; Poulsen, Mikael K; Rasmussen, Lars M

    2014-01-01

    Recently, copeptin was found associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients treated in primary care. This study aimed to evaluate whether plasma copeptin correlated to CVD in asymptomatic T2DM patients intensively investigated....... A variety of clinical investigations were performed, including blood pressure measurements, carotid intima media thickness evaluation and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Blood sample analyses included copeptin measurements. Median plasma copeptin concentrations were similar in the T2DM group...... for sub-clinical CVD. A total of 302 T2DM patients referred to the Diabetes Clinic at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, entered the study. None of the patients had known or suspected CVD. As a control group, 30 healthy adults were recruited from the DanRisk study - a random sample of middle-aged Danes...

  10. Myocardial perfusion SPECT in diabetic patients for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.A.; Fatima, S.; Fatmi, S.; Kureshi, S.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of myocardial SPECT perfusion scan in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients. A total number of thirty diabetic patients (21 males, 9 females) were included in the study. All the patients had strong risk-factors for coronary artery disease (strong family history, chronic smokers, hyperlipidemia, history of chest pain). All patients underwent coronary angiography and stress/rest myocardial perfusion SPECT scans with Tc-99m MIBI (two days protocol). Twenty two patients had significant coronary artery stenosis and 8 had normal coronary arteries. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was positive in 19 subjects out of the 22 patients with significant stenosis (Sensitivity 86.4%) and negative (false negative) in only three. Out of 8 patients with normal angiography 7 had normal MPS (Specificity 87.5%) whereas only one patient revealed abnormality in the myocardial perfusion study. When compared with coronary angiography the positive predictive value and negative predictive value for Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion scan was 86.4% and 87.5% respectively. In conclusion, Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a useful screening modality for the detection of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients. (author)

  11. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and actual diagnostic criteria for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović-Perišić Nataša

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recent studies indicate that the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is increasing in the world. Chronic hyperglycemia in DM is associated with a long term damage, dysfunction and failure of various organs, especially retina, kidney, nerves and, in addition, with an increased risk of cardiovasclar disease. For a long time the illness has been unknown. Early diagnosis of diabetes could suspend the development of diabetic complications. The aim of the study was to establish risk for the development of coronary disease in the patients evaluated by the use of new diagnostic criteria for DM. Methods. The study included 930 participants without diagnosis of DM, hypertension, dyslipidemia, nor coronary heart disease two years before the study. The patients went through measuring of fasting plasma glycemia, erythrocytes, hematocrit, cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. In the group with hyperglycemia the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test was performed. We analyzed ECG and made blood pressure monitoring, and also measured body mass, height, waist and hip circumference. We analyzed life style, especially smoking, and exercise and family history. Results. Diabetes prevalence was 2.68%, and prevalences of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and DM were 12.15%. Average age of males and females was 38 and 45 years, respectively. In the healthy population there was higher frequency of smokers (55% vs 42%, but in the population with hyperglycemia there were more obesity (23% vs 10.5%, hypertension (39% vs 9%, hypercholesterolemia (76% vs 44.1%, lower HDL-C (52.2% vs 25.7%. Cummulative risk factor in healthy subjects, and those with hyperglycemia were 5.6% and 14%, respectively. Conclusion. Subjects with hyperglicemia without diagnosis of DM have higher risk factors for coronary heart disease.

  12. Disease and Economic Burden of Hospitalizations Attributable to Diabetes Mellitus and Its Complications: A Nationwide Study in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Quarti Machado Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with a significant burden globally. The costs of diabetes-related hospitalizations are unknown in most developing countries. The aim of this study was to estimate the total number and economic burden of hospitalizations attributable to diabetes mellitus (DM and its complications in adults from the perspective of the Brazilian Public Health System in 2014. Data sources included the National Health Survey (NHS and National database of Hospitalizations (SIH. We considered diabetes, its microvascular (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy and macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease, respiratory and urinary tract infections, as well as selected cancers. Assuming that DM patients are hospitalized for these conditions more frequently that non-DM individuals, we estimated the etiological fraction of each condition related to DM, using the attributable risk methodology. We present number, average cost per case, and overall costs of hospitalizations attributable to DM in Brazil in 2014, stratified by condition, state of the country, gender and age group. In 2014, a total of 313,273 hospitalizations due to diabetes in adults were reported in Brazil (4.6% of total adult hospitalization, totaling (international dollar Int$264.9 million. The average cost of an adult hospitalization due to diabetes was Int$845, 19% higher than hospitalization without DM. Hospitalizations due to cardiovascular diseases related to diabetes accounted for the higher proportion of costs (47.9%, followed by microvascular complications (25.4% and DM per se (18.1%. Understanding the costs of diabetes and its major complications is crucial to raise awareness and to support the decision-making process on policy implementation, also allowing the assessment of prevention and control strategies.

  13. Dual Blockade of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone System in Type 2 Diabetic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Huan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the efficacy and safety of dual blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS among patients with type 2 diabetic kidney disease. Data Sources: We searched the major literature repositories, including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE, for randomized clinical trials published between January 1990 and October 2015 that compared the efficacy and safety of the use of dual blockade of the RAAS versus the use of monotherapy, without applying any language restrictions. Keywords for the searches included "diabetic nephropathy," "chronic kidney disease," "chronic renal insufficiency," "diabetes mellitus," "dual therapy," "combined therapy," "dual blockade," "renin-angiotensin system," "angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor," "angiotensin-receptor blocker," "aldosterone blockade," "selective aldosterone blockade," "renin inhibitor," "direct renin inhibitor," "mineralocorticoid receptor blocker," etc. Study Selection: The selected articles were carefully reviewed. We excluded randomized clinical trials in which the kidney damage of patients was related to diseases other than diabetes mellitus. Results: Combination treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor supplemented by an angiotensin II receptor blocking agent is expected to provide a more complete blockade of the RAAS and a better control of hypertension. However, existing literature has presented mixed results, in particular, related to patient safety. In view of this, we conducted a comprehensive literature review in order to explain the rationale for dual blockade of the RAAS, and to discuss the pros and cons. Conclusions: Despite the negative results of some recent large-scale studies, it may be immature to declare that the dual blockade is a failure because of the complex nature of the RAAS surrounding its diversified functions and utility. Further trials are warranted to study the combination therapy as an

  14. Vitamin B and its derivatives for diabetic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Amit D; Thakker, Divyesh; Rangoonwala, Arohi N; Gor, Deval; Walia, Rama

    2015-01-12

    Diabetes is a leading cause of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) mainly due to development and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). In absence of definitive treatments of DKD, small studies showed that vitamin B may help in delaying progression of DKD by inhibiting vascular inflammation and endothelial cell damage. Hence, it could be beneficial as a treatment option for DKD. To assess the benefits and harms of vitamin B and its derivatives in patients with DKD. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register to 29 October 2012 through contact with the Trials' Search Co-ordinator using search terms relevant to this review. We included randomised controlled trials comparing vitamin B or its derivatives, or both with placebo, no treatment or active treatment in patients with DKD. We excluded studies comparing vitamin B or its derivatives, or both among patients with pre-existing ESKD. Two authors independently assessed study eligibility, risk of bias and extracted data. Results were reported as risk ratio (RR) or risk differences (RD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous outcomes and mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for continuous outcomes. Statistical analyses were performed using the random-effects model. Nine studies compared 1354 participants randomised to either vitamin B or its derivatives with placebo or active control were identified. A total of 1102 participants were randomised to single vitamin B derivatives, placebo or active control in eight studies, and 252 participants randomised to multiple vitamin B derivatives or placebo. Monotherapy included different dose of pyridoxamine (four studies), benfotiamine (1), folic acid (1), thiamine (1), and vitamin B12 (1) while combination therapy included folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 in one study. Treatment duration ranged from two to 36 months. Selection bias was unclear in three studies and low in the remaining six studies. Two studies reported blinding of patient

  15. Diabetes and modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease: the prospective Million Women Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, Elizabeth A.; Pirie, Kirstin L.; Stevens, Richard J.; Beral, Valerie; Brown, Anna; Liu, Bette; Green, Jane; Reeves, Gillian K.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the effect of potentially modifiable lifestyle factors on the incidence of vascular disease in women with and without diabetes. In 1996-2001 over one million middle-aged women in the UK joined a prospective study, providing medical history, lifestyle and socio-demographic information. All participants were followed for hospital admissions and deaths using electronic record-linkage. Adjusted relative risks (RRs) and incidence rates were calculated to compare the incidence of coronary heart disease and stroke in women with and without diabetes and by lifestyle factors. At recruitment 25,915 women (2.1% of 1,242,338) reported current treatment for diabetes. During a mean follow-up of 6.1 years per woman, 21,928 had a first hospital admission or death from coronary heart disease (RR for women with versus without diabetes = 3.30, 95% CI 3.14-3.47) and 7,087 had a first stroke (RR = 2.47, 95% CI 2.24-2.74). Adjusted incidence rates of these conditions in women with diabetes increased with duration of diabetes, obesity, inactivity and smoking. The 5-year adjusted incidence rates for cardiovascular disease were 4.6 (95% CI 4.4-4.9) per 100 women aged 50-69 in non-smokers with diabetes, 5.9 (95% CI 4.6-7.6) in smokers with diabetes not using insulin and 11.0 (95% CI 8.3-14.7) in smokers with diabetes using insulin. Non-smoking women with diabetes who were not overweight or inactive still had threefold increased rate for coronary disease or stroke compared with women without diabetes. Of the modifiable factors examined in middle aged women with diabetes, smoking causes the greatest increase in cardiovascular disease, especially in those with insulin treated diabetes

  16. 75 FR 33817 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Pathogenic Mechanisms in UTI... Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Planning Grant for Ulcerative Colitis Trial in Children. Date: July 14...

  17. 76 FR 34717 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Teen-LABS. Date: July 15, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 2 p.m... Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition...

  18. 75 FR 57971 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Central Repositories Non-Renewable Sample Access (PAR-10-90)--Liver, Kidney, Urological Sciences. Date: October 12, 2010. Time: 2 p.m. to 4...

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors and diseases precede oral hypoglycaemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkens, JA; Herings, RMC; Stolk, RP; Spoelstra, JA; Grobbee, DE; Leufkens, HGM

    Although patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors, the link between these diseases remains largely unexplained. In this case-control study, the earlier use of cardiovascular drugs (before the diagnosis of diabetes) was investigated among cases with

  20. 78 FR 34663 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, PAR-12-265 Ancillary Studies: The Microbiome in Child Health, Development and Obesity. Date: June 21, 2013. Time: 1:30 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Agenda...

  1. 77 FR 40368 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Ancillary Studies to the Intestinal Stem Cells Consortium. Date: July 30, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases...

  2. 76 FR 11501 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Amended Notice of Meeting Notice is hereby given of a change in the meeting of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis...

  3. 76 FR 12125 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; GenitoUrinary Development Molecular Anatomy Project (GUDMAP) Date: March 23, 2011. Time: 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  4. Impact of dietary fiber intake on glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Fukuoka Diabetes Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hiroki; Iwase, Masanori; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ogata-Kaizu, Shinako; Ide, Hitoshi; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Joudai, Tamaki; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Uchida, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2013-12-11

    Dietary fiber is beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although it is consumed differently in ethnic foods around the world. We investigated the association between dietary fiber intake and obesity, glycemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. A total of 4,399 patients were assessed for dietary fiber intake using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The associations between dietary fiber intake and various cardiovascular risk factors were investigated cross-sectionally. Body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, triglyceride and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein negatively associated with dietary fiber intake after adjusting for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, total energy intake, fat intake, saturated fatty acid intake, leisure-time physical activity and use of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin. The homeostasis model assessment insulin sensitivity and HDL cholesterol positively associated with dietary fiber intake. Dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension and metabolic syndrome after multivariate adjustments including obesity. Furthermore, dietary fiber intake was associated with lower prevalence of albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate and chronic kidney disease after multivariate adjustments including protein intake. Additional adjustments for obesity, hypertension or metabolic syndrome did not change these associations. We demonstrated that increased dietary fiber intake was associated with better glycemic control and more favorable cardiovascular disease risk factors including chronic kidney disease in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Diabetic patients should be encouraged to consume more dietary fiber in daily life.

  5. Abdominal obesity and type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians: dietary strategies including edible oils, cooking practices and sugar intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, S; Misra, A

    2017-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are increasing in rural and urban regions of South Asia including India. Pattern of fat deposition in abdomen, ectopic fat deposition (liver, pancreas) and also low lean mass are contributory to early-onset insulin resistance, dysmetabolic state and diabetes in Asian Indians. These metabolic perturbations are further exacerbated by changing lifestyle, diet urbanization, and mechanization. Important dietary imbalances include increasing use of oils containing high amount of trans fatty acids and saturated fats (partially hydrogenated vegetable oil, palmolein oil) use of deep frying method and reheating of oils for cooking, high intake of saturated fats, sugar and refined carbohydrates, low intake of protein, fiber and increasing intake of processed foods. Although dietary intervention trials are few; the data show that improving quality of carbohydrates (more complex carbohydrates), improving fat quality (more monounsaturated fatty acids and omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids) and increasing protein intake could improve blood glucose, serum insulin, lipids, inflammatory markers and hepatic fat, but more studies are needed. Finally, regulatory framework must be tightened to impose taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages, oils such as palmolein, and dietary fats and limit trans fats.

  6. Sonographic findings of common musculoskeletal disease in patients with diabetes mellitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min Ho; Park, Ji Seon [Dept. of Medicine, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Eun; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Young; Jin, Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can accompany many musculoskeletal (MSK) diseases. It is difficult to distinguish the DM-related MSK diseases based on clinical symptoms alone. Sonography is frequently used as a first imaging study for these MSK symptoms and is helpful to differentiate the various DM-related MSK diseases. This pictorial essay focuses on sonographic findings of various MSK diseases that can occur in diabetic patients.

  7. Integrative Network Analysis Unveils Convergent Molecular Pathways in Parkinson's Disease and Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jose A.; Potashkin, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level. ...

  8. Mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus and Addison's disease: a nationwide, matched, observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantzichristos, Dimitrios; Persson, Anders; Eliasson, Björn; Miftaraj, Mervete; Franzén, Stefan; Bergthorsdottir, Ragnhildur; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2017-01-01

    Our hypothesis was that patients with diabetes mellitus obtain an additional risk of death if they develop Addison's disease (AD). Nationwide, matched, observational cohort study cross-referencing the Swedish National Diabetes Register with Inpatient, Cancer and Cause of Death Registers in patients with diabetes (type 1 and 2) and AD and matched controls with diabetes. Clinical characteristics at baseline, overall, and cause-specific mortality were assessed. The relative risk of death was assessed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Between January 1996 and December 2012, 226 patients with diabetes and AD were identified and matched with 1129 controls with diabetes. Median (interquartile range) follow-up was 5.9 (2.7-8.6) years. When patients with diabetes were diagnosed with AD, they had an increased frequency of diabetes complications, but both medical history of cancer and coronary heart disease did not differ compared with controls. Sixty-four of the 226 patients with diabetes and AD (28%) died, while 112 of the 1129 controls (10%) died. The estimated relative risk increase (hazard ratio) in overall mortality in the diabetes and AD group was 3.89 (95% confidence interval 2.84-5.32) compared with controls with diabetes. The most common cause of death was cardiovascular in both groups, but patients with diabetes and AD showed an increased death rate from diabetes complications, infectious diseases and unknown causes. Patients with the rare combination of diabetes and AD showed a markedly increased mortality and died more frequently from infections and unknown causes than patients with diabetes alone. Improved strategy for the management of this combination of metabolic disorders is needed. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Cardiovascular disease risk profile and microvascular complications of diabetes: comparison of Indigenous cohorts with diabetes in Australia and Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maple-Brown Louise J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous populations of Australia and Canada experience disproportionately high rates of chronic disease. Our goal was to compare cardiovascular (CVD risk profile and diabetes complications from three recent comprehensive studies of diabetes complications in different Indigenous populations in Australia and Canada. Methods We compared participants from three recent studies: remote Indigenous Australians (2002-2003, n = 37 known diabetes, urban Indigenous Australians (2003-2005, n = 99 known diabetes, and remote Aboriginal Canadians (2001-2002, n = 188 known diabetes. Results The three groups were similar for HbA1c, systolic BP, diabetes duration. Although leaner by body-mass-index criteria, remote Indigenous Australians displayed a more adverse CVD risk profile with respect to: waist-hip-ratio (1.03, 0.99, 0.94, remote Indigenous Australians, urban Indigenous Australians, remote Canadians, p Conclusions Although there are many similarities in diabetes phenotype in Indigenous populations, this comparison demonstrates that CVD risk profiles and diabetes complications may differ among groups. Irrespective, management and intervention strategies are required from a young age in Indigenous populations and need to be designed in consultation with communities and tailored to community and individual needs.

  10. Application of support vector machine modeling for prediction of common diseases: the case of diabetes and pre-diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Wei; Liu, Tiebin; Valdez, Rodolfo; Gwinn, Marta; Khoury, Muin J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background We present a potentially useful alternative approach based on support vector machine (SVM) techniques to classify persons with and without common diseases. We illustrate the method to detect persons with diabetes and pre-diabetes in a cross-sectional representative sample of the U.S. population. Methods We used data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to develop and validate SVM models for two classification schemes: Classification ...

  11. Periodontal diseases and caries experience of diabetic patients in an Arabian community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlKhateeb, T. L; AlAmoudi, N. H; Fatani, H. H; Mira, S. A; Ardawi, M. S

    1991-01-01

    A group of diabetic patients living in an Arabian community were matched by sex and age with a non-diabetic control group. Examination for periodontal status and dental caries was carried out on the matched pairs. Diabetics exhibited more gingival inflammation and increased probing depths when com pared with age-/sex-matched controls. The caries experience of diabetic patients was higher than that of normal groups. The findings of this study highlight the urgent need to develop a preventive dental program for diabetic patients so as to minimize their experience of dental disease. (author)

  12. Egg consumption, cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Nina Rica Wium; Lytken Larsen, Mogens; Dyerberg, Jørn

    2018-01-01

    Eggs are rich in nutrients and a source of essential fatty- and amino acids, and the food item with highest cholesterol content. Since the 1970s dietary recommendations have advised limiting egg intake to 2-4 a week for the healthy population, and in those diagnosed with cardiovascular disease (CVD......) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) an even more restricted consumption. The aim of the present paper was to assess the recommendation to lower the dietary intake of cholesterol and especially the intake of egg to reduce the risk of CVD and T2D. We performed three web-based literature searches on human studies...... (observational and interventional) published within the past 10 years during spring 2015. High-quality intervention studies have found nonsignificant effects of increasing the consumption of eggs on risk markers for CVD and T2D in healthy subjects and subjects with T2D. The risk associations found...

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Youl Rhee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral arterial disease (PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects.

  14. Incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koye, D N; Shaw, J E; Reid, C M; Atkins, R C; Reutens, A T; Magliano, D J

    2017-07-01

    The aim was to systematically review published articles that reported the incidence of chronic kidney disease among people with diabetes. A systematic literature search was performed using MEDLINE, Embase and CINAHL databases. The titles and abstracts of all publications identified by the search were reviewed and 10 047 studies were retrieved. A total of 71 studies from 30 different countries with sample sizes ranging from 505 to 211 132 met the inclusion criteria. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria ranged from 1.3% to 3.8% for Type 1 diabetes. For Type 2 diabetes and studies combining both diabetes types, the range was from 3.8% to 12.7%, with four of six studies reporting annual rates between 7.4% and 8.6%. In studies reporting the incidence of eGFR Disease (MDRD) equation, apart from one study which reported an annual incidence of 8.9%, the annual incidence ranged from 1.9% to 4.3%. The annual incidence of end-stage renal disease ranged from 0.04% to 1.8%. The annual incidence of microalbuminuria and albuminuria is ~ 2-3% in Type 1 diabetes, and ~ 8% in Type 2 diabetes or mixed diabetes type. The incidence of developing eGFR kidney disease, there was only modest variation in incidence rates. These findings may be useful in clinical settings to help understand the risk of developing kidney disease among those with diabetes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  15. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Dash Atan, Nasrin; Koushki, Mehdi; Motedayen, Morteza; Dousti, Majid; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Vafaee, Reza; Norouzinia, Mohsen; Gholami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was the evaluation of the prevalence of NAFLD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging disease with high prevalence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Many studies have reported the prevalence of NAFLD in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. However, these results are inconsistent. A Literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, web of science and Science Direct from 2005 to August 2017. The necessary information was extracted. Heterogeneity was evaluated using I 2 statistic. Meta-regression analyses were performed to the estimation of the relationship between the year of study and sample size with the prevalence of NAFLD. Publication bias was assessed by both Begg rank correlation and Egger tests. Subgroup analysis was performed for identification of sources heterogeneity. Seventeen studies involving 10897 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with NAFLD were included in this meta-analysis. The overall prevalence of NAFLD in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients by random effects models was 54% (95% CI, 45%- 64%). There is a significant heterogeneity across studies with (I 2 = 99%, p> 0.01). The funnel plot as graphically and Begg and Egger as statistically showed no publication bias among studies. Subgroup analysis indicated that the prevalence of NAFLD in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients differed in predictive factors such as lipid profile, BMI, HbA1c, AST, and ALT. This finding in spite of heterogeneity of documents is corresponding to the positive correlation between NAFLD and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The findings indicated that the overall prevalence of NAFLD among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients is significantly higher. It can be concluded that type 2 diabetes mellitus patients should be managed to prevent NAFLD.

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor 121 and 165 in the subacromial bursa are involved in shoulder joint contracture in type II diabetics with rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Akiyoshi; Gotoh, Masafumi; Hamada, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Kazuhiro; Yamazaki, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Masato; Ueyama, Yoshito; Mochida, Joji; Fukuda, Hiroaki

    2003-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a glycoprotein that plays an important role in neovascularization and increases vascular permeability. We reported that VEGF is involved in motion pain of patients with rotator cuff disease by causing synovial proliferation in the subacromial bursa (SAB). The present study investigates whether VEGF is also involved in the development of shoulder contracture in diabetics with rotator cuff disease. We examined 67 patients with rotator cuff disease, including 36 with complete cuff tears, 20 with incomplete tears, and 11 without apparent tears (subacromial bursitis). The patients were into groups according to the presence or absence of diabetes (14 type II diabetics and 53 non-diabetics). Specimens of the synovium of the SAB were obtained from all patients during surgery. Expression of the VEGF gene in the synovium of the subacromial bursa was evaluated by using the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The VEGF protein was localized by immunohistochemistry, and the number of vessels was evaluated based on CD34 immunoreactivity. The results showed that VEGF mRNA was expressed in significantly more diabetics (100%, 14/14) than in non-diabetics (70%, 37/53) (P=0.0159, Fisher's test). Investigation of VEGF isoform expression revealed VEGF121 in all 14 diabetics and in 37 of the 53 non-diabetics, VEGF165 in 12 of the 14 diabetics and in 21 of the 53 non-diabetics, and VEGF189 in 1 of the 14 diabetics and in 2 of the 53 non-diabetics. No VEGF206 was expressed in either group. VEGF protein was localized in both vascular endothelial cells and synovial lining cells. The mean number of VEGF-positive vessels and the vessel area were also significantly greater in the diabetics (pshoulder joint contracture were more common in the diabetics (P=0.0329 and P=0.073, respectively; Fisher's test). The mean preoperative range of shoulder motion significantly differed in terms of elevation between two groups: 103.8 degrees in

  17. A STUDY OF CLINICAL, BIOCHEMICAL AND SONOLOGICAL PROFILE OF NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN TYPE 2 DIABETES PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganga Prasad Uppalapati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The Prevalence of Diabetes is increasing worldwide and is expected to affect 57 million adults in India by 2025. Virtually, the entire spectrum of liver disease is seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This includes NAFLD, NASH and cirrhosis. Nearly, 70- 80% of the diabetic subjects have been reported to have hepatic fat accumulation, referred to as NAFLD (Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. There are not enough studies done on hepatic status of diabetic patients in our country. Hence, this study aims to describe the hepatic profile of type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of the study is to assess the clinical, biochemical and sonological profile of fatty liver in type 2 diabetes patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Type 2 diabetes patients who are attending medical OPD (n=118 were taken as subjects. They underwent liver function tests, blood glucose levels and assessed by ultrasound examination of abdomen. Their diabetic duration and treatment history was also recorded. RESULTS Age wise and sex wise comparison of the liver function tests did not reveal any significant difference. Comparing mean blood glucose between those with or without fatty liver did not reveal any significant difference. There was no clinically significant difference between liver enzyme parameters among patients with fatty liver and those without fatty liver (as assessed by ultrasonogram. Significant number of females developed fatty liver disease as compared to males. Obesity was found to have a significant association with fatty liver disease. Only 6 patients among 60 patients of those with normal or underweight showed fatty liver change as compared to 44 patients. Among 58 patients of those with overweight or obese patients showed fatty liver change (assessed by ultrasonogram. CONCLUSION Obese persons are at greater risk of developing NAFLD. Females have high risk of developing fatty liver disease when compared to males. No significant correlation was found between

  18. Anticipatory guidance in type 2 diabetes to improve disease management; next steps after basal insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric L; Frias, Juan P; Trujillo, Jennifer M

    2018-03-23

    The alarming rise in the number of people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) presents primary care physicians with increasing challenges associated with long-term chronic disease care. Studies have shown that the majority of patients are not achieving or maintaining glycemic goals, putting them at risk of a wide range of diabetes-related complications. Disease- and self-management programs have been shown to help patients improve their glycemic control, and are likely to be of particular benefit for patients with diabetes dealing with these issues. Anticipatory guidance is an individualized, proactive approach to patient education and counseling by a health-care professional to support patients in better coping with problems before they arise. It has been shown to improve disease outcomes in a variety of chronic conditions, including diabetes. While important at all stages, anticipatory guidance may be of particular importance during changes in treatment regimens, and especially during transition to, and escalation of, insulin-based regimens. The aim of this article is to provide advice to physicians on anticipatory guidance for basal-insulin dosing, focusing on appropriate basal-insulin-dose increase and prevention of potentially deleterious basal-insulin doses, so called overbasalization. It also provides an overview of new treatment options for patients with T2D who are not well controlled on basal-insulin therapy, fixed-ratio combinations of basal insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, and advice on the type of anticipatory guidance needed to ensure safe and appropriate switching to these therapies.

