WorldWideScience

Sample records for disease patients living

  1. Living with Parkinson's disease: priorities for research suggested by patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, K; Dauwerse, L; Hendrikx, A; Leedekerken, J W; Abma, T A

    2014-08-01

    To describe a study in which patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were engaged to list priorities for research to complement the professionals' research agenda. The study was conducted by researchers and people with PD or relatives. Interviews and focus groups were held to develop a research agenda from patients' perspectives. A questionnaire was completed by patients to prioritize the research topics. Voiceover group meetings and meetings with the advisory group were organized to obtain feedback on the research process and to deliberate the preliminary findings. Finally, dialog meetings were organized with stakeholders to discuss the agenda and to achieve a shared research agenda. Patients prioritized 18 research themes. Top priorities included fundamental research, research on medication, coping, family & relations and good care. Patients asked for applied and multidisciplinary research. Professionals and charitable funding bodies acknowledged the importance of such research but did not feel capable of judging such proposals. Patients furthermore asked for more attention to be paid to living with the illness in the here-and-now to complement fundamental research. The patients' research agenda can be used to match research with patients' needs and to adapt the clinical support of professionals to patients' wishes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate social participation in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to identify predictors for low social participation. The study was based on baseline data from 330 home-living patients with mild AD who participated in The Danish...... Alzheimer Intervention Study (DAISY). Proxy-obtained information from primary caregiver assessed patients' social participation. The result showed that low social participation was present in mild AD. Significant independent predictors of low social participation were impairment in activities of daily...

  3. Spiritual Needs among Patients with Chronic Pain Diseases and Cancer Living in a Secular Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büssing, Arndt; Janko, Annina; Baumann, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    . Methods In an anonymous cross-sectional study, standardized questionnaires were provided to German patients with chronic pain diseases (and cancer), i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire (SpNQ), Spirituality/Religiosity and Coping (SpREUK-15), Spiritual Well-being (FACIT-Sp), Brief Multidimensional Life......Objective Research has shown that several patients report unmet psychosocial and spiritual needs. While most studies focus on patients with advanced stages of disease, we intended to identify unmet spiritual needs in patients with chronic pain diseases and cancer living in a secular society...... Satisfaction Scale, Interpretation of Illness Questionnaire, and Escape from Illness (Escape). Results We enrolled 392 patients (67% women, mean age 56.3 ± 13.6 years; 61% Christian denomination) with chronic pain diseases (86%) and cancer (14%). Religious Needs (mean score 0.5 ± 0.8 on the scale...

  4. [Living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: The impact of dyspnoea on patients and caregivers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Xavier; Gómez-Batiste, Xavier; Pla, Margarida; Martínez-Muñoz, Marisa; Blay, Carles; Vila, Laura

    2016-12-01

    To understand the experiences of patients and caregivers living with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the impact of their symptoms and care needs arising from a functional, emotional, and social context. Qualitative study. Phenomenological perspective. Data were collected during 2013-2015. Primary, secondary and intermediate care. Osona (Barcelona). The study included 10 Primary Care patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, their respective 10 caregivers, and 19 primary care professionals, as well as 2 lung specialists, 2 palliative care professionals involved in their care, and one clinical psychologist. Theoretical sampling. Semi-structured and in-depth interviews with patients, caregivers, and professionals (47 interviews). The emergent topics identified in patients and caregivers interviews refer to dyspnoea, the predominant symptom without effective treatment and with a major impact on patients and caregivers lives. A symptom with great functional, emotional and social repercussions to which they need to adapt in order to survive. Beyond pharmacological measures to control respiratory symptoms, proper care of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, requires understanding of suffering, the losses and limitations that it causes in their lives and those of their caregivers. A palliative, holistic and closer approach to their real experiences, together with an empowerment to adapt to debilitating symptoms, could contribute to a better life in the end-stages of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Right ventricular morphology and function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients living at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Erer, Hatice Betül; Kul, Seref; Perinçek, Gökhan; Ilhan, Sami; Sayar, Nurten; Yıldırım, Binnaz Zeynep; Doğan, Coşkun; Karabağ, Yavuz; Balcı, Bahattin; Eren, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculature is affected in patients with chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD). As a result of increased pulmonary resistance, right ventricular morphology and function are altered in COPD patients. High altitude and related hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction, thereby affecting the right ventricle. We aimed to investigate the combined effects of COPD and altitude-related chronic hypoxia on right ventricular morphology and function. Forty COPD patients living at high altitude (1768 m) and 41 COPD patients living at sea level were enrolled in the study. All participants were diagnosed as COPD by a pulmonary diseases specialist depending on symptoms, radiologic findings and pulmonary function test results. Detailed two-dimensional echocardiography was performed by a cardiologist at both study locations. Oxygen saturation and mean pulmonary artery pressure were higher in the high altitude group. Right ventricular end diastolic diameter, end systolic diameter, height and end systolic area were significantly higher in the high altitude group compared to the sea level group. Parameters of systolic function, including tricuspid annular systolic excursion, systolic velocity of tricuspid annulus and right ventricular isovolumic acceleration were similar between groups, while fractional area change was significantly higher in the sea level groups compared to the high altitude group. Indices of diastolic function and myocardial performance index were similar between groups. An increase in mean pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular dimensions are observed in COPD patients living at high altitude. Despite this increase, systolic and diastolic functions of the right ventricle, as well as global right ventricular performance are similar in COPD patients living at high altitude and sea level. Altitude-related adaptation to chronic hypoxia could explain these findings. Copyright © 2012 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic

  6. Living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a survey of patients' knowledge and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Paul; Balter, Meyer; Bourbeau, Jean; Hodder, Rick

    2009-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common respiratory condition and the fourth leading cause of death in Canada. However, little is known about the impact of COPD on the lives and attitudes of individuals living with this condition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Canadians with COPD are properly educated and supported, and to recommend solutions to any care gaps identified. A total of 389 Canadians were surveyed who were 40 years of age and older, physician diagnosed with COPD, and current or former smokers. The telephone survey contained 68 items and took 35 min to complete. COPD severity was classified according to symptom severity using the Medical Research Council (MRC) score. Respondents tended to overestimate their disease severity and reported substantial symptom burden and psychosocial impact of living with COPD. Most individuals claimed to be well informed about COPD; however, their knowledge was poor in several domains including the causes of COPD, the consequences of inadequate therapy and the management of exacerbations. Family physicians were the main health care providers. A minority of respondents had seen a lung health educator. Only 34% had ever received a written action plan and only 33% had been told how to prevent an exacerbation. The symptom burden and psychosocial impact of living with COPD is substantial. There are significant gaps in patients' knowledge about the management of COPD and little contact with lung health educators. Increased use of COPD-specific, self-management education programs may help rectify these care gaps.

  7. Living with and Caring for Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease in Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Yektatalab

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many of the patients with Alzheimer disease are taken care of in nursing homes. However the literature on the experiences of Iranian formal caregivers of older adults with Alzheimer disease is scarce. This qualitative study explored the caring experiences of formal caregivers in nursing homes that can improve the quality of care and patient’s quality of life. Methods: This qualitative study used the principles of descriptive content analysis to analyze these data. Our participants included 11 female and 3 male caregivers aged 25 to 38 years who were selected for interviewing based on a purposive sampling method. The data were analyzed with a content analysis method. Results: Nearly 900 initial codes were extracted and categorized into 6 main themes including "managing difficult behaviors", "dependence on familial care", "continuum of different feelings", "care for a child", "living with the patients" and "not understanding the patients", which was further analyzed in the two subcategories "caring without enough information" and " a dead man moving". Conclusion: The care provided by our informants was mainly influenced by attitudes, culture and religious beliefs of caregivers about family attachment and ample driven reward of helping and caring frail or old people in Islam. These cultural and religious beliefs could facilitate provision of care and confrontation with patients’ child-like behaviors. It is suggested that employment of trained staff and plans for their continued education can improve the quality of care and the quality of the patient's life.

  8. Living well with end stage renal disease: patients' narratives interrupted from a virtue perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Wim; Uerz, Inez; Wils, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few decades there has been a revival of interest in virtue ethics, with the emphasis on the virtuous caregiver. This paper deals with the 'virtuous patient', specifically the patient with End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). We believe that a virtue approach provides insights not available to current methods of studying coping styles and coping strategies. Data are derived from seven semi-structured in-depth interviews. The transcripts of the interviews were subjected to an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The focus of the analysis was on 'living well with chronic illness.' It appears that the moral challenges faced by patients with ESRD are manifold. When they are invited to tell the story of their illness, they do not explicitly speak of virtues, but they often refer to moral qualities, and to attitudes that can be regarded as virtuous. We identify several such concepts in the narratives of patients with ESRD. We conclude that the Aristotelian model of virtue ethics is particularly descriptively (and possibly also normatively) relevant to the explanation of the life narratives and the moral challenges of patients with an ESRD.

  9. Tobacco, illicit drugs use and risk of cardiovascular disease in patients living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Abu-Assi, Emad; Iñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2017-11-01

    There is a strong link between HIV, smoking and illicit drugs. This association could be clinically relevant as it may potentiate the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The purpose of this review is to bring readers up to date on issues concerning the cardiovascular risk associated with tobacco and illicit drugs in patients living with HIV (PLHIV), examining the studies related to this topic published in the last year. There is a strong association between smoking and atherosclerotic disease in PLHIV, reducing life expectancy secondary to CVD by up to 6 years. Illicit drugs were associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic problems but to a lesser extent than smoking. A significant association of drugs such as cocaine with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis been demonstrated. The relation of marijuana, heroin and amphetamines with atherosclerosis generates more controversy. However, those drugs are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, independently of smoking and other traditional risk factors. Tobacco and illicit drugs are linked to CVD in HIV patients. This leads to the need to create special programs to address the addiction to smoking and illicit drugs, in order to mitigate their consequences and reduce cardiovascular risk.

  10. Gaining perspective on own illness - the lived experiences of a patient education programme for women with treated coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa; Milberg, Anna; Hjelm, Katarina; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2016-05-01

    To explore the lived experiences of women with coeliac disease after attending a patient education programme, to gain a broader perspective of its influence. Adults, particularly women, with coeliac disease report suffering from poor well-being and reduced quality of life in terms of health. Patient education programmes might support and encourage them in the search for possible improvements in lifestyle and in their approach to the disease. A qualitative phenomenological study. Personal narrative interviews with 14 women suffering from coeliac disease who had participated in an educational programme. Data analysis in accordance with Giorgi was performed. The essential structure of women's lived experiences following their participation in the patient education programme was found to be an interaction with others with the same disease, which left the women feeling individually strengthened. The interaction enabled the participants to acquire a broader view of their life with coeliac disease. As a result, this realigned their sense of self in relation to their own disease. In coping with coeliac disease, it seems that women need interaction with others with the disease to experience togetherness within a group, get the opportunity to compare themselves with others and to exchange knowledge. The interaction appears to result in that women acquire an overview of life with the disease, develop a greater confidence and dare to try new things in life. When designing a patient education programme it seems important to consider the needs of persons to meet others with the same disease, and to ask them about their need for knowledge, rather than simply assuming that health care professionals know what they need. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The experiences of patients and carers living with multimorbid, non-communicable diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Stephen R; Jowsey, Tanisha; McNab, Justin W

    2018-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing in prevalence and straining health systems globally. This creates a so-called 'burden of disease', which can be traced in terms of fiscal health system matters and in terms of quality of life and lived experiences of people with NCDs. The United Nations has called for a global agenda to manage NCDs and reduce their burden. The purpose of this article is to summarise key findings from the Serious and Continuing Illness Policy and Practice Study concerning patients’ and carers’ experiences of multimorbid NCDs in Australia. We focus on the relevance of findings for policy and general practitioners in Australia. We suggest that a complex multimorbidity policy is needed to contextualise and guide single-illness NCD policies. Our research suggests that specialist NCD nurses and allied health professionals could have important roles in improving care coordination between general practices and community health centres.  .

  12. Factors Affecting Changes in the Glomerular Filtration Rate after Unilateral Nephrectomy in Living Kidney Donors and Patients with Renal Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Ok; Chae, Sun Young; Back, Sora; Moon, Dae Hyuk [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We evaluated the factors affecting changes in the postoperative glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after unilateral nephrectomy in living kidney donors and patients with renal disease. We studied 141 subjects who underwent living donor nephrectomy for renal transplantation (n=75) or unilateral nephrectomy for renal diseases (n=66). The GFR of the individual kidney was determined by Tc-99m DTPA scintigraphy before and after nephrectomy. By performing multiple linear regression analysis, we evaluated the factors that are thought to affect changes in GFR, such as age, sex, body mass index (BMI), preoperative GFR, preoperative creatinine level, operated side, presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), presence of hypertension (HTN), and duration of follow-up. In both the donor nephrectomy and the disease nephrectomy groups, GFR increased significantly after nephrectomy (46.9{+-}8.4 to 58.1{+-}12.5 vs. 43.0{+-}9.6 to 48.6{+-}12.8 ml/min, p<0.05). In the donor nephrectomy group, age was significantly associated with change in GFR ({beta}=-0.3, P<0.005). In the disease nephrectomy group, HTN, preoperative creatinine level, and age were significantly associated with change in GFR ({beta}=-6.2, p<0.005; {beta}=-10.9, p<0.01; {beta}=-0.2, p<0.01, respectively). This compensatory change in GFR was not significantly related to sex, duration of follow-up, or operated side in either group. The compensatory change in the GFR of the remaining kidney declined with increasing age in both living kidney donors and patients with renal disease.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use among elderly patients living with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Asnakew Achaw; Tegegn, Henok Getachew; Haile, Kaleab Taye; Belachew, Sewunet Admasu; Mersha, Amanual Getnet; Erku, Daniel Asfaw

    2017-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among patients with chronic diseases has grown rapidly worldwide. Yet, little has been known about CAM use by elderly patients with chronic diseases in Ethiopia. This study aimed at assessing the prevalence and reasons for CAM utilization among elderly patients living with chronic diseases in Ethiopia. An institution-based quantitative cross-sectional survey was conducted among elderly patients with chronic disease attending outpatient ambulatory clinics of University of Gondar referral and teaching hospital (UoGRTH). An interviewer-administered and semi-structured questionnaire were utilized to collect the data. Of the total respondents, 240 (74%) reported the use of CAM, with herbal medicine and spiritual healing being the most commonly utilized CAM modalities (50.4% and 40.8% respectively). Dissatisfaction with conventional therapy (40.8%) and belief in the effectiveness of CAM (30.8%) are the most commonly cited reasons for the use of CAM therapies. Rural residency, higher educational status, higher average monthly income and presence of co-morbidity were positively associated with the use of CAM. This survey revealed a higher rate of CAM use among elderly patients with chronic diseases, along with a very low rate of disclosing their use to their health care providers. Special attention should be given for these patient population due to the potentially harmful interaction of different herbal remedies with the prescribed medications, thereby predisposing the patient to untoward adverse effects and compromised overall health outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Neuropsychological rehabilitation of memory deficits and activities of daily living in patients with Alzheimer's disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ávila R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD gradually lose their cognitive competence, particularly memory, and the ability to perform daily life tasks. Neuropsychological rehabilitation is used to improve cognitive functions by facilitating memory performance through the use of external aids and internal strategies. The effect of neuropsychological rehabilitation through memory training - motor movements, verbal association, and categorization - and activities of daily living (ADL training was tested in a sample of 5 elderly out-patients (mean age: 77.4 ± 2.88 years, with mild AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score: 22.20 ± 2.17 and their caregivers. All patients had been taking rivastigmine (6-12 mg/day for at least 3 months before being assigned to the rehabilitation sessions, and they continued to take the medication during the whole program. Just before and after the 14-week neuropsychological rehabilitation program all patients were assessed by interviewers that did not participate in the cognitive training, using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Montgomery-Alsberg Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Interview to Determine Deterioration in Functioning in Dementia, Functional Test, Memory Questionnaire of Daily Living for patient and caregiver, Quality of Life Questionnaire for patient and caregiver, and a neuropsychological battery. The results showed a statistically significant improvement in ADL measured by Functional Test (P = 0.04, and only a small improvement in memory and psychiatric symptoms. Our results support the view that weekly stimulation of memory and training of ADL is believed to be of great value in AD treatment, not only delaying the progress of the disease, but also improving some cognitive functions and ADL, even though AD is a progressively degenerative disease.

  15. The Challenges of Living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Summary of a Summit on Patient and Healthcare Provider Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canada has one of the highest rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD and the disease represents a significant health, social, and economic burden. There is currently no cure for IBD, although earlier diagnosis and new therapies have improved the overall health outcomes and quality of life for patients. Crohn’s and Colitis Canada is Canada’s only national, volunteer-based charity dedicated to finding cures for IBD and improving the lives of those affected, through research, education, patient programs, advocacy, and increased awareness. On April 30, 2015, Crohn’s and Colitis Canada hosted the “Patient and Healthcare Professional Summit on the Burden of Disease in IBD” to obtain a deeper understanding of the unmet needs of IBD patients and their caregivers. Through personal vignettes, patients articulated a pressing need to increase understanding of the challenges faced by people suffering from IBD among both health care professionals and the general public, develop best practices for navigating life transitions and addressing the unique challenges faced by children with IBD, and provide equitable access to appropriate, effective, and affordable treatments. The recommendations that emerged from the summit will inform about efforts to increase public awareness, inform about advocacy strategies, and contribute to the development of research priorities.

  16. The Lived Experience of Patients Receiving Hemodialysis Treatment for End-Stage Renal Disease: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaranai, Chantira

    2016-06-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD), the last stage of chronic kidney disease, is the point at which the kidneys are no longer able to support the body's needs. Thus, ESRD significantly impacts the day-to-day life of patients. To improve bodily functions and prolong life, patients with ESRD require renal replacement therapy in the form of either hemodialysis (HD) or kidney transplantation. Research has documented the impact of ESRD and HD on quality of life. There is a lack of qualitative studies that describe how ESRD sufferers in Thailand cope with daily life. This study aimed to better understand the daily life experiences of Thai patients with ESRD who are on HD. This study used a phenomenological approach and a semistructured interview guide. Thai men and women with ESRD and on HD were purposively recruited from an HD unit at one hospital in Thailand between February and May 2013. Inclusion criteria included (a) currently being treated for HD, (b) ability to communicate in Thai, and (c) age of over 18 years. Participants were asked to describe their problems, feelings, thoughts, and attitudes as well as how they experienced their lives. Data saturation was reached after the completion of 26 interviews. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The following themes emerged from the data: (a) facing life's limitations, (b) living with uncertainty, and (c) dependence on medical technology. The authors hope that the findings increase the understanding of healthcare providers about the lived experience of Thai patients with ESRD on HD. Greater understanding is critical in helping healthcare providers identify the changes in practice that will be necessary to better care for and integrate the best holistic practices into standardized care for this population.

  17. Difficulties related to compliance with gluten-free diet by patients with coeliac disease living in Upper Silesia

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    Magdalena Ferster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Compliance with gluten-free diet is the basic method for controlling coeliac disease in patients regardless of their age. It may be, however, challenging to follow in daily life. The prevalence of the disease (approx. 1% of European population is affected makes it an important public health problem. Aim of the study: Investigating the difficulties and obstacles related to compliance with gluten-free diet by children and adult patients living in Upper Silesia region. Material and method: The study included 30 mothers of children with coeliac disease (Group I and 30 adult coeliac disease patients (Group II. The patients kept a gluten-free diet. Data were obtained in an anonymous survey drawn up for the purpose of this study, conducted in 2010. Results: The respondents reported a very limited access to gluten-free meals in mass-catering establishments (76.7% of the participants in Group II, and 70% children at nurseries, kindergartens and schools, lack of adequate food product labelling (93% in both groups, difficulties experienced in social life (60% in Group II, difficulties experienced when travelling within Poland (76.7% in Group II and abroad (83.3% in Group II, and no existing reimbursement plan for the high diet costs (16.7% in Group I vs. 26.7% in Group II. Conclusions: 1 The necessity of compliance with gluten-free diet causes a lot of difficulties in everyday life to patients with coeliac disease and parents of children suffering from coeliac disease. Proper treatment requires their identification by the attending physician. 2 Improved food labelling as regards gluten content as well as inclusion of gluten-free meals in the menu of food-serving establishments will contribute to improved quality of life of children and adults suffering from coeliac disease. 3 Associations of patients on a gluten-free diet should continue their efforts to have high costs of this diet refunded.

  18. Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foundation Celiac Disease Foundation Read More "Celiac Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten- ...

