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Sample records for disease pcvad affected

  1. Spread of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD in Ontario (Canada swine herds: Part I. Exploratory spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Beth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systemic form of porcine circovirus associated disease (PCVAD, also known as postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS was initially detected in the early 1990s. Starting in 2004, the Canadian swine industry experienced considerable losses due to PCVAD, concurrent with a shift in genotype of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2. Objectives of the current study were to explore spatial characteristics of self-reported PCVAD distribution in Ontario between 2004 and 2008, and to investigate the existence and nature of local spread. Results The study included 278 swine herds from a large disease-monitoring project that included porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS virus-positive herds identified by the diagnostic laboratory, and PRRS virus-negative herds directly from the target population. Herds were included if they had growing pigs present on-site and available geographical coordinates for the sampling site. Furthermore, herds were defined as PCVAD-positive if a producer reported an outbreak of circovirus associated disease, or as PCVAD-negative if no outbreak was noted. Spatial trend was investigated using generalized additive models and time to PCVAD outbreak in a herd using Cox's proportional hazard model; spatial and spatio-temporal clustering was explored using K-functions; and location of most likely spatial and spatio-temporal clusters was investigated using scan statistics. Over the study period, the risk of reporting a PCVAD-positive herd tended to be higher in the eastern part of the province after adjustment for herd PRRS status (P = 0.05. This was partly confirmed for spread (Partial P P = 0.06 existence of spatio-temporal clustering of PCVAD and detection of a spatio-temporal cluster (P = 0.04. Conclusions In Ontario, PCVAD has shown a general trend, spreading from east-to-west. We interpret the existence of spatio-temporal clustering as evidence of spatio-temporal aggregation of PCVAD

  2. Bacterial diseases affecting apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial diseases of plants are usually difficult to control and often require a combination of control measures to successfully manage the disease. There are often stark differences between the means available to control bacterial diseases in annual crops versus a woody tree crop, such as apple. ...

  3. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women? Español In the United States, 1 ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  4. Stress factors in affective diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidzińska, E J

    1984-02-01

    An investigation carried out on 97 patients with affective disorders and on 100 healthy control subjects, revealed that acute and chronic stress factors occurred more in the group of patients with affective disorders than among healthy control over a similar time period. The frequency of stressful life situations was the same before the first affective episode in patients with unipolar and bipolar illness. The possible participation of such factors in triggering the first phase of illness is discussed. Similar factors appeared in both types of affective disorders. Significantly more frequent among patients than in the control group were: marital and family conflicts, health problems, emotional and ambitional failures, lack of success and work overload.

  5. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages Past Issues / Winter ... weeks of a heart attack. For Women with Heart Disease: About 6 million American women have coronary heart ...

  6. Environmental factors affecting autoimmune thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, M.; Paul, T.L.; Roti, E.; Braverman, L.E.

    1987-06-01

    A number of environmental factors affect the incidence and progression of autoimmune thyroid disease. Exposure to excess iodine, certain drugs, infectious agents and pollutants, and stress have all been implicated.

  7. Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163584.html Heart Disease Affects Far More Than the Heart Blocked arteries ... 14, 2017 TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Heart disease affects more than just the heart. It also ...

  8. The association between submission counts to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory and the economic and disease challenges of the Ontario swine industry from 1998 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, T; Friendship, R; Pearl, D L; McEwen, B; Ker, A; Dewey, C

    2012-10-01

    An intuitive assumption is to believe that the number of submissions made to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory is dictated by the financial state of the industries using the laboratory. However, no research is available to document how the economics of a food animal industry affects laboratory submissions and therefore disease monitoring and surveillance efforts. The objective of this study was to determine if economic indices associated with the Ontario swine industry can account for the variability seen in these submissions. Retrospective swine submissions made to the Animal Health Laboratory at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario from January 1998 to July 2009 were compiled. The following economic, demographic, and health variables impacting Ontario swine production were selected for analysis: auction price, lean-hog futures, currency exchange rate, price of corn, an outbreak of porcine circovirus type-2 associated diseases (PCVAD), government incentive program, number of farms in province, and average farm size. All independent variables identified by unconditional associations to have a significance of P≤0.2 with the outcome of monthly submission count were included in a multivariable negative binomial model. A final model was identified by a backwards elimination procedure. A total of 30,432 swine submissions were recorded. The mean frequency of monthly submissions over 139 months was 212.9 (SD=56.0). After controlling for farm size, the number of pigs in Ontario, higher submission counts were associated with a weaker CAD$ versus US$, higher auction prices, and a PCVAD outbreak (Pdisease outbreaks in the Ontario swine industry drive submissions to the laboratory. In conclusion, lab submissions are a useful source of animal health data for disease surveillance; however, surveillance activities should also monitor the economics of the industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors affecting levodopa effects in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogawa N

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Levodopa is the gold standard for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD because of its outstanding clinical efficacy. However, the majority of patients experience various adverse reactions, including the wearing-off phenomenon, the on-off phenomenon, dyskinesia and psychiatric symptoms. The response to levodopa depends not only on the intrinsic responsiveness of the patients, but also on various other important factors including the type of levodopa preparation, its absorption/metabolism, the blood-brain barrier, age at onset of disease and concomitant use of anti-parkinsonian drugs. This review summarizes factors which influence the effects of levodopa in PD. To minimize levodopa-induced adverse reactions and to relieve long-term parkinsonian symptoms, levodopa therapy should be conducted by taking these factors into consideration.

  10. Ticks and Tickborne Diseases Affecting Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Univ Res Div Bull 139, 42p, 1979. Sonenshine, D.E. Pheromones and other semiochemicals of the acari. Ann Rev Entomol 30:1-28 (1985). Sonenshine, D.E...techniques. For an example of personal protection, Schreck et al. (1986) demonstrated in a research study that military field uniforms treated with 0.5...infection by disease organisms. During several years of field research with ticks, I often had to remove them from myself or others, and pulling them

  11. How pregnancy can affect autoimmune diseases progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Marie-Pierre; Lombardelli, Letizia; Logiodice, Federica; Kullolli, Ornela; Parronchi, Paola; Romagnani, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune disorders are characterized by tissue damage, caused by self-reactivity of different effectors mechanisms of the immune system, namely antibodies and T cells. Their occurrence may be associated with genetic and/or environmental predisposition and to some extent, have implications for fertility and obstetrics. The relationship between autoimmunity and reproduction is bidirectional. This review only addresses the impact of pregnancy on autoimmune diseases and not the influence of autoimmunity on pregnancy development. Th17/Th1-type cells are aggressive and pathogenic in many autoimmune disorders and inflammatory diseases. The immunology of pregnancy underlies the role of Th2-type cytokines to maintain the tolerance of the mother towards the fetal semi-allograft. Non-specific factors, including hormonal changes, favor a switch to Th2-type cytokine profile. In pregnancy Th2, Th17/Th2 and Treg cells accumulate in the decidua but may also be present in the mother's circulation and can regulate autoimmune responses influencing the progression of autoimmune diseases.

  12. Immunoadsorption in Autoimmune Diseases Affecting the Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummvoll, Georg; Aringer, Martin; Handisurya, Ammon; Derfler, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    Autoantibodies play an important role in the pathophysiology of renal involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic vasculitis, and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease (or Goodpasture syndrome). Direct removal of autoantibodies therefore has been tried in various ways, first by plasma exchange. Today, immunoadsorption is the extracorporeal method that most effectively removes (pathogenic) immune complexes and antibodies. Although past data have shown efficacy and biocompatibility of immunoadsorption in (renal) SLE, it is still an experimental and expensive procedure, and evidence from randomized controlled trials is needed. Nevertheless, immunoadsorption is being used as a rescue therapy in life-threatening situations of SLE patients because of its fast mode of action and its acceptable safety profile. In granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (or Wegener's granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, the current standard is plasma exchange. Immunoadsorption, which probably would reduce the autoantibody burden more effectively, might be an even better more effective option, but sufficient evidence is lacking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. TEMPORAL ORDER OF DISEASE PAIRS AFFECTS SUBSEQUENT DISEASE TRAJECTORIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Mette K; Westergaard, David; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2016-01-01

    order of appearance. We discuss these different types of disease co-occurrences, and use the two diseases "sleep apnea" and "diabetes" to showcase the approach which otherwise can be applied to any disease pair. We benefit from seven million electronic medical records covering the entire population...... of Denmark for more than 20 years. Sleep apnea is the most common sleep-related breathing disorder and it has previously been shown to be bidirectionally linked to diabetes, meaning that each disease increases the risk of acquiring the other. We confirm that there is no significant temporal relationship......, as approximately half of patients with both diseases are diagnosed with diabetes first. However, we also show that patients diagnosed with diabetes before sleep apnea have a higher disease burden compared to patients diagnosed with sleep apnea before diabetes. The study clearly demonstrates that it is not only...

  14. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wühl, Elke; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Wanner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    and separately for children and adults. METHODS: The Orphanet classification of rare disease was searched for rare diseases potentially causing ESRD, and these diagnosis codes were mapped to the corresponding ERA-EDTA primary renal disease codes. Thirty-one diagnoses were defined as rare diseases causing ESRD...... disease affected young patients in up to 46%. On 31 December 2011, 20 595 patients (12.4% of the total RRT population) were on RRT for ESRD caused by a rare disease. The point prevalence was 32.5 per million age-related population in children and 152.0 in adults. Only 5.8% of these patients were younger...

  15. Pathobiomes Differ between Two Diseases Affecting Reef Building Coralline Algae

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    Anne-Leila Meistertzheim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Crustose coralline algae (CCA are major benthic calcifiers that play crucial roles in coral reef ecosystems. Two diseases affecting CCA have recently been investigated: coralline white band syndrome (CWBS and coralline white patch disease (CWPD. These diseases can trigger major losses in CCA cover on tropical coral reefs, but their causative agents remain unknown. Here, we provide data from the first investigation of the bacterial communities associated with healthy and diseased CCA tissues. We show that Neogoniolithon mamillare diseased tissues had distinct microbial communities compared to healthy tissues and demonstrate that CWBS and CWPD were associated with different pathobiomes, indicating that they had different disease causations. CWBS tissues were composed of opportunistic bacteria, and the origin of the disease was undetermined. In contrast, a vibrio related to Vibrio tubiashii characterized the CWPD pathobiome, suggesting that it could be a putative disease agent and supporting the case of a temperature dependent disease associated with global warming.

  16. The Olig family affects central nervous system development and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Botao Tan; Jing Yu; Ying Yin; Gongwei Jia; Wei Jiang; Lehua Yu

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell differentiation and maturation is a critical step during central nervous system devel-opment. The oligodendrocyte transcription family (Olig family) is known to be an important factor in regulating neural cell differentiation. Because of this, the Olig family also affects acute and chronic central nervous system diseases, including brain injury, multiple sclerosis, and even gliomas. Improved understanding about the functions of the Olig family in central nervous system development and disease will greatly aid novel breakthroughs in central nervous system diseases. This review investigates the role of the Olig family in central nervous system develop-ment and related diseases.

  17. Affected by Inflammatory Diseases: Diagnostic and Pathogenetic Insights

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    Alessandra Pontillo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human glycolytic enzyme α-enolase was associated with human diseases and with inflammation. An ELISA test was developed to measure anti-α-enolase AAE IgG and AAE IgA in the serum from patients affected by inflammatory diseases with the purpose to evaluate it as a novel diagnostic marker. 80 healthy blood donors and 194 paediatric patients affected by Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, celiac disease (CD, Crohn's Disease (CrD, hereditary periodic fever (HPF, and PFAPA syndrome were included in the study. HPF patients showed high levels of AAE antibodies, whereas JIA, CD, and CrD presented only partial results. Benign fevers such as PFAPA were almost negative for AAE Abs. These findings suggested that the genetic dysfunction of inflammasome associated with HPF could lead to the formation of AAE Abs that could be used for an early and easy diagnosis.

  18. The reproduction in women affected by cooley disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pafumi (Carlo); V. Leanza (Vito); L. Coco (Luana); S. Vizzini (Stefania); L. Ciotta (Lilliana); A. Messina (Alessandra); G. Zarbo (Giuseppe); A. D'Agati (Alfio); M.A. Palumbo (Marco Antonio); A. Iemmola (Alessandra); F.A. Gulino (Ferdinando Antonio); M.C. Teodoro (Maria Cristina); M. Attard (Matthew); A.C. Plesca (Alina Cristina); C. Soares (Catarina); N. Kouloubis (Nina); M. Chammas (Mayada)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe health background management and outcomes of 5 pregnancies in 4 women affected by Cooley Disease, from Paediatric Institute of Catania University, are described, considering the preconceptual guidances and cares for such patients. These patients were selected among a group of 100 tha

  19. Caregiver roles in families affected by Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røthing, Merete; Malterud, Kirsti; Frich, Jan C

    2013-01-01

    and the hierarchical order between spouses, partners, and parents and children. The relationship between spouses and partners changed during the course of the disease. A reciprocal relationship was difficult to maintain, as the role as carer overshadowed other roles. Children of an affected parent could compensate...

  20. psychosocial impact of sickle cell disease on mothers of affected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-09-09

    Sep 9, 2007 ... from sickle cell disease (SCD) in Nigeria has been inadequate. ... Subjects: One hundred mothers of SCD affected children (SCD children) were the study .... including the application of Children Behaviour ... "using illness to manipulate to get wants". ... age (SCD=40.250:5.929 vs Asthma = 37.571 :7.013.

  1. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Cognitive Deficits and Affective Disorder in Huntington's Disease

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    Mark I. Ransome

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a tandem repeat expansion encoding a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. HD involves progressive psychiatric, cognitive, and motor symptoms, the selective pathogenesis of which remains to be mechanistically elucidated. There are a range of different brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and striatum, known to be affected in HD, with evidence for hippocampal dysfunction accumulating in recent years. In this review we will focus on hippocampal abnormalities, in particular, deficits of adult neurogenesis. We will discuss potential molecular mechanisms mediating disrupted hippocampal neurogenesis, and how this deficit of cellular plasticity may in turn contribute to specific cognitive and affective symptoms that are prominent in HD. The generation of transgenic animal models of HD has greatly facilitated our understanding of disease mechanisms at molecular, cellular, and systems levels. Transgenic HD mice have been found to show progressive behavioral changes, including affective, cognitive, and motor abnormalities. The discovery, in multiple transgenic lines of HD mice, that adult hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity is disrupted, may help explain specific aspects of cognitive and affective dysfunction. Furthermore, these mouse models have provided insight into potential molecular mediators of adult neurogenesis deficits, such as disrupted serotonergic and neurotrophin signaling. Finally, a number of environmental and pharmacological interventions which are known to enhance adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been found to have beneficial affective and cognitive effects in mouse models, suggesting common molecular targets which may have therapeutic utility for HD and related diseases.

  2. Factors affecting recurrence after surgery for Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayuki Yamamoto

    2005-01-01

    Although in Crohn's disease post-operative recurrence is common, the determinants of disease recurrence remain speculative. The aim of this study was to examine factors affecting post-operative recurrence of Crohn's disease. A Medline-based literature review was carried out. The following factors were investigated: age at onset of disease, sex, family history of Crohn's disease,smoking, duration of Crohn's disease before surgery,prophylactic medical treatment (corticosteroids, 5-amino salicylic acid [5-ASA] and immunosuppressants),anatomical site of involvement, indication for surgery (perforating or non-perforating disease), length of resected bowel, anast-omotic technique, presence of granuloma in the specimen, involvement of disease at the resection margin, blood transfusions and postoperative complications. Smoking significantly increases the risk of recurrence (risk is approximately twice as high), especially in women and heavy smokers. Quitting smoking reduces the post-operative recurrence rate. A number of studies have shown a higher risk when the duration of the disease before surgery was short. There were, however, different definitions of 'short' among the studies. Prophylactic cortic-osteroids therapy is not effective in reducing the post-operative recurrence. A number of randomized controlled trials offered evidence of the efficacy of 5-ASA (mesalazine) in reducing post-operative recurrence. Recently, the thera-peutic efficacy of immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine) in the prevention of post-operative recurrence has been investigated and several studies have reported that these drugs might help prevent the recurrence. Further clinical trials would be necessary to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of immunosuppressants.Several studies showed a higher recurrence rate in patients with perforating disease than in those with non-perforating disease. However, evidence for differing recurrence rates in perforating and non

  3. Prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients affected by Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Campanella, Jonia; Soriani, Alessandra; Vailati, Alberto; Corazza, Gino R

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that coeliac disease is associated with autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as autoimmune thyroid disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recently, coeliac disease has been shown in approximately 10% of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenocortical insufficiency and it shares several clinical features with coeliac disease. Although hyperpigmentation and hypotension are the most specific signs, gastrointestinal symptoms are common and can be the first complaints of the patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients with Addison's disease. Seventeen consecutive patients affected by Addison's disease (14 F, mean age 53.9 years, range 26-79 years) were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them were affected by Addison's disease associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; the other 6 patients were suffering from isolated Addison's disease. Diagnosis had been performed at the age of 40.5 years (range 23-55). Steroid treatment had already been started in 16 of the patients. Endomysial antibodies were tested in all of them and a duodenal biopsy was taken in those found to be positive for antiendomysial antibody (EMA). One out of 17 patients was found to be EMA positive. Duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease by showing subtotal villous atrophy. Although we studied only a small sample, our preliminary results confirmed that Addison's disease is associated with coeliac disease, being present in 5.9% of patients with Addison's disease. Since the symptoms can be similar and treatment of Addison's disease can mask coeliac disease, this association should always be actively investigated.

  4. Genetic Characterization of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 from Pigs with Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, Ariel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Bratanich, Ana; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Bucafusco, Danilo; Craig, María Isabel; Cappuccio, Javier; Machuca, Mariana; Rimondi, Agustina; Dibárbora, Marina; Sanguinetti, Hector Ramón; Perfumo, Carlos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) has been associated with syndromes grouped by the term porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The PCV-2 isolates have been grouped into two major groups or genotypes according to their nucleotide sequence of whole genomes and/or ORF-2: PCV-2b, which have, in turn, been subdivided into three clusters (1A–1C), and PCV-2a, which has been subdivided into five clusters (2A–2E). In the present study, we obtained 16 sequences of PCV-2 from different farms from 2003 to 2008, from animals with confirmatory diagnosis of PCVAD. Since results showed an identity of 99.8% among them, they were grouped within a common cluster 1A-B. This preliminary study suggests a stable circulation of PCV-2b among the Argentinean pig population. PMID:23738099

  5. The reproduction in women affected by Cooley disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Pafumi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The health background management and outcomes of 5 pregnancies in 4 women affected by Cooley Disease, from Paediatric Institute of Catania University, are described, considering the preconceptual guidances and cares for such patients. These patients were selected among a group of 100 thalassemic women divided into three subgroups, according to their first and successive menstruation characteristics: i patients with primitive amenorrhoea, ii patients with secondary amenorrhoea and iii patients with normal menstruation. Only one woman, affected by primitive amenorrhoea, needed the induction of ovulation. A precise and detailed pre-pregnancy assessment was effected before each conception. This was constituted by a series of essays, including checks for diabetes and hypothyroidism, for B and C hepatitis and for blood group antibodies. Moreover were evaluated: cardiac function, rubella immunity and transaminases. Other pregnancy monitoring, and cares during labour and delivery were effected according to usual obstetrics practice. All the women were in labour when she were 38 week pregnant, and the outcome were five healthy babies born at term, weighting between 2600 and 3200gs. The only complication was the Caesarean section. The improvements of current treatments, especially in the management of iron deposits, the prolongation of survival rate, will result in a continuous increase of pregnancies in thalassemic women. Pregnancy is now a real possibility for women affected by such disease. We are furthermore studying the possibility to collect the fetus' umbilical cord blood, after the delivery, to attempt eterologus transplantation to his mother trying to get a complete marrow reconstitution.

  6. Diseases affecting the peribronchovascular interstitium: CT findings and pathologic correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañer, Eva; Gallardo, Xavier; Pallardó, Yolanda; Branera, Jordi; Cabezuelo, María Angeles; Mata, Josep María

    2005-01-01

    Central bronchi and pulmonary arteries are surrounded and enveloped by a strong connective-tissue sheath termed the peribronchovascular interstitium, extending from the level of the pulmonary hila into the peripheral lung. Thickening of the peribronchovascular interstitium can be seen in a wide variety of diseases. The CT appearance can be smooth, nodular, or irregular depending on the underlying cause. Many of the diseases affecting the peribronchovascular interstitium are entities that show a predilection for lymphatic routes, such as sarcoidosis, pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis, silicosis, and lymphoproliferative disorders. There are other entities that mainly affect the peribronchovascular interstitium without a predominant perilymphatic distribution, such as hydrostatic pulmonary edema, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, Kaposi's sarcoma, interstitial pulmonary emphysema, and interstitial hemorrhage. Although there is an overlap in radiologic features, some CT findings are useful in differentiating among these entities. When CT shows mainly peribronchovascular abnormality, the differential diagnosis is considerably reduced, and it is generally possible to reach the correct diagnosis by considering the clinical context. We illustrate the CT findings and pathologic correlation for a number of different disorders that mainly affect the peribronchovascular interstitium.

  7. What affects the quality of life in autoimmune Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G; Hackemann, A; Penna-Martinez, M; Badenhoop, K

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have shown a reduced quality of life in patients with Addison's disease, but little is known about the potential influences. We determined the quality of life in 200 patients with Addison's disease using an Addison's disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. Data about first symptoms, time to diagnosis and current medication were collected by questionnaires. With increasing latency between first symptoms and diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency, the quality of life decreased in highly significant manner (pdisease (p=0.05), atrophic gastritis (p=0.01) and primary ovarian failure (p=0.01) were highly correlated with reduced scores. Quality of life was significantly lower in female patients and in those with manifestation at older ages. With more autoimmune comorbidities, the quality of life scores dropped. The most important factor, however, was latency between first symptoms and diagnosis that affected patients' quality of life even years after manifestation of the disease. These results confirm and extend previous observations and emphasize the importance of a timely diagnosis. Therefore, medical awareness for this rare but easily treatable disorder needs to be sharpened. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Prion protein polymorphisms affect chronic wasting disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J Johnson

    Full Text Available Analysis of the PRNP gene in cervids naturally infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD suggested that PRNP polymorphisms affect the susceptibility of deer to infection. To test this effect, we orally inoculated 12 white-tailed deer with CWD agent. Three different PRNP alleles, wild-type (wt; glutamine at amino acid 95 and glycine at 96, Q95H (glutamine to histidine at amino acid position 95 and G96S (glycine to serine at position 96 were represented in the study cohort with 5 wt/wt, 3 wt/G96S, and 1 each wt/Q95H and Q95H/G96S. Two animals were lost to follow-up due to intercurrent disease. The inoculum was prepared from Wisconsin hunter-harvested homozygous wt/wt animals. All infected deer presented with clinical signs of CWD; the orally infected wt/wt had an average survival period of 693 days post inoculation (dpi and G96S/wt deer had an average survival period of 956 dpi. The Q95H/wt and Q95H/G96S deer succumbed to CWD at 1,508 and 1,596 dpi respectively. These data show that polymorphisms in the PRNP gene affect CWD incubation period. Deer heterozygous for the PRNP alleles had extended incubation periods with the Q95H allele having the greatest effect.

  9. Prion protein polymorphisms affect chronic wasting disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad J; Herbst, Allen; Duque-Velasquez, Camilo; Vanderloo, Joshua P; Bochsler, Phil; Chappell, Rick; McKenzie, Debbie

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the PRNP gene in cervids naturally infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD) suggested that PRNP polymorphisms affect the susceptibility of deer to infection. To test this effect, we orally inoculated 12 white-tailed deer with CWD agent. Three different PRNP alleles, wild-type (wt; glutamine at amino acid 95 and glycine at 96), Q95H (glutamine to histidine at amino acid position 95) and G96S (glycine to serine at position 96) were represented in the study cohort with 5 wt/wt, 3 wt/G96S, and 1 each wt/Q95H and Q95H/G96S. Two animals were lost to follow-up due to intercurrent disease. The inoculum was prepared from Wisconsin hunter-harvested homozygous wt/wt animals. All infected deer presented with clinical signs of CWD; the orally infected wt/wt had an average survival period of 693 days post inoculation (dpi) and G96S/wt deer had an average survival period of 956 dpi. The Q95H/wt and Q95H/G96S deer succumbed to CWD at 1,508 and 1,596 dpi respectively. These data show that polymorphisms in the PRNP gene affect CWD incubation period. Deer heterozygous for the PRNP alleles had extended incubation periods with the Q95H allele having the greatest effect.

  10. Oral diseases affect some 3.9 billion people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Medline, Embase, Lilacs. Published and unpublished observational population-based studies presenting information on the prevalence, incidence, case fatality and cause-specific mortality related to untreated caries, severe periodontitis and severe tooth loss between January 1980 and December 2010. There were no language restrictions. Study quality was assessed using the STROBE checklist (http://www.strobe-statement.org/). Prevalence estimates were calculated on the database for all age-gender-country-year groups using a specifically developed Bayesian meta-regression tool. Disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs) metrics were used to quantify the disease burden. Disability weights were calculated based on population-based surveys in five countries (USA, Peru, Tanzania, Bangladesh and Indonesia) and an open Internet survey. Uncertainties in estimates were examined using Monte Carlo simulation techniques with uncertainty levels presented as the 2.5th and 97.5th centiles, which can be interpreted as a 95% UI. Oral diseases remain highly prevalent in 2010 affecting 3.9 billion people. Untreated caries in permanent teeth was the most prevalent condition evaluated for the entire GBD (Global Burden of Disease) 2010 Study with a global prevalence of 35% for all ages combined. Severe periodontitis and untreated caries in deciduous teeth were the 6th and 10th most prevalent conditions, affecting, respectively, 11% and 9% of the global population. Oral conditions combined accounted for 15 million DALYs globally (1.9% of all YLDs and 0.6% of all DALYs), implying an average health loss of 224 years per 100,000 people. DALYs due to oral conditions increased 20.8% between 1990 and 2010, mainly due to population growth and aging. While DALYs due to severe periodontitis and untreated caries increased, those due to severe tooth loss decreased. The findings highlight the challenge in responding to the diversity of urgent oral health needs world

  11. Oral necrotizing microvasculitis in a patient affected by Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Fucà, Gerlandina; Carini, Francesco; Valenza, Vincenzo; Spicola, Michele; Procaccianti, Paolo; Messina, Pietro; Maresi, Emiliano

    2007-12-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) was first described in 1967 by Kawasaki, who defined it as "mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome". KD is an acute systemic vasculitis, which mainly involves medium calibre arteries; its origin is unknown, and it is observed in children under the age of 5, especially in their third year. The principal presentations of KD include fever, bilateral nonexudative conjunctivitis, erythema of the lips and oral mucosa, changes in the extremities, rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Within KD, oral mucositis - represented by diffuse mucous membrane erythema, lip and tongue reddening and lingual papillae hypertrophy with subsequent development of strawberry tongue - can occur both in the acute stage of the disease (0-9 days), and in the convalescence stage (>25 days) as a consequence of the pharmacological treatment. KD vascular lesions are defined as systemic vasculitis instead of systemic arteritis. This study analyzed the anatomical-pathological substrata of oral mucositis in a baby affected by Kawasaki disease and suddenly deceased for cardiac tamponade caused by coronary aneurysm rupture (sudden cardiac death of a mechanical type).

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease and mutations affecting the interleukin-10 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Kotlarz, Daniel; Boztug, Kaan; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Noyan, Fatih; Perro, Mario; Diestelhorst, Jana; Allroth, Anna; Murugan, Dhaarini; Hätscher, Nadine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Sauer, Martin; Kreipe, Hans; Lacher, Martin; Nustede, Rainer; Woellner, Cristina; Baumann, Ulrich; Salzer, Ulrich; Koletzko, Sibylle; Shah, Neil; Segal, Anthony W; Sauerbrey, Axel; Buderus, Stephan; Snapper, Scott B; Grimbacher, Bodo; Klein, Christoph

    2009-11-19

    The molecular cause of inflammatory bowel disease is largely unknown. We performed genetic-linkage analysis and candidate-gene sequencing on samples from two unrelated consanguineous families with children who were affected by early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. We screened six additional patients with early-onset colitis for mutations in two candidate genes and carried out functional assays in patients' peripheral-blood mononuclear cells. We performed an allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in one patient. In four of nine patients with early-onset colitis, we identified three distinct homozygous mutations in genes IL10RA and IL10RB, encoding the IL10R1 and IL10R2 proteins, respectively, which form a heterotetramer to make up the interleukin-10 receptor. The mutations abrogate interleukin-10-induced signaling, as shown by deficient STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation on stimulation with interleukin-10. Consistent with this observation was the increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and other proinflammatory cytokines from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from patients who were deficient in IL10R subunit proteins, suggesting that interleukin-10-dependent "negative feedback" regulation is disrupted in these cells. The allogeneic stem-cell transplantation performed in one patient was successful. Mutations in genes encoding the IL10R subunit proteins were found in patients with early-onset enterocolitis, involving hyperinflammatory immune responses in the intestine. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation resulted in disease remission in one patient. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  13. Prediction of disease-related mutations affecting protein localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurila Kirsti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cells contain numerous compartments, which have different protein constituents. Proteins are typically directed to compartments by short peptide sequences that act as targeting signals. Translocation to the proper compartment allows a protein to form the necessary interactions with its partners and take part in biological networks such as signalling and metabolic pathways. If a protein is not transported to the correct intracellular compartment either the reaction performed or information carried by the protein does not reach the proper site, causing either inactivation of central reactions or misregulation of signalling cascades, or the mislocalized active protein has harmful effects by acting in the wrong place. Results Numerous methods have been developed to predict protein subcellular localization with quite high accuracy. We applied bioinformatics methods to investigate the effects of known disease-related mutations on protein targeting and localization by analyzing over 22,000 missense mutations in more than 1,500 proteins with two complementary prediction approaches. Several hundred putative localization affecting mutations were identified and investigated statistically. Conclusion Although alterations to localization signals are rare, these effects should be taken into account when analyzing the consequences of disease-related mutations.

  14. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P weight gain.

  15. Major affective disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease compared with other chronic respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pothirat C

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaicharn Pothirat, Warawut Chaiwong, Nittaya Phetsuk, Sangnual Pisalthanapuna, Nonglak Chetsadaphan, Juthamas InchaiDivision of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailanBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and other chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs have significant impacts on quality of life including psychomotor domain.Purpose: To evaluate three major affective disorders in subjects with COPD compared with other CRDs and nonill population.Materials and methods: The Thai version of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI was used as a diagnostic instrument for three major affective disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and panic disorder by face-to-face interview in assessing patients with CRDs [COPD, asthma, rhinasthma, all asthma (asthma and rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis], and nonill subjects. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine the relation between major affective disorders and CRDs adjusting for age, sex, and disease severity.Results: Major affective disorders were more prevalent in CRDs than nonill groups (adjusted OR =2.6 [95% CI, 1.8-3.9], P<0.001. COPD patients had significantly more generalized anxiety and panic disorder (adjusted OR =4.0 [95% CI, 1.4-11.9], P=0.011, and 4.4 [95% CI, 1.1-18.1], P=0.038, respectively but not major depressive disorder (adjusted OR =2.7 [95% CI, 0.8-9.0, P=0.105] than nonill group. Comparing with all asthma, COPD patients had lower occurrence of major depressive and panic disorders (adjusted OR =0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.4], P=0.002, and 0.1 [95% CI, 0.0-0.9], P=0.043, respectively. There was no difference in major mood disorders in COPD, rhinasthma, and chronic rhinitis patients. Major affective disorders were not increased by disease severity in COPD.Conclusion: Major affective disorders were significantly higher in CRDs than nonill

  16. Multiple-class antimicrobial resistance surveillance in swine Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis isolates from Ontario and the impact of the 2004-2006 Porcine Circovirus type-2 Associated Disease outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass-Kaastra, Shiona K; Pearl, David L; Reid-Smith, Richard; McEwen, Beverly; Slavic, Durda; Fairles, Jim; McEwen, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this work was to describe trends in multiple-class antimicrobial resistance present in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli F4, Pasteurella multocida and Streptococcus suis from Ontario swine 1998-2010. Temporal changes in multiple-class resistance varied by the pathogens examined; significant yearly changes were apparent for the E. coli and P. multocida data. Although not present in the E. coli data, significant increases in multiple-class resistance within P. multocida isolates occurred from 2003 to 2005, coinciding with the expected increase in antimicrobials used to treat clinical signs of Porcine Circovirus Associated Disease (PCVAD) before it was confirmed. Prospective temporal scan statistics for multiple-class resistance suggest that significant clusters of increased resistance may have been found in the spring of 2004; months before the identification of the PCVAD outbreak in the fall of 2004. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Infectious diseases affect marine fisheries and aquaculture economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew; Conrad, Jon M.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Kent, Michael L.; Kuris, Armand M.; Powell, Eric N.; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  18. Infectious diseases affect marine fisheries and aquaculture economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Harvell, C Drew; Conrad, Jon M; Friedman, Carolyn S; Kent, Michael L; Kuris, Armand M; Powell, Eric N; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  19. Infectious Diseases Affect Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew; Conrad, Jon M.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Kent, Michael L.; Kuris, Armand M.; Powell, Eric N.; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  20. Common fish diseases and parasites affecting wild and farmed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Current control strategies to control aquatic pathogens include use of chemo- therapeutants and ... Diagnosis and control of diseases and parasites in aquaculture production systems requires adoption of a ..... plan with enforceable regulatory.

  1. Factors affecting school performance in children with rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arief Hermanu S.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the association between school performance and age, sex, duration of illness, educational achievement prior to illness, socioeconomic status of family, parent’s educational level, number of children in the family and severity of the disease of patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD. Subjects were patients with RHD treated at the Division of Cardiology, Department of Child Health, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital Jakarta. The parameters of school performance were educational achievement, absent of school and dropout. All data were processed by using Epi-Info program to find out bivariate analysis and Statistic Program for Social Sciences (SPSS for multivariate analysis. We obtained 80 patients with RHD; most of them were of mild severity (64 of 80% and the remainder 16 (20% with severe disease. There were 44 (55% males and 36 (45% females. Most parents (42 or 53% had junior high school educational level, most of them, 23 (29% had elementary school education, and 3 (4% illiterate. Bivariate and multivariate analyses showed that severity of disease and parental educational level were associated withschool performance of patients with RHD, but age, sex, duration of disease, premorbid educational achievement, socio-economic level of the family and number of children in family were not.

  2. Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs.

  3. Subjectively impaired bed mobility in Parkinson disease affects sleep efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M.; Sloun, R.J. van; Pevernagie, D.A.; Arends, J.B.; Cluitmans, P.J.; Bloem, B.R.; Overeem, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impaired bed mobility (IBM) may be an important reason for the high prevalence of sleep insomnia in Parkinson disease (PD). Here we assessed the influence of subjectively IBM on both subjective and objective sleep parameters in insomnia PD patients with (PD+IBM) and without (PD-IBM)

  4. Dopaminergic medication affects choice bias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuland, A.J.M. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Dirkx, M.F.M.; Zach, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.; Cools, R.; Ouden, H.E.M. den

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess dopaminergic effects on choice bias in Parkinson's disease (PD). Background: Bradykinesia, rigidity and resting tremor are the core symptoms of PD, but many patients also suffer from cognitive dysfunction. For instance, PD patients have an increased tendency to learn from aversive

  5. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Tatia M. C.; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to co

  6. Dopaminergic medication affects choice bias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuland, A.J.M. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Dirkx, M.F.M.; Zach, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.; Cools, R.; Ouden, H.E.M. den

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess dopaminergic effects on choice bias in Parkinson's disease (PD). Background: Bradykinesia, rigidity and resting tremor are the core symptoms of PD, but many patients also suffer from cognitive dysfunction. For instance, PD patients have an increased tendency to learn from aversive

  7. Environmentally induced, occupational diseases with emphasis on chronic kidney disease of multifactorial origin affecting tropical countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalawansa, Shehani A; Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally induced, occupational diseases are increasing worldwide, especially in rural agricultural communities. Poverty-associated malnutrition, environmental hazards and pollution, and lack of access to clean water, safe sanitation, and modern healthcare facilities are often associated with these chronic illnesses. The authors systematically reviewed occupational public health issues that have been related to the environment. General interpretations of results were included as per the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. Pertinent publications from research databases were reviewed on (A) the risk-benefits, (B) the prevalence of risk factors for various diseases, (C) the benefits of not ignoring the risk factors (i.e., broader evidence), and (D) the risks, effects, and outcomes of different types of interventions. The authors used chronic kidney disease of multifactorial origin (CKDmfo) as an example to explore the theme. Emphasis was given to the regions with emerging economies and developing countries located in the vicinity of the equator. Geographical, socio-economic and aetiological similarities exist for many chronic non-communicable diseases that are affecting tropical countries around the equator. The authors identified manufacturing, mining, and agriculture as the biggest polluters of the environment. In addition, deforestation and associated soil erosion, overuse of agrochemicals, and irresponsible factory discharge (e.g., chemicals and paint, from rubber and textile factories, etc.), all contribute to pollution. To decrease the escalating incidences of environmentally induced diseases, governments should work proactively to protect the environment, especially watersheds, and take steps to minimise harmful occupational exposures and strictly enforce environmental regulations. Creating public awareness of environmental issues and their relationship to public health is essential. This includes

  8. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  9. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  10. Major viral diseases affecting fish aquaculture in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, S I; Rodríguez, S

    1997-06-01

    The number of viruses isolated from fish has grown in the last few years as a reflection of the increasing interest in fish diseases, particularly those occurring in aquaculture facilities. Of all the described viruses, only a few are considered to be of serious concern and economic importance; they are described in this review, drawing special attention to the four families of viruses (Birnaviridae, Rhabdoviridae, Iridoviridae and Reoviridae) that have been reported in Spanish aquaculture. Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus, a member of the first family, is the most spread virus with a prevalence of 39%. Viral diseases are untreatable and because effective and safe vaccines for fish are not yet commercially available, a great care needs to be exercised when moving fish or eggs from one site or country to another. Some fish health control regulations have been legislated in Europe and USA.

  11. Growth charts for patients affected with Morquio A disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaño, Adriana M; Tomatsu, Shunji; Brusius, Ana; Smith, Mary; Orii, Tadao

    2008-05-15

    Children with Morquio A disease grow poorly and become physically handicapped because of systemic bone disease. The purpose of this study was to describe observed growth patterns and their relationship with the physical condition of patients with Morquio A. In a one-center study, questionnaire-based longitudinal and cross sectional data were used to develop growth curves, to assess physical activity and to determine the incidence of surgical procedures in 354 patients with Morquio A. Mean birth lengths of boys and girls were 52.6 and 52.1 cm, respectively. The mean final heights for males and females at 18 years and older were 122.4 +/- 21.5 and 113.1 +/- 22.6 cm, respectively. These results corresponded to -7.4 SD for males and -7.7 SD for females compared to the normal healthy controls. Mean birth weights for boys and girls were 3.59 +/- 0.58 and 3.5 +/- 0.7 kg, respectively. The mean body mass index for males and females at over 18 years of age was 24.7 +/- 6.1 and 25.6 +/- 5.4 kg/m(2), respectively. The growth pattern in Morquio A patients was characterized by impaired growth velocity after 1 year of age. This is the first report providing growth charts for patients with Morquio A, which can help with monitoring the disease and assessing the clinical efficacy of treatments.

  12. Vector-borne pathogens: New and emerging arboviral diseases affecting public health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue and Zika have quickly become two of the most important vector-borne diseases affecting Public health around the world. This presentation will introduce vector-borne diseases and all the vectors implicated. A focus will be made on the most important arboviral diseases (Zika and dengue) describ...

  13. Does Parkinson's disease affect judgement about another person's action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, E; Galpin, A J; Dick, J P R; Tipper, S P

    2010-07-01

    The observer's motor system has been shown to be involved in observing the actions of another person. Recent findings suggest that people with Parkinson's disease do not show the same motor facilitatory effects when observing the actions of another person. We studied whether Parkinson's patients were able to make unspeeded judgements about another person's action. Participants were asked to watch video clips of an actor lifting a box containing different weights (100, 200, 300 or 400 g) and to guess the weight that was being lifted on a 9-point scale. We compared the performance of 16 patients with PD with 16 healthy age-matched controls. Both groups were able to do the task, showing a significant relationship between the real weight and the guessed weight, albeit with a tendency to overestimate the lowest weight and underestimate the heaviest weight. The PD patients, however, showed a reduced slope value. These results show that despite their own motor deficits, PD patients are still able to judge the weight being lifted by another person, albeit with a slight reduction in accuracy. Further research will be required to determine whether PD patients use a motor simulation or a visual compensatory strategy to achieve this.

  14. Girls’ Diets Affect Puberty,Later Disease Risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢钦虢

    2000-01-01

    本刊上期刊登了吴春拂选注的一篇文章,题目是:Dieting May HarmGirl’s IQs。该文标题中的Dieting的意思是“节食”,节食,会降低女孩的智商;而本文标题中的Diets却是“饮食”的意思。本文的主题句就亮出一个或多或少与前文相左的意见: Young girls who consume diets rich in animal protein and fat may be eatingtheir way to an early puberty(青春期)and possibly increasing their risk for chronicdisease later in life. 女孩如果多吃富含动物蛋白质和动物脂肪的食物将过早进入青春期,并可能日后患上慢性疾病的风险。 根据专家的意见,女孩的“健康饮食”应该是:to reduce intakes of saturated(饱和的)fat and red meat and excess calories and to increase fruit/vegetable intakesin children. 如此饮食,其收效是:result in lower breast cancer rates,along with otherhealth benefits. 也许读者不会料到,如此饮食同样存在着“负面作用”:but the risk ofosteoporosis,and perhaps of other diseases,might increase. 两文并读,或者就单读此文,读者朋友就会深感左右为难,无所适从。 其实,深入一步想,这些意见并不矛盾,世界上许多事情都应该一分为二地去看,去思考。

  15. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental changes affecting circulation of neglected tropical diseases in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2015-11-01

    Egypt has been plagued by many neglected tropical diseases since Pharaonic time. These diseases are Schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and fascioliasis beside the epidermal parasitic skin diseases. Indeed, theses diseases still persist as public health problem in the country by the influence of demographic, socioeconomic and environmental obstacles. This study seeks for understanding the contribution of each factor in each obstacle in neglected tropical diseases perpetuation which in turn could help the governorate in planning integrated control strategies. It was found that poverty, unregulated urbanization and inadequate sanitation are important socioeconomic factors that have great effect on the transmission dynamics of the diseases. The environmental factors which affect the epidemiology of these diseases in the country are scarcity of water, construction of dams, land reclamation for agriculture beside the climate factors. Unfortunately, the panic increase in the population growth rate minimizes the efforts done by the governorate to elevate the public health services. These conditions also affect the transmission of epidermal parasitic skin diseases including scabies, head lice and hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans. The control programs and the recommendations to combat the diseases were discussed. The present study showed that the ecological factors affecting each neglected tropical disease in Egypt are somewhat similar which makes it worthy to develop an integrated control approaches aiming at improving the leading factors of neglected tropical diseases circulation in the country.

  16. Factors affecting the sustainability of tick and tick-borne disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Factors affecting the sustainability of tick and tick-borne disease control in. Uganda and ... Appropriate interaction measures, livestock management. Introduction ... and development of viable livestock industry in Africa, due ... a general decline in the back-up services such as dipwash ... products, thus affecting their quality.

  17. Decision Aids for Multiple-Decision Disease Management as Affected by Weather Input Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSS) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and manage...

  18. A Novel Statistical Model to Estimate Host Genetic Effects Affecting Disease Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Osvaldo; Garcia-Cortés, Luis Alberto; Lipschutz-Powell, Debby; Woolliams, John A.; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that genetic diversity can affect the spread of diseases, potentially affecting plant and livestock disease control as well as the emergence of human disease outbreaks. Nevertheless, even though computational tools can guide the control of infectious diseases, few epidemiological models can simultaneously accommodate the inherent individual heterogeneity in multiple infectious disease traits influencing disease transmission, such as the frequently modeled propensity to become infected and infectivity, which describes the host ability to transmit the infection to susceptible individuals. Furthermore, current quantitative genetic models fail to fully capture the heritable variation in host infectivity, mainly because they cannot accommodate the nonlinear infection dynamics underlying epidemiological data. We present in this article a novel statistical model and an inference method to estimate genetic parameters associated with both host susceptibility and infectivity. Our methodology combines quantitative genetic models of social interactions with stochastic processes to model the random, nonlinear, and dynamic nature of infections and uses adaptive Bayesian computational techniques to estimate the model parameters. Results using simulated epidemic data show that our model can accurately estimate heritabilities and genetic risks not only of susceptibility but also of infectivity, therefore exploring a trait whose heritable variation is currently ignored in disease genetics and can greatly influence the spread of infectious diseases. Our proposed methodology offers potential impacts in areas such as livestock disease control through selective breeding and also in predicting and controlling the emergence of disease outbreaks in human populations. PMID:26405030

  19. Normal and mutant HTT interact to affect clinical severity and progression in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aziz, N A; Jurgens, C K; Landwehrmeyer, G B;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HD gene (HTT). We aimed to assess whether interaction between CAG repeat sizes in the mutant and normal allele could affect disease severity and progression. METHODS: Using...... with less severe symptoms and pathology. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing CAG repeat size in normal HTT diminishes the association between mutant CAG repeat size and disease severity and progression in Huntington disease. The underlying mechanism may involve interaction of the polyglutamine domains of normal...

  20. Factors affecting poor nutritional status after small bowel resection in patients with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ki Ung; Yu, Chang Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Park, In Ja; Yoon, Yong Sik; Kim, Chan Wook; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2016-07-01

    In Crohn disease, bowel-preserving surgery is necessary to prevent short bowel syndrome due to repeated operations. This study aimed to determine the remnant small bowel length cut-off and to evaluate the clinical factors related to nutritional status after small bowel resection in Crohn disease.We included 394 patients (69.3% male) who underwent small bowel resection for Crohn disease between 1991 and 2012. Patients who were classified as underweight (body mass index disease, and 105 (26.6%) underwent at least 2 operations for recurrent disease. The mean body mass index and modified nutritional risk index were 20.6 and 100.8, respectively. The independent factors affecting underweight status were remnant small bowel length ≤240 cm (odds ratio: 4.84, P disease (odds ratio: 4.16, P disease (odds ratio: 4.90, P disease, ileostomy, and remnant small bowel length ≤230 cm are risk factors affecting the poor nutritional status of patients with Crohn disease after small bowel resection.

  1. Differential phenolic production in leaves of Vitis vinifera cv. Alvarinho affected with esca disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marta R M; Felgueiras, Mafalda L; Cunha, Ana; Chicau, Gisela; Ferreres, Federico; Dias, Alberto C P

    2017-03-01

    Esca is a destructive disease of complex etiology affecting grapevines worldwide. A major constraint to the study and control of esca is that the disease is not diagnosed until external leaf and/or fruit symptoms are visible; however external symptoms usually appear several years after infection onset. We studied the phenolic content of V. vinifera cv. Alvarinho leaves using high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS)/LC-MS. Leaves from affected cordons with and without visible symptoms (diseased and apparently healthy leaves, respectively) and leaves from asymptomatic cordons (healthy leaves) were analyzed. Application of principal components analysis (PCA) to HPLC data showed a clear separation between diseased, apparently healthy, and healthy leaves, with the apparently healthy leaves clustered in a medial position. Several compounds were highly correlated with diseased leaves indicating a differential phenolic production due to esca disease in V. vinifera cv. Alvarinho leaves. Total phenolic production was shown to significantly increase in diseased leaves, compared to healthy leaves, with apparently healthy leaves containing a medial amount. Trans-caffeoyltartaric acid, trans-coumaroyl-tartaric acid, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-galactoside, kaempferol-3-glucoside and myricetin were identified among the compounds associated with disease and their content shown to change similarly to total phenolic production. This study shows that it is possible to discriminate between diseased, healthy and apparently healthy leaves by applying PCA to HPLC data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic disease management: does the disease affect likelihood of care planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, Agnes I; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Ramsay, Emmae N; Ryan, Philip; Caughey, Gillian E; Esterman, Adrian; Shakib, Sepehr; Gilbert, Andrew L; McDermott, Robyn

    2012-11-01

    To compare the demographic, socioeconomic, and medical characteristics of patients who had a General Practitioner Management Plan (GPMP) with those for patients without GPMP. Cohort study of patients with chronic diseases during the time period 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008 using the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) claims database. Of the 88 128 veterans with chronic diseases included in the study, 23 015 (26%) veterans had a GPMP and 11 089 (13%) had a Team Care Arrangement (TCA). Those with a GPMP had a higher number of comorbidities (P<0.001), and a higher use of services such as health assessment and medicine review (P<0.001) than did those without GPMP. Diabetes was associated with a significantly increased use of GPMP compared with all other chronic diseases except heart failure. GPMPs are used in a minority of patients with chronic diseases. Use is highest in people with diabetes.

  3. PARKINSON'S DISEASE PATIENTS WITH DOMINANT HEMIBODY AFFECTED BY THE DISEASE RELY MORE ON VISION TO MAINTAIN UPRIGHT POSTURAL CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahr, Juliana; Pereira, Marcelo Pinto; Pelicioni, Paulo Henrique Silva; De Morais, Luana Carolina; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2015-12-01

    This study assesses the association between disease onset side (dominant or non-dominant) and vision on postural control of Parkinson's disease patients. Patient volunteers composed two groups, according to the onset side affected: Dominant group (n=9; M age=66.1 yr., SD=7.2; 6 women, 3 men) and Non-dominant group (n=9; M age=67.4 yr., SD=6.4; 6 women, 3 men). The groups' postural control was assessed by posturography during quiet upright stance in two conditions, Eyes open and Eyes closed. Two-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs; group×condition) with repeated measures for the second factor assessed the differences associated with affected hemibody and vision on postural control. Analyses indicated that patients with the dominant side affected also presented significantly greater variation in center of pressure than those with the non-dominant side affected, mainly in the Eyes closed condition. The results demonstrate a higher reliance on vision in the dominant side, possibly to compensate somatosensory system impairments. These results also highlight the importance of analyzing the hemibody affected by the disease when postural control is assessed in this population.

  4. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q; Watson, Thomas C; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N; Jones, Matthew W; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders.

  5. [McArdle disease or glycogen storage disease type v: Should it affect anaesthetic management?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza-Casas, V; Ferreira-Laso, L; Alloza-Fortun, M C; Fraile-Jimenez, A E

    2015-02-01

    McArdle disease is a metabolic myopathy that can may lead to severe perioperative problems. A case is reported of a woman with a history of McArdle disease, who was scheduled for a mastectomy. An understanding of the physiology and pathology, and the application of appropriate preventive measures can avoid complications. A overview of the complications and the management are described. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James R C; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  7. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington's Disease T Lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R C Miller

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington's disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington's disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington's disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington's disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington's disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system.

  8. Activity of Crohn's disease assessed by colour Doppler ultrasound analysis of the affected loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, J M; Maldonado, L; Sanchiz, V; Minguez, M; Benages, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with colour Doppler ultrasound the vascular changes in the wall of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, and to establish whether these changes reflects clinical or biochemical activity of Crohn's disease. Seventy-nine patients with Crohn's disease (44 with active disease and 35 inactive patients) were studied with frequency- and amplitude-encoded duplex Doppler sonography. A group of 35 healthy volunteers were also included. The exam consisted of the search for colour signals in the walls of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, classifying the degree of vascularity with a simple scoring system into three groups: absence of colour signal (score of 0); weak or scattered colour signals (score of 1); and multiple colour signals or clear identification of vessels in the loops walls (score of 2). Doppler curves were obtained of the detected vessels with measurement of the resistive index (RI). There was a visible increase in the gut walls' vascularity in the active patients compared with those with inactive disease. The mean RI was statistically significantly lower in the gut wall vessels of the patients with active illness than that obtained in the inactive patients. Colour Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease.

  9. Fecal calprotectin is equally sensitive in Crohn's disease affecting the small bowel and colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Kjeldsen, Jens; Nathan, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The utility of fecal calprotectin (fCal) in small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) remains to be clarified. The primary aim of this study was to determine levels of fCal in CD restricted to the small bowel compared with CD affecting the colon, in patients undergoing their first diagnostic work...

  10. How does early detection by screening affect disease progression?: Modeling estimated benefits in prostate cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Wever (Elisabeth); G. Draisma (Gerrit); E.A.M. Heijnsdijk (Eveline); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Simulation models are essential tools for estimating benefits of cancer screening programs. Such models include a screening-effect model that represents how early detection by screening followed by treatment affects disease-specific survival. Two commonly used screening-effec

  11. [The White man's burden - a case study caught between bipolar affective disorder and Huntington's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowidi, K; Kunisch, R; Bouna-Pyrrou, P; Meißner, D; Hennig-Fast, K; Weindl, A; Förster, S; Neuhann, T M; Falkai, P; Berger, M; Musil, R

    2013-06-01

    We report upon a case of a 55 year old patient with a bipolar affective disorder, presenting herself with a depressive symptomatology in addition to a severe motor perturbation. The main emphasis upon admittance was perfecting and improving her latest medication. Four weeks prior to her stay at our clinic a thorough neurological examination had taken place in terms of an invalidity pension trial which did not result in any diagnostic findings. Therefore a neurological disease seemed at first highly unlikely. Even though the prior testing was negative, the ensuing neurological examination at our clinic resulted in movement disorders very much indicative of Huntington's Disease. A detailed investigation in regards to the particular family history of the patient was positive for Huntington's Disease. However, whether the patient's mother had also been a genetic carrier of Huntington's Disease was still unknown at the time the patient was admitted to our clinic. It was nevertheless discovered that her mother had also suffered from a bipolar affective disorder. A genetic testing that followed the neurological examination of the patient proved positive for Huntington's Disease. Neuro-imaging resulted in a bicaudate-index of 2.4 (the critical value is 1.8). In a clinical psychological test battery the ensuing results were highly uncommon for patients with solely a bipolar affective disorder people. Under the medical regimen of Quetiapine, Citalopram and Tiaprid the patient's mood could be stabilized and there was some improvement of her motor pertubation.

  12. Ecosystem screening approach for pathogen-associated microorganisms affecting host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiana, Eric; Marais, Antoine; Mura, Catherine; Industri, Benoît; Arbiol, Gilles; Ponchet, Michel

    2011-09-01

    The microbial community in which a pathogen evolves is fundamental to disease outcome. Species interacting with a pathogen on the host surface shape the distribution, density, and genetic diversity of the inoculum, but the role of these species is rarely determined. The screening method developed here can be used to characterize pathogen-associated species affecting disease. This strategy involves three steps: (i) constitution of the microbial community, using the pathogen as a trap; (ii) community selection, using extracts from the pathogen as the sole nutrient source; and (iii) molecular identification and the screening of isolates focusing on their effects on the growth of the pathogen in vitro and host disease. This approach was applied to a soilborne plant pathogen, Phytophthora parasitica, structured in a biofilm, for screening the microbial community from the rhizosphere of Nicotiana tabacum (the host). Two of the characterized eukaryotes interfered with the oomycete cycle and may affect the host disease. A Vorticella species acted through a mutualistic interaction with P. parasitica, disseminating pathogenic material by leaving the biofilm. A Phoma species established an amensal interaction with P. parasitica, strongly suppressing disease by inhibiting P. parasitica germination. This screening method is appropriate for all nonobligate pathogens. It allows the definition of microbial species as promoters or suppressors of a disease for a given biotope. It should also help to identify important microbial relationships for ecology and evolution of pathogens.

  13. The pathology of sponge orange band disease affecting the Caribbean barrel sponge Xestospongia muta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angermeier, Hilde; Kamke, Janine; Abdelmohsen, Usama R; Krohne, Georg; Pawlik, Joseph R; Lindquist, Niels L; Hentschel, Ute

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sponge orange band (SOB) disease affecting the prominent Caribbean sponge Xestospongia muta. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that SOB is accompanied by the massive destruction of the pinacoderm. Chlorophyll a content and the main secondary metabolites, tetrahydrofurans, characteristic of X. muta, were significantly lower in bleached than in healthy tissues. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis using cyanobacteria-specific 16S rRNA gene primers revealed a distinct shift from the Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus clade of sponge symbionts towards several clades of unspecific cyanobacteria, including lineages associated with coral disease (i.e. Leptolyngbya sp.). Underwater infection experiments were conducted by transplanting bleached cores into healthy individuals, but revealed no signs of SOB development. This study provided no evidence for the involvement of a specific microbial pathogen as an etiologic agent of disease; hence, the cause of SOB disease in X. muta remains unidentified.

  14. High antibody titer in an adult with Pompe disease affects treatment with alglucosidase alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Juna M; van der Beek, Nadine A M E; Kroos, Marian A; Ozkan, Lale; van Doorn, Pieter A; Richards, Susan M; Sung, Crystal C C; Brugma, Jan-Dietert C; Zandbergen, Adrienne A M; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2010-12-01

    Clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with alglucosidase alfa in infants, children and adults with Pompe disease. Recent studies have shown that high antibody titers can occur in patients receiving ERT and counteract the effect of treatment. This particularly occurs in those patients with classic-infantile Pompe disease that do not produce any endogenous acid α-glucosidase (CRIM-negative). It is still unclear to what extent antibody formation affects the outcome of ERT in adults with residual enzyme activity. We present the case of a patient with adult-onset Pompe disease. He was diagnosed at the age of 39years by enzymatic testing (10.7% residual activity in fibroblasts) and DNA analysis (genotype: c.-32-13T>G/p.Trp516X). Infusion-associated reactions occurred during ERT and the patient's disease progressed. Concurrently, the antibody titer rose to a similarly high level as reported for some CRIM-negative patients with classic-infantile Pompe disease. Using newly developed immunologic-assays we could calculate that approximately 40% of the administered alglucosidase alfa was captured by circulating antibodies. Further, we could demonstrate that uptake of alglucosidase alfa by cultured fibroblasts was inhibited by admixture of the patient's serum. This case demonstrates that also patients with an appreciable amount of properly folded and catalytically active endogenous acid α-glucosidase can develop antibodies against alglucosidase alfa that affect the response to ERT.

  15. Efficacy of risedronate in a post-menopausal woman affected by osteoporosis and inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palomba

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a skeletal disease that can be asymptomatic and is sometimes underdiagnosed and undertreated. Post-menopausal osteoporosis can be associated with fractures and consequent impaired quality of life and increase of health care costs. Bisphosphonates are a therapeutic choice, because they proved to be effective in preventing bone loss. The current case report shows the efficacy of six-month risedronate administration in a post-menopausal woman affected by osteoporosis and inflammatory bowel disease in reducing biochemical bone turnover markers and increasing bone mineral density.

  16. Cultivars of tulip affected by tulip necrotic disease caused by tobacco necrosis virus in commercial field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahata, K.; Kusaba, T.; Mukobata, H.

    1983-08-01

    This paper represents the name of cultivars in which typical symptoms of tulip necrotic disease have been shown in commercial fields. Within 1976-1983 growing seasons, the authors observed fifty cultivars having the symptoms on their ground parts of tulips and it seemed that cultivars which belong to classes of Truimph, Darwin, Darwin Hybrid and Double Late were highly susceptible to tulip necrotic disease. It was also recognized that, most of affected cultivars flowered in mid or late April, and a few in early April.

  17. Effects of a disease affecting a predator on the dynamics of a predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Pierre; McHich, Rachid; Chowdhury, Tanmay; Sallet, Gauthier; Tchuente, Maurice; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2009-06-07

    We study the effects of a disease affecting a predator on the dynamics of a predator-prey system. We couple an SIRS model applied to the predator population, to a Lotka-Volterra model. The SIRS model describes the spread of the disease in a predator population subdivided into susceptible, infected and removed individuals. The Lotka-Volterra model describes the predator-prey interactions. We consider two time scales, a fast one for the disease and a comparatively slow one for predator-prey interactions and for predator mortality. We use the classical "aggregation method" in order to obtain a reduced equivalent model. We show that there are two possible asymptotic behaviors: either the predator population dies out and the prey tends to its carrying capacity, or the predator and prey coexist. In this latter case, the predator population tends either to a "disease-free" or to a "disease-endemic" state. Moreover, the total predator density in the disease-endemic state is greater than the predator density in the "disease-free" equilibrium (DFE).