  19. Erythrocytes as Potential Link between Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Carelli-Alinovi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many studies support the existence of an association between type 2 diabetes (T2DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In AD, in addition to brain, a number of peripheral tissues and cells are affected, including red blood cell (RBC and because there are currently no reliable diagnostic biomarkers of AD in the blood, a gradually increasing attention has been given to the study of RBC’s alterations. Recently it has been evidenced in diabetes, RBC alterations superimposable to the ones occurring in AD RBC. Furthermore, growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of RBC’s alterations and vice versa. Once again this represents a further evidence of a shared pathway between AD and T2DM. The present review summarizes the two disorders, highlighting the role of RBC in the postulated common biochemical links, and suggests RBC as a possible target for clinical trials.

  20. Trends in incidence of end-stage renal disease among persons with diagnosed diabetes--Puerto Rico, 1996-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Nilka Rios; Hora, Israel; Williams, Desmond E; Geiss, Linda S

    2014-03-07

    During 2010, approximately 6,091 persons aged ≥18 years in Puerto Rico were living with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (i.e., kidney failure that requires regular dialysis or kidney transplantation for survival). This included 1,462 persons who began treatment for ESRD in 2010. Diabetes is the leading cause of ESRD in Puerto Rico, accounting for 66% of new cases in adults, followed by hypertension, which accounts for 15% of the cases. Although the number of adults initiating ESRD treatment (i.e., dialysis or kidney transplantation) in Puerto Rico each year who have diabetes listed as a primary cause (ESRD-D) has increased since 1996, ESRD-D incidence among adults with diagnosed diabetes has not shown a consistent trend. To assess recent trends in ESRD-D incidence among adults aged ≥18 years in Puerto Rico with diagnosed diabetes and to further examine trends by age group and sex, CDC analyzed 1996-2010 data from the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) and the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). After increasing in the late 1990s, ESRD-D incidence decreased during the 2000s among adult men and among persons aged 18-44 years with diagnosed diabetes in Puerto Rico. Throughout the period, ESRD-D incidence among adult women and among persons aged 45-64 and ≥75 years with diagnosed diabetes did not show a consistent trend, and ESRD-D incidence among persons aged 65-74 years with diagnosed diabetes increased. Increased awareness of the risk factors for kidney disease and implementation of effective interventions to prevent or delay kidney disease among persons with diagnosed diabetes might decrease ESRD incidence in Puerto Rico, particularly among women and older persons.

  1. The self-management experience of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Shayan; Crnosija, Natalie; Weinger, Katie; Jacobson, Alan M; Park, Joonho; Tanenbaum, Molly L; Gonzalez, Jeffrey S; Mattana, Joseph; Hammock, Amy C

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore views related to the self-management of type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. We conducted three semi-structured focus groups in participants with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Credibility was supported through triangulation of data sources and the use of multiple investigators from different disciplines. Twenty-three adults participated. Three major themes were identified: emotional reactions to health state, the impact of family dynamics on self-management, and the burden of self-management regimens. Family dynamics were found to be a barrier and support to self-management, while complicated self-management regimens were found to be a barrier. Additionally, participants expressed several emotional reactions related to their CKD status, including regret related to having developed CKD and distress related both to their treatment regimens and the future possibility of dialysis. This exploratory study of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease describes barriers and supports to self-management and emotional reactions to chronic kidney disease status. Future research should confirm these findings in a larger population and should include family members and/or health care providers to help further define problems with self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Prevalence of Celiac Disease in 52,721 Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: International Comparison Across Three Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Maria E; Prinz, Nicole; Boyle, Claire T; Campbell, Fiona M; Jones, Timothy W; Hofer, Sabine E; Simmons, Jill H; Holman, Naomi; Tham, Elaine; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; DuBose, Stephanie; Thornton, Helen; King, Bruce; Maahs, David M; Holl, Reinhard W; Warner, Justin T

    2017-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has a recognized association with type 1 diabetes. We examined international differences in CD prevalence and clinical characteristics of youth with coexisting type 1 diabetes and CD versus type 1 diabetes only. Data sources were as follows: the Prospective Diabetes Follow-up Registry (DPV) (Germany/Austria); the T1D Exchange Clinic Network (T1DX) (U.S.); the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit (NPDA) (U.K. [England/Wales]); and the Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) (Australia). The analysis included 52,721 youths 1-2 years in 18% of youths, >3-5 years in 23% of youths, and >5 years in 17% of youths. CD prevalence ranged from 1.9% in the T1DX to 7.7% in the ADDN and was higher in girls than boys (4.3% vs. 2.7%, P < 0.001). Children with coexisting CD were younger at diabetes diagnosis compared with those with type 1 diabetes only (5.4 vs. 7.0 years of age, P < 0.001) and fewer were nonwhite (15 vs. 18%, P < 0.001). Height SDS was lower in those with CD (0.36 vs. 0.48, adjusted P < 0.001) and fewer were overweight/obese (34 vs. 37%, adjusted P < 0.001), whereas mean HbA 1c values were comparable: 8.3 ± 1.5% (67 ± 17 mmol/mol) versus 8.4 ± 1.6% (68 ± 17 mmol/mol). CD is a common comorbidity in youth with type 1 diabetes. Differences in CD prevalence may reflect international variation in screening and diagnostic practices, and/or CD risk. Although glycemic control was not different, the lower height SDS supports close monitoring of growth and nutrition in this population. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Redefining Diabetes and the Concept of Self-Management from a Patient's Perspective: Implications for Disease Risk Factor Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masupe, T. K.; Ndayi, K.; Tsolekile, L.; Delobelle, P.; Puoane, T.

    2018-01-01

    The colliding epidemics of non-communicable diseases including diabetes with chronic infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa requires contextualized innovative disease management strategies. This qualitative study conducted in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, South Africa aimed to identify and gain in-depth understanding of contextual and…

  4. Marital Status, Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Death among African American Women and Men: Incidence and Prevalence in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M.; Coresh, Josef; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and African Americans disproportionately experience more cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease (CHD), hypertension, and diabetes. The literature documents a complex relationship between marital status and health, which varies by gender. We prospectively examine…

  5. Abnormal thiamine-dependent processes in Alzheimer's Disease. Lessons from diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Gary E; Hirsch, Joseph A; Cirio, Rosanna T; Jordan, Barry D; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica

    2013-07-01

    Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal Thiamine-Dependent Processes in Alzheimer’s Disease. Lessons from Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Jordan, Barry D.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Elder, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Reduced glucose metabolism is an invariant feature of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and an outstanding biomarker of disease progression. Glucose metabolism may be an attractive therapeutic target, whether the decline initiates AD pathophysiology or is a critical component of a cascade. The cause of cerebral regional glucose hypometabolism remains unclear. Thiamine-dependent processes are critical in glucose metabolism and are diminished in brains of AD patients at autopsy. Further, the reductions in thiamine-dependent processes are highly correlated to the decline in clinical dementia rating scales. In animal models, thiamine deficiency exacerbates plaque formation, promotes phosphorylation of tau and impairs memory. In contrast, treatment of mouse models of AD with the thiamine derivative benfotiamine diminishes plaques, decreases phosphorylation of tau and reverses memory deficits. Diabetes predisposes to AD, which suggests they may share some common mechanisms. Benfotiamine diminishes peripheral neuropathy in diabetic humans and animals. In diabetes, benfotiamine induces key thiamine-dependent enzymes of the pentose shunt to reduce accumulation of toxic metabolites including advanced glycation end products (AGE). Related mechanisms may lead to reversal of plaque formation by benfotiamine in animals. If so, the use of benfotiamine could provide a safe intervention to reverse biological and clinical processes of AD progression. PMID:22982063

  7. Stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits in persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention: the Norwegian study in RENEWING HEALTH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, Heidi; Wahl, Astrid; Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Jenum, Anne Karen; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Ribu, Lis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate stages of change for physical activity and dietary habits using baseline data from persons with type 2 diabetes included in a mobile health intervention. We examined the associations between stages of change for physical activity change and dietary change, and between stages of change for each behavior and individual characteristics, health-related quality of life, self-management, depressive symptoms, and lifestyle. We examined 151 persons with type 2 diabetes with an glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7.1%, aged ≥18 years at baseline of a randomized controlled trial, before testing a mobile app with or without health counseling. Stages of change were dichotomized into 'pre-action' and 'action'. Self-management was measured using the Health Education Impact Questionnaire (heiQ) where a higher score reflects increased self-management, and health-related quality of life was measured with the Short-Form-36 (SF-36). Logistic regression modeling was performed. The median HbA1c level was 7.9% (7.1-12.4), 90% were overweight or obese, and 20% had ≥3 comorbidities. 58% were in the preaction stage for physical activity change and 79% in the preaction stage for dietary change. Higher scores of self-management were associated with an increased chance of being in the action stage for both dietary change and physical activity change. Higher body mass index was associated with an 8% reduced chance of being in the action stage for physical activity change (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99). Being in the action stage was associated with higher scores of self-management, crucial for type 2 diabetes. Over half of the participants were in the preaction stage for physical activity and dietary change, and many had a high disease burden with comorbidities and overweight. NCT01315756.

  8. Diabetes mortality differs between registers due to various disease definitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A. A.; Christensen, Henry; Lund, Erik D.

    2014-01-01

    ,998 diabetics were identified by the regional algorithm, of whom 11,499 (prevalence 4.1%) resided in the four municipalities. The total number of diabetics registered in the NDR was 227,621 in Denmark, of whom 10,976 (prevalence 4.0%) resided in the four municipalities. The regional diabetics (2,802 persons...

  9. Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases among Diabetic Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Studies on cardiovascular risk factors among diabetic persons in Ethiopia are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of the cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, physical inactivity, dyslipidemia and smoking) among diabetic patients at the diabetic clinic of Jimma ...

  10. Improving major amputation rates in the multicomplex diabetic foot patient: focus on the severity of peripheral arterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechow, Andrej; Slesaczeck, Torsten; Münch, Dirk; Nanning, Thomas; Paetzold, Hartmut; Schwanebeck, Uta; Bornstein, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), as well as diabetic neuropathy, is a risk factor for the development of diabetic foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences and predictors of outcome parameters in patients with diabetic foot by stratifying these subjects according to the severity of PAD. Research design and methods: In a prospective study, patients with new diabetic foot ulcers have been treated and investigated by structured healthcare. Subjects were recruited between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2007. All study participants underwent a 2-year follow-up observation period. The patients underwent a standardized examination and classification of their foot ulcers according to a modification of the University of Texas Wound Classification System. The severity of PAD was estimated by measurement of the ankle brachial index (ABI) and the continuous wave Doppler flow curve into undisturbed perfusion (0.9 diabetic foot were consecutively included into the study (69% male, mean age 66.3 ± 11.0 years, mean diabetes duration 15.8 ± 10.2 years). Major amputations (above the ankle) were performed in 4.7% of the patients. 22.1% of these subjects had decompensated PAD. These subjects had delayed ulcer healing, higher risk for major amputation [odds ratio (OR) 7.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8–21.2, p diabetic foot ulcers regarding to wound healing, major amputation and mortality. PMID:23730502

  11. Diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Tien Y; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy; Larsen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus and is a major cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people. One-third of people with diabetes have DR. Severe stages of DR include proliferative DR, caused by the abnormal growth of new retinal blood vessels......, and diabetic macular oedema, in which there is exudation and oedema in the central part of the retina. DR is strongly associated with a prolonged duration of diabetes, hyperglycaemia and hypertension. It is traditionally regarded as a microvascular disease, but retinal neurodegeneration is also involved...... (VEGF). Optimal control of blood glucose and blood pressure in individuals with diabetes remains the cornerstone for preventing the development and arresting the progression of DR. Anti-VEGF therapy is currently indicated for diabetic macular oedema associated with vision loss, whereas laser...

  12. Glitazone Treatment and Incidence of Parkinson's Disease among People with Diabetes: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Brauer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent in vitro and animal experiments suggest that peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma (PPARɣ agonist medications, such as antidiabetic glitazone (GTZ drugs, are neuroprotective in models of Parkinson's disease (PD. These findings have not been tested in humans. We hypothesized that individuals prescribed GTZ drugs would have a lower incidence of PD compared to individuals prescribed other treatments for diabetes.Using primary care data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD, we conducted a retrospective cohort study in which individuals with diabetes who were newly prescribed GTZ (GTZ-exposed group were matched by age, sex, practice, and diabetes treatment stage with up to five individuals prescribed other diabetes treatments (other antidiabetic drug-exposed group. Patients were followed up from 1999 until the first recording of a PD diagnosis, end of observation in the database, or end of the study (1 August 2013. An incidence rate ratio (IRR was calculated using conditional Poisson regression, adjusted for possible confounders. 44,597 GTZ exposed individuals were matched to 120,373 other antidiabetic users. 175 GTZ-exposed individuals were diagnosed with PD compared to 517 individuals in the other antidiabetic drug-exposed group. The incidence rate (IR of PD in the GTZ-exposed group was 6.4 per 10,000 patient years compared with 8.8 per 10,000 patient years in those prescribed other antidiabetic treatments (IRR 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.87. Adjustments for potential confounding variables, including smoking, other medications, head injury, and disease severity, had no material impact (fully adjusted IRR 0.75, 0.59-0.94. The risk was reduced in those with current GTZ prescriptions (current GTZ-exposed IRR 0.59, 0.46-0.77 but not reduced among those with past prescriptions (past GTZ-exposed IRR 0.85, 0.65-1.10. Our study only included patients with diabetes who did not have a PD

  13. 2018 consensus of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology and the Diabetes Association of Republic of China (Taiwan on the pharmacological management of patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern-En Chiang

    2018-03-01

    The Taiwan Society of Cardiology (TSOC and the Diabetes Association of Republic of China (DAROC, aiming to formulate a treatment consensus in type 2 diabetic patients with CVD, have appointed a jointed consensus group for the 2018 Consensus of TSOC/DAROC (Taiwan on the Pharmacological Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and CV Diseases. The consensus is comprised of 5 major parts: 1 Treatment of diabetes in patients with hypertension, 2 Treatment of diabetes in patients with CHD, 3 Treatment of diabetes in patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, 4 Treatment of diabetes in patients with a history of stroke, and 5 Treatment of diabetes in patients with HF. The members of the consensus group comprehensively reviewed all the evidence, mainly RCTs, and also included meta-analyses, cohort studies, and studies using claim data. The treatment targets of HbA1c were provided. The anti-diabetic agents were ranked according to their clinical evidence. The consensus is not mandatory. The final decision may need to be individualized and based on clinicians' discretion.

  14. Comparative analysis of diabetic nephropathy and non-diabetic nephropathy disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Aimin; Wang, Junsheng; Huan, Xuelai

    2017-12-01

    Clinical symptoms of diabetic nephropathy patients and non-diabetic nephropathy are compared and analyzed, hemodialysis effect and quality of life of two kinds of nephrotic patients are analyzed. Respectively extract 1300 cases of diabetic nephropathy and non-diabetic nephropathy patients admitted to different hospitals during December 2011-December 2014. Based on whether the patient suffers from diabetes, they were divided into diabetic group and control group. Hemodialysis of two groups of patients were followed up to observe effectiveness of blood treatment, and complications were observed after one year of follow-up. Hematodialysis effectiveness of diabetic nephropathy patients is significantly lower than that of non-diabetic nephropathy group. After 1 year's follow-up, it can be found that survival rate of diabetic nephropathy patients is much lower than that of control group. In statistical comparison of data involved in the two groups of patients, P diabetic nephropathy patients is relatively poor compared to that of non-diabetic patients. In clinics, management and prevention of diabetic patients should be strengthened to avoid complication of nephropathy which brings serious injury to patients.

  15. Salivary Distinctiveness and Modifications in Males with Diabetes and Behçet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loai Aljerf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases associated with systematic diseases as metabolic and vasculitic have been included in this paper. This will enhance our understanding of the salivary function in promoting healthy oral condition. The study investigates the effects of type I and type II diabetes mellitus in well-controlled diabetic patients, in addition to Behçet disease (BD on saliva flow rate (SFR, pH, the decay, missing, and filled tooth (DMFT index, glucose, and major earth-alkaline ions (Ca2+ and Mg2+ compared to healthy males and age-matched controls. Saliva samples were collected from 1403 male human subjects, distributed on 7 levels including 3 control groups, and analyzed. The symptoms and clinical observations were enrolled. A preprandial salivary glucose has illustrated statistically strong significant and positive correlations with HbA1c and blood glucose levels. TIDM saliva showed lower pH, SFR, and Ca2+ but higher Mg2+, caries risk, and poor metabolic control. These led to dysfunction of secretory capacity of salivary glands. TIIDM proved higher SFR, DMFT, and glucose than TIDM patients. DM oral calcium has decreased by age while magnesium sharply slopes at seniority. BD oral fluid is associated with lower glucose and minerals but noticeably with both higher pH and DMFT.

  16. Salivary Distinctiveness and Modifications in Males with Diabetes and Behçet's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljerf, Loai; Alhaffar, Iyad

    2017-01-01

    Oral diseases associated with systematic diseases as metabolic and vasculitic have been included in this paper. This will enhance our understanding of the salivary function in promoting healthy oral condition. The study investigates the effects of type I and type II diabetes mellitus in well-controlled diabetic patients, in addition to Behçet disease (BD) on saliva flow rate (SFR), pH, the decay, missing, and filled tooth (DMFT) index, glucose, and major earth-alkaline ions (Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ) compared to healthy males and age-matched controls. Saliva samples were collected from 1403 male human subjects, distributed on 7 levels including 3 control groups, and analyzed. The symptoms and clinical observations were enrolled. A preprandial salivary glucose has illustrated statistically strong significant and positive correlations with HbA 1c and blood glucose levels. TIDM saliva showed lower pH, SFR, and Ca 2+ but higher Mg 2+ , caries risk, and poor metabolic control. These led to dysfunction of secretory capacity of salivary glands. TIIDM proved higher SFR, DMFT, and glucose than TIDM patients. DM oral calcium has decreased by age while magnesium sharply slopes at seniority. BD oral fluid is associated with lower glucose and minerals but noticeably with both higher pH and DMFT.

  17. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  18. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Small Grants to Promote Diversity. Date... Diseases Special Emphasis Panel; Mechanisms of Upper Gut and Airway Interaction-Program Project Grant. Date..., Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases...

  19. Disease management programs in type 2 diabetes: quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthold, Heiner K; Bestehorn, Kurt P; Jannowitz, Christina; Krone, Wilhelm; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether disease management programs (DMPs) for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can improve some processes of care and intermediate outcomes. Two cross-sectional registries of patients with T2DM were used for data extraction before (previous cohort) and after (recent cohort) introduction of DMPs in Germany (N = 78,110). In the recent cohort, 15,293 patients were treated within the DMPs and 9791 were not. Processes of care, medications, and intermediate outcomes (achievement of treatment targets for low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, blood pressure, and glycosylated hemoglobin [A1C]) were analyzed using multi- variable, multilevel logistic regression, adjusting for patient case-mix and physician-level clustering to derive odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Availability of structured diabetes education and of lipid, blood pressure, and A1C measurements increased over time. In DMP patients, availability was significantly higher for blood pressure and A1C but not for lipid measurements. Prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, oral antidiabetic drugs, and insulin increased over time and was more common in DMP patients. Statin prescription increased over time but was not influenced by DMP status. Intermediate outcomes improved over time, but DMPs had no influence on intermediate outcomes except for reaching LDL cholesterol targets (odds ratio 1.12 [95% CI 1.06, 1.19] in favor of DMPs). While there may be some unmeasured confounding, our data suggest that improvement in processes of care by DMPs, as implemented in Germany, only partially translates into improvement of intermediate outcomes.

  20. End-stage renal disease and survival in people with diabetes: a national database linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S.; Fletcher, E.H.; Brady, I.; Looker, H.C.; Levin, D.; Joss, N.; Traynor, J.P.; Metcalfe, W.; Conway, B.; Livingstone, S.; Leese, G.; Philip, S.; Wild, S.; Halbesma, N.; Sattar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing prevalence of diabetes worldwide is projected to lead to an increase in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT).Aim: To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of ESRD and requirement for RRT among people with diabetes in a nationwide study and to report associated survival.Methods: Data were extracted and linked from three national databases: Scottish Renal Registry, Scottish Care Initiative-Diabetes Collaboration...

  1. A unified pathogenesis for kidney diseases, including genetic diseases and cancers, by the protein-homeostasis-system hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Yil

    2017-06-01

    Every cell of an organism is separated and protected by a cell membrane. It is proposed that harmony between intercellular communication and the health of an organism is controlled by a system, designated the protein-homeostasis-system (PHS). Kidneys consist of a variety of types of renal cells, each with its own characteristic cell-receptor interactions and producing characteristic proteins. A functional union of these renal cells can be determined by various renal function tests, and harmonious intercellular communication is essential for the healthy state of the host. Injury to a kind of renal cells can impair renal function and induce an imbalance in total body health. Every acute or chronic renal disease has unknown etiologic substances that are responsible for renal cell injury at the molecular level. The immune/repair system of the host should control the etiologic substances acting against renal cells; if this system fails, the disease progresses to end stage renal disease. Each renal disease has its characteristic pathologic lesions where immune cells and immune proteins, such as immunoglobulins and complements, are infiltrated. These immune cells and immune proteins may control the etiologic substances involved in renal pathologic lesions. Also, genetic renal diseases and cancers may originate from a protein deficiency or malfunctioning protein under the PHS. A unified pathogenesis for renal diseases, including acute glomerulonephritis, idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, immunoglobulin A nephropathy, genetic renal diseases such as Alport syndrome, and malignancies such as Wilms tumor and renal cell carcinoma, is proposed using the PHS hypothesis.

  2. Association of Parental History of Diabetes with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Children with Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer R; Stafford, Jeanette M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Badaru, Angela; Crume, Tessa L; Dabelea, Dana; Dolan, Lawrence M; Lawrence, Jean M; Pettitt, David J; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determine if parental diabetes(DM) is associated with unhealthier cardiovascular disease(CVD) risk profiles in youth with type 2 diabetes(T2D), and whether associations differed by race/ethnicity. Methods Family history was available for 382 youth with T2D from 2001 prevalent and 2002–2005 incident SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth cohorts. Parental DM was evaluated two ways two-category— any parent vs. no parent DM (evaluated overall and stratified by race/ethnicity); four-category— both parents, mother only, father only, or no parent DM (evaluated overall only). Associations with hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c), fasting lipids, blood pressure(BP), and urine albumin:creatinine ratio(ACR) were examined using regression models. Results Overall, sample characteristics included: 35.9% male, 19.1% non-Hispanic white(NHW), mean T2D duration 26.6 ± 22.2 months, mean HbA1c 7.9 ± 2.5% (62.6 ± 27.8mmol/mol). Unadjusted two-category comparisons showed youth with parental DM had higher HbA1c, higher DBP, and higher frequency of elevated ACR. Adjusted two-category comparisons showed associations remaining in non-stratified analysis for ACR [OR95%CI)=2.3(1.1, 5.0)] and in NHW youth for HbA1c [6.8% ± 0.4 v. 8.0 ± 0.4 (51.1±4.8mmol/mol v.63.9 ± 4.2), p=.015], DBP (67.7% ± 4.5 v. 76.9 ± 4.4 mmHg, p=.014) and lnTG (4.7±0.3 v. 5.3±0.3, p=.008). There were no significant findings in the adjusted four-category evaluation. Conclusions Parental history of diabetes may be associated with unhealthier CVD risk factors in youth with T2D. PMID:25784087

  3. Redefining diabetes and the concept of self-management from a patient's perspective: implications for disease risk factor management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masupe, T K; Ndayi, K; Tsolekile, L; Delobelle, P; Puoane, T

    2018-02-01

    The colliding epidemics of non-communicable diseases including diabetes with chronic infectious diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa requires contextualized innovative disease management strategies. This qualitative study conducted in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, South Africa aimed to identify and gain in-depth understanding of contextual and environmental issues pertinent to the patient that could influence Type 2-diabetes mellitus (T2DM) care and self-management. Participants included purposively sampled diabetics or pre-diabetics from the community, PURE study database, facility health club and health care providers. Data collection employed in-depth interviews, focus group discussions (FGDs) using structured interviews and FGD topic guides. Thematic data analysis was done to identify recurrent themes. Themes identified: knowledge and awareness about T2DM; health-seeking behaviour; weight perceptions; healthy lifestyles; self-management; health education needs and health care provider experiences. Patients defined T2DM as a physically and emotionally dangerous disease caused by socio-cultural factors, influenced by the sufferers' food and socio-cultural environment with significance placed on physical, social and emotional effects of T2DM diagnosis. Patient-centred definition of T2DM is key to enhancing T2DM self-management. Patients suggested that personally rewarding benefits of physical activity and healthy diet such as anti-ageing, brain boosting, energy boosting which are commonly harnessed by food, tobacco and beauty industry should be considered in T2DM self-management strategies.

  4. Cardiovascular disease and diabetes in patients with African or Asian background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aambø, Arild; Klemsdal, Tor Ole

    2017-11-28

    Population groups of different ancestry appear to have varying prevalence of diabetes, different risks of developing cardiovascular disease and different responses to certain drugs that are used for these conditions. We wished to review the literature in this field. We have performed searches in several databases for systematic review articles published from the year 2000 onwards, and supplemented these with articles from reference lists, our own literature archives and a pyramid search in the Norwegian Electronic Health Library database. Altogether 37 articles were included. With regard to diagnosed diabetes, the prevalence of coronary heart disease and stroke varies among groups of South Asian, East Asian, African and European ancestry. In patients of South Asian ancestry, the risk of coronary heart disease appears to be twice that of Europeans, and the disease occurs 5–10 years earlier. The prevalence of stroke is especially high in persons of African ancestry. Risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension are distributed differently among these groups. The therapeutic response to drugs such as beta blockers, ACE inhibitors and various statins differs; for example, statin doses in Asians may often be halved in relation to those used for Caucasians, and ACE inhibitors are not recommended as monotherapy for hypertension in persons of African ancestry. These differences are partly attributable to variations in genetic disposition. The findings are clinically significant – better insight in this field enables optimal tailoring of treatment for each patient, with more rapid achievement of goals and reduced risk of adverse effects. The recommendations given in this article are consistent with and complement the Directorate of Health’s revised guidelines for the treatment of diabetes.

  5. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic subjects in south-west Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolaji O. Oyelade

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is rarely sought for and generally underdiagnosed even in diabetics in developing countries like Nigeria. PAD is easily detected and diagnosed by the ankle-brachial index, a simple and reliable test. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of PAD in diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years and the value of ankle-brachial index measurement in the detection of PAD. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive study of 219 diabetic subjects aged 50–89 years was carried out. The participants were administered a pre-tested questionnaire and measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI was done. The ankle-brachial index < 0.90 was considered equivalent to peripheral arterial disease. Results: The overall prevalence of PAD was 52.5%. The prevalence of symptomatic PAD was 28.7% whilst that of asymptomatic PAD was 71.3%. There were a number of associations with PAD which included, age (p < 0.05, sex (p < 0.05, and marital status (p < 0.05. The use of the ankle-brachial index in the detection of PAD was clearly more reliable than the clinical methods like history of intermittent claudication and absence or presence of pedal pulses. Conclusion: The prevalence of PAD is relatively high in diabetic subjects in the southwestern region of Nigeria. Notable is the fact that a higher proportion was asymptomatic. Also the use of ABI is of great value in the detection of PAD as evidenced by a clearly more objective assessment of PAD compared to both intermittent claudication and absent pedal pulses.