  19. Web-based Health Information Seeking and eHealth Literacy among Patients Living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael L; Shuster, Jonathan J; Chaney, Beth H; Paige, Samantha R; Alber, Julia M; Chaney, J Don; Sriram, P S

    2017-09-05

    Many people living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) have low general health literacy; however, there is little information available on these patients' eHealth literacy, or their ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise online health information and apply this knowledge to address or solve disease-related health concerns. A nationally representative sample of patients registered in the COPD Foundation's National Research Registry (N = 1,270) was invited to complete a web-based survey to assess socio-demographic (age, gender, marital status, education), health status (generic and lung-specific health-related quality of life), and socio-cognitive (social support, self-efficacy, COPD knowledge) predictors of eHealth literacy, measured using the 8-item eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS). Over 50% of the respondents (n = 176) were female (n = 89), with a mean age of 66.19 (SD = 9.47). Overall, participants reported moderate levels of eHealth literacy, with more than 70% feeling confident in their ability to find helpful health resources on the Internet. However, respondents were much less confident in their ability to distinguish between high- and low-quality sources of web-based health information. Very severe versus less severe COPD (β = 4.15), lower lung-specific health-related quality of life (β = -0.19), and greater COPD knowledge (β = 0.62) were significantly associated with higher eHealth literacy. Higher COPD knowledge was also significantly associated with greater knowledge (ρ = 0.24, p = .001) and use (ρ = 0.24, p = .001) of web-based health resources. Findings emphasize the importance of integrating skill-building activities into comprehensive patient education programs that enable patients with severe cases of COPD to identify high-quality sources of web-based health information. Additional research is needed to understand how new social technologies can be used to help medically underserved COPD patients

  20. The Laboratory-Based Intermountain Validated Exacerbation (LIVE Score Identifies Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients at High Mortality Risk

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    Denitza P. Blagev

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identifying COPD patients at high risk for mortality or healthcare utilization remains a challenge. A robust system for identifying high-risk COPD patients using Electronic Health Record (EHR data would empower targeting interventions aimed at ensuring guideline compliance and multimorbidity management. The purpose of this study was to empirically derive, validate, and characterize subgroups of COPD patients based on routinely collected clinical data widely available within the EHR.Methods: Cluster analysis was used in 5,006 patients with COPD at Intermountain to identify clusters based on a large collection of clinical variables. Recursive Partitioning (RP was then used to determine a preferred tree that assigned patients to clusters based on a parsimonious variable subset. The mortality, COPD exacerbations, and comorbidity profile of the identified groups were examined. The findings were validated in an independent Intermountain cohort and in external cohorts from the United States Veterans Affairs (VA and University of Chicago Medicine systems.Measurements and Main Results: The RP algorithm identified five LIVE Scores based on laboratory values: albumin, creatinine, chloride, potassium, and hemoglobin. The groups were characterized by increasing risk of mortality. The lowest risk, LIVE Score 5 had 8% 4-year mortality vs. 56% in the highest risk LIVE Score 1 (p < 0.001. These findings were validated in the VA cohort (n = 83,134, an expanded Intermountain cohort (n = 48,871 and in the University of Chicago system (n = 3,236. Higher mortality groups also had higher COPD exacerbation rates and comorbidity rates.Conclusions: In large clinical datasets across different organizations, the LIVE Score utilizes existing laboratory data for COPD patients, and may be used to stratify risk for mortality and COPD exacerbations.

  1. Influences on clinical reasoning in family and psychosocial interventions in nursing practice with patients and their families living with chronic kidney disease.

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    Thirsk, Lorraine M; Moore, Sarah G; Keyko, Kacey

    2014-09-01

    To explore how Registered Nurses address psychosocial issues for patients and their families living with chronic kidney disease. It is in the scope of registered nursing practice to address the emotional, psychological and relational implications of living with chronic disease through psychosocial and family interventions. Patients living with chronic kidney disease frequently report poor quality of life and numerous psychosocial issues; however, they do not find that these issues are always adequately addressed. This research was hermeneutic inquiry as guided by Gadamer's philosophy of understanding. Family/psychosocial nursing practices are examined from the perspective of self-reports of Registered Nurses working in acute care nephrology units. Interviews with nurses were conducted throughout 2012. Nurses attribute, or explain, patient and family member behaviour in a variety of ways. These explanations may or may not align with actual patient/family reasons for behaviour. Nurses' explanations influence subsequent nursing practice. While there is some evidence of practices that overcome biased attributions of patient behaviour, the cognitive processes by which nurses develop these explanations are more complex than previously reported in nursing literature. Clinical reasoning and subsequent nursing practice are influenced by how nurses explain patients'/families' behaviour. Exploration of this issue with the support of social cognition literature suggests a need for further research with significant implications for nursing education and practice to improve family/psychosocial interventions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Qualitative research and its methods in epilepsy: Contributing to an understanding of patients' lived experiences of the disease.

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    Rapport, Frances; Clement, Clare; Doel, Marcus A; Hutchings, Hayley A

    2015-04-01

    This review paper makes the case for the usefulness of qualitative research methods in the context of epilepsy research. It begins with an assessment of the current state of epilepsy literature and identifies gaps especially in the following: research in 'developing' countries and research around surgery for adults with epilepsy. It makes the case that disclosure of people's behaviors, actions, and reactions in different, often complex health-care situations can indicate how they bring meaning to their disease experiences and support needs. It shows the value of encouraging work that clarifies how patients manage their illness and how they understand changes in their health and well-being over the life course of their illness and how health-care professionals and other stakeholder groups care for those with epilepsy. The paper suggests a range of methods for addressing gaps in the literature and highlights a range of data collection, data analysis, and data interpretation and synthesis techniques that are appropriate in this context. It pays particular attention to the strengths of qualitative applications in mixed-methods research using an example from a recent ulcerative colitis drug trial that indicates how they can be integrated into study findings, add rich description, and enhance study outcomes. Ethnographic methodology is also presented, as a way of offering rare access to the 'lived experience' dimension, before the paper concludes with an assessment of the qualitative criteria of credibility, dependability, transferability, and confirmability for judging a study's 'trustworthiness'. The criteria evidence not only the trustworthiness of data and findings but also the ways in which a study has approached any challenges inherent in its research design. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease: Inter-country variation, standard of living and healthcare system factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Philip; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Luyckx, Koen; Thomet, Corina; Budts, Werner; Enomoto, Junko; Sluman, Maayke A; Yang, Hsiao-Ling; Jackson, Jamie L; Khairy, Paul; Cook, Stephen C; Subramanyan, Raghavan; Alday, Luis; Eriksen, Katrine; Dellborg, Mikael; Berghammer, Malin; Johansson, Bengt; Mackie, Andrew S; Menahem, Samuel; Caruana, Maryanne; Veldtman, Gruschen; Soufi, Alexandra; Fernandes, Susan M; White, Kamila; Callus, Edward; Kutty, Shelby; Van Bulck, Liesbet; Apers, Silke

    2018-01-15

    Geographical differences in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of adults with congenital heart disease (ConHD) have been observed, but are poorly understood. We aimed to: (1) investigate inter-country variation in PROs in adults with ConHD; (2) identify patient-related predictors of PROs; and (3) explore standard of living and healthcare system characteristics as predictors of PROs. Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study (APPROACH-IS) was a cross-sectional, observational study, in which 4028 patients from 15 countries in 5 continents were enrolled. Self-report questionnaires were administered: patient-reported health (12-item Short Form Health Survey; EuroQOL-5D Visual Analog Scale); psychological functioning (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale); health behaviors (Health Behavior Scale-Congenital Heart Disease) and quality of life (Linear Analog Scale for quality of life; Satisfaction With Life Scale). A composite PRO score was calculated. Standard of living was expressed as Gross Domestic Product per capita and Human Development Index. Healthcare systems were operationalized as the total health expenditure per capita and the overall health system performance. Substantial inter-country variation in PROs was observed, with Switzerland having the highest composite PRO score (81.0) and India the lowest (71.3). Functional class, age, and unemployment status were patient-related factors that independently and consistently predicted PROs. Standard of living and healthcare system characteristics predicted PROs above and beyond patient characteristics. This international collaboration allowed us to determine that PROs in ConHD vary as a function of patient-related factors as well as the countries in which patients live. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Living with HIV: Patients Perspective

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast showcases three people who are living with HIV. The patients share their experiences of being diagnosed with HIV, of the treatments they are undergoing, and on taking responsibility for their health.

  5. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  6. Perceptions of living with a device-based treatment: an account of patients treated with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariz, Gun-Marie; Hamberg, Katarina

    2014-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. Little is known about patients' own perceptions of living with the implanted hardware. We aimed to explore patients' own perceptions of living with an implanted device. Semistructured interviews with open-ended questions were conducted with 42 patients (11 women) who had been on DBS for a mean of three years. The questions focused on patients' experiences of living with and managing the DBS device. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed according to the difference and similarity technique in grounded theory. From the patients' narratives concerning living with and managing the DBS device, the following four categories emerged: 1) The device-not a big issue: although the hardware was felt inside the body and also visible from outside, the device as such was not a big issue. 2) Necessary carefulness: Patients expressed the need to be careful when performing certain daily activities in order not to dislocate or harm the device. 3) Continuous need for professional support: Most patients relied solely on professionals for fine-tuning the stimulation rather than using their handheld controller, even if this entailed numerous visits to a remote hospital. 4) Balancing symptom relief and side-effects: Patients expressed difficulties in finding the optimal match between decrease of symptoms and stimulation-induced side-effects. The in-depth interviews of patients on chronic DBS about their perceptions of living with an implanted device provided useful insights that would be difficult to capture by quantitative evaluations. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  7. A Qualitative Exploration of the Lived Experiences of Patients Before and After Ileostomy Creation as a Result of Surgical Management for Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Andrew; Leach, Bethan

    2017-01-01

    Patient experiences pre- and post-ileostomy creation as a result of severe Crohn's Disease are underresearched. A qualitative phenomenological design involving a purposeful sampling approach was used to capture the lived physical and psychosocial transition of patients with Crohn's Disease before and after ileostomy formation. Patients were recruited from the membership of the United Kingdom Ileostomy Association; inclusion criteria stipulated participants must speak English and have a diagnosis of Crohn's Disease and subsequent stoma formation. Ten (10) patients (6 women, 4 men, ranging in age from 34 to 83 years with Crohn's Disease and an ileostomy [mean time with stoma 18.3 years, range 3-36 years]) participated in indepth, semistructured interviews with questions on sociodemographic characteristics along with questions informed by the relevant literature regarding life before and after the ileostomy. All interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed verbatim. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to examine the data and identify and interpret themes. Participants were asked to comment on these themes to ensure they were a realistic interpretation of their experiences. Two (2) major themes emerged that embodied ileostomy formation: being controlled by Crohn's and transition to a new life with an ileostomy. Crohn's symptoms controlled daily activities such as work and socializing due, in part, to the need to be in close proximity to toilet facilities. The ileostomy facilitated a transition to a new life that allowed patients to re-engage with work and social activities. One minor theme emerged: memories of Crohn's. Participants said their memories of Crohn's affected life with an ileostomy. Where Crohn's controlled every aspect of people's lives pre-ileostomy formation, the creation of the ileostomy was a positive experience because it helped manage Crohn's symptoms. Memories of life pre-ileostomy may affect individuals' behavior post

  8. Living With Chronic Lower Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pooler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I present a phenomenological study of individuals’ experiences of living with moderate to very severe chronic lower pulmonary disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or both. Phenomenology is a philosophy, distinct from descriptive or thematic research, which is useful as a foundation for scientific inquiry. In this study, I used the lens of Merleau-Ponty to understand and interpret participants’ experiences of living with pulmonary disease, and the approach of van Manen for analysis. I conclude that in chronic pulmonary disease, awareness of breathing and the body is experienced in the sounds, sensations, and signals of breathing and the body, and in the experiences of the body-in-the-world. Central themes of being-in-the-world from the study describe the disruption of the embodied phenomenological self: Participants experienced slowing down, doing less, and having to stop due to shortness of breath. Both chronic and acute dyspnea were prevalent and the taken-for-granted aspects of daily activities were disrupted. Findings of this study have implications for public and patient education, and opportunities for integration of experiential aspects within nursing education and practice.

  9. Living With Chronic Lower Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooler, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I present a phenomenological study of individuals’ experiences of living with moderate to very severe chronic lower pulmonary disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or both). Phenomenology is a philosophy, distinct from descriptive or thematic research, which is useful as a foundation for scientific inquiry. In this study, I used the lens of Merleau-Ponty to understand and interpret participants’ experiences of living with pulmonary disease, and the approach of van Manen for analysis. I conclude that in chronic pulmonary disease, awareness of breathing and the body is experienced in the sounds, sensations, and signals of breathing and the body, and in the experiences of the body-in-the-world. Central themes of being-in-the-world from the study describe the disruption of the embodied phenomenological self: Participants experienced slowing down, doing less, and having to stop due to shortness of breath. Both chronic and acute dyspnea were prevalent and the taken-for-granted aspects of daily activities were disrupted. Findings of this study have implications for public and patient education, and opportunities for integration of experiential aspects within nursing education and practice. PMID:28462289

  10. Living with advanced Parkinson's disease: a constant struggle with unpredictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Ostergaard, Karen

    2011-02-01

    This paper is a report of an exploration of patients' lifeworld and way of managing life with advanced Parkinson's disease prior to Deep Brain Stimulation and what they expect from life following this treatment. Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, which is initially well-treated with L-dopa. Living with Parkinson's disease means living with the experience of continuous loss of independence and self-esteem and unpredictable ON/OFF phenomena. Thus, in the advanced stage of the disease, treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation may become relevant. Eleven patients eligible for Deep Brain Stimulation were interviewed prior to treatment. Data were collected in 2007 and analysed according to the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of van Manen, using the four existentials as analytic tools. Living with advanced Parkinson's disease can be described as the experience of living with and managing unpredictability. The disease gradually took over, and participants had to struggle with unpredictability on a daily basis. Themes in relation to this were: The body - setting the agenda, Always a struggle to be on time, Living in dependence and compromise - being a burden, and Living with restrained space and changes in social life. Parkinson's disease leads to profound bodily restrictions. Living with an unpredictable body affects all aspects of life, and nurses need to be aware of the impact the disease has on the entire lifeworld, and how this may affect the way treatment is perceived. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Tuberculosis infection and disease in children living in households of Filipino patients with tuberculosis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Vergara, R M L; Sia, I G; Tupasi, T E; Alcañeses, M R; Orillaza, R B; Co, V; Quelapio, M I D; Beltran, G; Legaspi, J D; Rostrata, M P C; Tecson, M E B; Corpuz, M L S B

    2003-12-01

    DOTS Clinic with a DOTS-Plus pilot project for the management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in a high burden country. To determine the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) infection and disease among pediatric household contacts of patients with pulmonary TB (PTB). Cross-sectional study. One hundred and fifty-three children aged 0-15 years in the households of 62 bacteriologically confirmed PTB patients, including 44 with MDR-TB, were studied. BCG scars were noted, and tuberculin skin test (TST), screening chest radiography, and sputum or gastric aspirate smear and culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in those with radiographic findings suggestive of PTB were done. For children in this study, the prevalences of latent TB infection (LTBI), radiographically diagnosed pulmonary TB, and bacillary pulmonary TB were 69.2%, 3.3%, and 0.65%, respectively. Only age > or = 5 years was found to be a significant predictor of LTBI (OR 3.17, 95%CI 1.43-7.01). Contact investigation for active case-finding and early treatment of TB in children from households of patients with active PTB is essential for TB control. Further study on a more precise definition of TB infection and strategies for control in this population will be pursued.

  12. An ambient assisted living approach in designing domiciliary services combined with innovative technologies for patients with Alzheimer's disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Filippo; Aquilano, Michela; Arvati, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most disabling diseases to affect large numbers of elderly people worldwide. Because of the characteristics of this disease, patients with AD require daily assistance from service providers both in nursing homes and at home. Domiciliary assistance has been demonstrated to be cost effective and efficient in the first phase of the disease, helping to slow down the course of the illness, improve the quality of life and care, and extend independence for patients and caregivers. In this context, the aim of this work is to demonstrate the technical effectiveness and acceptability of an innovative domiciliary smart sensor system for providing domiciliary assistance to patients with AD which has been developed with an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) approach. The design, development, testing, and evaluation of the innovative technological solution were performed by a multidisciplinary team. In all, 15 sociomedical operators and 14 patients with AD were directly involved in defining the end-users' needs and requirements, identifying design principles with acceptability and usability features and evaluating the technological solutions before and after the real experimentation. A modular technological system was produced to help caregivers continuously monitor the health status, safety, and daily activities of patients with AD. During the experimentation, the acceptability, utility, usability, and efficacy of this system were evaluated as quite positive. The experience described in this article demonstrated that AAL technologies are feasible and effective nowadays and can be actively used in assisting patients with AD in their homes. The extensive involvement of caregivers in the experimentation allowed to assess that there is, through the use of the technological system, a proven improvement in care performance and efficiency of care provision by both formal and informal caregivers and consequently an increase in the quality of life of

  13. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and their caregivers: quantitative and qualitative analyses. This PhD project was carried out between April 2004 and March 2007 during my employment as project coordinator in the Memory Disorder Research...... and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the second study, data were collected using semi-structured research interviews with 11 patients before their participation in the DAISY intervention programme. Grounded theory analysis of the interview data revealed that the basic social psychological problem...... faced by the patients was: their awareness of decline in personal dignity and value. Coping strategies used to meet these problems were adaptations to the altered situation in order to maintain a feeling of well-being. In the third study, data were collected using individual semi-structured research...

  14. Living with HIV: Patients Perspective

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-06-04

    This podcast showcases three people who are living with HIV. The patients share their experiences of being diagnosed with HIV, of the treatments they are undergoing, and on taking responsibility for their health.  Created: 6/4/2009 by Division of HIV and AIDS Prevention (DHAP), National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STD, and Tuberculosis Prevention ( NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/4/2009.

  15. The Burden of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease on Patients' Daily Lives: A Cross-Sectional Study Conducted in a Primary Care Setting in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelović, Miloš; Babić, Tamara; Dragicević, Igor; Corac, Aleksandar; Goran Trajković

    2015-01-01

    Recent data from the studies conducted in the Western countries have proved that patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have significantly impaired health-related quality of life compared to general population. The study is aimed at evaluating the burden of reflux symptoms on patients'health-related quality of life. The study involved 1,593 patients with diagnosed gastroesophageal reflux disease.The Serbian version of a generic self-administered Centers for Disease Control and Prevention questionnaire was used. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, Pearson chi-square test and a multiple regression model. Among all participants, 43.9% reported fair or poor health. Mean value of unhealthy days during the past 30 days was 10.4 days, physically unhealthy days 6.4 days, mentally unhealthy days 5.3 days and activity limitation days 4.3 days. Furthermore, 24.8% participants reported having ≥ 14 unhealthy days, 14.9% had 14 physically unhealthy days, 11.8% reported 14 mentally unhealthy days, and 9.4% had ≥ 14 activity limitation days. This study addressed complex relationships between reflux symptoms and patients'impaired everyday lives.

  16. The Glittre-ADL test reflects functional performance measured by physical activities of daily living in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Karloh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The Glittre-ADL test (TGlittre is a valid and reliable test for the evaluation of functional capacity and involves multiple physical activities of daily living (PADL, which are known to be troublesome to patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. However, it is still unknown if this test is also able to reflect the functional performance of patients with COPD. Objective To investigate whether the TGlittre reflects the functional performance of COPD patients and whether the necessary time to complete the TGlittre and the PADL varies according to disease severity. Method Thirty-eight patients with COPD (age 65, SD=7 years; forced expiratory volume in the first second 41.3, SD=15.2% predicted underwent anthropometric and lung function assessments and were submitted to the TGlittre and PADL measurement. Results TGlittre performance correlated significantly (p<0.05 with PADL variables, such as time sitting (r=0.50, walking (r=-0.46, number of steps taken (r=–0.53, walking movement intensity (r=–0.66, walking energy expenditure (r=-0.50, and total energy expenditure (r=–0.33. TGlittre performance was not significantly different in patients among the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD spirometric stages, but walking and sitting time were significantly lower and greater, respectively, in severe and very severe patients compared to those with moderate disease (p<0.05. Conclusion The performance on the TGlittre correlates with walking and sitting time and other real life PADL measurements. The severity of the disease is associated with the differences in the level of physical activity in daily life more than in functional capacity.

  17. Living Well with Parkinson's Disease Is an Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Living Well with Parkinson's Disease is an Art Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents What ... More "Living Well with Parkinson's Disease is an Art" Articles Living Well with Parkinson's Disease is an ...

  18. Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Dream Robber: Living with Parkinson's disease Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents ... effects of levodopa called dyskinesias. Additional Information on Parkinson's Web Links MedlinePlus: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ ...

  19. Living with heart disease and angina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood sugar at recommended levels. Living a Healthy Lifestyle Some controllable risk factors for heart disease are: ... and partially hydrogenated or hydrogenated fats. These are unhealthy fats that are often found in fried foods, ...