  18. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Pycnopodia helianthoides (Asteroidea) Affected by Sea Star Wasting Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudenkauf, Brent M; Hewson, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Sea star wasting disease (SSWD) describes a suite of symptoms reported in asteroids of the North American Pacific Coast. We performed a metatranscriptomic survey of asymptomatic and symptomatic sunflower star (Pycnopodia helianthoides) body wall tissues to understand holobiont gene expression in tissues affected by SSWD. Metatranscriptomes were highly variable between replicate libraries, and most differentially expressed genes represented either transcripts of associated microorganisms (particularly Pseudomonas and Vibrio relatives) or low-level echinoderm transcripts of unknown function. However, the pattern of annotated host functional genes reflects enhanced apoptotic and tissue degradation processes and decreased energy metabolism, while signalling of death-related proteins was greater in asymptomatic and symptomatic tissues. Our results suggest that the body wall tissues of SSWD-affected asteroids may undergo structural changes during disease progression, and that they are stimulated to undergo autocatalytic cell death processes.

  19. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Pycnopodia helianthoides (Asteroidea Affected by Sea Star Wasting Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent M Gudenkauf

    Full Text Available Sea star wasting disease (SSWD describes a suite of symptoms reported in asteroids of the North American Pacific Coast. We performed a metatranscriptomic survey of asymptomatic and symptomatic sunflower star (Pycnopodia helianthoides body wall tissues to understand holobiont gene expression in tissues affected by SSWD. Metatranscriptomes were highly variable between replicate libraries, and most differentially expressed genes represented either transcripts of associated microorganisms (particularly Pseudomonas and Vibrio relatives or low-level echinoderm transcripts of unknown function. However, the pattern of annotated host functional genes reflects enhanced apoptotic and tissue degradation processes and decreased energy metabolism, while signalling of death-related proteins was greater in asymptomatic and symptomatic tissues. Our results suggest that the body wall tissues of SSWD-affected asteroids may undergo structural changes during disease progression, and that they are stimulated to undergo autocatalytic cell death processes.

  20. Does coral disease affect symbiodinium? Investigating the impacts of growth anomaly on symbiont photophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Henrik Robert Burns

    Full Text Available Growth anomaly (GA is a commonly observed coral disease that impairs biological functions of the affected tissue. GA is prevalent at Wai 'ōpae tide pools, southeast Hawai 'i Island. Here two distinct forms of this disease, Type A and Type B, affect the coral, Montiporacapitata. While the effects of GA on biology and ecology of the coral host are beginning to be understood, the impact of this disease on the photophysiology of the dinoflagellate symbiont, Symbiodinium spp., has not been investigated. The GA clearly alters coral tissue structure and skeletal morphology and density. These tissue and skeletal changes are likely to modify not only the light micro-environment of the coral tissue, which has a direct impact on the photosynthetic potential of Symbiodinium spp., but also the physiological interactions within the symbiosis. This study utilized Pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry (PAM to characterize the photophysiology of healthy and GA-affected M. capitata tissue. Overall, endosymbionts within GA-affected tissue exhibit reduced photochemical efficiency. Values of both Fv/Fm and ΔF/ Fm' were significantly lower (p<0.01 in GA tissue compared to healthy and unaffected tissues. Tracking the photophysiology of symbionts over a diurnal time period enabled a comparison of symbiont responses to photosynthetically available radiation (PAR among tissue conditions. Symbionts within GA tissue exhibited the lowest values of ΔF/Fm' as well as the highest pressure over photosystem II (p<0.01. This study provides evidence that the symbionts within GA-affected tissue are photochemically compromised compared to those residing in healthy tissue.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue are not affected by renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E J; de Klein, Annelies; Douben, Hannie; Korevaar, Sander S; Mensah, Fane K F; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are a potential therapeutic agent in renal disease and kidney transplantation. Autologous cell use in kidney transplantation is preferred to avoid anti-HLA reactivity; however, the influence of renal disease on mesenchymal stem cells is unknown. To investigate the feasibility of autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease, we isolated these cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy controls and patients with renal disease and compared them phenotypically and functionally. The mesenchymal stem cells from both groups showed similar morphology and differentiation capacity, and were both over 90% positive for CD73, CD105, and CD166, and negative for CD31 and CD45. They demonstrated comparable population doubling times, rates of apoptosis, and were both capable of inhibiting allo-antigen- and anti-CD3/CD28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. In response to immune activation they both increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. These mesenchymal stem cells were genetically stable after extensive expansion and, importantly, were not affected by uremic serum. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells of patients with renal disease have similar characteristics and functionality as those from healthy controls. Hence, our results indicate the feasibility of their use in autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease.

  2. Identification of histological patterns in clinically affected and unaffected palm regions in dupuytren's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo-Andrés Alfonso-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Dupuytren's disease is a fibro-proliferative disease characterized by a disorder of the extracellular matrix (ECM and high myofibroblast proliferation. However, studies failed to determine if the whole palm fascia is affected by the disease. The objective of this study was to analyze several components of the extracellular matrix of three types of tissues-Dupuytren's diseased contracture cords (DDC, palmar fascia clinically unaffected by Dupuytren's disease contracture (NPF, and normal forehand fascia (NFF. Histological analysis, quantification of cells recultured from each type of tissue, mRNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry for smooth muscle actin (SMA, fibrillar ECM components and non-fibrillar ECM components were carried out. The results showed that DDC samples had abundant fibrosis with reticular fibers and few elastic fibers, high cell proliferation and myofibroblasts, laminin and glycoproteins, whereas NFF did not show any of these findings. Interestingly, NPF tissues had more cells showing myofibroblasts differentiation and more collagen and reticular fibers, laminin and glycoproteins than NFF, although at lower level than DDC, with similar elastic fibers than DDC. Immunohistochemical expression of decorin was high in DDC, whereas versican was highly expressed NFF, with no differences for aggrecan. Cluster analysis revealed that the global expression profile of NPF was very similar to DDC, and reculturing methods showed that cells corresponding to DDC tissues proliferated more actively than NPF, and NPF more actively than NFF. All these results suggest that NPF tissues may be affected, and that a modification of the therapeutic approach used for the treatment of Dupuytren's disease should be considered.

  3. Transcriptomic analysis of molecular responses in Malus domestica 'M26' roots affected by apple replant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Stefan; Bartsch, Melanie; Winkelmann, Traud

    2017-06-01

    Gene expression studies in roots of apple replant disease affected plants suggested defense reactions towards biotic stress to occur which did not lead to adequate responses to the biotic stressors. Apple replant disease (ARD) leads to growth inhibition and fruit yield reduction in replanted populations and results in economic losses for tree nurseries and fruit producers. The etiology is not well understood on a molecular level and causal agents show a great diversity indicating that no definitive cause, which applies to the majority of cases, has been found out yet. Hence, it is pivotal to gain a better understanding of the molecular and physiological reactions of the plant when affected by ARD and later to overcome the disease, for example by developing tolerant rootstocks. For the first time, gene expression was investigated in roots of ARD affected plants employing massive analysis of cDNA ends (MACE) and RT-qPCR. In reaction to ARD, genes in secondary metabolite production as well as plant defense, regulatory and signaling genes were upregulated whereas for several genes involved in primary metabolism lower expression was detected. For internal verification of MACE data, candidate genes were tested via RT-qPCR and a strong positive correlation between both datasets was observed. Comparison of apple 'M26' roots cultivated in ARD soil or γ-irradiated ARD soil suggests that typical defense reactions towards biotic stress take place in ARD affected plants but they did not allow responding to the biotic stressors attack adequately, leading to the observed growth depressions in ARD variants.

  4. How glyphosate affects plant disease development: it is more than enhanced susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Ray

    2017-01-09

    Glyphosate has been shown to affect the development of plant disease in several ways. Plants utilize phenolic and other shikimic acid pathway-derived compounds as part of their defense against pathogens, and glyphosate inhibits the biosynthesis of these compounds via its mode of action. Several studies have shown a correlation between enhanced disease and suppression of phenolic compound production after glyphosate. Glyphosate-resistant crop plants have also been studied for changes in resistance as a result of carrying the glyphosate resistance trait. The evidence indicates that neither the resistance trait nor application of glyphosate to glyphosate-resistant plants increases susceptibility to disease. The only exceptions to this are cases where glyphosate has been shown to reduce rust diseases on glyphosate-resistant crops, supporting a fungicidal role for this chemical. Finally, glyphosate treatment of weeds or volunteer crops can cause a temporary increase in soil-borne pathogens that may result in disease development if crops are planted too soon after glyphosate application. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Decision aids for multiple-decision disease management as affected by weather input errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfender, W F; Gent, D H; Mahaffee, W F; Coop, L B; Fox, A D

    2011-06-01

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSSs) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation, or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and management decision recommendations. The extent to which errors in weather inputs affect the quality of the final management outcome depends on a number of aspects of the disease management context, including whether management consists of a single dichotomous decision, or of a multi-decision process extending over the cropping season(s). Decision aids for multi-decision disease management typically are based on simple or complex algorithms of weather data which may be accumulated over several days or weeks. It is difficult to quantify accuracy of multi-decision DSSs due to temporally overlapping disease events, existence of more than one solution to optimizing the outcome, opportunities to take later recourse to modify earlier decisions, and the ongoing, complex decision process in which the DSS is only one component. One approach to assessing importance of weather input errors is to conduct an error analysis in which the DSS outcome from high-quality weather data is compared with that from weather data with various levels of bias and/or variance from the original data. We illustrate this analytical approach for two types of DSS, an infection risk index for hop powdery mildew and a simulation model for grass stem rust. Further exploration of analysis methods is needed to address problems associated with assessing uncertainty in multi-decision DSSs.

  6. Pattern of complications and burden of disease in patients affected by beta thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifazi, Fedele; Conte, Rosa; Baiardi, Paola; Bonifazi, Donato; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Giordano, Paola; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Iacono, Angela; Padula, Rosa; Pepe, Alessia; Caterina Putti, Maria; Ruggieri, Lucia; Carlo Del Vecchio, Giovanni; Filosa, Aldo; Maggio, Aurelio; Ceci, Adriana

    2017-08-01

    Despite the correct application of blood transfusions and chelation treatments, beta thalassemia patients have many complications. Systematic population analyses on types and frequency of these complications are very few. The aim of this study is to characterize the complications, their risk factors and their clinical and economic impact. Complications at baseline and events occurring during one observational year were analyzed in 272 patients aged >12 years. Risk factors were analyzed through chi-squared and unpaired t tests. Logistic regression was applied to perform the risk factors multivariate analysis. A total of 554 complications (1-6 per patient) affected 82.3% of patients. Cardiac complications were less represented than expected. Musculoskeletal diseases were the most represented complications followed by hepatic, sexual and endocrine diseases. Splenectomized patients, born before 1970 and aged >40 years, starting iron chelation therapy when aged >4 years or after receiving more than 20 blood transfusions, presented a significantly higher number of complications. A total of 885 adverse events requiring 34125 additional medical services occurred in 1 year. Of these, 34.9% were related to treatments and 65.1% to other causes. Event numbers, additional medical interventions and cost increased progressively in patients affected by one or more complication compared to patients with no complications. The pattern of complications changes according to birth cohort and differentiates older from younger patients. The burden of the disease and its costs increase after the onset of the first complication, therefore prevention of complications is fundamental in these patients.

  7. Further analysis of previously implicated linkage regions for Alzheimer's disease in affected relative pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannfelt Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide linkage studies for Alzheimer's disease have implicated several chromosomal regions as potential loci for susceptibility genes. Methods In the present study, we have combined a selection of affected relative pairs (ARPs from the UK and the USA included in a previous linkage study by Myers et al. (Am J Med Genet, 2002, with ARPs from Sweden and Washington University. In this total sample collection of 397 ARPs, we have analyzed linkage to chromosomes 1, 9, 10, 12, 19 and 21, implicated in the previous scan. Results The analysis revealed that linkage to chromosome 19q13 close to the APOE locus increased considerably as compared to the earlier scan. However, linkage to chromosome 10q21, which provided the strongest linkage in the previous scan could not be detected. Conclusion The present investigation provides yet further evidence that 19q13 is the only chromosomal region consistently linked to Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Evaluation of Neurodevelopment and Factors Affecting it in Children With Acyanotic Congenital Cardiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Ozmen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The rate of congenital heart disease is 0.8% in all live births. The majority of this, however, is acyanotic congenital heart disease. The survival rate of children with cardiac disease has increased with the developments provided in recent years and their lifetime is extended. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate neurodevelopment of children with uncomplicated acyanotic congenital heart disease in preschool period and determine the factors affecting their neurodevelopmental process. Patients and Methods: 132 children with acyanotic congenital heart disease aged 6 - 72 months were involved in the study. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients under 2 years old were assessed by using Bayley Development Scale-III, and Stanford Binet Intelligence test was employed for patients over 2 years old. Denver Developmental Screening Test II was applied to all patients for their personal-social, fine motor, gross motor and language development. Results: The average age of patients (67 girls, 65 boys included in the study was 35.2 ± 19.6 months. It was determined that there were subnormal mental level in 13 (10% patients and at least one specific developmental disorder in 33 (25% patients. Bayley Mental Development Scale score of patients who had received incubator care in perinatal period was found significantly low (88 ± 4.2 compared to those with no incubator care (93.17 ± 8.5 (P = 0.028. Low educational level of father was established to be linked with low mental development scores at the age of 2 and following that age (P < 0.05. Iron deficiency anemia was discovered to be related to low psychometric test scores at every age (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Neurodevelopmental problems in children with acyanotic congenital heart disease were found higher compared to those in society. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients were determined to be closely associated with receiving incubator care, father’s educational

  9. Sensorineural Hearing Affection In Sickle Cell Disease Patients With Chronic Renal Failure Under Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Abdelwhab Saeed MD*, Magdy M El Sharkawy

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the problem of hearing loss in patients of chronic renal failure on regular haemodialysis and The factors which affect it. And to study the effect of sickle cell disease on hearing loss. we studied hearing loss in dialysis patients, sickle cell disease patients and patients of sickle cell disease with chronic renal failure under dialysis compared to normal control subjects. Design: !"",include sickle cell disease patients with chronic renal fa"# $%& ' ", i ,nclude ( # #"# $%&'", , ,( #&'", i 9nclude the normal *+&*+' All groups are subjected to full history, thorough clinical examination including neurological and ENT examination, investigations includes Hb, s. creatinine, s.albumen, s.calcium and calculation of kt/v for dialysis patients. Full audiological assessment, using #,-GSI audiometer was done for all groups with special concentration at frequency of - .Results: hearing loss was found in patients with chronic renal failure more than normal control. Patient with sickle cell disease have hearing disorders significantly higher than $/%- .% 0( # #cell disease have significantly. Marked degree of SNHL than those with SCD only. Hearing loss in patients with 12( # * 3 &4 !4! '#"#"patients with chronic renal failure with or without SCD correlate with duration of dialysis , presence of peripheral neuropathy, s. calcium level, efficiency of dialysis marked by kt/v. Conclusion and recommendation: hearing disorder is common in patients with chronic renal failure under regular haemodialysis and it increase with duration of dialysis it should be suspected if there is Peripheral neuropathy. It can be reduced with efficient dialysis, correction of anemia, adjustment of calcium level. Patients with SCD suffer also some degree of hearing loss especially at higher frequency and this degree of hearing loss

  10. Analysis of Newcastle disease virus quasispecies and factors affecting the emergence of virulent virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattenbelt, Jacqueline A; Stevens, Matthew P; Selleck, Paul W; Gould, Allan R

    2010-10-01

    Genome sequence analysis of a number of avirulent field isolates of Newcastle disease virus revealed the presence of viruses (within their quasispecies) that contained virulent F0 sequences. Detection of these virulent sequences below the ~1% level, using standard cloning and sequence analysis, proved difficult, and thus a more sensitive reverse-transcription real-time PCR procedure was developed to detect both virulent and avirulent NDV F0 sequences. Reverse-transcription real-time PCR analysis of the quasispecies of a number of Newcastle disease virus field isolates, revealed variable ratios (approximately 1:4-1:4,000) of virulent to avirulent viral F0 sequences. Since the ratios of these sequences generally remained constant in the quasispecies population during replication, factors that could affect the balance of virulent to avirulent sequences during viral infection of birds were investigated. It was shown both in vitro and in vivo that virulent virus present in the quasispecies did not emerge from the "avirulent background" unless a direct selection pressure was placed on the quasispecies, either by growth conditions or by transient immunosuppression. The effect of a prior infection of the host by infectious bronchitis virus or infectious bursal disease virus on the subsequent emergence of virulent Newcastle disease virus was examined.

  11. A study of the risk for Alzheimer’s disease in first-degree relatives of patients with affective disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文炜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in first-degree relatives of patients with affective disorders,and to evaluate the risk of AD in firstdegree relatives of the patients with affective disorders.Methods Patients with affective disorders meeting"DSM-Ⅳ-TR"criteria (affective disorders group) and their healthy spouses (conrol group) were recruited in this study (n=109 each) .The first-degree relatives in-

  12. Conditional dependence between tests affects the diagnosis and surveillance of animal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, I.A.; Stryhn, Henrik; Lind, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Dependence between the sensitivities or specificities of pairs of tests affects the sensitivity and specificity of tests when used in combination. Compared with values expected if tests are conditionally independent, a positive dependence in test sensitivity reduces the sensitivity of parallel te...... for toxoplasmosis and brucellosis in swine, and Johne's disease in cattle to illustrate calculation methods and to indicate the likely magnitude of the dependence between serologic tests used for diagnosis and surveillance of animal diseases.......Dependence between the sensitivities or specificities of pairs of tests affects the sensitivity and specificity of tests when used in combination. Compared with values expected if tests are conditionally independent, a positive dependence in test sensitivity reduces the sensitivity of parallel test...... interpretation and a positive dependence in test specificity reduces the specificity of serial interpretation. We calculate conditional covariances as a measure of dependence between binary tests and show their relationship to kappa (a chance-corrected measure of test agreement). We use published data...

  13. Vaccination against foot-and-mouth disease: do initial conditions affect its benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Porphyre

    Full Text Available When facing incursion of a major livestock infectious disease, the decision to implement a vaccination programme is made at the national level. To make this decision, governments must consider whether the benefits of vaccination are sufficient to outweigh potential additional costs, including further trade restrictions that may be imposed due to the implementation of vaccination. However, little consensus exists on the factors triggering its implementation on the field. This work explores the effect of several triggers in the implementation of a reactive vaccination-to-live policy when facing epidemics of foot-and-mouth disease. In particular, we tested whether changes in the location of the incursion and the delay of implementation would affect the epidemiological benefit of such a policy in the context of Scotland. To reach this goal, we used a spatial, premises-based model that has been extensively used to investigate the effectiveness of mitigation procedures in Great Britain. The results show that the decision to vaccinate, or not, is not straightforward and strongly depends on the underlying local structure of the population-at-risk. With regards to disease incursion preparedness, simply identifying areas of highest population density may not capture all complexities that may influence the spread of disease as well as the benefit of implementing vaccination. However, if a decision to vaccinate is made, we show that delaying its implementation in the field may markedly reduce its benefit. This work provides guidelines to support policy makers in their decision to implement, or not, a vaccination-to-live policy when facing epidemics of infectious livestock disease.

  14. Did depressive symptoms affect recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Vélez Feijó

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Vélez Feijó1, Carlos RM Rieder3, Márcia LF Chaves21Medical Sciences Post-Graduate Course; 2Internal Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; 3Movement Disorders Clinic Coordinator, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, BrazilObjective: Evaluate the influence of depressive symptoms on the recognition of emotional prosody in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients, and identify types of emotion on spoken sentences.Methods: Thirty-five PD patients and 65 normal participants were studied. Dementia was checked with the Mini Mental State Examination, Clinical Dementia Rating scale, and DSM IV. Recognition of emotional prosody was tested by asking subjects to listen to 12 recorded statements with neutral affective content that were read with a strong affective expression. Subjects had to recognize the correct emotion by one of four descriptors (angry, sad, cheerful, and neutral. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI was employed to rate depressive symptoms with the cutoff 14.Results: Total ratings of emotions correctly recognized by participants below and above the BDI cutoff were similar among PD patients and normal individuals. PD patients who correctly identified neutral and anger inflections presented higher rates of depressive symptoms (p = 0.011 and 0.044, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the normal group.Conclusions: Depression may modify some modalities of emotional prosody perception in PD, by increasing the perception of non-pleasant emotions or lack of affection, such as anger or indifference.Keywords: emotional prosody, Parkinson’s disease, depression, emotion

  15. NOD2 and ATG16L1 polymorphisms affect monocyte responses in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dylan M Glubb; Richard B Gearry; Murray L Barclay; Rebecca L Roberts; John Pearson; Jacqui I Keenan; Judy McKenzie; Robert W Bentley

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether polymorphisms in NOD2 and ATG16L1 affect cytokine responses and mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) survival in monocytes from Crohn's disease (CD) patients.METHODS: Monocytes were isolated from peripheral blood of CD patients of known genotype for common single nucleotide polymorphisms of NOD2 and ATG16L1 .Monocytes were challenged with MAP and bacterial persistence assessed at subsequent time-points. Cytokine responses were assayed using a Milliplex multi-analyte profiling assay for 13 cytokines.RESULTS: Monocytes heterozygous for a NOD2 polymorphism (R702W, P268S, or 1007fs) were more permissive for growth of MAP (P = 0.045) than those without. There was no effect of NOD2 genotype on subsequent cytokine expression. The T300A polymorphism of ATG16L1 did not affect growth of MAP in our model (P= 0.175), but did increase expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-10 (P = 0.047) and IL-6 (P = 0.019).CONCLUSION: CD-associated polymorphisms affected the elimination of MAP from ex vivo monocytes (NOD2 ), or expression of certain cytokines (ATG16L1 ), implying independent but contributory roles in the pathogenesis of CD.

  16. The Citicholinage Study: Citicoline Plus Cholinesterase Inhibitors in Aged Patients Affected with Alzheimer's Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareri, Pietro; Castagna, Alberto; Cotroneo, Antonino Maria; Putignano, Daria; Conforti, Raffaele; Santamaria, Francesco; Marino, Saverio; Putignano, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Citicoline can have beneficial effects both in degenerative and in vascular cognitive decline in a variety of ways (apoptosis inhibition, neuroplasticity potentiation, phospholipid, and acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis). Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) have been used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). When co-administered with cholinergic precursors, they are able to increase the intrasynaptic levels of ACh more than when the single drugs given alone. The aim of the present study was to show the effectiveness of oral citicoline plus AChEIs in patients affected with AD. This was a retrospective multi-centric case-control study, involving seven Centers for Cognitive Impairment and Dementia in Italy, on 448 consecutive patients aged 65 years old or older affected with AD. 197 patients were treated with an AChEI while 251 were treated with an AchEI + citicoline 1000 mg/day given orally. Cognitive functions were assessed by MMSE, daily life functions by ADL and IADL, behavioral symptoms by NPI, comorbidities by CIRS, and mood by GDS-short form. Tests were administered at baseline (T0), after 3 (T1), and 9 months (T2). The primary outcomes were effects of combined administration versus AChEIs given alone on cognitive functions assessed by MMSE. The secondary outcomes were possible side effects or adverse events of combination therapy versus AChEIs alone. Patients treated with citicoline plus an AChEI showed a statistically significant increase in MMSE between T0 and T1 (16.88±3.38 versus 17.62±3.64; p = 0.000) and between T1 and T2 (17.62±3.64 versus 17.89±3.54; p = 0.000). The present study encourages the role of combined administration in disease management by slowing disease progression.

  17. Risk of cancer onset in sub-Saharan Africans affected with chronic gastrointestinal parasitic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waku, M; Napolitano, L; Clementini, E; Staniscia, T; Spagnolli, C; Andama, A; Kasiriye, P; Innocenti, P

    2005-01-01

    Gastrointestinal Schistosomiasis and Amebiasis are uncommon in the western world, while such infections are frequent in the African community. In addition to the problems associated with the clinical symptoms of these parasitic infections, it is important to stress the increase in cancer of the Gastro-Intestinal (GI) tract. In this study we evaluate the prevalence of cancer in patients affected by chronic inflammatory diseases caused by the above named parasites. In three years, from January 2000 to December 2003, we observed a total of 1199 subject. Of these, 950 presented with complaints of diarrhoea, vomiting, abdominal pain, melena, hematemesis, rectal discharges and alteration of bowel habits. A total of 818 patients were evaluated in Uganda (Mulago and Arua hospitals) and 381 at Luisa Guidotti Hospital in Zimbabwe. An exhaustive clinical history was collected for each patient and then physical and laboratory examinations were performed. The clinical files of all patients previously admitted to the respective hospitals were obtained and the information taken from these files was then integrated with our clinical findings. Subjects who were found free of gastro-intestinal disease after examinations and did not have a clinical history of infective GI disease but presented with other pathologies, were regarded as control group. The control group was composed of 249 subjects. The subjects who were positive on examination underwent further investigations. The number of patients affected by schistosomiasis and amebiasis were 221 and 224 respectively. The number of patients who suffered from aspecific enterocolitis was 454, intestinal tuberculosis was present in 21 patients and we found 30 patients with esophageal candidiasis. Patients who had the above mentioned GI diseases were then divided into 3 groups. First group was composed of patients who had a clinical history of infective GI diseases and were re-admitted for similar symptoms, and on examination were

  18. Clinical Factors affecting Minor Amputation in Diabetic Foot Disease at Tengku Ampuan Afzan Hospital, Kuantan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZAKARIA, Zamzuri; AFIFI, Mustaqim; SHARIFUDIN, Mohd Ariff

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot disease poses a substantial problem in Malaysian diabetic population. We evaluate the clinical factors affecting minor amputation in diabetic foot disease. Methods: A cross-sectional study enrolling patients admitted to orthopaedic wards of a single tertiary hospital for diabetic foot disease was conducted. Patients who had undergone major amputation or with medical condition above the ankle joint were not included. Clinical data were collected by measurement of ankle brachial systolic index and Semmes-Weinstein 5.07 gauge monofilament test with foot clinical evaluation using King’s classification respectively. Results: The total number of patients included was 138, with mean age of 59.7 years (range 29 to 94 years old). Fifty patients (36.2%) had minor amputations. Poor compliance to diabetic treatment, King’s classification stage 5, low measures of ankle brachial systolic index, sensory neuropathy, high serum C-Reactive protein and high serum creatinine are significant predictive factors for minor amputation (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Identifying these risk factors may help in prevention of minor amputation and subsequently reduce limb loss in diabetic foot. PMID:26023294

  19. Spatiotemporal and species-specific patterns of diseases affecting crustose coralline algae in Curaçao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, G.; Steneck, R. S.; Nugues, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Distribution and abundance of coral diseases have been well documented, but only a few studies considered diseases affecting crustose coralline algae (CCA), particularly at the species level. We investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of diseases affecting CCA along the south coast of Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Two syndromes were detected: the Coralline White Band Syndrome (CWBS) previously described and the Coralline White Patch Disease (CWPD) reported here for the first time. Diseases were present at all six study sites, and our results did not reveal a relationship between disease occurrence and human influence. Both diseases were more prevalent on the shallower reef flat than on the deeper reef slope, and during the warm/rainy season than during the cold/dry season. The patterns observed were consistent with a positive link between temperature and disease occurrence. Reef flat communities were dominated by Neogoniolithon mamillare and Paragoniolithon solubile, whereas deeper habitats were dominated by Hydrolithon boergesenii. Diseases affected all the species encountered, and no preferable host was detected. There was a significant relationship between both disease occurrences and CCA cover. Monitoring of affected patches revealed that 90 % of lesions in CWBS increased in size, whereas 88 % of CWPD lesions regenerated over time. CWBS linear progression rate did not vary between seasons or species and ranged from 0.15 to 0.36 cm month-1, which is in the same order of magnitude as rates previously documented. We conclude that diseases have the potential to cause major loss in CCA cover, particularly in shallow waters. As CCA play a key role in reef ecosystems, our study suggests that the emergence of diseases affecting these algae may pose a real threat to coral reef ecosystems. The levels of disease reported here will provide a much-needed local baseline allowing future comparisons.

  20. Predictive value of social inhibition and negative affectivity for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Vrints, Christiaan J

    2014-01-01

    Methodological considerations and selected null findings indicate the need to reexamine the Type D construct. We investigated whether associations with cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) involve the specific combination of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition...

  1. Visual function improvement using photocromic and selective blue-violet light filtering spectacle lenses in patients affected by retinal diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L Colombo; E Melardi; P Ferri; G Montesano; S Samir Attaalla; F Patelli; S De Cilla; G Savaresi; L Rossetti

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate functional visual parameters using photocromic and selective blue-violet light filtering spectacle lenses in patients affected by central or peripheral scotoma due to retinal diseases...

  2. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L;

    2016-01-01

    , variations in fiber size, vacuoles, and some internal nuclei associated with cytosolic glycogen accumulation and ongoing regeneration; structural damage was seen only in a minority of human patients. Neither liver nor brain isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase were upregulated in muscles, thus providing...... no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus......McArdle disease (muscle glycogenosis type V) is caused by myophosphorylase deficiency, which leads to impaired glycogen breakdown. We investigated how myophosphorylase deficiency affects muscle physiology, morphology, and glucose metabolism in 20-week-old McArdle mice and compared the findings...

  3. Positive Affect and Survival in Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease : Findings From the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoen, Petra W.; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Peter; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Positive affect can improve survival, but the mechanisms responsible for this association are unknown. We sought to evaluate the association between positive affect and mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease and to determine biological and behavioral factors that might e

  4. Proteomics of juvenile senegal sole (Solea senegalensis) affected by gas bubble disease in hyperoxygenated ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Leiton, E; Cánovas-Conesa, B; Zerolo, R; López-Barea, J; Cañavate, J P; Alhama, J

    2009-01-01

    Solea senegalensis is a commercial flat fish traditionally farmed in earth ponds in coastal wetlands that might also become important to more intensive aquaculture. Gas bubble disease (GBD) is a potential risk for outdoor fish farming, particularly in certain periods of the year, related to improper management leading to macroalgae blooms. Physical-chemical conditions inducing hyperoxia, including radiation, temperature, and high levels of dissolved oxygen, have been monitored in fish affected by GBD together with observed symptoms. Exophthalmia, subcutaneous emphysemas, obstruction of gill lamellae, hemorrhages, and anomalous swimming were the main effects of oxygen supersaturation. A proteomic study was carried out for the first time under aquaculture conditions and protein expression changes are described for fish that were subject to hyperoxic conditions. Proteins identified in gill of GBD-affected fish are related to oxidative alteration of cytoskeleton structure/function (beta-tubulin, beta-actin), motility (light myosin chain, alpha-tropomyosin), or regulatory pathways (calmodulin, Raf kinase inhibitor protein), reflecting the central role of gill in oxygen exchange. Hepatic proteins identified are related to protein oxidative damages (beta-globin, FABPs), protection from oxidative stress (DCXR, GNMT), and inflammatory response (C3), in agreement with the predominant metabolic role of liver. Comparison of protein expression patterns and protein identification are suggested as potentially specific hyperoxia biomarkers that would facilitate prevention of GBD outbreaks.

  5. The effect of cognitive status and visuospatial performance on affective theory of mind in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinlay, Audrey; Albicini, Michelle; Kavanagh, Phillip S

    2013-01-01

    It is now well accepted that theory of mind (ToM) functioning is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. However, what remain unknown are the functions that underlie this impairment. It has been suggested that cognitive skills may be key in this area of functioning; however, many of the cognitive tests used to assess this have relied on intact visuospatial abilities. This study aimed to examine whether deficits in ToM were generated by cognitive or visuospatial dysfunction and the mediating effect of visuospatial function on ToM performance. Fifty PD patients (31 male, 19 female; mean age = 66.34 years) and 49 healthy controls (16 male, 33 female; mean age = 67.29 years) completed a ToM task (reading the mind in the eyes) and visuospatial task (line orientation). The results revealed that current cognitive status was a significant predictor for performance on the ToM task, and that 54% of the total effect of cognitive status on ToM was mediated by visuospatial abilities. It was concluded that visuospatial functioning plays an important mediating role for the relationship between executive dysfunction and affective ToM deficits in PD patients, and that visuospatial deficits may directly contribute to the presence of affective ToM difficulties seen in individuals with PD.

  6. Factors affecting the success of weaning in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Teke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Weaning failure rate was higher in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and many factors affect it. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors affecting the success of weaning in COPD patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV.Materials and methods: Totally 43 COPD patients who received IMV in intensive care unit were included. Clinical and laboratory results and Acute Physiology Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II scores were recorded and affecting factors on weaning success were investigated.Results: In 43 patients, 25 had successful weaning (58.1%. Patients with high APACHE II score prior to intubation was found as associated with weaning failure. High Glasgow coma scale (GCS scores before entubation and weaning are associated with weaning success. Pre-weaning anxiety, positive endotracheal aspirate culture, pulmonary arterial pressure value, enteral feeding, pre-weaning tachycardia, pre-weaning cuff leaking and FiO2 values were found to be associated with weaning failure. Pre-weaning cortisol levels were associated with weaning success. In successful weaning group, measured NIF and VT in spontaneous mode were found as higher and f/VT ratio was lower compared with unsuccessful group. T-tube during the 15th and 30th minutes of the symptoms of fatigue (sweating assets were associated with weaning failure. IMV duration and longer extubation duration of weaning, and more number of t-tube insertion attempts were found as associated with failure of weaning.Conclusions: Infection in patients with COPD, the presence of anxiety, and hemodynamic and respiratory instability significantly increases the weaning failure.

  7. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  8. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Tomé

    Full Text Available Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD (CAG∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6 background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with

  9. MSH3 polymorphisms and protein levels affect CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomé, Stéphanie; Manley, Kevin; Simard, Jodie P; Clark, Greg W; Slean, Meghan M; Swami, Meera; Shelbourne, Peggy F; Tillier, Elisabeth R M; Monckton, Darren G; Messer, Anne; Pearson, Christopher E

    2013-01-01

    Expansions of trinucleotide CAG/CTG repeats in somatic tissues are thought to contribute to ongoing disease progression through an affected individual's life with Huntington's disease or myotonic dystrophy. Broad ranges of repeat instability arise between individuals with expanded repeats, suggesting the existence of modifiers of repeat instability. Mice with expanded CAG/CTG repeats show variable levels of instability depending upon mouse strain. However, to date the genetic modifiers underlying these differences have not been identified. We show that in liver and striatum the R6/1 Huntington's disease (HD) (CAG)∼100 transgene, when present in a congenic C57BL/6J (B6) background, incurred expansion-biased repeat mutations, whereas the repeat was stable in a congenic BALB/cByJ (CBy) background. Reciprocal congenic mice revealed the Msh3 gene as the determinant for the differences in repeat instability. Expansion bias was observed in congenic mice homozygous for the B6 Msh3 gene on a CBy background, while the CAG tract was stabilized in congenics homozygous for the CBy Msh3 gene on a B6 background. The CAG stabilization was as dramatic as genetic deficiency of Msh2. The B6 and CBy Msh3 genes had identical promoters but differed in coding regions and showed strikingly different protein levels. B6 MSH3 variant protein is highly expressed and associated with CAG expansions, while the CBy MSH3 variant protein is expressed at barely detectable levels, associating with CAG stability. The DHFR protein, which is divergently transcribed from a promoter shared by the Msh3 gene, did not show varied levels between mouse strains. Thus, naturally occurring MSH3 protein polymorphisms are modifiers of CAG repeat instability, likely through variable MSH3 protein stability. Since evidence supports that somatic CAG instability is a modifier and predictor of disease, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that variable levels of CAG instability associated with polymorphisms of

  10. Dorsal sensory impairment in hands and feet of people affected by Hansen's disease in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Ruth; Melchior, Hanna

    2007-12-01

    Sensory testing in people affected by Hansen's disease is usually performed on palms and soles only. In Israel, both palmar/plantar and dorsal aspects of limbs are routinely tested. The aim of this study was to describe the magnitude of dorsal sensory impairment (SI) in limbs and compare the frequency of SI on palms and soles with that on the dorsum of hands and feet. In a cross-sectional study, limbs of 140 patients registered at The Israel Hansen's Disease Centre during the years 1999-2003 were tested for their sensory status. Both palmar/plantar and dorsal aspects were tested using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. SI was defined as not feeling stimuli applied with the 2 g monofilament. SI was detected on the dorsum in 43% of sites on hands and only in 27% on palms. 64% of sites on dorsum of feet had SI compared to 53% on the soles. SI was detected in up to 18% in hands with no palmar SI, and in 6% of feet with no plantar SI. Furthermore, SI on palms and soles was found to be accompanied by dorsal SI in all hands and in 97% of feet. SI on dorsum of limbs occurs more frequently than SI on palms and soles. Therefore sensory testing should also consider inclusion of the dorsal aspect of hands and feet.

  11. Analysis of optical neural stimulation effects on neural networks affected by neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The number of people in risk of developing a neurodegenerative disease increases as the life expectancy grows due to medical advances. Multiple techniques have been developed to improve patient's condition, from pharmacological to invasive electrodes approaches, but no definite cure has yet been discovered. In this work Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS) has been studied. ONS stimulates noninvasively the outer regions of the brain, mainly the neocortex. The relationship between the stimulation parameters and the therapeutic response is not totally clear. In order to find optimal ONS parameters to treat a particular neurodegenerative disease, mathematical modeling is necessary. Neural networks models have been employed to study the neural spiking activity change induced by ONS. Healthy and pathological neocortical networks have been considered to study the required stimulation to restore the normal activity. The network consisted of a group of interconnected neurons, which were assigned 2D spatial coordinates. The optical stimulation spatial profile was assumed to be Gaussian. The stimulation effects were modeled as synaptic current increases in the affected neurons, proportional to the stimulation fluence. Pathological networks were defined as the healthy ones with some neurons being inactivated, which presented no synaptic conductance. Neurons' electrical activity was also studied in the frequency domain, focusing specially on the changes of the spectral bands corresponding to brain waves. The complete model could be used to determine the optimal ONS parameters in order to achieve the specific neural spiking patterns or the required local neural activity increase to treat particular neurodegenerative pathologies.

  12. Protein oxidation in Huntington disease affects energy production and vitamin B6 metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorolla, Ma Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, Ma José; Tamarit, Jordi; Ortega, Zaira; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Ros, Joaquim; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2010-08-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that initially affects the striatum and progressively the cortex. Oxidative stress in HD has been described as important to disease progression. In this study, protein carbonylation, used as a marker of protein oxidation, was analyzed in human brain striatum. A comparison of HD samples to matched controls identified 13 carbonylated proteins, including enzymes involved in the glycolytic pathway and mitochondrial proteins related to ATP production. Oxidation of the mitochondrial enzymes resulted in decreased catalytic activity, in good agreement with the energy deficiency observed in HD. We also found carbonylation of pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin 1, both involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5-phosphate, the active form of vitamin B6. The Tet/HD94 conditional mouse model allowed us to demonstrate that increased carbonylation in striatum is dependent on mutant huntingtin expression. As in humans, pyridoxal kinase showed decreased levels and was highly carbonylated in the gene-on mice; these modifications were reverted in the gene-off mice. We hypothesize that both pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin 1 oxidation could result in decreased pyridoxal 5-phosphate availability necessary as a cofactor in transaminations, synthesis of glutathione, and synthesis of GABA and dopamine, two neurotransmitters that play a key role in HD pathology.

  13. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P personality (P Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety, depression, antisocial behavior, and AD/H problems in a sampling of our male and female patients aged between 18 years and 59 years.

  14. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  15. Forward flexion of trunk in Parkinson's disease patients is affected by subjective vertical position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Kyohei; Shiraishi, Makoto; Kawasaki, Tsubasa; Kamo, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose No method has been established to evaluate the dissociation between subjective and objective vertical positions with respect to the self-awareness of postural deformity in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate, from the relationship between an assessment of the dissociation of subjective and objective vertical positions of PD patients and an assessment based on established PD clinical evaluation scales, that the dissociation regarding vertical position is a factor in the severity of the forward flexion of trunk (FFT). Methods Subjects were 39 PD patients and 15 age-matched healthy individuals (control group). Posture was evaluated with measurement of FFT angle during static standing and the subjective vertical position (SV) of the patient. For evaluation of motor function, the Modified Hoehn & Yahr scale, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), 3-m Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and Functional Reach Test (FRT) were used. Results In PD patients, FFT angle in the 3rd tertile of patients was 13.8±9.7°, significantly greater than those in the control group and the 1st and 2nd tertiles of PD patients (control group vs 3rd tertile, p = 0.008; 1st tertile vs 3rd tertile, p<0.001; 2nd vs 3rd tertile, p = 0.008). In multiple regression analysis for factors in the FFT angle, significant factors were SV, disease duration, and the standard deviation of each SV angle measurement. Conclusion The dissociation between SV and objective vertical position affects the FFT of PD patients, suggesting an involvement of non-basal ganglia pathologies. PMID:28700731

  16. Spectral quality affects disease development of three pathogens on hydroponically grown plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Brown, C. S.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Plants were grown under light-emitting diode (LED) arrays with various spectra to determine the effects of light quality on the development of diseases caused by tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) on pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), powdery mildew [Sphaerotheca fuliginea (Schlectend:Fr.) Pollaci] on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and bacterial wilt (Pseudomonas solanacearum Smith) on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). One LED (660) array supplied 99% red light at 660 nm (25 nm bandwidth at half-peak height) and 1% far-red light between 700 to 800 nm. A second LED (660/735) array supplied 83% red light at 660 nm and 17% far-red light at 735 nm (25 nm bandwidth at half-peak height). A third LED (660/BF) array supplied 98% red light at 660 nm, 1% blue light (BF) between 350 to 550 nm, and 1% far-red light between 700 to 800 nm. Control plants were grown under broad-spectrum metal halide (MH) lamps. Plants were grown at a mean photon flux (300 to 800 nm) of 330 micromoles m-2 s-1 under a 12-h day/night photoperiod. Spectral quality affected each pathosystem differently. In the ToMV/pepper pathosystem, disease symptoms developed slower and were less severe in plants grown under light sources that contained blue and UV-A wavelengths (MH and 660/BF treatments) compared to plants grown under light sources that lacked blue and UV-A wavelengths (660 and 660/735 LED arrays). In contrast, the number of colonies per leaf was highest and the mean colony diameters of S. fuliginea on cucumber plants were largest on leaves grown under the MH lamp (highest amount of blue and UV-A light) and least on leaves grown under the 660 LED array (no blue or UV-A light). The addition of far-red irradiation to the primary light source in the 660/735 LED array increased the colony counts per leaf in the S. fuliginea/cucumber pathosystem compared to the red-only (660) LED array. In the P. solanacearum/tomato pathosystem, disease symptoms were less severe in plants grown under the 660 LED array, but the

  17. Vitamin D Affects Survival Independently of Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Daniela Veit; Barreto, Fellype Carvalho; Liabeuf, Sophie; Temmar, Mohammed; Boitte, Francis; Choukroun, Gabriel; Fournier, Albert; Massy, Ziad A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Vitamin D might have beneficial effects on vascular health. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D [25D] ≤ 15 ng/ml) and insufficiency (25D levels between 16 and 30 ng/ml) in a cohort of patients at different CKD stages and the relationships between vitamin D serum levels, vascular calcification and stiffness, and the mortality risk. Design, setting, participants & measurements: One hundred forty CKD patients (85 men, mean age 67 ± 12 yr; CKD stages 2 [8%], 3 [26%], 4 [26%], 5 [7%], and 5D [(33%]) were allocated for a prospective study. Serum levels of 25D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, aortic calcification score, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were evaluated. Results: There was a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (42%) and insufficiency (34%). Patients with 25D ≤ 16.7 ng/ml (median) had a significantly lower survival rate than patients with 25D >16.7 ng/ml (mean follow-up, 605 ± 217 d; range, 10 to 889; P = 0.05). Multivariate adjustments (included age, gender, diabetes, arterial pressure, CKD stage, phosphate, albumin, hemoglobin, aortic calcification score and PWV) confirmed 25D level as an independent predictor of all-cause mortality. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were highly prevalent in this CKD cohort. Low 25D levels affected mortality independently of vascular calcification and stiffness, suggesting that 25D may influence survival in CKD patients via additional pathways that need to be further explored. PMID:19443628

  18. Identification of weather variables sensitive to dysentery in disease-affected county of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianing; Wu, Xiaoxu; Li, Chenlu; Xu, Bing; Hu, Luojia; Chen, Jin; Dai, Shuang

    2017-01-01

    Climate change mainly refers to long-term change in weather variables, and it has significant impact on sustainability and spread of infectious diseases. Among three leading infectious diseases in China, dysentery is exclusively sensitive to climate change. Previous researches on weather variables and dysentery mainly focus on determining correlation between dysentery incidence and weather variables. However, the contribution of each variable to dysentery incidence has been rarely clarified. Therefore, we chose a typical county in epidemic of dysentery as the study area. Based on data of dysentery incidence, weather variables (monthly mean temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, absolute humidity, maximum temperature, and minimum temperature) and lagged analysis, we used principal component analysis (PCA) and classification and regression trees (CART) to examine the relationships between the incidence of dysentery and weather variables. Principal component analysis showed that temperature, precipitation, and humidity played a key role in determining transmission of dysentery. We further selected weather variables including minimum temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity based on results of PCA, and used CART to clarify contributions of these three weather variables to dysentery incidence. We found when minimum temperature was at a high level, the high incidence of dysentery occurred if relative humidity or precipitation was at a high level. We compared our results with other studies on dysentery incidence and meteorological factors in areas both in China and abroad, and good agreement has been achieved. Yet, some differences remain for three reasons: not identifying all key weather variables, climate condition difference caused by local factors, and human factors that also affect dysentery incidence. This study hopes to shed light on potential early warnings for dysentery transmission as climate change occurs, and provide a theoretical

  19. PS Dependent APP Cleavage Regulates Glucosylceramide Synthase and is Affected in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus O.W. Grimm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gangliosides were found to be associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Here we addressed a potential function of γ-secretase (presenilin dependent cleavage of the amyloid-precursor-protein (APP in the regulation of ganglioside de novo synthesis. Methods: To identify a potential role of γ-secretase and APP in ganglioside de novo synthesis we used presenilin (PS deficient and APP deficient cells and mouse brains, mutated PS as well as transgenic mice and AD post mortem brains. Changes in glucosylceramide synthase (GCS activity were identified by incorporation of radiolabeled UDP-glucose in glucosylceramide, changes in gene expression via real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Alterations in ganglioside levels were determined by thin layer chromatography and mass spectrometry. Results: We found that PS and APP deficiency, in vitro and in vivo, resulted in increased GCS gene expression, elevated enzyme activity and thus increased glucosylceramide and total ganglioside level. Using a specific γ-secretase inhibitor revealed that PS proteolytic activity alters ganglioside homeostasis. By the use of mutated PS causing early onset AD in cell culture and transgenic mice we found that GCS is increased in AD, further substantiated by the use of AD post mortem brains, suffering from sporadic AD. Conclusion: APP processing regulates ganglioside de novo synthesis and is affected in AD.

  20. Clinical value of nutritional status in neurodegenerative diseases: What is its impact and how it affects disease progression and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagalioti, Eftyhia; Trifonos, Christina; Morari, Aggeliki; Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Giaginis, Constantinos

    2016-11-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a major problem of public health that is associated with an increased risk of mortality and poor quality of life. Malnutrition is considered as a major problem that worsens the prognosis of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. In this aspect, the present review is aimed to critically collect and summarize all the available existing clinical data regarding the clinical impact of nutritional assessment in neurodegenerative diseases, highlighting on the crucial role of nutritional status in disease progression and management. According to the currently available clinical data, the nutritional status of patients seems to play a very important role in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. A correct nutritional evaluation of neurodegenerative disease patients and a right nutrition intervention is essential in monitoring their disease.

  1. Involvement of endocrine system in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease 1b: speculation on the role of autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Balivo, Francesca; Minopoli, Giorgia; Rossi, Alessandro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2014-03-19

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is an inherited metabolic defect of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis due to mutations of the SLC37A4 gene and to defective transport of glucose-6-phosphate. The clinical presentation of GSD1b is characterized by hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, fasting hypoglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Patients affected by GSD1b also show neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction that cause increased susceptibility to recurrent bacterial infections. GSD1b patients are also at risk for inflammatory bowel disease. Occasional reports suggesting an increased risk of autoimmune disorders in GSD1b patients, have been published. These complications affect the clinical outcome of the patients. Here we describe the occurrence of autoimmune endocrine disorders including thyroiditis and growth hormone deficiency, in a patient affected by GSD1b. This case further supports the association between GSD1b and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Exercise mediates the association between positive affect and 5-year mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Versteeg, Henneke; Hansen, Tina B

    2013-01-01

    mediated this relationship in patients with established ischemic heart disease. Methods and Results- The sample comprised 607 patients with ischemic heart disease from Holbæk Hospital, Denmark. In 2005, patients completed the Global Mood Scale (GMS) to assess positive affect and a purpose-designed question...... constructed no mediation model for hospitalization. Importantly, patients with high positive affect had a significantly reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.92; unadjusted analysis) and were more likely to exercise (odds ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval...

  3. Effects of the therapist's nonverbal behavior on participation and affect of individuals with Alzheimer's disease during group music therapy sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevasco, Andrea M

    2010-01-01

    In healthcare settings, medical professionals' nonverbal behavior impacts patients' satisfaction and long-term physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. The purpose of this research was to determine the effects of a music therapist's nonverbal behavior, affect and proximity, on participation and affect of 38 individuals with Alzheimer's disease and other related dementia (ADRD) during movement-to-music, singing, and instrument playing. Data indicated 62% of the individuals evinced positive affect when the therapist utilized affect and proximity combined, followed by the affect only condition (53%), proximity only condition (30%), and no affect or proximity condition (28%). A Friedman analysis indicated a significant difference in individuals' affect according to treatment conditions, chi(r)2 (3, 4) = 34.05, p = .001. Nonverbal behavior also impacted individuals' accuracy of participation, with participation at 79% for both affect and proximity combined, 75% for affect only, 71% for no affect or proximity, and 70% for proximity only. A significant difference occurred for participation by treatment conditions, F (3, 111) = 4.05, p = .009, eta2 = .10. Clinical implications are discussed.

  4. LRRK2 phosphorylates moesin at threonine-558: characterization of how Parkinson's disease mutants affect kinase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Nichols, R. Jeremy; Deak, Maria; Campbell, David G.; Gillardon, Frank; Knebel, Axel; Alessi, Dario R.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase-2) gene cause late-onset PD (Parkinson's disease). LRRK2 contains leucine-rich repeats, a GTPase domain, a COR [C-terminal of Roc (Ras of complex)] domain, a kinase and a WD40 (Trp-Asp 40) motif. Little is known about how LRRK2 is regulated, what its physiological substrates are or how mutations affect LRRK2 function. Thus far LRRK2 activity has only been assessed by autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of MBP (myelin basic protein), which is catalysed rather slowly. We undertook a KESTREL (kinase substrate tracking and elucidation) screen in rat brain extracts to identify proteins that were phosphorylated by an activated PD mutant of LRRK2 (G2019S). This led to the discovery that moesin, a protein which anchors the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, is efficiently phosphorylated by LRRK2, at Thr558, a previously identified in-vivo-phosphorylation site that regulates the ability of moesin to bind actin. LRRK2 also phosphorylated ezrin and radixin, which are related to moesin, at the residue equivalent to Thr558, as well as a peptide (LRRKtide: RLGRDKYKTLRQIRQ) encompassing Thr558. We exploited these findings to determine how nine previously reported PD mutations of LRRK2 affected kinase activity. Only one of the mutations analysed, namely G2019S, stimulated kinase activity. Four mutations inhibited LRRK2 kinase activity (R1941H, I2012T, I2020T and G2385R), whereas the remainder (R1441C, R1441G, Y1699C and T2356I) did not influence activity. Therefore the manner in which LRRK2 mutations induce PD is more complex than previously imagined and is not only caused by an increase in LRRK2 kinase activity. Finally, we show that the minimum catalytically active fragment of LRRK2 requires an intact GTPase, COR and kinase domain, as well as a WD40 motif and a C-terminal tail. The results of the present study suggest that moesin, ezrin and radixin may be LRRK2 substrates, findings that have been exploited to develop

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism in the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene affects inflammatory bowel diseases risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynnette R Ferguson; Claudia Huebner; Ivonne Petermann; Richard B Gearry; Murray L Barclay; Pieter Demmers; Alan McCulloch; Dug Yeo Han

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) gene play in the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) in a New Zealand population, in the context of international studies.METHODS: DNA samples from 388 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), 405 ulcerative colitis (UC), 27 indeterminate colitis (IC) and 201 randomly selected controls, from Canterbury, New Zealand were screened for 3 common polymorphisms in the TNF-α receptor:-238 G→A, -308 G→A and -857C→T, using a TaqmanRassay. A meta-analysis was performed on the data obtained on these polymorphisms combined with that from other published studies.RESULTS: Individuals carrying the -308 G/A allele had a significantly (OR = 1.91, x2 = 17.36, P < 0.0001)increased risk of pancolitis, and a 1.57-fold increased risk (OR = 1.57, x2 = 4.34, P = 0.037) of requiring a bowel resection in UC. Carrying the -857 C/T variantdecreased the risk of ileocolonic CD (OR = 0.56, x2 =4.32, P = 0.037), and the need for a bowel resection(OR = 0.59, x2 = 4.85, P = 0.028). The risk of UC was reduced in individuals who were smokers at diagnosis,(OR = 0.48, x2 = 4.86, P = 0.028).CONCLUSION: TNF-α is a key cytokine known to play a role in inflammatory response, and the locus for the gene is found in the IBD3 region on chromosome 6p21, known to be associated with an increased risk for IBD. The -308 G/A SNP in the TNF-α promoter is functional, and may account in part for the increased UC risk associated with the IBD3 genomic region. The-857 C/T SNP may decrease IBD risk in certain groups.Pharmaco- or nutrigenomic approaches may be desir-able for individuals with such affected genotypes.

  6. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Sawiak

    Full Text Available Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala. Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Rapid and Progressive Regional Brain Atrophy in CLN6 Batten Disease Affected Sheep Measured with Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawiak, Stephen J; Perumal, Sunthara Rajan; Rudiger, Skye R; Matthews, Loren; Mitchell, Nadia L; McLaughlan, Clive J; Bawden, C Simon; Palmer, David N; Kuchel, Timothy; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Variant late-infantile Batten disease is a neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis caused by mutations in CLN6. It is a recessive genetic lysosomal storage disease characterised by progressive neurodegeneration. It starts insidiously and leads to blindness, epilepsy and dementia in affected children. Sheep that are homozygous for a natural mutation in CLN6 have an ovine form of Batten disease Here, we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging to track brain changes in 4 unaffected carriers and 6 affected Batten disease sheep. We scanned each sheep 4 times, between 17 and 22 months of age. Cortical atrophy in all sheep was pronounced at the baseline scan in all affected Batten disease sheep. Significant atrophy was also present in other brain regions (caudate, putamen and amygdala). Atrophy continued measurably in all of these regions during the study. Longitudinal MRI in sheep was sensitive enough to measure significant volume changes over the relatively short study period, even in the cortex, where nearly 40% of volume was already lost at the start of the study. Thus longitudinal MRI could be used to study the dynamics of progression of neurodegenerative changes in sheep models of Batten disease, as well as to assess therapeutic efficacy.

  8. Plant protein and animal proteins: do they differentially affect cardiovascular disease risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-11-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Does swimming exercise affect experimental chronic kidney disease in rats treated with gum acacia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badreldin H Ali

    Full Text Available Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA. Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE on adenine-induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v, or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments, during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation.

  10. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Michalski, Dominik; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Morten S

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal gyrus from AD patients and found significantly increased PSCA levels (approximately 70%). In contrast, no changes in Lypd6 levels were detected. In concordance with our findings in AD patients, PSCA levels were increased in the frontal cortex of triple transgenic mice with an AD-like pathology harboring human transgenes that cause both age-dependent β-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display β-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting that PSCA-nAChR interactions may be involved in the cognitive dysfunction observed in AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of viral and phytoplasmal agents responsible for diseases affecting plants of Gaillardia Foug. in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillardia plants exhibiting symptoms characteristic of viral and phytoplasmal diseases were collected at botanical gardens and floriculture farms in Lithuania. Cucumber mosaic virus was isolated from diseased plants exhibiting symptoms characterized stunting, color breaking and malformation of flo...

  12. Traffic jam: a compendium of human diseases that affect intracellular transport processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridor, M; Hannan, L A

    2000-11-01

    As sequencing of the human genome nears completion, the genes that cause many human diseases are being identified and functionally described. This has revealed that many human diseases are due to defects of intracellular trafficking. This 'Toolbox' catalogs and briefly describes these diseases.

  13. In Graves' disease, increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles is primarily caused by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn three patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia, while the other eye looked ahead, into the field of action, or out of the field of action of the muscle that was measured. The affected muscles

  14. In Graves' disease, increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles is primarily caused by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn three patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia, while the other eye looked ahead, into the field of action, or out of the field of action of the muscle that was measured. The affected muscles we

  15. Previous infection with a mesogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus affects infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are two of the most important viruses affecting poultry worldwide, but little is known on the interactions between these two viruses when infecting birds. In a previous study we found that infection of chickens with a mesogenic strain of...

  16. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, L.; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Affective disorders are associated with an increased occurrence of cognitive deficits and have been linked to cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. The putative molecular mechanisms involved in these associations are however not clear. The aim of this systematic review was to ...

  17. Perinatal risk factors increase the risk of being affected by both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Wingren, Carl Johan; Vincente, Raquel P; Merlo, Juan; Agardh, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated whether perinatal factors influenced the risk of a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. We used multinomial logistic regression models to study the associations between perinatal factors, gender, mode of delivery, season of birth and the risk of type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease or both, in Swedish-born singleton children. We found that 4327 of the 768 395 children (0.6%) had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, 3817 (0.5%) had been diagnosed with coeliac disease and 191 (0.02%) were affected by both diseases. If the children already had type 1 diabetes (n = 4518), the absolute risk of being affected by coeliac disease increased to 4.2% (n = 191). Children with both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease were more likely to be female (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.01-1.97), delivered by Caesarean section (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.07-2.39), have native-born Swedish mothers (OR = 4.84, 95% CI = 1.96-11.97) or be born during the summer months (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.07-1.92). The increased risk of being affected by a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease was modulated by perinatal risk factors. This suggests that early life events are important when it comes to children with type 1 diabetes also developing coeliac disease. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Are there any changes in burden and management of communicable diseases in areas affected by Cyclone Nargis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siriwan Pichit

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aims to assess the situation of communicable diseases under national surveillance in the Cyclone Nargis-affected areas in Myanmar (Burma before and after the incident. Methods Monthly data during 2007, 2008 and 2009 from the routine reporting system for disease surveillance of the Myanmar Ministry of Health (MMOH were reviewed and compared with weekly reporting from the Early Warning and Rapid Response (EWAR system. Data from some UN agencies, NGOs and Tri-Partite Core Group (TCG periodic reviews were also extracted for comparisons with indicators from Sphere and the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. Results Compared to 2007 and 2009, large and atypical increases in diarrheal disease and especially dysentery cases occurred in 2008 following Cyclone Nargis. A seasonal increase in ARI reached levels higher than usual in the months of 2008 post-Nargis. The number of malaria cases post-Nargis also increased, but it was less clear if this reflected normal seasonal patterns or was specifically associated with the disaster event. There was no significant change in the occurrence of other communicable diseases in Nargis-affected areas. Except for a small decrease in mortality for diarrheal diseases and ARI in 2008 in Nargis-affected areas, population-based mortality rates for all other communicable diseases showed no significant change in 2008 in these areas, compared to 2007 and 2009. Tuberculosis control programs reached their targets of 70% case detection and 85% treatment success rates in 2007 and 2008. Vaccination coverage rates for DPT 3rd dose and measles remained at high though measles coverage still did not reach the Sphere target of 95% even by 2009. Sanitary latrine coverage in the Nargis-affected area dropped sharply to 50% in the months of 2008 following the incident but then rose to 72% in 2009. Conclusion While the incidence of diarrhea, dysentery and ARI increased post-Nargis in areas affected by the

  19. Anticipatory modulation of digit placement for grasp control is affected by Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R Lukos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful object manipulation relies on the ability to form and retrieve sensorimotor memories of digit forces and positions used in previous object lifts. Past studies of patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD have revealed that the basal ganglia play a crucial role in the acquisition and/or retrieval of sensorimotor memories for grasp control. Whereas it is known that PD impairs anticipatory control of digit forces during grasp, learning deficits associated with the planning of digit placement have yet to be explored. This question is motivated by recent work in healthy subjects revealing that anticipatory control of digit placement plays a crucial role for successful manipulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We asked ten PD patients off medication and ten age-matched controls to reach, grasp and lift an object whose center of mass (CM was on the left, right or center. The only task requirement was to minimize object roll during lift. The CM remained the same across consecutive trials (blocked condition or was altered from trial to trial (random condition. We hypothesized that impairment of the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits in PD patients would reduce their ability to anticipate digit placement appropriate to the CM location. Consequently, we predicted that PD patients would exhibit similar digit placement in the blocked vs. random conditions and produce larger peak object rolls than that of control subjects. In the blocked condition, PD patients exhibited significantly weaker modulation of fingertip contact points to CM location and larger object roll than controls (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively. Nevertheless, both controls and PD patients minimized object roll more in the blocked than in the random condition (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that, even though PD patients may have a residual ability of anticipatory control of digit contact points and forces, they fail to implement a

  20. Histopathology of crustose coralline algae affected by white band and white patch diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéré, Gaëlle; Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila; Steneck, Robert S; Nugues, Maggy M

    2015-01-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are major benthic calcifiers that play crucial roles in marine ecosystems, particularly coral reefs. Over the past two decades, epizootics have been reported for several CCA species on coral reefs worldwide. However, their causes remain often unknown in part because few studies have investigated CCA pathologies at a microscopic scale. We studied the cellular changes associated with two syndromes: Coralline White Band Syndrome (CWBS) and Coralline White Patch Disease (CWPD) from samples collected in Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Healthy-looking tissue of diseased CCA did not differ from healthy tissue of healthy CCA. In diseased tissues of both pathologies, the three characteristic cell layers of CCA revealed cells completely depleted of protoplasmic content, but presenting an intact cell wall. In addition, CWBS showed a transition area between healthy and diseased tissues consisting of cells partially deprived of protoplasmic material, most likely corresponding to the white band characterizing the disease at the macroscopic level. This transition area was absent in CWPD. Regrowth at the lesion boundary were sometimes observed in both syndromes. Tissues of both healthy and diseased CCA were colonised by diverse boring organisms. Fungal infections associated with the diseased cells were not seen. However, other bioeroders were more abundant in diseased vs healthy CCA and in diseased vs healthy-looking tissues of diseased CCA. Although their role in the pathogenesis is unclear, this suggests that disease increases CCA susceptibility to bioerosion. Further investigations using an integrated approach are needed to carry out the complete diagnosis of these diseases.