  6. THE FREQUENCY AND ASSOCIATION OF RISK FACTORS IN DEVELOPMENT OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Sokolović

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The coronary heart disease (CHD is a leading cause of lethality in both sexes. The risk for development of CHD is 2-4 times higher in non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM than in nondiabetics, and annual rate of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases in NIDDM is 2-5%. The etiology of CHD is still unknown until the risk factors connected to the development of CHD are well known.The purpose of this research was to establish the frequency and importance of the risk factors in development of CHD in NIDDM.The research included 60 patients with NIDDM who were by presence of CHD classified into two groups. We determined body mass index and waist hip ratio, total and HDL cholesterol, triglicerides, LDL cholesterols, uric acid and fibrinogen.Values of BMI were statistically higher in patients with CHD than in diabetics without CHD 29.67+3.31 vs. 27.87±3.17 kg/m2 (p<0.05. Raised risk levels of cholesterol had90% with CHD and 76% without CHD (Hi2=6.12, p<0.05. Larger percentage of patients in group with CHD had raised lipid risk levels of triglicerides 70% than in patients without CHD 56.5% (Hi2=4.36, p<0.05. The obesity was relatively rare in patients without CHD than in diabetics with CHD (13.6% vs. 76%, p<0.01.The frequency of risk factors was very high in NIDDM patients, which clearly points at their cumulative effect in development of CHD in diabetics.

  7. Interventional treatment of diabetic ischemic diseases of lower limb:a therapeutic observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaoyang; Liu Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical effects of endovascular interventional treatment for diabetic ischemic diseases of lower limb. Methods: Endovascular interventional management was performed in 47 patients with diabetic ischemic diseases of lower limb. The ankle-to-brachial index and the diameter of lower limb vessel were estimated both before the treatment and 3, 30 days after the treatment. The results were compared and analyzed. Results: Obvious improvement in ankle-to-brachial index and the diameter of lower limb vessel were observed after the treatment. Conclusion: Endovascular interventional treatment is very effective and reliable for diabetic ischemic diseases of lower limb. (authors)

  8. Osteoprotegerin and coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Henrik; Nybo, Mads; Hansen, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Plasma osteoprotegerin (P-OPG) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in diabetic and other populations. OPG is a bone-related glycopeptide produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and increased P-OPG may reflect arterial damage. We investigated the correlation between P-OPG and co......-OPG and coronary artery disease (CAD) in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients with microalbuminuria.......Plasma osteoprotegerin (P-OPG) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in diabetic and other populations. OPG is a bone-related glycopeptide produced by vascular smooth muscle cells and increased P-OPG may reflect arterial damage. We investigated the correlation between P...

  9. Periodontal disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakovic, Dragana; Pavlovic, Milos D

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate periodontal health in young patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Serbia. Periodontal disease was clinically assessed and compared in 187 children and adolescents (6 to 18 years of age) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 178 control subjects without diabetes. Children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus had significantly more plaque, gingival inflammation, and periodontal destruction than control subjects. The main risk factors for periodontitis were diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42 to 5.44), bleeding/plaque ratio (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.48), and age (OR = 1.10; 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.21). In case subjects, the number of teeth affected by periodontal destruction was associated with mean hemoglobin A1c (regression coefficient 0.17; P = 0.026), duration of diabetes (regression coefficient 0.19; P = 0.021), and bleeding/plaque ratio (regression coefficient 0.17; P = 0.021). Compared to children and adolescents without diabetes, periodontal disease is more prevalent and widespread in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and depends on the duration of disease, metabolic control, and the severity of gingival inflammation. Gingival inflammation in young patients with diabetes is more evident and more often results in periodontal destruction.

  10. Development of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model for Type 1 Diabetes: The Pittsburgh CHD in Type 1 Diabetes Risk Mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zgibor, J.C.; Ruppert, K.; Orchard, T.J.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Chaturvedi, N.; Roberts, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim - To create a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction model specific to type 1 diabetes. Methods - Development of the model used data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC). EDC subjects had type 1 diabetes diagnosed between 1950 and 1980, received their

  11. Influence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease on the development of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Weerasinghe, Sanjaya; Dassanayake, Anuradha S; Rajindrajith, Shaman; de Silva, Arjuna P; Kato, Norihiro; Wickremasinghe, A Rajitha; de Silva, H Janaka

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is linked to metabolic syndrome, and is known to be associated with impaired fasting glycemia and diabetes mellitus. This prospective community-based study was conducted to determine the association between NAFLD and incidence of diabetes mellitus in an urban adult population in Sri Lanka. Participants of the Ragama Health Study cohort were assessed for NAFLD using established ultrasound criteria in 2007. Those who were free of diabetes at baseline were followed up for 3 years. Incidence rates of diabetes mellitus were compared between subjects with and without NAFLD at baseline. Out of 2984 subjects, 926 had NAFLD and 676 had diabetes in 2007. Of the 2276 subjects who were free of diabetes in 2007, 1914 were re-assessed in 2010. After 3 years, 104 out of 528 subjects with NAFLD and 138 out of 1314 subjects without NAFLD had developed diabetes mellitus de novo. Incidence rates of diabetes were respectively 64.2 and 34 per 1000 person-years of follow up for those with and without NAFLD. NAFLD was an independent predictor of developing diabetes mellitus. Other independent predictors were impaired fasting glycemia and dyslipidemia. Subjects with ultrasonically diagnosed NAFLD have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus. Intervention for NAFLD through lifestyle modification may prevent progression of the current diabetes epidemic. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes are not associated with periodontal disease: the SHIP Trend Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowall, Bernd; Holtfreter, Birte; Völzke, Henry; Schipf, Sabine; Mundt, Torsten; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Kocher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To examine associations of pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes with periodontitis. The Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP)-Trend is a cross-sectional survey in North-Eastern Germany including 3086 participants (49.4% men; age 20-82 years). Clinical attachment loss (CAL) and periodontal probing depth (PPD) were assessed applying a random half-mouth protocol. The number of teeth was determined. Pre-diabetes comprised impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance. Previously known diabetes was defined as well controlled if glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was diabetes, newly detected type 2 diabetes (T2DM), known T2DM with HbA1cdiabetes was neither associated with mean CAL and PPD in multivariable adjusted linear regression models nor with edentulism (OR = 1.09 (95%-CI: 0.69-1.71)) and number of teeth (OR = 0.96 (95%-CI: 0.75-1.22), lowest quartile versus higher quartiles) in logistic regression models. Associations with mean CAL and edentulism were stronger in poorly controlled previously known diabetes than in well-controlled previously known diabetes (for edentulism: OR = 2.19 (95%-CI: 1.18-4.05), and OR = 1.40 (95%-CI: 0.82-2.38), respectively, for comparison with NGT). Periodontitis and edentulism were associated with poorly controlled T2DM, but not with pre-diabetes and well-controlled diabetes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Association Between a Genetic Variant Related to Glutamic Acid Metabolism and Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Prudente, Sabrina; Mendonca, Christine; Andreozzi, Francesco; di Pietro, Natalia; Sturma, Mariella; Novelli, Valeria; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Formoso, Gloria; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Niewczas, Monika A.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Biolo, Gianni; Pandolfi, Assunta; Rimm, Eric; Sesti, Giorgio; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Hu, Frank

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetes is associated with an elevated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Previous studies have suggested that the genetic factors predisposing to excess cardiovascular risk may be different in diabetic and non-diabetic participants. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic determinants of CHD that are specific to diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied five independent sets of CHD cases and CHD-negative controls from the Nurses Health Study (NHS; enrolled in 1976 and followed through 2008), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; enrolled in 1986 and followed through 2008), Joslin Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), Gargano Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), and Catanzaro Study (enrolled in 2004-2010). Included were a total of 1,517 CHD cases and 2,671 CHD-negative controls, all with type 2 diabetes. Results in diabetic patients were compared with those in 737 non-diabetic CHD cases and 1,637 non-diabetic CHD-negative controls from the NHS and HPFS cohorts. EXPOSURE 2,543,016 common genetic variants occurring throughout the genome. MAIN OUTCOME CHD defined as fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or angiographic evidence of significant stenosis of the coronary arteries. RESULTS We identified a variant on chromosome 1q25 (rs10911021) consistently associated with CHD risk among diabetic participants with an odds ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.51, P=2×10−8). No association between this variant and CHD was detected among non-diabetic participants (OR=0.99, P=0.89), consistent with a significant gene-by-diabetes interaction on CHD risk (P=2×10−4). As compared to protective allele homozygotes, rs10911021 risk allele homozygotes were characterized by a 32% decrease in the expression of the neighboring glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) gene in human endothelial cells (P=0.0048). They also showed a decreased ratio between plasma

  14. Metabolic syndrome and incidence of type 2 diabetes in patients with manifest vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, A.M.J.; Graaf, van der Y.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Spiering, W.; Visseren, F.L.J.

    2008-01-01

    Risk reduction in patients with clinically manifest vascular disease focuses on preventing new vascular events and not on prevention of type 2 diabetes. However, given the common pathophysiological pathways involved in the development of atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes, it is probable that

  15. 76 FR 36554 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Feasibility Studies for Clinical Trials in Type 1 Diabetes. Date: July 18, 2011..., 2011. Time: 1 to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the...

  16. Profile of Microvascular Disease in Type 2 Diabetes in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder complicated by microvascular and macrovascular diseases. The clinical profile of these complications has not been adequately studied in many tertiary health care centers in India. Aim: The authors studied the clinical profile of microvascular diabetes ...

  17. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in Spain: A narrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bueno (Hector); R. Hernáez (Rubén); A.V. Hernández (Adrián)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. In spite of having a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus the prevalence of ischemic heart disease is low in Spain. Methods. A narrative review of the bibliography was performed to search for potential particularities in the epidemiology, pathogenecity, and care of diabetes

  18. Effects of Probiotic Yogurt Consumption on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F mohammadi

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: Consumption of probiotic yogurt improved lipid profile and some inflammatory biomarkers in patients with type 2 diabetes. Also, probiotic yogurt caused significant decrease in HbA1c. It is suggested that probiotic yogurt may be used as an adjunct therapy to reduce the cardiovascular disease risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

  19. Effects of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes care: results of the OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Kostapanos, Michael S.; Moulis, Alexandros; Nikas, Nikos; Elisaf, Moses S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of benchmarking on the quality of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) care in Greece. Methods: The OPTIMISE (Optimal Type 2 Diabetes Management Including Benchmarking and Standard Treatment) study [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00681850] was an international multicenter, prospective cohort study. It included physicians randomized 3:1 to either receive benchmarking for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) treatment targets (benchmarking group) or not (control group). The proportions of patients achieving the targets of the above-mentioned parameters were compared between groups after 12 months of treatment. Also, the proportions of patients achieving those targets at 12 months were compared with baseline in the benchmarking group. Results: In the Greek region, the OPTIMISE study included 797 adults with T2DM (570 in the benchmarking group). At month 12 the proportion of patients within the predefined targets for SBP and LDL-C was greater in the benchmarking compared with the control group (50.6 versus 35.8%, and 45.3 versus 36.1%, respectively). However, these differences were not statistically significant. No difference between groups was noted in the percentage of patients achieving the predefined target for HbA1c. At month 12 the increase in the percentage of patients achieving all three targets was greater in the benchmarking (5.9–15.0%) than in the control group (2.7–8.1%). In the benchmarking group more patients were on target regarding SBP (50.6% versus 29.8%), LDL-C (45.3% versus 31.3%) and HbA1c (63.8% versus 51.2%) at 12 months compared with baseline (p Benchmarking may comprise a promising tool for improving the quality of T2DM care. Nevertheless, target achievement rates of each, and of all three, quality indicators were suboptimal, indicating there are still unmet needs in the management of T2DM. PMID:26445642

  20. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (Rosai-Dorfman disease): a clinicoradiological profile of three cases including two with skeletal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Priya; Babyn, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Originally described as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy, Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare histiocytic proliferative disorder with a distinctive microscopic appearance. A rare entity, RDD is often under-diagnosed because of a low index of suspicion by both radiologist and pathologist. Through this article, we wish to apprise radiologists of the spectrum of disease that can be encountered in this disorder. RDD can mimic other common childhood skeletal diseases including benign Langerhans cell histiocytosis and lymphoma. The clinical and radiological manifestations of RDD vary depending upon organ involvement, and its imaging features are often confused with those of other disorders. RDD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unifocal and multifocal skeletal involvement caused by granulomatous diseases, infections, pseudogranulomatous lesions and malignancy. As long-term outcome is usually good, a conservative approach is justified in most cases. Contrasted with its typical appearance, presenting with bilateral symmetrical cervical adenopathy (as shown in one patient), we also report extranodal involvement of bone in two patients. Extranodal disease occurs along with concomitant nodal disease in about 43% of patients. In 23% of patients, isolated extranodal RDD can be seen, most commonly in the head and neck. In two of our patients, we observed extranodal involvement with skeletal involvement away from the head and neck not associated with lymphadenopathy. Skeletal involvement in RDD without lymphadenopathy is rare, occurring only in 2% of all the patients reported to date. (orig.)

  1. The metabolic syndrome: validity and utility of clinical definitions for cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of clinical definitions of the metabolic syndrome is frequently misunderstood. While the metabolic syndrome as a physiological process describes a clustering of numerous age-related metabolic abnormalities that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, clinical definitions include obesity which is thought to be a cause rather than a consequence of metabolic disturbance, and several elements that are routinely measured in clinical practice, including high blood pressure, high blood glucose and dyslipidaemia. Obesity is frequently a central player in the development of the metabolic syndrome and should be considered a key component of clinical definitions. Previous clinical definitions have differed in the priority given to obesity. Perhaps more importantly than its role in a clinical definition, however, is obesity in isolation before the hallmarks of metabolic dysfunction that typify the syndrome have developed. This should be treated seriously as an opportunity to prevent the consequences of the global diabetes epidemic now apparent. Clinical definitions were designed to identify a population at high lifetime CVD and type 2 diabetes risk, but in the absence of several major risk factors for each condition, are not optimal risk prediction devices for either. Despite this, the metabolic syndrome has several properties that make it a useful construct, in conjunction with short-term risk prediction algorithms and sound clinical judgement, for the identification of those at high lifetime risk of CVD and diabetes. A recently published consensus definition provides some much needed clarity about what a clinical definition entails. Even this, however, remains a work in progress until more evidence becomes available, particularly in the area of ethnicity-specific waist cut-points. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Extending Metformin Use in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Pharmacokinetic Study in Stage 4 Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Munasinghe Dissanayake

    2017-07-01

    Discussion: In our patient cohorts with diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease, treatment with 4 weeks of low-dose metformin was not associated with adverse safety outcomes and revealed stable pharmacokinetics. Our study supports the liberalization of metformin use in this population and supports the use of metformin assays for more individualized dosing.

  3. Radiographic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in adult diabetic patients: comparison of diabetics with nondiabetics of no other underlying diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Mee; Shin, Cheol Yong; Kim, Tae Hoon; Young Shin So; Lee, Shin Hyung; Lee, Chang Joon; Gang, Hye Jung

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to evaluate the plain radiographic features of pulmonary tuberculosis in adult diabetic patients compared with those in patients without any underlying diseases. We analyzed the chest PA and lateral views of 100 patients having active pulmonary tuberculosis; 14 patients had diabetes mellitus and 60 patients had no other underlying diseases. Their images were assesed for anatomical distributions, extents of lesions, size and number of cavity and patterns of radiographic findings. Diabetic tuberculosis had higher prevalence and wider involvement of unusual segments for the tuberculosis such as anterior segment, lingular segment of upper lobe and basal segment of the lower lobe, and they showed the tendency of having more cavities than those who had no other underlying diseases, but there were no meaningful differences in the cavity size between the two groups. Pulmonary tuberculosis in diabetic patients tends to have wider extent with unusual segmental involvement and multiple cavities than in the patients who had no other underlying diseases

  4. Differences Characteristics Patients Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 with and without Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nindara Citra Aquarista

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the third highest Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs, which causes death in Indonesia.The incidence of coronary heart disease in diabetes mellitus is high, 65% of people with diabetes mellitus die due to coronary heart disease and stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the differences in the characteristics of Diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients with and without coronary heart disease in Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. This research uses observational analysis with cross sectional study design. The subject of the study is the incidence of diabetes Mellitus type 2 with and without coronary heart disease with undergoing outpatient treatment at Haji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016. The Samples were taken by fixed-disease sampling method with 42 people as the samples. The data analysis uses Chi Square test. The results show for the independent variables that have the most significant difference inHaji General Hospital Surabaya year 2016 is smoking behavior (p = 0.00; PR = 7.85; 95% CI = 2.09 to 29.50 and hypertension (p = 0,002; PR = 3.51; 95% CI = 1.42 to 8.67. In conclusion, the smoking behavior and hypertension can lead to complications of coronary heart disease for patients with type in Diabetes Mellitus type 2 in Haji General Hospital year 2016. It needs awareness to check blood pressure regularly and eliminate the smoking habit as the prevention of complications of coronary heart disease for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Keywords: diabetes mellitus type 2, coronary hearth disease.

  5. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in newly diagnosed patients with ketosis-onset diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T-T; Wang, A-P; Lu, J-X; Chen, M-Y; Zhao, C-C; Tang, Z-H; Li, L-X; Jia, W-P

    2018-03-21

    As the prevalence and clinical characteristics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are still unknown in ketosis-onset diabetes, the present study compared the characteristics of NAFLD in type 1 diabetes (T1D), ketosis-onset and non-ketotic type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. This cross-sectional study was performed with newly diagnosed Chinese patients with diabetes, including 39 T1D, 165 ketosis-onset and 173 non-ketotic T2D, with 30 non-diabetics included as controls. NAFLD was determined by hepatic ultrasonography, then its clinical features were analyzed and its associated risk factors evaluated. NAFLD prevalence in patients with ketosis-onset diabetes (61.8%) was significantly higher than in controls (23.3%; P=0.003) and in T1D patients (15.4%; Pketosis-onset and non-ketotic T2D patients (52.6%; P=0.229), although BMI and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) proved to be independent risk factors for the presence of NAFLD in both these groups whereas, in T1D patients, serum uric acid levels were independent risk factors. NAFLD prevalence and risk factors in ketosis-onset diabetes were similar to those in non-ketotic T2D, but different from those in T1D. These data provide further evidence that ketosis-onset diabetes should be classified as a subtype of T2D rather than idiopathic T1D. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of diabetes and hyperglycaemia on infectious disease hospitalisation and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Jensen, J S; Nordestgaard, B G

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Diabetes mellitus is believed to increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. The effects of hyperglycaemia per se on infectious disease risk are unknown and the influence of diabetes on infectious disease outcome is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied 10......,063 individuals from the Danish general population, who were participants in The Copenhagen City Heart Study, over a follow-up period of 7 years. Risk of hospitalisation caused by any infectious disease, and subsequent risk of disease progression to death were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression...

  7. Recurrent reciprocal genomic rearrangements of 17q12 are associated with renal disease, diabetes, and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Heather C; Clauin, Severine; Sharp, Andrew J; Moller, Rikke S; Ullmann, Reinhard; Kapur, Raj; Pinkel, Dan; Cooper, Gregory M; Ventura, Mario; Ropers, H Hilger; Tommerup, Niels; Eichler, Evan E; Bellanne-Chantelot, Christine

    2007-11-01

    Most studies of genomic disorders have focused on patients with cognitive disability and/or peripheral nervous system defects. In an effort to broaden the phenotypic spectrum of this disease model, we assessed 155 autopsy samples from fetuses with well-defined developmental pathologies in regions predisposed to recurrent rearrangement, by array-based comparative genomic hybridization. We found that 6% of fetal material showed evidence of microdeletion or microduplication, including three independent events that likely resulted from unequal crossing-over between segmental duplications. One of the microdeletions, identified in a fetus with multicystic dysplastic kidneys, encompasses the TCF2 gene on 17q12, previously shown to be mutated in maturity-onset diabetes, as well as in a subset of pediatric renal abnormalities. Fine-scale mapping of the breakpoints in different patient cohorts revealed a recurrent 1.5-Mb de novo deletion in individuals with phenotypes that ranged from congenital renal abnormalities to maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5. We also identified the reciprocal duplication, which appears to be enriched in samples from patients with epilepsy. We describe the first example of a recurrent genomic disorder associated with diabetes.

  8. Prognostic value of uric acid in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndrepepa, Gjin; Braun, Siegmund; King, Lamin; Cassese, Salvatore; Tada, Tomohisa; Fusaro, Massimiliano; Hadamitzky, Martin; Haase, Hans-Ullrich; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2013-02-01

    Studies investigating the prognostic role of UA (uric acid) in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus have given conflicting findings. We undertook the present study to assess the association between UA and outcome in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and CAD (coronary artery disease). The study included 3705 patients with diabetes mellitus and angiography-proven CAD. UA was measured before coronary angiography. The primary outcome was 1-year all-cause mortality. The UA concentration [median (25th-75th quartiles)] was 6.44 mg/dl (5.40-7.70 mg/dl). There were 264 deaths (7.1%) during follow-up: 45 deaths in patients of the first UA quartile, 43 deaths in patients of the second UA quartile, 51 deaths in patients of the third UA quartile and 125 deaths in patients of the fourth UA quartile {Kaplan-Meier estimates of mortality, 5.1, 4.8, 5.6 and 14.0% respectively; unadjusted HR (hazard ratio), 2.81 [95% CI (confidence interval), 2.21-3.58]; Ppower of the model regarding prediction of all-cause mortality [absolute and relative IDI (integrated discrimination improvement) 0.034 and 20.5% respectively; Pdiabetes mellitus and confirmed CAD, elevated levels of UA predict mortality independently of known cardiovascular risk factors.

  9. ROLE OF GLYCAEMIA LEVEL IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF INTERSTITIAL COLLAGEN IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rudenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A role of blood glucose levels in the development of interstitial collagen has been studied in 84 patients (53 women and 31 men, average age 60 ± 2.4 years with coronary heart disease (CHD. All patients were divided into twocomparable groups: a study group including patients with coronary heart disease andtype 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and a control group consisting of patients with coronary heart disease without DM. All patients received standard medical therapy as recommended by the European Society of Cardiology. The level of blood glucose in both groups was assessed by the standard technique, a degree of interstitial collagen volume fraction (ICVF was measured using the formula of J. Shirani et al. The data were processed by parametric and nonparametric statistical methods. It has been proved that hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes contributes to the development of ICVF, the degree of which increases with the rise of blood glucose level. A high level ofICVF in patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes type 2 can be a predictor of myocardial dyssynchrony development and heart failure progression, therefore, a close monitoring and timely correction of changes of blood glucose levelsare recommended to prevent the complication development. ICVF evaluation should become a routine diagnostic method in all patients with type 2 diabetes.

  10. The association of pioglitazone and urinary tract disease in type 2 diabetic Taiwanese: bladder cancer and chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yueh Lee

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although studies have shown an association between pioglitazone and bladder cancer, the associated factors have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors that may link pioglitazone to bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 34,970 study subjects were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database in 2003 with follow-up from 2005 to 2009. The demographic characteristics of patients who had used and had never used pioglitazone, including age, sex, diabetes duration, urinary tract disease, nephropathy, bladder cancer, and cumulative dose and duration of pioglitazone therapy, were analyzed using the χ2 test. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the independent effects of pioglitazone on bladder cancer and newly developed chronic kidney disease. RESULTS: Among 3,497 ever users and 31,473 never users of pioglitazone, the respective incident cases of bladder cancer were 12 (0.4% and 72 (0.2%, and for newly developed chronic kidney disease 245 (8.1% and 663 (2.3%, respectively. Ever use of pioglitazone [1.59(1.32-1.91], cumulative dose of pioglitazone 10,500 mg [1.34 (1.04-1.73], and duration of therapy 12 months [1.39 (1.09-1.76] were associated with the development of chronic kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: There was no association of pioglitazone use with bladder cancer development, however, there was an association with an increased risk of newly developed chronic kidney disease.

  11. Pharmacologic Approaches Against Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) in Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenna, Antonio; Nappi, Francesco; Avtaar Singh, Sanjeet Singh; Sutherland, Fraser W; Di Domenico, Fabio; Chello, Massimo; Spadaccio, Cristiano

    2015-05-01

    Advanced Glycation End-Products (AGEs) are signaling proteins associated to several vascular and neurological complications in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. AGEs proved to be a marker of negative outcome in both diabetes management and surgical procedures in these patients. The reported role of AGEs prompted the development of pharmacological inhibitors of their effects, giving rise to a number of both preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials with anti-AGEs drugs have been gradually developed and this review aimed to summarize most relevant reports. Evidence acquisition process was performed using PubMed and ClinicalTrials.gov with manually checked articles. Pharmacological approaches in humans include aminoguanidine, pyridoxamine, benfotiamine, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statin, ALT-711 (alagebrium) and thiazolidinediones. The most recent promising anti-AGEs agents are statins, alagebrium and thiazolidinediones. The role of AGEs in disease and new compounds interfering with their effects are currently under investigation in preclinical settings and these newer anti-AGEs drugs would undergo clinical evaluation in the next years. Compounds with anti-AGEs activity but still not available for clinical scenarios are ALT-946, OPB-9195, tenilsetam, LR-90, TM2002, sRAGE and PEDF. Despite most studies confirm the efficacy of these pharmacological approaches, other reports produced conflicting evidences; in almost any case, these drugs were well tolerated. At present, AGEs measurement has still not taken a precise role in clinical practice, but its relevance as a marker of disease has been widely shown; therefore, it is important for clinicians to understand the value of new cardiovascular risk factors. Findings from the current and future clinical trials may help in determining the role of AGEs and the benefits of anti-AGEs treatment in cardiovascular disease.

  12. Bardoxolone methyl in type 2 diabetes and stage 4 chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Zeeuw, Dick; Akizawa, Tadao; Audhya, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Although inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can slow the progression of diabetic kidney disease, the residual risk is high. Whether nuclear 1 factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 activators further reduce this risk is unknown....

  13. Huntington's disease does not appear to increase the risk of diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, T W; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup; Josefsen, Knud Elnegaard

    2009-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, neurodegenerative disorder characterised by neurological, cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. HD has been associated with diabetes mellitus, which is, to some extent, supported by studies in transgenic HD mice. In transgenic mice...