  20. Enhancing memory and activities of daily living in patients with early Alzheimer's disease using memory stimulation intervention: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Bajpai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of memory stimulation intervention added to donepezil treatment as compared to donepezil alone in patients with early Alzheimer's disease (eAD. Materials and Methods: Patients in the combined treatment group (CTG = 21 received standard dosages of donepezil and weekly memory stimulation activities sessions for 2 months, whereas the treatment as usual group (TAU = 22 received only standard dosages of donepezil. Each session had extensive tasks on memory and its implied practice on instrumental activities of daily living. After 8 sessions, both groups were evaluated for changes in memory and functional outcomes by administering the mini-mental state examination (MMSE, memory (Postgraduate Institute of Memory Scale, and instrumental activities of daily living scale (IADLS. This trial was registered on the Clinical Trials Registry - India (CTRI/2014/04/004550. Results: Statistical analysis was done using independent t-test, which revealed a significant difference between the groups on MMSE, memory, and IADLS post intervention. The MMSE score in the TAU group, while it increased in the CTG group by 4 points. A similar trend was evident in the memory and IADLS scores as well. Effect size in the CTG group was relatively large as compared to the TAU group where the effects were small and negative on some outcomes. Conclusion: The CTG group showed positive treatment effect on cognitive tests suggesting that combined memory stimulation and donepezil treatment has potential to improve the cognitive and functional performance of patients with eAD.

  1. Effect of a medical food on body mass index and activities of daily living in patients with Alzheimer's disease: secondary analyses from a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, P J G H; Verhey, F R J; Olde Rikkert, M G M; Twisk, J W R; Swinkels, S H N; Scheltens, P

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the effect of a medical food (Souvenaid) on body mass index (BMI) and functional abilities in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/INTERVENTION /MEASUREMENTS: These analyses were performed on data from a 12-week, double-blind, randomized, controlled, multicenter, proof-of-concept study with a similarly designed and exploratory 12-week extension period. Patients with mild AD (Mini-Mental State Examination score of 20-26) were randomized to receive either the active product or an iso-caloric control product. While primary outcomes included measures of cognition, the 23-item Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living (ADCS-ADL) scale was included as a secondary outcome. Both ADCS-ADL and BMI were assessed at baseline and Weeks 6, 12 and 24. Data were analyzed using a repeated-measures mixed model. Overall, data suggested an increased BMI in the active versus the control group at Week 24 (ITT: p = 0.07; PP: p = 0.03), but no treatment effect on ADCS-ADL was observed. However, baseline BMI was found to be a significant treatment effect modifier (ITT: p = 0.04; PP: p = 0.05), and an increase in ADCS-ADL was observed at Week 12 in patients with a 'low' baseline BMI (ITT: p = 0.02; PP: p = 0.04). These data indicate that baseline BMI significantly impacts the effect of Souvenaid on functional abilities. In addition, there was a suggestion that Souvenaid increased BMI.

  2. Patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, James R; Cornell, Danielle L; Kaplan, Bruce; Howard, Richard J

    2008-03-01

    Living donor kidney transplantation has several advantages for patients with end-stage renal disease. However, many patients are reluctant to pursue this treatment option, preferring instead to wait for a deceased donor organ. To examine predictors of patients' willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. One hundred thirty-two adult patients awaiting kidney transplantation who were enrolled in a randomized trial examining the effectiveness of education on rates of live donor kidney transplantation completed a baseline rating of their willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. Also, patients completed measures of knowledge and concerns about living donation and a rating of perceived health. Slightly more than half the patients (56.1%) had low willingness to talk to others about living donation. The following variables were associated with higher willingness to talk to others: white race (odds ratio, 3.31; confidence interval, 1.7-7.4), college education (odds ratio, 3.43, confidence interval, 2.0-5.6), fewer concerns about living donor kidney transplantation (odds ratio, 0.31; confidence interval, 0.2-0.6), and less favorable perceptions of their current health status (odds ratio, 4.31; confidence interval, 2.6-7.6). White race, more education, less concern about living donor kidney transplantation, and poorer perceived health are associated with greater willingness to talk to others about living kidney donation. These findings have important implications for educating patients about living donor kidney transplantation.

  3. Effects of donepezil on activities of daily living: integrated analysis of patient data from studies in mild, moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauthier, Serge; Lopez, Oscar Lopez; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to develop a standardization method to pool data recorded on different activities of daily living (ADL) scales in order to reduce variability of functional outcome data from Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials and to better evaluate the effect of donepezil treatment on function in p...

  4. Effects of donepezil on activities of daily living: integrated analysis of patient data from studies in mild, moderate and severe Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauthier, Serge; Lopez, Oscar Lopez; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2010-01-01

    We aimed to develop a standardization method to pool data recorded on different activities of daily living (ADL) scales in order to reduce variability of functional outcome data from Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials and to better evaluate the effect of donepezil treatment on function...

  5. Validation of the Portuguese version of the London Chest Activity of Daily Living Scale (LCADL in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Pitta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: While there are several subjective English tools, such as the London Chest Activity of Daily Living scale (LCADL, aimed at assessing dyspnoea during activities of daily living (ADL in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, none of these questionnaires has ever been translated into Portuguese. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reproducibility of the LCADL's Portuguese version in patients with COPD. Methods: 31 patients with COPD (17 male; 69 ± 7 years; FEV1 44 ± 15%predicted completed the Portuguese version of the LCADL twice with a 1-week interval. The traditional Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, already validated in Portuguese, was used as the criterion method. Results: There were no significant differences between test and retest of the LCADL. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient between test and retest concerning the different scale components was Self-care r = 0.96; Domestic r = 0.99; Physical r = 0.92; Leisure r = 0.95; Total Score r = 0.98. There were significant correlations of the LCADL Total Score with the SGRQ's different components and total score (0.36 < r < 0.74; p < 0.05 for all. The LCADL Total Score was also significantly correlated with the 6-minute walking distance test (r =  -0.48; p = 0.006. Conclusion: The Portuguese version of the LCADL is valid and reproducible in patients with COPD, making this study a new and important tool for assessing the limitations of performing ADL in this population. Resumo: Introdução: Diversos questionários desenvolvidos em língua inglesa visam avaliar especificamente a limitação pela dispnéia durante actividades da vida diá ria (AVD em doentes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC, como a escala London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL. No entanto, nenhum destes questionários foi ainda traduzido para a l

  6. Chronic complications and quality of life of patients living with sickle cell disease and receiving care in three hospitals in Cameroon: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andong, Anne M; Ngouadjeu, Eveline D T; Bekolo, Cavin E; Verla, Vincent S; Nebongo, Daniel; Mboue-Djieka, Yannick; Choukem, Simeon-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is associated with chronic multisystem complications that significantly influence the quality of life (QOL) of patients early in their life. Although sub-Saharan Africa bears 75% of the global burden of SCD, there is a paucity of data on these complications and their effects on the QOL. We aimed to record these chronic complications, to estimate the QOL, and to identify the corresponding risk factors in patients with SCD receiving care in three hospitals in Cameroon. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was used to collect data from consecutive consenting patients. Information recorded included data on the yearly frequency of painful crisis, the types of SCD, and the occurrence of chronic complications. A 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) standard questionnaire that examines the level of physical and mental well-being, was administered to all eligible participants. Data were analyzed with STATA® software. Of 175 participants included, 93 (53.1%) were female and 111 (aged ≥14 years) were eligible for QOL assessment. The median (interquartile range, IQR) age at diagnosis was 4.0 (2.0-8.0) years and the median (IQR) number of yearly painful crisis was 3.0 (1.0-7.0). The most frequent chronic complications reported were: nocturnal enuresis, chronic leg ulcers, osteomyelitis and priapism (30.9%, 24.6%, 19.4%, and 18.3% respectively). The prevalence of stroke and avascular necrosis of the hip were 8.0% and 13.1% respectively. The median (IQR) physical and mental scores were 47.3 (43.9-58.5) and 41.0 (38.8-44.6) respectively. Age and chronic complications such as stroke and avascular necrosis were independently associated with poor QOL. In this population of patients living with SCD, chronic complications are frequent and their QOL is consequently poor. Our results highlight the need for national guidelines for SCD control, which should include new-born screening programs and strategies to prevent chronic complications.

  7. Patient-reported outcomes in adults with congenital heart disease: Inter-country variation, standard of living and healthcare system factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Philip; Kovacs, Adrienne H.; Luyckx, Koen; Thomet, Corina; Budts, Werner; Enomoto, Junko; Sluman, Maayke A.; Yang, Hsiao-Ling; Jackson, Jamie L.; Khairy, Paul; Cook, Stephen C.; Subramanyan, Raghavan; Alday, Luis; Eriksen, Katrine; Dellborg, Mikael; Berghammer, Malin; Johansson, Bengt; Mackie, Andrew S.; Menahem, Samuel; Caruana, Maryanne; Veldtman, Gruschen; Soufi, Alexandra; Fernandes, Susan M.; White, Kamila; Callus, Edward; Kutty, Shelby; van Bulck, Liesbet; Apers, Silke

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Geographical differences in patient-reported outcomes (PROs) of adults with congenital heart disease (ConHD) have been observed, but are poorly understood. We aimed to: (1) investigate inter-country variation in PROs in adults with ConHD; (2) identify patient-related predictors of PROs; and

  8. Disorder or delusion? Living with Morgellons disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lindsay; Baier, Marjorie

    2009-08-01

    Whether Morgellons disease is a delusional disorder or even a disease has been a mystery for more than 300 years. Symptoms of Morgellons include crawling and stinging sensations, feeling of "bugs" and/or fiber-like material beneath the skin, disabling fatigue, and memory loss. The cause, transmission, and treatment are unknown. Research about Morgellons is staggeringly sparse and limited in scope. However, in recent years, discussion about Morgellons has become more common because of the Internet and online support groups. Mental health professionals and the general public need to be aware of the signs, symptoms, and treatment of this disease. Focusing on the disease and listening to patients can make a difference in the way health care professionals provide the best possible care for people with Morgellons. Copyright (c) 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Effect of a medical food on body mass index and activities of daily living in patients with Alzheimer's disease: secondary analyses from a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, P.J.G.H.; Verhey, F.R.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Swinkels, S.H.; Scheltens, P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of a medical food (Souvenaid) on body mass index (BMI) and functional abilities in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Design/setting/participants/intervention /measurements: These analyses were performed on data from a 12-week, double-blind,

  10. Effect of a medical food on body mass index and activities of daily living in patients with Alzheimer's disease: secondary analyses from a randomized, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, P.J.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Scheltens, P.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of a medical food (Souvenaid) on body mass index (BMI) and functional abilities in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). DESIGN/SETTING/PARTICIPANTS/INTERVENTION /MEASUREMENTS: These analyses were performed on data from a 12-week, double-blind,

  11. Schizophrenia causes significant burden to patients' and caregivers' lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkultecka-Dębek, Monika; Miernik, Katarzyna; Stelmachowski, Jarosław; Jakovljević, Miro; Jukić, Vlado; Aadamsoo, Kaire; Janno, Sven; Bitter, István; Tolna, Judit; Jarema, Marek; Jankovic, Slobodan; Pecenak, Jan; Vavrusova, Livia; Tavčar, Rok; Walczak, Jacek; Talbot, Darren; Augustyńska, Joanna

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious public health problem and is ranked among the most disabling diseases in the world. The sub-study presented here was part of a larger project to characterize the burden of schizophrenia on healthcare systems and on individuals living with the disease in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). This sub-study aimed to assess and analyze the impact of schizophrenia on many aspects of the lives of patients and caregivers. Psychiatrists from selected centers in seven Central and Eastern European countries were asked to complete a questionnaire in order to collect information about the disease history, characteristics, treatment protocols and resources used for each randomly selected patient. All data were statistically analyzed and compared between countries. Data from 961 patients with schizophrenia (mean age 40.7 years, 45.1% female) were included in the analysis. The mean number of days spent in hospital per patient per year across all seven countries was 25.3 days. Hospitalization occurred on average once per year, with psychiatrist visits 9.4 times per year. Of the patients in the study, 61% were single, 12% divorced and 22% married or cohabiting. Almost 84% were living with relatives or a partner; only 17% lived alone and, on average, 25% of patients received support from social workers. Relatives provided care for approximately 60% of patients and 4% of them had to stop working in order to do so. Twenty-nine percent of the patients were unemployed, and 56% received a disability pension or were retired, with only 19% in full-time employment or education. Schizophrenia has a significant effect on the lives of patients and caregivers and impacts their social integration.

  12. Living with illness and self-transcendence: the lived experience of patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Mei; Tseng, Ying-Hua; Hsin, Yu-Mei; Chou, Fan-Hao; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of patients afflicted with spinal muscular atrophy. Existing research studies on spinal muscular atrophy address the physical and psychological effects and complications of the disease; they also provide suggestions for how to improve the current management of this disease. However, information is limited on the disease process and the lived experience of spinal muscular atrophy patients. A phenomenological approach was conducted. Through 18 in-depth interviews recorded by a pen voice recorder, this study collected data obtained from a purposive sample of nine patients from the, 'Taiwan spinal muscular atrophy Families,' between November 2010-August 2011. The audio recordings were transcribed verbatim and data were analysed using Colaizzi's steps. Four themes and eight subthemes were identified: a loss of control (loss of muscular strength and independence), breaking limitations (assistive device use and mobility design), transcending limitations (independence/autonomy and social development) and living with hope (cherishing life and self-control). The results showed that the lived experiences of the spinal muscular atrophy patients involved living with illness, transcending the self and pursuing the meaning of life. Facing a life-threatening illness, these patients made self-adjustments in their lifestyles and exerted themselves to positively cope with hardships and maintain dignity and self-control. These findings could serve as evidence-based practice resources for healthcare professionals in helping individuals and their family members gain an in-depth understanding of spinal muscular atrophy's progression and life course and assist individuals in improving self-integrity to with hope. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Identifying Symptom Patterns in People Living With HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalie L.; Azuero, Andres; Vance, David E.; Richman, Joshua S.; Moneyham, Linda D.; Raper, James L.; Heath, Sonya L.; Kempf, Mirjam-Colette

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms guide disease management, and patients frequently report HIV-related symptoms, but HIV symptom patterns reported by patients have not been described in the era of improved antiretroviral treatment. The objectives of our study were to investigate the prevalence and burden of symptoms in people living with HIV and attending an outpatient clinic. The prevalence, burden, and bothersomeness of symptoms reported by patients in routine clinic visits during 2011 were assessed using the 20-item HIV Symptom Index. Principal component analysis was used to identify symptom clusters and relationships between groups using appropriate statistic techniques. Two main clusters were identified. The most prevalent and bothersome symptoms were muscle aches/joint pain, fatigue, and poor sleep. A third of patients had seven or more symptoms, including the most burdensome symptoms. Even with improved antiretroviral drug side-effect profiles, symptom prevalence and burden, independent of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, are high. PMID:26790340

  14. [Live style and risk of lifestyle diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kábrt, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome included obesity, diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension and disorder of lipid metabolism are serious complication affecting many people of economic advanced countries. Unhealthy live style with limited physical activity and overfeeding are the main cause of this disorder. Adjustment of the live style with regular physical activity has the better result compared with a diet intervention alone.

  15. The daily lives of people with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Vivian Valcarenghi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To understand the daily lives of people with Parkinson's disease. Method: Qualitative research, using as methodological and theoretical referential the Grounded Theory and Symbolic Interactionism, respectively. The in-depth interview was conducted with 30 people with Parkinson's disease. Results: From data analysis, three themes were selected: Living with the disease - living with the treatment and changes in lifestyle; Modifying of one's job performance - revealing incapacity for work and the need to anticipate retirement and; Living with the stigma - the feeling of prejudice against the disease and the perceived limitations of the health services. Final considerations: Living with a chronic and non-transferable disease encompasses social, physical and cultural effects, along with the personal experiences of each unique individual. This study assists the improvement of care to people with the disease, because the care practice emerges from the interactions between the subjects.

  16. The daily lives of people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcarenghi, Rafaela Vivian; Alvarez, Angela Maria; Santos, Silvana Sidney Costa; Siewert, Josiane Steil; Nunes, Simony Fabíola Lopes; Tomasi, Andrelise Viana Rosa

    2018-01-01

    To understand the daily lives of people with Parkinson's disease. Qualitative research, using as methodological and theoretical referential the Grounded Theory and Symbolic Interactionism, respectively. The in-depth interview was conducted with 30 people with Parkinson's disease. From data analysis, three themes were selected: Living with the disease - living with the treatment and changes in lifestyle; Modifying of one's job performance - revealing incapacity for work and the need to anticipate retirement and; Living with the stigma - the feeling of prejudice against the disease and the perceived limitations of the health services. Living with a chronic and non-transferable disease encompasses social, physical and cultural effects, along with the personal experiences of each unique individual. This study assists the improvement of care to people with the disease, because the care practice emerges from the interactions between the subjects.

  17. Comparable Short- and Long-term Outcomes in Living Donor and Deceased Donor Liver Transplantations for Patients With Model for End-stage Liver Disease Scores ≥35 in a Hepatitis-B Endemic Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, Kenneth S H; Fung, James Y Y; Chan, Albert C Y; Dai, Wing Chiu; Sharr, William W; Cheung, Tan To; Chan, See Ching; Lo, Chung Mau

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate if living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) should be offered to patients with Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores ≥35. No data was available to support LDLT of such patients. Data of 672 consecutive adult liver transplant recipients from 2005 to 2014 at our center were reviewed. Patients with MELD scores ≥35 were divided into the deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) group and the LDLT group and were compared. Univariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors affecting survival. The LDLT group (n = 54) had younger (33 yrs vs 50 yrs, P standard-liver-volume rates (51.28% vs 99.76%, P Hong Kong, where most waitlisted patients have acute-on-chronic liver failure from hepatitis B, LDLT is a wise alternative to DDLT.

  18. Epizootiology of Newcastle disease in two live bird markets in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a devastating viral disease of poultry worldwide. This study was therefore undertaken to understand the role of live bird markets (LBMs) in the epizootiology of ND in Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was administered to poultry dealers and cloacal swab sampling of live birds in two LBMs in ...

  19. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    these strategies can be effective as long as the strategy leads to 1) containment of guilt, fear, anxiety, and grief, 2) generation of hope , 3...patients with a sense of hope and a feeling that the disease can be coped with. The most difficult aspect of living with inflammatory bowel disease is...Recovery (mastectomy patients) and the Ostomy Association. They consist of people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Members support one another by sharing

  20. Living in a Patient-Centric Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dennis H

    2016-12-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer face a number of challenges in terms of treatment, cure of their underlying malignant condition, and quality of survivorship. This presentation will focus on the patient perception of both the quality of care and the empathy and availability of the head and neck oncology team. It has become evident that the quality of survivorship plays a central role in the patient's decision-making process. The process of decision making by the patient facing head and neck cancer and the impact on treatment choices will be explored. The ability of the patient and her or his support system to navigate through the increasingly complicated health care system will be considered, with an emphasis on strategies for success. Finally, the role of the of the head and neck surgeon, and the need for physician wellness in predicating successful patient outcomes will be considered. The ultimate goal of achieving optimal care, superior patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction is the true objective of the concept of living in a patient-centric universe.

  1. The experiences of patients and carers living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeder, Stephen R; Jowsey, Tanisha; McNab, Justin W

    2018-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing in prevalence and straining health systems globally. This creates a so-called 'burden of disease', which can be traced in terms of fiscal health system matters and in terms of quality of life and lived experiences of people with NCDs. The United Nations has called for a global agenda to manage NCDs and reduce their burden. The purpose of this article is to summarise key findings from the Serious and Continuing Illness Policy and Practice Study concerning patients’ and carers’ experiences of multimorbid NCDs in Australia. We focus on the relevance of findings for policy and general practitioners in Australia. We suggest that a complex multimorbidity policy is needed to contextualise and guide single-illness NCD policies. Our research suggests that specialist NCD nurses and allied health professionals could have important roles in improving care coordination between general practices and community health centres.  .

  2. "Rigor mortis" in a live patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Murali

    2010-03-01

    Rigor mortis is conventionally a postmortem change. Its occurrence suggests that death has occurred at least a few hours ago. The authors report a case of "Rigor Mortis" in a live patient after cardiac surgery. The likely factors that may have predisposed such premortem muscle stiffening in the reported patient are, intense low cardiac output status, use of unusually high dose of inotropic and vasopressor agents and likely sepsis. Such an event may be of importance while determining the time of death in individuals such as described in the report. It may also suggest requirement of careful examination of patients with muscle stiffening prior to declaration of death. This report is being published to point out the likely controversies that might arise out of muscle stiffening, which should not always be termed rigor mortis and/ or postmortem.

  3. Quality of life outcomes in patients living with stoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaraki, Fakhrialsadat; Vafaie, Mohamad; Behboo, Roobic; Maghsoodi, Nakisa; Esmaeilpour, Sahar; Safaee, Azadeh

    2012-09-01

    Despite efforts to maintain the intestinal tissue and treat gastrointestinal disease, a large number of patients undergo ostomy surgery each year. Using stoma reduces the patient's quality of life (QOL) greatly. Although there are approximately 3000 patients in Iran; there is little information about the impact of stoma on their QOL. The study aims to evaluate QOL of stoma patients using a special measurement tool. This survey was a cross-sectional study that was conducted on 102 random samples of stoma patients. The City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy Questionnaire was used for collecting demographic and clinical information and evaluating QOL. Univariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of QOL. The mean score for the overall QOL for stoma patients was 7.48 ± 0.9. 70% of patients were dissatisfied with sexual activities. More than half of them reported feelings of depression following stoma surgery. Univariate analysis indicated that factors such as the type of ostomy (temporary/permanent), the underlying disease that had led to the stoma, depression, problem with location of ostomy, and change in clothing style had significant effects on overall QOL and its subscales (P ostomy were statistically significant in predicting patients' QOL and its subscales (P < 0.05). The findings demonstrated that living with stoma influences the overall aspect of QOL. Education for the patients and their families is important for improving the stoma patients' QOL. Sexual and psychological consultation may also improve patients' QOL.