  1. Histopathology of crustose coralline algae affected by white band and white patch diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Quéré

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Crustose coralline algae (CCA are major benthic calcifiers that play crucial roles in marine ecosystems, particularly coral reefs. Over the past two decades, epizootics have been reported for several CCA species on coral reefs worldwide. However, their causes remain often unknown in part because few studies have investigated CCA pathologies at a microscopic scale. We studied the cellular changes associated with two syndromes: Coralline White Band Syndrome (CWBS and Coralline White Patch Disease (CWPD from samples collected in Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Healthy-looking tissue of diseased CCA did not differ from healthy tissue of healthy CCA. In diseased tissues of both pathologies, the three characteristic cell layers of CCA revealed cells completely depleted of protoplasmic content, but presenting an intact cell wall. In addition, CWBS showed a transition area between healthy and diseased tissues consisting of cells partially deprived of protoplasmic material, most likely corresponding to the white band characterizing the disease at the macroscopic level. This transition area was absent in CWPD. Regrowth at the lesion boundary were sometimes observed in both syndromes. Tissues of both healthy and diseased CCA were colonised by diverse boring organisms. Fungal infections associated with the diseased cells were not seen. However, other bioeroders were more abundant in diseased vs healthy CCA and in diseased vs healthy-looking tissues of diseased CCA. Although their role in the pathogenesis is unclear, this suggests that disease increases CCA susceptibility to bioerosion. Further investigations using an integrated approach are needed to carry out the complete diagnosis of these diseases.

  2. Somatic and cognitive-affective depressive symptoms among patients with heart disease: differences by sex and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Aparecida Marosti Dessotte

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this study investigated the association of somatic and cognitive-affective symptoms with sex and age, among patients hospitalized with heart disease. METHOD: this study was a secondary analysis of two previous observational studies totaling 531 patients with heart disease, hospitalized from 2005 to 2011 in two public hospitals in Ribeirão Preto, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Somatic and cognitive-affective symptoms were assessed using the subscales of the Beck Depression Inventory - I (BDI-I. RESULTS: of 531 participants, 62.7% were male, with a mean age 57.3 years (SD= 13.0 for males and 56.2 years (SD= 12.1 for females. Analyses of variance showed an effect of sex (p<0.001 for somatic and p=0.005 for cognitive-affective symptoms, but no effect of age. Women presented with higher mean values than men in both BDI-I subscales: 7.1 (4.5 vs. 5.4 (4.3 for somatic, and 8.3 (7.9 vs. 6.7 (7.2 for cognitive-affective symptoms. There were no differences by age for somatic (p=0.84 or cognitive-affective symptoms (p=0.84. CONCLUSION: women hospitalized with heart disease had more somatic and cognitive-affective symptoms than men. We found no association of somatic and cognitive-affective symptoms with age. Future research for these patients could reveal whether these differences according to sex continue throughout the rehabilitation process.

  3. Case report 438: Osteolytic phase of Paget disease affecting the ulna in case 1 and the humerus in case 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.L.; Ackermann, L.V.; Tsutsumi, Akira

    1987-08-01

    The two cases reported here are examples of monostotic Paget disease occurring in the unusual sites of the humerus and ulna. Sinse biopsy of osteolytic Paget disease may increase the likelihood of fracture, expecially in a weight-bearing long bone, an accurate radiographic diagnosis is important. Observation of a flame-shaped front of osteolysis or other radiographic features of Paget disease may be helpful. Exacerbation of radiographic osteopenia with immobilization, and remineralization with mobilization of the affected extremity, are findings which would also support the diagnosis of Paget disease. If the patient presents with a pathological fracture, as occurred in the two cases described here, a biopsy is appropriate to help establish the diagnosis, and to exclude sarcomatous transformation. A similar histological appearance might be found in patients with hyperparathyroidism, but the absence of the appropriate serological abnormalities and the characteristic radiographic findings in other bones, should exclude that diagnosis. (orig./SHA).

  4. BDNF and VEGF in the pathogenesis of stress-induced affective diseases: an insight from experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka, Marta; Obuchowicz, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Stress is known to play an important role in etiology, development and progression of affective diseases. Especially, chronic stress, by initiating changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), neurotransmission and the immune system, acts as a trigger for affective diseases. It has been reported that the rise in the concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and persistent up-regulation of glucocorticoid expression in the brain and periphery increases the excitotoxic effect on CA3 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus resulting in dendritic atrophy, apoptosis of neurons and possibly inhibition of neurogenesis in adult brain. Stress was observed to disrupt neuroplasticity in the brain, and growing evidence demonstrates its role in the pathomechanism of affective disorders. Experimental studies indicate that a well-known brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which have recently focused increasing attention of neuroscientists, promote cell survival, positively modulate neuroplasticity and hippocampal neurogenesis. In this paper, we review the alterations in BDNF and VEGF pathways induced by chronic and acute stress, and their relationships with HPA axis activity. Moreover, behavioral effects evoked in rodents by both above-mentioned factors and the effects consequent to their deficit are presented. Biochemical as well as behavioral findings suggest that BDNF and VEGF play an important role as components of cascade of changes in the pathomechanism of stress-induced affective diseases. Further studies on the mechanisms regulating their expression in stress conditions are needed to better understand the significance of trophic hypothesis of stress-induced affective diseases.

  5. Factors affecting change in glomerular filtration rate after unilateral nephrectomy in living kidney donors and patients with renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Ok; Back, So Ra; Kim, Euy Nyong; Lee, Jang Han; Yang, Won Seok; Kim, Soon Bae; Moon, Dae Hyuk [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We evaluated factors affecting change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after unilateral nephrectomy in living kidney donors and patients with renal disease. We retrospectively reviewed the 435 individuals who underwent unilateral nephrectomy in 2006. Among them, we enrolled 141 patients who had performed 99mTc-DTPA scans before and after surgery. The study population consisted of 75 living donors (M=43, F=32) and 66 patients with renal disease (M=46, F=20). We evaluated factors affecting the GFR change by multiple linear regression analysis. The renal disease group was significantly older than the donors at baseline (53.9{+-}12.9 vs. 37.8{+-}11.1yr, P<0.05) and had higher preoperative Cr level (0.95{+-}0.20 vs. 0.85{+-}0.18mg/dL, p<0.05). The mean duration of the follow-up was 7.3{+-}3.3 months, (p<0.05). The disease group and donors significantly increased the GFR after nephrectomy (43.0{+-}9.6 to 48.6{+-}12.8 vs. 46.9{+-}8.4 to 58.1{+-}12.5 ml/min, respectively, P<0.05). The disease group had significantly lesser mean GFR change than the doners. (5.6{+-}7.2 vs. 11.1{+-}8.5 ml/min, respectively, p<0.05). In the renal disease group, multiple regression analysis showed that preop Cr level and age were significantly associated with GFR change ({beta} =-12.53, p=0.003; {beta} =-0.19, p=0.004). In the donor group, age was significantly associated with the GFR change ({beta} =-0.265, p=0.002). But change of GFR was not associated with sex, preop GFR, BMI, duration of follow-up, site of nephrectomy in both groups. Age and preoperative renal function were predictive factors affecting change in GFR after unilateral nephrectomy.

  6. MR findings in acute Lyme disease affecting the knee. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallaro, A.; Harrer, T.; Richter, H.; Bautz, W.; Fellner, F.A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Univ., Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper we report a case with primarily unspecific arthralgia after surgical therapy of hallux valgus deformity and consecutive reflex sympathetic dystrophy in which MR led to the diagnosis of Lyme disease. (orig.)

  7. How does disease location affect acute phase reactants in ulcerative colitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Ipek

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: CRP, ESR, WBC, PLT counts and albumin levels are of limited value in determining disease activity in ulcerative colitis patients, especially in those with proctitis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1589-1593

  8. Biological control of soilborne diseases in organic potato production as affected by varying environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soilborne diseases are persistent problems in potato production and alternative management practices are needed, particularly in organic production, where control options are limited. Selected biocontrol organisms, including two naturally-occurring hypovirulent strains of Rhizoctonia solani (Rhs1a1 ...

  9. Affective Disorders, Psychosis and Dementia in a Community Sample of Older Men with and without Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Osvaldo P.; McCaul, Kieran; Hankey, Graeme J.; Yeap, Bu B.; Golledge, Jonathan; Flicker, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dementia and affective and psychotic symptoms are commonly associated with Parkinson’s disease, but information about their prevalence and incidence in community representative samples remains sparse. Methods We recruited a community-representative sample 38173 older men aged 65–85 years in 1996 and used data linkage to ascertain the presence of PD, affective disorders, psychotic disorders and dementia. Diagnoses followed the International Classification of Disease coding system. Age was recorded in years. Follow up data were available until December 2011. Results The mean age of participants was 72.5 years and 333 men (0.9%) had PD at study entry. Affective and psychotic disorders and dementia were more frequent in men with than without PD (respective odds ratios: 6.3 [95%CI = 4.7, 8.4]; 14.2 [95%CI = 8.4, 24.0] and 18.2 [95%CI = 13.4, 24.6]). Incidence rate ratios of affective and psychotic disorders were higher among men with than without PD, although ratios decreased with increasing age. The age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of an affective episode associated with PD was 5.0 (95%CI = 4.2, 5.9). PD was associated with an age-adjusted HR of 8.6 (95%CI = 6.1, 12.0) for psychotic disorders and 6.1 (95%CI = 5.5, 6.8) for dementia. PD and dementia increased the HR of depressive and psychotic disorders. Conclusions PD increases the risk of affective and psychotic disorders, as well as dementia, among community dwelling older men. The risk of a recorded diagnosis of affective and psychotic disorders decreases with increasing age. PMID:27689715

  10. Short-term teriparatide treatment does not affect NT-proBNP, a marker of cardiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Maria; Schwarz, Peter; Hansen, Ann Caroline;

    2012-01-01

    of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is seen in PHPT patients. The N-terminal fragment of the pro-peptide of Brain Natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a risk marker of CVD, has been shown to be elevated in PHPT patients, indicating that continuously high concentrations of PTH affect the heart. Therefore the aim...... of this study was to investigate whether teriparatide treatment is associated with changes in plasma NT-proBNP....

  11. Drug therapies and presence of coronary artery disease may affect aortic stiffness in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bektaş O

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Osman Bektaş,1 Zeki Yüksel Günaydin,1 Ahmet Karagöz,2 Ahmet Kaya1 1Ordu University, Department of Cardiology, Ordu, 2Giresun University, Department of Cardiology, Giresun, TurkeyWe have read the original research entitled "Altered diastolic function and aortic stiffness in Alzheimer’s disease" by Çalık et al1 which was published in the July 2014 issue of Clinical Interventions in Aging, with great interest. We would like to touch on some points about this article.View original paper by Çalık and colleagues

  12. Depression and anxiety among coronary heart disease patients: can affect dimensions and theory inform diagnostic disorder-based screening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Phillip J; Penninx, Brenda W

    2012-04-01

    To examine the association between low positive affect, somatic anxiety and general distress with affective disorders, anxious misery, and visceral fear among coronary heart disease patients. Patients awaiting a coronary revascularization procedure (N = 158; 20.9% female; median age = 65, interquartile range 58-73) underwent structured interview with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Patients completed a brief version of the Mood and Anxiety Symptom Questionnaire (i.e., Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27) and a measure of Type D personality. Somatic anxiety scores yielded an area under the curve (AUC) = .784 and 75.0% sensitivity and 68.5% specificity in relation to panic disorder. Low positive affect yielded AUC = .811 and 70.4% sensitivity and 77.1% specificity for major depression. General distress yielded AUC = .795 and 75.0% sensitivity and 72.5% specificity for generalized anxiety disorder. No affective dimension was optimally associated with the anxious misery or visceral fear cluster. Trait negative affect was not a suitable screener for any disorder. The Anxiety Depression Distress Inventory-27 dimensions of low positive affect and somatic anxiety provided optimal detection of depression and panic disorder, respectively, as hypothesized, supporting discriminant validity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Differential serologic response to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini in lambs affected with chronic respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, M; Rosenbusch, R F; Lopez-Virella, J; Kaeberle, M L

    1999-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) was used to evaluate the levels of antibodies to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and M. arginini in lambs with chronic respiratory disease. Sera were obtained from lambs in several flocks at various stages of the clinical disease and tested with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-treated M. ovipneumoniae and M. arginini whole cells and a crude capsular extract of M. ovipneumoniae as the antigens. There were low levels of antibody to M. ovipneumoniae in flocks sampled at the early stages of infection, whereas increased levels of antibody were present in lambs from flocks that had apparently recovered from the clinical disease. Slowly rising titers of circulating antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae were confirmed by sequential bleeding of lambs during the course of the clinical disease. However, antibody levels of M. arginini were more likely to increase earlier in the disease process. There was significant cross-reactivity between the 2 SDS-treated antigens in both the ELISA test and western immunoblotting. In contrast, the crude capsular extract was specific for detecting antibodies to M. ovipneumoniae.

  14. Visual conditions and postural directions affect postural sway variability in patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Madalena Rinaldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Postural sway variability was evaluated in Parkinson’s disease (PD patients at different stages of disease. Twenty PD patients were grouped into two groups (unilateral, 14; bilateral, 6 according to disease severity. The results showed no significant differences in postural sway variability between the groups (p ≥ 0.05. Postural sway variability was higher in the antero-posterior direction and with the eyes closed. Significant differences between the unilateral and bilateral groups were observed in clinical tests (UPDRS, Berg Balance Scale, and retropulsion test; p ≤ 0.05, all. Postural sway variability was unaffected by disease severity, indicating that neurological mechanisms for postural control still function at advanced stages of disease. Postural sway instability appears to occur in the antero-posterior direction to compensate for the stooped posture. The eyes-closed condition during upright stance appears to be challenging for PD patients because of the associated sensory integration deficit. Finally, objective measures such as postural sway variability may be more reliable than clinical tests to evaluate changes in balance control in PD patients.

  15. Parents helping parents: does this psychological mechanism work when the child is affected by a high risk disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, L M; Caprino, D; Zarri, D R

    2005-12-01

    Mutual help relationships are very important among families with children affected by serious diseases. Discussing common problems and experiences can provide the stimulus for developing the coping strategies that are needed to face new situations. This can thus be done with an outlook that nurtures subsequent adjustment and restoration of a good quality of life after diagnosis and the start of therapy. However, when parents are faced with the ordeal of a child affected by a high risk disease, this interaction may have detrimental effects. Through our observations of the behavior and relationships of 217 families over 5 years, we have been able to identify the caregiver as the staff member who can provide true and helpful support to the children and their parents. This caregiver is in touch with the psychologist supervisor on a daily basis, as well as with all the staff members involved in the global care of the child, including physicians, nurses, school teachers, and play workers. We strongly believe that physicians and caregivers must adopt strategies and practices to improve communication with, and often among, the families of affected children, and that they must act as a reliable source of support for their hopes for a cure. Treatment and recovery must never be proposed as a war to be won, but rather as an alliance among patients, parents, physicians and other caregivers that is formed to build health, and not merely to destroy the disease.

  16. Primary care nursing activities with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Ariane; Hudon, Catherine; Poitras, Marie-Eve; Roberge, Pasquale; Chouinard, Maud-Christine

    2017-05-01

    To describe nursing activities in primary care with patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Patients in primary care who are affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders such as anxiety and depression require care and follow-up based on their physical and mental health condition. Primary care nurses are increasingly expected to contribute to the care and follow-up of this growing clientele. However, little is known about the actual activities carried out by primary care nurses in providing this service in the Province of Quebec (Canada). A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were obtained through semistructured individual interviews with 13 nurses practising among patients with physical chronic disease in seven Family Medicine Groups in Quebec (Canada). Participants described five activity domains: assessment of physical and mental health condition, care planning, interprofessional collaboration, therapeutic relationship and health promotion. The full potential of primary care nurses is not always exploited, and some activities could be improved. Evidence for including nurses in collaborative care for patients affected by physical chronic disease and common mental disorders has been shown but is not fully implemented in Family Medicine Groups. Future research should emphasise collaboration among mental health professionals, primary care nurses and family physicians in the care of patients with physical chronic disease and common mental disorders. Primary care nurses would benefit from gaining more knowledge about common mental disorders and from identifying the resources they need to contribute to managing them in an interdisciplinary team. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Counter-insurgents of the blue revolution? Parasites and diseases affecting aquaculture and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, Reginald B; Bullard, Stephen A

    2014-12-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest-growing segment of food production and is expected to supply a growing portion of animal protein for consumption by humans. Because industrial aquaculture developed only recently compared to industrial agriculture, its development occurred within the context of a growing environmental awareness and acknowledgment of environmental issues associated with industrial farming. As such, parasites and diseases have become central criticisms of commercial aquaculture. This focus on parasites and diseases, however, has created a nexus of opportunities for research that has facilitated considerable scientific advances in the fields of parasitology and aquaculture. This paper reviews Myxobolus cerebralis , Lepeophtheirus salmonis , white spot syndrome virus, and assorted flatworms as select marquee aquaculture pathogens, summarizes the status of the diseases caused by each and their impacts on aquaculture, and highlights some of the significant contributions these pathogens have made to the science of parasitology and aquaculture.

  18. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Nidhi; Nayak, Saumya; Lee, Jessie; Pai Raikar, Srinivas; Hou, David; Sockalingam, Senthil; Lee, Ken J

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. PMID:28255233

  19. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  20. Possible interaction between myxomatosis and calicivirosis related to rabbit haemorrhagic disease affecting the European rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchandeau, S; Bertagnoli, S; Peralta, B; Boucraut-Baralon, C; Letty, J; Reitz, F

    2004-11-06

    Serological data on myxoma virus, rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) virus and RHD-like viruses in juvenile rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) trapped in 1995, 1996 and 1997 in two areas of France were analysed. For each disease, the effects of bodyweight, year, month and seropositivity for the other disease were modelled by using logistic regressions. In one area, a model including RHD seropositivity was selected to explain the myxoma virus seropositivity. Models including myxoma virus seropositivity were selected to explain the RHD seropositivity in both areas, and the odds of a rabbit being seropositive to both viruses were 5.1 and 8.4 times higher than the odds of a rabbit being seronegative to myxoma virus and seropositive to RHD. The year and bodyweight had significant effects for myxomatosis in one area and for RHD in both areas.

  1. Impact of radiation therapy for benign diseases; Role de la radiotherapie dans les affections benignes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), Fondation Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Van Houtte, P.; Beauvois, S.; Roelandts, M. [Institut Bordet, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-12-31

    Radiation therapy of benign diseases represent a wide panel of indications. Some indications are clearly identified as treatment of arteriovenous malformations (AVM), hyperthyroid ophthalmopathy, postoperative heterotopic bone formations or keloid scars. Some indications are under evaluation as complications induced by neo-vessels of age-related macular degeneration or coronary restenosis after angioplasty. Some indications remain controversial with poor evidence of efficiency as treatment of bursitis, tendinitis or Dupuytren`s disease. Some indications are now obsolete such as warts, or contra-indicated as treatment of infant and children. (authors)

  2. Maternal intermediate repeat expansion into the affected range in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Belzen, M.J.; Belfroid, R.D.M.; Losekoot, M.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Van Langen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intermediate repeat alleles are usually stable when transmitted to the next generation. However, in a small percentage of transmissions these repeats expand into the affected range, leading to a new mutation and a sporadic patient. Until now, expansions of intermediate alleles into the a

  3. Maternal intermediate repeat expansion into the affected range in Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Belzen, M.J.; Belfroid, R.D.M.; Losekoot, M.; Walstra, G.J.M.; Van Langen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Intermediate repeat alleles are usually stable when transmitted to the next generation. However, in a small percentage of transmissions these repeats expand into the affected range, leading to a new mutation and a sporadic patient. Until now, expansions of intermediate alleles into the a

  4. Time of Initiating Enzyme Replacement Therapy Affects Immune Abnormalities and Disease Severity in Patients with Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanou, Chidima; Plassmeyer, Matthew; Ryherd, Mark; Kozhaya, Lina; Austin, Lauren; Abidoglu, Cem; Unutmaz, Derya; Alpan, Oral; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) patients often present with abnormalities in immune response that may be the result of alterations in cellular and/or humoral immunity. However, how the treatment and clinical features of patients impact the perturbation of their immunological status remains unclear. To address this, we assessed the immune profile of 26 GD patients who were part of an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) study. Patients were evaluated clinically for onset of GD symptoms, duration of therapy and validated outcome measures for ERT. According to DS3 disease severity scoring system criteria, they were assigned to have mild, moderate or severe GD. Flow cytometry based immunophenotyping was performed to analyze subsets of T, B, NK, NKT and dendritic cells. GD patients showed multiple types of immune abnormalities associated to T and B lymphocytes with respect to their subpopulations as well as memory and activation markers. Skewing of CD4 and CD8 T cell numbers resulting in lower CD4/CD8 ratio and an increase in overall T cell activation were observed. A decrease in the overall B cells and an increase in NK and NKT cells were noted in the GD patients compared to controls. These immune alterations do not correlate with GD clinical type or level of biomarkers. However, subjects with persistent immune alterations, especially in B cells and DCs correlate with longer delay in initiation of ERT (ΔTX). Thus, while ERT may reverse some of these immune abnormalities, the immune cell alterations become persistent if therapy is further delayed. These findings have important implications in understanding the immune disruptions before and after treatment of GD patients. PMID:27942037

  5. Periodontal Health and Caries Prevalence Evaluation in Patients Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cicciù

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder related to the loss or absence of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. These deficits result in slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity, and dysfunction of behaviour. These symptoms negatively influence the patient’s capability to carry out the daily oral hygiene manoeuvres. The aim of this work is to record the oral health condition of PD patients evaluated at the IRCSS Bonino-Puleio in Messina. The oral health of 45 consecutive PD patients (study group with neurologic diagnosis based on United Kingdom Brain Bank Criteria has been compared with that of another 45 no PD patients of the same age (control group. The evaluation of the general oral condition was recorded underlining tooth loss, active periodontal disease, and presence of untreated caries. The frequency of untreated caries, periodontal diseases, and missing teeth of the study group was significantly higher than in control group. Based on the data results, clinicians should direct high attention to the oral hygiene of patients with PD, above all at the early stages of the caries or periodontal disease, in order to prevent serious evolution of those pathologic dental conditions that may finally result in the tooth extraction event.

  6. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup N

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nidhi Swarup,1 Saumya Nayak,2 Jessie Lee,2 Srinivas Pai Raikar,2 David Hou,2 Senthil Sockalingam,2 Ken J Lee2 1Crohn’s and Colitis Society of Singapore (CCSS, The Arcadia, 2QuintilesIMS, Science Park One, Singapore Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. Keywords: patient advocacy groups, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, patients, caregivers

  7. McArdle disease does not affect skeletal muscle fibre type profiles in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertius Abraham Kohn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from glycogen storage disease V (McArdle disease were shown to have higher surface electrical activity in their skeletal muscles when exercising at the same intensity as their healthy counterparts, indicating more muscle fibre recruitment. To explain this phenomenon, this study investigated whether muscle fibre type is shifted towards a predominance in type I fibres as a consequence of the disease. Muscle biopsies from the Biceps brachii (BB (n = 9 or Vastus lateralis (VL (n = 8 were collected over a 13-year period from male and female patients diagnosed with McArdle disease, analysed for myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform content using SDS-PAGE, and compared to healthy controls (BB: n = 3; VL: n = 10. All three isoforms were expressed and no difference in isoform expression in VL was found between the McArdle patients and healthy controls (MHC I: 33±19% vs. 43±7%; MHC IIa: 52±9% vs. 40±7%; MHC IIx: 15±18% vs. 17±9%. Similarly, the BB isoform content was also not different between the two groups (MHC I: 33±14% vs. 30±11%; MHC IIa: 46±17% vs. 39±5%; MHC IIx: 21±13% vs. 31±14%. In conclusion, fibre type distribution does not seem to explain the higher surface EMG in McArdle patients. Future studies need to investigate muscle fibre size and contractility of McArdle patients.

  8. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria;

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes...

  9. Periodontal Health and Caries Prevalence Evaluation in Patients Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciù, Marco; Risitano, Giacomo; Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Bramanti, Ennio

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder related to the loss or absence of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. These deficits result in slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity, and dysfunction of behaviour. These symptoms negatively influence the patient's capability to carry out the daily oral hygiene manoeuvres. The aim of this work is to record the oral health condition of PD patients evaluated at the IRCSS Bonino-Puleio in Messina. The oral health of 45 consecutive PD patients (study group) with neurologic diagnosis based on United Kingdom Brain Bank Criteria has been compared with that of another 45 no PD patients of the same age (control group). The evaluation of the general oral condition was recorded underlining tooth loss, active periodontal disease, and presence of untreated caries. The frequency of untreated caries, periodontal diseases, and missing teeth of the study group was significantly higher than in control group. Based on the data results, clinicians should direct high attention to the oral hygiene of patients with PD, above all at the early stages of the caries or periodontal disease, in order to prevent serious evolution of those pathologic dental conditions that may finally result in the tooth extraction event. PMID:23320249

  10. Detection of colour vision changes in patients with systemic diseases that can affect the eye

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KEUKEN, A; RODRIGUEZ‐CARMONA, M; BARBUR, JL

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Changes in colour vision can provide the earliest signs of vision loss caused by either retinal or systemic disease (Expert Rev.Ophthalmol. 6(4):409‐420,2011). Both yellow‐blue (YB) and red‐green (RG...

  11. Identification of seven loci affecting mean telomere length and their association with disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Codd, Veryan; Nelson, Christopher P.; Albrecht, Eva; Mangino, Massimo; Deelen, Joris; Buxton, Jessica L.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Fischer, Krista; Esko, Tonu; Surakka, Ida; Broer, Linda; Nyholt, Dale R.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Salo, Perttu; Hagg, Sara; Matthews, Mary K.; Palmen, Jutta; Norata, Giuseppe D.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Saleheen, Danish; Amin, Najaf; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Beekman, Marian; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Bohringer, Stefan; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Denniff, Matthew; Dong, Yanbin; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Dubinina, Elena; Eriksson, Johan G.; Garlaschelli, Katia; Guo, Dehuang; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Henders, Anjali K.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Kananen, Laura; Karssen, Lennart C.; Kettunen, Johannes; Klopp, Norman; Lagou, Vasiliki; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Madden, Pamela A.; Maegi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mannisto, Satu; McCarthy, Mark I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peters, Annette; Pollard, Helen; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Suchiman, H. Eka D.; Valdes, Ana M.; Verweij, Niek; Vinuela, Ana; Wang, Xiaoling; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wright, Margaret J.; Xia, Kai; Xiao, Xiangjun; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Catapano, Alberico L.; Tobin, Martin D.; Hall, Alistair S.; Blakemore, Alexandra I. F.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Zhu, Haidong; Erdmann, Jeanette; Reilly, Muredach P.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Schunkert, Heribert; Talmud, Philippa J.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Perola, Markus; Ouwehand, Willem; Kaprio, Jaakko; Martin, Nicholas G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hovatta, Iris; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Slagboom, P. Eline; Thompson, John R.; Spector, Tim D.; van der Harst, Pim; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2013-01-01

    Interindividual variation in mean leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with cancer and several age-associated diseases. We report here a genome-wide meta-analysis of 37,684 individuals with replication of selected variants in an additional 10,739 individuals. We identified seven loci, inclu

  12. In Utero Cigarette Smoke Affects Allergic Airway Disease But Does Not Alter the Lung Methylome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Eyring

    Full Text Available Prenatal and postnatal cigarette smoke exposure enhances the risk of developing asthma. Despite this as well as other smoking related risks, 11% of women still smoke during pregnancy. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke exposure during prenatal development generates long lasting differential methylation altering transcriptional activity that correlates with disease. In a house dust mite (HDM model of allergic airway disease, we measured airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR and airway inflammation between mice exposed prenatally to cigarette smoke (CS or filtered air (FA. DNA methylation and gene expression were then measured in lung tissue. We demonstrate that HDM-treated CS mice develop a more severe allergic airway disease compared to HDM-treated FA mice including increased AHR and airway inflammation. While DNA methylation changes between the two HDM-treated groups failed to reach genome-wide significance, 99 DMRs had an uncorrected p-value < 0.001. 6 of these 99 DMRs were selected for validation, based on the immune function of adjacent genes, and only 2 of the 6 DMRs confirmed the bisulfite sequencing data. Additionally, genes near these 6 DMRs (Lif, Il27ra, Tle4, Ptk7, Nfatc2, and Runx3 are differentially expressed between HDM-treated CS mice and HDM-treated FA mice. Our findings confirm that prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke is sufficient to modify allergic airway disease; however, it is unlikely that specific methylation changes account for the exposure-response relationship. These findings highlight the important role in utero cigarette smoke exposure plays in the development of allergic airway disease.

  13. DOES COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AFFECT REHABILITATION OUTCOME IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Ferrazzoli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cognitive status is generally considered as a major determinant of rehabilitation outcome in Parkinson’s disease. No studies about the effect of cognitive impairment on motor rehabilitation outcomes in Parkinson’s disease have been performed before.Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of cognitive decline on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Methods: We retrospectively identified 485 patients with Parkinson’s disease hospitalized for a 4-week Multidisciplinary Intensive Rehabilitation Treatment between January 2014 and September 2015. According to Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, patients were divided into: group 1 - normal cognition (score 27-30, group 2 - mild cognitive impairment (score 21-26, group 3 - moderate or severe cognitive impairment (score ≤ 20. According to Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB, subjects were divided into patients with normal (score ≥ 13.8 and pathological (score < 13.8 executive functions. The outcomes measures were: Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, Parkinson’s Disease Disability Scale, Six Minutes Walking, Timed Up and Go Test and Berg Balance Scale. Results: All scales had worse values with the increasing of cognitive impairment and passing from normal to pathological executive functions. After rehabilitation, all the outcome measures improved in all groups (p<0.0001. Between groups, the percentage of improvement was significantly different for total UPDRS (p=0.0009, best improvement in normal MMSE group; p=0.019, best improvement in normal FAB group, and Berg Balance Scale (p<0.0001, all pairwise comparisons significant, best improvement in patients with worse MMSE score; p<0.0001, best improvement in patients with pathological FAB. Timed Up and Go Test (p=0.006 and Berg Balance Scale (p<0.0001 improved in patients with pathological FAB score, more than in those with normal FAB score.Conclusions: Patients gain benefit in the

  14. Factors affecting survival in advanced chronic kidney disease patients who choose not to receive dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C F; McCarthy, M; Howse, M L P; Williams, P S

    2007-01-01

    Non-dialytic treatment (NDT) has become a recognized and important modality of treatment in end stage renal disease (ESRD) in certain groups of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, little is known about the prognosis of these NDT patients in terms of hospitalization rates and survival. We analyzed our experience in managing these NDT with a multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach over a three-year period. The Renal Unit at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital set up a dedicated MDT clinic to manage NDT patients in January 2003. Patients approaching end stage chronic kidney disease who chose not to dialyse were recruited from other nephrologists. The study group was classified according to age band (80 years), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (20 ml/min) according to the Modified Diet In Renal Disease formula and Stoke comorbidity grade (SCG). The SCG is a validated scoring system for the survival of patients on renal replacement therapy. We also used the ERA-EDTA primary renal diagnosis codes. As there are no existing standards for NDT patients, we used the U.K. national set for haemodialysis patients as a reference and target for our NDT patients. Data was collected prospectively. The median age was 79 years and the male: female ratio was approximately 1. The most common primary cause of kidney disease in the NDT study population was chronic renal failure of unknown cause n = 22 (31%), but the most common identifiable cause was diabetic nephropathy, n = 20 (28%). The most common comorbidity was ischaemic heart disease n = 25 (34%). Those achieving the standards for anaemia were 78% at referral. Only 30% of the NDT patients achieved the standard for blood pressure (managing their chosen modality to achieve the best possible quality of life. There should be integrated services with primary care, community nurses, and palliative care teams to enable the majority of the patient's treatment to be carried out at home and to allow a dignified death

  15. How do periodontal infections affect the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Munvar M; Ahmad, Sultan; Gan, Siew H; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Ahmad, Ejaz; Tabrez, Shams; Ahmed, Farid; Kamal, Mohammad A

    2014-04-01

    Chronic infection can cause slow progressive dementia, cortical atrophy and amyloid deposition in the atrophic form of general paresis. Due to the fact that specific bacterial ligands can increase the expression of proinflammatory molecules that can activate innate and adaptive immune systems, inflammation may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, there is a significant association between AD and various types of spirochete. Periodontitis is a prevalent and persistent peripheral infection that is associated with gram-negative anaerobic bacteria and is capable of showing localized and systemic infections in the host. Periodontal disease related pathogens and their inflammatory products contribute to systemic inflammation and the pathogenesis of AD. In this minireview, we propose a hypothetical link between periodontitis, type 2 diabetes and AD. We also present the possible mechanistic links between periodontitis-related inflammation, type 2 diabetes and AD. Since this condition is treatable, periodontitis may be a readily-modifiable risk factor for AD.

  16. How Ambient Humidity May Affect the Transmission of Viral Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan; Marr, Linsey; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2013-04-01

    Viral infectious diseases such as influenza have been a great burden to public health. The airborne transmission route is an important venue for the spread of many respiratory viral diseases. Many airborne viruses have been shown to be sensitive to ambient humidity, yet the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain elusive. A thorough understanding of this phenomenon may provide insight into the temporal and spatial distribution of diseases. For instance, studies have repeatedly suggested ambient humidity as an important environmental determinant in the transmission of influenza in temperate regions. Further, knowing how to optimize humidity so as to minimize virus survival may have practical implications for disease prevention. In this talk, we will discuss multiple mechanisms that may account for the association between humidity and viability of viruses in aerosols, including water activity, surface inactivation, salt toxicity, and conformational changes to the virus in response to varying pH. As a case study, we will discuss our work on the effect of relative humidity (RH) on survival of influenza A virus (IAV) and how it may contribute to the transmission patterns of seasonal flu around the world. We measured the change in viability of IAV in droplets at various RHs. Results suggest three potential regimes defined by humidity: physiological (~100% RH) with high viability, concentrated (~50% to near 100% RH) with lower viability, and dry (<~50% RH) with high viability. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic basis for the dependence of IAV's transmission on humidity. In temperate regions, the increase in influenza activity in winter may be due to enhanced transmission via the aerosol route thanks to IAV's higher viability in droplets at low RH. In tropical regions, transmission could be enhanced due to high viability of IAV at extremely high RH (rainy season), as observed in our study, possibly through both the aerosol route and the contact

  17. Seasonal changes in calcium homeostasis affect the incidence of postoperative tetany in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, H; Noguchi, S; Murakami, T; Watanabe, S; Uchino, S; Ohshima, A; Kawamoto, H; Toda, M; Yamashita, H

    2000-04-01

    We have found that postoperative tetany occurs in patients with Graves' disease who have secondary hyperparathyroidism caused by a deficiency in calcium and vitamin D concomitant with transient hypoparathyroidism after surgery. There are seasonal variations in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of seasonal changes in calcium homeostasis on the incidence of postoperative tetany in patients with Graves' disease who undergo subtotal thyroidectomy. A prospective study was carried out to investigate sequential changes in serum levels of intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), calcium and other electrolytes, 25(OH)D, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D) in female patients with Graves' disease who underwent subtotal thyroidectomy during the summer (n = 89) and during the winter (n = 89). The serum levels of calcium, magnesium, and 25(OH)D were significantly higher, but iPTH levels and 1,25(OH)2D levels were lower in summer than in winter. The percentage of vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D tetany developed in only 4 of 15 patients and in one patient whose iPTH level was below normal (incidence of tetany, 5.6%). In winter, however, tetany developed in 6 of 13 patients and in 4 patients whose iPTH level was below normal (incidence of tetany, 11.2%). Patients with Graves' disease are more susceptible to calcium and vitamin D deficiency during the winter than during the summer, resulting in the tendency toward a higher incidence of postoperative tetany in winter.

  18. The Physiology of Ultradian Rhythms and Their Role in Affecting Disease Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reveree side it necessary mnd Identify by block number) Biological Rhytms; Chronobiology ; Mortality; Performance...1983). Cardiomyopathic hamsters are an inbred strain with a genetically determined heart disease that results in heart failure and early death. Forty...Some aspects of chronobiology relating to the optimization of shift work. In Shift Work and Health: A Symposium. Washington DC: U.S. Gov’t Printing

  19. ECHS1 mutations in Leigh disease: a new inborn error of metabolism affecting valine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Heidi; Buck, Nicole; Wanders, Ronald; Ruiter, Jos; Waterham, Hans; Koster, Janet; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Ferdinandusse, Sacha; Pitt, James

    2014-11-01

    Two siblings with fatal Leigh disease had increased excretion of S-(2-carboxypropyl)cysteine and several other metabolites that are features of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) deficiency, a rare defect in the valine catabolic pathway associated with Leigh-like disease. However, this diagnosis was excluded by HIBCH sequencing and normal enzyme activity. In contrast to HIBCH deficiency, the excretion of 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-carnitine was normal in the children, suggesting deficiency of short-chain enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECHS1 gene). This mitochondrial enzyme is active in several metabolic pathways involving fatty acids and amino acids, including valine, and is immediately upstream of HIBCH in the valine pathway. Both children were compound heterozygous for a c.473C > A (p.A158D) missense mutation and a c.414+3G>C splicing mutation in ECHS1. ECHS1 activity was markedly decreased in cultured fibroblasts from both siblings, ECHS1 protein was undetectable by immunoblot analysis and transfection of patient cells with wild-type ECHS1 rescued ECHS1 activity. The highly reactive metabolites methacrylyl-CoA and acryloyl-CoA accumulate in deficiencies of both ECHS1 and HIBCH and are probably responsible for the brain pathology in both disorders. Deficiency of ECHS1 or HIBCH should be considered in children with Leigh disease. Urine metabolite testing can detect and distinguish between these two disorders.

  20. How do demographic transitions and public health policies affect patients with Parkinson’s disease in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Tânia M; Felicio, Andre C

    2017-01-01

    Brazil is currently experiencing a significant demographic transition characterized by a decrease in fertility rates and an exponential increase in the number of elderly citizens, which presents a special challenge for the health care professionals. More than other portions of the population, the elderly are most commonly affected by chronic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. Policymakers contend that Brazil is reasonably well-prepared regarding elderly health care, with policies that aim to ensure the quality of life and the well-being of this portion of the population. However, what happens in practice falls short of what the Brazilian Constitution sets forth. Specifically, there is a clear contradiction between what the law recognizes as being a citizen’s rights and the implementation of guidelines. Because health financing in Brazil remains relatively low, the civil society tries to fill in the gaps as much as possible in the treatment of elderly patients suffering from chronic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. In this review, we outline the current legislation in Brazil regarding the elderly and in particular, patients with Parkinson’s disease, in the context of a rapidly aging population. PMID:28182156

  1. Factors Affecting Changes in the Glomerular Filtration Rate after Unilateral Nephrectomy in Living Kidney Donors and Patients with Renal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Ok; Chae, Sun Young; Back, Sora; Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We evaluated the factors affecting changes in the postoperative glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after unilateral nephrectomy in living kidney donors and patients with renal disease. We studied 141 subjects who underwent living donor nephrectomy for renal transplantation (n=75) or unilateral nephrectomy for renal diseases (n=66). The GFR of the individual kidney was determined by Tc-99m DTPA scintigraphy before and after nephrectomy. By performing multiple linear regression analysis, we evaluated the factors that are thought to affect changes in GFR, such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), preoperative GFR, preoperative creatinine level, operated side, presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), presence of hypertension (HTN), and duration of follow-up. In both the donor nephrectomy and the disease nephrectomy groups, GFR increased significantly after nephrectomy (46.9{+-}8.4 to 58.1{+-}12.5 vs. 43.0{+-}9.6 to 48.6{+-}12.8 ml/min, p<0.05). In the donor nephrectomy group, age was significantly associated with change in GFR ({beta}=-0.3, P<0.005). In the disease nephrectomy group, HTN, preoperative creatinine level, and age were significantly associated with change in GFR ({beta}=-6.2, p<0.005; {beta}=-10.9, p<0.01; {beta}=-0.2, p<0.01, respectively). This compensatory change in GFR was not significantly related to sex, duration of follow-up, or operated side in either group. The compensatory change in the GFR of the remaining kidney declined with increasing age in both living kidney donors and patients with renal disease.

  2. Rare mutations of CACNB2 found in autism spectrum disease-affected families alter calcium channel function.

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    Alexandra F S Breitenkamp

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD are complex neurodevelopmental diseases clinically defined by dysfunction of social interaction. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis might be involved in ASD pathogenesis, and genes coding for the L-type calcium channel subunits CaV1.2 (CACNA1C and CaVβ2 (CACNB2 were recently identified as risk loci for psychiatric diseases. Here, we present three rare missense mutations of CACNB2 (G167S, S197F, and F240L found in ASD-affected families, two of them described here for the first time (G167S and F240L. All these mutations affect highly conserved regions while being absent in a sample of ethnically matched controls. We suggest the mutations to be of physiological relevance since they modulate whole-cell Ba2+ currents through calcium channels when expressed in a recombinant system (HEK-293 cells. Two mutations displayed significantly decelerated time-dependent inactivation as well as increased sensitivity of voltage-dependent inactivation. In contrast, the third mutation (F240L showed significantly accelerated time-dependent inactivation. By altering the kinetic parameters, the mutations are reminiscent of the CACNA1C mutation causing Timothy Syndrome, a Mendelian disease presenting with ASD. In conclusion, the results of our first-time biophysical characterization of these three rare CACNB2 missense mutations identified in ASD patients support the hypothesis that calcium channel dysfunction may contribute to autism.

  3. A genome-screen experiment to detect quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to facial eczema disease in sheep.

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    Phua, S H; Dodds, K G; Morris, C A; Henry, H M; Beattie, A E; Garmonsway, H G; Towers, N R; Crawford, A M

    2009-02-01

    Facial eczema (FE) is a secondary photosensitization disease arising from liver cirrhosis caused by the mycotoxin sporidesmin. The disease affects sheep, cattle, deer and goats, and costs the New Zealand sheep industry alone an estimated NZ$63M annually. A long-term sustainable solution to this century-old FE problem is to breed for disease-resistant animals by marker-assisted selection. As a step towards finding a diagnostic DNA test for FE sensitivity, we have conducted a genome-scan experiment to screen for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting this trait in Romney sheep. Four F(1) sires, obtained from reciprocal matings of FE resistant and susceptible selection-line animals, were used to generate four outcross families. The resulting half-sib progeny were artificially challenged with sporidesmin to phenotype their FE traits measured in terms of their serum levels of liver-specific enzymes, namely gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase. In a primary screen using selective genotyping on extreme progeny of each family, a total of 244 DNA markers uniformly distributed over all 26 ovine autosomes (with an autosomal genome coverage of 79-91%) were tested for linkage to the FE traits. Data were analysed using Haley-Knott regression. The primary screen detected one significant and one suggestive QTL on chromosomes 3 and 8 respectively. Both the significant and suggestive QTL were followed up in a secondary screen where all progeny were genotyped and analysed; the QTL on chromosome 3 was significant in this analysis.

  4. The novel multitarget iron chelating and propargylamine drug M30 affects APP regulation and processing activities in Alzheimer's disease models.

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    Amit, Tamar; Bar-Am, Orit; Mechlovich, Danit; Kupershmidt, Lana; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2017-09-01

    In many of the neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and AD-related disorders, as well as in the regular ageing process, excessive generation of oxidative stress (OS) and accumulation of iron levels and deposition have been observed in specific affected-brain regions and thus, regarded as contributing factors to the pathogenesis of the diseases. In AD, iron promotes amyloid β (Aβ) neurotoxicity by producing free radical damage and OS in brain areas affected by neurodegeneration, presumably by facilitating the aggregation of Aβ. In addition, it was shown that iron modulates intracellular levels of the holo amyloid precursor protein (APP) by iron-responsive elements (IRE) RNA stem loops in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the APP transcript. As a consequence of these observations, iron chelation is one of the major new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AD. This review describes the benefits and importance of the multimodal brain permeable chimeric iron-chelating/propargylamine drug M30, concerning its neuroprotective/neurorestorative inter-related activities relevant of the pathological features ascribed to AD, with a special focus on the effect of the drug on APP regulation and processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Scientific literature on infectious diseases affecting livestock animals, longitudinal worldwide bibliometric analysis.

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    Ducrot, Christian; Gautret, Marjolaine; Pineau, Thierry; Jestin, André

    2016-03-14

    The objectives of this bibliometric analysis of the scientific literature were to describe the research subjects and the international collaborations in the field of research on infectious diseases in livestock animals including fishes and honeybees. It was based on articles published worldwide from 2006 through 2013. The source of data was the Web of Science, Core collection(®) and only papers fully written in English were considered. Queries were built that combined 130 descriptors related to animal species and 1213 descriptors related to diseases and pathogens. To refine and assess the accuracy of the extracted database, supplementary filters were applied to discard non-specific terms and neighbouring topics, and numerous tests were carried out on samples. For pathogens, annotation was done using a thematic terminology established to link each disease with its corresponding pathogen, which was in turn classified according to its family. A total of 62,754 articles were published in this field during this 8-year period. The average annual growth rate of the number of papers was 5%. This represents the reference data to which we compared the average annual growth rate of articles produced in each of the sub-categories that we defined. Thirty-seven percent of the papers were dedicated to ruminant diseases. Poultry, pigs and fishes were covered by respectively 21, 13 and 14% of the total. Thirty-seven percent of papers concerned bacteria, 33% viruses, 19% parasites, 2% prions, the remaining being multi-pathogens. Research on virology, especially on pigs and poultry, is increasing faster than the average. There also is increasing interest in monogastric species, fish and bees. The average annual growth rate for Asia was 10%, which is high compared to 3% for Europe and 2% for the Americas, indicating that Asia is currently playing a leading role in this field. There is a well established network of international collaborations. For 75% of the papers, the co

  6. Unusual hematologic disease affecting Caucasian children traveling to Southeast Asia: acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia

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    Anselm Chi-Wai Lee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old American boy was staying with his family in Indonesia. He presented with a 5-month history of recurrent bruises and ecchymosis. A clinical diagnosis of acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia was made when his full blood counts showed hypereosinophilia (7.4×10 9/L with normal platelet count and gray platelets under the microscope. The diagnosis was supported by abnormal platelet aggregation tests consistent with a storage pool disorder. The bleeding symptoms and eosinophilia resolved a month later with a full course of antihelminthic therapy. Hematologists should be aware of this unusual disease in travelers returning from the Southeast Asia.

  7. Non-nociceptive pain in rheumatoid arthritis is frequent and affects disease activity estimation

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    Christensen, A W; Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Christensen, R

    2016-01-01

    in the medium and high PDQ groups scored worse on indicators of anxiety, depression, disability, mental health-related quality of life, pain, and fatigue. They also had more tender points and an RA disease activity score based on 28 joints (DAS28) where a higher fraction of the composite score pertained to non......-inflammatory factors compared to patients in the low PDQ classification group. There were no differences in objective inflammatory indices across groups. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the tender joint count (TJC) and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF36) mental component summary (MCS) score were...

  8. Derivation of Huntington Disease affected Genea046 human embryonic stem cell line

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    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea046 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, carrying HTT gene CAG expansion of 45 repeats, indicative of Huntington Disease. Following ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders, karyotype was confirmed as 46, XX by CGH and STR analysis demonstrated a female Allele pattern. The hESC line had pluripotent cell morphology, 85% of cells expressed Nanog, 92% Oct4, 75% Tra1–60 and 99% SSEA4 and demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination.

  9. Circulating TFH subset distribution is strongly affected in lupus patients with an active disease.

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    Carole Le Coz

    Full Text Available Follicular helper T cells (TFH represent a distinct subset of CD4(+ T cells specialized in providing help to B lymphocytes, which may play a central role in autoimmune diseases having a major B cell component such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Recently, TFH subsets that share common phenotypic and functional characteristics with TFH cells from germinal centers, have been described in the peripheral blood from healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of such populations in lupus patients. Circulating TFH cell subsets were defined by multicolor flow cytometry as TFH17 (CXCR3(-CCR6(+, TFH1 (CXCR3 (+ CCR6(- or TFH2 (CXCR3(-CCR6(- cells among CXCR5 (+ CD45RA(-CD4(+ T cells in the peripheral blood of 23 SLE patients and 23 sex and age-matched healthy controls. IL-21 receptor expression by B cells was analyzed by flow cytometry and the serum levels of IL-21 and Igs were determined by ELISA tests. We found that the TFH2 cell subset frequency is strongly and significantly increased in lupus patients with an active disease (SLEDAI score>8, while the TFH1 cell subset percentage is greatly decreased. The TFH2 and TFH1 cell subset frequency alteration is associated with the presence of high Ig levels and autoantibodies in patient's sera. Moreover, the TFH2 cell subset enhancement correlates with an increased frequency of double negative memory B cells (CD27(-IgD(-CD19(+ cells expressing the IL-21R. Finally, we found that IgE levels in lupus patients' sera correlate with disease activity and seem to be associated with high TFH2 cell subset frequency. In conclusion, our study describes for the first time the distribution of circulating TFH cell subsets in lupus patients. Interestingly, we found an increased frequency of TFH2 cells, which correlates with disease activity. Our results suggest that this subset might play a key role in lupus pathogenesis.

  10. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

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    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  11. Apolipoprotein E ε4 does not affect cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease.

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    Mengel, David; Dams, Judith; Ziemek, Jannis; Becker, Julian; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Hilker, Rüdiger; Baudrexel, Simon; Kalbe, Elke; Schmidt, Nele; Witt, Karsten; Liepelt-Scarfone, Inga; Gräber, Susanne; Petrelli, Annette; Neuser, Petra; Schulte, Claudia; Linse, Katharina; Storch, Alexander; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Riedel, Oliver; Mollenhauer, Brit; Ebentheuer, Jens; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Klockgether, Thomas; Spottke, Annika; Wüllner, Ullrich; Schulz, Jörg B; Reetz, Kathrin; Heber, Ines Ann; Ramirez, Alfredo; Dodel, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common and disabling non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD). The apolipoprotein E (APOE) allele ε4 is a known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and has also been suggested to be a risk factor for dementia in PD and even a predictor of impairment in certain cognitive domains. A total of 447 PD patients (PD patients without cognitive impairment: n = 187; PD patients with mild cognitive impairment: n = 188; PD patients with dementia: n = 72) were included from an ongoing observational German multicenter cohort study (LANDSCAPE study). All patients underwent an extensive neuropsychological test battery, including assessments of memory, visuospatial functioning, attention, language, and executive function. APOE genotype was determined by an allelic discrimination assay. Linear regression analysis was used to explore the associations between APOE-ε4 and cognitive performance. The APOE-ε4 allele was not associated with a diagnosis of cognitive impairment in PD (PD with mild cognitive impairment and PD with dementia) or with deficits in specific neuropsychological domains in our study cohort. Our data question the relevance of the APOE-ε4 allele as a predictor of cognitive impairment in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease Does Not Affect Circulating Monocyte Subpopulations

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    Pawel Maga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes are mononuclear cells characterized by distinct morphology and expression of CD14 and CD16 surface receptors. Classical, quiescent monocytes are positive for CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor but do not express Fc gamma receptor III (CD16. Intermediate monocytes coexpress CD16 and CD14. Nonclassical monocytes with low expression of CD14 represent mature macrophage-like monocytes. Monocyte behavior in peripheral arterial disease (PAD and during vessel wall directed treatment is not well defined. This observation study aimed at monitoring of acute changes in monocyte subpopulations during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA in PAD patients. Patients with Rutherford 3 and 4 PAD with no signs of inflammatory process underwent PTA of iliac, femoral, or popliteal segments. Flow cytometry for CD14, CD16, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD11c, and CD45RA antigens allowed characterization of monocyte subpopulations in blood sampled before and after PTA (direct angioplasty catheter sampling. Patients were clinically followed up for 12 months. All 61 enrolled patients completed 12-month follow-up. Target vessel failure occurred in 12 patients. While absolute counts of monocyte were significantly lower after PTA, only subtle monocyte activation after PTA (CD45RA and β-integrins occurred. None of the monocyte parameters correlated with long-term adverse clinical outcome. Changes in absolute monocyte counts and subtle changes towards an activation phenotype after PTA may reflect local cell adhesion phenomenon in patients with Rutherford 3 or 4 peripheral arterial disease.

  13. Entomological factors affecting the low endemicity of Chagas disease in Nazca, Southwestern Peru.

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    Paredes-Esquivel, Claudia; Lecaros, Emilio; Aguliar-Rosales, Mauro; Acosta, Hilda Solis; Castellanos, Pedro

    2010-05-01

    Chagas disease is prevalent in Peru. The province of Nazca, in the southwestern region of the country, shows a high intradomiciliary infestation rate of Triatoma infestans bugs. Although the vector is present, the number of Chagas disease cases appears to be much lower than those reported in the neighboring region of Arequipa. We examined 624 T. infestans from Nazca to determine the current Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates, and found that no bugs were infected with this parasite. These results contrast with those found in Arequipa, where 19-30% triatomines have been reported infected. To compare their vectorial capacity, we infected 30 T. infestans specimens, selected both from Nazca and Arequipa, by feeding bugs on T. cruzi-infected mice. The parasites developed all stages expected in the vector; furthermore, the infective stage, metacyclic trypomastigote, was found in both insect populations from the second week after infection. In addition, those insects that accepted to be fed with mice blood defecated immediately after finishing blood meal, indicating that they might be efficient vectors. We maintain that differences observed in infection rates between vectors from Nazca and Arequipa may be explained by differences in host availability. In Arequipa hosts are mainly small animals, whereas in Nazca the main blood source comes from birds, which are refractory to the infection.

  14. Toll-like receptor 7 affects the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

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    Kim, Sokho; Park, Surim; Kim, Bumseok; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-06-09

    Recently, a possible link between toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and liver disease was suggested, although it was limited to fibrosis. Based on this report, we investigated whether TLR7 has a pivotal role in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The TLR7 signaling pathway, which is activated by imiquimod (TLR7 ligand) naturally, induced autophagy and released insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) into medium from hepatocytes. Lipid accumulation induced by unsaturated fatty acid (UFA; arachidonic acid:oleic acid = 1:1) in hepatocytes, was attenuated in TLR7 and autophagy activation. Interestingly, TLR7 activation attenuated UFA-induced lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-Hydroxy-2-Nonenal (4-HNE). To clarify a possible pathway between TLR7 and lipid peroxidation, we treated hepatocytes with MDA and 4-HNE. MDA and 4-HNE induced 2-folds lipid accumulation in UFA-treated hepatocytes via blockade of the TLR7 signaling pathway's IGF-1 release compared to only UFA-treated hepatocytes. In vivo experiments carried out with TLR7 knockout mice produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. In conclusion, TLR7 prevents progression of NAFLD via induced autophagy and released IGF-1 from liver. These findings suggest a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NAFLD.

  15. Would you terminate a pregnancy affected by sickle cell disease? Analysis of views of patients in Cameroon.

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    Wonkam, Ambroise; de Vries, Jantina; Royal, Charmaine D; Ramesar, Raj; Angwafo, Fru F

    2014-09-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a debilitating illness that affects quality of life and life expectancy for patients. In Cameroon, it is now possible to opt for termination of an affected pregnancy (TAP) where the fetus is found to be affected by SCD. Our earlier studies found that, contrary to the views of Cameroonian physicians, a majority of parents with their children suffering from SCD would choose to abort if the fetuses were found to be affected. What have not yet been investigated are the views of people suffering from/living with SCD. We used a quantitative sociological method, with administered structured questionnaires, to study the attitudes of adult patients suffering from SCD on prenatal genetic diagnosis (PND) and possible TAP. The majority of the 89 participants were urban dwellers (84.3%), women (57.3%), Christian (95.5%) and single (90.9%), with a secondary/tertiary education (79.5%). The majority (89.2%) would consider PND for SCD; almost half (48.5%) would reject TAP while 40.9% would consider it. Respondents who rejected TAP claimed mostly ethical reasons (78.1%) while those who found TAP acceptable cited fear of having an affected child (88.9%) and the poor quality of the affected child's health (81.5%). Cameroonian patients with SCD are generally supportive of PND and a remarkably high number of patients living with SCD reported that they would consider terminating a pregnancy based on their assessment of the future well-being of the child. Research is required to investigate the burden of SCD on families and their quality of life.

  16. Mapping QTL affecting resistance to Marek's disease in an F6 advanced intercross population of commercial layer chickens

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    Wang Jing

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease (MD is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the Marek's disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic avian herpesvirus. MD is a major cause of economic loss to the poultry industry and the most serious and persistent infectious disease concern. A full-sib intercross population, consisting of five independent families was generated by crossing and repeated intercrossing of two partially inbred commercial White Leghorn layer lines known to differ in genetic resistance to MD. At the F6 generation, a total of 1615 chicks were produced (98 to 248 per family and phenotyped for MD resistance measured as survival time in days after challenge with a very virulent plus (vv+ strain of MDV. Results QTL affecting MD resistance were identified by selective DNA pooling using a panel of 15 SNPs and 217 microsatellite markers. Since MHC blood type (BT is known to affect MD resistance, a total of 18 independent pool pairs were constructed according to family × BT combination, with some combinations represented twice for technical reasons. Twenty-one QTL regions (QTLR affecting post-challenge survival time were identified, distributed among 11 chromosomes (GGA1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 15, 18, 26 and Z, with about two-thirds of the MD resistance alleles derived from the more MD resistant parental line. Eight of the QTLR associated with MD resistance, were previously identified in a backcross (BC mapping study with the same parental lines. Of these, 7 originated from the more resistant line, and one from the less resistant line. Conclusion There was considerable evidence suggesting that MD resistance alleles tend to be recessive. The width of the QTLR for these QTL appeared to be reduced about two-fold in the F6 as compared to that found in the previous BC study. These results provide a firm basis for high-resolution linkage disequilibrium mapping and positional cloning of the resistance genes.