  14. Kidney Measures with Diabetes and Hypertension on Cardiovascular Disease : The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, Nadine; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Sang, Yingying; Ballew, Shoshana; Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Astor, Brad C.; Coresh, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Whether the association of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with cardiovascular risk differs based on diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) status remains unanswered. Methods: We investigated 11,050 participants from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (fourth examination

  15. 77 FR 27238 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Special Emphasis Panel, Tracking Adolescents after Bariatric Surgery. Date: May 25, 2012. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant...

  16. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease using myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus: analysis of risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Ji Hyoung; Kang, Seong Min; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a critical disease with higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. There is growing interest in how to determine high-risk patients who are candidates for screening testing. This study was performed to evaluate the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients detected by Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) and to assess risk factors of CAD and cardiac hard events. 203 diabetic patients (64 male, mean age 64.1 ± 9.0 years) who underwent MPS were included between Jan 2000 and July 2004. Cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) were considered as hard events, and coronary angioplasty and bypass surgery >60 days after testing were considered as soft events. The mean follow-up period was 36 ± 18 months. Patients underwent exercise (n=6) or adenosine stress (n=197) myocardial perfusion SPECT. Perfusion defects on MPS were detected in 28.6% (58/203) of the patients. There was no cardiac death but 11 hard events were observed. The annual cardiac hard event rate was 1.1%. In univariate analysis of clinical factors, typical anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were significantly associated with the occurrence of hard events. Anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, and resting ECG abnormality remained independent predictors of nonfatal MIs with multivariate analysis. Abnormal SPECT results were significantly associated with high prevalence of hard events but not independent predictors on uni- and multivariate analyses. patients who were male, had longer diabetes duration (especially over 20 years), peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, or resting ECG abnormality had higher incidence of CAD. Among clinical factors in diabetic patients, typical angina, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were strong predictors of hard events

  17. Diagnosis of coronary artery disease using myocardial perfusion SPECT in patients with diabetes mellitus: analysis of risk factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hyoung; Kang, Seong Min; Bae, Jin Ho; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoo, Jeong Soo; Ahn, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jae Tae [Kyungpook National University, Daegu, (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a critical disease with higher rates of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to myocardial ischemia and infarction. There is growing interest in how to determine high-risk patients who are candidates for screening testing. This study was performed to evaluate the incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic patients detected by Tc-99m MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) and to assess risk factors of CAD and cardiac hard events. 203 diabetic patients (64 male, mean age 64.1 {+-} 9.0 years) who underwent MPS were included between Jan 2000 and July 2004. Cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) were considered as hard events, and coronary angioplasty and bypass surgery >60 days after testing were considered as soft events. The mean follow-up period was 36 {+-} 18 months. Patients underwent exercise (n=6) or adenosine stress (n=197) myocardial perfusion SPECT. Perfusion defects on MPS were detected in 28.6% (58/203) of the patients. There was no cardiac death but 11 hard events were observed. The annual cardiac hard event rate was 1.1%. In univariate analysis of clinical factors, typical anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were significantly associated with the occurrence of hard events. Anginal pain, peripheral vascular disease, and resting ECG abnormality remained independent predictors of nonfatal MIs with multivariate analysis. Abnormal SPECT results were significantly associated with high prevalence of hard events but not independent predictors on uni- and multivariate analyses. patients who were male, had longer diabetes duration (especially over 20 years), peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, or resting ECG abnormality had higher incidence of CAD. Among clinical factors in diabetic patients, typical angina, peripheral vascular disease, peripheral polyneuropathy, and resting ECG abnormality were strong predictors of hard events.

  18. Acceptance and Commitment Based Therapy on Disease Perception and Psychological Capital in Patients with Type II Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baghban Baghestan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a prevalent metabolic disease, diabetes can be followed by severe mental outcomes leading to problems affecting the daily life. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of acceptance and commitment-based intervention on illness perception and psychological capital in persons with type II diabetes. Materials & Methods: In the controlled pretest-posttest semi-experimental study, 34 patients with type II diabetes were studied in the Diabetes Clinic of Chamran Hospital of Ferdows City in 2015. The subjects, selected via available sampling method, were randomly divided into two groups including control (n=17 persons and experimental (n=17 persons groups. Data was collected by short illness perception questionnaire (IPQ and Luthans’ psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ. Eight 60-minute acceptance and commitment-base intervention sessions were weekly conducted in experimental group. Data was analyzed by SPSS 18 software using descriptive statistics and covariance analysis test. Findings: The pretest score having been adjusted, the acceptance and commitment-based intervention significantly increases the scores of illness perception and its sub-scales (p=0.0001 except the personal control sub-scale. In addition, it significantly increases the scores of the psychological capital and its sub-scales (p=0.0001 in patients with type II diabetes. Conclusion: The acceptance and commitment-based intervention can considerably improve the illness perception and the psychological capital in persons with type II diabetes.

  19. Diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa: health care perspectives, challenges, and the economic burden of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idemyor, Vincent

    2010-07-01

    The growing incidence of diabetes mellitus in the world is a widespread concern. While there has been improvement in the epidemiology and management of the disease in the developed world, the same cannot be said in sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is getting less attention as is the funding that it merits compared to communicable diseases. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more prevalent due to rising rates of obesity, physical inactivity, and urbanization. In contrast to the developed world, where the majority of the people with diabetes are over the age of 60 years, the sub-Saharan Africa diabetic population is in the economically productive age group of 30 to 45 years. The late diagnosis of diabetes in this region, coupled with inequalities in accessing care, leads to early presentations of diabetic complications. The health care delivery agenda is overwhelmed by poverty, as such diabetes management costs have to compete with other health issues such as antiretroviral drugs for HIV/ AIDS, tuberculosis treatment, and malarial control programs. There is an urgent need to place diabetes on the national health agenda in sub-Saharan Africa and ensure that this agenda is properly positioned and integrated into the health policies and strategies.

  20. The disease related deaths due to differentiated thyroid carcinomas treated multidisciplinary, including radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, Lj.; Kermeci, K.; Malesevic, M.; Mihailovic, J.; Srbovan, D.; Popadic, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the disease related deaths of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients treated multidisciplinary, including radioiodine. Patients and Methods: 364 DTC patients were treated from 1977 to the end of 2000. All patients were operated, treated by radioiodine and by hormonal therapy, external radiotherapy was applied in 22 and chemotherapy in 6 of them. 54 treated patients were lost from the follow-up. The course of disease and outcomes are known in 310 patients, among them 53 patients died. The disease related deaths occurred in 33 (10.6%) patients. Results: Between 33 patients whose deaths were in relation with DTC the disease progression was the cause of deaths in 30 (9.7% of treated) patients (the locoregional disease in 10, distant metastases /M1/ in 17, locoregional disease + M1 in 3 patients). From the late complications of treatment died 3 (1%) patients (all of them were in complete remission to the deaths). The mean survival of these 33 patients from the diagnosis to the end of the life was 6.9 years, median 5.1 years, range 2 months to 23.9 years. The five years survived 54.6% of them, 10 years 21.2% and more than 20 years 3%. M1 had 72.7% of patients (lung and/or bone M1 were present in 91.7% of them), N1 had 69.7% and in 30.3% local tumor was T4. In relation to all treated patients died 14.6% men compared to 9% women (p<0.05), 15.7% of patients 45 years old or older compared to 4.4% of younger then 45 years (p<0.001) and 21.3% of patients with follicular type of DTC compared to 7.3% with papillary type (p<0.001). From all patients without radioiodine accumulation in tumor tissue died 60%. Conclusion: The DTC related deaths were the consequence of M1 and less frequently the result of locoregional disease (T4 and/or N1) in about 1/10 of all treated patients. The deaths as result of the late complications of treatment were exceptional. The deaths were significantly more frequent between males, patients 45 years old or older and patients

  1. Diabetic foot disease in Ethiopian patients: A hospital based study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    More than two thirds had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Among ... Neuro-ischaemic ulcers were seen in 113 (58%) of the cases and neuropathic ulcer in 63 (32%). Ulcer with cellulitis ... demographic and clinical profile and treatment of their diabetes ...

  2. risk factors for cardiovascular diseases among diabetic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    uncommon among diabetic patients in Jimma University Specialized Hospital. Type 2 DM was a ... have been to Israel for less than 4 years (5). .... 102 (39.8%) had primary education. Sixty eight ..... Ethiopian immigrants to Israel. Diabetes care ...

  3. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resuki

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... The effect of Garcinia kola on glucose and lipid levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats was investigated. Ethanolic extract of G. kola was prepared and used for animal treatments. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (40 mg/kg body weight). Acute effects of.

  4. Double diabetes: an emerging disease in children and young adults ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Studies in most countries have shown an increasing incidence of diabetes mellitus in children and young adults. Double diabetes is a newly recognized problem in children with different diagnostic and therapeutic measures. Methods: A review of over 30 literature obtained from Google, PUBMED search and ...

  5. Diabetic foot disease: impact of ulcer location on ulcer healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, KM; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Kars, M

    2013-01-01

    Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing.......Healing of heel ulcers in patients with diabetes is considered to be poor, but there is relatively little information on the influence of ulcer location on ulcer healing....

  6. AWARENESS AND KNOWLEDGE OF DIABETIC EYE DISEASE AMONG DIABETIC PATIENTS PRESENTING TO EYE OPD IN CENTRAL INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Saluja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic eye disease can lead to permanent visual impairment or blindness if medical attention is delayed. Awareness and knowledge of diabetes-related eye complications is important for early medical presentation and maximisation of visual prognosis. The aim of the study is to study the level of awareness and knowledge of diabetic eye disease among diabetic patients presenting to eye OPD in central India. MATERIALS AND METHODS A hospital-based study was conducted on 300 diabetic patients presenting to eye OPD. A questionnaire was provided to the patients based on their awareness and knowledge of diabetic eye disease. On the basis of their response, answers were categorised into three groups for awareness (fully, partially and not aware and for knowledge (good, fair and poor knowledge. RESULTS Out of 300, the mean age of participants was 50.3 ± 12.4 years (range 20-79 years from which 123 (41% were males and 177 (59% were females. 106 (35.3% were from rural area and 194 (64.7% were from urban area. 164 (54.7% were literate and 136 (45.3% were illiterate. Maximum patients 172 (57.3% were diabetic since last 5 years with the average duration being 5.9 ± 4.1 years. Out of 300 patients, only 89 (29.7% were found to be fully aware and only 66 (22.0% had good knowledge (p<0.001. There was little knowledge of retinopathy risk factors or the need for routine eye examination. Most of the patients 152 (50.7% were not advised by their physician for screening. CONCLUSION The present study showed that there is poor awareness and knowledge among a larger portion of the sample among the illiterate patients, patients from rural area and those who were recently diagnosed diabetics. There is therefore a need for increasing awareness about diabetes in patients and physicians and providing access to retinopathy screening services to the patients.

  7. Perceptions of diabetes, barriers to disease management, and service needs: a focus group study of working adults with diabetes in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Landry L; Uehara, Denise L; Tom, Tammy

    2011-03-01

    Research about the support needs for and barriers to successful disease management of working adults with diabetes is limited. Our objective was to gain an in-depth understanding of how working adults in Hawaii perceive diabetes, barriers to disease management, and the services needed to keep people healthy and working. From November 2008 through March 2009, we conducted focus group interviews with 74 employed adults with diabetes enrolled in the Hawaii Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment project. Responses to questions were analyzed within and across groups to identify recurring themes. A third layer of analysis examined themes across responses to all questions, specifically, how barriers related to identified service needs. Employed participants with diabetes experienced pervasive effects on their lives as a result of the disease, although they interpreted these effects positively or negatively. Barriers to disease management, such as additional health issues, social prejudice, and lack of social support, indicated a need to educate the general public about the disease. Participants identified needing social support from other people with diabetes, psychological support to address the emotional side of diabetes, and coordinated teams of specialists to address medication side effects and other health-related barriers to disease management. Many participants discussed the challenge of integrating diabetes management with work and family responsibilities and the need for monetary support. This study provides insight into how employed adults perceived their disease and what they perceived as challenges to successfully managing diabetes. The findings provide future directions for community and workplace diabetes initiatives.

  8. Skin tags associated with obesity and diabetes mellitus in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sari Funda; Inci Ayca; Dolu Suleyman; Sari Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Objective. Both chronic kidney disease and skin tags are associated with similar cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hypertension, etc. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of skin tags in patients with chronic kidney disease, and to assess the relationship between skin tags and cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Methods. We evaluated 358 patients [14...

  9. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  10. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (pknowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  11. Cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mortality burden of cardiometabolic risk factors from 1980 to 2010: a comparative risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danaei, Goodarz; Lu, Yuan; Singh, Gitanjali M.; Carnahan, Emily; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Cowan, Melanie J.; Farzadfar, Farshad; Lin, John K.; Finucane, Mariel M.; Rao, Mayuree; Khang, Young-Ho; Riley, Leanne M.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Lim, Stephen S.; Ezzati, Majid; Aamodt, Geir; Abdeen, Ziad; Abdella, Nabila A.; Rahim, Hanan F. Abdul; Addo, Juliet; Aekplakorn, Wichai; Afifi, Mustafa M.; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Salinas, Carlos A. Aguilar; Agyemang, Charles; Ali, Mohammed K.; Ali, Mohamed M.; Al-Nsour, Mohannad; Al-Nuaim, Abdul R.; Ambady, Ramachandran; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Aro, Pertti; Azizi, Fereidoun; Babu, Bontha V.; Bahalim, Adil N.; Barbagallo, Carlo M.; Barbieri, Marco A.; Barceló, Alberto; Barreto, Sandhi M.; Barros, Henrique; Bautista, Leonelo E.; Benetos, Athanase; Bjerregaard, Peter; Björkelund, Cecilia; Bo, Simona; Bobak, Martin; Bonora, Enzo; Botana, Manuel A.; Bovet, Pascal; Breckenkamp, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Background High blood pressure, blood glucose, serum cholesterol, and BMI are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and some of these factors also increase the risk of chronic kidney disease and diabetes. We estimated mortality from cardiovascular diseases, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes

  12. Modeling chronic diseases: the diabetes module. Justification of (new) input data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan CA; Bos G; Jacobs-van der Bruggen MAM; Baan CA; Bos G; Jacobs-van der Bruggen MAM; PZO

    2005-01-01

    The RIVM chronic disease model (CDM) is an instrument designed to estimate the effects of changes in the prevalence of risk factors for chronic diseases on disease burden and mortality. To enable the computation of the effects of various diabetes prevention scenarios, the CDM has been updated and

  13. Type 1 diabetes mellitus, coeliac disease, and lymphoma: a report of four cases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    INTRODUCTION: Patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus have a high prevalence of coeliac disease, symptoms of which are often mild, atypical, or absent. Untreated coeliac disease is associated with an increased risk of malignancy, particularly of lymphoma. We describe four patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease who developed lymphoma. CASE REPORTS: Two patients were male and two female. In three patients, coeliac disease and lymphoma were diagnosed simultaneously. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma occurred in two patients, Hodgkin\\'s disease in one, and B cell lymphoma in one. Response to treatment was in general poor, and three patients died soon after the diagnosis of lymphoma was made. CONCLUSION: As the relative risk of lymphoma is reduced by a gluten-free diet, a high index of suspicion for coeliac disease should exist in all Type 1 diabetic patients with unexplained constitutional or gastrointestinal symptoms.

  14. Alzheimer disease and cognitive impairment associated with diabetes mellitus type 2: associations and a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, R O; Pagano, M A; Marschoff, E R; González, S E; Repetto, M G; Serra, J A

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that patients with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer disease, but the relationship between the 2 entities is not clear. Both diseases exhibit similar metabolic abnormalities: disordered glucose metabolism, abnormal insulin receptor signalling and insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and structural abnormalities in proteins and β-amyloid deposits. Different hypotheses have emerged from experimental work in the last two decades. One of the most comprehensive relates the microvascular damage in diabetic polyneuritis with the central nervous system changes occurring in Alzheimer disease. Another hypothesis considers that cognitive impairment in both diabetes and Alzheimer disease is linked to a state of systemic oxidative stress. Recently, attenuation of cognitive impairment and normalisation of values in biochemical markers for oxidative stress were found in patients with Alzheimer disease and concomitant diabetes. Antidiabetic drugs may have a beneficial effect on glycolysis and its end products, and on other metabolic alterations. Diabetic patients are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer disease, but paradoxically, their biochemical alterations and cognitive impairment are less pronounced than in groups of dementia patients without diabetes. A deeper understanding of interactions between the pathogenic processes of both entities may lead to new therapeutic strategies that would slow or halt the progression of impairment. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Associated Autoimmune Diseases on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Incidence and Metabolic Control in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Krzewska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is one of the most common chronic diseases developing in childhood. The incidence of the disease in children increases for unknown reasons at a rate from 3 to 5% every year worldwide. The background of T1DM is associated with the autoimmune process of pancreatic beta cell destruction, which leads to absolute insulin deficiency and organ damage. Complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of T1DM in genetically predisposed patients. The T1DM-inducing autoimmune process can also affect other organs, resulting in development of additional autoimmune diseases in the patient, thereby impeding diabetes control. The most common T1DM comorbidities include autoimmune thyroid diseases, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis; additionally, diabetes can be a component of PAS (Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome. The aim of this review is to assess the prevalence of T1DM-associated autoimmune diseases in children and adolescents and their impact on the course of T1DM. We also present suggestions concerning screening tests.

  16. Predictors of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) in families with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Results from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägner, Ana M; Santana, Ángelo; Hernández, Marta; Wiebe, Julia C; Nóvoa, Javier; Mauricio, Didac

    2011-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a clinically heterogeneous disease. The presence of associated autoimmune diseases (AAID) may represent a distinct form of autoimmune diabetes, with involvement of specific mechanisms. The aim of this study was to find predictors of AAID in the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) data set. Methods 3263 families with at least 2 siblings with T1D were included. Clinical information was obtained using questionnaires, anti-GAD and anti-IA-2 were measured and HLA-genotyping was performed. Siblings with T1D with and without AAID were compared and a multivariate regression analysis was performed to find predictors of AAID. T1D-associated HLA haplotypes were defined as the 4 most susceptible and protective, respectively. Results AAID was present in 14.4% of the T1D affected siblings. Age of diabetes onset, current age and time since diagnosis were higher, and there was a female predominance and more family history of AAID in the group with AAID, as well as more frequent anti-GAD and less frequent anti-IA2 positivity. Risk and protective HLA haplotype distributions were similar, though DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was more frequent in the group with AAID. In the multivariate analysis, female gender, age of onset, family history of AAID, time since diagnosis and anti-GAD positivity were significantly associated with AAID. Conclusions In patients with T1D, the presence of AAID is associated with female predominance, more frequent family history of AAID, later onset of T1D and more anti-GAD antibodies, despite longer duration of the disease. The predominance of certain HLA haplotypes suggests that specific mechanisms of disease may be involved. PMID:21744463

  17. [Cardiovascular disease prevention in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus according to the recent statement from the American Heart Association/American Diabetes Association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-03-01

    There is a clear epidemiologic association between glycemic control and cardiovascular disease. There is strong evidence of a microvascular benefit by lowering glycated hemoglobin diabetic patients, to control all major cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. These risk factors, easily measurable, account for 90% of acute myocardial infarction. In this review, the update on prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association is discussed and commented.

  18. The Statins in Prevention of Coronary Heart Diseases in Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bećir Heljić

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine whether the administration of statins to type 2 diabetics without pre-existing CHD reduced the incidence of CHD and their effects on cholesterol and CRP levels. All the participants were carefully interviewed, clinically examined, and laboratory tested to exclude conditions likely to provoke an inflammatory response that was an exclusion criterion. Exclusion criteria: Serious heart, liver or kidney problems, history of renal transplant, recent history of drug or alcohol abuse, HbA1c>10%, blood pressure >140/90mmHg, BMI >35 kg/m2, triglycerides >3,0mmol/dm3. 95 obese diabetics (mean age 60,9 years and BMI=31,59 kg/m2, diabetes duration more than 10 years without pre-existing CHD, were included in the analysis and were randomized to simvastatin (25 female and 20 male used 40 mg simvastatin daily or placebo (30 female and 20 male group. After six months, simvastatin significantly lowered CRP levels by 19%, (p<0,01, cholesterol levels by 18%, TG levels by 8%, LDL levels by 20% and VLDL levels by 17%, whereas there was no change with placebo. After one year the difference sustained between groups. Coronary events were rarely in the simvastatin group (6,6% than in the placebo group (14%. Coronary revascularizations were 4 in the placebo group and 1 in the simvastatin group. Rate of stroke was more often in the placebo group (18% than in the simvastatin group (8,8%. So, reduction of acute CHD events is for 7,4% in the simvastatin group. Positive correlation was between CRP and CVD (r=0,29. Statin therapy reduced the risk of coronary hearth disease in diabetics without CHD.

  19. Glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factor management in patients with diabetes with and without coronary artery disease: insights from the diabetes mellitus status in Canada survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Jasmine; Leiter, Lawrence A; Langer, Anatoly; Goldin, Lianne; Teoh, Hwee; Connelly, Kim A; Cheng, Alice Y Y; Tan, Mary K; Fitchett, David; McGuire, Darren K; Goodman, Shaun G; Yan, Andrew T

    2016-10-01

    Current diabetes guidelines recommend an individualized approach to glycaemic control. There are limited data on the contemporary and comprehensive management of patients with diabetes in relation to coronary artery disease (CAD). The Diabetes Mellitus Status in Canada (DM-SCAN) survey included 5123 patients with type 2 diabetes seen in primary care in November 2012. Primary care physicians (PCPs) collected clinical data and specified the A1C target for each patient on standardized forms. We compared management strategies and achievement of treatment targets in patients with and without CAD. Among the 4994 patients with data on CAD history, 22.5% had CAD. Primary care physicians were more likely to select a higher A1C target for patients with CAD (≤7.5 or ≤8.0%) versus without (≤7.0%). There was no difference in median A1C or in the proportion of patients with A1C ≤7.0% between the two groups. Compared with the group without known CAD, patients with CAD had a higher reported prevalence of hypoglycaemia in the preceding 6 months; more frequently received aspirin, statins, ACE inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers, and were more likely to achieve blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol targets. Only 15.4 and 12.0% of patients with and without CAD (P = 0.002), respectively, achieved all three guideline-recommended targets. Compared with patients with diabetes without CAD, those with CAD more frequently had a less stringent A1C target selected by their PCPs but achieved similar glycaemic control. Overall, risk factor management remained suboptimal in both groups. There remains an important opportunity to improve the care and outcome of patients with diabetes.

  20. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and early exit from paid employment in Europe; the impact of work-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwenhoven-Pasmooij, T A; Burdorf, A; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Hunink, M G M; Robroek, S J W

    2016-07-15

    The aims of the study were to examine (i) the association between cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes and exit from paid employment via disability benefits, unemployment, early retirement or other exit routes; and (ii) the impact of work-related factors on exit from paid employment among individuals with CVD or diabetes. Respondents of the longitudinal Survey of Health and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were included if they were aged >50years, had paid employment at baseline, and a known employment status after 2 or 6years (n=5182). A baseline-interview provided information on the presence of diagnosed CVD and diabetes, and physical and psychosocial work-related factors. During follow-up interviews information on work status was collected. Multinomial regression analyses were used to investigate the association between CVD, diabetes and exit from paid employment, and the impact of work-related factors. Workers with CVD or diabetes had significantly increased probabilities of disability benefits (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.69-3.70) and early retirement (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.05-1.74), but a comparable probability of unemployment (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.71-1.71). Regarding disability benefits, individuals who had a stroke had the highest probability (OR 3.48, 95% CI 1.31-9.23). Perceived high job demands with low rewards or with low control at work further increased the probability of early exit among individuals with CVD or diabetes. Our study shows a prominent role of CVD and diabetes in premature losses to the workforce, and it shows that optimizing psychosocial work-related factors could be beneficial in people with CVD or diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Diet and kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Dehghan, Mahshid; Teo, Koon K; Heinze, Georg; Gao, Peggy; Kohl, Maria; Clase, Catherine M; Mann, Johannes F E; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2013-10-14

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated chronic kidney disease (CKD) have become major public health problems. Little is known about the influence of diet on the incidence or progression of CKD among individuals with type 2 diabetes. To examine the association between (healthy) diet, alcohol, protein, and sodium intake, and incidence or progression of CKD among individuals with type 2 diabetes. All 6213 individuals with type 2 diabetes without macroalbuminuria from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) were included in this observational study. Recruitment spanned from January 2002 to July 2003, with prospective follow-up through January 2008. Chronic kidney disease was defined as new microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria or glomerular filtration rate decline of more than 5% per year at 5.5 years of follow-up. We assessed diet using the modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index (mAHEI). The analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, and competing risk of death was considered. After 5.5 years of follow-up, 31.7% of participants had developed CKD and 8.3% had died. Compared with participants in the least healthy tertile of mAHEI score, participants in the healthiest tertile had a lower risk of CKD (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.84) and lower risk of mortality (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.48-0.78). Participants consuming more than 3 servings of fruits per week had a lower risk of CKD compared with participants consuming these food items less frequently. Participants in the lowest tertile of total and animal protein intake had an increased risk of CKD compared with participants in the highest tertile (total protein OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.30). Sodium intake was not associated with CKD. Moderate alcohol intake reduced the risk of CKD (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.65-0.87) and mortality (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89). A healthy diet and moderate intake of alcohol may decrease the incidence or progression of CKD

  2. Ethnic disparities in risk of cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease and all-cause mortality: a prospective study among Asian people with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J J; Lim, S C; Yeoh, L Y; Su, C; Tai, B C; Low, S; Fun, S; Tavintharan, S; Chia, K S; Tai, E S; Sum, C F

    2016-03-01

    To study prospectively the ethnic-specific risks of cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease and all-cause mortality in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus among native Asian subpopulations. A total of 2337 subjects with Type 2 diabetes (70% Chinese, 17% Malay and 13% Asian Indian) were followed for a median of 4.0 years. Time-to-event analysis was used to study the association of ethnicity with adverse outcomes. Age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratios for cardiovascular disease in ethnic Malay and Asian Indian subjects were 2.01 (1.40-2.88; PChinese subjects. Adjustment for conventional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including HbA1c , blood pressure and lipid profile, slightly attenuated the hazards in Malay (1.82, 1.23-2.71; P=0.003) and Asian Indian subjects (1.47, 0.95-2.30; P=0.086); However, further adjustment for baseline renal function (estimated GFR) and albuminuria weakened the cardiovascular disease risks in Malay (1.48, 0.98-2.26; P=0.065) but strengthened that in Asian Indian subjects (1.81, 1.14-2.87; P=0.012). Competing-risk regression showed that the age- and gender-adjusted sub-distribution hazard ratio for end-stage renal disease was 1.87 (1.27-2.73; P=0.001) in Malay and 0.39 (0.18-0.83; P=0.015) in Asian Indian subjects. Notably, the difference in end-stage renal disease risk among the three ethnic groups was abolished after further adjustment for baseline estimated GFR and albuminuria. There was no significant difference in risk of all-cause mortality among the three ethnic groups. Risks of cardiovascular and end-stage renal diseases in native Asian subjects with Type 2 diabetes vary substantially among different ethnic groups. Differences in prevalence of diabetic kidney disease may partially explain the ethnic disparities. © 2015 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  3. Short-term Evaluation of a Comprehensive Education Program Including Inhaler Training and Disease Management on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kwang Ha; Chung, Wou Young; Park, Joo Hun; Hwang, Sung Chul; Kim, Tae Eun; Oh, Min Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Rhee, Chin Kook; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Park, Yong Bum; Kim, Sang Ha; Yum, Ho Kee

    2017-10-01

    Proper education regarding inhaler usage and optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is essential for effectively treating patients with COPD. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a comprehensive education program including inhaler training and COPD management. We enlisted 127 patients with COPD on an outpatient basis at 43 private clinics in Korea. The patients were educated on inhaler usage and disease management for three visits across 2 weeks. Physicians and patients were administered a COPD assessment test (CAT) and questionnaires about the correct usage of inhalers and management of COPD before commencement of this program and after their third visit. The outcomes of 127 COPD patients were analyzed. CAT scores (19.6±12.5 vs. 15.1±12.3) improved significantly after this program (pmanagement and the correct technique for using inhalers than those who did not have improved CAT scores (peducation program including inhaler training and COPD management at a primary care setting improved CAT scores and led to patients' better understanding of COPD management. Copyright©2017. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases

  4. Description of an oral Chagas disease outbreak in Venezuela, including a vertically transmitted case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón de; Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Dickson, Sonia; Muñoz-Calderón, Arturo; Hernández, Carlos; Pérez, Yadira; Mauriello, Luciano; Moronta, Eyleen

    2017-08-01

    We describe the eleventh major outbreak of foodborne Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in urban Venezuela, including evidence for vertical transmission from the index case to her fetus. After confirming fetal death at 24 weeks of gestation, pregnancy interruption was performed. On direct examination of the amniotic fluid, trypomastigotes were detected. T. cruzi specific-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) also proved positive when examining autopsied fetal organs. Finally, microscopic fetal heart examination revealed amastigote nests. Acute orally transmitted Chagas disease can be life threatening or even fatal for pregnant women and unborn fetuses owing to vertical transmission. There is therefore an urgent need to improve national epidemiologic control measures.