  4. Loss of ability to work and ability to live independently in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Heckman, Michael G; Wider, Christian; Putzke, John D; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J

    2012-02-01

    Ability to work and live independently is of particular concern for patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied a series of PD patients able to work or live independently at baseline, and evaluated potential risk factors for two separate outcomes: loss of ability to work and loss of ability to live independently. The series comprised 495 PD patients followed prospectively. Ability to work and ability to live independently were based on clinical interview and examination. Cox regression models adjusted for age and disease duration were used to evaluate associations of baseline characteristics with loss of ability to work and loss of ability to live independently. Higher UPDRS dyskinesia score, UPDRS instability score, UPDRS total score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, and presence of intellectual impairment at baseline were all associated with increased risk of future loss of ability to work and loss of ability to live independently (P ≤ 0.0033). Five years after initial visit, for patients ≤70 years of age with a disease duration ≤4 years at initial visit, 88% were still able to work and 90% to live independently. These estimates worsened as age and disease duration at initial visit increased; for patients >70 years of age with a disease duration >4 years, estimates at 5 years were 43% able to work and 57% able to live independently. The information provided in this study can offer useful information for PD patients in preparing for future ability to perform activities of daily living. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Living Well with Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Habits People with sickle cell disease should drink 8 to 10 glasses of water every day and eat healthy food. Try not to get too hot, too cold, or too tired. Children can, and should, participate in ... tired, and drink plenty of water. Look for clinical studies New ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives: Patient Admission Video

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-01

    This podcast is for hospital patients and visitors. It emphasizes two key points to help prevent infections: the importance of practicing hand hygiene while in the hospital, and that it's appropriate to ask or remind healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene.  Created: 5/1/2008 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 6/19/2008.

  7. Renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonpheng, Boonphiphop; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Wijarnpreecha, Karn

    2018-04-01

    Celiac disease, an inflammatory disease of small bowel caused by sensitivity to dietary gluten and related protein, affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the Western world. Extra-intestinal symptoms and associated diseases are increasingly recognized including diabetes mellitus type 1, thyroid disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and ataxia. There have also been a number of reports of various types of renal involvement in patients with celiac disease including diabetes nephropathy, IgA nephropathy, membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, nephrotic syndrome related to malabsorption, oxalate nephropathy, and associations of celiac disease with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease. This review aims to present the current literature on possible pathologic mechanisms underlying renal disease in patients with celiac disease.

  8. [Social participation and activities of daily living of patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases : support by self-help, exercise therapy and new media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattukat, K; Thyrolf, A

    2014-02-01

    Rheumatic patients are at risk of social isolation and physical inactivity which can have a significant impact on physical and mental health. Only every seventh patient is organized in a self-help group (SHG), most of them in the German League Against Rheumatism (GLAR). Members of a SHG are socially and physically more active and take part in exercise therapy (ET) more often. Depending on the study, the utilization of ET ranges from 25 % to 71 %. The functional training as the most attended offer of the GLAR showed positive effects at the physical and psychological levels. To motivate difficult to reach patients to engage in self-help and regular exercise, further development of exercise programs with individually tailored intensive strength and endurance elements as well as the increased use of new media seems promising. The Internet provides various opportunities for networking and social participation especially for severely impaired and temporally less flexible patients.

  9. Everyday life and social relations in home-living patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers: Quantitative and qualitative analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lisbeth Villemoes

    2007-01-01

    and the presence of neuropsychiatric symptoms. In the second study, data were collected using semi-structured research interviews with 11 patients before their participation in the DAISY intervention programme. Grounded theory analysis of the interview data revealed that the basic social psychological problem...... with the changes they face in relation to everyday life and social relations; and 3) to identify and analyse the experience of patients and their spousal caregivers concerning the impact of an intensive psychosocial intervention programme with tailored counselling, education courses and support groups, conducted...

  10. In-depth statistical analysis of the use of a website providing patients' narratives on lifestyle change when living with chronic back pain or coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweier, Rebecca; Grande, Gesine; Richter, Cynthia; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Romppel, Matthias

    2018-07-01

    To investigate the use of lebensstil-aendern.de ("lifestyle change"), a website providing peer narratives of experiences with successful lifestyle change, and to analyze whether peer model characteristics, clip content, and media type have an influence on the number of visitors, dwell time, and exit rates. An in-depth statistical analysis of website use with multilevel regression analyses. In two years, lebensstil-aendern.de attracted 12,844 visitors. The in-depth statistical analysis of usage rates demonstrated that audio clips were less popular than video or text-only clips, longer clips attracted more visitors, and clips by younger and female interviewees were preferred. User preferences for clip content categories differed between heart and back pain patients. Clips about stress management drew the smallest numbers of visitors in both indication modules. Patients are interested in the experiences of others. Because the quality of information for user-generated content is generally low, healthcare providers should include quality-assured patient narratives in their interventions. User preferences for content, medium, and peer characteristics need to be taken into account. If healthcare providers decide to include patient experiences in their websites, they should plan their intervention according to the different needs and preferences of users. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Palliative care needs of patients living with end-stage kidney disease not treated with renal replacement therapy: An exploratory qualitative study from Blantyre, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya J. Bates

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: This study reports on four thematic areas which warrant further quantitative and qualitative studies both in Malawi and other low-resource settings, where a growing number of patients with ESKD unable to access RRT will require palliative care in the coming years.

  12. Living with coeliac disease: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, C; Howard, R

    2014-02-01

    Coeliac disease can be controlled only through adherence to a gluten-free diet. This diet is highly restrictive and can be challenging to maintain. It has been linked with elevated levels of psychological distress, including depression, anxiety and social phobia. Narratives on living with coeliac disease were written by 130 adult members of Coeliac UK (mean age 52.7 years; mean time since diagnosis 10.2 years; 67% sample female; 28% male). Qualitative analysis using grounded theory methods identified five key categories: living with widespread ignorance; social invisibility; creating a coeliac community; a changed identity; grief - and accepting the trade-off. A psychosocial model of living with coeliac disease was constructed from the findings, the central category of which was the changed identity of those diagnosed with the condition. Grief was experienced in relation to a loss of the former diet, changed personal and social identities, loss of social confidence and loss of social activities. Grief was generally mitigated over time as adjustments were made to changes in identity and lifestyle. Creating (or becoming part of) a coeliac community was a strategy enabling those with coeliac disease to re-establish their identities and increase social recognition and acceptance of the condition. Gluten-free living entails a substantial restriction of food choice. The losses and changes entailed impact on the personal and social identities of those living with coeliac disease, and on the behaviour of others towards them. Psychosocial interventions focussed on facilitating coping and adjustment may benefit those experiencing difficulties. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. Quality of life outcomes in patients living with stoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrialsadat Anaraki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite efforts to maintain the intestinal tissue and treat gastrointestinal disease, a large number of patients undergo ostomy surgery each year. Using stoma reduces the patient′s quality of life (QOL greatly. Although there are approximately 3000 patients in Iran; there is little information about the impact of stoma on their QOL. Aims: The study aims to evaluate QOL of stoma patients using a special measurement tool. Settings and Design: This survey was a cross-sectional study that was conducted on 102 random samples of stoma patients. Materials and Methods : The City of Hope Quality of Life-Ostomy Questionnaire was used for collecting demographic and clinical information and evaluating QOL. Statistical Analysis Used: Univariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of QOL. Results: The mean score for the overall QOL for stoma patients was 7.48 ± 0.9. 70% of patients were dissatisfied with sexual activities. More than half of them reported feelings of depression following stoma surgery. Univariate analysis indicated that factors such as the type of ostomy (temporary/permanent, the underlying disease that had led to the stoma, depression, problem with location of ostomy, and change in clothing style had significant effects on overall QOL and its subscales ( P < 0.05. The results of the regression analyses showed that only depression and problem with the location of ostomy were statistically significant in predicting patients′ QOL and its subscales ( P < 0.05. Conclusions: The findings demonstrated that living with stoma influences the overall aspect of QOL. Education for the patients and their families is important for improving the stoma patients′ QOL. Sexual and psychological consultation may also improve patients′ QOL.

  14. "I Cannot Be Worried": Living with Chagas Disease in Tropical Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Colin J

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease (CD) profoundly affects the social and emotional dimensions of patients' lives, and disproportionately impacts poor, marginalized populations in Latin America. Biomedical treatment for CD fails to reach up to 99% of the people affected, and in any case seldom addresses the emotional health or socioeconomic conditions of patients. This study examines patient strategies for coping with CD in the department of Santa Cruz, Bolivia. In this ethnographic study, semistructured interviews took place from March-June 2013 with 63 patients who had previously tested positive for CD. During the fieldwork period, participant observation was conducted and patient family members, providers, community members, and public health officials were consulted. Patients often experienced emotional distress when diagnosed with CD, yet were generally unable to find biomedical treatment. Respondents stressed the need to avoid powerful emotions which would worsen the impact of CD symptoms. To manage CD, patients embraced a calm state of mind, described in Spanish as tranquilidad, which partially empowered them to return to a normal existence. In the perceived absence of biomedical treatment options, patients seek their own means of coping with CD diagnosis. Rather than fatalism or resignation, patients' emphasis on maintaining calm and not worrying about CD represents a pragmatic strategy for restoring a sense of normalcy and control to their lives. Programs focused on treatment of CD should remain mindful of the emotional and social impact of the disease on patients.

  15. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives: Patient Admission Video

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is for hospital patients and visitors. It emphasizes two key points to help prevent infections: the importance of practicing hand hygiene while in the hospital, and that it's appropriate to ask or remind healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene.

  16. Alberta Healthy Living Program--a model for successful integration of chronic disease management services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrin, Louise; Britten, Judith; Davachi, Shahnaz; Knight, Holly

    2013-08-01

    The most common presentation of chronic disease is multimorbidity. Disease management strategies are similar across most chronic diseases. Given the prevalence of multimorbidity and the commonality in approaches, fragmented single disease management must be replaced with integrated care of the whole person. The Alberta Healthy Living Program, a community-based chronic disease management program, supports adults with, or at risk for, chronic disease to improve their health and well being. Participants gain confidence and skills in how to manage their chronic disease(s) by learning to understand their health condition, make healthy eating choices, exercise safely and cope emotionally. The program includes 3 service pillars: disease-specific and general health patient education, disease-spanning supervised exercise and Better Choices, Better Health(TM) self-management workshops. Services are delivered in the community by an interprofessional team and can be tailored to target specific diverse and vulnerable populations, such as Aboriginal, ethno-cultural and francophone groups and those experiencing homelessness. Programs may be offered as a partnership between Alberta Health Services, primary care and community organizations. Common standards reduce provincial variation in care, yet maintain sufficient flexibility to meet local and diverse needs and achieve equity in care. The model has been implemented successfully in 108 communities across Alberta. This approach is associated with reduced acute care utilization and improved clinical indicators, and achieves efficiencies through an integrated, disease-spanning patient-centred approach. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  18. Strategies of Daily Living Rehabilitative Activities for Post Stroke Patients at Minia University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, Hend Elham Mohamed; EL-Lateef Mohammad, Zienab Abd; EL-Labban, Abdou Saad Taha; Ahmed, Gahen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stroke is a leading cause of disability. Rehabilitation aims to hasten and maximize recovery from stroke by treating the disabilities caused by the stroke. Therefore, the aim of this study determine the post stroke patients' knowledge and practices in relation to disease and activities of daily living before the implementation of…

  19. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. METHODS: Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living...... Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). RESULTS: All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results......BACKGROUND: Many cancer patients report unmet rehabilitation needs. Rehabilitation may include activities of daily living (ADL) tasks, but little is known about how cancer patients perform these tasks and how they prioritize their daily activities. Hence, this study aims to identify...

  20. Empowering Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestek, Mate; Meglič, Matic; Kurent, Blaž

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases require most of the resources in todays healthcare systems. Healthcare systems, as such, are thus not sustainable in the long term. Solutions to this problem are needed and a lot of research is focused on finding new approaches to more sustainable healthcare systems...... himself to become empowered. The patient needs to see data about his health in order to start thinking about new decisions in life that can lead to change in his behaviour. Objective: We have approached the problem of empowering patients with chronic diseases from a biological, psychological, sociological....... We want to develop extensible technology to support even more new interventions for different chronic diseases. We want the technology to enable semantic interoperability with other systems. Methods: We have collaborated with doctors in order to model the care plans for different chronic diseases...

  1. Does live music benefits patients with brain and spinal injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C-C; Mou, L; Wang, X; Guo, D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility and prospective success associated with implementing and evaluating a six-week live music intervention on an inpatient neurorehabilitation ward. In total 26 patients were included in this study. Out of which, 15 were patients and 11 were staff members. Staff participants completed wellbeing measures at before and after music. Patients completed an assortment of validated measures at five consecutive time points from baseline to follow-up. Staff participants experienced a minor decrease in wellbeing over time. The majority of the data collected from patients illustrated positive trends, with improvements in wellbeing, pain, cognition functioning, independent functioning, and mobility. The feasibility indicates that with modifications that this project is a viable venture. We found that live music appears to be promising new addition to neurorehabilitation.

  2. Lived experience of patients on tuberculosis treatment in Tshwane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oluwafunmilayo Olabisi Akeju

    a Adelaide Tambo School of Nursing, Tshwane University of Technology, ... better understanding of being a patient taking tuberculosis treatment and to improve ... tuberculosis treatment, which has contributed to an increase ... own perspective, what has been your lived experience since ... Intention to complete treatment.

  3. Impact of a temporary stoma on patients' everyday lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne K; Soerensen, Erik E; Burcharth, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine patients' experiences of impact of a temporary stoma on their everyday life. Furthermore, we wanted to generate new knowledge and comprehension of learning how to live with a temporary stoma. BACKGROUND: There are many aspects, largely unexplored, that may influenc...

  4. Seriously ill patients as living unspecified kidney donors: rationale and justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakké, Yannick S; Zuidema, Willij C; Hilhorst, Medard T; Erdman, Ruud A M; Massey, Emma K; Betjes, Michiel G H; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Weimar, Willem

    2015-01-01

    Between 2000 and December 2013, 106 live donor nephrectomies from anonymous living-donors were performed at the Erasmus MC Rotterdam; five of the donors (5.4%) had a life-threatening disease. The aim of the present report is to give the rational and justification for this procedure. All five donors underwent the national standard living-donor screening procedure. Additionally, motivation to donate and psychologic stability were assessed by a psychologist using in-depth interview techniques and a psychologic complaints questionnaire. Post-donor nephrectomy follow-up consisted of standard questionnaires and clinical check-ups. One patient had cerebral and caudal ependymomas, one had severe and progressive emphysema, two had Huntington's disease and one had a grade 2 oligodendroglioma. The psychologic screening revealed genuine motivation, adequate risk perception, and normal sense of reality. No contraindications for donation were found. The five donor nephrectomies made nine kidney transplantations possible. All donors were satisfied with the donation procedure. Three donors died during follow-up (0.6-4.9 years) as a result of their disease. In the absence of apparent additional health risks, medical, and psychologic contraindications, we consider it ethically justified to accept an offer from a cognitively competent patient with a life-threatening disease in view of their self-reported satisfaction during follow-up. Although based on a limited number of patients, we conclude that a stricter psychologic screening for seriously ill donors compared to healthy unspecified anonymous donors to unspecified patients is not necessary.

  5. The dilemma of diabetic patients living with hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Ling; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2011-08-01

    To examine the impact of the threat of hypoglycaemic episodes on people with diabetes in Taiwan. Intensive diabetes treatment in people with diabetes helps them to achieve better glycaemic control. However, it also causes more frequent hypoglycaemic episodes and has an impact on their overall quality of life. Hypoglycaemia is accompanied by various distressing symptoms which may cause excessive fear, affecting decision making in hypoglycaemic management. Purposive sampling and in-depth, face-to-face interviews were used to collect data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted from July 2008-January 2009 with 17 individuals treated with insulin who had previous hypoglycaemic episodes. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Four themes were generated from the analysis, 'inability to control fluctuations in health', 'challenges to interpersonal relationships', 'facing the disease alone' and 'finding a balance between competing symptoms'. Hypoglycaemia is a major health issue for many people with diabetes. Understanding individuals' experiences with hypoglycaemic episodes should help practitioners become more fully involved in promoting self-management. We identified key areas that health care providers should address, including concerns about patient education and professional support for people with diabetes experiencing hypoglycaemia, to enhance problem solving skills for them and their families. We recommend that health care providers make proper use of support groups for family caregivers or other important individuals in the lives of people with diabetes to provide education, clarification, support and guidance. In addition, health care providers also need to provide clients with hypoglycaemia-related emotional support, while enhancing diabetes self-management and problem-solving skills. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Dietary intakes differ between renal transplant recipients living in patient hotels versus home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahra, Terhi; Jenssen, Trond; Løvik, Astrid

    2004-04-01

    To compare dietary intake and health-related quality of life approximately 6 to 10 weeks after renal transplantation in patients living at home and at a patient hotel, and how the patients were following a heart-healthy diet according to the current American Heart Association guidelines. Cross-sectional observational study. Outpatient clinic at Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Norway. Forty renal transplant patients, 20 patients (14 men and 6 women) in both groups. There were 4 diabetic patients in each group. Dietary intake was assessed by 4-day dietary records. Health-related quality of life was investigated by the SF-36 questionnaire. The main outcome variables were daily energy intake and intakes of protein, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, fiber, and fruit and vegetables. The variables were tested by 2-sample t-tests, and significance was set at.05. There was no statistically significant difference in daily energy intake between the groups (P =.08), but there were significantly higher daily intakes of protein (P =.003), total fat (P =.03), monounsaturated fat (P =.02), cholesterol (P =.04), fiber (P =.02), calcium (P =.03), and fruit and vegetables (P =.03) in the group living at the patient hotel. The mean intake of saturated fat was 14.5% of total energy in the group living at home and 14.6% in the group living at the patient hotel. There were no significant differences in health-related quality of life between the groups. The results suggest that there are differences in dietary intake in renal transplant patients living at home compared with those at a patient hotel. It seems that neither of the groups follows current guidelines for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Pain Correlates with Sleep Disturbances in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yun-Ting; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Ma, Li-Jing; Zhang, Hui-Jun; Wang, Yi; Li, Jie; Huang, Jun-Ying; Liu, Jun-Yi; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Both sleep disorders and pain decrease quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, little is known about the relationship between objective sleep disturbances and pain in patients with PD. This study aimed to (1) examine the clinical characteristics of pain in PD patients and (2) explore the correlation between pain and sleep disturbances in PD patients. Parkinson's disease patients (N = 144) underwent extensive clinical evaluations of motor and nonmotor symptoms and characteristics of pain. Overnight video-polysomnography was also conducted. Clinical characteristics and sleep parameters were compared between PD patients with or without pain. Pain was reported by 75 patients (52.1%), with 49 (65.3%) reporting pain of at least moderate severity. PD patients with pain were older and had longer disease duration, more severe PD symptoms as assessed by Hoehn and Yahr stage and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and higher L-dopa equivalent daily dose compared with PD patients without pain. PD patients with pain also showed significantly decreased sleep efficiency (57.06% ± 15.84% vs. 73.80% ± 12.00%, P daily living, depressed mood, higher percentage of N1 sleep, and lower sleep efficiency were independent predictors of pain in patients with PD. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common type of pain in patients with PD. Disrupted sleep continuity, altered sleep architecture, depressed mood, and compromised activities of daily living may be associated with pain in patients with PD. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  8. Quality of life outcomes in patients living with stoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhrialsadat Anaraki; Mohamad Vafaie; Roobic Behboo; Nakisa Maghsoodi; Sahar Esmaeilpour; Azadeh Safaee

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite efforts to maintain the intestinal tissue and treat gastrointestinal disease, a large number of patients undergo ostomy surgery each year. Using stoma reduces the patient′s quality of life (QOL) greatly. Although there are approximately 3000 patients in Iran; there is little information about the impact of stoma on their QOL. Aims: The study aims to evaluate QOL of stoma patients using a special measurement tool. Settings and Design: This survey was a cross-section...

  9. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Living With Chronic Lower Pulmonary Disease: Disruptions of the Embodied Phenomenological Self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooler, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I present a phenomenological study of individuals' experiences of living with moderate to very severe chronic lower pulmonary disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or both). Phenomenology is a philosophy, distinct from descriptive or thematic research, which is useful as a foundation for scientific inquiry. In this study, I used the lens of Merleau-Ponty to understand and interpret participants' experiences of living with pulmonary disease, and the approach of van Manen for analysis. I conclude that in chronic pulmonary disease, awareness of breathing and the body is experienced in the sounds, sensations, and signals of breathing and the body, and in the experiences of the body-in-the-world. Central themes of being-in-the-world from the study describe the disruption of the embodied phenomenological self: Participants experienced slowing down, doing less, and having to stop due to shortness of breath. Both chronic and acute dyspnea were prevalent and the taken-for-granted aspects of daily activities were disrupted. Findings of this study have implications for public and patient education, and opportunities for integration of experiential aspects within nursing education and practice.