  17. Environmental temperature affects prevalence of blood parasites of birds on an elevation gradient: implications for disease in a warming climate.

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    Itzel Zamora-Vilchis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising global temperature is predicted to expand the distribution of vector-borne diseases both in latitude and altitude. Many host communities could be affected by increased prevalence of disease, heightening the risk of extinction for many already threatened species. To understand how host communities could be affected by changing parasite distributions, we need information on the distribution of parasites in relation to variables like temperature and rainfall that are predicted to be affected by climate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined relations between prevalence of blood parasites, temperature, and seasonal rainfall in a bird community of the Australian Wet Tropics along an elevation gradient. We used PCR screening to investigate the prevalence and lineage diversity of four genera of blood parasites (Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon and Trypanosoma in 403 birds. The overall prevalence of the four genera of blood parasites was 32.3%, with Haemoproteus the predominant genus. A total of 48 unique lineages were detected. Independent of elevation, parasite prevalence was positively and strongly associated with annual temperature. Parasite prevalence was elevated during the dry season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low temperatures of the higher elevations can help to reduce both the development of avian haematozoa and the abundance of parasite vectors, and hence parasite prevalence. In contrast, high temperatures of the lowland areas provide an excellent environment for the development and transmission of haematozoa. We showed that rising temperatures are likely to lead to increased prevalence of parasites in birds, and may force shifts of bird distribution to higher elevations. We found that upland tropical areas are currently a low-disease habitat and their conservation should be given high priority in management plans under climate change.

  18. El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project: model program for Latino caregivers of Alzheimer's disease-affected people.

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    Aranda, Maria P; Villa, Valentine M; Trejo, Laura; Ramírez, Rosa; Ranney, Martha

    2003-04-01

    The article describes the El Portal Latino Alzheimer's Project--a dementia-specific outreach and services program targeting Latino caregivers in the Los Angeles County area. The project is an example of an interorganizational community-based collaborative developed to provide an array of coordinated, ethnic-sensitive services to Latino dementia-affected adults and their family caregivers, using culturally specific outreach and services delivery strategies. Results of an evaluation of service utilization indicate a reduction in barriers to care and an increase in services utilization. Los Angeles County provides a natural urban laboratory to study the special needs and circumstances of older Latinos dealing with chronic and debilitating illnesses. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  19. Vasopressin in health and disease with a focus on affective disorders.

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    Zelena, Dóra

    2012-12-01

    The therapies of mood and anxiety disorders are not solved, because current antidepressants have delayed onset of therapeutic action and a significant number of patients are non-responsive. Research on the field was leaning towards neuropeptides as therapeutic targets. Vasopressin (VP) is a hot candidate, as beyond its peripheral actions VP is implicated in interneuronal communication and modulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), the key stress axis, as well as behavioural functions. Affective disorders are stress related disorders and the most frequently occurring abnormality in depressed subjects is hyperactivity of the HPA. VP with nucleus paraventricularis hypothalami origin is a direct adrenocorticotrophin secretagogue through its V1b receptor. VP seems to have special importance under prolonged stress conditions, which are known to be strong predictive factor of depressive disorder and can induce depressive-like symptoms. Preclinical and clinical data summarized in this review underline the importance of VP in the development of anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms. Orally active nonpeptiderg V1b antagonists were developed and seemed to have effective anxiolytic and antidepressant profile in preclinical studies, which was not fully confirmed by clinical observations. It seems that V1a receptors on special brain areas could have same importance. Taken together current knowledge strongly implies an importance of vasopressinergic regulation in affective disorders and consider VP as endogenous anxiogenic/depressogenic substance. However, wide range of side effects could develop as a result of an intervention on the VP system; therefore there is a need for area-specific targeting of VP receptors (e.g. with modified nanoparticles).

  20. Prognostic factors affecting disease-free survival rate following surgical resection of primary breast cancer

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    K Horita

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the prognostic factors that significantly influence the disease-free survival rate after surgical resection of primary breast cancers, we determined tumour and lymph node grades, and immunohistochemical staining for estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR, c-erbB-2, p53, bcl-2, bax and PCNA in 76 patients. Univariate analysis showed that increased grade of tumour and lymph nodes, negative immunostaining for ER, positive immunostaining for c-erbB-2, and a high PCNA index (³30% negatively influenced the disease- free survival rate, but PR, p53, bcl-2 and bax had no predictive value. Although p53 was not an independent prognostic factor by itself, the combination of p53, bcl-2, and bax proved to correlate with the disease-free survival, with the best prognosis noted in tumours negative for p53 and positive for both bcl-2 and bax, intermediate prognosis in tumours negative for p53 and positive for either bcl- 2 or bax and worst prognosis in tumors negative for p53 as well as bcl-2 and bax. Tumour grade correlated positively with PCNA index, while positive staining for ER correlated negatively with tumour grade as well as with PCNA index, although this was statistically insignificant. Immunostaining of breast cancers for Bcl-2 correlated negatively with tumour grade and PCNA index. Immunostaining for c-erbB-2 correlated positively with PCNA but not with tumour grade. Immunostaining for p53 tended to correlate positively with PCNA, but not with tumour grade. Immunostaining for PR and bax did not correlate with tumour grade and PCNA index. These results suggest that in addition to tumour size and lymph node involvement, immunostaining for ER, c-erbB-2, and a high PCNA index are important prognostic factors in human breast cancer. Wild-type p53 with preserved bcl-2 and bax gene products is also a favorable prognostic factor indicating breast cancer at an early stage of cancer progression.

  1. Not all sounds sound the same: Parkinson's disease affects differently emotion processing in music and in speech prosody.

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    Lima, César F; Garrett, Carolina; Castro, São Luís

    2013-01-01

    Does emotion processing in music and speech prosody recruit common neurocognitive mechanisms? To examine this question, we implemented a cross-domain comparative design in Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty-four patients and 25 controls performed emotion recognition tasks for music and spoken sentences. In music, patients had impaired recognition of happiness and peacefulness, and intact recognition of sadness and fear; this pattern was independent of general cognitive and perceptual abilities. In speech, patients had a small global impairment, which was significantly mediated by executive dysfunction. Hence, PD affected differently musical and prosodic emotions. This dissociation indicates that the mechanisms underlying the two domains are partly independent.

  2. Does Radial Styloid Abnormality in de Quervain’s Disease Affect the Outcome of Management?

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    Zaki, Hosam; Ali, Atif

    2010-01-01

    Radiological changes have been described in de Quervain’s disease of the wrist. The author analyzed the clinical data of 114 patients who reported to the orthopedic clinic of a Regional Referral Hospital for a period of 4 years [2003 to 2007]. Radiographs of the wrist were available for 39 cases, of which 14 [35.89%] were found abnormal. Two patients with abnormal radiographs [14.28%] required surgery where as 7 out of 25 [28%] with normal radiographs were managed surgically. Radial styloid abnormality was not found statistically significant [p < 0.05], and the outcome of management was irrespective of the changes in the radial styloid. PMID:22131918

  3. CpG demethylation enhances alpha-synuclein expression and affects the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

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    Lumine Matsumoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha-synuclein (SNCA gene expression is an important factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. Gene multiplication can cause inherited PD, and promoter polymorphisms that increase SNCA expression are associated with sporadic PD. CpG methylation in the promoter region may also influence SNCA expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using cultured cells, we identified a region of the SNCA CpG island in which the methylation status altered along with increased SNCA expression. Postmortem brain analysis revealed regional non-specific methylation differences in this CpG region in the anterior cingulate and putamen among controls and PD; however, in the substantia nigra of PD, methylation was significantly decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This CpG region may function as an intronic regulatory element for SNCA gene. Our findings suggest that a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism controlling SNCA expression influences PD pathogenesis.

  4. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit Myrup; Mikkelsen, Jens D.; Arvaniti, Maria

    2015-01-01

    and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins......Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes...... are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal...

  5. Diversity of Ilyonectria species in a young vineyard affected by black foot disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro REIS

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the Ilyonectria genus are the main causal agents of black foot disease of grapevine. These pathogens cause necrosis in the basal end of the rootstock, leading to the early decline and the death of vines in nurseries and young vineyards. In the present study a collection of isolates of the genus Ilyonectria obtained from a vineyard located in the Alentejo region, Portugal, was characterised. This vineyard was established with planting material originating from three different nurseries. To assess the inter- and intra-specific variability among isolates, morphological, cultural and biomolecular characteristics were evaluated. Morpho-cultural and molecular data (RAPD and ISSR markers and histone H3 nucleotide sequence identified I. estremocensis, I. europaea, I. liriodendri, I. macrodidyma, I. torresensis, I. vitis and “Cylindrocarpon” pauciseptatum. Ilyonectria torresensis was the most common species found in the survey, representing more than 50% of the isolates.

  6. Affecting cognition and quality of life via aerobic exercise in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang; Nelson, Nathaniel W; Savik, Kay; Wyman, Jean F; Dysken, Maurice; Bronas, Ulf G

    2013-01-01

    Aerobic exercise is a promising behavioral therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet few studies have investigated the effect of aerobic exercise on cognition in AD. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effect of 6-month aerobic exercise on the change in executive function, global cognition, quality of life (QOL), and depression in community-dwelling older adults with mild to moderate AD. A single group, repeated measures design with outcomes measured at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months was used. Results show that there were no significant changes in any measures except for depression (p = .026). There was a trend toward improvement in executive function and QOL with moderate effect sizes (ESs) and a trend toward deterioration in global cognition with moderate to large ESs. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of aerobic exercise in older adults with AD.

  7. Probiotic yogurt Affects Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Factors in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadnoush, Mahdi; Shaker Hosseini, Rahebeh; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Delpisheh, Ali; Alipoor, Elham; Faghfoori, Zeinab; Mohammadpour, Nakisa; Zaringhalam Moghadam, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an irregular response of immune system accompanied with different inflammatory manifestations including alterations in cytokines. Probiotics are non-pathogenic organisms with probable effects in various conditions such as inflammation. The present study hypothesized whether oral intake of bifidobacterium and lactobacillus in form of probiotic yogurt may represent an immunomodulatory effect in IBD patients. Overally, 210 patients in remission phase and 95 healthy people were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into two groups of either 250 grams of probiotic yogurt (PI) or 250 grams of plain yogurt (PC) daily for 8 weeks. The healthy control group (HG) also received probiotic yogurt as noted. The serum levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-10 and CRP levels were measured at baseline and at termination time. A significant difference was observed between intervention groups of PI and PC with HG group (p probiotics.

  8. Prevalence and factors affecting occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Saudi patients with chronic liver disease

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    Singal Ashwani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2 is more common in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD in general and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in particular. We aimed to determine the prevalence and factors affecting the occurrence of DM-2 in Saudi patients with CLD. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study at the King Fahd Central Hospital (KFCH, Gizan, Saudi Arabia. A total of 277 patients with either cirrhosis (CH or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC were analyzed for patient demographics, severity of liver disease, HBsAg, and anti-HCV, associated diseases including DM-2, and presence of HCC. The prevalence of DM-2 was also estimated in 400 age- and sex-matched Saudi patients admitted for various nonliver diseases (control group. Chi-square test, univariate analysis, and multivariate regression. Results: Prevalence of DM-2 in patients with CH was higher than in controls (19.2 vs. 9.2%; P = 0.001. Although those with HCC had a higher prevalence, the difference was not significant (10.9 vs. 9.2%; P = 0.5. Seventy-six percent of patients with HCC had associated CH. On multivariate analysis, age and hypertension were more common in diabetics. Although patients with HCV-related disease had a higher prevalence of DM-2 compared to HBV-related disease, the difference was not significant (26.3 vs. 15.7%; P > 0.05. Conclusions: DM-2 occurred more frequently in CLD patients, particularly in cirrhotics. Age and hypertension predicted the occurrence of DM-2. Small sample size of patients with HCV-related CH probably precluded higher prevalence of DM-2 in them.

  9. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Extraembryonic Tissues of Fetuses Affected by Monogenic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitalieri, Paola; Talarico, Rosa V; Botta, Annalisa; Murdocca, Michela; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Orlandi, Augusto; Giardina, Emiliano; Santoro, Massimo; Brancati, Francesco; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-01

    The generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from an autologous extraembryonic fetal source is an innovative personalized regenerative technology that can transform own-self cells into embryonic stem-like ones. These cells are regarded as a promising candidate for cell-based therapy, as well as an ideal target for disease modeling and drug discovery. Thus, hiPSCs enable researchers to undertake studies for treating diseases or for future applications of in utero therapy. We used a polycistronic lentiviral vector (hSTEMCCA-loxP) encoding OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC genes and containing loxP sites, excisible by Cre recombinase, to reprogram patient-specific fetal cells derived from prenatal diagnosis for several genetic disorders, such as myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), β-thalassemia (β-Thal), lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome (LDS), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), cystic fibrosis (CF), as well as from wild-type (WT) fetal cells. Because cell types tested to create hiPSCs influence both the reprogramming process efficiency and the kinetics, we used chorionic villus (CV) and amniotic fluid (AF) cells, demonstrating how they represent an ideal cell resource for a more efficient generation of hiPSCs. The successful reprogramming of both CV and AF cells into hiPSCs was confirmed by specific morphological, molecular, and immunocytochemical markers and also by their teratogenic potential when inoculated in vivo. We further demonstrated the stability of reprogrammed cells over 10 and more passages and their capability to differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers, as well as into neural cells. These data suggest that hiPSCs-CV/AF can be considered a valid cellular model to accomplish pathogenesis studies and therapeutic applications.

  10. Autonomic nervous system modulation affects the inflammatory immune response in mice with acute Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marcus Paulo Ribeiro; Rocha, Aletheia Moraes; de Oliveira, Lucas Felipe; de Cuba, Marília Beatriz; de Oliveira Loss, Igor; Castellano, Lucio Roberto; Silva, Marcus Vinicius; Machado, Juliana Reis; Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Paiva, Luciano Henrique; Savino, Wilson; Junior, Virmondes Rodrigues; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Prado, Vania Ferreira; Prado, Marco Antonio Maximo; Silva, Eliane Lages; Montano, Nicola; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Dias da Silva, Valdo Jose

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of changes to the autonomic nervous system in mice during the acute phase of Chagas disease, which is an infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The following types of mice were inoculated with T. cruzi (CHG): wild-type (WT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter knockdown (KDVAChT) C57BL/6j mice; wild-type non-treated (NT) FVB mice; FVB mice treated with pyridostigmine bromide (PYR) or salbutamol (SALB); and β(2)-adrenergic receptor knockout (KOβ2) FVB mice. During infection and at 18-21 days after infection (acute phase), the survival curves, parasitaemia, electrocardiograms, heart rate variability, autonomic tonus and histopathology of the animals were evaluated. Negative control groups were matched for age, genetic background and treatment. The KDVAChT-CHG mice exhibited a significant shift in the electrocardiographic, autonomic and histopathological profiles towards a greater inflammatory immune response that was associated with a reduction in blood and tissue parasitism. In contrast, the CHG-PYR mice manifested reduced myocardial inflammation and lower blood and tissue parasitism. Similar results were observed in CHG-SALB animals. Unexpectedly, the KOβ2-CHG mice exhibited less myocardial inflammation and higher blood and tissue parasitism, which were associated with reduced mortality. These findings could have been due to the increase in vagal tone observed in the KOβ2 mice, which rendered them more similar to the CHG-PYR animals. In conclusion, our results indicate a marked immunomodulatory role for the parasympathetic and sympathetic autonomic nervous systems, which inhibit both the inflammatory immune response and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental Chagas heart disease in mice.

  11. Factors that affect postnatal bone growth retardation in the twitcher murine model of Krabbe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Ries, William Louis; Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Arboleda, Gonzalo; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Krabbe disease is an inherited lysosomal disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates mainly in the central nervous system. To gain insight into the possible mechanism(s) that may be participating in the inhibition of the postnatal somatic growth described in the animal model of this disease (twitcher mouse, twi), we studied their femora. This study reports that twi femora are smaller than of those of wild type (wt), and present with abnormality of marrow cellularity, bone deposition (osteoblastic function), and osteoclastic activity. Furthermore, lipidomic analysis indicates altered sphingolipid homeostasis, but without significant changes in the levels of sphingolipid-derived intermediates of cell death (ceramide) or the levels of the osteoclast-osteoblast coupling factor (sphingosine-1-phosphate). However, there was significant accumulation of psychosine in the femora of adult twi animals as compared to wt, without induction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interleukin-6. Analysis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) plasma levels, a liver secreted hormone known to play a role in bone growth, indicated a drastic reduction in twi animals when compared to wt. To identify the cause of the decrease, we examined the IGF-1 mRNA expression and protein levels in the liver. The results indicated a significant reduction of IGF-1 mRNA as well as protein levels in the liver from twi as compared to wt littermates. Our data suggest that a combination of endogenous (psychosine) and endocrine (IGF-1) factors play a role in the inhibition of postnatal bone growth in twi mice; and further suggest that derangements of liver function may be contributing, at least in part, to this alteration. PMID:20441793

  12. TREM-1 deficiency can attenuate disease severity without affecting pathogen clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1 is a potent amplifier of pro-inflammatory innate immune reactions. While TREM-1-amplified responses likely aid an improved detection and elimination of pathogens, excessive production of cytokines and oxygen radicals can also severely harm the host. Studies addressing the pathogenic role of TREM-1 during endotoxin-induced shock or microbial sepsis have so far mostly relied on the administration of TREM-1 fusion proteins or peptides representing part of the extracellular domain of TREM-1. However, binding of these agents to the yet unidentified TREM-1 ligand could also impact signaling through alternative receptors. More importantly, controversial results have been obtained regarding the requirement of TREM-1 for microbial control. To unambiguously investigate the role of TREM-1 in homeostasis and disease, we have generated mice deficient in Trem1. Trem1(-/- mice are viable, fertile and show no altered hematopoietic compartment. In CD4(+ T cell- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced models of colitis, Trem1(-/- mice displayed significantly attenuated disease that was associated with reduced inflammatory infiltrates and diminished expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Trem1(-/- mice also exhibited reduced neutrophilic infiltration and decreased lesion size upon infection with Leishmania major. Furthermore, reduced morbidity was observed for influenza virus-infected Trem1(-/- mice. Importantly, while immune-associated pathologies were significantly reduced, Trem1(-/- mice were equally capable of controlling infections with L. major, influenza virus, but also Legionella pneumophila as Trem1(+/+ controls. Our results not only demonstrate an unanticipated pathogenic impact of TREM-1 during a viral and parasitic infection, but also indicate that therapeutic blocking of TREM-1 in distinct inflammatory disorders holds considerable promise by blunting excessive inflammation while preserving the

  13. Dietary supplementation of probiotics affects growth, immune response and disease resistance of Cyprinus carpio fry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akhil; Gupta, Paromita; Dhawan, Asha

    2014-12-01

    The effects of dietary Bacillus coagulans (MTCC 9872), Bacillus licheniformis (MTCC 6824) and Paenibacillus polymyxa (MTCC 122) supplementation on growth performance, non-specific immunity and protection against Aeromonas hydrophila infection were evaluated in common carp, Cyprinus carpio fry. Laboratory maintained B. coagulans, B. licheniformis and P. polymyxa were used to study antagonistic activity against fish pathogenic bacteria by agar well diffusion assay. Healthy fish fry were challenged by this bacterium for determination of its safety. Fish were fed for 80 days with control basal diet (B0) and experimental diets containing B. coagulans (B1), B. licheniformis (B2) and P. polymyxa (B3) at 10(9) CFU/g diet. Fish fry (mean weight 0.329 ± 0.01 g) were fed these diets and growth performance, various non-specific immune parameters and disease resistance study were conducted at 80 days post-feeding. The antagonism study showed inhibition zone against A. hydrophila and Vibrio harveyi. All the probiotic bacterial strains were harmless to fish fry as neither mortality nor morbidities were observed of the challenge. The growth-promoting influences of probiotic supplemented dietary treatments were observed with fish fry and the optimum survival, growth and feed utilization were obtained with P. polymyxa (B3) supplemented diet. Study of different non-specific innate immunological parameters viz. lysozyme activity, respiratory burst assay and myeloperoxidase content showed significant (p < 0.05) higher values in fish fry fed B3 diet at 10(9) CFU/g. The challenge test showed dietary supplementation of B. coagulans, B. licheniformis and P. polymyxa significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced the resistance of fish fry against bacterial challenge. These results collectively suggests that P. polymyxa is a potential probiotic species and can be used in aquaculture to improve growth, feed utilization, non-specific immune responses and disease resistance of fry common carp, C. carpio.

  14. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

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    Mehul Mistri

    Full Text Available Tay Sachs disease (TSD is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients. Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K, c.964 G>A (p.D322N, c.964 G>T (p.D322Y, c.1178C>G (p.R393P and c.1385A>T (p.E462V, c.1432 G>A (p.G478R and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W. The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  15. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistri, Mehul; Tamhankar, Parag M; Sheth, Frenny; Sanghavi, Daksha; Kondurkar, Pratima; Patil, Swapnil; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Gupta, Sarita; Sheth, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to β-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients). Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K), c.964 G>A (p.D322N), c.964 G>T (p.D322Y), c.1178C>G (p.R393P) and c.1385A>T (p.E462V), c.1432 G>A (p.G478R) and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W). The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V.

  16. Amount and distribution of dietary protein affects clinical response to levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J H; Nutt, J G; Woodward, W R; Hatcher, L F; Trotman, T L

    1989-04-01

    Reducing dietary protein improves the effectiveness of levodopa (LD) but the most effective distribution of a low-protein diet (0.8 g/kg) is unclear. We compared a 1.6 g/kg protein diet, a 0.8 g/kg diet with protein evenly distributed between meals, and a 0.8 g/kg diet with protein restricted to the evening meal in 5 parkinsonian patients with motor fluctuations. We monitored clinical response, plasma LD, and plasma large amino acids (LNAAs) hourly throughout the day. Mean "on" times were 51% (1.6 g/kg diet), 67% (0.8 g/kg evenly distributed), and 77% (0.8 g/kg restricted). Hourly averages of plasma LD did not differ between the diets. The mean plasma LNAAs were 732 nmol/ml (1.6 g/kg diet), 640 (0.8 g/kg distributed), and 542 (0.8 g/kg restricted), and the diurnal pattern reflected the distribution of protein intake. In conclusion, the amount and distribution of dietary protein affect clinical response to LD. These effects are not related to LD absorption but are explained by the variation in plasma LNAAs.

  17. Glucokinase regulatory protein gene polymorphism affects liver fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Petta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Variant in glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR, associated with lipid and glucose traits, has been suggested to affect fatty liver infiltration. We aimed to assess whether GCKR rs780094 C→T SNP influences the expression of steatosis, lobular inflammation and fibrosis in NAFLD patients, after correction for PNPLA3 genotype. METHODS: In 366 consecutive NAFLD patients (197 from Sicily, and 169 from center/northern Italy, we assessed anthropometric, biochemical and metabolic features; liver biopsy was scored according to Kleiner. PNPLA3 rs738409 C>G and GCKR rs780094 C>T single nucleotide polymorphisms were also assessed. RESULTS: At multivariate logistic regression analysis in the entire NAFLD cohort, the presence of significant liver fibrosis (>F1 was independently linked to high HOMA (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.23, p = 0.02, NAFLD activity score ≥ 5 (OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.45-6.81, pT SNP (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.43-2.98, pT SNP was also associated with higher serum triglycerides (ANOVA, p = 0.02 in the entire cohort. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with NAFLD, GCKR rs780094 C>T is associated with the severity of liver fibrosis and with higher serum triglyceride levels.

  18. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D;

    2015-01-01

    and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins...... are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the α4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal...... human transgenes that cause both age-dependent β-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display β-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting...

  19. [The lived experience of family member caring for a person affected by Alzheimer's disease: preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellone, E; Micci, F; Sansoni, J; Sinapi, N; Cattel, C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this article is to report the preliminary results from a phenomenological study on the lived experience of Alzheimer's caregivers. Eight caregivers involved in caring for two years at list were interviewed. The analysis of interviews by Giorgi's method showed a multidimensional reality synthesizable in eight spheres of themes: Illness, Patient, Caring, Caregiver's Life and Health, Coping, Spouse/Family, Others, Feelings. Illness has a great impact on the caregivers' life and causes the loss of the affected person even before his/her death. Caring is very hard and emotionally involving. Caregivers mainly complain the lack of support from the National Health System. The continuous involvement in caring produces also health problems, depression, and negative effects within the family. Others are considered as bad. The most common feelings are fear for possible accidents to the patients and remorses. Some caregivers have good coping style putting their faith in God, valuing the closeness of the family and living daily. The utility of the eight spheres of themes are discussed in order to guide the practice toward the caregivers.

  20. Lighten Up: Specific Postural Instructions Affect Axial Rigidity and Step Initiation in Patients With Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rajal G; Gurfinkel, Victor S; Kwak, Elizabeth; Warden, Amelia C; Horak, Fay B

    2015-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with stooped postural alignment, increased postural sway, and reduced mobility. The Alexander Technique (AT) is a mindfulness-based approach to improving posture and mobility by reducing muscular interference while maintaining upward intentions. Evidence suggests that AT can reduce disability associated with PD, but a mechanism for this effect has not yet been established. We investigated whether AT-based instructions reduce axial rigidity and increase upright postural alignment, and whether these instructions have different effects on postural alignment, axial rigidity, postural sway, and mobility than effort-based instructions regarding posture. Twenty subjects with PD practiced 2 sets of instructions and then attempted to implement both approaches (as well as a relaxed control condition) during quiet standing and step initiation. The "Lighten Up" instructions relied on AT principles of reducing excess tension while encouraging length. The "Pull Up" instructions relied on popular concepts of effortful posture correction. We measured kinematics, resistance to axial rotation, and ground reaction forces. Both sets of experimental instructions led to increases in upright postural alignment relative to the control condition. Only the Lighten Up instructions led to reduced postural sway, reduced axial postural tone, greater modifiability of tone, and a smoother center of pressure trajectory during step initiation, possibly indicating greater movement efficiency. Mindful movement approaches such as AT may benefit balance and mobility in subjects with PD by acutely facilitating increased upright postural alignment while decreasing rigidity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Acetic acid in aged vinegar affects molecular targets for thrombus disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Li; Yanyan, Zhang; Junfeng, Fan

    2015-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying the action of dietary vinegar on antithrombotic activity, acetic acid, the main acidic component of dietary vinegar, was used to determine antiplatelet and fibrinolytic activity. The results revealed that acetic acid significantly inhibits adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-, collagen-, thrombin-, and arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation. Acetic acid (2.00 mM) reduced AA-induced platelet aggregation to approximately 36.82 ± 1.31%, and vinegar (0.12 mL L(-1)) reduced the platelet aggregation induced by AA to 30.25 ± 1.34%. Further studies revealed that acetic acid exerts its effects by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 and the formation of thromboxane-A2. Organic acids including acetic acid, formic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, and malic acid also showed fibrinolytic activity; specifically, the fibrinolytic activity of acetic acid amounted to 1.866 IU urokinase per mL. Acetic acid exerted its fibrinolytic activity by activating plasminogen during fibrin crossing, thus leading to crosslinked fibrin degradation by the activated plasmin. These results suggest that organic acids in dietary vinegar play important roles in the prevention and cure of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. How does the neck flexion affect the cervical MRI features of Hirayama disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chao; Han, Hongbin; Yang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dongsheng; Fu, Yu; Sun, Yu; Liu, Bo

    2012-10-01

    Although flexion cervical MRI has been recommended for the diagnosis of Hirayama disease (HD), no study focused on the MR features at different neck flexion angles. Moreover, no uniform flexion angle has been confirmed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate the MRI typical signs of HD patients in different neck flexion degree and gives a suggestion to the MR scanning. Cervical MRI in neutral and different flexion positions (cervical flexion angle 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40°) were performed in 45 HD patients. Three MRI features including anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal (ASD), widening of cervical epidural space, and epidural flow voids (EFV) at each flexed position were summarized. To evaluate ASD quantitatively, the widest cervical epidural space with the maximum sagittal diameters (d) and cervical canal sagittal diameter (D) at the same level were measured. The d/D values at different angles were calculated and compared. ASD was demonstrated in 34 out of 45 cases (75.6%) at 20° and in all cases (100%) at other 4 angles (χ (2) = 25.728, P flexion angles have effects on ASD, widening of cervical epidural space and EFV. 25° is recommended as the least effective diagnostic flexion angle for MRI diagnosis of HD, and 35° may be the best one.

  3. L-propionylcarnitine effect on postexercise and postischemic hyperemia in patients affected by peripheral vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, C; Pollastri, M; Marrapodi, E; Leanza, D; Giordano, S; D'Iddio, S

    1995-08-01

    The hemodynamic effect of L-propionylcarnitine (LPC) administered intravenously was evaluated in a double-blind, randomized, three-period crossover study in 12 men (aged sixty to seventy-five years) with Leriche-Fontaine stage II peripheral arterial disease of lower limbs. At baseline, maximum working capacity of each patient was determined by a standardized ergometric test. This test was repeated at 80% of each patient's maximum working capacity before and after intravenous administration of LPC. Each patient received three single doses of 300 mg, 600 mg, and 1200 mg of LPC with a two-day rest period between them. Hemodynamic variables measured by strain-gauge plethysmography were: peak blood flow, peak flow time, and halftime and total time of hyperemia both after exercise and after induction of ischemia (with an occlusion cuff). LPC administration significantly shortened the halftime as well as the total time of hyperemia after exercise and after ischemia. With the two highest doses, LPC shortened the peak flow time after exercise. The peak blood flow after exercise and after ischemia increased, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. The results obtained indicate that LPC improves circulatory reserve of the ischemic limb and has no effect on heart rate and arterial blood pressure. No adverse events were reported. The effect of LPC on the hyperemic response to stress, mainly on halftime of hyperemia, is possibly due to a drug-induced increase of adenosine triphosphate utilization by the ischemic tissues.

  4. Whole transcriptome sequencing reveals gene expression and splicing differences in brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Twine

    Full Text Available Recent studies strongly indicate that aberrations in the control of gene expression might contribute to the initiation and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, alternative splicing has been suggested to play a role in spontaneous cases of AD. Previous transcriptome profiling of AD models and patient samples using microarrays delivered conflicting results. This study provides, for the first time, transcriptomic analysis for distinct regions of the AD brain using RNA-Seq next-generation sequencing technology. Illumina RNA-Seq analysis was used to survey transcriptome profiles from total brain, frontal and temporal lobe of healthy and AD post-mortem tissue. We quantified gene expression levels, splicing isoforms and alternative transcript start sites. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with a neuron's cytological structure and synapse function in AD brain samples. Analysis of the temporal lobe with the Cufflinks tool revealed that transcriptional isoforms of the apolipoprotein E gene, APOE-001, -002 and -005, are under the control of different promoters in normal and AD brain tissue. We also observed differing expression levels of APOE-001 and -002 splice variants in the AD temporal lobe. Our results indicate that alternative splicing and promoter usage of the APOE gene in AD brain tissue might reflect the progression of neurodegeneration.

  5. Exercise Affects Cardiopulmonary Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Meta-Analysis

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    Hongchang Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to comprehensively assess the effects of exercise on cardiopulmonary function indices in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. A literature review was performed by searching literatures in PubMed and Embase before June 2016. Studies were selected based on predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, followed by data extraction and a quality assessment of the included studies using the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool. Correlations between exercise and cardiopulmonary function indices [pulse wave velocity, respiratory exchange ratio, and peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak] were then evaluated using mean differences and 95% confidence intervals. All meta-analyses were conducted using R 3.12 software. Finally, five eligible studies involving 179 CKD patients were included. After intervention, a heterogeneity test showed that the VO2 peak values of the treatment group were greater than those of the control group, whereas no significant differences were found for the other indices. However, a sensitivity analysis showed inconsistent results both before and after intervention. Thus, we concluded that exercise might play an important role in improving the VO2 peak values in CKD patients. Additional studies are needed to verify this conclusion.

  6. Chemical and spectroscopic characteristics of the wood of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese affected by esca disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrelli, Diana; Amalfitano, Carmine; Conte, Pellegrino; Mugnai, Laura

    2009-12-23

    Chemical and spectroscopic analyses ((13)C cross-polarization-magic angle spinning NMR and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies) were carried out on the wood of Vitis vinifera cv. Sangiovese with brown-red discoloration and black streaks caused by esca disease. The analyses of the brown-red wood revealed the destruction of hemicelluloses and noncrystalline cellulose as well as modifications in the pectic and ligninic wood fractions. The pectic fraction consisted of carbohydrates associated with polyphenols. The lignin fraction exhibited only a few changes in the aromatic systems and a partial demethylation, and it appeared to be associated with condensed phenolic components probably arising from response polyphenols. The degradation of hemicelluloses and noncrystalline cellulose in brown-red wood, where the pathogens Phaeoacremonium aleophilum and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora prevail with respect to the other fungus Fomitiporia mediterranea, was consistent with reports on the degradative activity of such fungi in vitro carried out on model substrates. The observed alterations could also be attributed to the radical oxidation process caused by the oxidative response of defense itself triggered by infection, as suggested by the accumulation of postinfectional compounds. The analyses of wood tissue with black streaks showed less marked deterioration; here, an increase in pectic and phenolic substances, which probably accumulate in the xylem vessels as a response to the infection, was observed.

  7. Dopamine transporter SLC6A3 genotype affects cortico-striatal activity of set-shifts in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habak, Claudine; Noreau, Anne; Nagano-Saito, Atsuko; Mejía-Constaín, Beatriz; Degroot, Clotilde; Strafella, Antonio P; Chouinard, Sylvain; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Rouleau, Guy A; Monchi, Oury

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects motor function along with a wide range of cognitive domains, including executive function. The hallmark of the pathology is its significant loss of nigrostriatal dopamine, which is necessary for the cortico-striatal interactions that underlie executive control. Striatal dopamine reuptake is mediated by the SLC6A3 gene (formerly named DAT1) and its polymorphisms, which have been largely overlooked in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients (ages 53-68 years; 19 males, 11 females) at early stages of Parkinson's disease, were genotyped according to a 9-repeat (9R) or 10-repeat (10R) allele on the SLC6A3/DAT1 gene. They underwent neuropsychological assessment and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a set-shifting task (a computerized Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) that relies on fronto-striatal interactions. Patients homozygous on the 10R allele performed significantly better on working memory tasks than 9R-carrier patients. Most importantly, patients carrying a 9R allele exhibited less activation than their 10R homozygous counterparts in the prefrontal cortex, premotor cortex and caudate nucleus, when planning and executing a set-shift. This pattern was exacerbated for conditions that usually recruit the striatum compared to those that do not. This is the first study indicating that the SLC6A3/DAT1 genotype has a significant effect on fronto-striatal activation and performance in Parkinson's disease. This effect is stronger for conditions that engage the striatum. Longitudinal studies are warranted to assess this polymorphism's effect on the clinical evolution of patients with Parkinson's disease, especially with cognitive decline.

  8. A cross-sectional study of affective, psychiatric, cognitive disorders and motor complications of Parkinson's disease

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    Qian-wen JIANG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of depression, anxiety, psychiatric symptom, cognitive impairment and motor complications of Parkinson's disease (PD.  Methods  Face to face interview was carried out among patients with idiopathic PD from Outpatient Department of Neurology, Ruijin Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine from March to May 2015. Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE were used for evaluation of depression, anxiety and cognitive impairment.  Results  A total of 55 patients with PD were enrolled in this study. Prevalences of depression, anxiety, psychiatric symptom and cognitive impairment of PD were 16.36% (9/55, 14.55% (8/55, 23.64% (13/55 and 9.09% (5/55, respectively. Ratio of previous diagnosis and treatment were 2/9, 2/8, 2/13 and 1/5, respectively. Prevalences of fluctuation and dyskinesia were 27.27% (15/55 and 9.09% (5/55, separately. There were no significant differences in prevalences of depression (P = 0.858, anxiety (P = 0.188, psychiatric symptom (P = 0.926, cognitive impairment (P = 0.286, fluctuation (P = 0.205 or dyskinesia (P = 0.417 between male and female PD patients.  Conclusions  Prevalences of depression, anxiety, psychiatric symptom, cognitive impairment and motor complications of PD were high, while ratios of diagnosis and treatment were relatively low. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.010

  9. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Katelyn N; Badrov, Mark B; Barron, Carly C; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG.

  10. Dopamine depletion affects communicative intentionality in Parkinson's disease patients: Evidence from action kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straulino, Elisa; Scaravilli, Tomaso; Castiello, Umberto

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate communication is at the heart of successful, healthy social interactions in humans. Deficits in social communication are a hallmark of several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Yet, very little research has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying these issues. It has been suggested that dopamine is a candidate neurotransmitter system involved in stimulating communication in individuals that are not highly motivated to communicate. A typical model to study dopaminergic dysfunctions in humans is represented by Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, who show motor, cognitive and motivational symptoms. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of social communication on actions in non-demented PD patients receiving dopamine replacement therapy (Levodopa = l-Dopa) and in neurologically healthy control participants. Patients' ability to modulate motor patterning depending on the communicative intention motivating the action to be performed was evaluated both in "on" (with l-Dopa) and "off" (without l-Dopa) states. In two main conditions, participants were requested to reach towards, grasp an object, and either simply lift it (individual condition) or lift it with the intent to communicate a meaning to a partner (communicative condition). Movements' kinematics was recorded using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The results indicate that kinematics is sensitive to communicative intention and that l-Dopa treatment has positive effects on translating communicative intentions into specific motor patterns in PD patients. Although the to-be-grasped object remained the same both the controls and the PD patients in an 'on' state adopted different kinematic patterning for the 'individual' and the 'communication' conditions. The PD patients in the 'off' state, instead, were unable to kinematically differentiate between the two conditions. We contend that social and communicative impairments are associated with abnormalities in

  11. Safety of transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in patients affected by Crohn’s disease

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    Lucio Dell'Atti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Crohn’s disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. It is usually considered a contraindication to transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSBx. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety of TRUSBx in a small cohort of patients with CD. Methods: We queried our institutional database clinical data of patients with a diagnosis of CD undergoing TRUSBx, and a retrospective prospective study of 5 patients was planned. All patients enrolled were in the remission phase of CD and asymptomatic. They received the same antibiotic prophylaxis and a povidone-iodine aqueous solution enema before the procedure. A standardized reproducible technique was used with using a ultrasound machine equipped with a 5-9 MHz multifrequency convex probe “end-fire”. The patients were treated under local anaesthesia, and a 14-core biopsy scheme was performed in each patient as first intention. After the procedure each patient was given a verbal numeric pain scale to evaluate tolerability of TRUSBx. Results: TRUSBx was successfully completed in all patients. The number of biopsy cores was 14 (12-16. Of the 5 biopsy procedures performed 40% revealed prostatic carcinoma (PCa with a Gleason score 6 (3+3. No patients required catheterization or admission to the hospital for adverse events after the procedure. The most frequent adverse event was hematospermia (60%, while hematuria was present in 20% of patients and a minimal rectal bleeding in 20% of the patients. No patients reported severe or unbearable pain (score ≥ 8. Conclusions: This study suggests that CD may not be an absolute contraindication to TRUSBx for prostate cancer detection, but still requires a careful patients selection.

  12. Aβ Amyloid Pathology Affects the Hearts of Patients With Alzheimer's Disease: Mind the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncone, Luca; Luciani, Marco; Coggins, Matthew; Wilker, Elissa H; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Codispoti, Kari Elise; Frosch, Matthew P; Kayed, Rakez; Del Monte, Federica

    2016-12-06

    Individually, heart failure (HF) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are severe threats to population health, and their potential coexistence is an alarming prospect. In addition to sharing analogous epidemiological and genetic profiles, biochemical characteristics, and common triggers, the authors recently recognized common molecular and pathological features between the 2 conditions. Whereas cognitive impairment has been linked to HF through perfusion defects, angiopathy, and inflammation, whether patients with AD present with myocardial dysfunction, and if the 2 conditions bear a common pathogenesis as neglected siblings are unknown. Here, the authors investigated whether amyloid beta (Aβ) protein aggregates are present in the hearts of patients with a primary diagnosis of AD, affecting myocardial function. The authors examined myocardial function in a retrospective cross-sectional study from a cohort of AD patients and age-matched controls. Imaging and proteomics approaches were used to identify and quantify Aβ deposits in AD heart and brain specimens compared with controls. Cell shortening and calcium transients were measured on isolated adult cardiomyocytes. Echocardiographic measurements of myocardial function suggest that patients with AD present with an anticipated diastolic dysfunction. As in the brain, Aβ40 and Aβ42 are present in the heart, and their expression is increased in AD. Here, the authors provide the first report of the presence of compromised myocardial function and intramyocardial deposits of Aβ in AD patients. The findings depict a novel biological framework in which AD may be viewed either as a systemic disease or as a metastatic disorder leading to heart, and possibly multiorgan failure. AD and HF are both debilitating and life-threatening conditions, affecting enormous patient populations. Our findings underline a previously dismissed problem of a magnitude that will require new diagnostic approaches and treatments for brain and

  13. Physical Factors Affecting in Vitro Replication of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (Serotype “O”

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    Muhammad Taslim Ghori*, Khushi Muhammad and Masood Rabbani1

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Effect of physical factors (temperature, pH and UV light on replicating ability of “O” type of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD virus on Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK cell line was determined. The freshly grown FMD virus containing 106 units of tissue culture infective dose (TCID50 was divided into aliquots. Each of the 9 virus aliquots was exposed to 37, 57 or 77C for 15, 30 or 45 minutes, respectively. Each of the 5 virus aliquots was mixed with MEM-199 maintenance medium having pH 3, 5, 7, 9, or 11. Similarly, each of the 3 aliquots having 1 mm depth of the medium was exposed to ultraviolet light (252.7 nm wavelength: one foot distance for 15, 30 or 45 minutes. Each of the virus aliquot exposed to either of the temperature, pH or ultraviolet light (UV for either of the interaction time was inoculated to 8 wells of the 96-well cell culture plate containing complete monolayer of BHK cell line. One row of 8 wells served as virus control and other row of 8 wells served as control for monolayer of the BHK-21 cell line. The plates were incubated at 37°C for 48 hours. It was observed that temperature of 57 and 77C inactivated the virus within 15 minutes. The virus when admixed in the MEM-199 maintenance medium having pH 3, 5, 9 or 11, of the medium inactivated the virus while pH 7 did not show any detrimental effect on its survival. The ultraviolet light for 15, 30 or 45 minutes showed undetectable effect on survival of the virus as either of the virus aliquot exposed to the UV light for either of the interaction time showed cytopathogenic effects (CPE. It was concluded that the temperature of 57°C or higher for 15 minutes, acidic pH (below 5 or basic pH (more than 9 may inactivate the FMD virus.

  14. The negative bone effects of the disease and of chronic corticosteroid treatment in premenopausal women affected by rheumatoid arthritis

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    A. Fassio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a well-known extra-articular complication in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The chronic corticosteroid treatment, the functional impairment associated with RA and the disease itself appear to be the most relevant determinants. Most of the previous studies involved postmenopausal women, in whom the estrogenic deficiency might amplify the negative effect towards bone of both RA and corticosteroid therapy. We decided to evaluate bone health in a cohort of premenopausal RA patients. The study population includes 47 premenopausal women attending our outpatient clinic for RA and twice as many healthy age-matched control women selected from the hospital personnel. The bone density at the spine and femoral neck were significantly lower in patients with RA as compared with controls. When spine bone mineral density (BMD values were adjusted for the cumulative glucocorticoid (GC dose alone and for the cumulative GC dose plus body mass index (BMI the mean differences between two groups decreased but they remained statistically significant. We found no difference when the spine BMD was adjusted for cumulative GC dose, BMI and health assessment questionnaire. The difference in femoral neck BMD remained statistically significant also after all the same adjustments. In conclusion, our study shows that a BMD deficiency is frequent also in premenopausal women affected by RA, especially at femoral site and that the main determinants of this bone loss are not only the disease-related weight loss, corticosteroid therapy and functional impairment, but also the systemic effects of the disease itself.

  15. Effect of Readthrough Treatment in Fibroblasts of Patients Affected by Lysosomal Diseases Caused by Premature Termination Codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalonga, Leslie; Arias, Ángela; Tort, Frederic; Ferrer-Cortés, Xènia; Garcia-Villoria, Judit; Coll, Maria Josep; Gort, Laura; Ribes, Antonia

    2015-10-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin, may induce premature termination codon (PTC) readthrough and elude the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay mechanism. Because PTCs are frequently involved in lysosomal diseases, readthrough compounds may be useful as potential therapeutic agents. The aim of our study was to identify patients responsive to gentamicin treatment in order to be used as positive controls to further screen for other PTC readthrough compounds. With this aim, fibroblasts from 11 patients affected by 6 different lysosomal diseases carrying PTCs were treated with gentamicin. Treatment response was evaluated by measuring enzymatic activity, abnormal metabolite accumulation, mRNA expression, protein localization, and cell viability. The potential effect of readthrough was also analyzed by in silico predictions. Results showed that fibroblasts from 5/11 patients exhibited an up to 3-fold increase of enzymatic activity after gentamicin treatment. Accordingly, cell lines tested showed enhanced well-localized protein and/or increased mRNA expression levels and/or reduced metabolite accumulation. Interestingly, these cell lines also showed increased enzymatic activity after PTC124 treatment, which is a PTC readthrough-promoting compound. In conclusion, our results provide a proof-of-concept that PTCs can be effectively suppressed by readthrough drugs, with different efficiencies depending on the genetic context. The screening of new compounds with readthrough activity is a strategy that can be used to develop efficient therapies for diseases caused by PTC mutations.

  16. Prevalence of pathogens from Mollicutes class in cattle affected by respiratory diseases and molecular characteristics of Mycoplasma bovis field strains

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    Szacawa Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mycoplasma bovis is one of the main pathogens involved in cattle pneumonia. Other mycoplasmas have also been directly implicated in respiratory diseases in cattle. The prevalence of different Mycoplasma spp. in cattle affected by respiratory diseases and molecular characteristics of M. bovis field strains were evaluated. Material and Methods: In total, 713 nasal swabs from 73 cattle herds were tested. The uvrC gene fragment was amplified by PCR and PCR products were sequenced. PCR/DGGE and RAPD were performed. Results: It was found that 39 (5.5% samples were positive for M. bovis in the PCR and six field strains had point nucleotide mutations. Additionally, the phylogenetic analysis of 20 M. bovis field strains tested with RAPD showed two distinct groups of M. bovis strains sharing only 3.8% similarity. PCR/DGGE analysis demonstrated the presence of bacteria belonging to the Mollicutes class in 79.1% of DNA isolates. The isolates were identified as: Mycoplasma bovirhinis, M. dispar, M. bovis, M. canis, M. arginini, M. canadense, M. bovoculi, M. alkalescens, and Ureaplasma diversum. Conclusion: Different Mycoplasma spp. strains play a crucial role in inducing respiratory diseases in cattle.

  17. Communal farmers' perceptions of tick-borne diseases affecting cattle and investigation of tick control methods practiced in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungirai, Marvelous; Moyo, Doreen Zandile; De Clercq, Patrick; Madder, Maxime

    2016-02-01

    Tick borne diseases (TBDs) are responsible for huge economic losses in cattle production in most African countries where the majority of cattle owners are the resource poor communal farmers. Governments have initiated and co-ordinate tick control programs with farmers required to contribute funds for their sustenance. The success of these programs will hinge upon the involvement of communal farmers in their design, implementation and evaluation. To this end, 313 communal farmers (approximately 8.4% response rate) were interviewed and 3 focus group discussions were carried out in the southern low-veld part of Zimbabwe with the objectives of investigating communal farmers' perceptions on TBDs affecting cattle, level of participation in government initiated tick control programs, other tick control methods practiced, types of acaricides used and their perceived effectiveness. There was a general awareness of TBDs with 67.7% (n=212) farmers being able to describe tick diseases with names or clinical and post-mortem signs. The diseases or problems frequently associated with ticks were cowdriosis (38%, n=119), mastitis (36.7%, n=115), anaplasmosis (36.1%, n=113), body damage (28.4%, n=89), babesiosis (24.6%, n=77) and poor body condition (16.6%, n=52). Cattle mortalities due to TBDs were reported by 23.8% (n=74) of the farmers. The plunge dip was consistently used by farmers (70.3%, n=220) to control ticks. Other tick control methods practiced were the hand spraying (67.4%, n=211), hand dressing (16.6%, n=52), traditional methods (5.4%, n=17), use of pour-ons (4.5%, n=14) and smearing (2.2%, n=7). The formamidines were the most common class of acaricide used (59.4%, n=186), followed by synthetic pyrethroids (29.1%, n=91), macro cyclic lactones (12.8%, n=40) and organophosphates (4.5%, n=14). Most farmers (75.2%, n=231) perceived these acaricides to be effective in controlling ticks. The results of focus group discussions showed that a number of factors influenced the

  18. From slavery to incarceration: social forces affecting the epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases in the rural South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James C

    2006-07-01

    The high rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the southeastern United States have been shaped by historic and contemporary social forces. More than other regions of the country, the South was defined by slavery, an extremely hierarchical relationship between whites and blacks. Emancipation left much of the racial hierarchy intact with whites as farm owners and blacks as hired workers or sharecroppers. Agricultural policies that favored mechanization caused blacks to leave farm work and move into segregated towns, leading to the advent of the rural ghetto. Post-World War II mass migration, mostly by young men, to the industrial north altered the sex ratio and social capital of the southern towns left behind. The cocaine epidemic of the 1990s, followed by the high incarceration rates of the "War on Drugs," disproportionately affected low-income blacks. Each of these forces led to sexual and care-seeking behaviors that favor transmission of STDs.

  19. A mouse model of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease: focus on pharmacological interventions targeting affective dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eBonito Oliva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, are increasingly recognized as a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD. These ailments, which often appear in the early stage of the disease, affect a large number of patients and are only partly resolved by conventional antiparkinsonian medications, such as L-DOPA. Here, we investigated non-motor symptoms of PD in a mouse model based on bilateral injection of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA in the dorsal striatum. This model presented only subtle gait modifications, which did not affect horizontal motor activity in the open-field test. Bilateral 6-OHDA lesion also impaired olfactory discrimination, in line with the anosmia typically observed in early stage parkinsonism. The effect of 6-OHDA was then examined for mood-related dysfunctions. Lesioned mice showed increased immobility in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, two behavioral paradigms of depression. Moreover, the lesion exerted anxiogenic effects, as shown by reduced time spent in the open arms, in the elevated plus maze test, and by increased thigmotaxis in the open-field test. L-DOPA did not modify depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, which were instead counteracted by the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole. Reboxetine, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, was also able to prevent the depressive and anxiogenic effects produced by the lesion with 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pre-treatment with desipramine prior to injection of 6-OHDA, which is commonly used to preserve noradrenaline neurons, did not modify the effect of the lesion on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, in the present model, mood-related conditions are independent of the reduction of noradrenaline caused by 6-OHDA. Based on these findings we propose that the anti-depressive and anxiolytic action of reboxetine is mediated by promoting dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine uptake from residual

  20. [Effect of dopamine agonist pramipexole (mirapex) on tremor, affective disorders and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, O S; Boĭko, A N; Nesterova, O S; Otcheskaia, O V; Zhuravleva, E Iu; Artemova, I Iu; Khozova, A A; Ismailov, A M; Lisenker, L N; Vdovichenko, T V; Rotor, L D; Ganzhula, P A; Ivanov, A K

    2010-01-01

    The open 6-month study (the MIRAG study) on the effect of D2/D3 dopamine agonist pramipexole (mirapex) on tremor, affective disorders and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) was carried out. Ninety-eight patients, aged from 42 to 75 years (mean age 63.2+/-10.2 years) were included in the study. Scores on the Hoehn and Yahr scale varied from 1 to 4 (mean 2,5+/-0,8). Seventy percent of patients received levodopa in average dose 351.2+/-279.4 mg; 62% of patients had motor fluctuations and 43% had dyskinesias. Pramipexole was titrated to the effective dose (maximum 3 mg/d, mean 2.1 mg/d). In the end of the study, resting tremor was reduced by 54%, postural and kinetic tremor, as assessed with UPDRS and spirography, by 50% and 15%, respectively. The severity of depressive symptoms measured with the Montgomery-Asberg Scale and a modified version of the Geriatric-Depression Scale (GDS-15) was reduced by 56%. Motor fluctuations and dyskinesias were significantly reduced while cognitive functions were not changed. The clinically significant effect reflected in the reduction of motor and non-motor symptoms was observed in 83% of patients, regardless of disease duration, severity of motor deficit, affective and cognitive disorders,. The drug was well tolerated in all patients, including those older than 70 years. Pramipexole improved quality of life in PD patients due to the attenuation of cardinal motor parkinsonian symptoms as well as symptoms, which were relatively resistant to levadopa, e.g. postural and kinetic tremor, and depression. The therapeutic effect remained for at least 6 months.

  1. [Caring for a person affected by Alzheimer's disease: specific aspects of grief in family caregivers and their social support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaquin-Pavan, Evelyne; Pierrot, Marylène

    2007-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (DTA) leads to some behavioural, physical and psychic modifications in the patient that the natural helper (family-spouse-child) will have to face throughout the course of the disease. The authors have tried to identify the nature of losses experienced by helpers so as to bring out some preventive and curative support tracks. This preparatory research-action was conducted with 27 families through semi-directive conversations which enabled to reveal their difficulties (somatic-emotional-affective-organizational), their reactions of adaptation in echo with the losses of the patient along the course of the DTA as well as the elements enabling to maintain or not the ill person's family/close relation link. The analysis of obtained results is proposed according to the concepts of adaptation, affection and separation, systemic approach and coping. The comments and behaviours of helpers are put in relation with the symptoms of mourning as well as with the medical interactions, helper or not. Five chronological times were identified (before diagnosis-moment of the diagnosis-keeping at home-admission in institution-life in institution). The period of white mourning (connected to the loss of the recognition of his/her close relations by the patient) is mainly felt as a vector of suffering. As part of the dynamics of social support, the proposed tracks of nursing interventions mainly target the admission and life in institution; their aim is to offer an adapted support to natural helpers, whether they make the choice or not to support their close patients throughout the institutionalization. In appendices, all the key ideas helping to track down the elements contributing to maintain the ill person's helper/close relation link or accelerating his/her breaking down.

  2. A tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced positive affect improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Richard eRidderinkhof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD. We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous work has shown these measures to rely on the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning. We observed that induced positive affect facilitated learning, through its effects on reward prediction rather than outcome evaluation. Viewing a few minutes of comedy clips served to remedy dopamine-related problems in putamen-based frontostriatal circuitry and, consequently, in learning to predict which actions will yield reward.

  3. Assembly of the Genome of the Disease Vector Aedes aegypti onto a Genetic Linkage Map Allows Mapping of Genes Affecting Disease Transmission

    KAUST Repository

    Juneja, Punita

    2014-01-30

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti transmits some of the most important human arboviruses, including dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya viruses. It has a large genome containing many repetitive sequences, which has resulted in the genome being poorly assembled - there are 4,758 scaffolds, few of which have been assigned to a chromosome. To allow the mapping of genes affecting disease transmission, we have improved the genome assembly by scoring a large number of SNPs in recombinant progeny from a cross between two strains of Ae. aegypti, and used these to generate a genetic map. This revealed a high rate of misassemblies in the current genome, where, for example, sequences from different chromosomes were found on the same scaffold. Once these were corrected, we were able to assign 60% of the genome sequence to chromosomes and approximately order the scaffolds along the chromosome. We found that there are very large regions of suppressed recombination around the centromeres, which can extend to as much as 47% of the chromosome. To illustrate the utility of this new genome assembly, we mapped a gene that makes Ae. aegypti resistant to the human parasite Brugia malayi, and generated a list of candidate genes that could be affecting the trait. © 2014 Juneja et al.

  4. The effect of encoding condition on free recall in Parkinson's disease: incidental and intentional memory are equally affected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellfolk, Ulla; Huurinainen, Salla; Joutsa, Juho; Karrasch, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Free recall memory deficits are common at early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD). As most studies have used intentional memory tasks, there is little information on how non-intentional, incidental encoding conditions affect memory performance in PD. We studied possible differences between PD patients and controls on free recall using incidental and intentional visual memory tasks. Free recall was examined in relation to attentive/executive functioning and subjective memory complaints. A total of 29 non-demented, medicated PD patients (age 60, disease duration 19 months) and 29 healthy controls (age 61) participated in the study. Incidental free recall was studied using a memory-modification of the Boston naming test (Memo-BNT) and intentional free recall with the 20 Objects test. There was a significant main effect for group due to worse free recall performances in the PD group. No statistically significant interaction between group and encoding condition was observed. The free recall deficit in the PD group was related to cognitive/psychomotor slowing, but not to attentive/executive task demands, or to subjective memory complaints. The results indicate that PD patients are impaired on free recall irrespective of encoding condition.

  5. How human practices have affected vector-borne diseases in the past: a study of malaria transmission in Alpine valleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemperière Guy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria was endemic in the Rhône-Alpes area of eastern France in the 19th century and life expectancy was particularly shortened in Alpine valleys. This study was designed to determine how the disease affected people in the area and to identify the factors influencing malaria transmission. Methods Demographic data of the 19th century were collected from death registers of eight villages of the flood-plain of the river Isère. Correlations were performed between these demographic data and reconstructed meteorological data. Archive documents from medical practitioners gave information on symptoms of ill people. Engineer reports provided information on the hydraulic project developments in the Isère valley. Results Description of fevers was highly suggestive of endemic malaria transmission in the parishes neighbouring the river Isère. The current status of anopheline mosquitoes in the area supports this hypothesis. Mean temperature and precipitation were poorly correlated with demographic data, whereas the chronology of hydrological events correlated with fluctuations in death rates in the parishes. Conclusion Nowadays, most of the river development projects involve the creation of wet areas, enabling controlled flooding events. Flood-flow risk and the re-emergence of vector-borne diseases would probably be influenced by the climate change. The message is not to forget that human disturbance of any functioning hydrosystem has often been linked to malaria transmission in the past.

  6. Cognitive processes affect the gait of subjects with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease in dual tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Christofoletti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relation between gait parameters and cognitive impairments in subjects with Parkinson’s disease (PD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD during the performance of dual tasks. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving 126 subjects divided into three groups: Parkinson group (n = 43, Alzheimer group (n = 38, and control group (n = 45. The subjects were evaluated using the Timed Up and Go test administered with motor and cognitive distracters. Gait analyses consisted of cadence and speed measurements, with cognitive functions being assessed by the Brief Cognitive Screening Battery and the Clock Drawing Test. Statistical procedures included mixed-design analyses of variance to observe the gait patterns between groups and tasks and the linear regression model to investigate the influence of cognitive functions in this process. A 5% significant level was adopted. Results Regarding the subjects’ speed, the data show a significant difference between group vs task interaction (p = 0.009, with worse performance of subjects with PD in motor dual task and of subjects with AD in cognitive dual task. With respect to cadence, no statistical differences was seen between group vs task interaction (p = 0.105, showing low interference of the clinical conditions on such parameter. The linear regression model showed that up to 45.79%, of the variance in gait can be explained by the interference of cognitive processes. Conclusion Dual task activities affect gait pattern in subjects with PD and AD. Differences between groups reflect peculiarities of each disease and show a direct interference of cognitive processes on complex tasks.