  5. [Ischemic origin of diabetic foot disease. Epidemiology, difficulties of diagnosis, options for prevention and revascularization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolossváry, Endre; Bánsághi, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor Viktor; Járai, Zoltán; Farkas, Katalin

    2017-02-01

    "Diabetic foot" as definition covers a multifactorial clinical condition. According to the recent epidemiological data, the role of lower limb ischemia is getting more influential over other pathological causes, like neuropathy, infections and bone or soft tissue deformity. In diabetes, vascular disease leads to increased risk for leg ulcers and minor or major amputations. The traditional diagnostic tools for recognition of peripheral arterial disease have limited value because of diabetes specific clinical manifestations. Available vascular centers with special expertise and diagnostic tools are the prerequisite for efficient diagnosis supporting timely recognition of peripheral arterial disease. In course of treatment of diabetic foot with ischemic origin, beyond effective medical treatment revascularization (open vascular surgery or endovascular procedures) has paramount importance for prevention of limb loss. Vascular teams of vascular specialists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologist in dedicated centers in multidisciplinary cooperation with other professions represent public health issue in effective prevention. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(6), 203-211.

  6. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholm, Niina; Salem, Rany M; McKnight, Amy Jayne

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion...... mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE) consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D DN comprising ~2...... SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1 × 10(-7)), a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN....

  7. The association of atopy with incidence of ischemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk

    2015-01-01

    analyzed by Cox regression analyses with age as underlying time axis and adjusted for study cohort, gender, education, body mass index, alcohol intake, smoking habits, physical activity during leisure time, serum lipids, and blood pressure. The prevalence of atopy was 26.9 % (n = 3,994). There were 1......Allergy is a systemic inflammatory disease that could theoretically affect the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes through inflammatory pathways or mast cell-induced coronary spasm. Whether allergy is associated with an increased risk of CVD and diabetes is largely unknown. We......-specific IgE positivity to inhalant allergens. The Danish National Diabetes Register enabled identification of incident diabetes. Likewise, the Danish Registry of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Register provided information on fatal and non-fatal ischemic heart disease and stroke. Data were...

  8. Prognostic clinical and molecular biomarkers of renal disease in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena, Michelle J; de Zeeuw, Dick; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    biomarkers address the predictive performance of novel biomarker panels in addition to the classical panel in type 2 diabetes. However, the prospective studies conducted so far have small sample sizes, are insufficiently powered and lack external validation. Adequately sized validation studies of multiple......Diabetic kidney disease occurs in ∼ 25-40% of patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the high risk of progressive renal function loss and end-stage renal disease, early identification of patients with a renal risk is important. Novel biomarkers may aid in improving renal risk stratification...... and metabolomics biomarkers. We focus on multiple biomarker panels since the molecular processes of renal disease progression in type 2 diabetes are heterogeneous, rendering it unlikely that a single biomarker significantly adds to clinical risk prediction. A limited number of prospective studies of multiple...

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY AND PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE IN THE OUTCOME OF DIABETIC FOOT MANAGEMENT – A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar Prakash S, Krishnakumar, Chandra Prabha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral neuropathy and Peripheral Vascular Disease are the risk factors for the development of diabetic foot. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences and predictors of outcome parameters in patients with diabetic foot by stratifying these subjects according to the severity of these risk factors. Materials and methods: This is a prospective study conducted in 70 patients in the age group of 30-90 years diagnosed as Type II Diabetes with foot ulcers. After detailed clinical examination the following tests were conducted in all the patients: Complete blood count (CBC, Haemoglobin (Hb, Random Blood Sugar (RBS, Erythrocyte Sedimentation rate (ESR, Chest X-ray(CXR, Electrocardiography (ECG, foot X-ray, pus culture, Neuropathy testing by Semmes Weinstein Monofilament Test and Vibration Perception Threshold and Peripheral vascularity assessment by Duplex Doppler. Then grading of the ulcers was done using Wagner’s Grade. The outcome of the patients was assessed by recording the healing time, mode of surgery and amputation rates of the patients. Results: A total of 70 patients with diabetic foot were consecutively included into the study (65.7% male, age (31% in 51-60 years, mean diabetes duration (5.2 years, Ulcer Grade (37% in Grade IV, Foot lesions (45.7% in toe, Blood sugar levels (64% in 300-400 mg/dl, Neuropathy (84%, Peripheral vascular disease (67%, major amputation (7% and mortality (1.4%. Conclusion: All diabetic patients should undergo testing for neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease apart from doing other tests.

  10. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cardiovascular Disease: Genetic and Epigenetic Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore De Rosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM is a common metabolic disorder predisposing to diabetic cardiomyopathy and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD, which could lead to heart failure through a variety of mechanisms, including myocardial infarction and chronic pressure overload. Pathogenetic mechanisms, mainly linked to hyperglycemia and chronic sustained hyperinsulinemia, include changes in metabolic profiles, intracellular signaling pathways, energy production, redox status, increased susceptibility to ischemia, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The close relationship between type 2 DM and CVD has led to the common soil hypothesis, postulating that both conditions share common genetic and environmental factors influencing this association. However, although the common risk factors of both CVD and type 2 DM, such as obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, inflammation, and thrombophilia, can be identified in the majority of affected patients, less is known about how these factors influence both conditions, so that efforts are still needed for a more comprehensive understanding of this relationship. The genetic, epigenetic, and environmental backgrounds of both type 2 DM and CVD have been more recently studied and updated. However, the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms have seldom been investigated within the broader shared background, but rather studied in the specific context of type 2 DM or CVD, separately. As the precise pathophysiological links between type 2 DM and CVD are not entirely understood and many aspects still require elucidation, an integrated description of the genetic, epigenetic, and environmental influences involved in the concomitant development of both diseases is of paramount importance to shed new light on the interlinks between type 2 DM and CVD. This review addresses the current knowledge of overlapping genetic and epigenetic aspects in type 2 DM and CVD, including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, whose

  11. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease

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    Vani Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes different types of health care-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and meningitis. We report here a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease. A middle-aged man with a known case of diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease presented with the complaints of blurred vision in the left eye and the patient was found to have cataract. Patient was operated for cataract and Intraocular lens implanted. Patient developed headache and vomiting on the 4 th post-operative day. Lumbar puncture was carried out and gram stain of cerebrospinal fluid showed Gram-negative bacilli in the direct smear and culture yielded a heavy growth of K. pneumoniae. The patient was treated with antimicrobials according to the susceptibility pattern. He initially showed improvement but later on developed altered sensorium and hypotension. Patient succumbed to infection in spite of all medical attention.

  12. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese persons with diabetes

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    Tomašević Ratko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, diabetes and different lipid metabolic disorders are the most frequent risk factors for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, presented with a high variability in clinical and histological findings. Case report. We presented a case of 37-year-old male, suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus, grade III obesity (BMI 45 kg/m2 and multiple metabolic disorders. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hepatomegaly during the last six months. Laboratory diagnostics showed increased serum transaminase levels. Serologic markers for viral hepatitis B and C were negative. The patient denied significant alcohol consumption. Liver biopsy and pathohistologic finding revealed macro- (III grade and microvesicular (I grade fatty degeneration, as well as mixed-cell portal infiltration with moderate liver fibrosis, corresponding to the typical presentation of NASH (Non Alcoholic Steatohepatitis. Conclusion. NASH treatment options include the reduction of body mass and an adequate antidiabetic and dislipidemia treatment. The aim of all therapeutic measures was to stop the progression of the disease, to prevent the progression of fibrosis and the development of of cirrhosis. .

  13. Effects of Hyperglycemia and Iron Deficiency on Kidney and Heart Function in Type 2 Diabetes Disease

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    Belma Aščić-Buturović

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Untreated anemia can caused significant cardiac and kidney damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of anemia and hyperglycemia treatment in type 2 diabetes and their impact on kidney and heart impairment. The study is clinical retrospective and prospective and it was conducted in Clinic of Endocrinology, Diabetes Mellitus and Metabolic Diseases, University Clinical Center of Sarajevo. Prior to the study all patients were taking oral hypoglycemic drugs included sulfonylureas and biguanides. These subjects were put on 2 times daily fix mix insulin and biguanides after lunch. Each day, subjects received Iron tab 1 x 100 mg/ day, and C vitamin 1 x 100 mg/day. The results of our study are showing that effective treatment of glycaemia and anemia in patients with diabetes, reduces blood pressure, urine albumin secretion and pulse rate, diminishing cardiovascular damage and improving kidney function.

  14. Ultrasound assessment of thyroid gland volume in diabetic patients without overt thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduka, Christopher C; Adeyekun, Ademola A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease are known to mutually influence each other. Thyroid disease can worsen glycaemic control in diabetes, and patients with diabetes mellitus have increased incidence of thyroid disorders such as increase in size, compared to the normal population. The aim of the study was to sonographically assess thyroid gland volume in Nigerian adult diabetic patients and compare with apparently healthy adults (controls). The study setting was the Department of Radiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) Nigeria. The thyroid gland in 120 diabetic subjects and equal number of apparently healthy controls was scanned with a 5-12 MHz linear transducer of a SONOACE X4 Machine. Thyroid gland volume was assessed. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17 (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL, USA). Diabetics had significantly increased thyroid volume compared to age matched male and female control subjects (11.5 ± 5.2 cm3 vs 7.4 ± 1.9 cm3; Pthyroid volume among diabetics. Diabetics have higher thyroid gland dimensions, compared to apparently healthy subjects. Gland proliferation from circulating insulin may play a role. This is not influenced by gender.

  15. Differences in traditional and non-traditional risk factors with special reference to nutritional factors in patients with coronary artery disease with or without diabetes mellitus

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    Namita P Mahalle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increase in awareness about the role of nutritional factors in chronic non-communicable diseases. We therefore conducted this study with an aim to assess the relationship between nutritional factor (vitamin B12 and homocysteine [Hcy] and its association with insulin resistance and inflammatory markers, and differences in traditional and non-traditional risk factors among diabetics and non-diabetics in known cases of coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods: Three hundred consecutive patients with known coronary disease on coronary angiography, who were >25 years old were included in this study. All cases were interviewed using a questionnaire. Blood samples were analyzed for insulin, vitamin B12, Hcy and inflammatory markers (highly sensitive C-reactive protein [hsCRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], Tumor necrosis factor-alfa [TNF-α]. Insulin resistance was calculated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Results: Mean age of the patients was 60.95 ± 12.3 years. Body mass index and waist hip ratio were comparable in both groups. Triglyceride, very low-density lipoprotein and HbA1C were significantly higher and high-density lipoprotein (HDL was significantly lower in patients with diabetes. Patients with diabetes had significantly high levels of IL-6, hsCRP and TNF-α compared with non-diabetic patients. Insulin resistance was twofold higher in diabetic patients. Serum vitamin B12 levels were significantly lower and Hcy was significantly higher in the diabetic group compared with the non-diabetic patients. HbA1C, HOMA-IR and Hcy levels were positively correlated with inflammatory markers in the total study population and in the non-diabetic patients; but, in diabetic patients, HbA1C and Hcy showed this relation. Conclusions: Vitamin B12 deficiency is common in the diabetic population. Hcy levels were higher in diabetics compared with non-diabetics, and were related to glycemic level and

  16. Benefit and adherence of the disease management program "diabetes 2": a comparison of Turkish immigrants and German natives with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Anna Christin; Kofahl, Christopher

    2014-09-17

    There is an ongoing debate about equity and equality in health care, and whether immigrants benefit equally from services as the non-immigrant population. The study focuses on benefits from and adherence to the diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM 2) disease management program (DMP) among Turkish immigrants in Germany. So far, it has not been researched whether this group benefits from enrollment in the DMP as well as diabetics from the non-immigrant population. Data on the non-immigrant sample (N = 702) stem from a survey among members of a German health insurance, the Turkish immigrant sample (N = 102) was recruited in the area of Hamburg. Identical questions in both surveys enable comparing major components. Regarding process quality, Turkish diabetics do not differ from the non-immigrant sample; moreover, they have significantly more often received documentation and diabetes training. In terms of outcome quality however, results display a greater benefit on behalf of the non-immigrant sample (e.g., blood parameters and body mass index), and they also met more of the DMP criteria. This underlines the need of diabetics with Turkish background for further education and information in order to become the empowered patient as is intended by the DMP as well as to prevent comorbidities.

  17. Diabetic foot disease: From the evaluation of the “foot at risk” to the novel diabetic ulcer treatment modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Noha; Doupis, John

    2016-01-01

    The burden of diabetic foot disease (DFD) is expected to increase in the future. The incidence of DFD is still rising due to the high prevalence of DFD predisposing factors. DFD is multifactorial in nature; however most of the diabetic foot amputations are preceded by foot ulceration. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a major risk factor for foot ulceration. DPN leads to loss of protective sensation resulting in continuous unconscious traumas. Patient education and detection of high risk foot are essential for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation. Proper assessment of the diabetic foot ulceration and appropriate management ensure better prognosis. Management is based on revascularization procedures, wound debridement, treatment of infection and ulcer offloading. Management and type of dressing applied are tailored according to the type of wound and the foot condition. The scope of this review paper is to describe the diabetic foot syndrome starting from the evaluation of the foot at risk for ulceration, up to the new treatment modalities. PMID:27076876

  18. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Jun Ouk Ha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in Korea appears to be increasing. Some studies have shown that T2DM is a risk factor for symptomatic GERD. However, this possibility is still debated, and the pathogenesis of GERD in T2DM is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk factors (including autonomic neuropathy of GERD in patients with T2DM.MethodsThis cross-sectional case-control study enrolled T2DM patients (n=258 and healthy controls (n=184. All participants underwent physical examinations and laboratory tests. We evaluated medical records and long-term diabetes complications, including peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in patients with T2DM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in all patients. The Los Angeles (LA classification was used to grade GERD. GERD was defined as LA grade A (or higher or minimal change with GERD symptoms. GERD symptoms were examined using a frequency scale. Data were expressed as mean±standard error. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups.ResultsThe prevalence of GERD (32.6% vs. 35.9%, P=0.266 and GERD symptoms (58.8% vs. 59.2%, P=0.503 was not significantly different between T2DM patients and controls. We found no significant differences between T2DM patients with GERD and T2DM patients without GERD with respect to diabetic complications, including autonomic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, duration of DM, and glucose control.ConclusionThe prevalence of GERD in patients with T2DM showed no difference from that of controls. GERD was also not associated with peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, age, or duration of DM in patients with T2DM.

  19. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease and Associated Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chinese with Type 2 Diabetes

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    Qing-Lin Lou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo determine the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD and its associated risk factors in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, we conducted a cross-sectional study in Nanjing, China, in the period between January 2008 and December 2009.MethodsPatients with type 2 diabetes under the care by Jiangsu Province Official Hospital, Nanjing, China were invited for assessment. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria or estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Albuminuria was defined as urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g.ResultsWe recruited 1,521 urban Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (mean age, 63.9±12.0 years. The frequency of CKD and albuminuria was 31.0% and 28.9%, respectively. After adjusted by age and sex, hypertension, anemia and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with CKD with odds ratio (95% confidence interval being 1.93 (1.28 to 2.93, 1.70 (1.09 to 2.64, and 1.03 (1.00 to 1.06, respectively.ConclusionIn conclusion, CKD was common in the urban Nanjing Chinese with type 2 diabetes. Strategies to prevent or delay progression of kidney disease in diabetes should be carried out at the early disease course of type 2 diabetes.

  1. Knowledge of heart disease risk in a multicultural community sample of people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Lacey, Kimberly; Abbott, Gina; de Groot, Mary; Chyun, Deborah

    2006-06-01

    Prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) is a primary goal of diabetes management. Unfortunately, CHD risk knowledge is poor among people with diabetes. The objective is to determine predictors of CHD risk knowledge in a community sample of people with diabetes. A total of 678 people with diabetes completed the Heart Disease Facts Questionnaire (HDFQ), a valid and reliable measure of knowledge about the relationship between diabetes and heart disease. In regression analysis with demographics predicting HDFQ scores, sex, annual income, education, and health insurance status predicted HDFQ scores. In a separate regression analysis, having CHD risk factors did not predict HDFQ scores, however, taking medication for CHD risk factors did predict higher HDFQ scores. An analysis of variance showed significant differences between ethnic groups for HDFQ scores; Whites (M = 20.9) showed more CHD risk knowledge than African Americans (M = 19.6), who in turn showed more than Latinos (M = 18.2). Asians scored near Whites (M = 20.4) but did not differ significantly from any other group. Controlling for numerous demographic, socioeconomic, health care, diabetes, and cardiovascular health variables, the magnitude of ethnic differences was attenuated, but persisted. Education regarding modifiable risk factors must be delivered in a timely fashion so that lifestyle modification can be implemented and evaluated before pharmacotherapy is deemed necessary. African Americans and Latinos with diabetes are in the greatest need of education regarding CHD risk.

  2. Interrupting the natural history of diabetes mellitus: lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical strategies targeting disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavandi, Kaivan; Brownrigg, Jack; Hankir, Mohammed; Sood, Harpreet; Younis, Naveed; Worth, Joy; Greenstein, Adam; Soran, Handrean; Wierzbicki, Anthony; Goldsmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades we have seen a surge in the incidence of diabetes in industrialized nations; a threat which has now extended to the developing world. Type 2 diabetes is associated with significant microvascular and macrovascular disease, with considerable impact on morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has cast uncertainty on the benefits of very tight glycaemic goals in these individuals. The natural history of disease follows an insidious course from disordered glucose metabolism in a pre-diabetic state, often with metabolic syndrome and obesity, before proceeding to diabetes mellitus. In the research setting, lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical intervention targeted against obesity and glycaemia has shown that metabolic disturbances can be halted and indeed regressed if introduced at an early stage of disease. In addition to traditional anti-diabetic medications such as the glinides, sulphonylureas and the glitazones, novel therapies manipulating the endocannabinoid system, neurotransmitters, intestinal absorption and gut hormones have shown dual benefit in weight loss and glycaemic control normalisation. Whilst these treatments will not and should not replace lifestyle change, they will act as invaluable adjuncts for weight loss and aid in normalising the metabolic profile of individuals at risk of diabetes. Utilizing novel therapies to prevent diabetes should be the focus of future research, with the aim of preventing the challenging microvascular and macrovascular complications, and ultimately cardiovascular death.

  3. The beneficial role of curcumin on inflammation, diabetes and neurodegenerative disease: A recent update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Shatadal; Banerjee, Sharmistha; Sil, Parames C

    2015-09-01

    The concept of using phytochemicals has ushered in a new revolution in pharmaceuticals. Naturally occurring polyphenols (like curcumin, morin, resveratrol, etc.) have gained importance because of their minimal side effects, low cost and abundance. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a component of turmeric isolated from the rhizome of Curcuma longa. Research for more than two decades has revealed the pleiotropic nature of the biological effects of this molecule. More than 7000 published articles have shed light on the various aspects of curcumin including its antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Apart from these well-known activities, this natural polyphenolic compound also exerts its beneficial effects by modulating different signalling molecules including transcription factors, chemokines, cytokines, tumour suppressor genes, adhesion molecules, microRNAs, etc. Oxidative stress and inflammation play a pivotal role in various diseases like diabetes, cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease and cardiovascular diseases. Curcumin, therefore, could be a therapeutic option for the treatment of these diseases, provided limitations in its oral bioavailability can be overcome. The current review provides an updated overview of the metabolism and mechanism of action of curcumin in various organ pathophysiologies. The review also discusses the potential for multifunctional therapeutic application of curcumin and its recent progress in clinical biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Intron 4 Polymorphism in the Calcium-Sensing Receptor Gene in Diabetes Mellitus and its Chronic Complications, Diabetic Nephropathy and Non-Diabetic Renal Disease

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    Viera Železníková

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR significantly affects calcium-phosphate metabolism in kidneys, and it is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM due to its expression in pancreatic F-cells. The role of CaSR as one of the players in pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has been speculated. Methods: 158 Type 2 diabetic patients divided into three groups according to occurrence and type of kidney complications, 66 nondiabetic patients CKD, and 93 healthy subjects were enrolled into the study to analyze the role of two CaSR polymorphisms (in the codon 990 and in the intron 4 in ethiopathogenesis of DM and CKD. The Type 2 diabetic groups consisted of 48 patients without any kidney abnormalities, 58 patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN, and 52 patients with nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD. The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies was studied using PCR with the TaqMan Discrimination Assay or followed by the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism method, respectively. Results: We have found that the intron 4 polymorphism is a risk factor for the development of DM and CKD, except DN, while the codon 990 does not show any disease association. Conclusion: We conclude that CaSR is a general factor in pancreas and kidney pathologies. i 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, Jessica L; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G; Brown, Jamelle A; Feeley, Kyle P; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A; Berk, Brittany D; Weisbrod, Robert M; Widlansky, Michael E; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W; Hamburg, Naomi M

    2016-03-31

    Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We assessed non-invasive vascular function and mitochondrial DNA damage in 275 patients (age 57 ± 9 years, 60 % women) with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease alone (N = 55), diabetes mellitus alone (N = 74), combined atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus (N = 48), and controls age >45 without diabetes mellitus or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (N = 98). Mitochondrial DNA damage measured by quantitative PCR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was higher with clinical atherosclerosis alone (0.55 ± 0.65), diabetes mellitus alone (0.65 ± 1.0), and combined clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus (0.89 ± 1.32) as compared to control subjects (0.23 ± 0.64, P < 0.0001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and relevant cardiovascular risk factors, clinical atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus remained associated with higher mitochondrial DNA damage levels (β = 0.14 ± 0.13, P = 0.04 and β = 0.21 ± 0.13, P = 0.002, respectively). Higher mitochondrial DNA damage was associated with higher baseline pulse amplitude, a measure of arterial pulsatility, but not with flow-mediated dilation or hyperemic response, measures of vasodilator function. We found greater mitochondrial DNA damage in patients with diabetes mellitus and clinical atherosclerosis. The association of mitochondrial DNA damage and baseline pulse amplitude may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive small artery pulsatility with potentially adverse microvascular impact.

  6. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Sudha K; Sedor, John R; Freedman, Barry I; Kao, W H Linda; Kretzler, Matthias; Keller, Benjamin J; Abboud, Hanna E; Adler, Sharon G; Best, Lyle G; Bowden, Donald W; Burlock, Allison; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Cole, Shelley A; Comeau, Mary E; Curtis, Jeffrey M; Divers, Jasmin; Drechsler, Christiane; Duggirala, Ravi; Elston, Robert C; Guo, Xiuqing; Huang, Huateng; Hoffmann, Michael Marcus; Howard, Barbara V; Ipp, Eli; Kimmel, Paul L; Klag, Michael J; Knowler, William C; Kohn, Orly F; Leak, Tennille S; Leehey, David J; Li, Man; Malhotra, Alka; März, Winfried; Nair, Viji; Nelson, Robert G; Nicholas, Susanne B; O'Brien, Stephen J; Pahl, Madeleine V; Parekh, Rulan S; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Rasooly, Rebekah S; Rotimi, Charles N; Rotter, Jerome I; Schelling, Jeffrey R; Seldin, Michael F; Shah, Vallabh O; Smiles, Adam M; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Kent D; Thameem, Farook; Thornley-Brown, Denyse P; Truitt, Barbara J; Wanner, Christoph; Weil, E Jennifer; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zager, Philip G; Igo, Robert P; Hanson, Robert L; Langefeld, Carl D

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND) performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9). The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8), with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD.