  11. Patients' perspectives on how idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis affects the quality of their lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gould Michael K

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a debilitating lung disease with a survival of only three to five years from the time of diagnosis. Due to a paucity of studies, large gaps remain in our understanding of how IPF affects the quality of patients' lives. In only one other study did investigators ask patients directly for their perspectives on this topic. Further, currently there is no disease-specific instrument to measure health-related quality of life (HRQL in patients with IPF. A carefully constructed measurement instrument, sensitive to underlying change, is needed for use in clinical trials and longitudinal studies of patients with IPF. Before developing such an instrument, researchers must improve their understanding of the relevant effects of IPF on patients' lives. On a broader scale, to provide the best care for people with IPF, clinicians must appreciate – from patients' perspectives – how this disease affects various aspects of their lives. Methods We used focus groups and individual in-depth interviews with 20 IPF patients to collect their perspectives on how IPF affects their lives (with a focus on the quality of their lives. We then analyzed these perspectives and organized them into a conceptual framework for describing HRQL in patients with IPF. Next, we examined how well certain existing measurement instruments – which have been administered to IPF patients in prior studies – covered the domains and topics our patients identified. Results In our framework, we identified 12 primary domains: symptoms, IPF therapy, sleep, exhaustion, forethought, employment and finances, dependence, family, sexual relations, social participation, mental and spiritual well-being, mortality. Each domain is composed of several topics, which describe how IPF affects patients' lives. When we compared the content of our conceptual framework with the existing instruments, we found the coverage of the existing instruments to

  12. Meaning of living with severe chronic obstructive lung disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Gabriella; Nasse, Maximilian; Stanze, Henrikje; Boakye, Sonja Owusu; Nauck, Friedemann; Schneider, Nils

    2016-12-08

    To explore what it means for patients to live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an incurable and constantly progressing disease. Qualitative longitudinal study using narrative and semistructured interviews. This paper presents findings of the initial interviews. Analysis using grounded theory. Lung care clinics and community care in Lower Saxony, Germany. 17 patients with advanced-stage COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) III/IV). Analysis shows that these patients have difficulties accepting their life situation and feel at the mercy of the disease, which could be identified as a core-experienced phenomenon. Over a long period of time, patients have only a vague feeling of being ill, caused by uncertain knowledge, slow progress and doubtful attribution of clinical symptoms of the disease (causal conditions). As an action strategy, patients try to maintain daily routines for as long as possible after diagnosis. Both effective standard and rescue medication, which helps to reduce breathlessness and other symptoms, and the feeling of being faced with one's own responsibility (intervening conditions) support this strategy, whereby patients' own responsibility is too painful to acknowledge. As a consequence, patients try to deny the threat to life for a long period of time. Frequently, they need to experience facing their own limits, often in the form of an acute crisis, to realise their health situation. The experience of the illness is contextualised by a continuous increase in limited mobility and social isolation. In order to help patients to improve disease awareness, to accept their life situation and to improve their reduced quality of life, patients may benefit from the early integration of palliative care (PC), considering its multiprofessional patient-centred and team-centred approach. Psychological support and volunteer work, which are relevant aspects of PC, should be appropriate to address psychosocial

  13. Community matrons as problem-solvers for people living with multi-co-morbid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Sue; Thunhurst, Colin; Furze, Gill

    2016-12-02

    Working with patients in their own homes gives community matrons an advantage of seeing patients in the context of their everyday lives. This allows comprehensive assessment of need with an aim of promoting health or promoting stability for people living with chronic disease. Complex issues are resolved through problem-solving and this can result in patients being maintained in their own homes and thus in reduced unplanned hospitalisation. Data were collected from participants using semi-structured interviews and audio diaries. The sample comprised professionals: CMs (n=21), managers (n=4), former commissioners (n=2) and GPs (n=3); and patients (n=10) and their family carers (n=5). In this article, data from community matrons is discussed. Community matrons often drew on the social determinants model of health to problem solve and to create meaningful strategies that work for patients in their care. Raising awareness of the high-level skills of community matrons and promoting appreciation of the importance of a social determinants model of health is important in explaining why nurses are such a crucial element of the primary health care workforce.

  14. Cerebrovascular disease in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotta Newra Tellechea

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rare in childhood, stroke may have a serious impact when it happens in this stage of life. Also, it may be the first sign of a systemic disease. We report 12 cases of patients with stroke treated in the Neuropediatrics Unit of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA from March 1997 to March 2000. All patients, from term infants to 12-year-old children hospitalized in the Pediatrics Unit of HCPA, had clinical suspicion of stroke, which was later confirmed by radiological studies. Patient follow up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean = 3.4 years. Presenting symptoms were hemiparesis in 9 patients, seizures in 7, deviation of labial commissure in 3, and loss of consciousness in 1. The increase in the number of cases of childhood stroke identified and later confirmed by noninvasive methods had helped in the determination of different ethiologies of stroke: the most frequent being hematologic, cardiac and genetic diseases. However, our study included 6 newborns with stroke whose ethiology was not identified. Seven children with seizures received phenobarbital. Six term infants had neonatal seizures secondary to stroke and restricted to the first 72 hours of life.

  15. A patient centred approach to care planning for patients with chronic genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair Kent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay proposes seven pre-requisites for the creation of effective programmes of care and support for patients living with the consequences of chronic genetic diseases. It then goes on to discuss the role of patient organisations and other stakeholders in bringing about the development and implementation of these.

  16. The doctor-patient relationship in living donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2007-11-01

    A therapeutic and effective doctor-patient relationship and patient-doctor relationship is at the core of all successful medical care. The medical and psychological evaluation of a potential kidney donor serves to protect the long-term health of both the donor and the potential recipient. Careful assessment of risk and donor education is at the core of donor evaluation and the decision to progress with donation requires refined clinical judgment by the medical team and critical thinking by the donor. Increasing pressure to increase the numbers of living donor transplants and suggestions by some that the process should be commercialized make it timely to consider the nature of the relationship between the doctor and the patient in the unusual circumstance of living donation. A high rate of complications in recipients of purchased kidneys and a lack of knowledge of the fate of paid donors have been reported. Commercialization of transplantation undermines the therapeutic doctor-patient relationship and threatens the healthy development of the international transplant endeavor.

  17. Your Guide to Living Well with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you live or work with others, your “secondhand” smoke can cause them numerous health problems, including ... these new challenges well. So pick up this book whenever you need it for information and encouragement. ...

  18. Multimodality molecular imaging of disease progression in living ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    immune cell trafficking, stem cell therapy, transgenic animals and even molecular interactions in living subjects. .... measurement of the effect of absorbed electromagnetic ..... Changes in intracellular pH, electrical impulses by nerve cells and ...

  19. Nobody likes premies: the relative value of patients' lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, A; Leblanc, I; Barrington, K J

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether patient selection or triage requires placing a relative value on human lives and whether the values placed on these lives are consistent with current ethical theories. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to groups of physicians and students in Montreal. It presented eight currently incompetent patients with potential neurological sequelae requiring emergency care. Predicted outcomes were explicitly described. Four patients had a predicted 50% survival and a 50% chance of impairment; they were a preterm and a term neonate, a 2-month-old and a 50-year-old. Two already disabled patients, a 7-year-old and an 80-year-old, had 50% predicted survival. A 14-year-old and a 35-year-old had 5% survival, but differing impairment. Respondents were asked if they would resuscitate and in what order they would resuscitate if all needed intervention simultaneously. Eighty-five percent response rate, n=524. The proportion stating they would always resuscitate was smallest for the 80-year-old (18% Pold (53 and 58%, Pold and the 7-year-old would be resuscitated most frequently (74 and 77%, Pold, followed by the 7-year-old, the 14-year-old, the term newborn, the 50-year-old, the 35-year-old, the premature newborn and the 80-year-old. Order of resuscitation was not closely related to the predicted survival, impairment or potential life years gained. Age appeared to have a strong influence, with children's lives being valued more than the adults'. This tendency was reversed for the newborn infants who were undervalued compared with older children, and most particularly for the premature. The value placed on the life of newborns, in particular the premature, is less than that expected by any objective medical data and was not consistent with any ethical theory that we tested.

  20. Traditional chinese medicine improves activities of daily living in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weidong; Kwak, Shin; Liu, Yun; Sun, Yan; Fang, Zhenglong; Qin, Baofeng; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), named Zeng-xiao An-shen Zhi-chan 2 (ZAZ2), on patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among 115 patients with idiopathic PD enrolled (mean age, 64.7 ± 10.2 years old), 110 patients (M = 65, F = 45; mean age, 64.9 ± 10.7 years old) completed the study. Patients took either ZAZ2 (n = 59) or placebo granule (n = 56) in a blind manner for 13 weeks while maintaining other anti-Parkinson medications unchanged. All participants wore a motion logger, and we analyzed the power-law temporal autocorrelation of the motion logger records taken on 3 occasions (before, one week, and 13 weeks after the drug administration). Drug efficacy was evaluated with the conventional Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), as well as the power-law exponent α, which corresponds to the level of physical activity of the patients. ZAZ2 but not placebo granule improved the awake-sleep rhythm, the UPDRS Part II, Part II + III, and Part IV scores, and the α values. The results indicate that ZAZ2 improved activities of daily living (ADL) of parkinsonism and, thus, is a potentially suitable drug for long-term use.

  1. Traditional Chinese Medicine Improves Activities of Daily Living in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, named Zeng-xiao An-shen Zhi-chan 2 (ZAZ2, on patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Among 115 patients with idiopathic PD enrolled (mean age, 64.7 ± 10.2 years old, 110 patients (M = 65, F = 45; mean age, 64.9 ± 10.7 years old completed the study. Patients took either ZAZ2 (=59 or placebo granule (=56 in a blind manner for 13 weeks while maintaining other anti-Parkinson medications unchanged. All participants wore a motion logger, and we analyzed the power-law temporal autocorrelation of the motion logger records taken on 3 occasions (before, one week, and 13 weeks after the drug administration. Drug efficacy was evaluated with the conventional Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, as well as the power-law exponent α, which corresponds to the level of physical activity of the patients. ZAZ2 but not placebo granule improved the awake-sleep rhythm, the UPDRS Part II, Part II + III, and Part IV scores, and the α values. The results indicate that ZAZ2 improved activities of daily living (ADL of parkinsonism and, thus, is a potentially suitable drug for long-term use.

  2. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  3. What Is Celiac Disease? How Do I Live with It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaska, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, is a hereditary, autoimmune disease that causes a sensitivity to gluten, which is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. The key symptoms of celiac disease are diarrhea, constipation, gas, bloating, backaches, stomachaches, nausea, anemia, fatigue, osteoporosis, stunted growth in children, and weight…

  4. Live Fish Impaction in Hypopharynx in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Senthilkumaran

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Successful removal of a live fish impacted in the hypopharynx of a 65-year-old male is reported to emphasize the importance of the speed with which it has to be recognized and intervened. The present report also highlights the altered sensory perception in the oral cavity of elderly people as a potential risk factor for airway obstruction due to a foreign body. Moreover, the possibility of a foreign body has to be suspected, if an elderly patient without any cardiorespiratory illness presents with an acute onset of progressive respiratory distress.

  5. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients.

  6. Anxiety and depression in adult patients with familial Mediterranean fever: a study comparing patients living in Germany and Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Arnd; Örnek, Ahmet; Kilic, Levent; Kurucay, Mustafa; Şendur, Süleyman N; Lainka, Elke; Henning, Bernhard F

    2017-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of anxiety and depression among patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) living in Germany or Turkey a prospective study was conducted. Forty FMF patients living in Turkey (T), 40 FMF patients living in Germany (G) and 40 healthy controls living in Germany (C) were included. Patients and controls were of Turkish ancestry. G were compared to T and C. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used with a cut-off of ≥ 8 for each subdomain score (HADS-A, HADS-D). Baseline characteristics of G were comparable to T and C except for age (T: 30.5 years, G: 35.2 years, C: 34.6 years; T vs. G P = 0.045), duration of disease (T: 14.4 years, G: 24; P < 0.001), C-reactive protein (T: 0.78 mg/dL, G: 0.78 mg/dL, C: 0.35 mg/dL; G vs. C P = 0.03). Prevalence of anxiety was higher in G compared to C (T: 65%, G: 52.5%, C: 22.5%: G vs. C P < 0.05). No difference was found for the prevalence of depression (T: 30%, G: 35%, C: 20%). The association between FMF and anxiety in subjects living in Germany persisted after adjusting for age and gender in a regression analysis and was robust to an adjustment for coexisting depression. Anxiety and depression did not correlate with FMF disease severity assessed with the Pras score. Anxiety, but not depression is more common among FMF patients living in Germany compared to healthy controls. No significant difference could be found between FMF patients living in Germany or Turkey concerning the prevalence of anxiety or depression. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  7. Famous Stone Patients and Their Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The fact that stone patients have endured much throughout the ages and that prior to our current era, when the ultimate horror, "being cut for the stone" was the only alternative to the repeated episodes of colic, should be recalled from time to time. Urolithiasis has affected humanity throughout the ages and has been indiscriminate to those lives it touched. A full accounting of those who have suffered and recorded their agonies is beyond the scope of this investigation; however, even a partial accounting is valuable for present day physicians who care for those with stone disease. For the present work, the historical accounts of stone disease literature were scrutinized for individual sufferers who could be cross-referenced from other sources as legitimately afflicted by stones. Only those patients that could be documented and were (or are) well known were included, because the internet is now a verdant repository of thousands of "not so well knowns." Reliable historical data was found for a variety of persons from the pre-Christian era to the present, including those remembered as philosophers and scientists, physicians, clergy, leaders and rulers, entertainers, athletes and fictitious/Hollywood-type individuals. Verified accounts of famous stone formers were chosen for this paper, and are presented in chronological order. The list of urolithiasis sufferers presented here is undoubtedly incomplete, but it is not through lack of trying that they are missing. Most often, the suffering do so silently, and that is always allowed.

  8. Medications Used for Cognitive Enhancement in Patients With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, Alzheimer's Disease, and Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Yu; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2018-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, which frequently occurs in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, has a significant impact on the daily lives of both patients and their family. Furthermore, since the medications used for cognitive enhancement have limited efficacy, the issue of cognitive enhancement still remains a clinically unsolved challenge. We reviewed the clinical studies (published between 2007 and 2017) that focused on the efficacy of medications used for enhancing cognition in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the standard treatments for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Some studies have reported selective cognitive improvement in patients with schizophrenia following galantamine treatment. Newer antipsychotics, including paliperidone, lurasidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, and BL-1020, have also been reported to exert cognitive benefits in patients with schizophrenia. Dopaminergic medications were found to improve language function in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, no beneficial effects on cognitive function were observed with dopamine agonists in patients with schizophrenia. The efficacies of nicotine and its receptor modulators in cognitive improvement remain controversial, with the majority of studies showing that varenicline significantly improved the cognitive function in schizophrenic patients. Several studies have reported that N -methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) enhancers improved the cognitive function in patients with chronic schizophrenia. NMDAR enhancers might also have cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has also been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on attention, processing speed, and memory in female patients with schizophrenia. Clinical trials with

  9. Live with the Disease Like You Used to Before You Knew You Were Infected: A Qualitative Study Among 10-Year Survivors Living with HIV in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Samuel; Riviera, Vanessa; Jean, Circee Phara; Louis, Marie Jude Jean; Reif, Lindsey K; Severe, Patrice; Rouzier, Vanessa; Johnson, Warren D; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; McNairy, Margaret L; Boutin-Foster, Carla

    2017-03-01

    In 2003, the Haitian Study Group on Kaposi's Sarcoma and Opportunistic Infections (GHESKIO), a nonprofit organization, began administering antiretroviral therapy (ART) to its patients. This practice transformed HIV from a fatal disease to a more manageable chronic condition. However, relatively few studies focus on the experiences of survivors. This study provided a unique opportunity to interview patients who survived at least 10 years after being treated with ART at GHESKIO. The goal of the study was to elicit from patients their perspectives on what enabled them to survive with AIDS. Grounded Theory, a qualitative research method was used to guide data collection, coding, and analysis. Individual interviews were conducted, audio-taped, transcribed and analyzed in Creole, and translated into English. Data saturation was reached at 25 participants. Of which, 64% were women, the mean age was 49, range of 43-55 years, 24% were married, 44% had not completed elementary school, and 72% had no income, the remaining participants had incomes ranging from $1000 to $5000 annually. Qualitative analysis resulted in 681 codes, which were grouped into six categories: being spiritually grounded, having supportive interactions with providers, caring for children, setting personal goals, persevering and living life as usual, and maintaining strict medication adherence practices. The overarching theory was that having a reason to live despite one's circumstances and living life as usual enabled one to survive. Having a strong spiritual foundation coupled with supportive family and providers motivated participants to live and adhere to their ART. As the number of patients who are living longer with HIV in Haiti increases, results from this study will be important in helping tailor interventions that enhance their overall quality of life.

  10. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives: Patient Admission Video (Short Version)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-05-01

    This podcast is for hospital patients and visitors. It emphasizes two key points to help prevent infections: the importance of practicing hand hygiene while in the hospital, and that it's appropriate to ask or remind healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene.  Created: 5/1/2008 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 4/26/2010.

  11. The Lived Experiences of Nurses Caring For Dying Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Danna L

    2017-01-01

    Nurses and healthcare professionals may have difficulty adjusting to and comprehending their experiences when a patient’s life ends. This has the potential to interfere with patient care. Reflection on past events and actions enables critical discovery of strategies to benefit both nurses and patients. This qualitative phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of nurses caring for dying pediatric patients. The philosophical underpinning of Merleau-Ponty (2008), in combination with the research method of van Manen (1990), was used for this study. The Roy Adaptation Model (RAM) (Roy, 2009; Roy & Andrews, 1991) was the nursing model that guided the study to help understand that nurses are an adaptive system, using censoring as a compensatory adaptive process to help function for a purposeful cause. Nine female nurse participants with one to four years of experience were interviewed. The context of the experiences told by nurses caring for dying pediatric patents uncovered seven essential themes of empathy, feelings of ambivalence, inevitability, inspiration, relationship, self-preservation, and sorrow, and these themes demonstrated a connection formed between the nurse and the patient.

  12. Perceived social support affects disease coping among people living with HIV: a study in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Faraji

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine potential correlations between perceived social support and disease coping styles among people living with HIV infection at a referral center in Tehran. Methods: In an observational study, 112 patients were recruited between April and July 2012. Along with demographic characteristics, availability of tangible, informational, and emotional support was measured using subscales extracted from the medical outcomes study: social support survey; disease coping styles were investigated in four groups (problem-focused, emotion-focused, engagement-based, and meaning-based. Data were analyzed to examine whether social support subscales predict coping styles. Results: Almost 70% of the patients were male, and 52% reported sexual contact as their perceived route of infection. Use of coping styles was positively correlated with social support scores (rs = 0.53, P < 0.001, and informational support had significant influence on implementation of three out of the four coping styles (emotion-focused, problem-focused, engagement-based. Being married and not reporting the route of infection were associated with higher social support scores; monthly income and level of education had significant associations with the use of various coping styles. Conclusions: Patients who implement strategies to cope with HIV/AIDS have received more informational and emotional support. This study recommends that the delivery of informational support in a comprehensive package can practically target the current demands of our patients; while thorough investigation of potential effects on disease coping, response to treatment, and compliance can aid us in the design of interventions to target stigma at societal level.

  13. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  14. Wireless Monitoring for Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases and Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefaliakos, Antonios; Pliakos, Ioannis; Charalampidou, Martha; Diomidous, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The use of applications for mobile devices and wireless sensors is common for the sector of telemedicine. Recently various studies and systems were developed in order to help patients suffering from severe diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease. They present a challenge for the sector because such systems demand the flow of accurate data in real time and the use of specialized sensors. In this review will be presented some very interesting applications developed for patients with cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Poor caregiver mental health predicts mortality of patients with neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwi, Sandy J; Ford, Brett Q; Casey, James J; Miller, Bruce L; Levenson, Robert W

    2017-07-11

    Dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases cause profound declines in functioning; thus, many patients require caregivers for assistance with daily living. Patients differ greatly in how long they live after disease onset, with the nature and severity of the disease playing an important role. Caregiving can also be extremely stressful, and many caregivers experience declines in mental health. In this study, we investigated the role that caregiver mental health plays in patient mortality. In 176 patient-caregiver dyads, we found that worse caregiver mental health predicted greater patient mortality even when accounting for key risk factors in patients (i.e., diagnosis, age, sex, dementia severity, and patient mental health). These findings highlight the importance of caring for caregivers as well as patients when attempting to improve patients' lives.