  7. Preparing for Ebola Virus Disease in West African countries not yet affected: perspectives from Ghanaian health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyarko, Yaw; Goldfrank, Lewis; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Soghoian, Sari; de-Graft Aikins, Ama

    2015-02-26

    The current Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) epidemic has ravaged the social fabric of three West African countries and affected people worldwide. We report key themes from an agenda-setting, multi-disciplinary roundtable convened to examine experiences and implications for health systems in Ghana, a nation without cases but where risk for spread is high and the economic, social and political impact of the impending threat is already felt. Participants' personal stories and the broader debates to define fundamental issues and opportunities for preparedness focused on three inter-related themes. First, the dangers of the fear response itself were highlighted as a threat to the integrity and continuity of quality care. Second, healthcare workers' fears were compounded by a demonstrable lack of societal and personal protections for infection prevention and control in communities and healthcare facilities, as evidenced by an ongoing cholera epidemic affecting over 20,000 patients in the capital Accra alone since June 2014. Third, a lack of coherent messaging and direction from leadership seems to have limited coordination and reinforced a level of mistrust in the government's ability and commitment to mobilize an adequate response. Initial recommendations include urgent investment in the needed supplies and infrastructure for basic, routine infection control in communities and healthcare facilities, provision of assurances with securities for frontline healthcare workers, establishment of a multi-sector, "all-hazards" outbreak surveillance system, and engaging directly with key community groups to co-produce contextually relevant educational messages that will help decrease stigma, fear, and the demoralizing perception that the disease defies remedy or control. The EVD epidemic provides an unprecedented opportunity for West African countries not yet affected by EVD cases to make progress on tackling long-standing health systems weaknesses. This roundtable discussion

  8. Subtle changes in bone mineralization density distribution in most severely affected patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misof, B M; Roschger, P; Jorgetti, V; Klaushofer, K; Borba, V Z C; Boguszewski, C L; Cohen, A; Shane, E; Zhou, H; Dempster, D W; Moreira, C A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with low aBMD as measured by DXA and altered microstructure as assessed by bone histomorphometry and microcomputed tomography. Knowledge of bone matrix mineralization is lacking in COPD. Using quantitative backscatter electron imaging (qBEI), we assessed cancellous (Cn.) and cortical (Ct.) bone mineralization density distribution (BMDD) in 19 postmenopausal women (62.1 ± 7.3 years of age) with COPD. Eight had sustained fragility fractures, and 13 had received treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids. The BMDD outcomes from the patients were compared with healthy reference data and were correlated with previous clinical and histomorphometric findings. In general, the BMDD outcomes for the patients were not significantly different from the reference data. Neither the subgroups of with or without fragility fractures or of who did or did not receive inhaled glucocorticoid treatment, showed differences in BMDD. However, subgroup comparison according to severity revealed 10% decreased cancellous mineralization heterogeneity (Cn.CaWidth) for the most severely affected compared with less affected patients (p=0.042) and compared with healthy premenopausal controls (p=0.021). BMDD parameters were highly correlated with histomorphometric cancellous bone volume (BV/TV) and formation indices: mean degree of mineralization (Cn.CaMean) versus BV/TV (r=0.58, p=0.009), and Cn.CaMean and Ct.CaMean versus bone formation rate (BFR/BS) (r=-0.71, p50th percentile) BV/TV. The normality in most of the BMDD parameters and bone formation rates as well as the significant correlations between them suggests unaffected mineralization processes in COPD. Our findings also indicate no significant negative effect of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on the bone mineralization pattern. However, the observed concomitant occurrence of relatively lower bone volumes with lower bone matrix mineralization will both contribute to the reduced a

  9. IN SITU IMMUNE RESPONSE EVALUATION VIA IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The in situ immune response in skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABD is not well characterized. Aim: Our investigation attempts to immunophenotype cells in lesional skin in several ABD, utilizing immunohistochemistry (ICH. Methods: We tested by IHC for CD4, CD8, CD19, CD20, CD45, CD56/NCAM, PAX-5, granzyme B, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil elastase, LAT and ZAP-70 in patients affected by ABD. We tested 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 biopsies from healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABD, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis. Results: We found a predominantly CD8 positive/CD45 positive T cell infiltrate in all ABD. Our skin biopsies demonstrated consistently positive staining for myeloperoxidase, but negative staining for neutrophil elastase. Most ABD biopsies displayed negative staining for CD4 and B cell markers; natural killer cell markers were also rarely seen. ZAP-70 and LAT were frequently detected. In El Bagre-EPF, a significant fragmentation of T cells in lesional skin was noted, as well as autoreactivity to lymph nodes. Conclusions: The documented T cell and myeloperoxidase staining are indicative of the role of T lymphocytes and neutrophils in lesional biopsies in patients with ABD, in addition to previously documented deposition of B cells, immunoglobulins and complement in situ. In El Bagre-EPF, T cells could also target lymph nodes; however, further studies are needed to confirm this possibility.

  10. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal......) and TUNEL, and moderate levels of caspase 3 immuno-reactivity suggested a high cell turnover where DNA damage/repair might be occurring in the diseased hearts. Interestingly, the apparently similar cardiac diseases exhibited differences in the immunopathological responses in Atlantic salmon....

  11. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  12. Dialysis methods may affect carotid intima-media thickness in Chinese end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhanqin; Zhu, Ming; Guan, Jianming; Chen, Jianghua; He, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhu, Shaoming; Song, Xuequan; Wang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause of cardiovascular morbidity in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is an early independent predictor of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to compare the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and the maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) for carotid IMT in Chinese ESRD patients. A total of 72 CAPD patients, 92 MHD patients, and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were included. Dialysis patients were divided into five subgroups according to dialysis duration: 3-6, 7-12, 13-59, 60-119, and 120-179 months. Carotid IMT and carotid plaques were detected for each patient. The carotid IMT and total plaque detection rate in the CAPD and MHD groups were considerably higher than in the healthy control group (p  0.05). However, after stratification by dialysis duration, the total carotid IMT in the CAPD subgroup was higher than in the MHD subgroup in dialysis duration of 60-119 and 120-179 months (p  0.05). Our study showed that both CAPD and MHD affect carotid IMT in Chinese ESRD patients, and the degree of atherosclerosis in CAPD patients might be higher than that in MHD patients after 5 years of dialysis.

  13. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations.

  14. Myocardial damage in dogs affected by heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis): immunohistochemical study of cardiac myoglobin and troponin I in naturally infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretón, E; Grandi, G; Morchón, R; Simón, F; Passeri, B; Cantoni, A M; Kramer, L; Montoya-Alonso, J A

    2012-10-26

    It has recently been reported that dogs affected by canine heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis) can show an increase in plasma levels of myoglobin and cardiac troponin I, two markers of muscle/myocardial injury. In order to determine if this increase is due to myocardial damage, the right ventricle of 24 naturally infected dogs was examined by routine histology and immunohistochemistry with anti-myoglobin and anti-cardiac troponin I antibodies. Microscopic lesions included necrosis and myocyte vacuolization, and were associated with loss of staining for one or both proteins. Results confirm that increased levels of myoglobin and cardiac troponin I are indicative of myocardial damage in dogs affected by heartworm disease.

  15. Personality and serotonin transporter genotype interact with social context to affect immunity and viral set-point in simian immunodeficiency virus disease

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    From the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, stress has been a suspected contributor to the wide variation seen in disease progression, and some evidence supports this idea. Not all individuals respond to a stressor in the same way, however, and little is known about the biological mechanisms by which variations in individuals’ responses to their environment affect disease-relevant immunologic processes. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus/rhesus macaque model of AIDS, we explored how persona...

  16. Disease and health conditions affecting camel production in pastoral and agro-pastoral communities of northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Swai,

    2011-02-01

    herds in Tanzania. These diseases deserve further research attention owing to its potential impact on meat, milk production affecting food security.

  17. Relationship between vagal tone, cortisol, TNF-alpha, epinephrine and negative affects in Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Sonia Pellissier

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS involve brain-gut dysfunctions where vagus nerve is an important component. The aim of this work was to study the association between vagal tone and markers of stress and inflammation in patients with CD or IBS compared to healthy subjects (controls. The study was performed in 73 subjects (26 controls, 21 CD in remission and 26 IBS patients. The day prior to the experiment, salivary cortisol was measured at 8:00 AM and 10:00 PM. The day of the experiment, subjects completed questionnaires for anxiety (STAI and depressive symptoms (CES-D. After 30 min of rest, ECG was recorded for heart rate variability (HRV analysis. Plasma cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, TNF-alpha and IL-6 were measured in blood samples taken at the end of ECG recording. Compared with controls, CD and IBS patients had higher scores of state-anxiety and depressive symptomatology. A subgroup classification based on HRV-normalized high frequency band (HFnu as a marker of vagal tone, showed that control subjects with high vagal tone had significantly lower evening salivary cortisol levels than subjects with low vagal tone. Such an effect was not observed in CD and IBS patients. Moreover, an inverse association (r =  -0.48; p<0.05 was observed between the vagal tone and TNF-alpha level in CD patients exclusively. In contrast, in IBS patients, vagal tone was inversely correlated with plasma epinephrine (r =  -0.39; p<0.05. No relationship was observed between vagal tone and IL-6, norepinephrine or negative affects (anxiety and depressive symptomatology in any group. In conclusion, these data argue for an imbalance between the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and the vagal tone in CD and IBS patients. Furthermore, they highlight the specific homeostatic link between vagal tone and TNF-alpha in CD and epinephrine in IBS and argue for the relevance of vagus nerve reinforcement interventions in those diseases.

  18. Extreme Air Pollution Conditions Adversely Affect Blood Pressure and Insulin Resistance: The Air Pollution and Cardiometabolic Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Robert D; Sun, Zhichao; Brook, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Rao, Xiaoquan; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Sun, Qinghua; Fan, Zhongjie; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence supports that fine particulate matter adversely affects cardiometabolic diseases particularly in susceptible individuals; however, health effects induced by the extreme concentrations within megacities in Asia are not well described. We enrolled 65 nonsmoking adults with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in the Beijing metropolitan area into a panel study of 4 repeated visits across 4 seasons since 2012. Daily ambient fine particulate matter and personal black carbon levels ranged from 9.0 to 552.5 µg/m(3) and 0.2 to 24.5 µg/m(3), respectively, with extreme levels observed during January 2013. Cumulative fine particulate matter exposure windows across the prior 1 to 7 days were significantly associated with systolic blood pressure elevations ranging from 2.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.3-3.7) to 2.7 (0.6-4.8) mm Hg per SD increase (67.2 µg/m(3)), whereas cumulative black carbon exposure during the previous 2 to 5 days were significantly associated with ranges in elevations in diastolic blood pressure from 1.3 (0.0-2.5) to 1.7 (0.3-3.2) mm Hg per SD increase (3.6 µg/m(3)). Both black carbon and fine particulate matter were significantly associated with worsening insulin resistance (0.18 [0.01-0.36] and 0.22 [0.04-0.39] unit increase per SD increase of personal-level black carbon and 0.18 [0.02-0.34] and 0.22 [0.08-0.36] unit increase per SD increase of ambient fine particulate matter on lag days 4 and 5). These results provide important global public health warnings that air pollution may pose a risk to cardiometabolic health even at the extremely high concentrations faced by billions of people in the developing world today.

  19. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisdair M Boag

    Full Text Available Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS, circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH, CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH, CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation. Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016. Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037. Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015 and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017 were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism.

  20. Autoantibodies against Cytochrome P450 Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme in Dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) Affected with Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's Disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boag, Alisdair M; Christie, Michael R; McLaughlin, Kerry A; Syme, Harriet M; Graham, Peter; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Canine hypoadrenocorticism likely arises from immune-mediated destruction of adrenocortical tissue, leading to glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency. In humans with autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) or autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS), circulating autoantibodies have been demonstrated against enzymes associated with adrenal steroid synthesis. The current study investigates autoantibodies against steroid synthesis enzymes in dogs with spontaneous hypoadrenocorticism. Coding regions of canine CYP21A2 (21-hydroxylase; 21-OH), CYP17A1 (17-hydroxylase; 17-OH), CYP11A1 (P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme; P450scc) and HSD3B2 (3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; 3βHSD) were amplified, cloned and expressed as 35S-methionine radiolabelled recombinant protein. In a pilot study, serum samples from 20 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism and four unaffected control dogs were screened by radio-immunoprecipitation assay. There was no evidence of reactivity against 21-OH, 17-OH or 3βHSD, but five dogs with hypoadrenocorticism showed immunoreactivity to P450scc compared with controls. Serum samples were subsequently obtained from 213 dogs diagnosed with hypoadrenocorticism and 110 dogs from a hospital control population. Thirty control dogs were randomly selected to establish a threshold for antibody positivity (mean + 3 × standard deviation). Dogs with hypoadrenocorticism were more likely to be P450scc autoantibody positive than hospital controls (24% vs. 1.2%, respectively; p = 0.0016). Sex was significantly associated with the presence of P450scc autoantibodies in the case population, with 30% of females testing positive compared with 17% of males (p = 0.037). Significant associations with breed (p = 0.015) and DLA-type (DQA1*006:01 allele; p = 0.017) were also found. This cross-sectional study indicates that P450scc autoantibodies are present in a proportion of dogs affected with hypoadrenocorticism.

  1. Impairment of diastolic function in adult patients affected by osteogenesis imperfecta clinically asymptomatic for cardiac disease: casuality or causality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Fornari, Rachele; Di Lorenzo, Gabriella; Celli, Mauro; Lubrano, Carla; Falcone, Stefania; Fabbrini, Elisa; Greco, Emanuela; Zambrano, Anna; Brama, Marina; Prossomariti, Giancarlo; Marzano, Sara; Marini, Mario; Conti, Francesco; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Spera, Giovanni

    2009-01-09

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited connective disorder causing increased bone fragility and low bone mass. OI includes severe bone fragility, impaired dentinogenesis, with less common alterations in the joints, blood vessels, heart valves, skin. Interestingly, description of left ventricular rupture, aortic dissection and heart valves incompetence has been previously described. Death may occur in OI patients for cardiac disease in asyntomatic subjects. Aim of our study has been to evaluate the presence of potential subclinical cardiac disorders and to characterize cardiac functional parameters by echocardiography in adults with OI in absence of cardiac symptoms. Forty patients (21 females and 19 males) affected by type I, III, IV OI and 40 control subjects (20 females and 20 males) were evaluated in the study. Patients and controls underwent clinical examination, screening for endocrine and metabolic disorders, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. In particular, all subjects were evaluated by two-dimensional echocardiography with continuous- and pulse-wave Doppler. Patients and controls belonged to NYHA class I and no significant electrocardiographic alteration was documented in both groups. Thirty-eight patients (95%) showed valvular regurgitation compared to one control subject (2.5%; Prelaxation time (IRT) was increased by 47% (95% CI: 26% to 53%; Pmetabolic alterations. These diastolic echocardiographic parameters might worsen over time, especially if other cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., smoking, hypertension, metabolic and endocrine alterations) are not carefully checked, monitored and treated. In the context of a multidisciplinary evaluation of OI patients, our data suggest that a careful cardiological evaluation of these patients is indicated beside skeletal evaluation and therapeutical skeletal options.

  2. Factors affecting the accuracy of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP in assessing hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Sik Jung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP can measure hepatic steatosis. However, factors affecting its accuracy have not been described yet. This study investigated predictors of discordance between liver biopsy (LB and CAP. METHODS: A total of 161 consecutive patients with chronic liver disease who underwent LB and CAP were enrolled prospectively. Histological steatosis was graded as S0 (66% of hepatocytes. Cutoff CAP values were calculated from our cohort (250, 301, and 325 dB/m for ≥ S1, ≥ S2, and S3. Discordance was defined as a discrepancy of at least two steatosis stages between LB and CAP. RESULTS: The median age (102 males and 59 females was 49 years. Repartition of histological steatosis was as follows; S0 26.1% (n = 42, S1 49.7% (n = 80, S2 20.5% (n = 33, and S3 3.7% (n = 6. In multivariate linear regression analysis, CAP value was independently associated with steatosis grade along with body mass index (BMI and interquartile range/median of CAP value (IQR/MCAP (all P<0.05. Discordance was identified in 13 (8.1% patients. In multivariate analysis, histological S3 (odd ratio [OR], 9.573; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.207-75.931; P = 0.033 and CAP value (OR, 1.020; 95% CI, 1.006-1.034; P = 0.006 were significantly associated with discordance, when adjusting for BMI, IQR/MCAP, and necroinflammation, reflected by histological activity or ALT level. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with high grade steatosis or high CAP values have a higher risk of discordance between LB and CAP. Further studies are needed to improve the accuracy of CAP interpretation, especially in patients with higher CAP values.

  3. Biallelic mutations in huntington disease: A new case with just one affected parent, review of the literature and terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Wendy R; Peñaherrera, Maria S; Robinson, Wendy P; Milunsky, Jeff M; Nicholson, Jane M; Albin, Roger L

    2015-05-01

    Patients with biallelic mutations for Huntington disease (HD) are rare. We present a 46-year-old female with two expanded Huntingtin (HTT) alleles with just one known affected parent. This is the first reported patient with molecular studies performed to exclude HTT uniparental disomy (UPD). The proband had biparental inheritance of HTT alleles (42/44 CAG repeats). Given the negative UPD results, the proband's unaffected mother either had a reduced penetrance allele that expanded into the full mutation range during transmission to our patient or an unknown full HTT mutation and died before symptom onset, unlikely given no family history of HD and asymptomatic at age 59. We made the novel observation in our literature review that most patients with biallelic HD did not have two full HTT mutations. Most had one HTT allele that was in the intermediate or reduced penetrance ranges or 40 CAG repeats, the lowest limit of the full mutation range. Although the number of patients is small, when an allele in these size ranges was present, generally the age of HD onset was in the 50s. If the second HTT allele had >45 repeats, then onset was typically 20s-30s. While similar ages of onset have been reported for patients with one or two HTT mutations, patients with biallelic mutations may have later onset if an expanded HTT allele has ≤40 CAG repeats. Finally, we propose that "biallelic mutations" or "compound heterozygosity" are more accurate descriptive terms than "homozygosity" when there are two non-identical expanded HTT alleles.

  4. Renal replacement therapy for rare diseases affecting the kidney: an analysis of the ERA-EDTA Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuhl, E.; Stralen, K.J. van; Wanner, C.; Ariceta, G.; Heaf, J.G.; Bjerre, A.K.; Palsson, R.; Duneau, G.; Hoitsma, A.J.; Ravani, P.; Schaefer, F.; Jager, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, increased efforts have been undertaken to address the needs of patients with rare diseases by international initiatives and consortia devoted to rare disease research and management. However, information on the overall prevalence of rare diseases within the end-stage ren

  5. Increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles in recent-onset Graves' disease caused primarily by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn 3 patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia. The affected muscles were found to be very stiff when the other eye looked straight ahead. It was expected that these stiff muscles would be able to

  6. Identification and Complete Genome of Seneca Valley Virus in Vesicular Fluid and Sera of Pigs Affected with Idiopathic Vesicular Disease, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, F A; Linhares, D C L; Barcellos, D E S N; Lam, H C; Collins, J; Marthaler, D

    2015-12-01

    Numerous, ongoing outbreaks in Brazilian swine herds have been characterized by vesicular lesions in sows and acute losses of neonatal piglets. The complete genome of Seneca Valley virus (SVV) was identified in vesicular fluid and sera of sows, providing evidence of association between SVV and vesicular disease and viraemia in affected animals.

  7. Increased muscle tension and reduced elasticity of affected muscles in recent-onset Graves' disease caused primarily by active muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Simonsz (Huib); G. Kommerell (Guntram)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractIn 3 patients with Graves' disease of recent onset, length-tension diagrams were made during surgery for squint under eyedrop anesthesia. The affected muscles were found to be very stiff when the other eye looked straight ahead. It was expected that these stiff muscles would be able to s

  8. Patient reported and clinical outcomes in paediatric end stage renal disease: Understanding factors affecting quality of life, access to transplantation and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjaden, L.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis addresses to what extent end stage renal disease (ESRD) and its treatment affects quality of life and social functioning in paediatric patients. Special emphasis is placed on the role of demographic and medical factors. Secondly, we studied the very long-term psychosocial outcomes of

  9. 18F-FDG Uptake in Less Affected Lung Field Provides Prognostic Stratification in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobashi, Tomomi; Kubo, Takeshi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Handa, Tomohiro; Koyasu, Sho; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Mishima, Michiaki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the clinical significance of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD), by investigating the relationships between (18)F-FDG PET/CT parameters and clinical indicators and by evaluating the prognostic implications of (18)F-FDG PET/CT results. Ninety patients (51 men, 39 women; mean age, 55.4 y; age range, 26-78 y) with ILD who underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively analyzed. SUVmean was defined as the mean SUV of the less-affected lung field, SUVTF as adjusted SUVmean using tissue fraction (TF), and CTmean as the mean attenuation of the corresponding region of interest on high-resolution CT. SUVmean, SUVTF, and CTmean were compared in the 90 ILD patients and in 15 age- and sex-matched controls. Correlations of SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVTF, and CTmean with clinical indicators, including estimated percentage of forced vital capacity (%FVC), estimated percentage of diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (%DLco), sialylated carbohydrate antigen Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6), surfactant protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and ILD-sex-age-physiology (GAP) index, were evaluated using the Spearman rank correlation test and the Tukey-Kramer test. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analyses of factors associated with lung transplantation-free survival. SUVmean, SUVTF, and CTmean were significantly higher in ILD patients than in healthy controls, except for CTmean in patients with a nonusual interstitial pneumonia pattern. SUVmean and CTmean were significantly correlated with %FVC, %DLco, KL-6, and SP-D; SUVTF was significantly correlated with %DLco, KL-6, SP-D, and LDH; and SUVmax was weakly correlated with KL-6 and CRP. Univariate analysis showed that SUVmean, SUVTF, sex, %FVC, %DLco, KL-6, and ILD-GAP index were significantly prognostic of lung transplantation-free survival; and multivariate analysis showed that SUVmean and ILD-GAP index

  10. Flavor of oranges as impacted by abscission zone formation for trees affected by huanglongbing disease and Lasiodiploida infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees affected by Huanglongbing (HLB) exhibit excessive fruit drop, which is exacerbated by secondary infection of the abscission zone by the fungus Lasiodiplodia. ‘Hamlin’ orange trees, both healthy and affected by HLB, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, determined by Polymerase chain reactio...

  11. Genetic variants in IL2RA and IL7R affect multiple sclerosis disease risk and progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Lee, Joshua D.; Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common demyelinating neurodegenerative disease with a strong genetic component. Previous studies have associated genetic variants in IL2RA and IL7R in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this study we describe the association between IL2RA (rs2104286) and IL7R (rs6897932) in the Canadian population. Genotyping 1,978 MS patients and 830 controls failed to identify any significant association between these variants and disease risk. However, stratified analysis for family history of disease, and disease course identified a trend towards association for IL2RA in patients without a family history (p = 0.05; odds ratio = 0.77), and a significant association between IL7R and patients who developed progressive MS (PrMS) (p = 0.002; odds ratio = 0.73). Although not statistically significant, the effect of IL2RA (rs2104286) in patients without a family history of MS indicates that the genetic components for familial and sporadic disease are perhaps distinct. This data suggests the onset of sporadic disease is likely determined by a large number of variants of small effect, whereas MS in patients with a family history of disease is caused by a few deleterious variants. In addition, the significant association between PrMS and rs6897932 indicates that IL7R may not be disease-causing but a determinant of disease course. Further characterization of the effect of IL2RA and IL7R genetic variants in defined MS subtypes is warranted to evaluate the effect of these genes on specific clinical outcomes and to further elucidate the mechanisms of disease onset and progression. PMID:24770783

  12. Limited fungicide applications affect foliar and fruit disease severity and phytochemical content of muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry rot diseases cause significant reductions in yield and quality of muscadine grapes, but these losses may be reduced significantly by fungicide applications. Four studies were conducted to explore the relationship between yield, disease control, berry quality, and phytochemical content followin...

  13. Do Intraindividual Variation in Disease Progression and the Ensuing Tight Window of Opportunity Affect Estimation of Screening Benefits?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koffijberg, Hendrik; Rinkel, Gabriel; Buskens, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background. The effects of variation in disease progression between individuals on the effectiveness of screening have been assessed extensively in the literature. For several diseases, progression may also vary within individuals over time. The authors study the effects of intraindividual variation

  14. Exposure assessment to fumonisins B1, B2 and B3 through consumption of gluten-free foodstuffs intended for people affected by celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Francesco; Fasano, Evelina; Scognamiglio, Gelsomina; Nardone, Antonio; Triassi, Maria; Cirillo, Teresa

    2016-11-01

    Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species and affecting maize crops. Some analogues of fumonisins are known for their toxic and possible carcinogenic effects on humans and animals. Because of their occurrence in corn-based food, diet is the main source of exposure to these mycotoxins, especially among people affected by celiac disease. Hence, the purpose of this paper was to evaluate the amount of fumonisins B1, B2 and B3 in maize-based products and to assess the exposure of people affected by celiac disease to fumonisins. The sample consisted of 154 gluten-free products analyzed according to method UNI EN 14352:2005. Results showed a heterogeneous contamination by fumoninisin B1, B2 and B3, although below limits of Commission Regulation No 1126/2007 and consistent with other European literature data. Exposure to fumonisins was evaluated for different age groups. In some cases exposure to fumonisins could not be ignored since the total intake could exceed EFSA Provisional Maximum Tolerable Intake up to 150%. Therefore, in the light of an overall contamination by fumonisins the total dietary exposure could be underrated not only in people affected by celiac disease, but also in non-celiac population.

  15. Intergenerational Instability of the CAG Repeat of the Gene for Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD1) is Affected by the Genotype of the Normal Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    五十嵐, 修一; Igarashi, Shuichi

    1997-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat in the MJD1 gene at 14q32.1. To identify elements affecting the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat, we investigated whether the CGG/GGG polymorphism at the 3' end of the CAG repeat affects the intergenerational instability of the CAG repeat. The [expanded (CAG) n-CGG]/[normal (CAG) n-GGG] haplotypes were found to result in significantly greater instability...

  16. Intralesional Injection of Hyaluronic Acid in Patients Affected With Peyronie's Disease: Preliminary Results From a Prospective, Multicenter, Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zucchi, MD

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Intralesional treatment with hyaluronic acid can improve plaque size, penile curvature, and overall sexual satisfaction and seems preferably indicated in the early (active phase of the disease. Furthermore, it is easy to perform and well tolerated.

  17. A new multiplex PCR strategy for the simultaneous determination of four genetic polymorphisms affecting HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Knudsen, Troels Bygum; Ohlendorff, Stine Dahl

    2001-01-01

    The CCR5 Delta32, CCR2 64I, SDF1 3'A, and CCR5 promoter 59029 polymorphisms have been suggested to influence HIV-1 disease progression. Furthermore, the CCR5 Delta32 and the CCR2 64I polymorphisms have been associated with various other diseases. The purpose of the present study was to develop......, SDF1 3'A, and CCR5 promoter 59029 A/G polymorphisms....

  18. Diseases affecting patients returning from abroad: Experience of a travel clinic in Japan from 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Miyata, Nobuyuki; Miyajima, Makiko; Sakamoto, Yohei; Amano, Yuichiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo

    2017-01-01

    The number of patients returning from or staying abroad is likely to increase in the future. We performed a retrospective study of patients returning from abroad in our travel clinic in Japan. All patients presenting within 6 months of traveling abroad between 2004 and 2014 were included in the present study. A total of 2374 (mean age, 35 years) patients were seen by doctors specializing in treating infectious diseases. Of these, 918 were females and 87 of them lived abroad. Diagnoses and exposure regions were recorded for all patients. The most frequent region visited before attending our clinic was Southeast Asia (n = 1050, 44%), with a median duration for staying abroad of 8 days. The major purposes for overseas travel were tourism (n = 1302, 55%) and business (n = 684, 29%). Of the 2399 individual diagnoses made, the most frequent were diseases of the gastrointestinal system (n = 1083, 45%), skin and soft tissue (n = 440, 18%), systemic febrile disease without specific systems (419, 18%), and the respiratory system (353, 15%). The relative incidences of specific diseases changed drastically due to significant disease outbreaks, such as pandemic influenza in 2009. Exposure regions remained relatively constant throughout the study period, except for Japan. Vaccine-preventable diseases accounted for 5.3% of all the diseases, and 402 (26%) patients received pre-travel consultation and prophylaxis with vaccines and/or anti-malarial drug. We should make an effort to make more people notice the risk of travel and properly perform prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extrinsic factors significantly affect patterns of disease in free-ranging and captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Linda; Terio, Karen A; Worley, Michael; Jago, Mark; Bagot-Smith, Arthur; Marker, Laurie

    2005-07-01

    The cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been considered a paradigm for disease vulnerability due to loss of genetic diversity. This species monomorphism has been suspected to be the basis for their general poor health and dwindling populations in captivity. North American and South African captive populations have high prevalences of hepatic veno-occlusive disease, glomerulosclerosis, gastritis, and systemic amyloidosis, diseases that are rare in other species. Unusually severe inflammatory reactions to common infectious agents have also been documented in captive cheetahs. The current study compared disease prevalences in free-ranging Namibian cheetahs with those in two captive populations of similar ages. The occurrence of diseases in the free-ranging population was determined from 49 necropsies and 27 gastric biopsies obtained between 1986 and 2003 and compared with prevalences in 147 North American and 80 South African captive cheetahs. Except for two cheetahs, the free-ranging population was in robust health with only mild lesions present, in contrast with significantly higher prevalences in the captive populations. Despite widespread heavy Helicobacter colonization in wild cheetahs, only 3% of the free-ranging population had moderate to severe gastritis, in contrast with 64% of captive cheetahs. No severe inflammatory reactions to viral infections were detected in the free-ranging animals. Because free-ranging Namibian cheetahs are as genetically impoverished as captive cheetahs, these findings caution against attributing loss of fitness solely to genetic factors and attest to the fundamental importance of extrinsic factors in wildlife health.

  20. Medication non-adherence in adult patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease: a critical review and update of the determining factors, consequences and possible interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Selinger, Christian P

    2017-03-01

    Achieving adherence to medications can be a serious challenge for patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medical treatment is fundamental for inducing and maintaining remission, preventing flares and reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Non-adherence may affect patients' quality of life resulting in unfavourable treatment outcomes, more hospitalizations and higher healthcare-related costs. Recognising and improving adherence is therefore a primary aim for the treatment of IBD. Areas covered: We critically discuss the current knowledge on medication non-adherence in adult patients affected by IBD, also mentioning a few issues concerning the paediatric and adolescent populations. In particular, we reviewed the literature focusing on the definition and detection of non-adherence, on its extent and on the possible non-modifiable and modifiable factors involved (patient-centred, therapy-related, disease-related and physician-related). Furthermore, we analysed the interventional studies performed so far. The literature review was conducted through PubMed addressing medication non-adherence in IBD, using the keywords 'adherence' and related terms and 'IBD, ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease'. Expert commentary: Adherence to therapy for IBD is a complex yet fundamental issue that cannot be solved by addressing a single aspect only. Future studies should focus on patient-tailored and multidimensional interventions.

  1. Maternal allergic disease does not affect the phenotype of T and B cells or the immune response to allergens in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindsjö, E; Joerink, M; Johansson, C; Bremme, K; Malmström, V; Scheynius, A

    2010-07-01

    It is hypothesized that the in utero environment in allergic mothers can affect the neonatal immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of maternal allergic disease on cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC) phenotype and proliferative responses upon allergen stimulation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 12 allergic and 14 nonallergic mothers and CBMC from their children were analysed. In the mothers, we determined cell proliferation, production of IL-4 and expression of FOXP3 in response to allergen stimulation. In the children, we evaluated cell proliferation and FOXP3 expression following allergen stimulation. Furthermore, expression of different homing markers on T cells and regulatory T cells and maturity of the T cells and B cell subsets were evaluated directly ex vivo. The timothy- and birch-allergic mothers responded with increased proliferation and/or IL-4 production towards timothy and birch extract, respectively, when compared to nonallergic mothers. This could not be explained by impairment of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells in the allergic mothers. CBMC proliferation and FOXP3 expression in response to allergens were not affected by the allergic status of the mother. Also, phenotype of T cells, FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and B cells was not affected by the allergic status of the mother. Our results suggest that maternal allergic disease has no effect on the neonatal response to allergens or the phenotype of neonatal lymphocytes. The factors studied here could, however, still affect later development of allergy.

  2. Awareness and Its Association With Affective Symptoms in Young-onset and Late-onset Alzheimer Disease: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, D. van; Vugt, M.E. de; Kohler, S.; Aalten, P.; Bakker, C.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: It is unknown whether there are differences between young-onset dementia and late-onset dementia in awareness levels and whether awareness is differentially associated with affective symptoms in both groups. The present study assesses possible differences between young-onset (YO-AD) and

  3. Negative affectivity and social inhibition in cardiovascular disease: evaluating type-D personality and its assessment using item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emons, Wilco H.M.; Meijer, Rob R.; Denollet, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Individuals with increased levels of both negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI)—referred to as type-D personality—are at increased risk of adverse cardiac events. We used item response theory (IRT) to evaluate NA, SI, and type-D personality as measured by the DS14. The obje

  4. Effectiveness of knowledge translation tools addressing multiple high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults: protocol for a systematic review alongside a realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Perrier, Laure; Hamid, Jemila; Tricco, Andrea C; Cardoso, Roberta; Ivers, Noah M; Liu, Barbara; Marr, Sharon; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Wong, Geoff; Graves, Lisa; Straus, Sharon E

    2015-02-03

    The burden of chronic disease is a global phenomenon, particularly among people aged 65 years and older. More than half of older adults have more than one chronic disease and their care is not optimal. Chronic disease management (CDM) tools have the potential to meet this challenge but they are primarily focused on a single disease, which fails to address the growing number of seniors with multiple chronic conditions. We will conduct a systematic review alongside a realist review to identify effective CDM tools that integrate one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting older adults and to better understand for whom, under what circumstances, how and why they produce their outcomes. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AgeLine and the Cochrane Library for experimental, quasi-experimental, observational and qualitative studies in any language investigating CDM tools that facilitate optimal disease management in one or more high-burden chronic diseases affecting adults aged ≥65 years. Study selection will involve calibration of reviewers to ensure reliability of screening and duplicate assessment of articles. Data abstraction and risk of bias assessment will also be performed independently. Analysis will include descriptive summaries of study and appraisal characteristics, effectiveness of each CDM tool (meta-analysis if appropriate); and a realist programme theory will be developed and refined to explain the outcome patterns within the included studies. Ethics approval is not required for this study. We anticipate that our findings, pertaining to gaps in care across high-burden chronic diseases affecting seniors and highlighting specific areas that may require more research, will be of interest to a wide range of knowledge users and stakeholders. We will publish and present our findings widely, and also plan more active dissemination strategies such as workshops with our key stakeholders. Our protocol is registered with PROSPERO (registration number

  5. Genetic risk factors affecting mitochondrial function are associated with kidney disease in people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swan, E J; Salem, R M; Sandholm, N

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association with diabetic kidney disease of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. METHODS: The mitochondrial genome and 1039 nuclear genes that are integral to mitochondrial function were investigated using a case (n = 823 in...

  6. Detection and management of Xyleborus glabratus and other vectors of laurel wilt, a lethal disease affecting avocados in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redabay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus, carries a phytopathogenic symbiont, Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt, a lethal vascular disease of some Lauraceae species. Both X. glabratus and R. lauricola are natives of Asia that recently invaded much of the coastal plain of the sout...

  7. Are Clinical Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias Affected by Education and Self-Reported Race?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Grober, Ellen; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Ehrlich, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial examined whether the diagnostic process for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias may be influenced by knowledge of the patient's education and/or self-reported race. Four conditions were implemented: diagnostic team knows (a) race and education, (b) education only, (c) race only, or (d) neither. Diagnosis and…

  8. Isolation of a recent Korean epizootic strain of Newcastle disease virus from Eurasian Scops Owls affected with severe diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang-Seuk; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Jeon, Woo-Jin; Nah, Jin-Ju; Kim, Young-Jun; Lee, Mu-Yeong; Lee, Hang; Kwon, Jun-Hun

    2008-01-01

    Velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was recovered from two dead Eurasian Scops Owls (Otus scops) from a wildlife rescue center in Korea during 2005. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequence of the partial fusion (F) protein revealed that the isolates had the highest level of homology to recent Korean NDV strains from poultry.

  9. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chro...

  10. Are Clinical Diagnoses of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias Affected by Education and Self-Reported Race?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; Grober, Ellen; Eimicke, Joseph P.; Ehrlich, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    A randomized controlled trial examined whether the diagnostic process for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias may be influenced by knowledge of the patient's education and/or self-reported race. Four conditions were implemented: diagnostic team knows (a) race and education, (b) education only, (c) race only, or (d) neither. Diagnosis and…

  11. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chro...

  12. Profile of patients affected by Hansen's disease seen at the Outpatient Clinic of Dermatology at Hospital Evangélico de Curitiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budel, Anelise Roskamp; Raymundo, Anelise Rocha; Costa, Carla Fabiane da; Gerhardt, Cristina; Pedri, Lucas Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic infectious disease with worldwide distribution. Although it is a curable disease, it remains as a public health problem, with Brazil being the second most endemic country in the world. The skin lesions and neural damage, which lead to physical disabilities, affect the patients' self-esteem, cause a decrease in quality of life and interfere in the patients' lives. Identify the profile of the patients affected by leprosy seen at the Outpatient Clinic of Dermatology of Hospital Evangélico de Curitiba and characterize the levels of quality of life of the sample in the week prior to the survey by means of the Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire. Application of the Dermatology Life Quality Index to 22 patients diagnosed with leprosy in the period from May to October 2009. Among the 22 patients who participated in the study, 55% were male and 45% were female, with a mean age of 50.2 years. The scores obtained with the Dermatology Life Quality Index ranged from 1 to 25 points, with a mean of 10.23. Most of the patients (50%) had scores in the range severe or very severe; 31.8% of the patients obtained scores in the range mild or moderate, and 18.2% of the patients reported that there was no impairment of their quality of life. The profile of the patients affected by leprosy in this study were men, with a mean age of 50 years and presenting the multibacillary form of the disease. The application of the Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaire allowed us to verify that the score severe or very severe for quality of life was predominant in the sample, with higher impact on women and no significant difference concerning pauci or multibacillary leprosy.

  13. [Do actual body experiences affect physical self-concept? A longitudinal study with patients with cardiac disease during sport therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Jens; Tietjens, Maike

    2014-07-01

    The present study investigates variations of physical well-being and physical self-concept during sport therapy in rehabilitation of patients with heart diseases. Additionally, interrelationships between physical self-concept and physical well-being were assumed. In a sample of 43 heart disease patients (aged 44-86), physical self-concept (PSK-scale) was assessed before and after a 3-week physical exercise treatment. Actual physical well-being was assessed with the Perceived Physical State adjective list (WKV) at 3 measuring points (beginning, mid, and end of sport therapy). Enhancements of physical self-concept and actual physical well-being could be found. Furthermore, relationships between both constructs could be revealed: The progression of one construct depends on the initial state of the respective other. Low initial states facilitate positive progression. These results are discussed both as a ceiling effect and as the consequence of a physical stimulation below threshold.

  14. High intensity interval training favourably affects antioxidant and inflammation mRNA expression in early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Briskey, David R; Scanlan, Aaron T; Coombes, Jeff S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation have been linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease. To reduce oxidative stress and inflammation related to chronic kidney disease, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. Data suggests high intensity interval training may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with explanations of mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. This study assessed effects of eight weeks of high intensity interval training (85% VO2max), versus low intensity exercise (45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour, in an animal model of early-stage chronic kidney disease. We examined kidney-specific mRNA expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase 1; Gpx1, superoxide dismutase 1; Sod1, and catalase; Cat) and inflammation (kidney injury molecule 1; Kim1 and tumour necrosis factor receptor super family 1b; Tnfrsf1b), as well as plasma F2-isoprostanes, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Compared to sedentary behaviour, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Sod1 (p=0.01) and Cat (pinflammation.

  15. Low-intensity resistance exercise does not affect cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aluísio H.R. Andrade Lima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effect of a single bout of resistance exercise on cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease. METHODS: Fifteen patients with peripheral artery disease (age: 58.3±4.0 years underwent the following sessions in a random order: resistance exercise (three sets of 10 repetitions of the six resistance exercises with a workload of 5-7 in the OMNI-RES scale and control (similar to the resistance session; however, the resistance exercises were performed with no load. The frequency domain (low frequency, high frequency and sympathovagal balance and symbolic analysis (0V, 1V and 2V patterns of heart rate variability were obtained before and until one hour after the interventions. RESULTS: After the resistance exercise and control sessions, similar increases were observed in the consecutive heartbeat intervals (control: 720.8±28.6 vs. 790.9±34.4 ms; resistance exercise: 712.9±30.1 vs. 756.8±37.9 ms; p0.05. CONCLUSION: A single bout of resistance exercise did not alter cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with peripheral artery disease.

  16. Rare Variants in PLD3 Do Not Affect Risk for Early-Onset Alzheimer Disease in a European Consortium Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Rita; Van den Bossche, Tobi; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Geerts, Nathalie; Laureys, Annelies; Dillen, Lubina; Graff, Caroline; Thonberg, Håkan; Chiang, Huei-Hsin; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Maria A; Diehl-Schmid, Janine; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Binetti, Giuliano; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Lladó, Albert; Gelpi, Ellen; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Santana, Isabel; Tsolaki, Magda; Koutroumani, Maria; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan; de Mendonça, Alexandre; Martins, Madalena; Borroni, Barbara; Padovani, Alessandro; Matej, Radoslav; Rohan, Zdenek; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Deyn, Peter P; Cras, Patrick; van der Zee, Julie; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Rare variants in the phospholipase D3 gene (PLD3) were associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD). We identified a missense mutation in PLD3 in whole-genome sequence data of a patient with autopsy confirmed Alzheimer disease (AD) and onset age of 50 years. Subsequently, we sequenced PLD3 in a Belgian early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) patient (N = 261) and control (N = 319) cohort, as well as in European EOAD patients (N = 946) and control individuals (N = 1,209) ascertained in different European countries. Overall, we identified 22 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1%, 20 missense and two splicing mutations. Burden analysis did not provide significant evidence for an enrichment of rare PLD3 variants in EOAD patients in any of the patient/control cohorts. Also, meta-analysis of the PLD3 data, including a published dataset of a German EOAD cohort, was not significant (P = 0.43; OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.60-3.31). Consequently, our data do not support a role for PLD3 rare variants in the genetic etiology of EOAD in European EOAD patients. Our data corroborate the negative replication data obtained in LOAD studies and therefore a genetic role of PLD3 in AD remains to be demonstrated.

  17. Cats are not small dogs: is there an immunological explanation for why cats are less affected by arthropod-borne disease than dogs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-09-20

    It is widely recognized that cats appear to be less frequently affected by arthropod-borne infectious diseases than dogs and share fewer zoonotic pathogens with man. This impression is supported by the relative lack of scientific publications related to feline vector-borne infections. This review explores the possible reasons for the difference between the two most common small companion animal species, including the hypothesis that cats might have a genetically-determined immunological resistance to arthropod vectors or the microparasites they transmit. A number of simple possibilities might account for the lower prevalence of these diseases in cats, including factors related to the lifestyle and behaviour of the cat, lesser spend on preventative healthcare for cats and reduced opportunities for research funding for these animals. The dog and cat have substantially similar immune system components, but differences in immune function might in part account for the markedly distinct prevalence and clinicopathological appearance of autoimmune, allergic, idiopathic inflammatory, immunodeficiency, neoplastic and infectious diseases in the two species. Cats have greater genetic diversity than dogs with much lower linkage disequilibrium in feline compared with canine breed groups. Immune function is intrinsically related to the nature of the intestinal microbiome and subtle differences between the canine and feline microbial populations might also impact on immune function and disease resistance. The reasons for the apparent lesser susceptibility of cats to arthropod-borne infectious diseases are likely to be complex, but warrant further investigation.

  18. A Survey of Earthquake-Affected Region and Controlling Actions to Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012

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    Ahmad koosha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : There are always changes in our planet that can threat human life and earthquake is one of them and has an increasing importance. This study aims to survey earthquake-affected region and controlling actions to communicable and non-communicable diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012. Material and Methods : This is a cross-sectional study that its data were collected by East Azerbaijan province health center personnel and were analyzed and reported by current research team on the disease categories and relevant, controlling activities. In addition, the researchers assessed strengths and weaknesses of the teams’ performance from their members’ perspectives by interview. Results : The findings indicate that status of environmental health and psychological disorders is suitable and status of communicable and non-communicable diseases is acceptable. The strengths points of health teams included rapid assessment and on-time response to earthquake and constant monitoring of diseases and weaknesses were lack of coordination and organizing in disaster management Conclusion : This study showed that implemented activities for disease control and preventing epidemics had enough effectiveness and this experience can be used as a suitable model for disaster management in similar situations.

  19. Does minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 disparity affect the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease in tunisian recipients of hematopoietic stem cells?

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    Mohamed Hichem Sellami

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Minor histocompatibility antigen HA-1 (MiHAg-HA-1 disparity between a patient and his or her human leukocyte antigen (HLA genoidentical donor has been widely associated with an increased risk of graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of HA-1 disparity on the incidence of both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease in Tunisian recipients of hematopoietic stem cells. METHODS: A total of 60 patients and their 60 respective sibling hematopoietic stem cell donors were enrolled in this study. All patients prophylactically received cyclosporine A and/or methotrexate for graft-versus-host disease. An HA-1 genotyping assay was performed with the SSP-PCR method, and HLA-A*0201- and/or HLA-A*0206-positive samples were identified using the Luminex HLA typing method. RESULTS: The Luminex HLA typing assay showed that 54 patients were positive for either the HLA-A*0201 or HLA-A*0206 alleles. Among these cases, six pairs were mismatched for MiHAg-HA-1. Both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease occurred in four mismatched patients (Fisher's p-values were 0.044 and 0.170, respectively. A univariate logistic regression model analysis showed that only acute graft-versus-host disease may be affected by recipient MiHAg-HA-1 disparity (p: 0.041, OR: 6.727, while chronic graft-versus-host disease correlates with both age and recipient/donor sex mismatch (p: 0.014, OR: 8.556 and p: 0.033, OR: 8.664, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our findings support previously reported data suggesting a significant association between HA-1 disparity and the risk of acute graft-versus-host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  20. Does minor histocompatibility antigen HA‐1 disparity affect the occurrence of graft‐versus‐host disease in tunisian recipients of hematopoietic stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Torjemane, Lamia; de Arias, Alejandro Espadas; Kaabi, Houda; Ladeb, Saloua; Poli, Francesca; Othmane, Tarek Ben; Hmida, Slama

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Minor histocompatibility antigen HA‐1 (MiHAg‐HA‐1) disparity between a patient and his or her human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genoidentical donor has been widely associated with an increased risk of graft‐versus‐host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of HA‐1 disparity on the incidence of both acute and chronic graft‐versus‐host disease in Tunisian recipients of hematopoietic stem cells. METHODS: A total of 60 patients and their 60 respective sibling hematopoietic stem cell donors were enrolled in this study. All patients prophylactically received cyclosporine A and/or methotrexate for graft‐versus‐host disease. An HA‐1 genotyping assay was performed with the SSP‐PCR method, and HLA‐A*0201‐ and/or HLA‐A*0206‐positive samples were identified using the Luminex HLA typing method. RESULTS: The Luminex HLA typing assay showed that 54 patients were positive for either the HLA‐A*0201 or HLA‐A*0206 alleles. Among these cases, six pairs were mismatched for MiHAg‐HA‐1. Both acute and chronic graft‐versus‐host disease occurred in four mismatched patients (Fisher's p‐values were 0.044 and 0.170, respectively). A univariate logistic regression model analysis showed that only acute graft‐versus‐host disease may be affected by recipient MiHAg‐HA‐1 disparity (p: 0.041, OR: 6.727), while chronic graft‐versus‐host disease correlates with both age and recipient/donor sex mismatch (p: 0.014, OR: 8.556 and p: 0.033, OR: 8.664, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our findings support previously reported data suggesting a significant association between HA‐1 disparity and the risk of acute graft‐versus‐host disease following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21243279

  1. Motor-symptom laterality affects acquisition in Parkinson's disease: A cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

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    Huang, Pei; Tan, Yu-Yan; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Lapidow, Elizabeth; Wang, Ying; Zang, Yu-Feng; Gluck, Mark A; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Asymmetric onset of motor symptoms in PD can affect cognitive function. We examined whether motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning and explored its underlying neural mechanism by functional magnetic resonance imaging in PD patients. We recruited 63 early-stage medication-naïve PD patients (29 left-onset medication-naïve patients, 34 right-onset medication-naïve patients) and 38 matched normal controls. Subjects completed an acquired equivalence task (including acquisition, retention, and generalization) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Learning accuracy and response time in each phase of the task were recorded for behavioral measures. Regional homogeneity was used to analyze resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, with regional homogeneity lateralization to evaluate hemispheric functional asymmetry in the striatum. Left-onset patients made significantly more errors in acquisition (feedback-based associative learning) than right-onset patients and normal controls, whereas right-onset patients performed as well as normal controls. There was no significant difference among these three groups in the accuracy of either retention or generalization phase. The three groups did not show significant differences in response time. In the left-onset group, there was an inverse relationship between acquisition errors and regional homogeneity in the right dorsal rostral putamen. There were no significant regional homogeneity changes in either the left or the right dorsal rostral putamen in right-onset patients when compared to controls. Motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning in PD, with left-onset medication-naïve patients being selectively impaired. Dysfunction in the right dorsal rostral putamen may underlie the observed deficit in associative learning in patients with left-sided onset.© 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017

  2. A PCR-based diagnostic assay for the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae in Crassostrea virginica affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, A.P.; Barber, B.J.; Boettcher, K.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a PCR-assay for the diagnosis of juvenile oyster disease (JOD) based on the detection of Roseovarius crassostreae directly from affected oysters. Species-specific primers are used to amplify the 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of R. crassostreae, and confirmation of product identity is accomplished by restriction enzyme analysis. No false positives were obtained with either closely related bacterial species or from other DNAs present in oyster samples. The assay has the potential to detect as few as 10 cells of R. crassostreae per oyster when samples are taken from the inner valve surfaces of the animal. Inclusion of material from soft body surfaces is not necessary, and may reduce sensitivity approximately 10-fold. In a JOD-affected population, a positive PCR result was obtained from all oysters from which these bacteria were subsequently cultured. The assay also detected the presence of R. crassostreae in 2 oysters from which no R. crassostreae isolates were recovered. No R. crassostreae was detected by either PCR or bacteriology in oysters from a population that was not exhibiting JOD-signs. This assay is expected to advance regional disease management efforts and provide valuable insights into the disease process and epizootiology of JOD. ?? Inter-Research 2005.

  3. TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE 1, MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE 9, ALPHA-1 ANTITRYPSIN, METALLOTHIONEIN AND UROKINASE TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR RECEPTOR IN SKIN BIOPSIES FROM PATIENTS AFFECTED BY AUTOIMMUNE BLISTERING DISEASES

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    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors have been described to play a role in autoimmune skin blistering diseases. We studied skin lesional biopsies from patients affected by several autoimmune skin blistering diseases for proteinases and proteinase inhibitors. Methods: We utilized immunohistochemistry to evaluate biopsies for alpha-1-antitrypsin, human matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 (TIMP-1, metallothionein and urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR. We tested 30 patients affected by endemic pemphigus, 30 controls from the endemic area, and 15 normal controls. We also tested 30 biopsies from patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus, and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH. Results: Contrary to findings in the current literature, most autoimmune skin blistering disease biopsies were negative for uPAR and MMP9. Only some chronic patients with El Bagre-EPF were positive to MMP9 in the dermis, in proximity to telocytes. TIMP-1 and metallothionein were positive in half of the biopsies from BP patients at the basement membrane of the skin, within several skin appendices, in areas of dermal blood vessel inflammation and within dermal mesenchymal-epithelial cell junctions.

  4. Disease severity declines over time after a wild boar population has been affected by classical swine fever--legend or actual epidemiological process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, M; Kramer-Schadt, S; Blome, S; Beer, M; Thulke, H-H

    2012-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a severe multi-systemic disease that can affect both domestic pigs and wild boar. Past outbreaks in European wild boar involved high-virulent CSF virus (CSFV) strains and were mostly self-limiting. In these cases, morbidity and mortality rates were high in the affected regions. In contrast, endemic infections have been observed in several European wild boar populations in recent decades. Morbidity and mortality rates were much lower despite the fact that outbreaks were still detected via diseased or fallen animals. The virus strains involved were mostly classified as genotype 2.3 strains of moderate virulence causing age-dependent disease outcomes. The mechanisms leading to the establishment and perpetuation of endemicity are still not fully understood, but the factor "moderate virulence" seems to be of considerable importance. In this study, we aim to clarify whether the perception of declined 'CSF severity' could hypothetically reflect the adaptation of an initially high-virulent virus or whether this might be better explained as a misinterpretation of observations. A mechanistic eco-epidemiological model was employed to follow up a highly virulent strain of CSFV introduced into large connected wild boar populations. In the model, the virulence of the CSF virus is represented by case mortality and life expectancy after lethal infection. Allowing for small stochastic variation, these two characteristics of the virus are passed on with every new simulated infection that occurs. Model analysis revealed a decrease from high to moderate case mortality within a few years of simulated perpetuation of the virus. The resulting mortality corresponded to the level where the population average of the infectious period and the basic reproduction number of the disease were maximal. This shift in virulence was sufficient to prolong virus circulation considerably beyond the epidemic phase of the simulated outbreaks. Alternative mechanistic

  5. Plant Disease Severity Assessment-How Rater Bias, Assessment Method, and Experimental Design Affect Hypothesis Testing and Resource Use Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kuo-Szu; Bock, Clive H; Lee, I-Hsuan; El Jarroudi, Moussa; Delfosse, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    The effect of rater bias and assessment method on hypothesis testing was studied for representative experimental designs for plant disease assessment using balanced and unbalanced data sets. Data sets with the same number of replicate estimates for each of two treatments are termed "balanced" and those with unequal numbers of replicate estimates are termed "unbalanced". The three assessment methods considered were nearest percent estimates (NPEs), an amended 10% incremental scale, and the Horsfall-Barratt (H-B) scale. Estimates of severity of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat were used to develop distributions for a simulation model. The experimental designs are presented here in the context of simulation experiments which consider the optimal design for the number of specimens (individual units sampled) and the number of replicate estimates per specimen for a fixed total number of observations (total sample size for the treatments being compared). The criterion used to gauge each method was the power of the hypothesis test. As expected, at a given fixed number of observations, the balanced experimental designs invariably resulted in a higher power compared with the unbalanced designs at different disease severity means, mean differences, and variances. Based on these results, with unbiased estimates using NPE, the recommended number of replicate estimates taken per specimen is 2 (from a sample of specimens of at least 30), because this conserves resources. Furthermore, for biased estimates, an apparent difference in the power of the hypothesis test was observed between assessment methods and between experimental designs. Results indicated that, regardless of experimental design or rater bias, an amended 10% incremental scale has slightly less power compared with NPEs, and that the H-B scale is more likely than the others to cause a type II error. These results suggest that choice of assessment method, optimizing sample number and number of replicate

  6. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  7. Non-communicable diseases in decontamination workers in areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster: a retrospective observational study

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    Sawano, Toyoaki; Ozaki, Akihiko; Leppold, Claire; Nomura, Shuhei; Shimada, Yuki; Tsukada, Manabu; Nemoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Shigeaki; Kanazawa, Yukio; Ohira, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and whether NCDs were treated or not, among hospitalised decontamination workers who moved to radio-contaminated areas after Japan's 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. Methods We retrospectively extracted records of decontamination workers admitted to Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital between 1 June 2012 and 31 August 2015, from hospital records. We investigated the incidence of underlying NCDs such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes among the decontamination workers, and their treatment status, in addition to the reasons for their hospital admission. Results A total of 113 decontamination workers were admitted to the hospital (112 male patients, median age of 54 years (age range: 18–69 years)). In terms of the demographics of underlying NCDs in this population, 57 of 72 hypertensive patients (79.2%), 37 of 45 dyslipidaemic patients (82.2%) and 18 of 27 hyperglycaemic patients (66.7%) had not been treated for their NCDs before admission to the hospital. Conclusions A high burden of underlying NCDs was found in hospitalised decontamination workers in Fukushima. Managing underlying diseases such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes mellitus is essential among this population. PMID:27974372

  8. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  9. Bullous pemphigoid in a leg affected with hemiparesia: a possible relation of neurological diseases with bullous pemphigoid?

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    Foureur, N; Descamps, V; Lebrun-Vignes, B; Picard-Dahan, C; Grossin, M; Belaich, S; Crickx, B

    2001-01-01

    We report a typical case of bullous pemphigoid (BP) associated with a neurological disorder and study a possible link between neurological disorders and BP. An 84-year-old hemiplegic woman presented with unilateral BP on the hemiparetic side. BP was confirmed by histological and immunofluorescence data. The medical records of the previous 46 consecutive patients with BP were retrospectively analyzed (average age: 79; median age: 85). Thirty of the 46 patients with BP had neurological disorders. These disorders included dementia, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, cerebral stroke, Parkinson's disease, gonadotropic adenoma, trembling, dyskinesia, lumbar spinal stenosis. In a control group of the 46 consecutive oldest patients (older than 71; average age: 82,5; median age: 80) with another skin disease referred during the previous two-year-period to our one-day-unit only, 13 patients had a neurological disorder. This study demonstrates that there is a high prevalence of neurological disorders in patients with BP (p = 0.0004). A prospective case control study with neurological examination and psychometrical evaluation is warranted to confirm these data. We speculate that neuroautoimmunity associated with the aging process or neurological disorders may be involved in pemphigoid development via an autoimmune response against dystonin which shares homology with bullous pemphigoid antigen 1. Bullous pemphigoid could be considered to be a marker of neurological disorder.

  10. Optimization of RNA isolation from Brittle Leaf Disease affected date palm leaves and construction of a subtractive cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïdi, Mohammed Najib; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia; Rayanni, Mariem; Drira, Noureddine

    2009-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was described here for the isolation of high-quality RNA from date palm leaves affected with Brittle Leaf Disease (BLD) and containing high amount of phenolic compounds. The procedure was based on the use of a non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 (NP-40), Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and beta-mercaptoethanol in the extraction buffer in order to isolate cytoplasmic RNA and to prevent the oxidation of phenolic compounds. This method allowed the isolation of intact RNA, suitable for cDNA synthesis and library construction. Differential screening of the subtractive cDNA library from affected leaf RNA led to the identification of some BLD-induced genes.

  11. Corneal Transplantation in Disease Affecting Only One Eye: Does It Make a Difference to Habitual Binocular Viewing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen K Bandela

    Full Text Available Clarity of the transplanted tissue and restoration of visual acuity are the two primary metrics for evaluating the success of corneal transplantation. Participation of the transplanted eye in habitual binocular viewing is seldom evaluated post-operatively. In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye may remain functionally inactive during binocular viewing due to its suboptimal visual acuity and poor image quality, vis-à-vis the healthy fellow eye.This study prospectively quantified the contribution of the transplanted eye towards habitual binocular viewing in 25 cases with unilateral transplants [40 yrs (IQR: 32-42 yrs and 25 age-matched controls [30 yrs (25-37 yrs]. Binocular functions including visual field extent, high-contrast logMAR acuity, suppression threshold and stereoacuity were assessed using standard psychophysical paradigms. Optical quality of all eyes was determined from wavefront aberrometry measurements. Binocular visual field expanded by a median 21% (IQR: 18-29% compared to the monocular field of cases and controls (p = 0.63. Binocular logMAR acuity [0.0 (0.0-0.0] almost always followed the fellow eye's acuity [0.00 (0.00 --0.02] (r = 0.82, independent of the transplanted eye's acuity [0.34 (0.2-0.5] (r = 0.04. Suppression threshold and stereoacuity were poorer in cases [30.1% (13.5-44.3%; 620.8 arc sec (370.3-988.2 arc sec] than in controls [79% (63.5-100%; 16.3 arc sec (10.6-25.5 arc sec] (p<0.001. Higher-order wavefront aberrations of the transplanted eye [0.34 μ (0.21-0.51 μ] were higher than the fellow eye [0.07 μ (0.05-0.11 μ] (p<0.001 and their reduction with RGP contact lenses [0.09 μ (0.08-0.12 μ] significantly improved the suppression threshold [65% (50-72%] and stereoacuity [56.6 arc sec (47.7-181.6 arc sec] (p<0.001.In unilateral corneal disease, the transplanted eye does participate in gross binocular viewing but offers limited support to fine levels of binocularity. Improvement in the transplanted

  12. Temporal dynamics of black band disease affecting pillar coral ( Dendrogyra cylindrus) following two consecutive hyperthermal events on the Florida Reef Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cynthia L.; Neely, Karen L.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio

    2017-06-01

    Black band disease (BBD) affects many coral species worldwide and is considered a major contributor to the decline of reef-building coral. On the Florida Reef Tract BBD is most prevalent during summer and early fall when water temperatures exceed 29 °C. BBD is rarely reported in pillar coral ( Dendrogyra cylindrus) throughout the Caribbean, and here we document for the first time the appearance of the disease in this species on Florida reefs. The highest monthly BBD prevalence in the D. cylindrus population were 4.7% in 2014 and 6.8% in 2015. In each year, BBD appeared immediately following a hyperthermal bleaching event, which raises concern as hyperthermal seawater anomalies become more frequent.