  7. Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha K Iyengar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic kidney disease (DKD is the most common etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the industrialized world and accounts for much of the excess mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus. Approximately 45% of U.S. patients with incident end-stage kidney disease (ESKD have DKD. Independent of glycemic control, DKD aggregates in families and has higher incidence rates in African, Mexican, and American Indian ancestral groups relative to European populations. The Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS contrasting 6,197 unrelated individuals with advanced DKD with healthy and diabetic individuals lacking nephropathy of European American, African American, Mexican American, or American Indian ancestry. A large-scale replication and trans-ethnic meta-analysis included 7,539 additional European American, African American and American Indian DKD cases and non-nephropathy controls. Within ethnic group meta-analysis of discovery GWAS and replication set results identified genome-wide significant evidence for association between DKD and rs12523822 on chromosome 6q25.2 in American Indians (P = 5.74x10-9. The strongest signal of association in the trans-ethnic meta-analysis was with a SNP in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs12523822 (rs955333; P = 1.31x10-8, with directionally consistent results across ethnic groups. These 6q25.2 SNPs are located between the SCAF8 and CNKSR3 genes, a region with DKD relevant changes in gene expression and an eQTL with IPCEF1, a gene co-translated with CNKSR3. Several other SNPs demonstrated suggestive evidence of association with DKD, within and across populations. These data identify a novel DKD susceptibility locus with consistent directions of effect across diverse ancestral groups and provide insight into the genetic architecture of DKD.

  8. A Different Perspective for Management of Diabetes Mellitus: Controlling Viral Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingying; Xing, Huichun

    2017-01-01

    Knowing how to prevent and treat diabetes mellitus (DM) earlier is essential to improving outcomes. Through participating in synthesis and catabolism of glycogen, the liver helps to regulate glucose homeostasis. Viral related liver diseases are associated with glycometabolism disorders, which means effective management of viral liver diseases may be a therapeutic strategy for DM. The present article reviews the correlation between DM and liver diseases to give an update of the management of DM rooted by viral liver diseases.

  9. β-Glucans (Saccharomyces cereviseae) Reduce Glucose Levels and Attenuate Alveolar Bone Loss in Diabetic Rats with Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of oral ingestion of β-glucans isolated from Saccharomyces cereviseae on the metabolic profile, expression of gingival inflammatory markers and amount of alveolar bone loss in diabetic rats with periodontal disease. Diabetes mellitus was induced in 48 Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (80 mg/kg). After confirming the diabetes diagnosis, the animals were treated with β-glucans (by gavage) for 28 days. On the 14th day of this period, periodontal disease was induced using a ligature protocol. β-glucans reduced the amount of alveolar bone loss in animals with periodontal disease in both the diabetic and non-diabetic groups (p periodontal disease (p periodontal disease (p periodontal effects in diabetic rats with periodontal disease. PMID:26291983

  10. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease and evaluation of standard of care in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rungby, Jorgen; Schou, Morten; Warrer, Per

    2017-01-01

    -density lipoprotein cholesterol was 2.0 mmol/l. Conclusion: In a nationwide database survey in primary care, the prevalence of CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes was high (21.4%). Standard of care was largely in accordance with national guidelines. Identification of eligible patients is possible with existing......Objective: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) complicates type 2 diabetes. Empagliflozin and liraglutide have demonstrated improved survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and established CVD. We assessed prevalence and standard of care of patients with type 2 diabetes and established CVD managed.......6% were women. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 68.2 ml/min, and 22.2% had microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria. Standard of care was fair: mean glycated hemoglobin was 52.3 mmol/mol (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial=6.9%), mean blood pressure was 131.4/75.7 mmHg, and mean low...

  11. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus among obese and non-obese patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.B.; Rehman, H.U.; Hafeezullah, M.; Gul, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Globally, obesity is now recognised as an epidemic. The degree of obesity is proportional to the rate of development of cardiovascular diseases, hence, resulting in a dramatic increase in morbidity and mortality. Apart from obesity, diabetes mellitus is another well recognised risk factor contributing to coronary artery disease. The precise prevalence of obesity-related diabetes varies with age, race and gender; and is yet unknown in our population. We therefore, carried out study with the aim to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in obese and non-obese patients with diagnosed coronary artery disease. Methods: This hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted in Cardiology Department of Postgraduate Medical Institute, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar, from March 15, 2005 to May 30, 2006. A total of 200 patients with diagnosed coronary artery disease were enrolled, 100 were classified as obese and 100 as non-obese. Results: Among these, 139 patients were male and 61 female. A total of 88 were found to be diabetic, 54 of these were obese and 34 non-obese (p =0.004). Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus was significantly more frequent among obese patients with coronary artery disease as compared to non obese patients with coronary artery disease. (author)

  12. Relations between Resiliency, Diabetes-Related Quality of Life, and Disease Markers to School-Related Outcomes in Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M.; Jaramillo, Evelyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the role that resiliency and diabetes quality of life play in school functioning and glucose control among adolescents with diabetes. Participants included 45 adolescents with diabetes who participated in a larger study evaluating the feasibility of a model of mental health screening, assessment, and referral/service…

  13. Both glucocentric and cardiocentric approaches are necessary for a resilient disease such as diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Caramelli

    Full Text Available Summary Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex disease that compromises almost all systems in the human organism. Independently of the intrinsic mechanisms, the source of all consequences of DM is hyperglycemia, a condition associated to intense metabolic changes that will lead to increased morbidity and mortality in the long term. Several different therapeutic hypoglycemic oral agents were developed and significantly facilitated the treatment of hyperglycemia acting at different sites, since patients could take more than one agent. This glucocentric approach was somehow criticized as those hypoglycemic drugs have shown weaker than expected benefits in terms of cardiovascular outcomes and there was a sub use of statins and antihypertensive agents in this population. On the other hand, the catastrophic cardiovascular consequences of hypoglycemia in older adults submitted to tight glycemic control and the results of recent clinical trials that showed impressive reduction in cardiovascular outcomes with less potent antidiabetic agents seem to pave the way to a cardiocentric approach including a lax treatment of DM. Interestingly, the results obtained in recent studies with SGLT2 inhibitors are being mostly attributed to mechanisms other than its hypoglycemic effect in spite of including patients at high cardiovascular risk already taking hypoglycemic agents. Considering the worldwide growing number of patients with diabetes, caregivers must follow a dialectical thinking and choose a synthesis approach where glycemic control is the first and foremost target to be achieved, followed by control of cardiovascular risk factors.

  14. Integrative network analysis unveils convergent molecular pathways in Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level. Using a random walk algorithm within the human functional linkage network we identified a molecular cluster of 478 neighboring genes closely associated with confirmed Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes genes. Biological and functional analysis identified the protein serine-threonine kinase activity, MAPK cascade, activation of the immune response, and insulin receptor and lipid signaling as convergent pathways. Integration of results from microarrays studies identified a blood signature comprising seven genes whose expression is dysregulated in Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Among this group of genes, is the amyloid precursor protein (APP), previously associated with neurodegeneration and insulin regulation. Quantification of RNA from whole blood of 192 samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS) and the Prognostic Biomarker Study (PROBE), revealed that expression of APP is significantly upregulated in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Assessment of biomarker performance revealed that expression of APP could distinguish Parkinson's disease from healthy individuals with a diagnostic accuracy of 80% in both cohorts of patients. These results provide the first evidence that Parkinson's disease and diabetes are strongly linked at the molecular level and that shared molecular networks provide an additional source for identifying highly sensitive biomarkers. Further, these results suggest for the first time that

  15. Integrative network analysis unveils convergent molecular pathways in Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Santiago

    Full Text Available Shared dysregulated pathways may contribute to Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes, chronic diseases that afflict millions of people worldwide. Despite the evidence provided by epidemiological and gene profiling studies, the molecular and functional networks implicated in both diseases, have not been fully explored. In this study, we used an integrated network approach to investigate the extent to which Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes are linked at the molecular level.Using a random walk algorithm within the human functional linkage network we identified a molecular cluster of 478 neighboring genes closely associated with confirmed Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes genes. Biological and functional analysis identified the protein serine-threonine kinase activity, MAPK cascade, activation of the immune response, and insulin receptor and lipid signaling as convergent pathways. Integration of results from microarrays studies identified a blood signature comprising seven genes whose expression is dysregulated in Parkinson's disease and type 2 diabetes. Among this group of genes, is the amyloid precursor protein (APP, previously associated with neurodegeneration and insulin regulation. Quantification of RNA from whole blood of 192 samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS and the Prognostic Biomarker Study (PROBE, revealed that expression of APP is significantly upregulated in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Assessment of biomarker performance revealed that expression of APP could distinguish Parkinson's disease from healthy individuals with a diagnostic accuracy of 80% in both cohorts of patients.These results provide the first evidence that Parkinson's disease and diabetes are strongly linked at the molecular level and that shared molecular networks provide an additional source for identifying highly sensitive biomarkers. Further, these results suggest for the first

  16. Clinicopathological review of immunohistochemically defined Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease-including some interesting cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Gil Myeong; Kim, Jo-Heon; Lim, Gil Chai; Kim, Jinseok

    2012-10-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto Disease (KFD) is a benign, self-limited disease characterized by tender regional lymphadenopathy with fever. KFD remains a poorly defined disease, and no clear diagnostic criteria are available. Here, we assess the clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic findings of KFD cases and report two unusual cases. Forty KFD patients that underwent lymph node (LN) biopsy and diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining, from January 2003 to November 2010, were enrolled in this retrospective study. The patients had a mean age of 29.3 years, and 29 (72.5 %) were women. Affected LNs were mainly located unilaterally in the cervical area. Mean LN size was 15.3 mm. Twenty-eight (70 %) patients had LN tenderness, and 25 (62.5 %) patients had fever. Leukopenia was observed in 18 of 35 evaluable patients. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were elevated in most patients. Anti-nuclear antibody was positive in four of 19 evaluable patients, but all had been diagnosed with concurrent systemic lupus erythematosus. Histologically, the 40 cases were classified into three types, that is, as proliferative (37.5 %), necrotizing (55.0 %), or xanthomatous (7.5 %). Interesting cases: Case 1 was a 35-year-old female with KFD and uveitis, retinal vasculitis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Case 2 was a 47-year-old male with KFD and bone marrow involvement and presented with severe bicytopenia. Although KFD is an uncommon self-limited benign disorder, it must be included in the differential diagnosis of lymphadenopathy with fever and cytopenia. It is important that the clinical features of KFD be understood to reach a correct diagnosis.

  17. Prediction of First Cardiovascular Disease Event in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: The Steno Type 1 Risk Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vistisen, Dorte; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Hansen, Christian Stevns; Hulman, Adam; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Bech-Nielsen, Henning; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2016-03-15

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), but they are currently undertreated. There are no risk scores used on a regular basis in clinical practice for assessing the risk of CVD in type 1 diabetes mellitus. From 4306 clinically diagnosed adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we developed a prediction model for estimating the risk of first fatal or nonfatal CVD event (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease). Detailed clinical data including lifestyle factors were linked to event data from validated national registers. The risk prediction model was developed by using a 2-stage approach. First, a nonparametric, data-driven approach was used to identify potentially informative risk factors and interactions (random forest and survival tree analysis). Second, based on results from the first step, Poisson regression analysis was used to derive the final model. The final CVD prediction model was externally validated in a different population of 2119 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. During a median follow-up of 6.8 years (interquartile range, 2.9-10.9) a total of 793 (18.4%) patients developed CVD. The final prediction model included age, sex, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c, albuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, smoking, and exercise. Discrimination was excellent for a 5-year CVD event with a C-statistic of 0.826 (95% confidence interval, 0.807-0.845) in the derivation data and a C-statistic of 0.803 (95% confidence interval, 0.767-0.839) in the validation data. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test showed good calibration (P>0.05) in both cohorts. This high-performing CVD risk model allows for the implementation of decision rules in a clinical setting. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. [THE INFLUENCE OF MONO- AND MULTIVASCULAR LESIONS OF CORONARY ARTERIES ON THE COURSE OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypalo, A; Kravchun, P; Kadykova, O

    2017-03-01

    The article assesses the influence of mono- and multivascular lesions of coronary arteries on the course of coronary heart disease at patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. For this purpose, a comprehensive survey of 75 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 was arranged. Depending on the number of vascular lesions of the coronary arteries, according to the data of coronary arteries computer tomography, all patients were divided into two subgroups. The first subgroup included 27 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries. To the second subgroup were included 48 patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries. During the analysis of carbohydrate metabolism in cases of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 the HOMA index increase by 25.40% and insulin level increase by 17.05% were revealed at patients with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries in comparison with patients with monovascular lesions of coronary arteries, respectively. The combination of coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries was associated with an increase of sortilin level (233,47±47,85 ng/l). A significant increase in triglycerides, lipoprotein cholesterol of very low density influences greatly on the progression of coronary atherosclerosis with lesions of greater number of coronary arteries at patients surveyed. At patients with coronary heart disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 with multivascular lesions of coronary arteries the left ventricle myocardial re-modeling occurred through the increase of left ventricle's size and cavity.

  19. Hip and pelvis diseases on lumbar AP radiographs including both hip joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyun Soo; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Jeong Ho; Song, Ha Heon; Shim, Dae Moo [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the frequency of disease, and to evaluate the methods used for lumbar spine radiography in Korea. Sixty university and training hospitals were randomly selected and asked to describe the projections, film size and radiographic techniques employed for routine radiography in patients with suspected disease of the lumbar spine. Plain radiographs of 1215 patients, taken using 14x17 inch film and depicting both hip joints and the lumbar region, were analysed between March 1999 and February 2000. In 15 patients (1.2%), the radiographs revealed hip or pelvic lesion, confirmed as follows: avascular necrosis of the femoral head (n=11, with bilateral lesion in four cases); sustained ankylosing spondylitis (n=2); acetabular dysplasia (n=1); and insufficiency fracture of the pubic rami secondary to osteoporosis (n=1). In 11 or the 20 hospitals which responded, 14{sup x}17{sup f}ilm was being used for lumbar radiography, while in the other nine, film size was smaller. Plain radiography of the lumbar spine including both hip joints, may be a useful way to simultaneously evaluate lesions not only of the lumbar spine but also of the hip and/or pelvis.

  20. Broader prevalence of Wolbachia in insects including potential human disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, C D; Gonçalves, D S; Baton, L A; Shimabukuro, P H F; Carvalho, F D; Moreira, L A

    2015-06-01

    Wolbachia are intracellular, maternally transmitted bacteria considered the most abundant endosymbionts found in arthropods. They reproductively manipulate their host in order to increase their chances of being transmitted to the offspring, and currently are being used as a tool to control vector-borne diseases. Studies on distribution of Wolbachia among its arthropod hosts are important both for better understanding why this bacterium is so common, as well as for its potential use as a biological control agent. Here, we studied the incidence of Wolbachia in a broad range of insect species, collected from different regions of Brazil, using three genetic markers (16S rRNA, wsp and ftsZ), which varied in terms of their sensitivity to detect this bacterium. The overall incidence of Wolbachia among species belonging to 58 families and 14 orders was 61.9%. The most common positive insect orders were Coleoptera, Diptera, Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, with Diptera and Hemiptera having the highest numbers of Wolbachia-positive families. They included potential human disease vectors whose infection status has never been reported before. Our study further shows the importance of using quantitative polymerase chain reaction for high-throughput and sensitive Wolbachia screening.

  1. Evidence for somatic gene conversion and deletion in bipolar disorder, Crohn's disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, type-1 diabetes, and type-2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2011-02-03

    During gene conversion, genetic information is transferred unidirectionally between highly homologous but non-allelic regions of DNA. While germ-line gene conversion has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some diseases, somatic gene conversion has remained technically difficult to investigate on a large scale. A novel analysis technique is proposed for detecting the signature of somatic gene conversion from SNP microarray data. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has gathered SNP microarray data for two control populations and cohorts for bipolar disorder (BD), cardiovascular disease (CAD), Crohn's disease (CD), hypertension (HT), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type-1 diabetes (T1D) and type-2 diabetes (T2D). Using the new analysis technique, the seven disease cohorts are analyzed to identify cohort-specific SNPs at which conversion is predicted. The quality of the predictions is assessed by identifying known disease associations for genes in the homologous duplicons, and comparing the frequency of such associations with background rates. Of 28 disease/locus pairs meeting stringent conditions, 22 show various degrees of disease association, compared with only 8 of 70 in a mock study designed to measure the background association rate (P conversion could be a significant causative factor in each of the seven diseases. The specific genes provide potential insights about disease mechanisms, and are strong candidates for further study.

  2. The relationship between hypomagnesemia, metformin therapy and cardiovascular disease complicating type 2 diabetes: the Fremantle Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Peters

    Full Text Available Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community.We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean ± SD age 63.4 ± 11.6 years, 49.0% males from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1 who were followed for 12.3 ± 5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD and cerebrovascular disease (CVD as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L. Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05. There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI 0.28 (0.11-0.74; P=0.010, but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models.Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk.

  3. A trial of darbepoetin alfa in type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Marc A; Burdmann, Emmanuel A; Chen, Chao-Yin

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately...... tested. METHODS: In this study involving 4038 patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and anemia, we randomly assigned 2012 patients to darbepoetin alfa to achieve a hemoglobin level of approximately 13 g per deciliter and 2026 patients to placebo, with rescue darbepoetin alfa when the hemoglobin...... assigned to darbepoetin alfa and 496 patients assigned to placebo (Pchronic kidney disease...

  4. [Prevalence of autoimmune diseases and microangiopathy in children with diabetes type 1 over the years 2000-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowińska-Olszewska, Barbara; Ordowska, Urszula; Golonko, Magdalena; Tobiaszewska, Monika; Florys, Bożena; Jabłońska, Jolanta; Otocka, Agnieszka; Łuczyński, Włodzimierz; Zasim, Aneta; Jakubowska, Ewa; Michalak, Justyna; Bossowski, Artur

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade the number of patients with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has increased rapidly. Treatment of the disease is focused on proper physical development and the prevention of complications. Aim of the study was to analyze changes in the treatment and clinical picture of type 1 diabetes in children over the years 2000 to 2010 with particular emphasis on the presence of autoimmune diseases and microangiopathy. The study included 567 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes under the care of outpatient diabetes clinic. We compared 251 children, diabetes outpatient clinic patients in 2000, with 316 children in 2010. Data were obtained from the outpatient and hospital records. We compared baseline demographic, anthropometric data, treatment regimen, type of insulin, metabolic control, prevalence of autoimmune diseases and microangipathy. In 2010 there was a reduction in the age of diagnosis of diabetes from 10 to 8 years (p=0.039). Significantly increased the proportion of children treated with CSII (up to 60.1%) and decreased the percentage of children using conventional insulin for the benefit of insulin analogs. The increase in HbA1c from 7.4 to 8.0% (p7.5% in 2010. The percentage of children with obesity increased from 5.2 to 13.7% (p=0.004) and there was a significant increase in SDS-BMI. The percentage of children with autoimmune diseases such as celiac (from 0,4 to 7,3%, p<0,001) and thyroid (from 6.9 to 21.3%, p<0.001) has increased. The incidence of retinopathy decreased from 6 to 1% (p=0.04), and albuminuria decreased insignificantly. Over the last decade, a significant change in the method of treatment in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes has occurred. The deterioration of metabolic control, despite the frequent use in the treatment of CSII, may be due to increased frequency of obesity and additional autoimmune diseases in today´s patients. More similar to physiologic way of insulin infusion

  5. Does Altered Uric Acid Metabolism Contribute to Diabetic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Ambreen; Zager, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Multiple experimental and clinical studies have identified pathways by which uric acid may facilitate the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with diabetes. However, it remains uncertain if the association of uric acid with CKD represents a pathogenic effect or merely reflects renal impairment. In contrast to many published reports, a recent Mendelian randomization study did not identify a causal link between uric acid and CKD in people with type 1 diabetes. Two recent multicenter randomized control trials, Preventing Early Renal Function Loss in Diabetes (PERL) and FEbuxostat versus placebo rAndomized controlled Trial regarding reduced renal function in patients with Hyperuricemia complicated by chRonic kidney disease stage 3 (FEATHER), were recently designed to assess if uric acid lowering slows progression of CKD. We review the evidence supporting a role for uric acid in the pathogenesis of CKD in people with diabetes and the putative benefits of uric acid lowering.

  6. Secondary hyperparathyroidism prevalence and profile, between diabetic and non-diabetic patients with stage 3 to 4 chronic kidney disease attended in internal medicine wards. MiPTH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo-Lorido, José Carlos; Carretero-Gómez, Juana; García-Sánchez, Francisco; Maciá-Botejara, Enrique; Ramiro-Lozano, José Manuel; Masero-Carretero, Antonio; Robles, Nicolás Roberto; Bureo-Dacal, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPTH) is a leading cause of renal osteodystrophy, and an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim is to establish differences in prevalence and profile of SHPTH, regarding diabetics or non-diabetics with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cross-sectional multicenter study which included patients with stages 3 to 4 CKD. SHPTH was considered when the intact PTH levels (iPTH) were equal or higher than 70pg/ml. We divided the sample into two groups (diabetics and non-diabetics). We used robust statistical methods. 409 patients (214 diabetics) were studied. HPTH was found in 60.4% of diabetics vs 65% of non-diabetics (P=0.42). Diabetics with HPTH were younger (79.5 vs 82.3 years-old, P=0.005), and had more hypertension (P=0.0014), dyslipidemia (P=0.0001) and comorbidities. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant relationship in case of diabetics, with age (OR: 1.04, 95%CI 1.005-1.09 P=0.02 ), and with statins treatment (OR 2.3, 95%CI 1.17-4.54, P=0.01). The prevalence of SHPTH between the groups was similar, however, diabetics had more presence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and SHPTH in this case was also related with moderate microalbuminuria and lower levels of vitamin D. An association with statins was also found in this group. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiovascular metabolic syndrome - an interplay of, obesity, inflammation, diabetes and coronary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rana, J. S.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Jukema, J. W.; Kastelein, J. J. P.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is currently one of the biggest causes of morbidity and mortality facing humanity. Such a paradigm shift of disease pattern over the last century has only worsened due to the alarming global prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In recent years there is increasing focus

  8. 76 FR 67749 - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Intestinal Stem Cell Consortium (ISCC). Date: December 1, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Agenda: To review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.847, Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Research; 93.848, Digestive Diseases and Nutrition Research; 93.849, Kidney Diseases, Urology and Hematology Research, National Institutes...

  9. Risk factors and treatment of pediatric chronic diseases : Type 1 diabetes, asthma and allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadizar, F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The increase in the number of children with chronic diseases is a major concern. Early detection through improved screening and diagnostic tests, better diagnosis based on updated

  10. Compromised quality of life in patients with both Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, S.; Pouwer, F.; Tushuizen, M.E.; Hoogma, R.P.; Mulder, C.J.; Simsek, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease are two chronic illnesses associated with each other. Both diseases and their treatments can seriously impair quality of life. The objective of the present study was to investigate health-related quality of life in adult patients diagnosed with both

  11. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio; Fromm, M; Schulzke, JD

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type I diabetes (TID), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune

  12. Shared and Distinct Genetic Variants in Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smyth, Deborah J.; Plagnol, Vincent; Walker, Neil M.; Cooper, Jason D.; Downes, Kate; Yang, Jennie H. M.; Howson, Joanna M. M.; Stevens, Helen; McManus, Ross; Wijmenga, Cisca; Heap, Graham A.; Dubois, Patrick C.; Clayton, David G.; Hunt, Karen A.; van Heel, David A.; Todd, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Two inflammatory disorders, type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, cosegregate in populations, suggesting a common genetic origin. Since both diseases are associated with the HLA class II genes on chromosome 6p21, we tested whether non-HLA loci are shared. Methods: We evaluated the

  13. The morbidity and associated risk factors of cancer in chronic liver disease patients with diabetes mellitus: a multicenter field survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Kohjima, Motoyuki; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Seike, Masataka; Ide, Yasushi; Mizuta, Toshihiko; Honda, Koichi; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakamuta, Makoto; Sata, Michio

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with various cancers; however, little is known of the relationship between cancer and diabetes in chronic liver disease (CLD) patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the morbidity and associated factors of cancer, including the use of anti-diabetics, in CLD patients with diabetes. We performed a multicenter survey in 2012 and 478 CLD patients with diabetes were enrolled (age 64.3 ± 12.1 years, female/male 187/291). A frequency analysis of cancer and antidiabetic use was performed. Independent factors for cancer were analyzed using logistic regression and decision-tree analysis. The morbidity of cancer was 33.3%. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and extra-hepatic cancer were diagnosed in 24.7 and 11.3% of enrolled patients, respectively. The frequency of antidiabetic use was 66.5%. Of prescribed antidiabetics, 39% were dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 inhibitors; however, their use was not significantly associated with cancer. In contrast, the use of exogenous insulin (OR 2.21; 95% CI 1.16-4.21, P = 0.0165) and sulfonylurea (OR 2.08; 95% CI 1.05-3.97, P = 0.0353) were independently associated with HCC and extra-hepatic cancer, respectively. In decision-tree analysis, exogenous insulin and sulfonylurea were also identified as a divergence factor for HCC and extra-hepatic cancer, respectively. We found a high morbidity of not only HCC, but also extra-hepatic cancer in CLD patients with diabetes. We also showed a possible association between the use of antidiabetics and the morbidity of cancer. Thus, a large-scale cohort study is needed to establish a therapeutic strategy for diabetes to suppress carcinogenesis in CLD patients.

  14. Prediction of autoimmune diabetes and celiac disease in childhood by genes and perinatal environment: Design and initial aims of the PAGE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars C. Stene

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease result from misdirected immune mediated destruction of host cells, and are among the most common chronic diseases in children. Despite changes in incidence over the past 3 decades, little is known about non-genetic risk factors (except for dietary gluten for celiac disease. Norway is among the countries in the world with the highest incidence of these two diseases. We describe here plans and study design for the PAGE study (Prediction of Autoimmune diabetes and celiac disease in childhood by Genes and perinatal Environment. PAGE is a sub-study within the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort study, including follow-up of more than 100,000 pregnancies. Children who develop type 1 diabetes or celiac disease are identified via linkage to the Norwegian Patient Register and the Norwegian Childhood Diabetes Registry, with complementing information from questionnaires. The overall aim is to test hypotheses about potential non-genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes and for celiac disease, with focus on factors operating early in life. In addition to a full cohort analysis of factors registered in questionnaires, we will analyse biomarkers in maternal blood plasma and cord blood plasma. Mothers and children will be genotyped for well-established susceptibility polymorphisms. Biomarkers will be analysed in cases and controls within the cohort. Factors to be tested in the full cohort include infant feeding, diet and dietary supplements in the mother during pregnancy and in the child, and use of antibiotics and non-prescription drugs. Biomarkers to be tested include 25-hydroxyvitamin D, markers of immune activation, and small metabolites (metabolomics. We will also explore the potential role of maternal cells in the fetal circulation (maternal microchimerism in later risk of celiac disease and type 1 diabetes.

  15. Clinical profile of haemodialysis patients with diabetic nephropathy leading to end stage renal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazzaz, Z.J.; Dhafar, K.O.; Tashkandi, M.A.; Farooq, M.U.