  16. [Inpatients days in patients with respiratory diseases and periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; González-Cruz, Herminia; Casa-Medina, Guillermo; García-Sancho, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process that has been associated with the severity of respiratory diseases. In Mexico a prevalence of 78% was found in population with social security and > 60 years old. The aim of this study is to establish the association between periodontal disease and respiratory diseases according to the inpatient days. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2011. We included hospitalized patients, ≥ 18 years of age, without sedation or intubated. A dentist classified patients into two groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease: mild-to-moderate and severe. We estimated medians of inpatient days by disease and severity. Negative binomial models were adjusted to estimate incidence rate ratios and predicted inpatient days. 3,059 patients were enrolled. The median of observed and predicted inpatient days was higher in the group of severe periodontal disease (p disease, tuberculosis, and influenza had the highest incidence rates ratios of periodontal disease (p periodontal disease is positively -associated with inpatient days of patients with respiratory diseases.

  17. Characterization of Ictus in the Long-lived Patient: A Decade of Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yainelí Cutiño Maás

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: the increase of longevity, together non-transmissible diseases, support the prediction of the occurrence of ictus as cause of death. Objective: to characterize lomg-lived patients who have suffered from ictus. Methods: it is a descriptive study which included 456, 90 year old or more patients, with the diagnosis of ictus admitted at the Hospital Gustavo Aldereguía Lima, from January 2005 to December 2014. The variables included were: age, sex, kind of ictus, toxic habits, personal pathologic antecedents and condition at discharge. Results: 5,41 % of the total admissions due to ictus corresponded to long-lived patients. Female sex was more representative with 58,6 %. Ischemic etiology with 91,4 %. Arterial hypertension (76, 1 % and ischemic cardiopathy (43, 9 % were the most frequent risk factors. Hospital death rate was 35,7 %. Conclusion: there is a progressive increase of the presentation of ictus in long-lived with higher prevalence in the female sex and a high hospital death rate.

  18. 42 CFR 482.90 - Condition of participation: Patient and living donor selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... selected to receive a transplant, the center must document in the patient's medical record the patient... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Patient and living... Condition of participation: Patient and living donor selection. The transplant center must use written...

  19. Quality of patients life with celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bičíková, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is dealing with the quality of life of patients with celiac disease. In the theoretical part, I am presenting the characteristics of celiac disease and I am describing its history briefly. For better orientation in the issue, I also joined a description of the anatomy of the small intestine and pathophysiology of celiac disease. In this thesis I am also dealing with incidence of disease, etiology and risk factors participating in the development of celiac disease, symptoms and the...

  20. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of the complications of CKD, e.g. renal anaemia, ... ARTICLE. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease. T Gerntholtz,1 FCP (SA); G Paget,2 ..... Telmisartan, ramipril, or both in patients at high risk for vascular events.

  1. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Living with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification 3: a qualitative study describing the lives and illness of people diagnosed with a rare neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tomiko; Muraoka, Koko; Yamada, Megumi; Nishio, Yuri; Hozumi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) is a rare, intractable disease with unknown etiology. IBGC3 is a familial genetic disease defined by genetic mutations in the major causative gene ( SLC20A2 ). People with IBGC3 experience distress from the uncommon nature of their illness and uncertainty about treatment and prognoses. The present study aimed to describe the lives and illness of people with IBGC3. Participants were recruited from patients aged 20 years or older enrolled in a genetic study, who were diagnosed with IBGC3 and wanted to share their experiences. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants. Interviews were conducted between December 2012 and February 2014, and were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Qualitative data analysis was performed to identify categories and subcategories. Efforts were made to ensure the credibility, transferability, dependability, conformability, and validity of the data. Six thematic categories, 17 subcategories, and 143 codes emerged. The six categories were: (1) Frustration and anxiety with progression of symptoms without a diagnosis; (2) Confusion about diagnosis with an unfamiliar disease; (3) Emotional distress caused by a genetic disease; (4) Passive attitude toward life, being extra careful; (5) Taking charge of life, becoming active and engaged; and (6) Requests for healthcare. The qualitative data analysis indicated a need for genetic counseling, access to disease information, establishment of peer and family support systems, mental health services, and improvement in early intervention and treatment for the disease.

  3. [Being cared for and caring: living with multiple chronic diseases (Leila)-a qualitative study about APN contributions to integrated care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Staub, Maria; Zigan, Nicole; Händler-Schuster, Daniela; Probst, Sebastian; Monego, Renate; Imhof, Lorenz

    2015-04-01

    Living with multiple chronic diseases is complex and leads to enhanced care needs. To foster integrated care a project called "Living with chronic disease" (Leila) was initiated. The aim was to develop an Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) service in collaboration with medical centers for persons who are living with multiple chronic diseases. The following research questions were addressed: 1. What are patients' experiences, referring physicians and APNs with the Leila-Service? 2. How are referral processes performed? 3. How do the involved groups experience collaboration and APN role development? A qualitative approach according grounded theory of Corbin and Strauss was used to explore the experiences with the Leila project and the interaction of the persons involved. 38 interviews were conducted with patients who are living with multiple chronic diseases, their APN's and the referring physicians. The findings revealed "Being cared for and caring" as main category. The data demonstrated how patients responded to their involvement into care and that they were taken as serious partners in the care process. The category "organizing everyday life" describes how patients learned to cope with the consequences of living with multiple chronic diseases. "Using all resources" as another category demonstrates how capabilities and strengths were adopted. The results of the cooperation- and allocation processes showed that the APN recognition and APN role performance have to be negotiated. Prospective APN-services for this patient population should be integrated along with physician networks and other service providers including community health nursing.

  4. Understanding interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management for older adults living in communities: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookey-Bassett, Sue; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Mckey, Colleen A; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2017-01-01

    To report a concept analysis of interprofessional collaboration in the context of chronic disease management, for older adults living in communities. Increasing prevalence of chronic disease among older adults is creating significant burden for patients, families and healthcare systems. Managing chronic disease for older adults living in the community requires interprofessional collaboration across different health and other care providers, organizations and sectors. However, there is a lack of consensus about the definition and use of interprofessional collaboration for community-based chronic disease management. Concept analysis. Electronic databases CINAHL, Medline, HealthStar, EMBASE, PsychINFO, Ageline and Cochrane Database were searched from 2000 - 2013. Rodgers' evolutionary method for concept analysis. The most common surrogate term was interdisciplinary collaboration. Related terms were interprofessional team, multidisciplinary team and teamwork. Attributes included: an evolving interpersonal process; shared goals, decision-making and care planning; interdependence; effective and frequent communication; evaluation of team processes; involving older adults and family members in the team; and diverse and flexible team membership. Antecedents comprised: role awareness; interprofessional education; trust between team members; belief that interprofessional collaboration improves care; and organizational support. Consequences included impacts on team composition and function, care planning processes and providers' knowledge, confidence and job satisfaction. Interprofessional collaboration is a complex evolving concept. Key components of interprofessional collaboration in chronic disease management for community-living older adults are identified. Implications for nursing practice, education and research are proposed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A Comparative Study on the Quality of Living for Therapeutic Cancer and Hospice Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Kook; Rhee, Dong Soo; Rou, Jae Man; Kim, Jong Deok

    2004-01-01

    This study carried a comparative analysis of quality of living perceived by cancer and hospice patients who received radiotherapy, and influential factors in order to provide basic data for nursing goals and establishment of strategy. The subjects of the study were 50 cancer patients who were more than twenty years old and was receiving radiotherapy in therapeutic radiology department of C university hospital, and fourteen hospice patients who were in J hospital in Gwangju. They were conveniently sampled according to the selection standard, and researchers personally interviewed them using questionnaire and patient scripts to obtain necessary data. The results were presented as follows: 1. When cancer and hospice patients were examined demographically, the number of 60 year-old patients were the most. The subjects whose marriage period was more than thirty-one years were the most. In medical expense, more than 70.0% of the patients bore their expenses themselves. 2. When disease-related characteristics of the cancer and pos piece patients were examined, more than 75% of the patients had experience of being in hospital, and more than experienced operation. However, for prevalence period, 57.5% of the cancer patients had less than six months, and 64.3% of the hospice patients had more than two years. 3. For physical symptoms of cancer patients, 77.5% had fatigue, 60.0% had loss of appetite, and 52.5% had loss of weight while for the hospice patients, 100% had loss of weight, and 92.9% had fatigue and loss of appetite. For the cancer patients, 0.0% had swelling, and 7.5% had bleeding, For the hospice patients, 7.1% had change in skin, and 14.3% had diarrhea. 4. Mean score of the cancer subjects were as follows: family support, social support, emotional and spiritual support, physical symptoms, and periods were 3.87, 2.88, 3.10, 2.80, and 2.94 respectively. Those of the hospice patients were 3.80, 1.96, 1.58, 2.64 and 3.24 respectively. 5. Mean score of family support

  6. A Comparative Study on the Quality of Living for Therapeutic Cancer and Hospice Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Kook [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Kwangju Health College, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Dong Soo; Rou, Jae Man; Kim, Jong Deok [Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology, Chonnam University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    This study carried a comparative analysis of quality of living perceived by cancer and hospice patients who received radiotherapy, and influential factors in order to provide basic data for nursing goals and establishment of strategy. The subjects of the study were 50 cancer patients who were more than twenty years old and was receiving radiotherapy in therapeutic radiology department of C university hospital, and fourteen hospice patients who were in J hospital in Gwangju. They were conveniently sampled according to the selection standard, and researchers personally interviewed them using questionnaire and patient scripts to obtain necessary data. The results were presented as follows: 1. When cancer and hospice patients were examined demographically, the number of 60 year-old patients were the most. The subjects whose marriage period was more than thirty-one years were the most. In medical expense, more than 70.0% of the patients bore their expenses themselves. 2. When disease-related characteristics of the cancer and pos piece patients were examined, more than 75% of the patients had experience of being in hospital, and more than experienced operation. However, for prevalence period, 57.5% of the cancer patients had less than six months, and 64.3% of the hospice patients had more than two years. 3. For physical symptoms of cancer patients, 77.5% had fatigue, 60.0% had loss of appetite, and 52.5% had loss of weight while for the hospice patients, 100% had loss of weight, and 92.9% had fatigue and loss of appetite. For the cancer patients, 0.0% had swelling, and 7.5% had bleeding, For the hospice patients, 7.1% had change in skin, and 14.3% had diarrhea. 4. Mean score of the cancer subjects were as follows: family support, social support, emotional and spiritual support, physical symptoms, and periods were 3.87, 2.88, 3.10, 2.80, and 2.94 respectively. Those of the hospice patients were 3.80, 1.96, 1.58, 2.64 and 3.24 respectively. 5. Mean score of family support

  7. Disease awareness and management behavior of patients with atopic dermatitis: a questionnaire survey of 313 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hye Sung; Lee, Kyung Ho; Park, Young Min; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jun Young

    2015-02-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) should be relatively well informed about the disorder to control their condition and prevent flare-ups. Thus far, there is no accurate information about the disease awareness levels and therapeutic behavior of AD patients. To collect data on patients' knowledge about AD and their behavior in relation to seeking information about the disease and its treatment. We performed a questionnaire survey on the disease awareness and self-management behavior of AD patients. A total of 313 patients and parents of patients with AD who had visited the The Catholic University of Korea, Catholic Medical Center between November 2011 and October 2012 were recruited. We compared the percentage of correct answers from all collected questionnaires according to the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients. Although dermatologists were the most frequent disease information sources and treatment providers for the AD patients, a significant proportion of participants obtained information from the Internet, which carries a huge amount of false medical information. A considerable number of participants perceived false online information as genuine, especially concerning complementary and alternative medicine treatments of AD, and the adverse effects of steroids. Some questions on AD knowledge had significantly different answers according to sex, marriage status, educational level, type of residence and living area, disease duration, disease severity, and treatment history with dermatologists. Dermatologists should pay more attention to correcting the common misunderstandings about AD to reduce unnecessary social/economic losses and improve treatment compliance.

  8. The lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease in Kingston, Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brown Forrester

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore the lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease, in Kingston, Jamaica. Method: A descriptive qualitative design was used for this research. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adolescents with sickle cell disease at a Sickle Cell Unit operated by the University of the West Indies. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Results: The majority of the adolescents demonstrated a positive self-concept. They reported strong family, school, and peer support which made them feel accepted. All were actively engaged in social activities such as parties, but had challenges participating in sporting activities. Various coping strategies were utilized to address challenges of the disease including praying, watching television, and surfing the Internet. Conclusion: Sickle cell disease can be very challenging for the adolescent, but with positive self-concept and increased social support, especially from family and peers, these adolescents were able to effectively cope with their condition and live productive lives.

  9. The lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease in Kingston, Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Andrea Brown; Barton-Gooden, Antoinette; Pitter, Cynthia; Lindo, Jascinth L M

    2015-01-01

    To explore the lived experiences of adolescents with sickle cell disease, in Kingston, Jamaica. A descriptive qualitative design was used for this research. In-depth interviews were conducted with six adolescents with sickle cell disease at a Sickle Cell Unit operated by the University of the West Indies. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. The majority of the adolescents demonstrated a positive self-concept. They reported strong family, school, and peer support which made them feel accepted. All were actively engaged in social activities such as parties, but had challenges participating in sporting activities. Various coping strategies were utilized to address challenges of the disease including praying, watching television, and surfing the Internet. Sickle cell disease can be very challenging for the adolescent, but with positive self-concept and increased social support, especially from family and peers, these adolescents were able to effectively cope with their condition and live productive lives.

  10. Yellow fever live attenuated vaccine: A very successful live attenuated vaccine but still we have problems controlling the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Alan D T

    2017-10-20

    Yellow fever (YF) is regarded as the original hemorrhagic fever and has been a major public health problem for at least 250years. A very effective live attenuated vaccine, strain 17D, was developed in the 1930s and this has proved critical in the control of the disease. There is little doubt that without the vaccine, YF virus would be considered a biosafety level 4 pathogen. Significantly, YF is currently the only disease where an international vaccination certificate is required under the International Health Regulations. Despite having a very successful vaccine, there are occasional issues of supply and demand, such as that which occurred in Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo in 2016 when there was insufficient vaccine available. For the first time fractional dosing of the vaccine was approved on an emergency basis. Thus, continued vigilance and improvements in supply and demand are needed in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Heart valve disease among patients with hyperprolactinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  12. Women of low socioeconomic status living with diabetes: Becoming adept at handling a disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimonrut Boonsatean

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to explore how Thai women of low socioeconomic status handle their type 2 diabetes. Methods: A qualitative interpretative method was used to study 19 women with type 2 diabetes in a suburban community in Thailand. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews and were analysed using inductive and constructive processes. Results: Participants’ lives underwent many changes between their initial diagnoses and later stages when they became adept at handling diabetes. Two themes emerged, which involved (1 the transition to handling diabetes and (2 the influences of the social environment. The first theme encompassed confronting the disease, reaching a turning point in the process of adaptation and developing expertise in handling diabetes. The second theme involved threats of loss of status and empowerment by families. These findings showed that becoming adept at handling diabetes required significant changes in women’s behaviours and required taking advantage of influences from the social environment. Conclusion: The process of developing expertise in handling diabetes was influenced by both inner and outer factors that required adjustment to learn to live with diabetes. Furthermore, the reductions found in women’s social statuses when they become patients in the healthcare system might pose a barrier to women of low socioeconomic status becoming adept at handling diabetes. However, the experiences of empowerment received from the women’s families acted as a powerful strategy to strengthen their handling of the disease. To develop accessible and sensitive health care for this population, it is important to pay attention to these findings.

  13. Boxing training for patients with Parkinson disease: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie A; Diehl, M Dyer; Staples, William H; Conn, Lindsay; Davis, Kendra; Lewis, Nicole; Schaneman, Katie

    2011-01-01

    A nontraditional form of exercise recently applied for patients with Parkinson disease (PD) is boxing training. The primary purpose of this case series is to describe the effects of disease severity and duration of boxing training (short term and long term) on changes in balance, mobility, and quality of life for patients with mild or moderate to severe PD. The feasibility and safety of the boxing training program also were assessed. Six patients with idiopathic PD attended 24 to 36 boxing training sessions for 12 weeks, with the option of continuing the training for an additional 24 weeks (a seventh patient attended sessions for only 4 weeks). The 90-minute sessions included boxing drills and traditional stretching, strengthening, and endurance exercises. Outcomes were tested at the baseline and after 12, 24, and 36 weeks of boxing sessions (12-, 24-, and 36-week tests). The outcome measures were the Functional Reach Test, Berg Balance Scale, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Timed "Up & Go" Test, Six-Minute Walk Test, gait speed, cadence, stride length, step width, activities of daily living and motor examination subscales of the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale, and Parkinson Disease Quality of Life Scale. Six patients completed all phases of the case series, showed improvements on at least 5 of the 12 outcome measures over the baseline at the 12-week test, and showed continued improvements at the 24- and 36-week tests. Patients with mild PD typically showed improvements earlier than those with moderate to severe PD. Despite the progressive nature of PD, the patients in this case series showed short-term and long-term improvements in balance, gait, activities of daily living, and quality of life after the boxing training program. A longer duration of training was necessary for patients with moderate to severe PD to show maximal training outcomes. The boxing training program was feasible and safe for these patients with PD.

  14. Hodgkin's disease: Analysis of 75 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, M.; Cheema, M. H.; Sana, S.; Aziz, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate patients suffering from Hodgkin's disease to identify its epidemiological characteristics, modalities of treatment and features of survival. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted between July 1997 to June 1999 at the Oncology Department of Jinnah Hospital, Lahore. Subjects and Methods: A total 75 patient with Hodgkin's disease underwent Cotswold staging classification, complete hematological, renal and hepatic profile, LDH and uric acid. Chest radiograph abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography and CT scan/MRI bone marrow biopsies. All the patients received combination chemotherapy. Patients with bulky disease received field radiation. Results: Median age was eight ( 18 years). Male to female ratio was 3.5:1, advanced disease accounted for 68%, mixed cellularity was documented in 61% of patients. Eighty-two percent of patients belonged to lower socioeconomic strata. Forty-six patients (65.4%) achieved complete remission (CR) Major toxicities were hematological with febrile neutropenia in 14.6% patients. OS of patients achieving CR with good socioeconomic status was superior compared to patients with lower socioeconomic status (p<0.02). Treatment delays were due to economic constraints, illiteracy, malnutrition and co-morbid conditions. Conclusion: Advanced disease, mixed cellularity and male predominance was common. Socioeconomic status had a significant impact on the presentation of the disease. Poor tolerance to chemotherapy and enhanced toxicities are especially seen in the low socioeconomic group. (author)

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Sorantin, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of congenital heart disease (CHD) is around 10 per 1000 live births in Germany. More than 90 % of these patients will survive into adulthood due to improvements in therapy. The classification of CHD may be based according to the anatomic structures involved, to the presence of an intracardiac shunt, the presence of a cyanosis and the intensity of therapy and complexity of the disease. Nearly half of all patients with CHD suffer from an intracardiac shunt, whereas complex cases such as patients with a tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries are much more rare. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the work-up and follow-up of patients with CHD, especially after infancy and childhood. Depending on the abnormality in question, a multiparametric examination protocol is mandatory. Knowledge of operative procedures and findings of other imaging modalities help to optimize examination and time needed for it.

  16. Living with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS): the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Helen; Summers, Angela; Beaver, Kinta; Caress, Ann-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Although relatively rare, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is nonetheless a major concern within the renal community. Risk of developing EPS is associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). High mortality was previously reported, although surgery has since improved outcomes. Research into EPS focuses on imaging and early detection methods, genetics, biomarkers and preventive strategies. No previous studies have examined patients' experiences of EPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the experience of patients who have undergone surgery for EPS in one center in the North of England. A qualitative phenomenological approach, involving in-depth interviews, was adopted. Nine participants were recruited out of a total of 18 eligible. Most participants were interviewed twice over a 12-month period (October 2009 to October 2010). Interpretive data analysis was conducted, following the philosophical tradition of hermeneutics, to draw out themes from the data. Data collection and analysis took place concurrently and participants were sent a summary of their first interview to allow a period of reflection prior to the subsequent interview. EPS presented the most serious challenge participants had faced since developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Three major themes were identified, each with subcategories. The key issues for patients were related to identification of early symptoms and lack of understanding. The patients' sense of 'not being heard' by health care professionals led to a loss of trust and enhanced their feelings of uncertainty. The enormity of the surgery, the suffering, and what they had to endure had an enormous impact, but an overriding aspect of this experience was also the loss they felt for their independence and for the PD therapy over which they had control. The findings of this study highlight a number of important issues relevant to clinical practice, including lack of information and understanding of EPS, particularly its

  17. Living with Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC): Development of a Conceptual Model of MCC Based on Patient Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Howard L; Dias Barbosa, Carla; Guillemin, Isabelle; Lambert, Jérémy; Mahnke, Lisa; Bharmal, Murtuza

    2018-03-06

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive skin cancer with limited treatment options at advanced stages. There is a paucity of data available regarding the impact of MCC and its management on patients' lives. This study aimed to address this gap by interviewing patients with metastatic MCC entering a trial of an immunotherapy (avelumab). In a single-arm, open-label, international, phase 2 trial in patients with stage IV, chemotherapy-refractory, histologically confirmed MCC, patients were invited to participate in semi-structured phone interviews. These were conducted before avelumab administration. Interview transcripts were analysed qualitatively to identify concepts important to patients relating to their experience of metastatic MCC and its management. Nineteen patients were interviewed. Most reported MCC to be painless and asymptomatic. They reported being often misdiagnosed and described a long process before receiving the correct diagnosis. They also reported a feeling of "shock" after being informed of the severity and seriousness of their cancer. Overall, patients did not report impaired physical and cognitive capacities or impact on daily lives, either before or after diagnosis. However, patients and their relatives reported feelings of "worry" and "fear" about the unknown outcome of the disease. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy negatively affected patients physically and psychologically in their everyday lives. MCC disease was not perceived by the interviewed patients to result in severe functional limitations or to severely impact everyday activities, but was associated with substantial negative psychological impact. In contrast, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for MCC are highly debilitating and disrupt patients' lives. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02155647.