  13. Relationships among alexithymia and pain intensity, pain interference, and vitality in persons with neuromuscular disease: Considering the effect of negative affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Masako; Molton, Ivan R; Jensen, Mark P; Ehde, Dawn M; Amtmann, Silvia; O'Brien, Sarah; Arimura, Tatsuyuki; Kubo, Chiharu

    2010-05-01

    Alexithymia, the inability to identify or label emotions, has been shown to be associated with pain in patients with a number of chronic pain conditions. We sought to: (1) replicate this association in samples of persons with chronic pain secondary to neuromuscular disease, (2) extend this finding to other important pain-related measures, and (3) to determine whether relationships among alexithymia and study variables existed after controlling for negative affect. One hundred and twenty-nine individuals with muscular dystrophy and chronic pain were administered measures of alexithymia (Toronto Alexithymia Scale, TAS-20), pain intensity (0-10 NRS), pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory Interference scale), mental health (SF-36 Mental Health scale; as a proxy measure of negative affect) and vitality (SF-36 Vitality scale). Higher TAS scores were associated significantly with higher pain intensity and interference, and less vitality. Although the strengths of these associations were reduced when mental health was used as a control, the associations between the Difficulty Identifying Feelings scale and vitality, and the Externally Oriented Thinking and Total TAS scales and pain intensity remained statistically significant. The findings replicate and extend previous findings concerning the associations between alexithymia and important pain-related variables in a sample of persons with chronic pain and neuromuscular disease. Future research is needed to determine the extent to which the associations are due to (1) a possible causal effect of alexithymia on patient functioning that is mediated via its effects on negative affect or (2) the possibility that alexithymia/outcome relationships reflect response bias caused by general negative affectivity.

  14. Time up and go task performance improves after transcranial direct current stimulation in patient affected by Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Rosini, Sandra; Orizio, Italo; Ferrari, Clarissa; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2014-09-19

    Locomotor disturbances represent one of the major distress in everyday life in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Timed up and go test (TUG) has been advocated a useful and reliable tool for quantifying locomotor performance. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during timed up and go test (TUG) in a group of patients with PD. Ten participants underwent two sessions of anodal tDCS (left and right) and one session of placebo tDCS. TUG was performed before and after each tDCS session (anodal or placebo). A significant motor improvement after right DLPFC stimulation vs. placebo stimulation was observed. These results suggest that anodal tDCS can be a relevant tool to modulate walking abilities in PD.

  15. Uraemic pruritus markedly affects the quality of life and depressive symptoms in haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseł, Joanna; Batycka-Baran, Aleksandra; Reich, Adam; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of uraemic pruritus on patients' wellbeing. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of uraemic pruritus on quality of life and depressive symptoms in patients with end-stage renal disease. A total of 200 haemodialysis patients were included into the study. The prevalence of uraemic pruritus was 38%. Patients with uraemic pruritus had significantly lower quality of life according to SF-36 questionnaire compared to the remaining of analysed subjects. Among patients with uraemic pruritus, 64.5% individuals also showed impaired skin-related quality of life evaluated with Dermatology Life Quality Index. The quality of life impairment correlated with uraemic pruritus intensity assessed with VAS and the 4-item itch questionnaire. Depression level significantly correlated with quality of life and severity of depressive symptoms was significantly associated with uraemic pruritus intensity. Our study underscores that uraemic pruritus should be regarded as an important health problem among haemodialysis patients.

  16. Association between Genetic Variations Affecting Mean Telomere Length and the Prevalence of Hypertension and Coronary Heart Disease in Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with telomere length (TL) were associated with the incidence of hypertension (HTN)/coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular risk factors in the Korean population. Data from 5,705 (ages 39–70) participants in the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (rural Ansung and urban Ansan cohorts) were studied. Twelve SNPs known to be associated with telomere biology were tested for an association with HTN/CHD. As results, no significant associations were found between the selected TL-related SNPs and prevalence of HTN and CHD. Among non-alcohol users, subjects with minor alleles in rs1269304 and rs10936601 (TERC and LRRC34, respectively) exhibited a higher rate of CHD occurrence (odds ratio [OR], 1.862; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 1.137, 3.049; OR, 1.855; 95% CIs, 1.111, 2.985; respectively). However, alcohol users with minor alleles in rs398652 (PELI2) were significantly associated with higher HTN prevalence (OR, 1.179; 95% CIs, 1.040, 1.336). Of the 3 SNPs related to disease outcomes, rs1296304 was significantly associated with increased levels of diastolic blood pressure (β estimate, 0.470; 95% CIs, 0.013, 0.926). The minor allele in rs398652 was significantly associated with higher levels of body mass index (OR, 0.128; 95% CIs, 0.010, 0.246) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR, 0.013; 95% CIs, 0.001, 0.024). In conclusion, there were no significant associations between the selected TL-related SNPs and the occurrence of HTN/CHD in Koreans. However, the results suggest the presence of a possible interaction between related SNPs and alcohol behavior associated with HTN/CHD occurrence.

  17. Retrospective monitoring of minimal residual disease using hairpin-shaped clone specific primers in B-cell lymphoma affected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilini, Fabio; Turba, Maria E; Forni, Monica

    2013-06-15

    Lymphoma is one of the most common forms of cancer in dogs as it is in humans but, unlike humans, the cure rates in canines are still very low. Despite the fact that high grade B-cell lymphomas are considered to be chemotherapy responsive, almost all treated dogs ultimately relapse and die due to the residual malignant lymphocytes, namely minimal residual disease (MRD). It would be extremely valuable for clinicians to detect, monitor and quantify MRD for risk group stratification, effective treatment intervention and outcome prediction. The PCRs targeting the Ig gene rearrangements constitute one of the most reliable tools to this end. We have recently validated a method which exploits hairpin-shaped primers for quantifying MRD. In the present study, that method is conveniently used for retrospectively monitoring MRD in the peripheral blood of 8 dogs diagnosed with B-cell lymphoma who underwent chemotherapy. All dogs attained complete remission. The median disease-free interval was 254.5 days (range 63-774) while the median survival time was 313.5 days (range 143-817 days). At admission, all dogs, except one which had already been treated with prednisone, had circulating neoplastic cells. All dogs attained complete remission (CR) which was almost always matched with a complete MRD response. The persistence of MRD despite apparent CR indicated a worse prognosis and a short duration of CR. Finally, the relapse is consistently anticipated by the reappearance of MRD in the peripheral blood. The study confirmed the suitability of an MRD monitoring assay as a clinical decision-making tool.

  18. Immunogenetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility of Humans and Rodents to Hantaviruses and the Clinical Course of Hantaviral Disease in Humans

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    Nathalie Charbonnel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the associations of immunity-related genes with susceptibility of humans and rodents to hantaviruses, and with severity of hantaviral diseases in humans. Several class I and class II HLA haplotypes were linked with severe or benign hantavirus infections, and these haplotypes varied among localities and hantaviruses. The polymorphism of other immunity-related genes including the C4A gene and a high-producing genotype of TNF gene associated with severe PUUV infection. Additional genes that may contribute to disease or to PUUV infection severity include non-carriage of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA allele 2 and IL-1β (-511 allele 2, polymorphisms of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1 and platelet GP1a. In addition, immunogenetic studies have been conducted to identify mechanisms that could be linked with the persistence/clearance of hantaviruses in reservoirs. Persistence was associated during experimental infections with an upregulation of anti-inflammatory responses. Using natural rodent population samples, polymorphisms and/or expression levels of several genes have been analyzed. These genes were selected based on the literature of rodent or human/hantavirus interactions (some Mhc class II genes, Tnf promoter, and genes encoding the proteins TLR4, TLR7, Mx2 and β3 integrin. The comparison of genetic differentiation estimated between bank vole populations sampled over Europe, at neutral and candidate genes, has allowed to evidence signatures of selection for Tnf, Mx2 and the Drb Mhc class II genes. Altogether, these results corroborated the hypothesis of an evolution of tolerance strategies in rodents. We finally discuss the importance of these results from the medical and epidemiological perspectives.

  19. The choroid and lamina cribrosa is affected in patients with Parkinson's disease: enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography study.

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    Eraslan, Muhsin; Cerman, Eren; Yildiz Balci, Sevcan; Celiker, Hande; Sahin, Ozlem; Temel, Ahmet; Suer, Devran; Tuncer Elmaci, Nese

    2016-02-01

    To compare lamina cribrosa (LC) and choroidal thicknesses using enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls. A total number of 44 eyes of 22 patients with PD and 50 eyes of 25 healthy subjects were utilized in this institutional cross-sectional study. After a complete ophthalmic examination, all eyes were imaged with OCT (RTVue-100 version 5.1 Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography; Optovue Inc., Fremont, CA, USA); LC and choroidal thickness were assessed. The mean LC thicknesses were 209.4 ± 40.2 μm in patients with PD and 292.5 ± 33.7 μm in control subjects. There was a significant difference in the mean LC thickness between the groups (p choroidal thickness measurements of the PD group at the subfoveal region and 1.5 mm temporal and 1.5 mm nasal to the fovea were 228.1 ± 44.3, 193.2 ± 41.4 and 188.4 ± 49.0 μm, respectively, whereas measurements for the controls were, respectively, 246.5 ± 38.2, 227.3 ± 34.7 and 216.7 ± 51.4 μm. The choroid was significantly thinner in eyes of the PD group compared to that of the controls (p = 0.001, p choroid thicknesses (rs[94] = -0.282, p = 0.006; rs[94] = -0.324, p = 0.001, rs[94] = -0.240, and p = 0.020, respectively). Regardless of the disease severity, PD may cause atrophy and volume loss in the lamina cribrosa, and choroid. An enhanced depth imaging technique may be used as an additional modality in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with PD. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Depressive state- and disease-related alterations in neural responses to affective and executive challenges in geriatric depression.

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    Wang, Lihong; Krishnan, K Ranga; Steffens, David C; Potter, Guy G; Dolcos, Florin; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-07-01

    Geriatric depression has been associated with a heterogeneous neuropathology. Identifying both depressive state-related and disease-related alterations in brain regions associated with emotion and cognitive function could provide useful diagnostic information in geriatric depression. Twelve late-onset acutely depressed patients, 15 patients fully remitted from major depression, and 20 healthy comparison subjects underwent event-related functional MRI. Brain activation and deactivation associated with executive and emotional processing were investigated using an emotional oddball task in which circles were presented infrequently as attentional targets and sad and neutral pictures as novel distractors. Significant changes in brain activation in patients were found mainly in response to attentional targets rather than to sad distractors. Relative to healthy comparison subjects, the depressed patients had attenuated activation in the regions of the executive system, including the right middle frontal gyrus, the cingulate, and inferior parietal areas. Activity in the middle frontal gyrus revealed depressive state-dependent modulation, whereas attenuated activation in the anterior portion of the posterior cingulate and inferior parietal regions persisted in the remitted subjects, suggesting a disease-related alteration. Enhanced deactivation was observed in the posterior portion of the posterior cingulate, which was also state dependent. The remitted group did not show this deactivation. Our results indicate distinct roles for the right middle frontal gyrus and the anterior and posterior portions of the posterior cingulate cortex in geriatric depression. The deactivation of the posterior portion of the posterior cingulate could be informative for differentiation of cognitive dysfunction related to depression from other conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment.

  1. The prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease with inflammatory low back pain

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    A. Lo Nigro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, are Crohn’s disease (CD or ulcerative colitis (UC, are frequently complicated by joint complaints with prevalence that varies between 10 and 28 %. The IBD related arthropathy may be expressed as peripheral arthritis or axial one frequently indistinguishable from the classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS. According to ESSG criteria for spondyloarthropathy, the presence of synovitis or the inflammatory back pain (IBP in IBD patients is diagnostic for spondyloarthropathy, but for diagnosis of as also radiological criteria must be fulfilled. There are few studies regarding the radiological prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with IBD. We examined, by plain film radiograms of pelvis, 100 sacroiliac joints (SJ of 50 IBD patients with IBP. The New York (1984 SJ radiological score with gradation from 0 to 4 was applied. Total sacroiliac score (SJS was summarized between left and right side (from 0 to 8. Fourteen patients fulfilled New York modified criteria for AS and 8 patients had unilateral 2nd grade sacroiliitis. Only 4 of 14 AS patients (28% were HLA B27 positive. Thirty patients had localized IBP, 10 extended to buttock and 4 extended to sacrum. Sixteen patients had sciatica-like extension of back pain. A difference in SJS between left and right side were observed only in CD patients (1,3± 0,8 e 0,8± 0,9 respectively; p<0,05, but not in UC (1,5± 1,2 vs 1,5± 1,3; p=ns nor in total IBD patients (1,4± 1 vs 1,2± 1,2; p=ns. Total SJS was higher in UC respect CD, but not significantly (2,9± 2,3 vs 2,1± 1,5; p=ns. Our data confirm the importance of these symptoms in patients with IBD, who need to be carefully investigated also for these aspects.

  2. Association between previously identified loci affecting telomere length and coronary heart disease (CHD in Han Chinese population

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    Ding H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hui Ding,1 Fen Yan,1 Lin-Lin Zhou,2 Xiu-Hai Ji,3 Xin-Nan Gu,1 Zhi-Wei Tang,1 Ru-Hua Chen11Department of Pulmonary Medicine, The Affiliated Yixing People's Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Cardiology, Affiliated Cixi Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, 3Department of Oncology, Affiliated Taicang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: To replicate previously confirmed telomere-length loci in a Chinese Han population with coronary heart disease (CHD, and investigate these loci and the possibility of and age at onset of CHD.Patients and methods: 1514 CHD patients and 2470 normal controls were recruited. Medical data including age, sex, body mass index, lipid profiles, history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were collected from all the participants. Seven previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to leucocyte telomere length were genotyped, including rs10936599 in TERC, rs2736100 in TERT, rs7675998 in NAF1, rs9420907 in OBFC1, rs8105767 in ZNF208, rs755017 in RTEL1, and rs11125529 in ACYP2.Results: No significant difference in genotype frequencies from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium test was noted for all tested SNPs both in the CHD patients and the normal controls. No polymorphism was observed for rs9420907, and AA genotype was noted in both the CHD patients and the controls. Neither the genotype nor the allele frequencies of rs2736100, rs8105767, rs11125529, and rs2967374 were significantly different between the CHD patients and the normal controls. For rs10936599 and rs755017, statistical difference was found for the allele frequency but not genotype. Distributions of genotype and allele were significantly different between the two groups for rs7675998. The odds ratio for carriers of CHD was 2.127 (95% confidence interval: 1.909–2.370 for the A allele of rs

  3. Selective Insecticide Applications Directed Against Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Affected a Nontarget Secondary Vector of Chagas Disease, Triatoma garciabesi.

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    Rodríguez-Planes, L I; Vazquez-Prokopec, G M; Cecere, M C; Canale, D M; Gürtler, R E

    2016-01-01

    The control of nondomiciliated triatomine species adapted to peridomestic habitats represents a challenge because they are connected to sylvatic colonies, and pyrethroid insecticides have limited effects outdoors. The effects of residual insecticide spraying have rarely been assessed on secondary triatomines. Triatoma garciabesi (Carcavallo, Martinez, Cichero, Prosen & Ronderos, 1967) is a nontarget vector that inhabits the dry western Chaco region, and a member of the Triatoma sordida Stål 1859 complex. Little is known on the capacity of T. garciabesi to invade and establish viable domestic or peridomestic colonies, and on its response to residual insecticide sprays directed against Triatoma infestans Klug 1834. The presence and abundance of triatomines were assessed by timed manual collections annually or biannually (spring and fall) during 10 yr after a community-wide insecticide spraying campaign and selective insecticide sprays directed against T. infestans in a rural village of northwestern Argentina. T. garciabesi mainly occupied peridomestic habitats associated with chickens, and was unable to colonize human sleeping quarters. Trees with chickens occurred in nearly all houses and were infested in >25% of the occasions. The abundance of bugs at house-compound level was best explained by a generalized estimating equation model that included selective insecticide sprays during the previous semester (negative effects), chicken abundance (positive effects), seasonality, and their interactions. Our results suggest that insecticide applications targeting T. infestans affected the abundance of T. garciabesi, and reduced the likelihood of future infestation.

  4. Energy-containing nutritional supplements can affect usual energy intake postsupplementation in institutionalized seniors with probable Alzheimer's disease.

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    Parrott, Matthew D; Young, Karen W H; Greenwood, Carol E

    2006-09-01

    To determine whether increases in caloric intake associated with consumption of a mid-morning nutritional supplement for 3 weeks were maintained in the week after stopping the supplement and to investigate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and cognitive and behavioral measures on this response. Secondary analysis of a previously published randomized, crossover, nonblinded clinical trial. A fully accredited geriatric care facility affiliated with the University of Toronto. Thirty institutionalized seniors with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) who ate independently. Investigator-weighed food intake, body weight, cognitive (Severe Impairment Battery; Global Deterioration Scale) and behavioral (Neuropsychiatric Inventory--Nursing Home version; London Psychogeriatric Rating Scale) assessments. Individuals who responded successfully to supplementation as indicated by increases in daily energy intake were likely to maintain 58.8% of that increase postsupplementation, although stopping the supplement was associated with decreased habitual energy intake in low-BMI individuals who reduced their daily intakes during supplementation in response to the extra calories. Cognitive/behavioral tests were not reliable predictors of postsupplement intake. Institutionalized seniors with probable AD are likely to alter their usual energy intakes to maintain changes resulting from 3 weeks of supplementation. This effect may allow for rotating supplementation schedules in nursing homes that could reduce staff burden, but only for those individuals who are most likely to respond favorably. These data indicate that nutritional supplements and diet plans should be carefully prescribed in low-BMI individuals to limit variability in total energy provided and thus prevent lower-than-normal intake.

  5. The management of Charcot joint disease affecting the ankle and foot by arthrodesis controlled by an Ilizarov frame: early results.

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    El-Gafary, K A M; Mostafa, K M; Al-Adly, W Y

    2009-10-01

    Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot is a chronic and progressive disease of bone and joint associated with a risk of amputation. The main problems encountered in this process are osteopenia, fragmentation of the bones of the foot and ankle, joint subluxation or even dislocation, ulceration of the skin and the development of deep sepsis. We report our experience of a series of 20 patients with Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot and ankle treated with an Ilizarov external fixator. The mean age of the group was 30 years (21 to 50). Diabetes mellitus was the underlying cause in 18 patients. Five had chronic ulcers involving the foot and ankle. Each patient had an open lengthening of the tendo Achillis with excision of all necrotic and loose bone from the ankle, subtalar and midtarsal joints when needed. The resulting defect was packed with corticocancellous bone graft harvested from the iliac crest and an Ilizarov external fixator was applied. Arthrodesis was achieved after a mean of 18 weeks (15 to 20), with healing of the skin ulcers. Pin track infection was not uncommon, but no frame had to be removed before the arthrodesis was sound. Every patient was able to resume wearing regular shoes after a mean of 26.5 weeks (20 to 45).

  6. Lighten up: Specific postural instructions affect axial rigidity and step initiation in patients with Parkinson’s disease

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    Cohen, Rajal G.; Gurfinkel, Victor S.; Kwak, Elizabeth; Warden, Amelia C.; Horak, Fay B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with stooped postural alignment, increased postural sway, and reduced mobility. The Alexander Technique (AT) is a mindfulness-based approach to improving posture and mobility by reducing muscular interference while maintaining upward intentions. Evidence suggests that AT can reduce disability associated with PD, but a mechanism for this effect has not yet been established. Objective We investigated whether AT-based instructions reduce axial rigidity and increase upright postural alignment, and whether these instructions have different effects on postural alignment, axial rigidity, postural sway, and mobility than effort-based instructions regarding posture. Method Twenty subjects with PD practiced two sets of instructions and then attempted to implement both approaches (as well as a relaxed control condition) during quiet standing and step initiation. The ‘Lighten Up’ instructions relied on AT principles of reducing excess tension while encouraging length. The ‘Pull Up’ instructions relied on popular concepts of effortful posture correction. We measured kinematics, resistance to axial rotation, and ground reaction forces. Results Both sets of experimental instructions led to increases in upright postural alignment relative to the control condition. Only the Lighten Up instructions led to reduced postural sway, reduced axial postural tone, greater modifiability of tone, and a smoother center of pressure trajectory during step initiation, possibly indicating greater movement efficiency. Conclusion Mindful movement approaches such as AT may benefit balance and mobility in subjects with PD by acutely facilitating increased upright postural alignment while decreasing rigidity. PMID:25665828

  7. Tocotrienol Affects Oxidative Stress, Cholesterol Homeostasis and the Amyloidogenic Pathway in Neuroblastoma Cells: Consequences for Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Regner, Liesa; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P.; Schorr, Pascal; Nelke, Christopher; Streidenberger, Olga; Stoetzel, Hannah; Winkler, Jakob; Zaidan, Shatha R.; Thiel, Andrea; Endres, Kristina; Grimm, Heike S.; Volmer, Dietrich A.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    One of the characteristics of Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is an increased amyloid load and an enhanced level of reactive oxidative species (ROS). Vitamin E has known beneficial neuroprotective effects, and previously, some studies suggested that vitamin E is associated with a reduced risk of AD due to its antioxidative properties. However, epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches of vitamin E treatment are controversial. Here, we investigate the effect of α-tocotrienol, which belongs to the group of vitamin E, on AD-relevant processes in neuronal cell lines. In line with the literature, α-tocotrienol reduced the ROS level in SH-SY5Y cells. In the presence of tocotrienols, cholesterol and cholesterol esters, which have been shown to be risk factors in AD, were decreased. Besides the unambiguous positive effects of tocotrienol, amyloid-β (Aβ) levels were increased accompanied by an increase in the activity of enzymes responsible for Aβ production. Proteins and gene expression of the secretases and their components remained unchanged, whereas tocotrienol accelerates enzyme activity in cell-free assays. Besides enhanced Aβ production, tocotrienols inhibited Aβ degradation in neuro 2a (N2a)-cells. Our results might help to understand the controversial findings of vitamin E studies and demonstrate that besides the known positive neuroprotective properties, tocotrienols also have negative characteristics with respect to AD. PMID:27801864

  8. Microbial transglutaminase treatment in pasta-production does not affect the immunoreactivity of gliadin with celiac disease patients' sera.

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    Ruh, Tobias; Ohsam, Jürgen; Pasternack, Ralf; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Kumazawa, Yoshiyuki; Hils, Martin

    2014-07-30

    The effect of microbial transglutaminase (MTG)-treatment of pasta-dough on the immunoreactivity with celiac disease patient's sera has been investigated. Modification by MTG has been proven by determination of the MTG reaction product ε-(γ-glutamyl)lysine (3.63 μmol/g protein), which was not detectable in non-MTG-treated pasta. Antigenicity has been analyzed by immunoblotting and ELISA using gliadin-extracts from pasta and MTG-treated pasta. Immunoblotting showed that the antibody-population (antigliadin antibodies and antideamidated gliadin antibodies) of the sera is specific for every individual patient. Immunoblotting and ELISA showed that there is no difference in immunoreactivity of gliadin extracted from pasta and MTG-pasta. Recognition pattern and intensity in Western blot as well as antibody titer has also been identical even for sera with a high antideamidated gliadin antibody titer. These results indicate no difference between pasta-gliadin and MTG-pasta-gliadin and especially no increased deamidation in pasta-gliadin by MTG-treatment.

  9. [Severe kyphosis and esophagus hiatal hernia affected in the levodopa absorption of a patient with Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Norio; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Lin, Youwei; Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masafumi; Murata, Miho

    2009-08-01

    An 82 year-old woman with Parkinson's disease complained of a tendency to fall. She has had an extensive kyphosis since she was 66 years old. Over the last 6 months, she has repeatedly fallen. Even though she took anti-parkisonian drugs, she had also developed camptocormia. Her plasma levodopa concentration was analyzed for 4 hrs after administrating an oral dose of levodopa (200 mg) plus carbidopa (20 mg) at the time of fasting. The change in the plasma levodopa concentration showed bimodal peaks. The physical symptoms depended on the plasma concentration and improved twice. Esophageal tortuosity and esophageal hiatal hernia were detected by esophagography and upper gastric endoscopy. Such physical symptoms were speculated to have been caused by the transit disturbance of the drug in the gastrointestinal duct. During a second analysis of the plasma levodopa concentration, the patient was instructed to keep extending her back after consuming the same dose of drugs but with a greater amount of water than in the first analysis. A single and a higher peak were observed for the plasma levodopa concentration, and the physical symptoms, including camptocormia and parkinsonism, were improved. Hunched posture could influence the absorption of antiparkinsonian drugs.

  10. The response of skin disease to stress: changes in the severity of acne vulgaris as affected by examination stress.

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    Chiu, Annie; Chon, Susan Y; Kimball, Alexa B

    2003-07-01

    Although emotional stress has long been suspected to exacerbate acne vulgaris, previous reports addressing its influence on acne severity have been mainly anecdotal. To elucidate the possible relationship between stress and acne exacerbation by evaluating changes in acne severity during nonexamination and examination periods and to assess the possible relationship of these changes in severity with perceived examination stress by using previously validated scales measuring acne severity and perceived stress. Prospective cohort study. General university community. A volunteer sample of 22 university students (15 women and 7 men) with a minimum acne vulgaris severity of 0.5 on the photonumeric Leeds acne scale (baseline scores, 0.50-1.75). Participants were graded on their acne severity using the Leeds acne scale, and had their subjective stress levels assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale questionnaire during both nonexamination and examination periods. Subjects had a higher mean grade of acne severity and mean perceived stress score (Pdiet quality, and number of meals per day, increased acne severity was significantly associated with increased stress levels (r = 0.61, Pdiet quality was the only other significant association (P =.02). Patients with acne may experience worsening of the disease during examinations. Furthermore, changes in acne severity correlate highly with increasing stress, suggesting that emotional stress from external sources may have a significant influence on acne.

  11. Genotyping WSSV isolates from northwestern Mexican shrimp farms affected by white spot disease outbreaks in 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Durán-Avelar, Ma; Pérez-Enríquez, Ricardo; Zambrano-Zaragoza, José Francisco; Montoya-Rodríguez, Leobardo; Vázquez-Juárez, Ricardo; Vibanco-Pérez, Norberto

    2015-05-11

    White spot disease (WSD) causes high mortality in cultured shrimp throughout the world. Its etiologic agent is the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). The genomic repeat regions ORF 75, ORF 94, and ORF 125 have been used to classify WSSV isolates in epidemiological studies using PCR with specific primers and sequencing. The present study investigated the variation in nucleotide sequences from 107, 150, and 143 isolates of WSSV collected from Litopenaeus vannamei shrimp ponds with WSD outbreaks in northwestern Mexico during the period 2010-2012, in the genomic repeat regions ORFs 75, 94, and 125, respectively. The haplotypic nomenclature for each isolate was based on the number of repeat units and the position of single nucleotide polymorphisms on each ORF. We report finding 17, 43, and 66 haplotypes of ORFs 75, 94, and 125, respectively. The study found high haplotypic diversity in WSSV using the complete sequences of ORFs 94 and 125 as independent variables, but low haplotypic diversity for ORF 75. Different haplotypes of WSSV were found from region-to-region and year-to-year, though some individual haplotypes were found in different places and in more than one growing cycle. While these results suggest a high rate of mutation of the viral genome at these loci, or perhaps the introduction of new viral strains into the area, they are useful as a tool for epidemiological surveys. Two haplotypes from some of the ORFs in the same shrimp were encountered, suggesting the possibility of multiple infections.

  12. Patients affected with Fabry disease have an increased incidence of progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness: an investigation of twenty-two hemizygous male patients

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    Chassaing Augustin

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease (FD, OMIM 301500 is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to the deficient activity of alpha-galactosidase A, a lysosomal enzyme. While the progressive systemic deposition of uncleaved glycosphingolipids throughout the body is known to have protean clinical manifestations, few data are available regarding the cochlear involvement. Methods We non-invasively investigated cochlear functions in 22 consecutive hemizygous males (age 19–64 years, mean 39 affected with classic FD. Conventional audiometry, tympanometry, ABR audiometry, otoacoustic emissions were performed in all patients, together with medical history record and physical examination as part of an exhaustive baseline evaluation prior to enzyme replacement therapy. Results A total of 12 patients (54.5% with classic FD were found to have abnormal audition. Five patients had progressive hearing loss and seven patients (32% experienced sudden deafness. In addition, a hearing loss on high-tone frequencies was found in 7 out of the 10 remaining patients without clinical impairment, despite their young age at time of examination. The incidence of hearing loss appeared significantly increased in FD patients with kidney failure (P tinnitus aurium was also found in six patients (27%. Conclusion This is the first evidence of a high incidence of both progressive hearing loss and sudden deafness in a cohort of male patients affected with classic Fabry disease. The exact pathophysiologic mechanism(s of the cochlear involvement deserves further studies.

  13. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN GAB2 HAPLOTYPE AND HIGHER GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE-AFFECTED BRAIN REGIONS IN COGNITIVELY NORMAL APOEε4 CARRIERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Winnie S.; Chen, Kewei; Lee, Wendy; Sidhar, Kunal; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Allen, April N.; Myers, Amanda; Villa, Stephen; Meechoovet, Bessie; Pruzin, Jeremy; Bandy, Daniel; Fleisher, Adam S.; Langbaum, Jessica B.S.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Jensen, Kendall; Dunckley, Travis; Caselli, Richard J.; Kaib, Susan; Reiman, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), we found an association between common haplotypes of the GAB2 gene and AD risk in carriers of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, the major late-onset AD susceptibility gene. We previously proposed the use of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) measurements as a quantitative presymptomatic endophenotype, more closely related to disease risk than the clinical syndrome itself, to help evaluate putative genetic and non-genetic modifiers of AD risk. In this study, we examined the relationship between the presence or absence of the relatively protective GAB2 haplotype and PET measurements of regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in several AD-affected brain regions in 158 cognitively normal late-middle-aged APOEε4 homozygotes, heterozygotes, and non-carriers. GAB2 haplotypes were characterized using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array data from each of these subjects. As predicted, the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype was associated with higher regional-to-whole brain FDG uptake in AD-affected brain regions in APOEε4 carriers. While additional studies are needed, this study supports the association between the possibly protective GAB2 haplotype and the risk of late-onset AD in APOEε4 carriers. It also supports the use of brain-imaging endophenotypes to help assess possible modifiers of AD risk. PMID:20888920

  14. Cognitive and affective changes in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease patients undergoing switch of cholinesterase inhibitors: a 6-month observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Sorbi, Sandro; Attar, Mahmood; Colombo, Delia; Cravello, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease after an initial response to cholinesterase inhibitors may complain a later lack of efficacy. This, in association with incident neuropsychiatric symptoms, may worsen patient quality of life. Thus, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor could represent a valid therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the switch from one to another cholinesterase inhibitor on cognitive and affective symptoms in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients. Four hundred twenty-three subjects were included from the EVOLUTION study, an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study conducted on Alzheimer disease patients who switched to different cholinesterase inhibitor due either to lack/loss of efficacy or response, reduced tolerability or poor compliance. All patients underwent cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments, carried out before the switch (baseline), and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. A significant effect of the different switch types was found on Mini-Mental State Examination score during time, with best effectiveness on mild Alzheimer's disease patients switching from oral cholinesterase inhibitors to rivastigmine patch. Depressive symptoms, when measured using continuous Neuropsychiatric Inventory values, decreased significantly, while apathy symptoms remained stable over the 6 months after the switch. However, frequency of both depression and apathy, when measured categorically using Neuropsychiatric Inventory cut-off scores, did not change significantly during time. In mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients with loss of efficacy and tolerability during cholinesterase inhibitor treatment, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an important option for slowing cognitive deterioration. The evidence of apathy stabilization and the positive tendency of depressive symptom improvement should definitively be confirmed in double-blind controlled studies.

  15. Dopamine transporter SLC6A3 genotype affects cortico-striatal activity of set-shifts in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habak, Claudine; Noreau, Anne; Nagano-Saito, Atsuko; Mejía-Constaín, Beatriz; Degroot, Clotilde; Strafella, Antonio P.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects motor function along with a wide range of cognitive domains, including executive function. The hallmark of the pathology is its significant loss of nigrostriatal dopamine, which is necessary for the cortico-striatal interactions that underlie executive control. Striatal dopamine reuptake is mediated by the SLC6A3 gene (formerly named DAT1) and its polymorphisms, which have been largely overlooked in Parkinson’s disease. Thirty patients (ages 53–68 years; 19 males, 11 females) at early stages of Parkinson’s disease, were genotyped according to a 9-repeat (9R) or 10-repeat (10R) allele on the SLC6A3/DAT1 gene. They underwent neuropsychological assessment and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a set-shifting task (a computerized Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) that relies on fronto-striatal interactions. Patients homozygous on the 10R allele performed significantly better on working memory tasks than 9R-carrier patients. Most importantly, patients carrying a 9R allele exhibited less activation than their 10R homozygous counterparts in the prefrontal cortex, premotor cortex and caudate nucleus, when planning and executing a set-shift. This pattern was exacerbated for conditions that usually recruit the striatum compared to those that do not. This is the first study indicating that the SLC6A3/DAT1 genotype has a significant effect on fronto-striatal activation and performance in Parkinson’s disease. This effect is stronger for conditions that engage the striatum. Longitudinal studies are warranted to assess this polymorphism’s effect on the clinical evolution of patients with Parkinson’s disease, especially with cognitive decline. PMID:25212851

  16. Cognitive and affective changes in mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease patients undergoing switch of cholinesterase inhibitors: a 6-month observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Spalletta

    Full Text Available Patients with Alzheimer's disease after an initial response to cholinesterase inhibitors may complain a later lack of efficacy. This, in association with incident neuropsychiatric symptoms, may worsen patient quality of life. Thus, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor could represent a valid therapeutic strategy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the switch from one to another cholinesterase inhibitor on cognitive and affective symptoms in mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients. Four hundred twenty-three subjects were included from the EVOLUTION study, an observational, longitudinal, multicentre study conducted on Alzheimer disease patients who switched to different cholinesterase inhibitor due either to lack/loss of efficacy or response, reduced tolerability or poor compliance. All patients underwent cognitive and neuropsychiatric assessments, carried out before the switch (baseline, and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. A significant effect of the different switch types was found on Mini-Mental State Examination score during time, with best effectiveness on mild Alzheimer's disease patients switching from oral cholinesterase inhibitors to rivastigmine patch. Depressive symptoms, when measured using continuous Neuropsychiatric Inventory values, decreased significantly, while apathy symptoms remained stable over the 6 months after the switch. However, frequency of both depression and apathy, when measured categorically using Neuropsychiatric Inventory cut-off scores, did not change significantly during time. In mild to moderate Alzheimer disease patients with loss of efficacy and tolerability during cholinesterase inhibitor treatment, the switch to another cholinesterase inhibitor may represent an important option for slowing cognitive deterioration. The evidence of apathy stabilization and the positive tendency of depressive symptom improvement should definitively be confirmed in double-blind controlled

  17. Attitudes of Hungarian asthmatic and COPD patients affecting disease control: empirical research based on Health Belief Model

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    Judit eSimon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient non-adherence to treatment is a major problem across most chronic diseases. In COPD and asthma treatments it is a complex issue because people need to make behavioural and lifestyle changes while taking medications. Poor adherence results in increased rates of morbidity and mortality, more frequent hospitalisations, and ultimately higher healthcare expenditures. Material and methods: The objective of the study was to assess asthmatic and COPD patient’s attitudes toward adherence in Hungary. Health Belief Model was used to help explain reasons of non-adherence. The results of the study should provide additional support to understanding health-related behaviours and to developing health related programs enhancing adherence of asthmatic and COPD patients.145 diagnosed COPD patients and 161 diagnosed asthmatic patients were involved in 6 pulmonary centres. The questions were designed to measure Health Belief Model dimensions A 1-5 point verbal Likert scale was used. As a second stage, the answers were compared with the registered patient’s personal health data available in pulmonary centre’s documentation. The data was analysed using SPSS software.Results: More than 32% of patients are very interested in new asthma or COPD research results, but their main information source is physician. The trust toward the physician is very high. Patients accept treatments and rarely ask questions. Respondents are cooperative but sometimes fail to follow therapeutic recommendations. There is no willingness to join self-help groups or associations. Discussion: The paternalistic approach was generally accepted, moreover expected by the patients from the physicians. It is important to train patients, increase their self-efficacy, responsibility and involve them into self-management programs. Both physicians and patients should be trained how to communicate – this approach can lead to increased understanding and better adherence.

  18. Exploring beyond the oral mucosa in patients affected with autoimmune blistering diseases: the importance of endoscopic procedures.

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    España, A; Fernandez, S

    2016-09-14

    Autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD) comprise several entities characterized by the presence of autoantibodies targeted against structural proteins either in desmosomes or in the dermoepidermal junction of polystratified squamous epithelium. Patients develop blisters, erosions in cutaneous surfaces or mucosas. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic mucocutaneous lesions, the typical findings on histological studies and direct immunofluorescence assays, and the presence of specific autoantibodies against the epidermal antigens. It may not be possible for dermatologists to appropriately explore the nose and throat (NT). Thus, a clinical exploration by endoscopic procedures of NT may be a useful tool during the conventional dermatological exam. The aims of this review are to draw attention to the most frequent NT manifestations in AIBD patients, and underline the utility of endoscopic procedures to achieve a more successful and rationale management of patients. Additionally, we will provide brief information related to the anatomical structures and type of epithelium in NT areas which may explain the extent and type of NT involvement in AIBD. Endoscopic exploration in AIBD patients is important for several reasons. Firstly, it will allow the real NT mucosal involvement in each patient to be determined, thus making a differential diagnosis during the endoscopic exam possible, based on the localization of mucosal lesions. Secondary mucosal morbidity can also be ruled out. Secondly, the clinical response to treatment may be established, especially in NT mucosa, as these are anatomical areas subjected to important local traumas, and physiological functions such as breathing, swallowing, speech production and phonation may be damaged. Therefore, a multidisciplinary management in AIBD is mandatory by both dermatologists and otorhinolaryngologists, adding the clinical exploration by endoscopic procedures of NT to the conventional dermatological exam in all AIBD patients

  19. Sexual dysfunctions in men affected by autoimmune Addison's disease before and after short-term gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granata, Antonio; Tirabassi, Giacomo; Pugni, Valeria; Arnaldi, Giorgio; Boscaro, Marco; Carani, Cesare; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence suggesting that autoimmune Addison's disease (AD) could be associated with sexual dysfunctions probably caused by gluco- and mineralocorticoid deficiency; however, no study has yet treated this subject in males. To evaluate male sexuality and psychological correlates in autoimmune AD before and after gluco- and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy. Twelve subjects with a first diagnosis of autoimmune AD were studied before (baseline) and 2 months after (recovery phase) initiating hormone replacement therapy. Erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), overall satisfaction (OS), depression, and anxiety were studied using a number of questionnaires (International Index of Erectile Function, Beck Depression Inventory, and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory); clinical, biochemical, and hormone data were included in the analysis. At baseline, low values were found for EF, OF, SD, IS, and OS and high values for depression and anxiety; all of these parameters improved significantly in the recovery phase compared with baseline. EF variation between the two phases correlated significantly and positively with the variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure and inversely with that of upright plasma renin activity. Multiple linear regression analysis using EF variation as dependent variable confirmed the relationship of the latter with variation of serum cortisol, urinary free cortisol, and upright plasma renin activity but not with variation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Our study showed that onset of autoimmune AD in males is associated with a number of sexual dysfunctions, all reversible after initiating replacement hormone therapy; cortisol and aldosterone deficiency seems to play an important role in the genesis of erectile dysfunction although the mechanism of their activity is not clear. © 2012 International Society

  20. Patient-Provider Interactions Affect Symptoms in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

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    Michelle L Dossett

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether the benefits that some patients derive from complementary and integrative medicine (CIM are related to the therapies recommended or to the consultation process as some CIM provider visits are more involved than conventional medical visits. Many patients with gastrointestinal conditions seek out CIM therapies, and prior work has demonstrated that the quality of the patient-provider interaction can improve health outcomes in irritable bowel syndrome, however, the impact of this interaction on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is unknown. We aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of conducting a 2 x 2 factorial design study preliminarily exploring the impact of the patient-provider interaction, and the effect of an over-the-counter homeopathic product, Acidil, on symptoms and health-related quality of life in subjects with GERD.24 subjects with GERD-related symptoms were randomized in a 2 x 2 factorial design to receive 1 either a standard visit based on an empathic conventional primary care evaluation or an expanded visit with questions modeled after a CIM consultation and 2 either Acidil or placebo for two weeks. Subjects completed a daily GERD symptom diary and additional measures of symptom severity and health-related quality of life.There was no significant difference in GERD symptom severity between the Acidil and placebo groups from baseline to follow-up (p = 0.41, however, subjects who received the expanded visit were significantly more likely to report a 50% or greater improvement in symptom severity compared to subjects who received the standard visit (p = 0.01. Total consultation length, perceived empathy, and baseline beliefs in CIM were not associated with treatment outcomes.An expanded patient-provider visit resulted in greater GERD symptom improvement than a standard empathic medical visit. CIM consultations may have enhanced placebo effects, and further studies to assess the active components of this

  1. Overexpression of Peroxiredoxin 4 Affects Intestinal Function in a Dietary Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

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    Aya Nawata

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has shown that methionine- and choline-deficient high fat (MCD+HF diet induces the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, in which elevated reactive oxygen species play a crucial role. We have reported that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4, a unique secretory member of the PRDX antioxidant family, protects against NAFLD progression. However, the detailed mechanism and potential effects on the intestinal function still remain unclear.Two weeks after feeding mice a MCD+HF diet, the livers of human PRDX4 transgenic (Tg mice exhibited significant suppression in the development of NAFLD compared with wild-type (WT mice. The serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were significantly lower in Tg mice. In contrast, the Tg small intestine with PRDX4 overexpression showed more suppressed shortening of total length and villi height, and more accumulation of lipid in the jejunum, along with lower levels of dihydroethidium binding. The enterocytes exhibited fewer apoptotic but more proliferating cells, and inflammation was reduced in the mucosa. Furthermore, the small intestine of Tg mice had significantly higher expression of cholesterol absorption-regulatory factors, including liver X receptor-α, but lower expression of microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein.Our present data provide the first evidence of the beneficial effects of PRDX4 on intestinal function in the reduction of the severity of NAFLD, by ameliorating oxidative stress-induced local and systemic injury. We can suggest that both liver and intestine are spared, to some degree, by the antioxidant properties of PRDX4.

  2. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

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    Mario U Manto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibodies. We found that glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7 and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15 recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10 or limbic encephalitis (n = 4. We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal glutamate decarboxylase antibody representing this epitope specificity (1 disrupted in vitro the association of glutamate decarboxylase with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles, (2 depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect, (3 significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task, (4 markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm, and (5 induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of glutamate decarboxylase by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such glutamate decarboxylase antibodies could be envisioned.

  3. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S; Guerra-Narbona, Rafael; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Delgado-García, José María; Saitow, Fumihito; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct GAD autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal GAD antibodies. We found that GAD autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7) and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15) recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by GAD autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10) or limbic encephalitis (n = 4). We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal GAD antibody representing this epitope specificity; (1) disrupted in vitro the association of GAD with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles; (2) depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect; (3) significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task; (4) markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm; and (5) induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of GAD by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such GAD antibodies could be envisioned.

  4. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Non-surgical Methods

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    Valderrama, Pilar; Blansett, Jonathan A; Gonzalez, Mayra G; Cantu, Myrna G; Wilson, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this review is to summarize the findings of studies that have evaluated non-surgical approaches for detoxification of implant body surfaces in vitro and in vivo, and to evaluate clinical trials on the use of these methodologies for treating peri-implant disease. Materials and methods: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (Pubmed) from 1966 to 2013. In vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials on non-surgical therapy were evaluated. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment levels, bleeding on probing; radiographic bone fill and histological re-osseointegration. Results: From 134 articles found 35 were analyzed. The findings, advantages and disadvantages of using lasers as well as mechanical and chemical methods are discussed. Most of the in vivo and human studies used combination therapies which makes determining the efficacy of one specific method difficult. Most human studies are case series with short term longitudinal analysis without survival or failure reports. Conclusion: Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve using these approaches. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Re-osseointegration may be difficult to achieve if not impossible without surgical access to ensure thorough debridement of the defect and detoxification of the implant surface. Combination protocols for non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical results but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:24894571

  5. Indoxyl Sulfate Affects Glial Function Increasing Oxidative Stress and Neuroinflammation in Chronic Kidney Disease: Interaction between Astrocytes and Microglia

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    Simona Adesso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indoxyl sulfate (IS is a protein-bound uremic toxin resulting from the metabolism of dietary tryptophan which accumulates in patients with impaired renal function, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD. IS is a well-known nephrovascular toxin but little is known about its effects on central nervous system (CNS cells. Considering the growing interest in the field of CNS comorbidities in CKD, we studied the effect of IS on CNS cells. IS (15–60 μM treatment in C6 astrocyte cells increased reactive oxygen species release and decreased nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2 activation, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and NAD(PH dehydrogenase quinone 1 expression. Moreover, IS increased Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR and Nuclear Factor-kB (NF-kB activation in these cells. Similiar observations were made in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. Inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 release and nitrotyrosine formation were increased by IS (15–60 μM in primary mouse astrocytes and mixed glial cells. IS increased AhR and NF-kB nuclear translocation and reduced Nrf2 translocation and HO-1 expression in primary glial cells. In addition, IS induced cell death in neurons in a dose dependent fashion. Injection of IS (800 mg/kg, i.p. into mice induced histological changes and increased COX-2 expression and nitrotyrosine formation in thebrain tissue. Taken together, our results show a significant contribution of IS in generating a neurotoxic enviroment and it could also have a potential role in neurodegeneration. IS could be considered also a potential therapeutical target for CKD-associated neurodegenerative complications.

  6. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

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    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  7. Serum concentration of secretory IgA during pregnancy and in gynaecological diseases affecting glands and mucosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, V; Seyfarth, M; Brock, J

    1991-01-01

    Secretory IgA (S-IgA) was measured in serum samples from pregnant women by means of radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini with an antiserum against the secretory component and an S-IgA standard. The results neglect the differentiation in SC, S-IgA, and S-IgM. The study includes S-IgA serum levels during pregnancy and post partum as well as in patients with cervical carcinoma and inflammation of the genital tract. The S-IgA serum levels of pregnant women (2nd and 3rd trimester) and after delivery were increased significantly in comparison to nonpregnant women (p less than 0.01). The S-IgA levels in genital inflammation diseases and cervical carcinoma were only sometimes elevated. Pregnant women, 1st trimester: means = 40.0 mg/l (s = 12.2); pregnant women, 2nd trimester: means = 60.13 mg/l (s = 18.9); pregnant women, 3 rd trimester: means = 73.5 mg/l (s = 17.4); post partum: means = 77.5 mg/l (s = 29.52); cervical carcinoma: means = 41.9 mg/l (s = 17.3); adnexitis: means = 46.46 mg/l (s = 16.8); controls: means = 38.61 mg/l (s = 10.5). In a second part S-IgA could be estimated in serum samples of pregnant women by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The levels ranged from 7.1 mg/l to 19.3 mg/l in the 1st trimenon and from 16.8 mg/l to 82 mg/l in the 3rd trimenon (means = 11.72 mg/l; s = 4.419; n = 21 and means = 40.01 mg/l; s = 15.117; n = 60). This increasing was significant too (p less than 0.01).

  8. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology.

  9. Selenium Supplementation Affects Insulin Resistance and Serum hs-CRP in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhian, A; Bahmani, F; Taghizadeh, M; Mirhashemi, S M; Aarabi, M H; Raygan, F; Aghadavod, E; Asemi, Z

    2016-04-01

    To our knowledge, this study is the first indicating the effects of selenium supplementation on metabolic status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary heart disease (CHD). This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of selenium supplementation on metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation, and oxidative stress of patients with T2DM and CHD. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed among 60 patients with T2DM and CHD aged 40-85 years. Participants were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group A received 200 μg selenium supplements (n=30) and group B received placebo per day (n=30) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken at the beginning of the study and after 8-week intervention to quantify metabolic profiles. After 8 weeks, compared with the placebo, selenium supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (- 2.2±4.6 vs. + 3.6±8.4 μIU/ml, p=0.001), homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (- 0.7±1.3 vs. + 0.9±2.4, p=0.004), homeostatic model assessment-beta cell function (HOMA-B) (- 7.5±17.2 vs. + 15.1±34.5, p=0.002) and a significant increase in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (+0.01±0.03 vs. - 0.01±0.03, p=0.02). In addition, patients who received selenium supplements had a significant reduction in serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (- 1 372.3±2 318.8 vs. - 99.8±1 453.6 ng/ml, p=0.01) and a significant rise in plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) concentrations (+ 301.3±400.6 vs. - 127.2±428.0 mmol/l, phs-CRP, and a significant increase in QUICKI score and TAC concentrations.

  10. Disease-specific survival for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer affected by statistical method of assessment

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    Yuan Fei

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, prognosis and impact of prognostic/predictive factors are assessed with Kaplan-Meier plots and/or the Cox proportional hazard model. There might be substantive differences from the results using these models for the same patients, if different statistical methods were used, for example, Boag log-normal (cure-rate model, or log-normal survival analysis. Methods Cohort of 244 limited-stage small-cell lung cancer patients, were accrued between 1981 and 1998, and followed to the end of 2005. The endpoint was death with or from lung cancer, for disease-specific survival (DSS. DSS at 1-, 3- and 5-years, with 95% confidence limits, are reported for all patients using the Boag, Kaplan-Meier, Cox, and log-normal survival analysis methods. Factors with significant effects on DSS were identified with step-wise forward multivariate Cox and log-normal survival analyses. Then, DSS was ascertained for patients with specific characteristics defined by these factors. Results The median follow-up of those alive was 9.5 years. The lack of events after 1966 days precluded comparison after 5 years. DSS assessed by the four methods in the full cohort differed by 0–2% at 1 year, 0–12% at 3 years, and 0–1% at 5 years. Log-normal survival analysis indicated DSS of 38% at 3 years, 10–12% higher than with other methods; univariate 95% confidence limits were non-overlapping. Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction significantly impacted DSS. DSS assessed by the Cox and log-normal survival analysis methods for four clinical risk groups differed by 1–6% at 1 year, 15–26% at 3 years, and 0–12% at 5 years; multivariate 95% confidence limits were overlapping in all instances. Conclusion Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction all significantly impacted DSS. Apparent DSS for patients was influenced by the

  11. Urban air pollution and meteorological factors affect emergency department visits of elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pei-Hsiou; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Guo, Yue-Leon; Chang, Shuenn-Chin; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2017-05-01

    Both air pollution and meteorological factors in metropolitan areas increased emergency department (ED) visits from people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Few studies investigated the associations between air pollution, meteorological factors, and COPD-related health disorders in Asian countries. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between the environmental factors and COPD-associated ED visits of susceptible elderly population in the largest Taiwanese metropolitan area (Taipei area, including Taipei city and New Taipei city) between 2000 and 2013. Data of air pollutant concentrations (PM10, PM2.5, O3, SO2, NO2 and CO), meteorological factors (daily temperature, relative humidity and air pressure), and daily COPD-associated ED visits were collected from Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration air monitoring stations, Central Weather Bureau stations, and the Taiwan National Health Insurance database in Taipei area. We used a case-crossover study design and conditional logistic regression models with odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for evaluating the associations between the environmental factors and COPD-associated ED visits. Analyses showed that PM2.5, O3, and SO2 had significantly greater lag effects (the lag was 4 days for PM2.5, and 5 days for O3 and SO2) on COPD-associated ED visits of the elderly population (65-79 years old). In warmer days, a significantly greater effect on elderly COPD-associated ED visits was estimated for PM2.5 with coexistence of O3. Additionally, either O3 or SO2 combined with other air pollutants increased the risk of elderly COPD-associated ED visits in the days of high relative humidity and air pressure difference, respectively. This study showed that joint effect of urban air pollution and meteorological factors contributed to the COPD-associated ED visits of the susceptible elderly population in the largest metropolitan area in Taiwan. Government authorities should review

  12. Lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000066.htm Lung disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation diseases -- These diseases affect the blood vessels ...

  13. Does blood transfusion affect pituitary gonadal axis and sperm parameters in young males with sickle cell disease?

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    Ashraf T Soliman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the effect of packed red cell transfusion (PCTx on serum concentrations of gonadotropins luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone (LH and FSH and testosterone (T levels and measured sperm parameters in young adults with sickle cell disease (SCD on top-up transfusion (TTx and those on exchange transfusion (ETx regimen. Materials and Methods: Basal serum concentrations of FSH, LH, and T and semen parameters were evaluated before and 7 days after PCTx in 18 young adults with transfusion-dependent SCD, aged 20.7 ± 2.88 years. They had full pubertal development (Tanner′s stage 5, and capacity to ejaculate. They were regularly transfused since early childhood. Chelation therapy was started early during the first 2 years of life using desferrioxamine and was replaced by deferasirox for the last 4-5 years. Ten patients were on TTx and eight were on ETx regimen. Results: PCTx significantly increased hemoglobin (Hb from 8.5 ± 1.17 g/dl to 10.5 ± 0.4 g/dl, T from 12.3 ± 1.24 nmol/L to 14.23 ± 1.22 nmol/L and gonadotropins′ concentrations. Sperm parameters improved significantly after PCTx including: total sperm count from 87.4 ± 24.6 million/ml to 146.2 ± 51.25 million/ml, total progressive sperm motility (TPM from 40.8 ± 11.1 million/ml to 93.4 ± 38.3 million/ml, rapid progressive sperm motility (RPM progressive motility from 29.26 ± 8.75 million/ml to 67.4 ± 29 million/ml. After PCTx the total sperm count, TPM and RPM were significantly better in the ETx group versus the TTx group. Before and after PCTx, T concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm total count, volume, TPM and RPM (r = 0.53, 0.55, 0.42, and 0.38, respectively, P < 0.01. Hb concentrations were correlated significantly with sperm count, TPM, RPM, and % of sperms with normal morphology (r = 0.60, 0.69, 0.66, and 0.86, respectively, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Our study suggests that in males with SCD blood transfusion is associated

  14. Hepatitis B virus and microRNAs: Complex interactions affecting hepatitis B virus replication and hepatitis B virus-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Jason; Steel, Laura F; Bouchard, Michael J

    2015-06-28

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). With nearly 750000 deaths yearly, hepatocellular carcinoma is the second highest cause of cancer-related death in the world. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of HBV-associated HCC remain incompletely understood. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small non-coding RNAs that play a role primarily in post-transcriptional gene regulation, have been recognized as important regulators of cellular homeostasis, and altered regulation of miRNA expression has been suggested to play a significant role in virus-associated diseases and the development of many cancers. With this in mind, many groups have begun to investigate the relationship between miRNAs and HBV replication and HBV-associated disease. Multiple findings suggest that some miRNAs, such as miR-122, and miR-125 and miR-199 family members, are playing a role in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, including the development of HBV-associated HCC. In this review, we discuss the current state of our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, including how HBV affects cellular miRNAs, how these miRNAs impact HBV replication, and the relationship between HBV-mediated miRNA regulation and HCC development. We also address the impact of challenges in studying HBV, such as the lack of an effective model system for infectivity and a reliance on transformed cell lines, on our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, and propose potential applications of miRNA-related techniques that could enhance our understanding of the role miRNAs play in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, ultimately leading to new therapeutic options and improved patient outcomes.

  15. Effects of Simultaneously Applied Short-Term Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Tactile Stimulation on Memory and Affective Behaviour of Patients with Probable Alzheimer’s Disease

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    E. Scherder

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies beneficial effects of peripheral electrical or tactile nerve stimulation were observed on memory and affective behaviour in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, it was investigated whether electrical and tactile stimulation applied simultaneously to Alzheimer patients would exceed the effects which were observed following treatment by each type of stimulation separately. Our data reveal that the simultaneous application of the two types of stimulation had a beneficial effect on non-verbal and verbal long-term recognition memory. In addition, patients who were treated participated more in activities of daily living, and were more interested in social contacts. In spite of these positive results, comparisons with those of previous studies suggest that a combination of electrical and tactile stimulation does not yield more effects than application of each type of stimulation separately.

  16. A new species of Henneguya, a gill parasite of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) affected with ulcerative disease syndrome from Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemanand, Th; Meitei, N Mohilal; Bandyopadhyay, Probir K; Mitra, Amlan K

    2008-01-01

    A new species of Henneguya parasitizing tissues affected by the ulcerative disease syndrome of a freshwater fish Anabas testudineus (Bloch) from Khiodum and Pumlen lakes of Manipur state is described. Of the fishes examined 75% were found to be infested with this myxozoan parasite. Mature spores of the new species are elongated, biconvex, and oval with bluntly rounded anterior end and gradually tapering posterior end with a caudal prolongation, measuring 12.6-15.4 (14.0+/- 1.1) microm in length. Length of the caudal prolongation is 11.2-12.6 (11.7+/- 0.6) microm. The width of the spores is 5.6-7.0 (6.3+/- 0.5) microm. The length of the polar capsules is 5.6-6.3 (5.5+/- 0.3) microm.

  17. INFLUENCE OF NEUROTIC AND AFFECTIVE DISORDERS ON FORMATION OF PREDICTORS OF ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE AND DISORDERS OF CARBOHYDRATE AND LIPID METABOLISM

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    N. P. Garganeyeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of analysis of cardiovascular and psychosocial risk factors which influence the development and prediction of ischemic heart disease (IHD and disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in 132 patients with neurotic and affective disorders are presented. The significance of predictors of IHD formation was evaluated with method of logistic regression. According to results of stepwise procedure the total score of prediction of IHD in male group was 93.7%. The influence of mental factors on disorders of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism which lead to persistent rise of level of blood glucose, lipid spectrum indices imbalance, promoting the progression of cardiovascular risk in IHD patients with anxiety, depressive, asthenic and other non-psychotic mental disorders, was ascertained.

  18. Serum protein profiles as potential biomarkers for infectious disease status in pigs

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    Koene Miriam GJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In veterinary medicine and animal husbandry, there is a need for tools allowing the early warning of diseases. Preferably, tests should be available that warn farmers and veterinarians during the incubation periods of disease and before the onset of clinical signs. The objective of this study was to explore the potential of serum protein profiles as an early biomarker for infectious disease status. Serum samples were obtained from an experimental pig model for porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD, consisting of Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2 infection in combination with either Porcine Parvovirus (PPV or Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV. Sera were collected before and after onset of clinical signs at day 0, 5 and 19 post infection. Serum protein profiles were evaluated against sera from non-infected control animals. Results Protein profiles were generated by SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry in combination with the Proteominer™ technology to enrich for low-abundance proteins. Based on these protein profiles, the experimentally infected pigs could be classified according to their infectious disease status. Before the onset of clinical signs 88% of the infected animals could be classified correctly, after the onset of clinical sigs 93%. The sensitivity of the classification appeared to be high. The protein profiles could distinguish between separate infection models, although specificity was moderate to low. Classification of PCV2/PRRSV infected animals was superior compared to PCV2/PPV infected animals. Limiting the number of proteins in the profiles (ranging from 568 to 10 had only minor effects on the classification performance. Conclusions This study shows that serum protein profiles have potential for detection and identification of viral infections in pigs before clinical signs of the disease become visible.