    2010-01-01

    To know the characteristics of the diabetic patients on regular dialysis at Al-noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The data had been collected retrospectively from 13-11-2005 to 12-12-2005 from the diabetic patients directly those were on dialysis due to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and from their files. The total study subjects were 51 with mean age of Diabetics was (55.2 years +-7.9) showing male predominance 31(60.8%). All were Saudies. The mean duration of Diabetes mellitus and dialysis were (16.8years) and (22 months), respectively. The mean age of start of Diabetes mellitus and dialysis was (37.4 years) and (53.5 years). The mean duration of onset of diabetes to dialysis was (16.1 years). Out of the total, 29(56.9%) were non-smoker. Patients with family history of diabetes with other associated illnesses were 23(45%) followed by 15(29.4%) had family history of only diabetes. Type II diabetics were 40(78.4%). Regarding metabolic profile, patients with high blood glucose level were 10(19.6%) while 3(5.9%), 50(98%) and 18(35.3%) patients had high cholesterol, low density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, respectively. Maximum number of patients were in sixth decade of life. Up to three fourth patients had family history of diabetes. Most of the subjects had only diabetic nephropathy. Maximum patients had high low density lipoprotein level. (author)

  16. Disease related knowledge, medication adherence and glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Saeed Ur Rashid; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Saleem, Fahad; Bashir, Sajid; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of diabetes-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in Pakistan. The study was designed as a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional analysis. T2DM patients attending a public outpatient clinic in Sargodha, Pakistan, were targeted for the study. In addition to the demographic information, the Urdu version of Michigan Diabetes Knowledge Test and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale was used for data collection. Patients' medical records were reviewed for glycated haemoglobin levels (HbA1c). Descriptive statistics were used to elaborate sociodemographic characteristics. The Spearman's Rho correlation was used to measure association of disease-related knowledge and treatment adherence with glycaemic control. SPSS V 20.0 was used for data analysis and ppatients were included in the study. The mean age (SD) of these patients was 50.77±9.671 years, 56.6% were males and 90% (n=353) of respondents were married. The mean (SD) duration of disease was 5.58 (4.09) years with median HbA1c of 9.00 (IQR=8.20-10.40). The median knowledge score was 8.0 (IQR=6.0-10.0), while the median adherence score was 4.7 (IQR=3.0-6.0). HbA1c had non-significant and weak negative association with diabetes-related knowledge (r=-0.036, p=0.404) and treatment adherence (r=-0.071, p=0.238). There was negative association reported between HbA1c, treatment adherence and diabetes-related knowledge. Greater efforts are clearly required to investigate other factors affecting glycaemic control among T2DM patients in Pakistan. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anterior Hypopituitarism is Rare and Autoimmune Disease is Common in Adults with Idiopathic Central Diabetes Insipidus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Objective: Central diabetes insipidus is a rare clinical condition with a heterogenous aetiology. Up to 40% of cases are classified as idiopathic, though many of these are thought to have an autoimmune basis. Published data has suggested that anterior hypopituitarism is common in childhood onset idiopathic diabetes insipidus. We aimed to assess the incidence of anterior hypopituitarism in a cohort of adult patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Design and Patients: We performed a retrospective review of the databases of two pituitary investigation units. This identified 39 patients with idiopathic diabetes insipidus. All had undergone MRI scanning and dynamic pituitary testing (either insulin tolerance testing or GHRH\\/arginine and short synacthen testing) to assess anterior pituitary function. Results: One patient had partial growth hormone deficiency; no other anterior pituitary hormonal deficits were found. 33% had at least one autoimmune disease in addition to central diabetes insipidus. Conclusions: Our data suggest that anterior hypopituitarism is rare in adult idiopathic diabetes insipidus. Routine screening of these patients for anterior hypopituitarism may not therefore be indicated. The significant prevalence of autoimmune disease in this cohort supports the hypothesis that idiopathic diabetes insipidus may have an autoimmune aetiology.

  18. Integrative analysis for finding genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholdt, R.; Størling, Zenia, Marian; Hansen, Kasper Lage

    2007-01-01

    We have developed an integrative analysis method combining genetic interactions, identified using type 1 diabetes genome scan data, and a high-confidence human protein interaction network. Resulting networks were ranked by the significance of the enrichment of proteins from interacting regions. We...... identified a number of new protein network modules and novel candidate genes/proteins for type 1 diabetes. We propose this type of integrative analysis as a general method for the elucidation of genes and networks involved in diabetes and other complex diseases....

  19. Exercise as a provocative test in early renal disease in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Baker, L; Deckert, T

    1985-01-01

    micrograms/min) and 14 Albustix-negative diabetics (group 2) with increased urinary albumin excretion (15-122 micrograms/min). Assignment to a study group was made on the basis of three 24-h urine collections, and the groups were well matched for age, weight, height, and serum creatinine concentration....... The two diabetic groups were similar with regard to duration of disease (13 +/- 6 versus 16 +/- 3 years), metabolic control (HbA1c: 8.4 +/- 1.4 versus 8.7 +/- 1.3%) and degree of diabetic complications (beat-to-beat variation and retinopathy). An exercise protocol of 450 and 600 kpm/min workloads...

  20. PREVALENCE OF MEIBOMIAN GLAND DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETIC PATIENTS & ITS CLINICAL PRESENTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Pathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS : To study the prevalence of the meibomian gland disease in typ e 2 diabetic patients and its clinical presentations. SETTING AND DESIGN : A hospital based cross sectional descriptive study of 100 type 2 diabetic patients attending a medical college was conducted. METHODS : Detailed diabetic history was recorded. Assessment of ocular surface i.e. the lid margins , conjunctiva , corneal surface was done via slit lamp biomicroscopy. Meibomian gland disease (MGD severity was assessed by the quality and expressibility of the meibomian secretion. Dry eye tests like schir mer’s test and tear film breakup time were done. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED : SPSS statistical software version 17 was used. RESULTS : 56% of the patients out of 100 diabetic patients had MGD. The most common symptom was burning (46.9% , followed by dryness ( 23.5% , 5.6% had conjunctival injection , 7.14% had corneal erosions , 25% had mucus debris , 53.65% had dry eye which was statistically significant (p=0.001 , 56.25% males and 72.2% females had the disease which was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION : The prevalence of Meibomian gland disease in the diabetic population was 56% which is more than the general population prevalence. Apart from other disorders diabetics are also more prone for ocular surface diseases like Meibomian gland disease. MGD is an important pre disposer for severe diseases like Dry eye in this subgroup of patients which can lead to complications like conjunctival keratinisations , corneal erosions and perforations. Careful examination of these patients for ocular surface disease and prompt treatment is required.

  1. Increased active von Willebrand factor during disease development in the aging diabetic patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang Feng; Xia, Zuo Li; Han, Ji Ju; Wang, Yi Ting; Wang, Ji Yue; Pan, Shao Dong; Wu, Ya Ping; Zhang, Bin; Li, Guang Yao; Du, Jing Wei; Gao, Hen Qiang; de Groot, Philip G; de Laat, Bas; Hollestelle, Martine J

    2013-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes is known to cause endothelial activation resulting in the secretion of von Willebrand factor (VWF). We have shown that levels of VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation are increased in specific clinical settings. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether active VWF levels increase during aging and the development of diabetes within the population of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. Patients and controls were divided into two groups based on age: older and younger than 60 years of age. VWF antigen, VWF propeptide, VWF activation factor and total active VWF were measured. Patients older than 60 years of age had increased levels of total active VWF, VWF activation factor and VWF propeptide compared to younger patients and controls. All measured VWF parameters were associated with age in diabetic patients. Total active VWF and VWF propeptide correlated with the period of being diagnosed with diabetes. Regression analyses showed that especially the VWF activation factor was strongly associated with diabetes in patients older than 60 years of age. In conclusion, we found that the conformation of VWF could be involved in the disease process of diabetes and that the VWF in a glycoprotein Ib-binding conformation could play a role as risk marker during the development of diabetes in combination with an increase in age. Our study shows that the active quality of VWF was more important than the quantity.

  2. Coronary Artery Disease Alters Ventricular Repolarization Dynamics in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtovec, Bojan; Sinkovec, Matjaz; Starc, Vito; Radovancevic, Branislav; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2005-01-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics (VRD) is an important predictor of outcome in diabetes. We examined the potential impact of coronary artery disease (CAD) on VRD in type 2 diabetic patients. We recorded 5-min high-resolution resting electrocardiograms (ECG) in 38 diabetic patients undergoing elective coronary angiography, and in 38 age- and gender- matched apparently healthy subjects (Controls). Using leads I and II, time-domain indices of VRD were calculated. Coronary angiography was regarded as positive if a 350% stenosis was found. Angiography was positive in 21 diabetic patients (55%). Patients with CAD had a significantly higher degree of VRD than Controls (SDNN(QT): 15.81+/-7.22 ms vs. 8.94+/-6.04 ms; P <0.001, rMSSD(QT): 21.02k7.07 ms vs. 11.18k7.45 ms; P <0.001). VRD in diabetic patients with negative angiograms did not differ from VRD in Controls (SDNN(QT): 8.94+/-6.04 ms vs. 7.44+/-5.72 ms; P=0.67, rMSSD(QT): 11.18+/-7.45 ms vs. 10.22+/-5.35 ms; P=O. 82). CAD increases VRD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, changes in ventricular repolarization in diabetic patients may be due to silent CAD rather than to diabetes per se.

  3. Safety and Efficacy of Liraglutide in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and End-Stage Renal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Thomas; Knop, Filip K; Jørgensen, Morten B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate parameters related to safety and efficacy of liraglutide in patients with type 2 diabetes and dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease (ESRD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Twenty-four patients with type 2 diabetes and ESRD and 23 control subjects with type 2 diabetes...

  4. Tight Junctions, Intestinal Permeability, and Autoimmunity Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jeroen; Rozing, Jan; Sapone, Anna; Lammers, Karen; Fasano, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D), a hyperglycosaemia caused by a destructive autoimmune process targeting the insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells. Even if environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are clearly involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, for most autoimmune disorders there is no or little knowledge about the causing agent or genetic makeup underlying the disease. In this respect, CD represents a unique autoimmune disorder because a close genetic association with HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes and, more importantly, the environmental trigger (the gliadin fraction of gluten-containing grains wheat, barley, and rye) are known. Conversely, the trigger for autoimmune destruction of pancreatic ß cells in T1D is unclear. Interestingly, recent data suggest that gliadin is also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. There is growing evidence that increased intestinal permeability plays a pathogenic role in various autoimmune diseases including CD and T1D. Therefore, we hypothesize that besides genetic and environmental factors, loss of intestinal barrier function is necessary to develop autoimmunity. In this review, each of these components will be briefly reviewed. PMID:19538307

  5. The V16A polymorphism in SOD2 is associated with increased risk of diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllsten, A; Jorsal, Anders; Lajer, Maria Stenkil

    2009-01-01

    on the development of cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Type 1 diabetes patients attending the Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark, between 1993 and 2001 were enrolled in this study. A total of 441 cases with diabetic nephropathy (albumin excretion > or =300 mg/24 h) and 314 controls with persistent....... The hazard ratio was 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The MnSOD V16A polymorphism is involved in the development of nephropathy caused by type 1 diabetes and seems to predict cardiovascular disease during follow-up....... affects the localisation of MnSOD and therefore its ability to scavenge superoxide radicals. In a Danish cohort of type 1 diabetes patients, we sought to confirm previous findings of association between the V allele and the risk of diabetic nephropathy and to investigate the influence of this polymorphism...

  6. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and its association with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanjiappan, Sivabal; Hamide, Abdoul; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Periyasamy, Senthilkumar Gandhipuram; Mehalingam, Vadivelan

    2018-01-31

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a wide spectrum of liver disease that ranges from hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Obesity and diabetes mellitus are the prime risk factors for NAFLD. The aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of NAFLD among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and to detect the association of NAFLD with cardiovascular disease in them. Prospective observational study. The study was conducted on 300 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending the outpatient department of a tertiary care teaching hospital. All patients underwent hepatic ultrasonography to look for hepatic steatosis. Among the 300 patients, 124 were divided into NAFLD and non-NAFLD groups based on the ultrasound findings. These patients were subjected to electrocardiogram, 2D echocardiogram, carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) measurement and ankle brachial pressure index measurement along with measurement of markers of oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis was present in 61% of diabetic patients in this study. Cardiovascular disease was not found to be significantly associated in diabetic patients with NAFLD. However, cardiovascular risk factors like CIMT, high sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were elevated in these patients. hs-CRP and MDA levels were found to be significantly associated with the severity of NAFLD. There is a high prevalence of NAFLD in type 2 diabetic patients. No correlation was detected between the presence of NAFLD and cardiovascular disease in them; although there was an association between cardiovascular risk factors and NAFLD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A Role for Excitatory Amino Acids in Diabetic Eye Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Pulido

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of vision loss. The primary clinical hallmarks are vascular changes that appear to contribute to the loss of sight. In a number of neurodegenerative disorders there is an appreciation that increased levels of excitatory amino acids are excitotoxic. The primary amino acid responsible appears to be the neurotransmitter glutamate. This review examines the nature of glutamatergic signaling at the retina and the growing evidence from clinical and animal model studies that glutamate may be playing similar excitotoxic roles at the diabetic retina.

  8. A disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus is associated with improved quality of care within existing budgets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, L M G; Vrijhoef, H J M; Landewé-Cleuren, S; Schaper, N; Van Merode, G G; Spreeuwenberg, C

    2007-10-01

    To assess the impact of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes mellitus (Type 1 and Type 2) on cost-effectiveness, quality of life and patient self-management. By organizing care in accordance with the principles of disease management, it is aimed to increase quality of care within existing budgets. Single-group, pre-post design with 2-year follow-up in 473 patients. Substantial significant improvements in glycaemic control, health-related quality of life (HRQL) and patient self-management were found. No significant changes were detected in total costs of care. The probability that the disease management programme is cost-effective compared with usual care amounts to 74%, expressed in an average saving of 117 per additional life year at 5% improved HRQL. Introduction of a disease management programme for patients with diabetes is associated with improved intermediate outcomes within existing budgets. Further research should focus on long-term cost-effectiveness, including diabetic complications and mortality, in a controlled setting or by using decision-analytic modelling techniques.

  9. Serum Vascular Adhesion Protein-1 Predicts End-Stage Renal Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Diabetes is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD worldwide. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1 participates in inflammation and catalyzes the deamination of primary amines into aldehydes, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonia, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. We have shown that serum VAP-1 is higher in patients with diabetes and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and can predict cardiovascular mortality in subjects with diabetes. In this study, we investigated if serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD in diabetic subjects.In this prospective cohort study, a total of 604 type 2 diabetic subjects were enrolled between 1996 to 2003 at National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan, and were followed for a median of 12.36 years. The development of ESRD was ascertained by linking our database with the nationally comprehensive Taiwan Society Nephrology registry. Serum VAP-1 concentrations at enrollment were measured by time-resolved immunofluorometric assay.Subjects with serum VAP-1 in the highest tertile had the highest incidence of ESRD (p<0.001. Every 1-SD increase in serum VAP-1 was associated with a hazard ratio of 1.55 (95%CI 1.12-2.14, p<0.01 for the risk of ESRD, adjusted for smoking, history of cardiovascular disease, body mass index, hypertension, HbA1c, duration of diabetes, total cholesterol, use of statins, ankle-brachial index, estimated GFR, and proteinuria. We developed a risk score comprising serum VAP-1, HbA1c, estimated GFR, and proteinuria, which could predict ESRD with good performance (area under the ROC curve = 0.9406, 95%CI 0.8871-0.9941, sensitivity = 77.3%, and specificity = 92.8%. We also developed an algorithm based on the stage of CKD and a risk score including serum VAP-1, which can stratify these subjects into 3 categories with an ESRD risk of 0.101%/year, 0.131%/year, and 2.427%/year, respectively.In conclusion, serum VAP-1 can predict ESRD and is a useful biomarker to

  10. UKPDS 59: hyperglycemia and other potentially modifiable risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amanda I; Stevens, Richard J; Neil, Andrew; Stratton, Irene M; Boulton, Andrew J M; Holman, Rury R

    2002-05-01

    To determine the role of hyperglycemia in prospective analyses of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in type 2 diabetes, taking into account other potential risk factors. Potential risk factors for the development of PVD were examined in 3,834 of 5,102 individuals enrolled in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) without PVD at diagnosis of diabetes, followed for 6 years, and for whom relevant data were available. PVD was defined as two of the following: ankle-arm blood pressure index < 0.8, absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses to palpation in one or both legs, and intermittent claudication. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between potential risk factors measured 3-4 months after diagnosis of diabetes and incident PVD. The prevalence of PVD at 3-year intervals to 18 years was determined. Hyperglycemia, assessed as HbA(1c), was associated with an increased risk for incident PVD, independent of other risk factors including age, increased systolic blood pressure, reduced HDL cholesterol, smoking, prior cardiovascular disease, peripheral sensory neuropathy, and retinopathy. Each 1% increase in HbA(1c) was associated with a 28% increased risk of PVD (95% CI 12-46), and each 10-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure with a 25% increase in risk (95% CI 10-43). Hyperglycemia, as well as smoking, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure are potentially modifiable risk factors for the development of PVD.

  11. Association between serum chemerin level and severity of coronary artery disease in Egyptian patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Lachine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between serum chemerin level and the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in Egyptian patients with type 2 diabetes T2DM. The study included 160 subjects; divided into 4 equal groups; T2DM patients having CAD, CAD patients without diabetes, T2DM patients without CAD and a healthy control group. Serum chemerin level, and hs-CRP were measured and the severity of CAD was assessed using SYNTAX score. Serum chemerin was significantly higher in patients with CAD (p<0.001, with no difference however between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects (p= 0.16. Our results showed a significant positive correlation between serum chemerin and waist circumference (p=0.024 as well as waist to hip ratio (p=0.044. A significant association has been observed between the severity of CAD and each of serum chemerin (p <0.001 and hs-CRP (p =0.04. We report here a positive correlation between serum chemerin level and cardio-metabolic disease, with a significant association between serum chemerin concentration and severity of CAD in Egyptian patients with T2DM.

  12. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  13. Efficacy of a Multimodal Cognitive Rehabilitation Including Psychomotor and Endurance Training in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reuter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment, especially executive dysfunction might occur early in the course of Parkinson's disease. Cognitive training is thought to improve cognitive performance. However, transfer of improvements achieved in paper and pencil tests into daily life has been difficult. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a multimodal cognitive rehabilitation programme including physical exercises might be more successful than cognitive training programmes without motor training. 240 PD-patients were included in the study and randomly allocated to three treatment arms, group A cognitive training, group B cognitive training and transfer training and group C cognitive training, transfer training and psychomotor and endurance training. The primary outcome measure was the ADAS-Cog. The secondary outcome measure was the SCOPA-Cog. Training was conducted for 4 weeks on a rehabilitation unit, followed by 6 months training at home. Caregivers received an education programme. The combination of cognitive training using paper and pencil and the computer, transfer training and physical training seems to have the greatest effect on cognitive function. Thus, patients of group C showed the greatest improvement on the ADAS-Cog and SCOPA-COG and were more likely to continue with the training programme after the study.

  14. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Caroline S; Golden, Sherita Hill; Anderson, Cheryl; Bray, George A; Burke, Lora E; de Boer, Ian H; Deedwania, Prakash; Eckel, Robert H; Ershow, Abby G; Fradkin, Judith; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Nelson, Robert G; Patel, Mahesh J; Pignone, Michael; Quinn, Laurie; Schauer, Philip R; Selvin, Elizabeth; Vafiadis, Dorothea K

    2015-08-25

    Cardiovascular disease risk factor control as primary prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has changed substantially in the past few years. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review the current literature and key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure and blood glucose control, cholesterol management, aspirin therapy, and lifestyle modification. We present a synthesis of the recent literature, new guidelines, and clinical targets, including screening for kidney and subclinical cardiovascular disease for the contemporary management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Update on Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Light of Recent Evidence: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Anderson, Cheryl; Bray, George A.; Burke, Lora E.; de Boer, Ian H.; Deedwania, Prakash; Eckel, Robert H.; Ershow, Abby G.; Fradkin, Judith; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Nelson, Robert G.; Patel, Mahesh J.; Pignone, Michael; Quinn, Laurie; Schauer, Philip R.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Vafiadis, Dorothea K.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk factor control as primary prevention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus has changed substantially in the past few years. The purpose of this scientific statement is to review the current literature and key clinical trials pertaining to blood pressure and blood glucose control, cholesterol management, aspirin therapy, and lifestyle modification. We present a synthesis of the recent literature, new guidelines, and clinical targets, including screening for kidney and subclinical cardiovascular disease for the contemporary management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26246459

  16. Lifestyle Choices Fuel Epidemics of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Among Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Evan L; DiNicolantonio, James J; Patil, Harshal; Helzberg, John H; Lavie, Carl J

    2016-01-01

    Within the next 15years, India is projected to overtake China as the world's most populous nation. Due to the rapid pace of urbanization and modernization fueling population growth, in conjunction with a genetic predisposition to insulin resistance, India is suffering a rising epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including coronary artery disease (CAD), type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and stroke. In addition to the genetic predisposition, major negative lifestyle factors are contributing to the alarming outbreak of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among the Asian Indian population; these factors include: 1) a diet high in added sugar, refined grains and other processed foods, 2) physical inactivity, 3) vitamin D deficiency (VDD), and 4) smoking/pollution. These risk factors are all highly modifiable, and steps to improve these issues should be taken urgently to avoid a worsening NCD crisis among the inhabitants of the South Asian subcontinent as well as for people with Asian Indian ethnicity worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetes screening in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Tauna; Boggs, Dusta; Mullins, Rebecca; Brock, Emily

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has increased worldwide and the pathophysiological problems associated with diabetes increase the potential for employees' physical disabilities. These complications, including neuropathy, nephropathy, and visual impairment, negatively impact the job performance of employees and compromise workplace safety. Occupational health nurses can provide diabetes screening programs to employees and identify chronic disease risk factors early. This article describes an occupational diabetes screening program at a major corporation in Belize, Central America, defines diabetes, outlines the diabetes teaching plan, and presents the demographics of the participants and results of the screening. Cultural considerations and recommendations for future occupational diabetes screenings are proposed. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. HHEX_23 AA Genotype Exacerbates Effect of Diabetes on Dementia and Alzheimer Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Xu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has suggested that variations within the IDE/HHEX gene region may underlie the association of type 2 diabetes with Alzheimer disease (AD. We sought to explore whether IDE genes play a role in the association of diabetes with dementia, AD, and structural brain changes using data from two community-based cohorts of older adults and a subsample with structural MRI.The first cohort, which included dementia-free adults aged ≥75 y (n = 970 at baseline, was followed for 9 y to detect incident dementia (n = 358 and AD (n = 271 cases. The second cohort (for replication, which included 2,060 dementia-free participants aged ≥60 y at baseline, was followed for 6 y to identify incident dementia (n = 166 and AD (n = 121 cases. A subsample (n = 338 of dementia-free participants from the second cohort underwent MRI. HHEX_23 and IDE_9 were genotyped, and diabetes (here including type 2 diabetes and prediabetes was assessed. In the first cohort, diabetes led to an adjusted hazard ratio (HR of 1.73 (95% CI 1.19-2.32 and 1.66 (95% CI 1.06-2.40 for dementia and AD, respectively, among all participants. Compared to people carrying the GG genotype without diabetes, AA genotype carriers with diabetes had an adjusted HR of 5.54 (95% CI 2.40-7.18 and 4.81 (95% CI 1.88-8.50 for dementia and AD, respectively. There was a significant interaction between HHEX_23-AA and diabetes on dementia (HR 4.79, 95% CI 1.63-8.90, p = 0.013 and AD (HR 3.55, 95% CI 1.45-9.91, p = 0.025 compared to the GG genotype without diabetes. In the second cohort, the HRs were 1.68 (95% CI 1.04-2.99 and 1.64 (1.02-2.33 for the diabetes-AD and dementia-AD associations, respectively, and 4.06 (95% CI 1.06-7.58, p = 0.039 and 3.29 (95% CI 1.02-8.33, p = 0.044 for the interactions, respectively. MRI data showed that HHEX_23-AA carriers with diabetes had significant structural brain changes compared to HHEX_23-GG carriers without diabetes. No joint effects of IDE_9 and diabetes on dementia

  19. Metabolomics window into diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Qiao, Shuxuan; Shi, Chenze; Wang, Shuya; Ji, Guang

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes has become a major global health problem. The elucidation of characteristic metabolic alterations during the diabetic progression is critical for better understanding its pathogenesis, and identifying potential biomarkers and drug targets. Metabolomics is a promising tool to reveal the metabolic changes and the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. The present review provides an update on the application of metabolomics in diabetic complications, including diabetic coronary artery disease, diabetic nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic neuropathy, and this review provides notes on the prevention and prediction of diabetic complications. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Peripheral vascular disease is associated with reduced glycosuria in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Siersma, V

    2004-01-01

    was 65.2 years. Urinary glucose concentration (UGC) was determined quantitatively in a freshly voided morning urine specimen. RESULTS: The over-all prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) was 16.5%. Bivariately, high values of UGC were associated with low prevalence of PVD (p...). The predictive value of PVD--together with HbA1c, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and 10 other possible predictors--was confirmed in a logistic regression analysis with glycosuria (Y/N) as outcome variable (p=0.0004). CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, type 2 diabetic patients with PVD tend not to have glycosuria...... as compared to patients without PVD. PVD may be indicative of generalized atherosclerotic lesions in the major vessels, including the renal arteries. This could lead to a lowering of GFR and thereby of the amount of glucose filtered. Assuming no, or only a minor direct effect of PVD on tubular function...