  18. Congenital abnormalities in Japanese patients with Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan-Hong; Kodama, Hiroko; Kato, Tadaaki

    2012-10-01

    Menkes disease (MNK) is an X-linked recessive disorder. Incidence of live-born infants with MNK is 2.8 per million live births in Japan. The aim of this study was to observe congenital malformations (CMs) in MNK patients. Subjects comprised 35 Japanese male patients with classical MNK who received copper histidine treatment. Patient clinical data were obtained anonymously from medical records or medical record summaries by pediatrician's retrospective review through a survey. We observed 21 different CMs in 14 patients. Eight of these had a single CM, while six had multiple CMs. The most frequent CM was higher arched palate with other CMs found in five patients. There was no relationship between CMs and mutations in the ATP7A gene. Using Mann-Whitney U tests, age at death was also significantly lower in MNK patients with CMs (Pheart disease, and one with microphallus. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intellectual function, activities of daily living and computerized tomography of the brain in geriatric demented patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omura, Fumiaki; Ogura, Chikara; Kishimoto, Akira; Okubo, Masayo; Imamoto, Atsushi [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine; Tsuchie, Harutaka; Sugihara, Kanichiro; Fujii, Shozo

    1984-09-01

    Thirty eight patients of geriatric dementia (mean age 74.9 years) were examined by computerized tomography (CT) and their intellectual functions and activities of daily living (ADL) were evaluated. CT was evaluated by both visual assessment method and direct measuring method. Intellectual function was evaluated by Jikei University dementia rating scale. ADL was evaluated by both Hasegawa's rating scale and Sengoku's rating scale. Results were as follows: significant influence by age was observed in intellectual functions and ADL of subjects above 75 years old. There were good correlations between the higher intellectual function, the better grooming and hygiene, and less needs of nursing care. The severe brain atrophy evaluated by the visual assessment method was correlated with the depressed level of intellectual function. When brain atrophy is mild despite high degree of dementia, reexamination should be made to explore somatic diseases inducing depression of mental activity. It also should be noted that sex and age difference is important in studying geriatric patients.

  20. Suicidal behavior among Turkish patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozdilek B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Betul Ozdilek,1 Bulent Kadri Gultekin21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Psychiatry, Erenkoy Mental Health and Neurology Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: To investigate the predictors of suicidal ideation and attempts among Turkish Parkinson’s disease (PD patients.Materials and methods: The study comprised 120 patients with PD. Clinical findings were obtained by using the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale. Disease severity was measured by the Hoehn and Yahr staging scale, and the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living scale was used for patient disability. Psychiatric evaluation was performed by the same psychiatrist using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV Axis I Disorders. Severity of depression was measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Suicidal ideation and attempts were considered positive if experienced during the patient’s lifetime. The Suicide Probability Scale was used to assess the risk of suicide. Data were analyzed by logistic regression models to identify variables associated with suicidal ideation and attempts.Results: Based on logistic regression analysis, education level, age of disease onset, disease duration, depression, and history of impulse-control disorder (ICD behaviors were significant predictors of suicidal ideation. The risk rate in the presence of depression and history of ICD behaviors was increased by 5.92 and 4.97, respectively. Additionally, lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation was found in 11.6% (14 of 120 of PD patients, although no patient had ever attempted suicide.Conclusion: Turkish patients with PD who exhibit a high risk for suicidal ideation also experience disease starting at an earlier age, longer disease duration, presence of depression, and ICD behaviors, and should be monitored carefully.Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, suicidal behavior, risk factors

  1. Health behavior of patients with ischemic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Węgorowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Admission By analyzing the available scientific literature, it is possible to define ischemic heart disease as a set of disease symptoms that are a consequence of a chronic state of imbalance between the ability to supply nutrients and oxygen and the real need of myocardial cells for these substances. Adapting life-style behaviors to healthy living is a priority to prevent the onset and development of cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic heart disease, Purpose of research The aim of the study is to determine the health behavior of patients with ischemic heart disease. Materials and methods The study was conducted from 01.08.2015 to 28.12.2015 in a group of 35 people (15 women and 20 men. The research method used in the work is a diagnostic survey, the research technique used was a survey of its own author. Conclusions By analyzing the data collected, it is important to note that patients with coronary heart disease are often associated with health problems such as hypertension, diabetes and abnormal weight. The nutritional habits of the subjects studied can be described as abnormal, particularly the excessive intake of oily meat and too little fish intake. It has also been observed that most of the patients studied have familial predisposition to ischemic heart disease. Discussion Heart attacks occur mostly in people with obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. It is also closely related to ischemic heart disease. The health behaviors of patients suffering from Ischemic Heart Disease are moderately satisfactory and therefore the role of a nurse practitioner as a health educator is very difficult but essential in the prevention of ischemic heart disease.

  2. Physician perceptions about living organ donation in patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, S; Bromberg, M B; Gibson, S B

    2017-09-01

    Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) have expressed desire to become living organ donors but are unable to do so with current organ donation policies. Our objective is to assess ALS patient's interest in organ donation, and perceived concerns of this practice by ALS neurologists. An electronic survey was administered to ALS neurologists across the United States regarding living organ donation in ALS patients prior to respiratory failure. 52 complete responses were received from 121 invites. 67% (35/52) of neurologists expressed no concerns about living organ donation in ALS patients, and 33% had concerns. The concerns related to respiratory failure, anesthesia exposure and renal dysfunction. With their concerns addressed, 71% of neurologists reported that they would endorse living organ donation. 49% of neurologists reported being asked by a patient for information regarding living organ donation. ALS neurologists felt that 22.8% of ALS patients (median 19%) would be interested in learning more about organ donation, while only 6% of neurologists broach this subject with their patients. Our results indicate that 1 in every 4 ALS patients may be interested in exploring options for living organ donation, and this topic is not routinely addressed by ALS clinics. These results indicate an unexplored area of patient interest. To honor a patient's wishes to donate, the transplant community will have to accommodate living organ donation from terminally ill patients, and address neurologist concerns. Such a practice could benefit two groups of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Living With Lupus KidsHealth / For Parents / Living With Lupus What's in ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  4. Peripheral vascular disease in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, E. A.; Aslam, N.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) has been investigated in many different ways. It depends on the diagnostic methods used and definition of atherosclerotic manifestations in the different vascular beds. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PVD in the lower limbs in group of patients with CAD. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at Combined Military Hospital/Armed Forces institute of Cardiology, Rawalpindi, over a period of one year (January 1998 to January 1999). Subjects and methods: A total number of 200 patient (171 male and 29 females) aged 55-77 years with CAD. Diagnosed by coronary angiography were included in the study. In all patients blood pressure was recorded in both arms by sphygmomanometer and ankle systolic pressure by Doppler ultrasound. Ankle branchial index was calculated. Demographic data were obtained from the patient's hospital files. Results: The prevalence of PVD was 22.5% in patients with CAD in agreement with the results of most previous investigation. There was tendency towards increasing prevalence of PVD with more advanced CAD. Thirty patients (27%) showed evidence of triple vessel disease as compared to 13 patient (18%) with double vessel and 2 patients (1%) with single vessel disease. Conclusion: A non-invasive investigation of peripheral arterial circulation should be included early in the clinical consideration of patients with chest pain or similar symptoms suggesting coronary artery disease. Ankle systolic pressure appears to be simple and cheap technique for evaluation of results. (author)

  5. The Lived Experience of Psoriasis Patients from Social Stigma and Rejection: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanibirgani, Alireza; Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud; Zarea, Kourosh; Abedi, Heidarali

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic skin disease that causes challenges such as stigma and labeling from both the community and individuals due to its effects on appearance. The objective of this study was to describe and explain the social stigma and rejection experienced by patients with psoriasis. The present research is a qualitative study with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach conducted among psoriasis patients referring to the dermatology clinic and ward of Imam Khomeini hospital in Ahvaz, Iran between June and December 2014. In this study, 15 patients with psoriasis were selected by purposeful sampling, and they were asked to express their experience of stigma and rejection. The data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews, and Diekelmann and colleagues' method was used for data analysis. After analysis of interviews, four themes were extracted: lack of social support, unrealistic and inappropriate labeling, rejection and isolation, and feeling of absurdity and futility. These can be indicative of the patients' experience from social stigma and rejection phenomena. Patients' experiences of stigma and rejection phenomena indicated that all aspects of their lives are affected. Moreover, these findings highlight the significance of stigma and rejection concepts in providing better care to these patients.

  6. Rheumatic Disease Autoantibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisihara, Renato; Pigosso, Yasmine; Prado, Nathalia; Utiyama, Shirley R R; Carvalho, Gisah; Skare, Thelma

    2018-06-04

    Patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD) such as Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) may have non-organ specific autoantibodies such as ANA (antinuclear antibodies) and RF (rheumatoid factor). To study the prevalence of rheumatic autoantibodies in a group of ATD patients without known rheumatic diseases and to evaluate its association with the patients' epidemiological and treatment profile. To follow positive non-organ specific autoantibody-positive ATD individuals to investigate whether they will develop a rheumatic disorder. A sample of 154 ATD patients (70 HT and 84 GD; mean age 45.3 ± 14.2) had determination of ANA by immunofluorescence, using hep-2 cells as substrate, extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) profile by ELISA kits and RF by latex agglutination. Epidemiological and treatment profile were obtained through chart review. These patients were followed for the mean period of five years, between 2010 to 2015. Positive ANA was found in 17.5% (27/154) of the patients: anti-Ro/SS-A in 4/154 (2.5%); anti-RNP in 4/154 (2.5%) and anti-La/SS-B in 3/154 (1.9%). None had anti-Sm antibodies. RF was detected in 12/154 (7.7%) of ATD patients and was more common in older individuals (p = 0.007). There was a positive association between the presence of RF and ANA (p = 0.03; OR = 3.89; 95% CI = 1.1-13.3). None of the patients with positive autoantibodies developed clinical rheumatic diseases during the period of observation. We found rheumatic autoantibodies in 17.5% of ATD patients without rheumatic diseases. None of them were associated with the appearance of clinical rheumatic disorder during the period of five years. ©2018The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Periodontal disease and the special needs patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louise F; Ford, Pauline J; Symons, Anne L

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with special needs are at more risk of dental disease, including periodontal diseases, and have a greater prevalence and incidence of periodontal diseases than the rest of the population. Genetic or medical conditions, and/or the use of prescription medication or recreational substances, may further increase the risk for susceptibility to periodontal disease. The success of preventing or controlling periodontal diseases amongst this group of patients has not been established. Even those individuals who access regular and comprehensive dental care appear to develop periodontal diseases as they age, and this development occurs at a rate comparable to the natural history of the disease. The reasons behind the lack of success of interventions in reducing the incidence of periodontal diseases are complex and part of the lack of success may relate to the professional challenges in treating individuals with special needs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. The naming impairment of living and nonliving items in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanes, P; Goldblum, M C; Boller, F

    1995-01-01

    Several studies of semantic abilities in Dementia of the Alzheimer Type (DAT) suggest that their semantic disorders may affect specific categories of knowledge. In particular, the existence of a category-specific semantic impairment affecting, selectively, living things has frequently been reported in association with DAT. We report here results from two naming tasks of 25 DAT patients and two subgroups within this population. The first naming task used 48 black and white line drawings from Snodgrass and Vanderwart (1980) which controlled the visual complexity of stimuli from living and nonliving categories. The second task used 44 colored pictures (to assess the influence of word frequency in living vs. nonliving categories). Within the set of black and white pictures, both DAT patients and controls obtained significantly lower scores on high visual complexity stimuli than on stimuli of low visual complexity. A clear effect of semantic category emerged for DAT patients and controls, with a lower performance on the living category. Within the colored set, pictures corresponding to high frequency words gave rise to significantly higher scores than pictures corresponding to low frequency words. No significant difference emerged between living versus nonliving categories, either in DAT patients or in controls. In the two tasks, the two subgroups of DAT patients presented a different profile of performance and error type. As color constitutes the main difference between the two sets of pictures, our results point to the relevance of this cue in the processing of semantic information, with visual complexity and frequency also being very relevant.

  9. Efficiency of patients with carcinoma and acceptance of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Kamińska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human functioning is based on physical, psychological, social and spiritual areas. The emergence of cancer and all types of problems affect these areas. Adapting to cancer is very important for the process of therapy, and acceptance of the disease is its determinant. Aim of the research study : To determine the relationship between oncological patients physical fitness and their acceptance of the disease. Material and methods: The following research techniques and tools have been used: a questionnaire survey, the Repta operation scale for assessing the functionality of patients in the course of the disease, a modified Pain Assessment Worksheet for evaluating the intensity of pain and its impact on daily activities and the AIS scale to assess the degree of acceptance of the disease. Results: Most of the respondents were fully efficient in the field of the activities of daily living. The vast majority of respondents did not feel pain, or felt pain that could be taken lightly. Pain that made daily functioning difficult, particularly in mobility and locomotion, concerned only persons over 60 years old. In the study group there was dominantly an average degree of acceptance of the disease; a small group was marked by a high level, and only a few people showed a lack of acceptance of the disease. Independent people and people in need of assistance accepted the illness at a medium level, and vulnerable patients showed the lowest level of acceptance. Conclusions : The efficiency of patients with cancer affects the level of acceptance of the disease. Cancer for the majority of respondents is not an obstacle in performing basic activities. Most respondents accept the disease, a small part selects a high level, and only a few people show a lack of acceptance of the disease.

  10. Employment among Spinal Cord Injured Patients Living in Turkey: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Berrin; Erhan, Belgin; Bardak, Ayse Nur

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of employment and to establish the factors affecting vocational status in spinal cord injured patients living in Turkey. One hundred and fifty-two traumatic spinal cord injured patients older than 18 years with injury duration of at least 1 year and living in the community were included in the study;…

  11. Dental considerations in patients with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz Pamplona, Marta; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Sarrión Pérez, María Gracia

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Cardiovascular diseases are one of the main causes of death in the developed world, and represent the first cause of mortality in Spain. In addition to their associated morbidity, such disorders are important due to the number of affected individuals and the many patients subjected to treatment because of them. Objective: An update is provided on the oral manifestations seen in patients with arterial hypertension, ischemic heart disease, arrhythmias and heart failure, and...

  12. Pentazocine dependence among sickle cell disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Sickle cell disease is a chronic disease. Severe bone pain is commonly the hallmark of clinical features. This commonly necessitates the use of analgesics especially Opioids which unfortunately have a high potential to produce dependence. The complications of dependence in patients on any psychoactive ...

  13. An outbreak of Newcastle disease in free-living pheasants (Phasianus colchicus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt; Ahrens, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The epidemiology of an outbreak of Newcastle disease in a population of approximately 12 000 free-living pheasants (Phasianus colchicus) on the island of Faeno in Denmark in 1996 is described. The mortality epizootic demonstrated over an observation period of 3 weeks. A total of 70 avian paramyxo...... to the pheasants by feral birds....

  14. Increased respiratory symptoms in COPD patients living in the vicinity of livestock farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlée, Floor; Yzermans, C Joris; van Dijk, Christel E; Heederik, Dick; Smit, Lidwien A M

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have investigated the effect of livestock farm emissions on the respiratory health of local residents, but results are inconsistent. This study aims to explore associations between the presence of livestock farms and respiratory health in an area of high-density livestock farming in the Netherlands. We focused especially on associations between farm exposures and respiratory symptoms within subgroups of potentially susceptible patients with a pre-existing lung disease.In total, 14 875 adults (response rate 53.4%) completed a questionnaire concerning respiratory health, smoking habits and personal characteristics. Different indicators of livestock farm exposures relative to the home address were computed using a geographic information system.Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma was lower among residents living within 100 m of a farm (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24-0.91 and OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.45-0.93, respectively). However, >11 farms in 1000 m compared to fewer than four farms in 1000 m (fourth quartile versus first quartile) was associated with wheezing among COPD patients (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.89). Using general practitioners' electronic medical records, we demonstrated that selection bias did not affect the observed associations.Our data suggest a protective effect of livestock farm emissions on the respiratory health of residents. Nonetheless, COPD patients living near livestock farms reported more respiratory symptoms, suggesting an increased risk of exacerbations. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  15. Color Discrimination in Patients with Gaucher Disease and Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Tov, Shlomi; Dinur, Tama; Giladi, Nir; Bar-Shira, Anat; Zelis, Mayaan; Zimran, Ari; Elstein, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Poor color discrimination among patients with Parkinson disease (PD) has long been recognized. It has been shown that carrying one or two mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) for the autosomal disease Gaucher disease (GD), as based initially on clinical evidence, is a genetic risk factor for early-onset PD. The purpose of this study was to assess color discrimination in patients with one or two GBA mutations relative to healthy controls to ascertain whether this function is affected when persons with GD or even one GBA mutation develop PD. The Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test (FMHT) was evaluated among patients with GD+PD compared to patients with GD only, obligate GBA carriers with and without PD, patients with PD only, and healthy controls. FMHT outcome include computer-generated TES (Total Error Score) and values recommended by Vingrys & King-Smith. Six groups of 10 persons were tested. Significant differences were seen for male GD+PD and for age in PD. The highest mean TES was in the PD only group, the lowest in the GD only group. There was a significant difference because of PD in groups with GD and GBA carriers. GD+PD means were between GD only and PD only mean scores. These findings confirm that PD impacts color discrimination, more in males with GD+PD but nonetheless, GD+PD patients (but not GBA carriers) had better scores than PD only patients.

  16. Impact of living and socioeconomic characteristics on cardiovascular risk in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Abboud, Halim; Labreuche, Julien; Arauz, Antonio; Bryer, Alan; Lavados, Pablo M; Massaro, Ayrton; Munoz Collazos, Mario; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Yamout, Bassem I; Vicaut, Eric

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to stratify the risk of vascular event recurrence in patients with cerebral infarction according to living and socioeconomic characteristics and geographic region. The Outcomes in Patients with TIA and Cerebrovascular Disease (OPTIC) study is an international prospective study of patients aged 45 years or older who required secondary prevention of stroke [following either an acute transient ischemic attack, minor ischemic strokes, or recent (less than six-months previous), stable, first-ever, nondisabling ischemic stroke]. A total 3635 patients from 245 centers in 17 countries in four regions (Latin America, Middle East, North Africa, South Africa) were enrolled between 2007 and 2008. The outcome measure was the two-year rate of a composite of major vascular events (vascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke). During the two-year follow-up period, 516 patients experienced at least one major cardiovascular event, resulting in an event rate of 15·6% (95% confidence interval 14·4-16·9%). Event rates varied across geographical region (P socioeconomic conditions (from 13·4% to 47·9%, adjusted P value for trend socioeconomic variables. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Stenager, E

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population...

  18. Retrograde amnesia in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Eijsackers, E; Mulder, J

    2006-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on two retrograde memory tests, one based on public events, and the other querying autobiographical memory. On both tests, patients showed strong decrements as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde

  19. [Hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Jan

    Hypothyroidism is frequently found in patients with heart disease. It is a risk factor for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease and has a direct negative effect on both the left and right ventricular functions (hypothyroidism-induced cardiomyopathy). The confirmed manifest hypothyroidism is always a reason for replacement therapy with levothyroxine; regarding patients with heart disease, we always begin treatment with a small dose and increase it gradually. The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is disputable and its benefits probably depend on age. At a higher age, the therapy-related risks often outweigh its benefits, so we make do with the target levels of the thyroid stimulating hormone being within the upper band of the normal range, or even slightly above it, rather than overdosing the patient. To summarize in a simplified way, the treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is the most effective in younger individuals, mainly those aged below 65, while at a higher age > 80 years the risk usually outweighs the benefit.Key words: cardiovascular risk - hypothyroidism - ischemic heart disease - left ventricular dysfunction - right ventricular dysfunction - subclinical hypothyroidism - thyroid peroxidase antibodies.

  20. [Thyroid cancer in patients with Grave's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mssrouri, R; Benamr, S; Essadel, A; Mdaghri, J; Mohammadine, El H; Lahlou, M-K; Taghy, A; Belmahi, A; Chad, B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in patients operated on for Graves' disease, to identify criteria which may predict malignancy, and to develop a practical approach to determine the extensiveness of thyroidectomy. Retrospective study of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 1995 and 2005. 547 patients underwent subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease during this period. Post-operative pathology examination revealed six cases of thyroid cancer (1.1%). All six cases had differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary carcinoma in 3 cases, follicular carcinoma in 2 cases and papillo-follicular carcinoma in 1 case). The indication for initial thyroidectomy was a palpable thyroid nodule in 3 cases (50%), failure of medical treatment for Grave's disease in 2 cases (33%), and signs of goiter compression in 1 case (17%). Five patients underwent re-operative total thyroidectomy. This study shows that while malignancy in Grave's disease is uncommon, the presence of thyroid nodule(s) in patients with Grave's disease may be considered as an indication for radical surgery. The most adequate radical surgery in this situation is to perform a total thyroidectomy.