  19. Through the looking glass: an exploratory study of the lived experiences and unmet needs of families affected by Von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasparian, Nadine A; Rutstein, Alison; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M; Mireskandari, Shab; Tyler, Janet; Duffy, Jessica; Tucker, Katherine M

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established protocols for the medical management of Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), families affected by this rare tumour syndrome continue to face numerous psychological, social, and practical challenges. To our knowledge, this is one of the first qualitative studies to explore the psychosocial difficulties experienced by families affected by VHL. A semi-structured interview was developed to explore patients' and carers' experiences of VHL along several life domains, including: self-identity and self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, education and career opportunities, family communication, physical health and emotional well-being, and supportive care needs. Quantitative measures were also used to examine the prevalence of anxiety, depression, and disease-specific distress in this sample. Participants were recruited via the Hereditary Cancer Clinic at the Prince of Wales Hospital in Sydney, Australia. A total of 23 individual telephone interviews were conducted (15 patients, 8 carers), yielding a response rate of 75%. A diverse range of experiences were reported, including: sustained uncertainty about future tumour development, frustration regarding the need for lifelong medical screening, strained family relationships, difficulties communicating with others about VHL, perceived social isolation and limited career opportunities, financial and care-giving burdens, complex decisions in relation to childbearing, and difficulties accessing expert medical and psychosocial care. Participants also provided examples of psychological growth and resilience, and voiced support for continued efforts to improve supportive care services. More sophisticated systems for connecting VHL patients and their families with holistic, empathic, and person-centred medical and psychosocial care are urgently needed.

  20. Serum Immunoglobulin G Levels to Porphyromonas gingivalis Peptidylarginine Deiminase Affect Clinical Response to Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

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    Tetsuo Kobayashi

    Full Text Available To determine whether serum immunity to Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD affects the clinical response to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA.In a retrospective study, rheumatologic and periodontal conditions of 60 patients with RA who had been treated with conventional synthetic DMARD were evaluated before (baseline and after 3 and 6 months of bDMARD therapy. After serum levels of anti-PPAD immunoglobulin G (IgG were determined at baseline, the patients were respectively divided into two groups for high and low anti-PPAD IgG titers according to the median measurements. Genotypes at 8 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to RA were also determined.After 3 and 6 months of therapy, patients with low anti-PPAD IgG titers showed a significantly greater decrease in changes in the Disease Activity Score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP (P = 0.04 for both and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP IgG levels (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04 than patients with high anti-PPAD IgG titers, although these parameter values were comparable at baseline. The anti-PPAD IgG titers were significantly positively correlated with changes in the DAS28-CRP (P = 0.01 for both and the anti-CCP IgG levels (P = 0.02 for both from baseline to 3 and 6 months later. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significantly positive association between the anti-PPAD IgG titers and changes in the DAS28-CRP after 6 months of bDMARD therapy (P = 0.006, after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, periodontal condition, and RA-related SNPs.The serum IgG levels to PPAD affect the clinical response to bDMARD in patients with RA.

  1. Serum Immunoglobulin G Levels to Porphyromonas gingivalis Peptidylarginine Deiminase Affect Clinical Response to Biological Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drug in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Ito, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Shimada, Atsushi; Narita, Ichiei; Murasawa, Akira; Nakazono, Kiyoshi; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether serum immunity to Porphyromonas gingivalis peptidylarginine deiminase (PPAD) affects the clinical response to biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In a retrospective study, rheumatologic and periodontal conditions of 60 patients with RA who had been treated with conventional synthetic DMARD were evaluated before (baseline) and after 3 and 6 months of bDMARD therapy. After serum levels of anti-PPAD immunoglobulin G (IgG) were determined at baseline, the patients were respectively divided into two groups for high and low anti-PPAD IgG titers according to the median measurements. Genotypes at 8 functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to RA were also determined. After 3 and 6 months of therapy, patients with low anti-PPAD IgG titers showed a significantly greater decrease in changes in the Disease Activity Score including 28 joints using C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) (P = 0.04 for both) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) IgG levels (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04) than patients with high anti-PPAD IgG titers, although these parameter values were comparable at baseline. The anti-PPAD IgG titers were significantly positively correlated with changes in the DAS28-CRP (P = 0.01 for both) and the anti-CCP IgG levels (P = 0.02 for both) from baseline to 3 and 6 months later. A multiple regression analysis revealed a significantly positive association between the anti-PPAD IgG titers and changes in the DAS28-CRP after 6 months of bDMARD therapy (P = 0.006), after adjusting for age, gender, smoking, periodontal condition, and RA-related SNPs. The serum IgG levels to PPAD affect the clinical response to bDMARD in patients with RA.

  2. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice.

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    Nanda Gruben

    Full Text Available The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1, are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD, which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. It is possible that chemerin and/or Cmklr1 exert their effects on these disorders through inflammation, but so far the data have been controversial. To gain further insight into this matter, we studied the effect of whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency on insulin resistance and NAFLD. In view of the primary role of macrophages in hepatic inflammation, we also transplanted bone marrow from Cmklr1 knock-out (Cmklr1-/- mice and wild type (WT mice into low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice, a mouse model for NASH. All mice were fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet containing 21% fat from milk butter and 0.2% cholesterol for 12 weeks. Insulin resistance was assessed by an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, and by measurement of plasma glucose and insulin levels. Liver pathology was determined by measuring hepatic inflammation, fibrosis, lipid accumulation and the NAFLD activity score (NAS. Whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency did not affect body weight gain or food intake. In addition, we observed no differences between WT and Cmklr1-/- mice for hepatic inflammatory and fibrotic gene expression, immune cell infiltration, lipid accumulation or NAS. In line with this, we detected no differences in insulin resistance. In concordance with whole-body Cmklr1 deficiency, the absence of Cmklr1 in bone marrow-derived cells in Ldlr-/- mice did not affect their insulin resistance or liver pathology. Our results indicate that Cmklr1 is not involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance or NAFLD. Thus, we recommend that the associations reported between Cmklr1 and insulin resistance or NAFLD should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Alzheimer’s disease: relevant molecular and physiopathological events affecting amyloid-β brain balance and the putative role of PPARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, Juan M.; Bastías-Candia, Sussy; Santos, Manuel J.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementia. With the expected aging of the human population, the estimated morbidity of AD suggests a critical upcoming health problem. Several lines of research are focused on understanding AD pathophysiology, and although the etiology of the disease remains a matter of intense debate, increased brain levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) appear to be a critical event in triggering a wide range of molecular alterations leading to AD. It has become evident in recent years that an altered balance between production and clearance is responsible for the accumulation of brain Aβ. Moreover, Aβ clearance is a complex event that involves more than neurons and microglia. The status of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and choroid plexus, along with hepatic functionality, should be considered when Aβ balance is addressed. Furthermore, it has been proposed that exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of metals, such as copper, could both directly affect these secondary structures and act as a seeding or nucleation core that facilitates Aβ aggregation. Recently, we have addressed peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs)-related mechanisms, including the direct modulation of mitochondrial dynamics through the PPARγ-coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) axis and the crosstalk with critical aging- and neurodegenerative-related cellular pathways. In the present review, we revise the current knowledge regarding the molecular aspects of Aβ production and clearance and provide a physiological context that gives a more complete view of this issue. Additionally, we consider the different structures involved in AD-altered Aβ brain balance, which could be directly or indirectly affected by a nuclear receptor (NR)/PPAR-related mechanism. PMID:25120477

  4. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD.

  5. Genetic diversity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from farmed Pacific white shrimp and ambient pond water affected by acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease outbreak in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonsin, Kaknokrat; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Theethakaew, Chonchanok; Kodama, Toshio; Junjhon, Jiraphan; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Suthienkul, Orasa; Iida, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is an emerging shrimp disease that causes massive die-offs in farmed shrimps. Recent outbreaks of AHPND in Asia have been causing great losses for shrimp culture and have become a serious socioeconomic problem. The causative agent of AHPND is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, which is typically known to cause food-borne gastroenteritis in humans. However, there have been few reports of the epidemiology of V. parahaemolyticus AHPND strains, and the genetic relationship among AHPND strains is unclear. Here, we report the genetic characterization of V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from AHPND outbreaks in Thailand. We found eight isolates from AHPND-suspected shrimps and pond water that were positive for AHPND markers AP1 and AP2. PCR analysis confirmed that none of these eight AP-positive AHPND strains possesses the genes for the conventional virulence factors affecting to humans, such as thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH), TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) and type III secretion system 2. Phylogenetic analysis by multilocus sequence typing showed that the AHPND strains are genetically diverse, suggesting that AHPND strains were not derived from a single genetic lineage. Our study represents the first report of molecular epidemiology of AHPND-causing V. parahaemolyticus strains using multilocus sequence typing, and provides an insight into their evolutionary mechanisms.

  6. Preparing towards Preventing and Containing an Ebola Virus Disease Outbreak: What Socio-cultural Practices May Affect Containment Efforts in Ghana?

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    Philip Baba Adongo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is a condition with high fatality. Though the disease is deadly, taking precautions to reduce contact with infected people and their secretions can prevent cross- infection. In the 2014 EVD outbreak, socio-cultural factors were identified to be responsible for the spread of the disease in the three most affected countries in West Africa. In this light, we undertook this study to identify socio-cultural factors that may influence the prevention and containment of EVD in Ghana and ways to address such practices.We conducted a descriptive qualitative study in five regions in Ghana. Twenty-five focus group discussions (5 in each region with community members (4 in each region and nurses (1 in each region were conducted. In addition, forty (40 in-depth interviews were conducted with various stakeholders and opinion leaders; eight in each region. All interviews were recorded using a digital voice recorder and transcribed. With the aid of Nvivo 10 for windows, we analyzed the data using framework analysis.We found that socio-cultural practices, such as care of the body of dead and burial practices, widowhood rites and anointing children with water used to rinse the dead, were common. These practices require individuals coming into direct contact with either the dead or items used to take care of the dead. Social norms also require frequent handshakes in all social gatherings such as funeral, and religious congregations. We also found that self-medication (using herbs and orthodox medications was a common practice. People use both biomedical and non-orthodox health outlets either simultaneously or in sequence in times of ill-health.The study concludes that high risk socio-cultural practices were common among Ghanaians and generally perceived as indispensable. These high risk practices may hinder containment efforts in the event of an outbreak. Community leaders should be engaged in any social mobilization to modify these

  7. Is kidney function affecting the management of myocardial infarction? A retrospective cohort study in patients with normal kidney function, chronic kidney disease stage III–V, and ESRD

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    Saad M

    2016-01-01

    between treatment modalities and comorbidities, and to account for possible confounding factors. Three hundred and thirty-four patients (mean age 67.2±13.9 years were included. In terms of management, medical treatment was not different among the three groups. However, cardiac catheterization was performed less in ESRD when compared with no CKD and CKD stage III–V (45.6% vs 74% and 93.9% (P<0.001. CABG was performed in comparable proportions in the three groups and CABG was not associated with the degree of CKD (P=0.078 in binary logistics regression. Cardiac catheterization on the other hand carried the strongest association among all studied variables (P<0.001. This association was maintained after adjusting for other comorbidities. The length of stay for the three cohorts (non-CKD, CKD stage III–V, and ESRD on hemodialysis was 16, 17, and 15 days, respectively and was not statistically different. Many observations have reported discrimination of care for patients with CKD considered suboptimal candidates for aggressive management of their cardiac disease. In our study, medical therapy was achieved at high percentage and was comparable among groups of different kidney function. However, kidney disease seems to affect the management of patients with acute MI; percutaneous coronary angiography is not uniformly performed in patients with CKD and ESRD when compared with patients with normal kidney function. Keywords: myocardial infarction, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease

  8. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi;

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  9. Factors affecting disease-free survival in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer who receive adjuvant trastuzumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÜNDÜZ, SEYDA; GÖKSU, SEMA SEZGIN; ARSLAN, DENIZ; TATLI, ALI MURAT; UYSAL, MÜKREMIN; GÜNDÜZ, UMUT RIZA; SEVINÇ, MERT MAHSUNI; COŞKUN, HASAN SENOL; BOZCUK, HAKAN; MUTLU, HASAN; SAVAS, BURHAN

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women worldwide and the second cause of cancer-related mortality. A total of 20–30% of patients with early-stage breast cancer develop recurrence within the first 5 years following diagnosis. Trastuzumab significantly improves overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) in women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early and locally advanced breast cancer. This study aimed to determine the factors that affect DFS following adjuvant transtuzumab therapy. A total of 62 patients treated with trastuzumab for early and locally advanced breast cancer were included in our study. Data, including pathology, treatment and treatment outcome, rate of recurrence and laboratory tests, were retrospectively collected. There was no significant association between DFS and age, menopausal status, disease stage and hormone receptor status. The median follow-up was 48.4 months. The median DFS of patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab was 64.1 months. In addition, the median DFS was 44.3 vs. 66.8 months in patients with platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) ≤200 vs. >200, respectively (log-rank test; P=0.001), and 70 vs. 45 months in patients with eosinophil count ≤70 vs. >70×103/mm3 (log-rank test; P=0.001). Our data revealed the prognostic relevance of a decrease in the peripheral blood eosinophil count and PLR value following trastuzumab therapy in breast cancer. PLR and eosinophil count measurements are cost-effective, readily available worldwide, non-invasive and safe. Combined with other markers, such as patient age, tumor stage and tumor histology, may be effectively used for patients with breast cancer. PMID:26623060

  10. Characterization of a spontaneous novel mutation in the NPC2 gene in a cat affected by Niemann Pick type C disease.

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    Stefania Zampieri

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids within the lysosomes due to mutation in NPC1 or NPC2 genes. A feline model of NPC carrying a mutation in NPC1 gene has been previously described. We have identified two kittens affected by NPC disease due to a mutation in NPC2 gene. They manifested with tremors at the age of 3 months, which progressed to dystonia and severe ataxia. At 6 months of age cat 2 was unable to stand without assistance and had bilaterally reduced menace response. It died at the age of 10 months. Post-mortem histological analysis of the brain showed the presence of neurons with cytoplasmic swelling and vacuoles, gliosis of the substantia nigra and degeneration of the white matter. Spheroids with accumulation of ubiquitinated aggregates were prominent in the cerebellar cortex. Purkinje cells were markedly reduced in number and they showed prominent intracytoplasmic storage. Scattered perivascular aggregates of lymphocytes and microglial cells proliferation were present in the thalamus and midbrain. Proliferation of Bergmann glia was also observed. In the liver, hepatocytes were swollen because of accumulation of small vacuoles and foamy Kupffer cells were also detected. Foamy macrophages were observed within the pulmonary interstitium and alveoli as well. At 9 months cat 1 was unable to walk, developed seizures and it was euthanized at 21 months. Filipin staining of cultured fibroblasts showed massive storage of unesterified cholesterol. Molecular analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes showed the presence of a homozygous intronic mutation (c.82+5G>A in the NPC2 gene. The subsequent analysis of the mRNA showed that the mutation causes the retention of 105 bp in the mature mRNA, which leads to the in frame insertion of 35 amino acids between residues 28 and 29 of NPC2 protein (p.G28_S29ins35.

  11. Predictive value of social inhibition and negative affectivity for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with coronary artery disease: the type D personality construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denollet, Johan; Pedersen, Susanne S; Vrints, Christiaan J; Conraads, Viviane M

    2013-01-01

    Methodological considerations and selected null findings indicate the need to reexamine the Type D construct. We investigated whether associations with cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) involve the specific combination of negative affectivity (NA) and social inhibition (SI), or rather the main effect of either trait alone. In this 5-year follow-up of 541 patients with CAD, the Type D construct (14-item Type D Scale) was tested by examining a) the interaction of continuous NA and SI z scores and b) a four-group classification defined by low/high trait scores. End points were major adverse cardiac events (MACEs; death, myocardial infarction [MI], coronary revascularization) and cardiac death/MI. At follow-up, 113 patients had a MACE, including 47 patients with cardiac death/MI. After adjustment for disease severity, age, sex, and main trait effects, the interaction of NA and SI z scores was associated with MACE (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.67). This continuous measure of Type D was also associated with cardiac death/MI (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.11-1.96) and remained an independent predictor of events after adjustment for depressive symptoms. Using a cutoff of 10 on both NA and SI scales, Type D was associated with an adjusted OR of 1.74 (95% CI = 1.11-2.73) for MACE and an OR of 2.35 (95% CI = 1.26-4.38) for death/MI but was unrelated to noncardiac death. Patients with high NA or SI alone were not at increased risk. Continuous (NA × SI interaction) and dichotomized measures of Type D were associated with cardiovascular events in patients with CAD. Research is needed to explore moderating factors that may alter this association.

  12. Factors Affecting Health-Related Quality of Life and Physical Activity after Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune and Nonautoimmune Liver Diseases: A Prospective, Single Centre Study

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    Katarzyna Kotarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. With the improvement of the outcomes after liver transplantation (LTx, health-related quality of life (HRQoL and physical activity are becoming significant outcome parameters. We prospectively assessed these parameters in patients with autoimmune and nonautoimmune liver disorders undergoing LTx. Materials and Methods. Patients (n=107 were subdivided into 3 groups depending on the time after LTx: group-A (n=21: 6–12 months; group-B (n=48: 13–36 months; and group-C (n=38: >37 months. SF-36 and IPAQ were applied in HRQoL and physical activity assessment. Results. Females had impaired HRQoL in most SF-36 domains. Younger patients showed higher scores at SF-36 physical functioning domain but IPAQ was not influenced by age. Group-B had higher general health and physical component summary than group-A (P=0.037, P=0.04, resp. and total IPAQ than group-C (P=0.047. The sitting time domain was longer in group-A than in group-B and group-C (P=0.0157;  P=0.042, resp.. Employed patients had better HRQoL and higher physical activity than those not working. SF-36 and IPAQ were unrelated to the autoimmune etiology of liver disease. Conclusions. These findings show that female and unemployed patients have worse HRQoL, while gender and age at LTx time do not affect IPAQ’s physical activity. The autoimmune etiology of liver disease does not influence HRQoL and physical activity after LTx.

  13. Increased numbers of IL-7 receptor molecules on CD4+CD25-CD107a+ T-cells in patients with autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system.

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    Nalini Kumar Vudattu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High content immune profiling in peripheral blood may reflect immune aberrations associated with inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS and other autoimmune diseases affecting the central nervous system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 46 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, 9 patients diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS (RRMS, 13 with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS, 9 with other neurological diseases (OND and well as 15 healthy donors (HD were analyzed by 12 color flow cytometry (TCRalphabeta, TCRgammadelta, CD4, CD8alpha, CD8beta, CD45RA, CCR7, CD27, CD28, CD107a, CD127, CD14 in a cross-sectional study to identify variables significantly different between controls (HD and patients (OND, RRMS, SPMS. We analyzed 187 individual immune cell subsets (percentages and the density of the IL-7 receptor alpha chain (CD127 on 59 individual immune phenotypes using a monoclonal anti-IL-7R antibody (clone R34.34 coupled to a single APC molecule in combination with an APC-bead array. A non-parametric analysis of variance (Kruskal-Wallis test was conducted in order to test for differences among the groups in each of the variables. To correct for the multiplicity problem, the FDR correction was applied on the p-values. We identified 19 variables for immune cell subsets (percentages which allowed to segregate healthy individuals and individuals with CNS disorders. We did not observe differences in the relative percentage of IL-7R-positive immune cells in PBMCs. In contrast, we identified significant differences in IL-7 density, measured on a single cell level, in 2/59 variables: increased numbers of CD127 molecules on TCRalphabeta+CD4+CD25 (intermed T-cells and on TCRalphabeta+CD4+CD25-CD107a+ T-cells (mean: 28376 Il-7R binding sites on cells from HD, 48515 in patients with RRMS, 38195 in patients with SPMS and 33692 IL-7 receptor binding sites on cells from patients with OND. CONCLUSION: These data

  14. Meniere's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meniere's disease can affect your social life, your productivity and the overall quality of your life. Learn ... www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menieres-disease/basics/definition/CON-20028251 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  15. Molecular analysis of HEXA gene in Argentinean patients affected with Tay-Sachs disease: possible common origin of the prevalent c.459+5A>G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Stefania; Montalvo, Annalisa; Blanco, Mariana; Zanin, Irene; Amartino, Hernan; Vlahovicek, Kristian; Szlago, Marina; Schenone, Andrea; Pittis, Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited disorder caused by the deficient activity of hexosaminidase A due to mutations in the HEXA gene. Up to date there is no information regarding the molecular genetics of TSD in Argentinean patients. In the present study we have studied 17 Argentinean families affected by TSD, including 20 patients with the acute infantile form and 3 with the sub-acute form. Overall, we identified 14 different mutations accounting for 100% of the studied alleles. Eight mutations were novel: 5 were single base changes leading to drastic residue changes or truncated proteins, 2 were small deletions and one was an intronic mutation that may cause a splicing defect. Although the spectrum of mutations was highly heterogeneous, a high frequency of the c.459+5G>A mutation, previously described in different populations was found among the studied cohort. Haplotype analysis suggested that in these families the c.459+5G>A mutation might have arisen by a single mutational event.

  16. The influence of somatosensory and muscular deficits on postural stabilization: Insights from an instrumented analysis of subjects affected by different types of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencioni, Tiziana; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Rabuffetti, Marco; Bovi, Gabriele; Calabrese, Daniela; Aiello, Alessia; Di Sipio, Enrica; Padua, Luca; Diverio, Manuela; Pareyson, Davide; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common hereditary neuromuscular disorder. CMT1 is primarily demyelinating, CMT2 is primarily axonal, and CMTX1 is characterized by both axonal and demyelinating abnormalities. We investigated the role of somatosensory and muscular deficits on quiet standing and postural stabilization in patients affected by different forms of CMT, comparing their performances with those of healthy subjects. Seventy-six CMT subjects (CMT1A, CMT2 and CMTX1) and 41 healthy controls were evaluated during a sit-to-stand transition and the subsequent quiet upright posture by means of a dynamometric platform. All CMT patients showed altered balance and postural stabilization compared to controls. Multivariate analysis showed that in CMT patients worsening of postural stabilization was related to vibration sense deficit and to dorsi-flexor's weakness, while quiet standing instability was related to the reduction of pinprick sensibility and to plantar-flexor's weakness. Our results show that specific sensory and muscular deficits play different roles in balance impairment of CMT patients, both during postural stabilization and in static posture. An accurate evaluation of residual sensory and muscular functions is therefore necessary to plan for the appropriate balance rehabilitation treatment for each patient, besides the CMT type. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. TrkB reduction exacerbates Alzheimer's disease-like signaling aberrations and memory deficits without affecting β-amyloidosis in 5XFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, L; Ohno, M

    2015-05-05

    Accumulating evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) significantly decrease early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether BDNF/TrkB reductions may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of AD. To address this question, we generated 5XFAD transgenic mice with heterozygous TrkB knockout (TrkB(+/-)·5XFAD), and tested the effects of TrkB reduction on AD-like features in this mouse model during an incipient stage that shows only modest amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology and retains normal mnemonic function. TrkB(+/-) reduction exacerbated memory declines in 5XFAD mice at 4-5 months of age as assessed by the hippocampus-dependent spontaneous alternation Y-maze task, while the memory performance was not affected in TrkB(+/-) mice. Meanwhile, TrkB(+/-)·5XFAD mice were normal in nest building, a widely used measure for social behavior, suggesting the memory-specific aggravation of AD-associated behavioral impairments. We found no difference between TrkB(+/-)·5XFAD and 5XFAD control mice in cerebral plaque loads, Aβ concentrations including total Aβ42 and soluble oligomers and β-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein. Interestingly, reductions in hippocampal expression of AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor subunits as well as impaired signaling pathways downstream to TrkB such as CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and Akt/GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β) were observed in TrkB(+/-)·5XFAD mice but not in 5XFAD mice. Among these signaling aberrations, only Akt/GSK-3β dysfunction occurred in TrkB(+/-) mice, while others were synergistic consequences between TrkB reduction and subthreshold levels of Aβ in TrkB(+/-)·5XFAD mice. Collectively, our results indicate that reduced TrkB does not affect β-amyloidosis but exacerbates the manifestation of hippocampal mnemonic and signaling dysfunctions in early AD.

  18. Expression of chicken interleukin-2 by a highly virulent strain of Newcastle disease virus leads to decreased systemic viral load but does not significantly affect mortality in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susta, Leonardo; Diel, Diego G; Courtney, Sean; Cardenas-Garcia, Stivalis; Sundick, Roy S; Miller, Patti J; Brown, Corrie C; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-08-08

    In mammals, interleukin 2 (IL-2) has been shown to decrease replication or attenuate pathogenicity of numerous viral pathogens (herpes simplex virus, vaccinia virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, human immunodeficiency virus) by activating natural killer cells (NK), cytotoxic T lymphocytes and expanding subsets of memory cells. In chickens, IL-2 has been shown to activate T cells, and as such it might have the potential to affect replication and pathogenesis of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). To assess the effect of IL-2 during NDV infection in chickens, we produced a recombinant virulent NDV strain expressing chicken IL-2 (rZJ1-IL2). The effects of IL-2 expression were investigated in vivo using the intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) in day-old chicks and pathogenesis experiments in 4-week-old chickens. In these studies, rZJ1-IL2 was compared to a control virus expressing the green fluorescent protein (rZJ1-GFP). Assessed parameters included survival curves, detailed histological and immunohistochemical grading of lesions in multiple organs, and virus isolation in blood, spleen and mucosal secretions of infected birds. At the site of infection (eyelid), expression of IL-2 was demonstrated in areas of rZJ-IL2 replication, confirming IL-2 production in vivo. Compared to rZJ1-GFP strain, rZJ1-IL2 caused milder lesions and displayed decreased viral load in blood, spleen and mucosal secretions of infected birds. In the rZJ1-IL2-infected group, virus level in the blood peaked at day 4 post-infection (pi) (10(3.46) EID50 /0.1 ml) and drastically decreased at day 5 pi (10(0.9) EID50/0.1 ml), while in the rZJ1-GFP-infected group virus levels in the blood reached 10(5.35) EID50/0.1 ml at day 5. However, rZJ1-IL2-infected groups presented survival curves similar to control birds infected with rZJ1-GFP, with comparable clinical signs and 100 % mortality. Further, expression of IL-2 did not significantly affect the ICPI scores, compared to rZJ1-GFP strain. Increased

  19. Age, segment, and horn disease affect expression of cytokines, growth factors, and receptors in the epidermis and dermis of the bovine claw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J A; Zarlenga, D S; Habecker, P L; Dyer, R M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine changes in RNA expression for growth factors, cytokines, and receptors in epidermal-dermal tissues of the bovine claw relative to host age, claw segment, and disease state of the horn. Epidermal-dermal tissues were collected from the coronary, wall, sole, and bulb segments of 8- to 9-mo-old Holstein fetuses, normal adult cows, and adult cows with sole ulceration. Anatomic and pathologic characteristics were determined in tissues stained with eosin and hematoxylin, and RNA expression levels were evaluated using real-time, quantitative PCR. In normal tissues, certain RNA expression levels were clearly affected by host age: 290.0-, 610.0-, 53.4-, and 8.1-fold greater expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor was observed in fetal coronary, wall, sole, and bulb segment relative to adult tissues, respectively. A claw segment effect was also observed in that IL-1alpha expression was greater (1.59-fold) in the normal adult wall relative to the coronary segment, and IL-18 expression was greater (16.2-fold) in the normal adult sole compared with the coronary segment and 2.88 greater in the fetal sole relative to the bulb segment. Sole ulceration was associated with hemorrhage, thrombosis, inflammation, and striking increases in IL-1beta, IL-18, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and with less dramatic, albeit measurable, changes in IL-1 type I receptor, IL-1 receptor antagonist, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Amidst striking increases in keratinocyte growth factor receptor (i.e., 21.0-fold, 10.4-fold, 0, and 21.6-fold in the coronary, wall, sole, and bulb segments, respectively), a concomitant decrease occurred in keratinocyte growth factor (i.e., 0.80-, 0.54-, 0.56-, and 0.72-fold, respectively). The results demonstrated changes in disease state and, to a lesser extent, claw segment and were accompanied by alterations in the RNA expression of several cytokines, growth factors, and receptors present in the normal

  20. Treatment with D-penicillamine or zinc sulphate affects copper metabolism and improves but not normalizes antioxidant capacity parameters in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromadzka, Grażyna; Grażyna, Gromadzka; Karpińska, Agata; Agata, Karpińska; Przybyłkowski, Adam; Adam, Przybyłkowski; Litwin, Tomasz; Tomasz, Litwin; Wierzchowska-Ciok, Agata; Agata, Wierzchowska-Ciok; Dzieżyc, Karolina; Karolina, Dzieżyc; Chabik, Grzegorz; Grzegorz, Chabik; Członkowska, Anna; Anna, Członkowska

    2014-02-01

    Copper accumulation in tissues due to a biallelic pathogenic mutation of the gene: ATP7B results in a clinical phenotype known as Wilson disease (WD). Aberrations in copper homeostasis can create favourable conditions for superoxide-yielding redox cycling and oxidative tissue damage. Drugs used in WD treatment aim to remove accumulated copper and normalise the free copper concentration in the blood. In the current study the effect of decoppering treatment on copper metabolism and systemic antioxidant capacity parameters was analyzed. Treatment naïve WD patients (TNWD) (n = 33), those treated with anti-copper drugs (TWD) (n = 99), and healthy controls (n = 99) were studied. Both TNWD and TWD patients characterised with decreased copper metabolism parameters, as well as decreased total antioxidant potential (AOP), glutathione (GSH) level, activity of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and S-transferase glutathione, compared to controls. TWD patients had significantly lower copper metabolism parameters, higher total AOP and higher levels of GSH than TWD individuals; however, no difference was observed between these two patient groups with respect to the rest of the antioxidant capacity parameters. Patients who had undergone treatment with D-penicillamine or zinc sulphate did not differ with respect to copper metabolism or antioxidant capacity parameters, with the exception of GPx that was lower in D-penicillamine treated individuals. These data suggest that anti-copper treatment affects copper metabolism as well as improves, but does not normalize, natural antioxidant capacity in patients with WD. We propose to undertake studies aimed to evaluate the usefulness of antioxidants as well as selenium as a supplemental therapy in WD.

  1. Missense mutations in SH2D1A identified in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease differentially affect the expression and function of SAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Ma, Cindy S; Alvaro, Frank; Nichols, Kim E; Tangye, Stuart G

    2006-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in SH2D1A, which encodes signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). In addition to SLAM, SAP associates with several other cell-surface receptors including 2B4 (CD244), Ly9 (CD229), CD84 and NTB-A. SAP contains a single src-homology-2 domain and acts as an intracellular adaptor protein by recruiting the protein tyrosine kinase FynT to the cytoplasmic domains of some of these receptors, which results in the initiation of specific downstream signal transduction pathways. XLP is likely to result from perturbed signalling through one or more of these SAP-associating receptors. In this study, we identified missense (Y54C, I84T and F87S) and insertion (fs82 --> X103) mutations in four different kindreds affected by XLP. Each mutation dramatically reduced the half-life of SAP, thus diminishing its expression in primary lymphocytes as well as in transfected cell lines. Interestingly, although the Y54C and F87S mutations compromised the ability of SAP to associate with different receptors, the I84T mutation had no effect on the ability of SAP to bind SLAM, CD84 or 2B4. However, signalling downstream of SLAM was reduced in the presence of SAP bearing the I84T mutation. These findings indicate that, irrespective of the type of mutation, signalling through SAP-associating receptors in XLP can be impaired by reducing the expression of SAP, the ability of SAP to bind surface receptors and/or its ability to activate signal transduction downstream of the SLAM-SAP complex.

  2. Down-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 adversely affects the expression of Alzheimer's disease-relevant genes and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchner, Thole; Schliebs, Reinhard; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2005-10-01

    Beta-amyloid peptides play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, preventing beta-amyloid formation by inhibition of the beta site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 is considered as a potential strategy to treat AD. Cholinergic mechanisms have been shown to control amyloid precursor protein processing and the number of muscarinic M2-acetylcholine receptors is decreased in brain regions of patients with AD enriched with senile plaques. Therefore, the present study investigates the effect of this M2 muscarinic receptor down-regulation by siRNA on total gene expression and on regulation of BACE1 in particular in SK-SH-SY5Y cells. This model system was used for microarray analysis after carbachol stimulation of siRNA-treated cells compared with carbachol stimulated, non-siRNA-treated cells. The same model system was used to elucidate changes at the protein level by using two-dimensional gels followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis. Taken together, the results indicate that the M2 acetylcholine receptor down-regulation in brains of patients with AD has important effects on the expression of several genes and proteins with major functions in the pathology of AD. This includes beta-secretase BACE1 as well as several modulators of the tau protein and other AD-relevant genes and proteins. Moreover, most of these genes and proteins are adversely affected against the background of AD.

  3. Down-regulation of MHC Class I by the Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) UL49.5 Gene Product Mildly Affects Virulence in a Haplotype-specific Fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease is a devastating neoplastic disease of chickens caused by gallid herpesvirus 2 or Marek’s disease virus (MDV), which is characterized by massive visceral tumors, immune suppression, neurologic syndromes, and peracute deaths. It has been reported that MDV down-regulates surface expre...

  4. X-linked dystonia parkinsonism syndrome (XDP, lubag): disease-specific sequence change DSC3 in TAF1/DYT3 affects genes in vesicular transport and dopamine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzfeld, Thilo; Nolte, Dagmar; Grznarova, Maria; Hofmann, Andrea; Schultze, Joachim L; Müller, Ulrich

    2013-03-01

    X-chromosomal dystonia parkinsonism syndrome (XDP, 'lubag') is associated with sequence changes within the TAF1/DYT3 multiple transcript system. Although most sequence changes are intronic, one, disease-specific single-nucleotide change 3 (DSC3), is located within an exon (d4). Transcribed exon d4 occurs as part of multiple splice variants. These variants include exons d3 and d4 spliced to exons of TAF1, and an independent transcript composed of exons d2-d4. Location of DSC3 in exon d4 and utilization of this exon in multiple splice variants suggest an important role of DSC3 in the XDP pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we transfected neuroblastoma cells with four expression constructs, including exons d2-d4 [d2-d4/wild-type (wt) and d2-d4/DSC3] and d3-d4 (d3-d4/wt and d3-d4/DSC3). Expression profiling revealed a dramatic effect of DSC3 on overall gene expression. Three hundred and sixty-two genes differed between cells containing d2-d4/wt and d2-d4/DSC3. Annotation clustering revealed enrichment of genes related to vesicular transport, dopamine metabolism, synapse function, Ca(2+) metabolism and oxidative stress. Two hundred and eleven genes were differentially expressed in d3-d4/wt versus d3-d4/DSC3. Annotation clustering highlighted genes in signal transduction and cell-cell interaction. The data show an important role of physiologically occurring transcript d2-d4 in normal brain function. Interference with this role by DSC3 is a likely pathological mechanism in XDP. Disturbance of dopamine function and of Ca(2+) metabolism can explain abnormal movement; loss of protection against reactive oxygen species may account for the neurodegenerative changes in XDP. Although d3-d4 also affect genes potentially related to neurodegenerative processes, their physiologic role as splice variants of TAF1 awaits further exploration.

  5. Structural Model of psychological risk and protective factors affecting on quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease: A psychocardiology model

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Khayyam Nekouei; Alireza Yousefy; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Gholamreza Manshaee; Masoumeh Sadeghei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conducted researches show that psychological factors may have a very important role in the etiology, continuity and consequences of coronary heart diseases. This study has drawn the psychological risk and protective factors and their effects in patients with coronary heart diseases (CHD) in a structural model. It aims to determine the structural relations between psychological risk and protective factors with quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. Materials and M...

  6. Affective Urbanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    Urban design and architecture are increasingly used as material and affective strategies for setting the scene, for manipulation and the production of urban life: The orchestration of atmospheres, the framing and staging of urban actions, the programming for contemplation, involvement, play, expe...... affects can be choreographed and designed intentionally or whether it arises from unpredictable circumstances within urbanity itself....

  7. Affective Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    of environmental knowledge production. It uses InfoAmazonia, the databased platform on Amazon rainforests, as an example of affective geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. Amazonia is defined as a digitally created affective (map)space within...

  8. Chemokine-like receptor 1 deficiency does not affect the development of insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruben, Nanda; Vergara, Marcela Aparicio; Kloosterhuis, Niels J.; van der Molen, Henk; Stoelwinder, Stefan; Youssef, Sameh; de Bruin, Alain; Delsing, Dianne J.; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; van de Sluis, Bart; Hofker, Marten H.; Koonen, Debby P. Y.

    2014-01-01

    The adipokine chemerin and its receptor, chemokine-like receptor 1 (Cmklr1), are associated with insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which covers a broad spectrum of liver diseases, ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). It is possible that

  9. Addison disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts of some or all of its hormones ( hypopituitarism ) Autoimmune disorder that affects the nerves and the ... disease) Dermatitis herpetiformis Diabetes Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypoparathyroidism Hypopituitarism Immune response Myasthenia gravis Ovarian hypofunction Pernicious anemia ...

  10. Fifth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvovirus B19; Erythema infectiosum; Slapped cheek rash ... Fifth disease is caused by human parvovirus B19. It often affects preschoolers or school-age children during the spring. The disease spreads through the fluids in the nose and ...

  11. Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaucher disease is a rare, inherited disorder. It is a type of lipid metabolism disorder. If you have ... affected. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence. Gaucher disease has no cure. Treatment options for types 1 ...

  12. Wilson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in copper, such as –shellfish –liver –mushrooms –nuts –chocolate • A person cannot prevent Wilson disease; however, people with a family history of Wilson disease, especially those with an affected ...

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sexual Functioning? How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's Patients? How ...

  14. A ketogenic diet improves motor performance but does not affect β-amyloid levels in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Tina L; Studzinski, Christa M; Keller, Jeffrey N; Paul Murphy, M; Niedowicz, Dana M

    2013-04-10

    β-Amyloid (Aβ), a small, fibrillogenic peptide, is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the brain. In addition, Aβ accumulates in skeletal muscle cells in individuals with sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM), an age-related muscle disease. Because of the socioeconomic burden associated with age-related diseases, particularly AD, there has been considerable emphasis on studying potential therapeutic strategies. The high-fat, low carbohydrate ketogenic diet has been used extensively to treat refractory childhood epilepsy and has been studied as a potential treatment for other neurological diseases, including Parkinson's disease and AD. In this study, we fed young APP/PS1 knock-in mice, which have a whole body knock-in of AD-related genes, a ketogenic diet and determined the effect on Aβ levels in the brain and skeletal muscle, as well motor performance and oxidative stress. Aβ and its precursor, the β-C-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein (CTFβ), were unchanged overall in both the brain and quadriceps after 1 month on the ketogenic diet, and there was no effect on nitrotyrosine, a product of oxidative stress. The ketogenic diet improved performance on the Rota-rod apparatus (p=0.007), however. These data indicate that the ketogenic diet may have some efficacy in the treatment of both neurologic and muscle diseases though the underlying mechanisms do not involve amelioration of Aβ pathology.

  15. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ... Parkinson's Disease Patients with a Depression Diagnosis? What Type of Exercise or Exercise Programs Are Recommended? What ...

  16. Diabetic Eye Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetic Eye Disease What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of ... loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  19. Does the low prevalence affect the sample size of interventional clinical trials of rare diseases? An analysis of data from the aggregate analysis of clinicaltrials.gov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Siew Wan; Willis, Adrian; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Day, Simon; Miller, Frank; Madan, Jason; Posch, Martin; Zohar, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel

    2017-03-02

    Clinical trials are typically designed using the classical frequentist framework to constrain type I and II error rates. Sample sizes required in such designs typically range from hundreds to thousands of patients which can be challenging for rare diseases. It has been shown that rare disease trials have smaller sample sizes than non-rare disease trials. Indeed some orphan drugs were approved by the European Medicines Agency based on studies with as few as 12 patients. However, some studies supporting marketing authorisation included several hundred patients. In this work, we explore the relationship between disease prevalence and other factors and the size of interventional phase 2 and 3 rare disease trials conducted in the US and/or EU. We downloaded all clinical trials from Aggregate Analysis of ClinialTrials.gov (AACT) and identified rare disease trials by cross-referencing MeSH terms in AACT with the list from Orphadata. We examined the effects of prevalence and phase of study in a multiple linear regression model adjusting for other statistically significant trial characteristics. Of 186941 ClinicalTrials.gov trials only 1567 (0.8%) studied a single rare condition with prevalence information from Orphadata. There were 19 (1.2%) trials studying disease with prevalence <1/1,000,000, 126 (8.0%) trials with 1-9/1,000,000, 791 (50.5%) trials with 1-9/100,000 and 631 (40.3%) trials with 1-5/10,000. Of the 1567 trials, 1160 (74%) were phase 2 trials. The fitted mean sample size for the rarest disease (prevalence <1/1,000,000) in phase 2 trials was the lowest (mean, 15.7; 95% CI, 8.7-28.1) but were similar across all the other prevalence classes; mean, 26.2 (16.1-42.6), 33.8 (22.1-51.7) and 35.6 (23.3-54.3) for prevalence 1-9/1,000,000, 1-9/100,000 and 1-5/10,000, respectively. Fitted mean size of phase 3 trials of rarer diseases, <1/1,000,000 (19.2, 6.9-53.2) and 1-9/1,000,000 (33.1, 18.6-58.9), were similar to those in phase 2 but were statistically significant

  20. Affect Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Holm; Poulsen, Stig Bernt; Lunn, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Gergely and colleagues’ state that their Social Biofeedback Theory of Parental Affect Mirroring” can be seen as a kind of operationalization of the classical psychoanalytic concepts of holding, containing and mirroring. This article examines to what extent the social biofeedback theory of parental...

  1. Treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease with rabeprazole in primary and secondary care : does Helicobacter pylori infection affect proton pump inhibitor effectiveness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, NJ; de Boer, WA; Geldof, H; Hazelhoff, B; Bergmans, P; Tytgat, GNJ; Smout, AJPM

    2004-01-01

    Background: The presence of the gastric pathogen, Helicobacter pylori influences acid suppression by proton pump inhibitors and treatment outcome in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Aim: To determine the influence of H. pylori infection on effectiveness of rabeprazole in primary and

  2. Reduced expression of ATP7B affected by Wilson disease-causing mutations is rescued by pharmacological folding chaperones 4-phenylbutyrate and curcumin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghe, P.V. van den; Stapelbroek, J.M.; Krieger, E.; Bie, P. de; Graaf, S.F. van de; Groot, R.E. de; Beurden, E. van; Spijker, E.; Houwen, R.H.; Berger, R.; Klomp, L.W.

    2009-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive copper overload disorder of the liver and basal ganglia. WD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding ATP7B, a protein localized to the trans-Golgi network that primarily facilitates hepatic copper excretion. Current treatment comprises reduction of ci

  3. Blood born miRNAs signatures that can serve as disease specific biomarkers are not significantly affected by overall fitness and exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Backes

    Full Text Available Blood born micro(miRNA expression pattern have been reported for various human diseases with signatures specific for diseases. To evaluate these biomarkers, it is mandatory to know possible changes of miRNA signatures in healthy individuals under different physiological conditions. We analyzed the miRNA expression in peripheral blood of elite endurance athletes and moderatly active controls. Blood drawing was done before and after exhaustive exercise in each group. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment we did not find any miRNA with significant p-values when comparing miRNA expression between the different groups. We found, however, 24 different miRNAs with an expression fold change of minimum 1.5 in at least one of the comparisons (athletes before vs after exercise, athletes before exercise vs controls and athletes after exercise vs controls. The observed changes are not significant in contrast to the expression changes of the blood born miRNA expression reported for many human diseases. These data support the idea of disease associated miRNA patterns useful as biomarkers that are not readily altered by physiological conditions.

  4. Blood born miRNAs signatures that can serve as disease specific biomarkers are not significantly affected by overall fitness and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Keller, Andreas; Hart, Martin; Meyer, Tim; Meese, Eckart; Hecksteden, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Blood born micro(mi)RNA expression pattern have been reported for various human diseases with signatures specific for diseases. To evaluate these biomarkers, it is mandatory to know possible changes of miRNA signatures in healthy individuals under different physiological conditions. We analyzed the miRNA expression in peripheral blood of elite endurance athletes and moderatly active controls. Blood drawing was done before and after exhaustive exercise in each group. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment we did not find any miRNA with significant p-values when comparing miRNA expression between the different groups. We found, however, 24 different miRNAs with an expression fold change of minimum 1.5 in at least one of the comparisons (athletes before vs after exercise, athletes before exercise vs controls and athletes after exercise vs controls). The observed changes are not significant in contrast to the expression changes of the blood born miRNA expression reported for many human diseases. These data support the idea of disease associated miRNA patterns useful as biomarkers that are not readily altered by physiological conditions.

  5. Evaluation of commercial formulations of entomopathogenic fungi to manage the redbay ambrosia beetle, vector of Laurel wilt, a lethal disease affecting avocados in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The redbay ambrosia beetle (RAB), Xyleborus glabratus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) vectors the fungal pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which causes laurel wilt (LW), a lethal disease of trees in the family Lauraceae, including the most commercially important crop in this family, avocado, Pe...

  6. Subpopulations of bovine T lymphocytes collected during foot-and-mouth disease virus infection are affected by freezing, but are subsequently stable in frozen samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral-blood lymphocytes by flow cytometry is an important tool for infectious disease research. In many live-animal experiments and other longitudinal studies, the processing, prompt staining, and analysis of fresh samples is a logistical challenge and daily variation can c...

  7. Ablation of systemic SIRT1 activity promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by affecting liver-mesenteric adipose tissue fatty acid mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is escalating paralleled with obesity rates in both adults and children. Mammalian sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a highly conserved NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, has been identified as a metabolic regulator of lipid homeostasis and a potential tar...

  8. The Transactivation Domain of Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) Meq Oncoprotein Does Not Affect Tumor Incidence But Plays a Role in Tumor Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus encoded oncoprotein, Meq, is responsible for the tumorigenic phenotype of the virus. We have previously shown that replacement of the meq gene in the very virulent strain Md5 with that of vaccine strain CVI988/Rispens results in virus attenuation in chickens. To determine the...

  9. First Report of a New Phytoplasma Subgroup, 16SrIII-S, Associated with Decline Disease Affecting Sweet and Sour Cherry Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    During July 2007, we observed sweet cherry (Prunus avium) and sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) trees exhibiting disease symptoms suggestive of possible phytoplasma infection in a large orchard in the Kaunas region of Lithuania. Samples of leaf tissue were collected from sweet cherry trees that were aff...

  10. Control status quo of drinking-water-borne endemic fluorosis in the disease affected areas in Shandong Province in 2012:an analysis of survey results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    云中杰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To understand the schedule and effectiveness of water-improving defluoridation projects comprehensively of control of fluorosis in drinking-water-borne endemic fluorosis areas in Shandong Province,and to provide a scientific basis for making strategies for prevention and control of the disease.Methods In accordance

  11. Chagasic thymic atrophy does not affect negative selection but results in the export of activated CD4+CD8+ T cells in severe forms of human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Morrot

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Extrathymic CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP T cells are increased in some pathophysiological conditions, including infectious diseases. In the murine model of Chagas disease, it has been shown that the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is able to target the thymus and induce alterations of the thymic microenvironment and the lymphoid compartment. In the acute phase, this results in a severe atrophy of the organ and early release of DP cells into the periphery. To date, the effect of the changes promoted by the parasite infection on thymic central tolerance has remained elusive. Herein we show that the intrathymic key elements that are necessary to promote the negative selection of thymocytes undergoing maturation during the thymopoiesis remains functional during the acute chagasic thymic atrophy. Intrathymic expression of the autoimmune regulator factor (Aire and tissue-restricted antigen (TRA genes is normal. In addition, the expression of the proapoptotic Bim protein in thymocytes was not changed, revealing that the parasite infection-induced thymus atrophy has no effect on these marker genes necessary to promote clonal deletion of T cells. In a chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA-specific T-cell receptor (TCR transgenic system, the administration of OVA peptide into infected mice with thymic atrophy promoted OVA-specific thymocyte apoptosis, further indicating normal negative selection process during the infection. Yet, although the intrathymic checkpoints necessary for thymic negative selection are present in the acute phase of Chagas disease, we found that the DP cells released into the periphery acquire an activated phenotype similar to what is described for activated effector or memory single-positive T cells. Most interestingly, we also demonstrate that increased percentages of peripheral blood subset of DP cells exhibiting an activated HLA-DR+ phenotype are associated with severe cardiac forms of human chronic Chagas disease. These cells may

  12. Affective Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Dean

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article sets out the idea of affective networks as a constitutive feature of communicative capitalism. It explores the circulation of intensities in contemporary information and communication networks, arguing that this circulation should be theorized in terms of the psychoanalytic notion of the drive. The article includes critical engagements with theorists such as Guy Debord, Jacques Lacan, Tiziana Terranova, and Slavoj Zizek.

  13. Sequence adaptations affecting cleavage of the VP1/2A junction by the 3C protease in foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Belsham, Graham

    2014-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid protein precursor P1-2A is cleaved by the virus-encoded 3C protease to VP0, VP3, VP1 and 2A. It was shown previously that modification of a single amino acid residue (K210E) within the VP1 protein and close to the VP1/2A cleavage site, inhibited clea...

  14. Economic evaluations of pharmacogenetic approaches in infectious diseases: a review of current approaches and evaluation of critical aspects affecting their quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Meoni

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacogenetics holds great potential for improving the effectiveness of treatment modalities in infectious diseases by taking into account the genetic determinants of both the host and infectious agents’ individuality. Better utilization of resources and improved therapeutic efficiency are the expected outcomes of personalized medicine using pharmacogenetic and pharmacogenomics information made available by technological advances. However, there has been growing concern in the clinical community regarding the evaluation of the true benefits of these approaches. This perception is partly due to the limited number and perceived poor quality of economic evaluations in this field, and initiatives aimed at harmonizing and communicating strategies improving the quality of these studies and their acceptance by the clinical community are greatly needed. This paper reviews current literature of economic evaluations of pharmacogenetics interventions guiding pharmacotherapy in infectious diseases. PubMed and the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination databases were searched using a combination of five broad research terms related to pharmacogenetic approaches, and papers relative to economic evaluations of pharmacogenetic interventions in infectious diseases retained for further analysis. Using these criteria, a total of 14 papers were included in this review. The area of economic evaluation of pharmacogenetic interventions in infectious diseases remains understudied and would benefit from greater harmonization. The main weaknesses of evaluations reviewed in this paper seem to be represented by poor evidence of pharmacogenetic marker validation, inconsistencies in the selection of costs and utility included in the economic models and the choice of sensitivity analysis. All these factors limit the overall transparency of the studies, greater acceptance of their results and applicability to diverse and possibly resourcelimited environments where these

  15. Loss of hepatocyte-nuclear-factor-4alpha affects colonic ion transport and causes chronic inflammation resembling inflammatory bowel disease in mice.

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    Mathieu Darsigny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hnf4alpha, an epithelial specific transcriptional regulator, is decreased in inflammatory bowel disease and protects against chemically-induced colitis in mice. However, the precise role of this factor in maintaining normal inflammatory homeostasis of the intestine remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sole role of epithelial Hnf4alpha in the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show here that specific epithelial deletion of Hnf4alpha in mice causes spontaneous chronic intestinal inflammation leading to focal areas of crypt dropout, increased cytokines and chemokines secretion, immune cell infiltrates and crypt hyperplasia. A gene profiling analysis in diseased Hnf4alpha null colon confirms profound genetic changes in cell death and proliferative behaviour related to cancer. Among the genes involved in the immune protection through epithelial barrier function, we identify the ion transporter claudin-15 to be down-modulated early in the colon of Hnf4alpha mutants. This coincides with a significant decrease of mucosal ion transport but not of barrier permeability in young animals prior to the manifestation of the disease. We confirm that claudin-15 is a direct Hnf4alpha gene target in the intestinal epithelial context and is down-modulated in mouse experimental colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. CONCLUSION: Our results highlight the critical role of Hnf4alpha to maintain intestinal inflammatory homeostasis during mouse adult life and uncover a novel function for Hnf4alpha in the regulation of claudin-15 expression. This establishes Hnf4alpha as a mediator of ion epithelial transport, an important process for the maintenance of gut inflammatory homeostasis.

  16. The Polymorphism of the ACE Gene Affects Left Ventricular Hypertrophy and Causes Disturbances in Left Ventricular Systolic/Diastolic Function in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wanic-Kossowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is one of the most frequently occurring autosomal diseases inherited in the dominant manner. Due to this, lesions in the cardiovascular system of ADPKD patients have caught the attention of clinical investigators worldwide. The aim of the study was to analyse cardiovascular complications in ADPKD patients with a focus on left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and selected components of its systolic/diastolic function based on echocardiography. The study was conducted on 55 patients with ADPKD (24 males, 31 females, subdivided into three groups according to the stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD. The patient group with ADPKD and ESRD (group C manifested an increased incidence of the D allele as compared to group A and group B (χ2=4.217, P=0.04. In all ADPKD patients with the DD genotype, left ventricular mass (LVM, posterior wall thickness (PWT, and interventricular septal thickness (IVS were significantly higher compared to patients possessing the II and ID genotypes (P<0.02, P<0.003, and P<0.009, resp.. The DD genotype exists more frequently in ADPKD patients with ESRD and is associated with a higher occurrence of LVH and disturbances in systolic-diastolic function when compared to ADPKD ESRD patients with the II and ID genotypes.

  17. A content analysis of cognitive and affective uses of patient support groups for rare and uncommon vascular diseases: comparisons of may thurner, thoracic outlet, and superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K

    2015-01-01

    Rare disease patients are the predominant group of patients who are now connecting online to patient support groups, yet research on their uses of support groups has received little attention. This is a content analysis of three vascular diseases of differing degrees of rarity. Wall posts from Facebook patient support groups for May Thurner syndrome, thoracic outlet syndrome, and superior mesenteric artery syndrome were analyzed over a period of two years. Using Uses and Gratifications as the theoretical framework, the study purpose was to assess how variations in health condition and rarity of condition affect online support group user needs. Results indicated common main cognitive and affective uses across conditions, indicating a consistent pattern of needs communicated by all patients. However, there were nuanced differences in subcategories of cognitive and affective uses between the most and least rare disorders, which inform areas for tailored support mechanisms. Additionally, these vascular patients used their respective support groups primarily for cognitive reasons, especially for the rarest conditions, which informs of basic medical informational needs these patients face related to tests, treatment, surgery, and diagnoses.

  18. [Can epidemiological factors affect the 2-year outcomes after surgery for degenerative lumbar disease in terms of quality of life, disability and post-surgical pain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Álvarez, C; Pérez-Prieto, D; Saló-Bru, G; Molina, A; Lladó, A; Cáceres, E; Ramírez, M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of epidemiological factors on the outcomes of surgery for degenerative lumbar disease in terms of quality of life, disability and chronic pain. A total of 263 patients who received surgery for degenerative lumbar disease (2005-2008) were included in the study. The epidemiological data collected were age, gender, employment status, and co-morbidity. The SF-36, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Core Outcomes Measures Index (COMI), and VAS score for lumbar and sciatic pain were measure before and 2 years after surgery. The correlation between epidemiological data and questionnaire results, as well as any independent prognostic factors, were assessed in the data analysis. The mean age of the patients was 54.0 years (22-86), and 131 were female (49.8%). There were 42 (16%) lost to follow-up. Statistically significant correlations (P<.05) were observed between age, gender, co-morbidity, permanent sick leave, and pre-operative pain with changes in the ODI, COMI, physical and SF-36 mental scales, and lumbar and sciatic VAS. Linear regression analysis showed permanent sick leave and age as predictive factors of disability (β=14.146; 95% CI: 9.09 - 29.58; P<.01 and β=0.334; 95% CI: 0.40 - 0.98, P<.05, respectively), and change in quality of life (β=-8.568; 95% CI: -14.88 - -2.26; p<.01 and β=-0.228, IC 95% CI: -0.40 - -0.06, P<.05, respectively). Based on our findings, age and permanent sick leave have to be considered as negative epidemiologic predictive factors of the outcome of degenerative lumbar disease surgery. Copyright © 2012 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomic Integrity Is Favourably Affected by High-Intensity Interval Training in an Animal Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Scanlan, Aaron T; Vella, Rebecca K; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an irreversible disease that diminishes length and quality of life. Emerging evidence suggests CKD progression and genomic integrity are inversely and causally related. To reduce health complications related to CKD progression, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. To date, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with postulations regarding the mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. In order to examine the ability of aerobic exercise to encourage improvements in genomic integrity, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 85 % VO2max), low intensity training (LIT; 45-50 % VO2max), and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. To assess genomic integrity, we examined kidney-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of genes related to genomic repair and stability: Fan1, Mre11a, and telomere length as measured by T/S ratio. Following HIIT, mRNA expression of Fan1 was significantly up-regulated, compared to SED (p = 0.026) and T/S ratio was significantly increased, compared to SED (p < 0.001) and LIT (p = 0.002). Our results suggest that HIIT is superior to SED and LIT as HIIT beneficially influenced the expression of genes related to genomic integrity.

  20. A new disease-related mutation for mitochondrial encephalopathy lactic acidosis and strokelike episodes (MELAS) syndrome affects the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lertrit, P.; Noer, A.S.; Kapsa, R.; Marzuki, S. (Monash Univ., Clayton, Victoria (Australia)); Jean-Francois, M.J.B.; Thyagarajan, D.; Byrne, E. (St. Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, Victoria (Australia)); Dennett, X. (Univ. of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)); Lethlean, K. (Prince Henry Hospital, Sydney (Australia))

    1992-09-01

    The molecular lesions in two patients exhibiting classical clinical manifestations of MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and strokelike episodes) syndrome have been investigated. A recently reported disease-related A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243 of the mtDNA, in the DHU loop of tRNA[sup Leu], was detected by restriction-enzyme analysis of the relevant PCR-amplified segment of the mtDNA of one patient but was not observed, by either restriction-enzyme analysis or nucleotide sequencing, in the other. To define the molecular lesion in the patient who does not have the A[yields]G base substitution at nt 3243, the total mitochondrial genome of the patient has been sequenced. An A[yields]G base substitution at nt 11084, leading to a Thr-to-Ala amino acid replacement in the ND4 subunit of the respiratory complex I, is suggested to be a disease-related mutation. 49 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 运动对慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并二氧化碳分压轻度升高患者的影响%Affection of Movement on Patients of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宝华; 安福成; 李鹏飞

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨运动对慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并二氧化碳分压轻度升高患者的影响。方法选择60例无心脏疾病、肝肾疾病、支气管哮喘、内分泌疾病、恶性肿瘤、关节疾病的慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并轻度二氧化碳升高的患者,通过随机分组的方法,实验组30例,对照组30例,观察运动对慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并二氧化碳分压轻度升高患者的影响。数据分析采用方差分析。结果运动对慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并二氧化碳分压轻度升高患者的二氧化碳分压有明显下降,差异有显著性(P<0.05)。结论慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并二氧化碳分压轻度升高的患者可以通过增加运动量进行治疗。%Objective To investigate the affection of movement on patients of chronic obstructivepulmonary disease with carbon dioxide increasely slightly. Methods By randomizing method, 60 patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseasesease with carbon dioxide increasely slightly without heart disease, kidney disease, bronchial asthma, endocrine dis⁃eases,malignant tumor, joint disease were divided into two groups, 30 cases as experimental group, 30 patients as control group. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance to investigate the affection of movement on patients of chronic ob⁃structive pulmonary disease with carbon dioxide increasely slightly. Results Movement can decrease cabon dioxide partial pressure obviously for patients of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases ease with carbon dioxide increasely slightly. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions Patients of chronic obstructivepulmonary disease with car⁃bon dioxide increasely slightly can be treated to increase the amount of exercise.