  1. Prevalence of distal diabetic polyneuropathy using quantitative sensory methods in a population with diabetes of more than 10 years' disease duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles-García, José M; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Pérez, María; López-Gómez, Vanessa

    2010-11-01

    Results of studies on the prevalence of distal diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) are contradictory. Conventional methods used for the diagnosis of DPN in clinical practice have limited effectiveness. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of DPN in a population with long-standing diabetes (more than 10 years disease duration) by measuring vibratory, thermal and tactile sensitivities with quantitative sensory devices, as well as their relationship with associated clinical risk factors. A total of 1011 diabetic patients were evaluated in a multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study. The three sensitivities were assessed by ultrabiothesiometer, aesthesiometer and thermoskin devices, respectively. The prevalence of neuropathic pain was validated by the DN4 questionnaire. Of the 1011 cases included, 400 (39.6%) met the diagnostic criteria of DPN, while no DPN was found in the remaining 611 (60.4%). Of the 400 patients with DPN, 253 (63.2%) showed clinical manifestations, while 147 (36.8%) were diagnosed as subclinical DPN. The prevalence of DPN increased with disease duration. There was a progressive loss of the three sensitivities with increased disease duration, particularly thermal and vibratory sensitivities. This loss was statistically significant for the latter two sensitivities. Among patients with clinical DPN, 84.2% had painful neuropathic symptoms. The prevalence of DPN was positively related to micro- and macroangiopathic complications and with dyslipidemia. This study reveals a high degree of underdiagnosis of DPN, most likely due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease in a considerable proportion of patients. Our observations provide evidence of the usefulness of specific equipment for quantitative and objective assessment of polyneuropathy. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimating the burden of disease attributable to diabetes in South Africa in 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Debbie; Norman, Rosana; Pieterse, Desiréé; Levitt, Naomi S

    2007-08-01

    To estimate the burden of disease attributable to diabetes by sex and age group in South Africa in 2000. The framework adopted for the most recent World Health Organization comparative risk assessment (CRA) methodology was followed. Small community studies used to derive the prevalence of diabetes by population group were weighted proportionately for a national estimate. Population-attributable fractions were calculated and applied to revised burden of disease estimates. Monte Carlo simulation-modelling techniques were used for uncertainty analysis. South Africa. Adults 30 years and older. Mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), stroke, hypertensive disease and renal failure. Of South Africans aged >or= 30 years, 5.5% had diabetes which increased with age. Overall, about 14% of IHD, 10% of stroke, 12% of hypertensive disease and 12% of renal disease burden in adult males and females (30+ years) were attributable to diabetes. Diabetes was estimated to have caused 22,412 (95% uncertainty interval 20,755 - 24,872) or 4.3% (95% uncertainty interval 4.0 - 4.8%) of all deaths in South Africa in 2000. Since most of these occurred in middle or old age, the loss of healthy life years comprises a smaller proportion of the total 258,028 DALYs (95% uncertainty interval 236,856 - 290,849) in South Africa in 2000, accounting for 1.6% (95% uncertainty interval 1.5 - 1.8%) of the total burden. Diabetes is an important direct and indirect cause of burden in South Africa. Primary prevention of the disease through multi-level interventions and improved management at primary health care level are needed.

  3. Diabetes and dementia; the bitter taste of a sweet disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exalto, L.G.

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is associated with an roughly doubled risk of dementia. Although this association is well established, it is less clear which factors account for this increased risk. Moreover, it is unknown which individuals are at increased risk, what are vulnerable periods in life, and what

  4. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øyen, Nina; Diaz, Lars Jorge; Leirgul, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a national cohort study, we...

  5. Conjoint Associations of Gestational Diabetes and Hypertension With Diabetes, Hypertension, and Cardiovascular Disease in Parents: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Romina; Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Meltzer, Sara; Rahme, Elham; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2017-11-15

    The conjoint association of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and gestational hypertension (GH) with cardiometabolic disease has not been well studied. We evaluated a combined GDM/GH risk indicator in both mothers and fathers because of shared spousal behaviors and environments. In the present population-based retrospective cohort study, GH was identified in matched pairs of mothers with GDM or without GDM (matched on age group, health region, and year of delivery) who had singleton live births in Quebec, Canada (1990-2007). A total of 64,232 couples were categorized based on GDM/GH status (neither, either, or both). Associations with diabetes, hypertension, and a composite of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models (from 12 weeks postpartum to March 2012). Compared with having neither GDM nor GH, having either was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio (HR) = 14.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12.9, 16.6), hypertension (HR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.8, 2.0), and CVD/mortality (HR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.7). We found associations of greater magnitude among participants who had both (for diabetes, HR = 36.9, 95% CI: 26.0, 52.3; for hypertension, HR = 5.7, 95% CI: 4.9, 6.7; and for CVD/mortality, HR = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 3.5). Associations with diabetes were also observed in fathers (for either, HR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.3; for both, HR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.4, 2.3). In conclusion, we found associations of a combined GDM/GH indicator with cardiometabolic disease in mothers and with diabetes in fathers, with stronger associations when both GDM and GH were present. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  6. The association of ACE gene polymorphism with diabetic kidney disease and renoprotective efficacy of valsartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To investigate the associations between the insertion/deletion (I/D polymorphisms in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE gene and susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease (DKD; and the efficacy of valsartan in reducing the urine protein in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Materials and methods: We enrolled 128 T2DM patients in this study, including 54 cases with DKD (DKD+ and 74 controls (DKD–. The ACE polymorphism was assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and the genotype distribution and allele frequency were analyzed. The DKD+ group was subdivided into the DD, ID and II subgroups, based on their genotypes. In addition, patients with DKD received valsartan treatment for 12 weeks. We determined changes in the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR and serum creatinine (SCr. Results: The frequencies of the genotypes DD and ID were higher in the DKD+ than in the DKD– group. The frequency of allele D was higher, and of allele I was lower, in the DKD+ than in DKD– group (p < 0.05. Following valsartan treatment, albuminuria was significantly decreased in subgroups DD and ID (p < 0.05. Conclusions: In T2DM patients, the ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with onset of DKD. Furthermore, the ACE I/D polymorphism influenced the renoprotective response to valsartan: Patients with the DD genotype benefitted the most from this treatment.

  7. The association of ACE gene polymorphism with diabetic kidney disease and renoprotective efficacy of valsartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuying; Peng, Wen; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Qiao, Huibo; Wang, Li; Xu, Zhigang; Wu, Chenguang

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the associations between the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphisms in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene and susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease (DKD); and the efficacy of valsartan in reducing the urine protein in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. We enrolled 128 T2DM patients in this study, including 54 cases with DKD (DKD+) and 74 controls (DKD-). The ACE polymorphism was assayed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the genotype distribution and allele frequency were analyzed. The DKD+ group was subdivided into the DD, ID and II subgroups, based on their genotypes. In addition, patients with DKD received valsartan treatment for 12 weeks. We determined changes in the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine (SCr). The frequencies of the genotypes DD and ID were higher in the DKD+ than in the DKD- group. The frequency of allele D was higher, and of allele I was lower, in the DKD+ than in DKD- group (p ACE I/D polymorphism was associated with onset of DKD. Furthermore, the ACE I/D polymorphism influenced the renoprotective response to valsartan: Patients with the DD genotype benefitted the most from this treatment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Risk factors for diabetes, but not for cardiovascular disease, are associated with family history of Type 2 diabetes in subjects from central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Brambila, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Independent of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FHT2DM) is another important risk factor for developing diabetes. To establish the association among FHT2DM, risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in subjects from central Mexico. Clinical and biochemical studies were performed in 383 first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 270 subjects unrelated to patients with type 2 diabetes-all subjects were from the city of Puebla in central Mexico. Logistic regressions were used to assess the association between FHT2DM and metabolic parameters. Cardiovascular risk was classified by dyslipidemia and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). FHT2DM was associated with risk factors for diabetes, such as increased fasting insulin levels (OR = 1.731, 95% CI = 1.041-2.877), decreased insulin sensitivity (OR = 1.951, 95% CI = 1.236-3.080) and pre-diabetes (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.14-2.33). FHT2DH was not associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as dyslipidemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.70-1.79) and FRS (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.40-1.36) when adjusted for gender, age, smoking and obesity. Diabetic risk factors, but not cardiovascular disease risk factors, are associated with a positive family history of diabetes in subjects from central Mexico, independent of the presence of obesity.

  9. Women of low socioeconomic status living with diabetes: Becoming adept at handling a disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimonrut Boonsatean

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore how Thai women of low socioeconomic status handle their type 2 diabetes. Methods: A qualitative interpretative method was used to study 19 women with type 2 diabetes in a suburban community in Thailand. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and were analysed using inductive and constructive processes. Results: Participants’ lives underwent many changes between their initial diagnoses and later stages when they became adept at handling diabetes. Two themes emerged, which involved (1 the transition to handling diabetes and (2 the influences of the social environment. The first theme encompassed confronting the disease, reaching a turning point in the process of adaptation and developing expertise in handling diabetes. The second theme involved threats of loss of status and empowerment by families. These findings showed that becoming adept at handling diabetes required significant changes in women’s behaviours and required taking advantage of influences from the social environment. Conclusion: The process of developing expertise in handling diabetes was influenced by both inner and outer factors that required adjustment to learn to live with diabetes. Furthermore, the reductions found in women’s social statuses when they become patients in the healthcare system might pose a barrier to women of low socioeconomic status becoming adept at handling diabetes. However, the experiences of empowerment received from the women’s families acted as a powerful strategy to strengthen their handling of the disease. To develop accessible and sensitive health care for this population, it is important to pay attention to these findings.

  10. [The salivary factors related to caries and periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng-xing; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Zhi; Qin, Man

    2013-09-01

    To detect the salivary factors related to caries and periodontal disease and to analyze the risk of caries and periodontal disease in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus. The study comprised 30 children with diabetic mellitus, aged 7-15 years old, and 60 healthy age-and gender-matched children. Caries and periodontal indexes were recorded and saliva related factors were analyzed. Caries indexes of diabetes children [permanent teeth: decay missing filling tooth (DMFT) M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 4), deciduous teeth: decay missing filling tooth (dmft) M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 1)] were not significantly different with those of healthy children [DMFT M (Q1,Q3) = 1(0, 3), dmft M (Q1,Q3) = 0(0, 4)], but plaque index (PLI) (1.25 ± 0.33) and bleeding index (BI) (0.74 ± 0.45) of diabetes children were significantly higher than those of healthy children (PLI was 0.93 ± 0.31,BI was 0.34 ± 0.22) (P 0.05). Salivary glucose, immunoglobulin sIgA and sIgG were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05).Salivary lysozyme of diabetes children was significantly higher than that of healthy children (P 0.05). Diabetes mellitus can lead to the changes of some salivary factors related to gingivitis in diabetes children. Children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus may have a higher risk of periodontal disease.

  11. Coronary heart disease in the diabetic African: frequency clinical and angiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touze, J E; Ekra, A; Darracq, R; Mardelle, T; Adoh, A; Ake, E; Chauvet, J; Bertrand, E

    1987-01-01

    The frequency and clinical and coronarographic features of coronary heart disease (CHD) in black African diabetic patients were assessed in a two-part study. The aim of part I was to determine the frequency of CHD in 50 diabetic patients selected by the following criteria: male, age between 40 and 60 years, diabetes history less than 20 years, no history of CHD and normal E.K.G. All 50 of these patients underwent a stress test and those who failed or for whom results were inconclusive were submitted to coronary arteriography. Part II was a retrospective study of 104 patients with CHD. Its aim was to compare the clinical and coronarographic features of CHD patients with (27 cases) and without (77 cases) diabetes mellitus. The frequency of CHD in the 50 diabetics selected for this study was 10% (31 negative exercise tests, 19 inconclusive exercise tests, 5 coronary arteriographies with significant narrowing). Of these 5 diabetics with CHD, 3 had single vessel involvement (left descending artery: 2 cases, circumflex artery: 1 case), 1 patient had double vessel involvement (right coronary circumflex artery) and 1 had triple vessel involvement (left descending, circumflex, and right coronary artery). In the retrospective study the clinical profile of the diabetic and non-diabetic CHD patients was the same with respect to sex, age, angina, myocardial infarction, and death rate. As regard the risk factors, blood cholesterol level was higher in diabetics while cigarette smoking was higher in non-diabetics. The frequency of hypertension was the same in both groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Prevalence and severity of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients with aortic valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhang-wei; Qian, Ju-ying; Jian, Ying; Ge, Lei; Liu, Xue-bo; Shu, Xian-hong; Ge, Junbo

    2011-02-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is common in the elderly and associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, while diabetes is one of the confirmed risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence and severity of CAD in type-2 diabetic patients with AVC. From June to December in 2007, a total of 325 consecutive patients with chest pain or chest distress were admitted for coronary angiography. The severity of CAD was evaluated by the Gensini score and the number of stenosed vessels. All patients underwent transthoracic echocardiography for detecting AVC. Compared with the patients without diabetes (n = 221), the type-2 diabetic patients (n = 104) had a similar prevalence of CAD (66.5% vs. 72.1%, P = 0.312). Further classified by the presence of AVC, patients with AVC had a higher prevalence of CAD, average Gensini score and the number of stenosed vessels, both in the group with and without diabetes. It was also demonstrated that the odds ratio (OR) of AVC for CAD in the diabetic patients was higher than in the non-diabetic ones (3.405 vs 2.515) after chi-square analysis (single-variable). However, at multivariable logistic regression analysis for CAD, the OR of AVC was 3.757 (P = 0.03) in diabetic group, while it did not achieve statistical significance in the non-diabetic group (OR = 2.130, P= 0.074). Type-2 diabetic patients with AVC had a higher prevalence of and more severe CAD.

  13. Article Commentary: Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Liver Disease. A Deadly Trio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Lonardo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this commentary to the paper by Donadon V. et al (Clinical Medicine: Endocrinology and Diabetes. 2009;2:25–33. the association and significance of insulin resistance with chronic liver disease are shortly reviewed and the molecular mechanisms underlying the diabetogenic and oncogenic potentials of advanced liver disease are summarized. Literature studies demonstrate that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC can be part of the natural history of NASH. HCCs in patients with features of metabolic syndrome as the only risk factor for liver disease have distinct morphological characteristics and mainly occur in the absence of significant fibrosis in the background liver. Moreover, data indicate that the presence of diabetes carries an approximately three to four-fold increased risk of HCC and such a risk is strongly increased by concurrent viral infections. Finally, the relationship between insulin resistance, steatosis and diabetes in NAFLD and HCV infection will be commented, along with the directions for future studies.

  14. Impact of the components of Mediterranean nutrition regimen on long-term prognosis of diabetic patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Mosharraf

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of different nutritional regimens on long-term prognosis and outcome in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD has been questioned. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of different nutritional components of Mediterranean regimen on long-term cardiovascular events in diabetic patients with CAD in the Iranian population. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study, we recruited 233 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and with at least 6 months of documented CAD. Nutritional assessment was obtained by a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ and the diet score was calculated on the basis of the Mediterranean diet quality index (Med-DQI. For Assessing long-term CAD prognosis, the patients were followed by telephone for one year. The study endpoint was long-term major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular event (MACCE. RESULTS: Death was observed in 19 patients (8.2% during the one-year follow-up. Two patients (0.9% suffered non-fatal myocardial infarction and 14 (6.0% needed revascularization within 1 year after discharge from hospital. Overall MACCE within one year in the study population was 12.4%. There were significant differences between number of deaths and dietary scores of saturated fatty acid, cholesterol, meats, fish, and fruit and vegetables (P < 0.05. Moreover, significant differences were found between MACCE rate and dietary scores of saturated fatty acid, cholesterol, and fruit and vegetables (P < 0.05. Using multivariate logistic regression models, Mediterranean dietary regimen could effectively predict long-term death as well as MACCE adjusted for gender and age variables. CONCLUSION: Mediterranean dietary regimens, including low level of cholesterol and saturated fatty acid, can effectively improve long-term outcome including death and MACCE in diabetic patients with CAD.   Keywords: Diabetes Mellitus, Coronary

  15. The prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R I G

    2015-08-01

    Primary prevention of diabetes and cardiovascular disease is an important priority for people with schizophrenia. This review aims to identify lifestyle and pharmacological interventions that reduce diabetes and cardiovascular disease in people with schizophrenia. PubMed and other electronic databases were searched to identify relevant articles. Lifestyle interventions that focus on diet and physical activity reduce the incidence of diabetes. Similar programmes in people with schizophrenia have led to significant weight loss and may reasonably be expected to reduce diabetes in the long-term. Metformin may be considered when lifestyle change is not feasible or effective. Lifestyle interventions, particularly smoking cessation, are likely to be effective in reducing cardiovascular disease in people with schizophrenia. Although cardiovascular prevention trials with statins have not been performed in people with schizophrenia, similar reductions in cholesterol has been seen as in the general population and statins should be considered for those at high risk. Traditional cardiovascular risk prediction models perform well in identifying those at high cardiovascular risk, but bespoke prediction models using data from people with schizophrenia perform better. Reducing diabetes and cardiovascular disease requires a coordinated and concerted effort from mental and physical health teams working across primary and secondary care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Psychosocial Context of Differences Between Asthmatic and Diabetic Patients in Adaptation to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Jagoda; Pituła, Beata

    2016-01-01

    A significant rise in the incidence of asthma and diabetes makes the psychosocial underpinnings of these diseases an increasingly important issue. This article examines differences in psychosocial functioning between healthy people and patients suffering from asthma and diabetes, as separate disease entities. Psychological factors seem to play a significant role particularly in the process of recovery and adaptation to the disease. Our assumption was that a time perspective, a sense of belonging, and a hope may be related to the functioning of people with chronic asthma and diabetes. The study involved a total of 90 people assigned to three groups: healthy individuals, asthmatic patients, and diabetic patients. The findings demonstrate that patients suffering from asthma have a different attitude toward the future and a sense of fatalism in the present. Yet there are no significant differences between asthma patients and healthy individuals in the sense of belonging and hope. Diabetic patients perceive the present as more fatalistic than asthmatic patients and healthy individuals, and they are less oriented at setting and achieving future goals. The finding that the type and course of the disease are associated with specific psychosocial adaptation may have functional and therapeutic implications, and thus should get psycho-clinical attention.

  17. Relation between family history, obesity and risk for diabetes and heart disease in Pakistani children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, A.; Hakeem, R.; Hydrie, M.Z.; Ahmadani, M.Y.; Masood, Q.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess the differences in relative risk of developing diabetes and CHD, obesity, fasting blood glucose, insulin and lipids of children having family history of diabetes or heart disease in first or second degree relatives as compared to control group. Design: Children were given a questionnaire to collect demographic data and to assess their dietary habits and family history. Anthropometric measurements and blood samples for fasting blood glucose, insulin and lipids of 8-10 years old children from 4 schools was taken. Subjects: Children having positive family history of diabetes (n=44) or heart disease (n=16) in first or second degree relatives were compared with a control group (n=39). Results: Children having positive family history for diabetes had slightly higher mean values for BMI, waist circumference, arm fat % as compared to the controls but the differences were not statistically significant. Overweight children (>85th Percentile of BMI for age) did not differ significantly in terms of various risk indicators however those who were in the uppermost tertile of arm fat % had significantly higher total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL-C, LDL:HDL and Insulin levels (P<0.05 in each case). Conclusion: Diabetes and CVD risks from positive family history for the disease are probably mediated through increased body fat percentage. Thus even when information about family history of disease is lacking, arm-fat-percentage could be used as an important screening tool for determining the risk status of children. (author)

  18. Development and validation of a questionnaire to evaluate patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, L E; Veloski, J; Chatterton, M L; Gevirtz, F O; Nash, D B

    2000-07-01

    To develop a reliable and valid questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management programs. Questions related to structure, process, and outcomes were categorized into 14 domains defining the essential elements of diabetes disease management. Health professionals confirmed the content validity. Face validity was established by a patient focus group. The questionnaire was mailed to 711 patients with diabetes who participated in a disease management program. To reduce the number of questionnaire items, a principal components analysis was performed using a varimax rotation. The Scree test was used to select significant components. To further assess reliability and validity; Cronbach's alpha and product-moment correlations were calculated for components having > or =3 items with loadings >0.50. The validated 73-item mailed satisfaction survey had a 34.1% response rate. Principal components analysis yielded 13 components with eigenvalues > 1.0. The Scree test proposed a 6-component solution (39 items), which explained 59% of the total variation. Internal consistency reliabilities computed for the first 6 components (alpha = 0.79-0.95) were acceptable. The final questionnaire, the Diabetes Management Evaluation Tool (DMET), was designed to assess patient satisfaction with diabetes disease management programs. Although more extensive testing of the questionnaire is appropriate, preliminary reliability and validity of the DMET has been demonstrated.

  19. Dissecting diabetes/metabolic disease mechanisms using pluripotent stem cells and genome editing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Kee Keong Teo

    2015-09-01

    Major conclusions: hPSCs and the advancing genome editing tools appear to be a timely and potent combination for probing molecular mechanism(s underlying diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndromes. The knowledge gained from these hiPSC-based disease modeling studies can potentially be translated into the clinics by guiding clinicians on the appropriate type of medication to use for each condition based on the mechanism of action of the disease.

  20. Cost of tobacco-related diseases, including passive smoking, in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, S M; Ho, L M; Lapsley, H M; Chau, J; Cheung, W L; Ho, S Y; Pow, M; Lam, T H; Hedley, A J

    2006-04-01

    Costs of tobacco-related disease can be useful evidence to support tobacco control. In Hong Kong we now have locally derived data on the risks of smoking, including passive smoking. To estimate the health-related costs of tobacco from both active and passive smoking. Using local data, we estimated active and passive smoking-attributable mortality, hospital admissions, outpatient, emergency and general practitioner visits for adults and children, use of nursing homes and domestic help, time lost from work due to illness and premature mortality in the productive years. Morbidity risk data were used where possible but otherwise estimates based on mortality risks were used. Utilisation was valued at unit costs or from survey data. Work time lost was valued at the median wage and an additional costing included a value of USD 1.3 million for a life lost. In the Hong Kong population of 6.5 million in 1998, the annual value of direct medical costs, long term care and productivity loss was USD 532 million for active smoking and USD 156 million for passive smoking; passive smoking accounted for 23% of the total costs. Adding the value of attributable lives lost brought the annual cost to USD 9.4 billion. The health costs of tobacco use are high and represent a net loss to society. Passive smoking increases these costs by at least a quarter. This quantification of the costs of tobacco provides strong motivation for legislative action on smoke-free areas in the Asia Pacific Region and elsewhere.

  1. Novel risk factors for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease in non-diabetic patients: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M Bérard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of genetic and environmental vascular risk factors in non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease, either peripheral arterial occlusive disease or thromboangiitis obliterans, the two main entities of peripheral arterial disease, and to established whether some of them are specifically associated with one or another of the premature peripheral arterial disease subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS: This study included 113 non diabetic patients with premature peripheral arterial disease (diagnosis <45-year old presenting either a peripheral arterial occlusive disease (N = 64 or a thromboangiitis obliterans (N = 49, and 241 controls matched for age and gender. Both patient groups demonstrated common traits including cigarette smoking, low physical activity, decreased levels of HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A-I, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (active form of B6 vitamin and zinc. Premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease was characterized by the presence of a family history of peripheral arterial and carotid artery diseases (OR 2.3 and 5.8 respectively, 95% CI, high lipoprotein (a levels above 300 mg/L (OR 2.3, 95% CI, the presence of the factor V Leiden (OR 5.1, 95% CI and the glycoprotein Ia(807T,837T,873A allele (OR 2.3, 95% CI. In thromboangiitis obliterans group, more patients were regular consumers of cannabis (OR 3.5, 95% CI and higher levels in plasma copper has been shown (OR 6.5, 95% CI. CONCLUSIONS: According to our results from a non exhaustive list of study parameters, we might hypothesize for 1 a genetic basis for premature peripheral arterial occlusive disease development and 2 the prevalence of environmental factors in the development of thromboangiitis obliterans (tobacco and cannabis. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated that the 807T/837T/873A allele of platelet glycoprotein Ia may confer an additional risk for development of peripheral

  2. Reliability and limitation of various diagnostic methods including nuclear medicine in myocardial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuyasu, Yoshiki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Yamazaki, Toshio

    1981-01-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, nuclear method, cardiac catheterization, left ventriculography and endomyocardial biopsy (biopsy) were performed in 40 cases of cardiomyopathy (CM), 9 of endocardial fibroelastosis and 19 of specific heart muscle disease, and the usefulness and limitation of each method was comparatively estimated. In CM, various methods including biopsy were performed. The 40 patients were classified into 3 groups, i.e., hypertrophic (17), dilated (20) and non-hypertrophic.non-dilated (3) on the basis of left ventricular ejection fraction and hypertrophy of the ventricular wall. The hypertrophic group was divided into 4 subgroups: 9 septal, 4 apical, 2 posterior and 2 anterior. The nuclear study is useful in assessing the site of the abnormal ventricular thickening, perfusion defect and ventricular function. Echocardiography is most useful in detecting asymmetric septal hypertrophy. The biopsy gives the sole diagnostic clue, especially in non-hypertrophic.non-dilated cardiomyopathy. ECG is useful in all cases but correlation with the site of disproportional hypertrophy was not obtained. (J.P.N.)

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic patients with a foot ulcer. A progress report of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, N. C.; Andros, G.; Apelqvist, J.; Bakker, K.; Lammer, J.; Lepantalo, M.; Mills, J. L.; Reekers, J.; Shearman, C. P.; Zierler, R. E.; Hinchliffe, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWDGF) has produced in 2011 a guideline on the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes and a foot ulcer. This document, together with a systematic review that provided the background information on

  4. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  5. Impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Simone R; Heijink, Richard; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A

    2011-07-01

    Evaluating the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures for patients with diabetes, depression, heart failure or COPD. Systematic Pubmed search for studies reporting the impact of disease management programs on healthcare expenditures. Included were studies that contained two or more components of Wagner's chronic care model and were published between January 2007 and December 2009. Thirty-one papers were selected, describing disease management programs for patients with diabetes (n=14), depression (n=4), heart failure (n=8), and COPD (n=5). Twenty-one studies reported incremental healthcare costs per patient per year, of which 13 showed cost-savings. Incremental costs ranged between -$16,996 and $3305 per patient per year. Substantial variation was found between studies in terms of study design, number and combination of components of disease management programs, interventions within components, and characteristics of economic evaluations. Although it is widely believed that disease management programs reduce healthcare expenditures, the present study shows that evidence for this claim is still inconclusive. Nevertheless disease management programs are increasingly implemented in healthcare systems worldwide. To support well-considered decision-making in this field, well-designed economic evaluations should be stimulated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of Gut Microbiota in Obesity and Type 2 and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: New Insights into "Old" Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsch, Igor Alexander; Konturek, Peter Christopher

    2018-04-17

    The investigation of the human microbiome is the most rapidly expanding field in biomedicine. Early studies were undertaken to better understand the role of microbiota in carbohydrate digestion and utilization. These processes include polysaccharide degradation, glycan transport, glycolysis, and short-chain fatty acid production. Recent research has demonstrated that the intricate axis between gut microbiota and the host metabolism is much more complex. Gut microbiota—depending on their composition—have disease-promoting effects but can also possess protective properties. This review focuses on disorders of metabolic syndrome, with special regard to obesity as a prequel to type 2 diabetes, type 2 diabetes itself, and type 1 diabetes. In all these conditions, differences in the composition of the gut microbiota in comparison to healthy people have been reported. Mechanisms of the interaction between microbiota and host that have been characterized thus far include an increase in energy harvest,