  2. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  3. CD1a, HAM56, CD68 and S-100 are present in lesional skin biopsies from patients affected by autoimmune blistering diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Abreu Velez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Previous research on autoimmune skin blistering diseases (ABD has primarily focused on the humoral immune response; moreover, little attention has been given to the potential role of the antigen presenting cells (APCs in lesional skin. Aim: The purpose of our study was to immunophenotype selected APC in the lesional skin of ABDs, utilizing immunohistochemistry (IHC stains. Materials and Methods: We utilized IHC to stain for dendritic cells (DC, staining with CD1a, CD68, HAM56, and S-100 in lesional skin from 30 patients with endemic pemphigus foliaceus (EPF, 15 controls from the EPF endemic area, and 15 healthy controls from the USA. We also tested archival biopsies from patients with selected ABD, including 30 patients with bullous pemphigoid (BP, 20 with pemphigus vulgaris (PV, 8 with pemphigus foliaceus (PF and 14 with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and 2 with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA. Results: Cells stained by CD68, HAM56 and S-100 were present in the majority of the ABD skin biopsies; these cells were located primarily in perivascular infiltrates surrounding dermal vessels subjacent to the blisters. However, these cells were also noted within the blisters, in vessels supplying dermal eccrine glands and ducts, and in areas of dermal endothelial-mesenchymal cell junction-like structures, especially in BP cases. In our CD1a staining, the number and location of positive staining cells varied with each disease, being abundant in most ABD in the epidermis suprajacent to the blisters, or in the epidermis surrounding the blister site if the blister site epidermis was missing. In the control biopsies, most did not display positive IHC staining, with the exception of a few CD1a positive cells in the epidermis Conclusion: Our findings confirm positive IHC staining for APCs in areas of the skin besides the disease blisters. Our findings suggest that the antigen presentation in ABD proceeds in areas distant from the blister site

  4. Estudo epidemiológico das doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas na cavidade oral An epidemiological study of immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Helena Pereira de Carvalho

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: As doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas compõem diversas patologias que apresentam formas variadas de manifestação no organismo. OBJETIVO: Foi proposição desta pesquisa, estabelecer a prevalência das principais doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados laudos histopatológicos de 10.292 casos arquivados no Serviço de Anatomia Patológica da Disciplina de Patologia Oral da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, no período de 1988 a 2009. Dos casos diagnosticados como algum tipo de doença em estudo, coletaram-se dados clínicos como sexo, idade, raça, sítio anatômico e sintomatologia das doenças. RESULTADOS: Do total de casos registrados, no serviço supracitado, 82 (0,8% corresponderam a doenças dermato lógicas imunologicamente mediadas com manifestação na cavidade oral. As doenças encontradas neste estudo foram: líquen plano oral, pênfigo vulgar e penfigoide benigno das membranas mucosas, sendo o líquen plano oral a lesão mais prevalente, representando 68,05% dos casos analisados, dos quais 64,3% apresentavam-se em mu lheres, sendo a mucosa jugal o sítio anatômico mais acometido (46,8%. CONCLUSÃO: A ocorrência de doenças dermatológicas imunologicamente mediadas que apresentam manifestação oral ainda é um fato incomum, semelhante ao observado na maioria das regiões mundiais. No entanto, a busca pelo diagnóstico precoce é um requisito essencial para a condução do tratamento dessas doenças, tendo em vista o possível comprometimento sistêmico do organismo nos pacientes.BACKGROUND: Immune-mediated skin diseases encompass a variety of pathologies that present in different forms in the body. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of the principal immune-mediated skin diseases affecting the oral cavity. METHODS: A total of 10,292 histopathology reports stored in the archives of the

  5. Identification of a common variant affecting human episodic memory performance using a pooled genome-wide association approach: a case study of disease gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, Traci L; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are an important tool for discovering novel genes associated with disease or traits. Careful design of case-control groups greatly facilitates the efficacy of these studies. Here we describe a pooled GWAS study undertaken to find novel genes associated with human episodic memory performance. A genomic locus for the WW and C2 domain-containing 1 protein, KIBRA (also known as WWC1), was found to be associated with memory performance in three cognitively normal cohorts from Switzerland and the USA. This result was further supported by correlation of KIBRA genotype and differences in hippocampal activation as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). These findings provide an excellent example of the application of GWAS using a pooled genomic DNA approach to successfully identify a locus with strong effects on human memory.

  6. Newcastle disease in a zoo affecting demoiselle cranes (Anthropoides virgo), greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) and a pied imperial pigeon (Ducula bicolor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleta, E F; Marschall, H J

    1981-07-01

    Newcastle disease virus could be isolated from demoiselle cranes (Anthropoides virgo), greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber) and a pied imperial pigeon (Ducula bicolor) in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cultures. All of these birds died without prominent symptoms and had no typical pathological lesions. Identification and characterisation studies of the viruses were performed in CEF cultures and embryos. Serological cross reactions could be detected between NDV strain B1 and the new isolates by haemagglutination inhibition and plaque reduction tests. Electron microscopic examination revealed particles with paramyxovirus morphology. Inoculation of susceptible cockerels resulted in severe clinical symptoms and mortality. The distribution of lesions in the digestive tract indicates that the isolated viruses are of the velogenic viscerotropic type.

  7. Invasive fungal diseases during first induction chemotherapy affect complete remission achievement and long-term survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmenia, Corrado; Micozzi, Alessandra; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Gentile, Giuseppe; Di Caprio, Luigi; Nasso, Daniela; Minotti, Clara; Capria, Saveria; Cartoni, Claudio; Alimena, Giuliana; Meloni, Giovanna; Amadori, Sergio; Foà, Robin; Venditti, Adriano

    2014-04-01

    We retrospectively evaluated, in a logistic-regression-model, the role of proven/probable invasive fungal diseases (PP-IFD), occurring during first induction chemotherapy, on the achievement of complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS) in 198 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. A PP-IFD was documented in 34 (17.2%) patients. Younger age, good performance status at AML diagnosis and no development of a PP-IFD (OR 4.09, 95% CI 1.71-9.81, p<0.0001) were independent factors associated to CR achievement. Younger age, good performance status, favorable genetic risk and no development of PP-IFD (HR 1.86, 95% CI 1.20-2.88, p=0.005) were independent factors associated to OS at 3 years. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Failure of sulfinpyrazone to affect platelet survival in patients with rheumatic heart valvular disease: a double blind study using /sup 75/Se-methionine labelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabris, F.; Casonato, A.; Randi, M.L.; Schivazappa, L.; Schiavinato, L.; Girolami, A. (Padua Univ. (Italy))

    1983-01-01

    Platelet survival time was studied in 18 patients suffering from valvular heart disease using a modified /sup 75/Se-methionine method. 9 of 18 patients underwent surgery for heart valve replacement. Platelet survival time was determined before and 6 months after treatment with placebo of sulfinpyrazone in a double blind study. Before treatment and surgery, platelet survival time was significantly reduced in patients with a history of embolism (P < 0.0048). In patients receiving valve replacement, platelet survival time was shortened both in the sulfinpyrazone and placebo groups 6 months after surgery. Of the 9 patients not receiving prostheses and with a thrombotic history, treatment with placebo and sulfinpyrazone resulted in improved platelet survival times.

  9. A Costa Rican family affected with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to the myelin protein zero (MPZ) p.Thr124Met mutation shares the Belgian haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Alejandro; Berghoff, Corinna; Berghoff, Martin; Rojas-Araya, Melissa; Carolina, Ortiz; Heuss, Dieter; Del Valle, Gerardo; Rautenstrauss, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    The p.Thr124Met mutation in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) causes the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2J, a peripheral neuropathy with additional symptoms as pupillary alterations and deafness. It was observed in several families around the world originating e. g. from Germany, Belgium, Japan, Italy and North America. Here we report Central American patients originating from a family in Costa Rica carrying this mutation. Clinical, electrophysiological and molecular analysis of patients and controls were performed, including gene and linked markers' sequencing. Carriers share almost the entire haplotype with two non related Belgian CMT patients. As a result of the haplotype analysis, based on ten markers (seven SNPs, two microsatellites and an intronic polyA stretch), the founder effect hypothesis for this allele migration is suggestive.

  10. A Costa Rican family affected with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to the myelin protein zero (MPZ p.Thr124Met mutation shares the Belgian haplotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Leal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The p.Thr124Met mutation in the myelin protein zero (MPZ causes the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2J, a peripheral neuropathy with additional symptoms as pupillary alterations and deafness. It was observed in several families around the world originating e. g. from Germany, Belgium, Japan, Italy and North America. Here we report Central American patients originating from a family in Costa Rica carrying this mutation. Clinical, electrophysiological and molecular analysis of patients and controls were performed, including gene and linked markers´ sequencing. Carriers share almost the entire haplotype with two non related Belgian CMT patients. As a result of the haplotype analysis, based on ten markers (seven SNPs, two microsatellites and an intronic polyA stretch, the founder effect hypothesis for this allele migration is suggestive. Rev. Biol. Trop. 62 (4: 1285-1293. Epub 2014 December 01.

  11. Environmental factors affecting survival of immature Ixodes scapularis and implications for geographical distribution of lyme disease: The climate/behavior hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard; Albert, Marisa; Acevedo, Lixis; Dyer, Megan C.; Arsnoe, Isis M.; Tsao, Jean I.; Mather, Thomas N.; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that host-seeking nymphs in southern populations of Ixodes scapularis remain below the leaf litter surface, while northern nymphs seek hosts on leaves and twigs above the litter surface. This behavioral difference potentially results in decreased tick contact with humans in the south, and fewer cases of Lyme disease. We studied whether north-south differences in tick survival patterns might contribute to this phenomenon. Four month old larvae resulting from a cross between Wisconsin males and South Carolina females died faster under southern than under northern conditions in the lab, as has previously been reported for ticks from both northern and southern populations. However, newly-emerged larvae from Rhode Island parents did not differ consistently in mortality under northern and southern conditions, possibly because of their younger age. Survival is lower, and so the north-south survival difference might be greater in older ticks. Larval survival was positively related to larval size (as measured by scutal area), while survival was positively related to larval fat content in some, but not all, trials. The difference in larval survival under northern vs. southern conditions might simply result from faster metabolism under warmer southern conditions leading to shorter life spans. However, ticks consistently died faster under southern than under northern conditions in the laboratory when relative humidity was low (75%), but not under moderate (85%) or high (95%) RH. Therefore, mortality due to desiccation stress is greater under southern than under northern conditions. We hypothesize that mortality resulting from the greater desiccation stress under southern conditions acts as a selective pressure resulting in the evolution of host-seeking behavior in which immatures remain below the leaf litter surface in southern I. scapularis populations, so as to avoid the desiccating conditions at the surface. If this hypothesis is correct, it has

  12. A questionnaire survey on diseases and problems affecting sheep and goats in communal farming regions of the Eastern Cape province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Gareth F; Penrith, Mary-Louise; Leask, Rhoda

    2016-08-31

    A questionnaire of 15 questions was completed by four categories of respondents with the aim of establishing the experience and opinions of these groups on the constraints including animal health problems for communal, small-scale sheep and goat farming in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The questionnaires were completed independently and categories were representative of the areas investigated. Analysis of responses was done by means, ranges, votes and clusters of responses. Comparisons between the responses of the four categories were made to identify similarities or contrasts. The results revealed that of non-veterinary concerns, stock theft was the major problem for these farms. Nutrition was a further major constraint. A third area of significant concern was the provision or availability of facilities like fences, water troughs, dips and sheds. Lack of marketing and business skills were also seen as important deficiencies to be rectified so as to promote profitable farming. Of the most important veterinary problems identified, the provision, availability, cost and care of drugs and vaccines were seen as major stumbling blocks to effective disease control, as well as lack of access to veterinary services. The most important diseases that constrain small-ruminant livestock farming in the farming systems investigated were sheep scab and other ectoparasites, heart water, enterotoxaemia, internal parasites and bluetongue. A lack of knowledge in key areas of small-stock farming was revealed and should be rectified by an effective training and support programme to improve the contribution of small-ruminant farming to livelihoods in these communities.

  13. Trends and Factors Affecting Hospitalization Costs in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Two-Center Study over the Past Decade

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    Junjie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the growing number of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and hospitalization cases, the overall medical care cost elevates significantly in consequence. A total of 2458 hospitalizations, involving 1401 patients with IBD, were included from two large medical centers. Hospitalization costs and factors impacting cost changes were determined. Patients with IBD and frequency of hospitalizations increased significantly from 2003 to 2011 (P<0.001. The annual hospitalization cost per patient, cost per hospitalization, and daily cost during hospitalization increased significantly in the past decade (all P<0.001. However, length of stay decreased significantly (P<0.001. Infliximab was the most significant factor associated with higher hospitalization cost (OR = 44380.09, P<0.001. Length of stay (OR = 1.29, P<0.001, no medical insurance (OR = 1.31, P=0.017, CD (OR = 3.55, P<0.001, inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU (OR = 4.30, P<0.0001, poor prognosis (OR = 6.78, P<0.001, surgery (OR = 3.16, P<0.001, and endoscopy (OR = 2.44, P<0.001 were found to be predictors of higher hospitalization costs. Patients with IBD and frequency of hospitalizations increased over the past decade. CD patients displayed a special one peak for age at diagnosis, which was different from UC patients. The increased hospitalization costs of IBD patients may be associated with infliximab, length of stay, medical insurance, subtypes of IBD, prognosis, surgery, and endoscopy.

  14. A questionnaire survey on diseases and problems affecting sheep and goats in communal farming regions of the Eastern Cape province, South Africa

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    Gareth F. Bath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire of 15 questions was completed by four categories of respondents with the aim of establishing the experience and opinions of these groups on the constraints including animal health problems for communal, small-scale sheep and goat farming in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa. The questionnaires were completed independently and categories were representative of the areas investigated. Analysis of responses was done by means, ranges, votes and clusters of responses. Comparisons between the responses of the four categories were made to identify similarities or contrasts. The results revealed that of non-veterinary concerns, stock theft was the major problem for these farms. Nutrition was a further major constraint. A third area of significant concern was the provision or availability of facilities like fences, water troughs, dips and sheds. Lack of marketing and business skills were also seen as important deficiencies to be rectified so as to promote profitable farming. Of the most important veterinary problems identified, the provision, availability, cost and care of drugs and vaccines were seen as major stumbling blocks to effective disease control, as well as lack of access to veterinary services. The most important diseases that constrain small-ruminant livestock farming in the farming systems investigated were sheep scab and other ectoparasites, heart water, enterotoxaemia, internal parasites and bluetongue. A lack of knowledge in key areas of small-stock farming was revealed and should be rectified by an effective training and support programme to improve the contribution of small-ruminant farming to livelihoods in these communities.

  15. Suitability and limitations of portion-specific abattoir data as part of an early warning system for emerging diseases of swine in Ontario

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    Thomas-Bachli Andrea L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abattoir data have the potential to provide information for geospatial disease surveillance applications, but the quality of the data and utility for detecting disease outbreaks is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to 1 identify non-disease factors that may bias these data for disease surveillance and 2 determine if major disease events that took place during the study period would be captured using multi-level modelling and scan statistics. We analyzed data collected at all provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario, Canada during 2001-2007. During these years there were outbreaks of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS and swine influenza that produced widespread disease within the province. Negative binomial models with random intercepts for abattoir, to account for repeated measurements within abattoirs, were created. The relationships between partial carcass condemnation rates for pneumonia and nephritis with year, season, agricultural region, stock price, and abattoir processing capacity were explored. The utility of the spatial scan statistic for detecting clusters of high partial carcass condemnation rates in space, time, and space-time was investigated. Results Non-disease factors that were found to be associated with lung and kidney condemnation rates included abattoir processing capacity, agricultural region and season. Yearly trends in predicted condemnation rates varied by agricultural region, and temporal patterns were different for both types of condemnations. Some clusters of high condemnation rates of kidneys with nephritis in time and space-time preceded the timeframe during which case clusters were detected using traditional laboratory data. Yearly kidney condemnation rates related to nephritis lesions in eastern Ontario were most consistent with the trends that were expected in relation to the documented disease outbreaks

  16. Suitability and limitations of portion-specific abattoir data as part of an early warning system for emerging diseases of swine in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Bachli, Andrea L; Pearl, David L; Friendship, Robert M; Berke, Olaf

    2012-01-06

    Abattoir data have the potential to provide information for geospatial disease surveillance applications, but the quality of the data and utility for detecting disease outbreaks is not well understood. The objectives of this study were to 1) identify non-disease factors that may bias these data for disease surveillance and 2) determine if major disease events that took place during the study period would be captured using multi-level modelling and scan statistics. We analyzed data collected at all provincially-inspected abattoirs in Ontario, Canada during 2001-2007. During these years there were outbreaks of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) and swine influenza that produced widespread disease within the province. Negative binomial models with random intercepts for abattoir, to account for repeated measurements within abattoirs, were created. The relationships between partial carcass condemnation rates for pneumonia and nephritis with year, season, agricultural region, stock price, and abattoir processing capacity were explored. The utility of the spatial scan statistic for detecting clusters of high partial carcass condemnation rates in space, time, and space-time was investigated. Non-disease factors that were found to be associated with lung and kidney condemnation rates included abattoir processing capacity, agricultural region and season. Yearly trends in predicted condemnation rates varied by agricultural region, and temporal patterns were different for both types of condemnations. Some clusters of high condemnation rates of kidneys with nephritis in time and space-time preceded the timeframe during which case clusters were detected using traditional laboratory data. Yearly kidney condemnation rates related to nephritis lesions in eastern Ontario were most consistent with the trends that were expected in relation to the documented disease outbreaks. Yearly lung condemnation rates did not

  17. Coronary artery disease, left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction are associated with stroke in patients affected by persistent non-valvular atrial fibrillation: a case-control study

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    Andrea Passantino

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Persistent non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events such as stroke, and its rate is expected to rise because of the ageing population. The absolute rate of stroke depends on age and comorbidity. Risk stratification for stroke in patients with NVAF derives from populations enrolled in randomized clinical trials. However, participants in clinical trials are often not representative of the general population. Many stroke risk stratification scores have been used, but they do not include transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE, pulsate wave Doppler (PWD and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI, simple and non-invasive diagnostic tools. The role of TTE, PWD and TDI findings has not been previously determined. Our study goal was to determine the association between TTE and PWD findings and stroke prevalence in a population of NVAF prone outpatients. Patients were divided into two groups: P for stroke prone and F for stroke free. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups concerning cardiovascular risk factors, age (p=0.2, sex (p=0.2, smoking (p=0.3, diabetes (p=0.1 and hypercholesterolemia (p=0.2; hypertension was statistically significant (p less than 0.001. There were statistically significant differences concerning coronary artery disease, previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI (p less than 0.05 and non- AMI coronaropathy (p less than 0.04, a higher rate being in the P group. Concerning echo-Doppler findings, a higher statistically significant rate of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH (p less than  0.05 and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (p less than 0.001 was found in the P group and dilated left atrium (p Dietary analysis and patterns of nutritional supplement use in normal and age-related macular disease affected subjects: a prospective cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eperjesi Frank

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor diet is thought to be a risk factor for many diseases, including age-related macular disease (ARMD, which is the leading cause of blind registration in those aged over 60 years in the developed world. The aims of this study were 1 to evaluate the dietary food intake of three subject groups: participants under the age of 50 years without ARMD (U50, participants over the age of 50 years without ARMD (O50, and participants with ARMD (AMD, and 2 to obtain information on nutritional supplement usage. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study designed in a clinical practice setting. Seventy-four participants were divided into three groups: U50; 20 participants aged 50 years, from 52 to 77 (62.7 ± 6.8 years, and ARMD; 27 participants aged > 50 years with ARMD, from 55 to 79 (66.0 ± 5.8 years. Participants were issued with a three-day food diary, and were also asked to provide details of any daily nutritional supplements. The diaries were analysed using FoodBase 2000 software. Data were input by one investigator and statistically analysed using Microsoft Excel for Microsoft Windows XP software, employing unpaired t-tests. Results Group O50 consumed significantly more vitamin C (t = 3.049, p = 0.005 and significantly more fibre (t = 2.107, p = 0.041 than group U50. Group ARMD consumed significantly more protein (t = 3.487, p = 0.001 and zinc (t = 2.252, p = 0.029 than group O50. The ARMD group consumed the highest percentage of specific ocular health supplements and the U50 group consumed the most multivitamins. Conclusions We did not detect a deficiency of any specific nutrient in the diets of those with ARMD compared with age- and gender-matched controls. ARMD patients may be aware of research into use of nutritional supplementation to prevent progression of their condition.

  18. A pilot study estimating liver fibrosis with ultrasound shear-wave elastography: does the cause of liver disease or location of measurement affect performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, Michael D; Brown, Sanford F; Machan, Jason T; Taliano, Ross J; Promrat, Kittichai; Cronan, John J

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of real-time shear-wave elastography for assessment of liver fibrosis in an unselected patient population, comparing shear-wave elastography measurements obtained at and remote from the site of random liver biopsy. In a prospective study of 50 patients (21 with and 29 without hepatitis C) referred for clinically indicated random liver biopsy for diffuse liver disease, shear-wave elastography measurements were taken from four locations before biopsy: one at the left lobe, two at the right lobe, and one at the biopsy location. The mean, minimum, maximum, and SD of shear-wave elastography were compared with pathologic grading. Steatosis and serum markers were analyzed using multiple logistic regression. Optimized shear-wave elastography thresholds were calculated using AUC analysis. The AUC (95% CI) at the biopsy site, ipsilateral lobe, and contralateral lobe were 0.82 (0.63-1.0), 0.84 (0.67-1.0), and 0.59 (0.19-0.99) in hepatitis C patients; 0.89 (0.75-1.0), 0.88 (0.73-1.0), and 0.93 (0.80-1.0) in nonhepatitis C patients; and 0.85 (0.74-0.96), 0.89 (0.79-0.99), and 0.80 (0.67-0.93) in all patients, respectively. Optimized biopsy site shear-wave elastography values for detecting Metavir score F2 or greater were 1.87 m/s (75% sensitivity and specificity), 2.00 m/s (80% sensitivity and specificity), and 1.89 m/s (76% sensitivity and specificity) in hepatitis C, nonhepatitis C, and all patients, respectively. Steatosis and serum markers were not significant. Real-time shear-wave elastography accurately predicted significant fibrosis (stage ≥ 2) in an unselected patient population with diffuse disease, including patients with and without hepatitis C. Shear-wave elastography best predicts pathologic grading when taken at the biopsy site or ipsilateral lobe in hepatitis C patients. Percentage steatosis was not predictive of shear-wave elastography results.

  19. Clinical and molecular features of an infant patient affected by Leigh Disease associated to m.14459G > A mitochondrial DNA mutation: a case report

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    Moggio Maurizio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leigh Syndrome (LS is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bilateral symmetrical necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia and brainstem. Onset is in early infancy and prognosis is poor. Causative mutations have been disclosed in mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes affecting respiratory chain subunits and assembly factors. Case presentation Here we report the clinical and molecular features of a 15-month-old female LS patient. Direct sequencing of her muscle-derived mtDNA revealed the presence of two apparently homoplasmic variants: the novel m.14792C > G and the already known m.14459G > A resulting in p.His16Asp change in cytochrome b (MT-CYB and p.Ala72Val substitution in ND6 subunit, respectively. The m.14459G > A was heteroplasmic in the mother's blood-derived DNA. Conclusions The m.14459G > A might lead to LS, complicated LS or Leber Optic Hereditary Neuropathy. A comprehensive re-evaluation of previously described 14459G > A-mutated patients does not explain this large clinical heterogeneity.

  1. The Refsum disease marker phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid, affects Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondria, and reduces cell viability in rat hippocampal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Stefan; Schönfeld, Peter; Reiser, Georg

    2005-02-01

    The saturated branched chain fatty acid, phytanic acid, a degradation product of chlorophyll, accumulates in Refsum disease, an inherited peroxisomal disorder with neurological clinical features. To elucidate the pathogenic mechanism, we investigated the influence of phytanic acid on cellular physiology of rat hippocampal astrocytes. Phytanic acid (100 microM) induced an immediate transient increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, followed by a plateau. The peak of this biphasic Ca2+ response was largely independent of extracellular Ca2+, indicating activation of cellular Ca2+ stores by phytanic acid. Phytanic acid depolarized mitochondria without causing in situ swelling of mitochondria. The slow decrease of mitochondrial potential is not consistent with fast and simultaneous opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. However, phytanic acid induced substantial generation of reactive oxygen species. Phytanic acid caused astroglia cell death after a few hours of exposure. We suggest that the cytotoxic effect of phytanic acid seems to be due to a combined action on Ca2+ regulation, mitochondrial depolarization, and increased ROS generation in brain cells.

  2. Prion protein gene heterogeneity in free-ranging white-tailed deer within the chronic wasting disease affected region of Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chad; Johnson, Jody; Clayton, Murray; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd

    2003-07-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was first identified in Wisconsin (USA) in whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in February 2002. To determine if prion protein gene (Prnp) allelic variability was associated with CWD in white-tailed deer from Wisconsin, we sequenced Prnp from 26 CWD-positive and 100 CWD-negative deer. Sequence analysis of Prnp suggests that at least 86-96% of the white-tailed deer in this region have Prnp allelic combinations that will support CWD infection. Four Prnp alleles were identified in the deer population, one of which, resulting in a glutamine to histidine change at codon 95, has not been previously reported. The predominant allele in the population encodes for glutamine at codon 95, glycine at codon 96, and serine at codon 138 (QGS). Less abundant alleles encoded QSS, QGN, and HGS at the three variable positions. Comparison of CWD-positive with CWD-negative deer suggested a trend towards an over-representation of the QGS allele and an under-representation of the QSS allele.

  3. Long-term treatment with L-DOPA or pramipexole affects adult neurogenesis and corresponding non-motor behavior in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, W-H; Depboylu, C; Hermanns, G; Maurer, L; Windolph, A; Oertel, W H; Ries, V; Höglinger, G U

    2015-08-01

    Non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia and depression are often observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and can precede the onset of motor symptoms for years. The underlying pathological alterations in the brain are not fully understood so far. Dysregulation of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb has been recently suggested to be implicated in non-motor symptoms of PD. However, there is so far no direct evidence to support the relationship of non-motor symptoms and the modulation of adult neurogenesis following dopamine depletion and/or dopamine replacement. In this study, we investigated the long-term effects of l-DOPA and pramipexole, a dopamine agonist, in a mouse model of bilateral intranigral 6-OHDA lesion, in order to assess the impact of adult neurogenesis on non-motor behavior. We found that l-DOPA and pramipexole can normalize decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the periglomerular layer of the olfactory bulb caused by a 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, pramipexole showed an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect in the forced swim test and social interaction test. However, there was no significant change in learning and memory function after dopamine depletion and dopamine replacement, respectively.

  4. Analysis of SAT Type Foot-And-Mouth Disease Virus Capsid Proteins and the Identification of Putative Amino Acid Residues Affecting Virus Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F.; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces. PMID:23717387

  5. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois F Maree

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces.

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET uptake in the pre-Huntington disease caudate affects the time-to-onset independently of CAG expansion size

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    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Bruselli, Laura [Nuclear Medicine Department, S. Andrea Hospital, La Spezia (Italy); Orobello, Sara; Elifani, Francesca; Squitieri, Ferdinando [Centre for Neurogenetics and Rare Diseases, IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, IS (Italy)

    2012-06-15

    To test in a longitudinal follow-up study whether basal glucose metabolism in subjects with a genetic risk of Huntington disease (HD) may influence the onset of manifest symptoms. The study group comprised 43 presymptomatic (preHD) subjects carrying the HD mutation. They underwent a {sup 18}F-FDG PET scan and were prospectively followed-up for at least 5 years using the unified HD rating scale to detect clinical changes. Multiple regression analysis included subject's age, CAG mutation size and glucose uptake as variables in a model to predict age at onset. Of the 43 preHD subjects who manifested motor symptoms, suggestive of HD, after 5 years from the PET scan, 26 showed a mean brain glucose uptake below the cut-off of 1.0493 in the caudate, significantly lower than the 17 preHD subjects who remained symptom-free (P < 0.0001). This difference was independent of mutation size. Measurement of brain glucose uptake improved the CAG repeat number and age-based model for predicting age at onset by 37 %. A reduced level of glucose metabolism in the brain caudate may represent a predisposing factor that contributes to the age at onset of HD in preHD subjects, in addition to the mutation size. (orig.)

  7. Tropheryma whipplei, the agent of Whipple's disease, affects the early to late phagosome transition and survives in a Rab5- and Rab7-positive compartment.

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    Giovanna Mottola

    Full Text Available Tropheryma whipplei, the agent of Whipple's disease, inhibits phago-lysosome biogenesis to create a suitable niche for its survival and replication in macrophages. To understand the mechanism by which it subverts phagosome maturation, we used biochemical and cell biological approaches to purify and characterise the intracellular compartment where Tropheryma whipplei resides using mouse bone-marrow-derived macrophages. We showed that in addition to Lamp-1, the Tropheryma whipplei phagosome is positive for Rab5 and Rab7, two GTPases required for the early to late phagosome transition. Unlike other pathogens, inhibition of PI(3P production was not the mechanism for Rab5 stabilisation at the phagosome. Overexpression of the inactive, GDP-bound form of Rab5 bypassed the pathogen-induced blockade of phago-lysosome biogenesis. This suggests that Tropheryma whipplei blocks the switch from Rab5 to Rab7 by acting on the Rab5 GTPase cycle. A bio-informatic analysis of the Tropheryma whipplei genome revealed a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH homologous with the GAPDH of Listeria monocytogenes, and this may be the bacterial protein responsible for blocking Rab5 activity. To our knowledge, Tropheryma whipplei is the first pathogen described to induce a "chimeric" phagosome stably expressing both Rab5 and Rab7, suggesting a novel and specific mechanism for subverting phagosome maturation.

  8. Effect of Dietary Supplements in Reducing Probability of Death for Uremic Crises in Dogs Affected by Chronic Kidney Disease (Masked RCCT

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    Andrea Zatelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan and alkalinizing agents can decrease morbidity and mortality in humans with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Whether this holds true in dog is not known. Objective of the study was to determine whether a commercial dietary supplement containing chitosan, phosphate binders, and alkalinizing agents (Renal, compared to placebo, reduces mortality rate due to uremic crises in dogs with spontaneous CKD, fed a renal diet (RD. A masked RCCT was performed including 31 azotemic dogs with spontaneous CKD. Dogs enrolled in the study were randomly allocated to receive RD plus placebo (group A; 15 dogs or RD plus Renal (group B; 16 dogs. During a first 4-week period, all dogs were fed an RD and then randomized and clinically evaluated up to 44 weeks. The effects of dietary supplements on mortality rate due to uremic crises were assessed. At 44 weeks, compared to group A, dogs in group B had approximately 50% lower mortality rate due to uremic crises (P=0.015. Dietary supplementation with chitosan, phosphate binders, and alkalinizing agents, along with an RD, is beneficial in reducing mortality rate in dogs with spontaneous CKD.

  9. Analysis of SAT type foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid proteins and the identification of putative amino acid residues affecting virus stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Francois F; Blignaut, Belinda; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Rieder, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection by adhering to integrin receptors on target cells, followed by cell entry and disassembly of the virion through acidification within endosomes. Mild heating of the virions also leads to irreversible dissociation into pentamers, a characteristic linked to reduced vaccine efficacy. In this study, the structural stability of intra- and inter-serotype chimeric SAT2 and SAT3 virus particles to various conditions including low pH, mild temperatures or high ionic strength, was compared. Our results demonstrated that while both the SAT2 and SAT3 infectious capsids displayed different sensitivities in a series of low pH buffers, their stability profiles were comparable at high temperatures or high ionic strength conditions. Recombinant vSAT2 and intra-serotype chimeric viruses were used to map the amino acid differences in the capsid proteins of viruses with disparate low pH stabilities. Four His residues at the inter-pentamer interface were identified that change protonation states at pH 6.0. Of these, the H145 of VP3 appears to be involved in interactions with A141 in VP3 and K63 in VP2, and may be involved in orientating H142 of VP3 for interaction at the inter-pentamer interfaces.

  10. Apolipoprotein e4 affects topographical changes in hippocampal and cortical atrophy in Alzheimer's disease dementia: a five-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeo Jin; Cho, Hanna; Kim, Yun Joong; Ki, Chang-Seok; Chung, Sun Ju; Ye, Byoung Seok; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Kyung Han; Jeon, Seun; Lee, Jong-Min; Chin, Juhee; Kim, Jeong-Hun; Na, Duk L; Seong, Joon-Kyung; Seo, Sang Won

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) is a genetic risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Once AD manifests clinically, however, the effects of APOE4 are less clear. Therefore, we investigated the longitudinal effects of APOE4 on topographical changes in AD patient brain atrophy. We prospectively recruited 35 patients with AD (19 APOE4 carriers and 16 non-carriers), and 14 normal controls, then followed them for five years. We measured hippocampal deformities and cortical thickness. Hippocampal comparison between APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with AD showed carriers had rapid changes in the head and body, while non-carriers had rapid changes in a small portion of the body. Cortical thickness comparison between APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with AD dementia showed carriers had rapid thinning in the lateral frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, while no region showed more rapid cortical thinning in non-carriers than in carriers. These findings underlined the importance of the APOE4 allele for designing and interpreting future treatment trials in patients with AD dementia.

  11. Skeletal muscle mass to visceral fat area ratio is an important determinant affecting hepatic conditions of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shida, Takashi; Akiyama, Kentaro; Oh, Sechang; Sawai, Akemi; Isobe, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yoshikazu; Ishige, Kazunori; Mizokami, Yuji; Yamagata, Kenji; Onizawa, Kojiro; Tanaka, Hironori; Iijima, Hiroko; Shoda, Junichi

    2017-08-08

    Not only obesity but also sarcopenia is associated with NAFLD. The influence of altered body composition on the pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to determine whether skeletal muscle mass to visceral fat area ratio (SV ratio) affects NAFLD pathophysiology. A total of 472 subjects were enrolled. The association between SV ratio and NAFLD pathophysiological factors was assessed in a cross-sectional nature by stratification analysis. When the SV ratio was stratified by quartiles (Q 1-Q 4), the SV ratio showed a negative relationship with the degree of body mass index, HOMA-IR, and liver stiffness (Q 1, 8.9 ± 7.5 kPa, mean ± standard deviation; Q 2, 7.5 ± 6.2; Q 3, 5.8 ± 3.7; Q 4, 5.0 ± 1.9) and steatosis (Q 1, 282 ± 57 dB/m; Q 2, 278 ± 58; Q 3, 253 ± 57; Q 4, 200 ± 42) measured by transient elastography. Levels of leptin and biochemical markers of liver cell damage, liver fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative stress, and hepatocyte apoptosis were significantly higher in subjects in Q 1 than in those in Q 2, Q 3, or Q 4. Moreover, fat contents in femoral muscles were significantly higher in subjects in Q 1 and the change was associated with weakened muscle strength. In logistic regression analysis, NAFLD subjects with the decreased SV ratio were likely to have an increased risk of moderate-to-severe steatosis and that of advanced fibrosis. Decreased muscle mass coupled with increased visceral fat mass is closely associated with an increased risk for exacerbating NAFLD pathophysiology.

  12. A multicenter prospective study on the risk of acquiring liver disease in anti-hepatitis C virus negative patients affected from homozygous beta-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, D; Zanella, A; Farma, E; De Mattei, C; Bosoni, P; Zappa, M; Picone, A; Mozzi, F; Rebulla, P; Cappellini, M D; Allain, J P; Sirchia, G

    1998-11-01

    Although the risk of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis has been recently reduced, transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia patients may still develop liver disease due to viral infection or iron overload. We assessed the frequency and causes of liver dysfunction in a cohort of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative thalassemics. Of 1,481 thalassemics enrolled in 31 centers, 219 (14.8%) tested anti-HCV- by second-generation assays; 181 completed a 3-year follow-up program consisting of alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) measurement at each transfusion and anti-HCV determination by third-generation enzyme-immunoassay (EIA-3) at the end of study. Serum ferritin levels were determined at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Ten patients were anti-HCV+ by EIA-3 at the end of follow-up. Of them, seven were already positive in 1992 to 1993 when the initial sera were retested by EIA-3, one tested indeterminate by confirmatory assay, and two had true seroconversion (incidence, 4. 27/1,000 person years; risk of infection, 1/7,100 blood units, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1 in 2,000-1 in 71,000 units). At baseline, 67 of 174 thalassemics had abnormal ALT. Of those with normal ALT, seven subsequently developed at least one episode of moderate ALT increase (incidence, 24.6/1,000 person-years). All of the 20 patients with ferritin values >/=3,000 ng/mL had clinically relevant ALT abnormalities, as compared with 53 of 151 with <3,000 ng/mL (P < .005). Hepatic dysfunction is still frequent in thalassemics. Although it is mainly attributable to siderosis and primary HCV infection, the role of undiscovered transmissible agents cannot be excluded.

  13. Phosphate fertilizer is a main source of arsenic in areas affected with chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasumana, Channa; Fonseka, Saranga; Fernando, Ashvin; Jayalath, Kumudika; Amarasinghe, Mala; Siribaddana, Sisira; Gunatilake, Sarath; Paranagama, Priyani

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease of unknown etiology (CKDu) has escalated into an epidemic in North Central Province (NCP) and adjacent farming areas in the dry zone of Sri Lanka. Studies have shown that this special type of CKD is a toxic nephropathy and arsenic may play a causative role along with a number of other heavy metals. We investigated the hypothesis that chemical fertilizers and pesticide could be a source of arsenic. 226 samples of Fertilizers and 273 samples of pesticides were collected and analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for arsenic and other heavy metals in two university laboratories. Almost all the agrochemicals available to the farmers in the study area are contaminated with arsenic. The highest amount was in triple super phosphate (TSP) with a mean value of 31 mg/kg. Also TSP is a rich source of other nephrotoxic metals including Cr, Co, Ni, Pb and V. Annually more than 0.1 million tons of TSP is imported to Sri Lanka containing approximately 2100 kg of arsenic. The next highest concentration was seen in the rock phosphate obtained from an open pit mine in NCP (8.56 mg/kg). Organic fertilizer contained very low amounts of arsenic. Arsenic contamination in pesticides varied from 0.18 mg/kg to 2.53 mg/kg although arsenic containing pesticides are banned in Sri Lanka. Glyphosate the most widely used pesticide in Sri Lanka contains average of 1.9 mg/kg arsenic. Findings suggest that agrochemicals especially phosphate fertilizers are a major source of inorganic arsenic in CKDu endemic areas. Organic fertilizer available in Sri Lanka is comparatively very low in arsenic and hence the farmers in CKDu endemic areas in Sri Lanka should be encouraged to minimize the use of imported chemical fertilizer and use organic fertilizers instead.

  14. Duodenal Bacteria From Patients With Celiac Disease and Healthy Subjects Distinctly Affect Gluten Breakdown and Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Johnston, Chad W; Bernier, Steve P; Russell, Amy K; Jury, Jennifer; Herran, Alexandra R; Casqueiro, Javier; Tye-Din, Jason A; Surette, Michael G; Magarvey, Nathan A; Schuppan, Detlef; Verdu, Elena F

    2016-10-01

    Partially degraded gluten peptides from cereals trigger celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune enteropathy occurring in genetically susceptible persons. Susceptibility genes are necessary but not sufficient to induce CD, and additional environmental factors related to unfavorable alterations in the microbiota have been proposed. We investigated gluten metabolism by opportunistic pathogens and commensal duodenal bacteria and characterized the capacity of the produced peptides to activate gluten-specific T-cells from CD patients. We colonized germ-free C57BL/6 mice with bacteria isolated from the small intestine of CD patients or healthy controls, selected for their in vitro gluten-degrading capacity. After gluten gavage, gliadin amount and proteolytic activities were measured in intestinal contents. Peptides produced by bacteria used in mouse colonizations from the immunogenic 33-mer gluten peptide were characterized by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and their immunogenic potential was evaluated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells from celiac patients after receiving a 3-day gluten challenge. Bacterial colonizations produced distinct gluten-degradation patterns in the mouse small intestine. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen from CD patients, exhibited elastase activity and produced peptides that better translocated the mouse intestinal barrier. P aeruginosa-modified gluten peptides activated gluten-specific T-cells from CD patients. In contrast, Lactobacillus spp. from the duodenum of non-CD controls degraded gluten peptides produced by human and P aeruginosa proteases, reducing their immunogenicity. Small intestinal bacteria exhibit distinct gluten metabolic patterns in vivo, increasing or reducing gluten peptide immunogenicity. This microbe-gluten-host interaction may modulate autoimmune risk in genetically susceptible persons and may underlie the reported association of dysbiosis and CD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute

  15. Ectopically expressed sweet pepper ferredoxin PFLP enhances disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum affected by harpin and protease-mediated hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Mang-Jye; Louh, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Hsiang-En

    2014-12-01

    Plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) is a photosynthesis-type ferredoxin (Fd) found in sweet pepper. It contains an iron-sulphur cluster that receives and delivers electrons between enzymes involved in many fundamental metabolic processes. It has been demonstrated that transgenic plants overexpressing PFLP show a high resistance to many bacterial pathogens, although the mechanism remains unclear. In this investigation, the PFLP gene was transferred into Arabidopsis and its defective derivatives, such as npr1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1) and eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility 1) mutants and NAHG-transgenic plants. These transgenic plants were then infected with the soft-rot bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora, ECC) to investigate the mechanism behind PFLP-mediated resistance. The results revealed that, instead of showing soft-rot symptoms, ECC activated hypersensitive response (HR)-associated events, such as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), electrical conductivity leakage and expression of the HR marker genes (ATHSR2 and ATHSR3) in PFLP-transgenic Arabidopsis. This PFLP-mediated resistance could be abolished by inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI), 1-l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane (E64) and benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), but not by myriocin and fumonisin. The PFLP-transgenic plants were resistant to ECC, but not to its harpin mutant strain ECCAC5082. In the npr1 mutant and NAHG-transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the eds1 mutant, overexpression of the PFLP gene increased resistance to ECC. Based on these results, we suggest that transgenic Arabidopsis contains high levels of ectopic PFLP; this may lead to the recognition of the harpin and to the activation of the HR and other resistance mechanisms, and is dependent on the protease-mediated pathway.

  16. Clinical features and sociodemographic factors affecting Trichomonas vaginalis infection in women attending a central sexually transmitted diseases clinic in Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumadhya D Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trichomoniasis is a relatively neglected area of research in Sri Lanka. Given the number of infections observed, an analysis of sociodemographic characteristics of patients would be valuable in prevention. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 359 newly registered women at a tertiary level sexually transmitted diseases clinic over a period of 18 months. Trichomoniasis was diagnosed by culture of vaginal swabs collected from the posterior fornix. Results: The prevalence of trichomoniasis in the sample was 7.2%. Of those who tested positive for trichomoniasis, 76% were in the age group of 21-45 years, 68% were married and living with a spouse and 60% were unemployed. A diagnosis of Trichomoniasis was associated with being married (OR, 1.6; CI, 0.56-4.41, age over 33 years (OR=1.3, CI, 0.55-2.9, being employed (OR, 1.3; CI, 0.56 - 2.94, having an education of less than ten years at school (OR, 3.0; CI 1.28-7.26 and not using condoms during the last sexual act (OR 2.0, CI 0.84-4.86. The risk was less among commercial sex workers (OR, 0.3, CI: 0.14-0.85, those with multiple sexual partners (OR, 0.2; CI; 0.073-0.408 and women reporting extramarital sexual relationships (OR, 0.3; CI, 0.128-0.733. Conclusions: Education on safe sex and recognition of symptoms is currently targeted at high risk groups such as commercial sex workers. Extending these programmes to the rest of the community will further reduce the risk of transmission of trichomonas.

  17. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of gene expression is affected by disease-associated SNPs within the 3′-UTR via altered RNA structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Ulrike; Sczakiel, Georg; Laufer, Sandra D.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNAs) or their target sites (miR-SNPs) within the 3′-UTR of mRNAs are increasingly thought to play a major role in pathological dysregulation of gene expression. Here, we studied the functional role of miR-SNPs on miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. First, analyses were performed on a SNP located in the miR-155 target site within the 3′-UTR of the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1; rs5186, A > C) mRNA. Second, a SNP in the 3′-UTR of the muscle RAS oncogene homolog (MRAS; rs9818870, C > T) mRNA was studied which is located outside of binding sites of miR-195 and miR-135. Using these SNPs we investigated their effects on local RNA structure, on local structural accessibility and on functional miRNA binding, respectively. Systematic computational RNA folding analyses of the allelic mRNAs in either case predicted significant changes of local RNA structure in the vicinity of the cognate miRNA binding sites. Consistently, experimental in vitro probing of RNA showing differential cleavage patterns and reporter gene-based assays indicated functional differences of miRNA-mediated regulation of the two AGTR1 and MRAS alleles. In conclusion, we describe a novel model explaining the functional influence of 3′-UTR-located SNPs on miRNA-mediated control of gene expression via SNP-related changes of local RNA structure in non-coding regions of mRNA. This concept substantially extends the meaning of disease-related SNPs identified in non protein-coding transcribed sequences within or close to miRNA binding sites. PMID:22664914

  18. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... Care: Real Stories Betsaida Cruz, PT, Long Beach Memorial Medicinal: “Terapia fisica para el Parkinson” Building a ... and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? ...

  19. Long-Term Vitamin D Supplementation Affects Metabolic Status in Vitamin D-Deficient Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhian, Alireza; Raygan, Fariba; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Talari, Hamid Reza; Esfandiari, Reza; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Asemi, Zatollah

    2017-03-01

    Background: Vitamin D might be beneficial in diabetic patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) through its favorable effects on metabolic profiles and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress.Objective: This study was performed to examine the effects of 6 mo of vitamin D supplementation on metabolic status in diabetic patients with CAD.Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 60 vitamin D-deficient diabetic patients with CAD aged 40-85 y. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups to take either 50,000-IU vitamin D supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) every 2 wk for 6 mo. Fasting blood samples were obtained at the beginning of the study and after the 6-mo intervention to quantify glycemic indicators, lipid concentrations, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress.Results: Compared with placebo, vitamin D supplementation resulted in significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose (-14.9 ± 7.1 compared with +19.3 ± 7.1 mg/dL; P = 0.001), serum insulin (-2.7 ± 1.1 compared with +1.8 ± 1.1 μIU/mL; P = 0.006), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (-0.7 ± 0.3 compared with +0.5 ± 0.3; P = 0.01), and β cell function (-9.1 ± 4.2 compared with +5.7 ± 4.2; P = 0.01) and a significant increase in serum vitamin D (+6.8 ± 0.9 compared with +0.1 ± 0.9 ng/mL; P D supplementation among vitamin D-deficient diabetic patients with CAD had beneficial effects on glycemic control and serum hs-CRP, NO, GSH, and malondialdehyde concentrations. This trial was registered on the Iranian website (www.irct.ir) for registration of clinical trials as IRCT201510315623N56.

  20. Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... near you Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Common Problems That Can Affect Your Voice Patient ... that traditionally accompany gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Voice Misuse and Overuse Speaking is a physical task ...

  1. Light Therapy Boxes for Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) Light therapy boxes can offer an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder. Features such as light intensity, safety, cost and style are important considerations. ...

  2. How do high cost-sharing policies for physician care affect inpatient care use and costs among people with chronic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Haichang

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rising health care costs continue to be a significant concern in the United States. High cost-sharing strategies thus have been widely used to address rising health care costs. Since high cost-sharing policies can reduce needed care as well as unneeded care use, it raises the concern whether these policies for physician care are a good strategy for controlling costs among chronically ill patients, especially whether utilization and costs in inpatient care will increase in response. This study examined whether high cost sharing in physician care affects inpatient care utilization and costs differently between individuals with and without chronic conditions. Findings from this study will contribute to the insurance benefit design that can control care utilization and save costs of chronically ill individuals. Prior studies suffered from gaps that limit both internal validity and external validity of their findings. This study has its unique contributions by filling these gaps jointly. The study used data from the 2007 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative sample, with a cross-sectional study design. Instrumental variable technique was used to address the endogeneity between health care utilization and cost-sharing levels. We used negative binomial regression to analyze the count data and generalized linear models for costs data. To account for national survey sampling design, weight and variance were adjusted. The study compared the effects of high cost-sharing policies on inpatient care utilization and costs between individuals with and without chronic conditions to answer the research question. The final study sample consisted of 4523 individuals; among them, 752 had hospitalizations. The multivariate analysis demonstrated consistent patterns. Compared with low cost-sharing policies, high cost-sharing policies for physician care were not associated with a greater increase in inpatient care utilization (P = .86 for chronically ill

  3. Detection and molecular characterization of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) from piglets with exudative epidermitis in Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Natalia; Mirazo, Santiago; Castro, Gustavo; Arbiza, Juan

    2012-10-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is an economically important emerging pathogen associated with distinct syndromes and diseases in swine, collectively known as porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The main purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of PCV2 in piglets affected with exudative epidermitis (EE) in Uruguay. In addition we aimed to analyze the phylogenetic relationships of the isolated strains. In June 2011 an outbreak of EE detected in a small herd was reported. Piglets presented skin lesions compatible with EE and symptoms associated with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) were also observed. Sera from affected and healthy animals were tested for the presence of viral DNA. Exclusively, diseased piglets were infected with PCV2. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PCV2 isolates belonged to PCV2b genotype. We report the detection and molecular characterization of PCV2 strains for the first time in Uruguay.

  4. Vaginal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have ... that affect the vagina include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems ...

  5. Fatal bronchopneumonia in a Metastrongylus elongatus and Porcine circovirus type 2 co-infected pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruchella, G; Paoletti, B; Speranza, R; Di Guardo, G

    2012-08-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection is distributed worldwide and PCV2-associated disease (PCVAD) is considered among the most economically relevant ones to the global swine industry. PCV2 is known to play a causal role in the porcine respiratory disease complex, usually in close association with a large plethora of other biologic agents. We describe herein a case of fatal parasitic bronchopneumonia by Metastrongylus elongatus in a PCV2-infected pig. Metastrongylosis may still represent a major concern for outdoor herds. Our recent experience suggests that a concurrent PCVAD condition may trigger metastrongylosis, which may subsequently result, at its turn, in severe, sometimes fatal, pulmonary disease.

  6. Parkinson disease - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your doctor has told you that you have Parkinson disease . This disease affects the brain and leads to ... have you take different medicines to treat your Parkinson disease and many of the problems that may come ...

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in the intestine of cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using an alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshihumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2010-11-01

    An alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval pretreatment step was used to enhance immunolabeling of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections from cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The modified chemical method used in this study amplified the PrP(Sc) signal by unmasking PrP(Sc) compared with the normal cellular prion protein. In addition, this method reduced nonspecific background immunolabeling that resulted from the destruction of the residual normal cellular form of prion protein, and reduced the treatment time compared with the usual autoclave pretreatment step. Immunolabeled PrP(Sc) was thereby clearly detected in the myenteric plexus of the ileum in naturally occurring BSE cattle.

  8. Mitochondrial Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fats) that come from your food. When the mitochondria are defective, the cells do not have enough energy. The unused oxygen ... disease can vary. It depends on how many mitochondria are defective, and where ... organ, tissue, or cell type is affected. But often the problem affects ...

  9. 西乌珠穆沁旗居民慢性病危险因素监测分析%Monitor and analysis of risk factors in chronic disease affecting the residents in West Wuzhumuqin Banner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏国; 王亚军; 白华民; 闫芳; 曹玲玲; 余艳琴; 郝金奇

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解西乌珠穆沁旗居民慢性病的危险因素,为防治慢性病提供科学依据。方法:用按比例多阶段随机抽样的方法抽取在西乌珠穆沁旗居住满5年的18岁以上居民3528人作为调查对象,进行问卷调查及体格检查。结果:西乌珠穆沁旗居民中高血压、糖尿病和冠心病人群中危险因素是吸烟、饮酒、体育锻炼、体质指数,而脑卒中的人群危险因素是吸烟、饮酒。蒙古族人群吸烟率、饮酒率高于其他民族人群。调查人群的超重率和肥胖率分别为29.4%和16.8%,吸烟率为22.2%,饮酒率为15.9%,其中男性的吸烟率、饮酒率、锻炼率、超重率和肥胖率均高于女性。不同年龄组吸烟、饮酒、体育锻炼、体质指数差异均有统计学意义( P <0.05),多因素分析显示,性别、吸烟、饮酒、超重、肥胖、遗传等因素是西乌珠穆沁旗居民慢性病的患病危险因素。结论:影响西乌珠穆沁旗居民健康的危险因素较多,应积极采取预防控制措施,提高居民的生活质量。%Objective:To study the risk factors in chronic disease affecting the residents in West Wuzhumuqin Banner, providing a scientific basis for the prevention and control of chronic disease. Methods:3,528 residents over 18 years old living more than 5 years in West Wuzhumuqin were randomly selected to answer questionnaires and have physical examinations. Results:It was smoking, drinking, physical activity, body mass index that were risk factors in patients with hypertension, diabetes and coronary heart disease, while it was smoking and drinking that were factors in patients with stroke. The smoking rate and the drinking rate in Mongolians are higher than those in other nationalities. The overweight , obesity , smoking and drinking rates in the people surveyed were 29. 4% ,16. 8%, 22. 2% and 15. 9% respectively. The smoking , drinking , exercise , overweight and obesity rates in men

  10. Do consanguineous parents of a child affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related parents with healthy offspring? Design of a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The offspring of consanguineous relations have an increased risk of congenital/genetic disorders and early mortality. Consanguineous couples and their offspring account for approximately 10% of the global population. The increased risk for congenital/genetic disorders is most marked for autosomal recessive disorders and depends on the degree of relatedness of the parents. For children of first cousins the increased risk is 2-4%. For individual couples, however, the extra risk can vary from zero to 25% or higher, with only a minority of these couples having an increased risk of at least 25%. It is currently not possible to differentiate between high-and low-risk couples. The quantity of DNA identical-by-descent between couples with the same degree of relatedness shows a remarkable variation. Here we hypothesize that consanguineous partners with children affected by an autosomal recessive disease have more DNA identical-by-descent than similarly-related partners who have only healthy children. The aim of the study is thus to establish whether the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous parents of children with an autosomal recessive disease is indeed different from its proportion in consanguineous parents who have healthy children only. Methods/Design This project is designed as a case-control study. Cases are defined as consanguineous couples with one or more children with an autosomal recessive disorder and controls as consanguineous couples with at least three healthy children and no affected child. We aim to include 100 case couples and 100 control couples. Control couples are matched by restricting the search to the same family, clan or ethnic origin as the case couple. Genome-wide SNP arrays will be used to test our hypothesis. Discussion This study contains a new approach to risk assessment in consanguineous couples. There is no previous study on the amount of DNA identical-by-descent in consanguineous

  11. 高血压患者的患病行为及其影响因素%Analysis on behaviors due to diseases in the patients having hypertension and the factors affecting the behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈菊华; 鲁萍

    2009-01-01

    Objective To approach hypertensive patients' understandings of their own diseases, daily behaviors responding to their complaints and the factors affecting their abnormal behaviors. Methods A specially-designed questionnaire survey was adopted and total 98 cases of all internal-patients suffering from hypertension were surveyed. Results The percentage of patients involving in the survey with abnormal psychological orientations is 38.8%. That of patients with abnormal disease confirmation factors is 46.9%. And that of patients with abnormal hypochondria index is 43.9%. The main factors affecting patients' behaviors are Age, Educational Background and Working Stress felt by themselves. Conclusions Nurses should attach more importance to the cognitive trainings of hypertension patients, get along with patients who have abnormal disease response symptoms and especially, pay more attention to Health Education and Psychological Nursing to patients who are seniors, higher-educated or whoever suffering working stress.%目的 了解高血压患者对自身疾病的认知、行为现状及异常患病行为的影响因素.方法 采用"患病行为问卷"对98例高血压住院患者进行问卷调查.结果 心理取向因子异常者占38.8%,疾病确信因子异常者占46.9%,疑病指数异常者占43.9%;影响患者行为的主要影响因素有年龄、文化程度和自觉工作紧张度.结论 护士应重视高血压患者的患病认知教育,尤其要做好年龄较大、文化程度较高、自觉工作紧张患者的健康教育和心理护理.

  12. IL-12/IL-23p40 Is Highly Expressed in Secondary Lymphoid Organs and the CNS during All Stages of EAE, but Its Deletion Does Not Affect Disease Perpetuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravens, Petra D.; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Miller-Little, William A.; Ben, Li-Hong; Segal, Benjamin M.; Herndon, Emily; Stüve, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 are heterodimers that share the p40 subunit, and both cytokines are critical in the differentiation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Th1 and Th17 effector cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), an animal model of the human central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). However, ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against p40 failed to show efficacy over placebo in a phase II clinical trial in patients with MS. The role of p40 in initial T cell priming and maintenance in secondary lymphoid tissues is not yet well understood. Methods Active EAE was induced in the B6.129-IL12b strain of p40eYFP reporter mice (yet40 mice), and Th1 and Th17 polarized cells were adoptively transferred into p40-deficient mice. Cellular subsets were phenotyped by multi-parameter flow cytometry, and p40 tissue expression was identified by confocal microscopy. Results We show that yet40 mice are susceptible to EAE, and that p40 is highly expressed in secondary lymphoid organs and the CNS during all stages of the disease. Interestingly, p40 expression in the recipient is not required for EAE induction after adoptive transfer of activated and differentiated encephalitogenic Th1 and Th17 cells into p40-deficient mice. Peripheral antagonism of T helper cell trophic factors critical for the differentiation and maintenance of Th1 and Th17 cells ameliorates EAE, indicating that p40 may play a critical role in the induction of CNS autoimmunity but not in its perpetuation. Conclusion Our data may explain why ustekinumab did not ameliorate paraclinical and clinical disease in patients with MS. In patients with already established disease, activated antigen-specific encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells are likely already differentiated, and are not dependent on p40 for maintenance. A clinical trial of longer duration with anti-p40 mAbs or other forms of

  13. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... our Helpline: 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) Staffed by nurses, social workers and therapists, our Helpline is here to ...

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

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    Full Text Available ... How Does Depression Affect the Patient's Family and Social Network? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect Memory? How Does Parkinson's Disease Affect the Urinary System? How Does Speech Therapy Help Parkinson's ... our Helpline: 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636) Staffed by nurses, social workers and therapists, our Helpline is here to ...

  15. How does real affect affect affect recognition in speech?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet Phuong

    2009-01-01

    The automatic analysis of affect is a relatively new and challenging multidisciplinary research area that has gained a lot of interest over the past few years. The research and development of affect recognition systems has opened many opportunities for improving the interaction between man and

  16. ART therapy affect CD4+FoxP3+regulatory T cells in disease progression of HIV-1 infection%ART治疗对HIV感染者CD4+FoxP3+T细胞水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊竑冶; 董冠军; 傅更锋; 还锡萍; 羊海涛; 王建军; 侯亚义

    2012-01-01

    . Conclusion: Treg cells are involved in the immune pathogenesis of AIDS. ART treatment and gender differences affect the levels of Treg cells in different stages of HIV infection. This suggests that the regulation of the levels of Treg cells may contribute to the clinical control of disease.

  17. Experiencing affective interactive art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialoskorski, Leticia S.S.; Westerink, Joyce H.D.M.; Broek, van den Egon L.

    2010-01-01

    The progress in the field of affective computing enables the realization of affective art. This paper describes the affective interactive art system Mood Swings, which interprets and visualizes affect expressed by a person. Mood Swings is founded on the integration of a framework for affective move

  18. Necesidad del abandono del tabaquismo para la prevención de enfermedad periodontal y otras afecciones It is necessary to quit smoking to prevent periodontal disease and other affections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eladio Miguel Traviesas Herrera

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica sobre el papel que ejerce el tabaquismo como factor de riesgo de múltiples afecciones que inciden en el estado de salud del individuo. Se revisaron artículos originales y de revisión, localizados a través de Pubmed, Google y revistas internacionales y nacionales reconocidas, que correspondieron a las palabras claves seleccionadas. El periodo de búsqueda de la información estuvo comprendido entre los meses de enero a diciembre del año 2010. Se destacó la influencia que ejerce esta práctica en la aparición de las enfermedades bucales siguientes: lesiones premalignas, cáncer bucal, estomatitis nicotínica y periodontopatías inflamatorias agudas y crónicas. Se expresó la influencia de esta práctica en el desarrollo y gravedad de la enfermedad periodontal. También se exploraron en esta revisión aspectos relacionados con el abandono del tabaquismo: las ventajas físicas, psicológicas, económicas inmediatas y a largo plazo que representa esta conducta, así como los procesos y los métodos que en la actualidad se explotan para dicho abandono. Se evidenció que resulta necesario implementar técnicas para el abandono del tabaquismo y de esta forma contribuir a la devolución de la salud periodontal.A bibliographic review was made on the smoking role as risk factor of multiple affections with impact on the subject's health. Authors reviewed original papers and of reviews located by Pubmed, Google and international national recognized journals corresponding to selected key words. Information search period was from January to December, 2010. It was emphasized in a particular way the influence of this practice on appearance of following oral pathologies: pre-malignant lesions, oral cancer, nicotinic stomatitis as well as the acute and chronic inflammatory periodontal diseases. The influence of this practice in the development and severity of periodontal disease was expressed. Also, the authors

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