  1. [Development of an activity of daily living scale for patients with COPD: the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoza, Yoshiyasu; Ariyoshi, Koya; Honda, Sumihisa; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Senjyu, Hideaki

    2009-10-01

    Patients with COPD often experience restriction in their activities of daily living (ADL) due to dyspnea. This type of restriction is unique to patients with COPD and cannot be adequately evaluated by the generic ADL scales. This study developed an ADL scale (the Activity of Daily Living Dyspnea scale [ADL-D scale]) for patients with COPD and investigated its validity and internal consistency. Patients with stable COPD were recruited and completed a pilot 26-item questionnaire. Patients also performed the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT), and completed the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea grade. There were 83 male participants who completed the pilot questionnaire. Following the pilot, 8 items that were not undertaken by the majority of subjects, and 3 items judged to be of low clinical importance by physical therapists were removed from the pilot questionnaire. The final ADL-D scale contained 15 items. Scores obtained with the ADL-D scale were significantly correlated with the MRC dyspnea grades, distance walked on the ISWT and SGRQ scores. The ADL-D scores were significantly different across the five grades of the MRC dyspnea grade. The ADL-D scale showed high consistency (Chronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.96). The ADL-D scale is a useful scale for assessing impairments in ADL in Japanese male patients with COPD.

  2. Periodontal disease in the oldest-old living in Kungsholmen, Sweden: findings from the KEOHS project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Russell, Stefanie Luise; Avlund, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The Kungsholmen Elders Oral Health Study evaluated the oral health status of generally healthy, community-dwelling persons aged 80 years and over living in Stockholm, Sweden. This paper reports periodontal disease findings and evaluates the distribution by sociodemographic factors. METHODS......-analysis of the differences in proportion of participants with SP revealed that the difference by sex also increased by age. CONCLUSIONS: These findings document the substantial and ongoing impact of periodontal disease in a sample of generally healthy, community dwelling older adults and underscore the importance...... of continued periodontal disease prevention and treatment in the oldest-old....

  3. Knowledge acquisition in patients with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rydell Karlsson, Monica

    2007-01-01

    The general aim was to evaluate different aspects of the knowledge acquisition process in patients with heart disease. Three different education programs were evaluated. In Paper I 208 patients with systolic heart failure (HF) aged >60 years, were included. They were randomized to the nurse-based outpatient clinic or to the patients´ general practitioners (GP). The aim was to assess effects of a nurse-based management program intended to increase the knowledge of the H...

  4. Current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Gerald G; Saunders, Amanda Vaughn

    2010-09-01

    There is neither proven effective prevention for Alzheimer disease nor a cure for patients with this disorder. Nevertheless, a spectrum of biopsychosocial therapeutic measures is available for slowing progression of the illness and enhancing quality of life for patients. These measures include a range of educational, psychological, social, and behavioral interventions that remain fundamental to effective care. Also available are a number of pharmacologic treatments, including prescription medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for Alzheimer disease, "off-label" uses of medications to manage target symptoms, and controversial complementary therapies. Physicians must make the earliest possible diagnosis to use these treatments most effectively. Physicians' goals should be to educate patients and their caregivers, to plan long-term care options, to maximally manage concurrent illnesses, to slow and ameliorate the most disabling symptoms, and to preserve effective functioning for as long as possible. The authors review the various current treatments for patients with Alzheimer disease.

  5. Impact of Ménière's Disease on Significant Others' Health and Lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Pyykkő, Ilmari; Levo, Hilla; Kentala, Erna

    2018-01-01

    Ménière's disease (MD) is a chronic and, in part, intermittent illness that poses multiple challenges for both the physical and psychological well-being of patients, as well as on those around them. The patients face psychosocial consequences, which include disruptions to life goals, employment, income, relationships, leisure activities, and daily living activities that also influence their family members and friends. However, there is a limited understanding of the impact of MD on significant others (SOs). The current study was aimed at identifying how the SOs of patients with MD respond to different aspects of the impact of the disorder on health and life (i.e., psychological aspects, activities, participation, and positive aspects). The study employed a cross-sectional survey design. The study sample was 186 SOs of patients with MD who were recruited through Finnish Ménière's Federation. Participants completed a 25-item structured questionnaire focusing on different aspects of the impact of the disorder on health and life, and also provided some demographic information. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearson's correlation, and K-means cluster analysis techniques. Examination of response patterns suggests that the disorder had, on average, a marginal effect on SOs' psychological aspects, activities, and participation as the SOs generally focused on complaints. Interestingly, SOs reported some positive consequences as a result of their partners' condition. The results show a limited association between SOs' demographic variables and response patterns. The Pearson's correlation suggested a strong association between the subscales psychological aspects, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Also, a weak negative correlation was observed among positive aspects and participation restrictions. The cluster analysis resulted in three clusters, namely, (1) "nonengaged," (2) "supportive," and (3) "concerned." The current study results

  6. Patients' substantialization of disease, the hybrid symptom and metaphysical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pârvan, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In the context of current scholarship concerned with facilitating integration between the biomedical and the patient-centred models of care, the article suggests that disease brings about an ontological disruption in patients, which is not directly addressed in either model, and may interfere with treatment and therapy outcomes if not met with a type of care termed here as 'metaphysical'. The receipt of diagnosis and medical care can give patients the sense that they are ontologically diminished, or less of a human, and along with physicians' approaches to and discourses about disease, may prompt them to seek ontological restoration or security in the same way as psychologically traumatized patients sometimes do: by treating the disease and/or the experience of harm associated with it as a thing that exists per se. I call this 'substantialization' of disease (or harm) and draw on Augustine's theory of non-substantial deficiencies (physiological and moral) and on Plato's and Plotinus's different takes on such defects in order to discuss what substantialization can do for patients. Based on literature that examines patients' ways of talking about and living with their disease, I speculate that substantialization can generate a 'hybrid symptom', consisting in patterns of exercising agency which may predispose to non-adherence. Ways in which physicians could provide metaphysical care are proposed, along with an understanding of chronic patients as hybrid ontological and agentic units, which draws on theories of enactive cognition. I opine that metaphysical care may facilitate integration between the depersonalized and personalized models of care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  8. Cardiometabolic factors and disease duration in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassani, Erica; Cereda, Emanuele; Barichella, Michela; Madio, Carmen; Cancello, Raffaella; Caccialanza, Riccardo; Zini, Michela; Cilia, Roberto; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a favorable cardiometabolic risk profile. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between cardiometabolic risk factors and the duration of disease. One hundred and fifty patients with PD (56.7% men) were studied, measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), body fat percentage (BF%) by impedance, fasting glucose, serum lipids, and transaminases. In sex- and age-adjusted correlation models, duration of PD was inversely related to BMI (r = -0.20; P HDL) levels were positively correlated with disease duration (P HDL-cholesterol ratio was also inversely associated with duration of PD (P HDL levels and total HDL-cholesterol ratio were favorably associated with duration of PD. This factor may contribute to cardiometabolic protection in PD. The mechanisms underlying this association deserve further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Travel advice and vaccinations in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases: the earlier, the better

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mast, Q. de; Keuter, M.; Thiel, P.P. van; Ven, A.J. van der

    2014-01-01

    The number of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases who have been travelling to the tropics or subtropics has been rising. Use of immunomodulating drugs increases the risk for infectious diseases and may reduce seroprotection rates following vaccination. In addition, live vaccines, such as the

  10. Celiac disease: implications for patient management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Megan; Grossman, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that is known specifically for causing inflammation of the mucosa in the small intestine. Through multiple diagnostic and screening tools such as small intestinal biopsy sample, serological testing, and human leukocyte antigen testing, healthcare providers can diagnose this disease that contains components related to genetic predisposition and intake of gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. There are some who believe that having an autoimmune disease may predispose one to acquiring another disease. With patients experiencing mostly diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss, the implementation of a gluten-free diet is the treatment that healthcare providers recommend. Through monitoring gluten intake and providing nutritional supplementation, those diagnosed with celiac disease can lead a relatively normal life without complications. With celiac disease affecting all age ranges in the population, and with a documented higher frequency, there is a growing awareness in society that can be easily seen in grocery stores, restaurants, and food manufacturers.

  11. The Lived Experiences of Patients Waiting for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abbasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Waiting for coronary artery bypass grafting is an unpleasant experience for patients and is associated with physical and psychological problems. The aim of this study was to recognize lived experiences of patients waiting for coronary artery bypass graft. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using an interpretative phenomenological approach and proposed method of Van Manen. Twelve participants (9 men and 3 women were purposefully selected with maximum variation from Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom city, in 2016. The data of this study were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews in the period of time between 40 to 70 minutes. The recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim to text, then, the transcribed texts were analyzed using the proposed van Manen’s six-step method. Results: From analysis of participants' statements, concepts, such as sense of panic, fear of death, understanding patients’ collaboration, understanding the importance of heart, decision for heart surgery, and trying to keep calm, were deduced. Conclusion: The participants of this study, from diagnosis of cardiovascular disease until the time of artery bypass grafting, thought that they were at risk for heart attack and death, and in spite of fear of death and sense of panic, they used peer-patients to control these negative experiences. Therefore, the members of health care team, particularly nurses, can provide necessary trainings to help patients from diagnosis time until surgery.

  12. Tinnitus: patients do not have to 'just live with it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Craig W; Sandridge, Sharon A; Bea, Scott M; Cherian, Kay; Cherian, Neil; Kahn, Karyn M; Kaltenbach, James

    2011-05-01

    Tinnitus is distressing and affects the quality of life for many patients. Because primary care physicians may be the entry point for patients seeking help for tinnitus, we urge them to acknowledge this symptom and its potential negative impact on the patient's health and quality of life. Physicians should actively listen to the patient and provide hope and encouragement, but also provide realistic expectations about the course of treatment. The patient must also understand that there may be no singular "cure" for tinnitus and that management may involve multidisciplinary assessment and treatment.

  13. Dental profile of patients with Gaucher disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, Stuart L; Elstein, Deborah; Sgan-Cohen, Harold; Mann, Jonathan; Zimran, Ari

    2003-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to determine whether patients with Gaucher disease had significant dental pathology because of abnormal bone structure, pancytopenia, and coagulation abnormalities. Methods Each patient received a complete oral and periodontal examination in addition to a routine hematological evaluation. Results Gaucher patients had significantly fewer carious lesions than otherwise healthy carriers. Despite prevalence of anemia, there was no increase in gingival disease; despite the high incidence of thrombocytopenia, gingival bleeding was not noted; and despite radiological evidence of bone involvement, there was no greater incidence loss of teeth or clinical tooth mobility. Conclusions These data represent the first survey of the oral health of a large cohort of patients with Gaucher disease. It is a pilot study of a unique population and the results of the investigation are indications for further research. Based on our findings, we recommend regular oral examinations with appropriate dental treatment for patients with Gaucher disease as for other individuals. Consultation between the dentist and physician, preferably one with experience with Gaucher disease, should be considered when surgical procedures are planned. PMID:12875661

  14. Mortality in patients with pituitary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary disease is associated with increased mortality predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and GH hypersecretion (and cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the reduction of mortality in patients with Cushing\\'s disease and acromegaly, retrospectively. For patients with acromegaly, the role of IGF-I is less clear-cut. Confounding pituitary hormone deficiencies such as gonadotropins and particularly ACTH deficiency (with higher doses of hydrocortisone replacement) may have a detrimental effect on outcome in patients with pituitary disease. Pituitary radiotherapy is a further factor that has been associated with increased mortality (particularly cerebrovascular). Although standardized mortality ratios in pituitary disease are falling due to improved treatment, mortality for many conditions are still elevated above that of the general population, and therefore further measures are needed. Craniopharyngioma patients have a particularly increased risk of mortality as a result of the tumor itself and treatment to control tumor growth; this is a key area for future research in order to optimize the outcome for these patients.

  15. [Serum glycosaminoglycans in Graves' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna B; Olczyk, Krystyna Z; Koźma, Ewa M; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna B; Wisowski, Grzegorz R; Marcisz, Czesław

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the blood serum sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration of Graves' disease patients before treatment and after attainment of the euthyroid state. The study was carried out on the blood serum obtained from 17 patients with newly recognised Graves' disease and from the same patients after attainment of the euthyroid state. Graves' patients had not any clinical symptoms neither of ophthalmopathy nor pretibial myxedema. GAGs were isolated from the blood serum by the multistage extraction and purification using papaine hydrolysis, alkali elimination, as well as cetylpyridium chloride binding. Total amount of GAGs was quantified by the hexuronic acids assay. HA content in obtained GAGs sample was evaluated by the ELISA method. Increased serum concentration of sulfated GAGs in non-treated Graves' disease patients was found. Similarly, serum HA level in untreated patients was significantly elevated. The attainment of euthyroid state was accompanied by the decreased serum sulfated GAGs level and by normalization of serum HA concentration. In conclusion, the results obtained demonstrate that the alterations of GAGs metabolism connected with Graves' disease can lead to systemic changes of the extracellular matrix properties.

  16. Healthcare professionals' views of the experiences of individuals living with Crohn's Disease in Spain. A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanjuán, Sofía; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Richart-Martínez, Miguel; Sanjuán-Quiles, Ángela

    2018-01-01

    Crohn's Disease (CD) in Spain lacks of a unified National Clinical Pathway and not even any early detection program and professional follow-up outpatient attention once it has been diagnosed. Little is known about the Spanish health professionals' views of the experiences of individuals living with Crohn's Disease nationwide and also about how the Spanish Health System faces this situation. A qualitative research method was conducted to explore this topic through in-depth interviews with eleven healthcare professionals, who represented different clinics treating people with CD from the province of Alicante (Spain). Three topics and seven sub-topics were derived from the analysis of the content emerging from the interviews. The three main topics were: the healthcare system as a hindrance for ongoing treatment of CD, the impact of the disease, support networks. The knowledge of CD gained by healthcare professionals, in the contexts studied here within, with regards to the psychosocial aspects and the experience of those living with the disease and their immediate circles, is poor, if not null on an academic level, becoming experiential on their incorporation into the professional field. Additionally, a priori, they lack the tools to address the doubts and concerns of patients from the moment of diagnosis through the ongoing care of the patient. Organizational hindrances, such as the lack of time and consensual guidelines for adequately monitoring CD patients in Alicante (Spain), further restrict the patient-professional relationship. Due to the consensus established by the National Agency regulating the contents of the Health Professions' Education and Training across the country, we are assuming that the phenomenon highlighted may be similar in other parts of Spain. Therefore, it can be said that healthcare professionals have a limited understanding of the impact of CD on the day-to-day life of those affected, not being considered a part of the CD patients' formal

  17. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross...... by patients. The clinical assessment included a review of clinical features of RA and exposure to DMARDs over the course of RA. Comorbidities were recorded; CV morbidity included myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease, coronary bypass surgery, and stroke. Traditional risk factors recorded were...... any CV event and age and male gender and between extra-articular disease and myocardial infarction. Prolonged exposure to methotrexate (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.89), leflunomide (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), sulfasalazine (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.98), glucocorticoids (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92 to 0...

  18. [Effect of disease severity on upper extremity muscle strength, exercise capacity, and activities of daily living in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan Kahraman, Buse; Özsoy, İsmail; Acar, Serap; Özpelit, Ebru; Akdeniz, Bahri; Sevinç, Can; Savcı, Sema

    2017-07-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease. Although muscle strength, exercise capacity, quality of life, and activities of daily living of patients with PAH are affected, it is not known how they are affected by disease severity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate effects of disease severity on upper extremity muscle strength, exercise capacity, and performance of activities of daily living in patients with PAH. Twenty-five patients with disease severity classified according to the New York Heart Association (NYHA) as functional class II (n=14) or class III (n=11) were included in the study. Upper-extremity exercise capacity and limitations in performing activities of daily living were assessed with 6-minute pegboard and ring test (6PBRT) and the Milliken activities of daily living scale (MAS), respectively. Shoulder flexion, elbow extension, elbow flexion muscle strength, and handgrip strength were measured with dynamometer. There were no significant differences in age, gender, body mass index, or mean pulmonary artery pressure between groups (p>0.05). The 6PBRT, MAS, and elbow flexion (right) and grip strength (right and left) results were significantly lower in NYHA III group than in NYHA II group (p=0.004, p=0.002, p=0.043, p=0.002 and p=0.003, respectively). There was no significant difference in shoulder flexion, elbow flexion (left), or elbow extension between groups (p>0.05). Results suggest that upper extremity exercise capacity, elbow flexion muscle strength (right), and handgrip strength decrease and that limitations in activities of daily living grow as disease severity increases in patients with PAH. When planning rehabilitation programs, disease severity should be considered and evaluations and treatments for the upper extremities should be included.

  19. LOCAL ANESTHETICS IN PATIENTS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    risto Daskalov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A significant problem in the dental medicine is pain alleviation. Many studies in the dental anesthesiology result in the production of new agents for locoregional anesthesia. Objective: This article aim to present the results of the last studies on the effect of the local anesthetics used in the oral surgery on patients with cardiovascular diseases. Material: A general review of the existing literature on the effect of the adrenaline, included as vasoconstrictor in the local anesthetics, used in patients with cardiovascular diseases is made. The benefits of vasoconstrictors for the quality of the anesthetic effect are proven. Conclusion: A small amount of adrenaline in the anesthetic solution does not result in complications development in patients with controlled cardiovascular diseases. Articaine is recommended agent of first choice for local anesthesia in the oral surgery.

  20. Neoplastic pericardial disease. Analysis of 26 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Nogueira Soufen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To characterize patients with neoplastic pericardial disease diagnosed by clinical presentation, complementary test findings, and the histological type of tumor. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with neoplastic pericardial disease were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Clinical manifestations and abnormalities in chest roentgenograms and electrocardiograms were frequent, but were not specific. Most patients underwent surgery. There was a high positivity of the pericardial biopsy when associated with the cytological analysis of the pericardial liquid used to determine the histological type of the tumor, particularly when the procedure was performed with the aid of pericardioscopy. CONCLUSION: The correct diagnosis of neoplastic pericardial disease involves suspicious but nonspecific findings during clinical examination and in screen tests. The suspicious findings must be confirmed through more invasive diagnostic approaches, in particular pericardioscopy with biopsy and cytological study.

  1. Suicide in patients with motor neuron disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Søren; Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, through an epidemiological study, whether suicide risk is increased in patients with motor neuron disease (MND). The study involved 116 patients with MND. In the study period 92 patients died, 47 males and 45 females. No patients committed suicide....... The number of expected suicides was 0.27 for males and 0.12 for females, a total of 0.38. The difference between observed and expected suicides was not statistically significant for males and females....

  2. Knowledge, attitude, and perception of disease among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome: A study from a tertiary care center in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mahajan, Vikram K; Chauahn, Pushpinder S; Mehta, Karainder S; Rawat, Ritu; Shiny, T N

    2016-01-01

    Although modification of behavioral practices among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-affected patients is important in decreasing HIV disease transmission, the knowledge, attitude, and perception studies about HIV infection rarely include persons living with HIV/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS). To assess knowledge, attitude, and perceptions of persons living with HIV/AIDS for the disease and other epidemiological aspects. One-hundred and fifty consecutive persons living with HIV/AIDS were enrolled for this questionnaire-based cross-sectional, descriptive study. These 150 patients comprised 93 men and 57 women, aged between 14 and 78 (mean 37.13) years. The majority, 112 (74.67%) patients were between 20 and 50 years of age and 116 (77.3%) patients were either illiterate or high-school dropouts. Drivers, laborers, and self-employed comprised 69 (74.2%) patients among affected males. Only 129 (86%) respondents had heard about HIV/AIDS and knew about its heterosexual transmission. Ninety-eight (65.3%) respondents were aware of disease transmission from infected blood or needle pricks. Interestingly, 106 (70.7%) respondents were aware of the importance of using condom in preventing disease transmission. Television/radio was the most common sources of information for 135 (90%) patients. Nearly, 69% respondents disfavored disclosing their disease to friends/colleagues fearing stigmatization. Information, education, and communication activities are imperative to educate persons living with HIV/AIDS about life-long nature of the disease, modes of its transmission, and significance of preventive measures to bridge the gaps in their knowledge. While improvement in individual economic status, education, and health services remains highly desirable, mass media can play a pivotal role in creating awareness among masses.

  3. Stress Ulcer Disease in the Burned Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    appearance of gastritis and duodenitis and their morphologic and histologic characteristics point to impaired mucosal blood flow and focal is...Gastric Duodenal disease disease study study Total number of patients 54 37 Gastritis 45 18 Duodenitis 34 15 Acute gastric ulcer 14 6...early mucosai slough, which ap- peared to be incipient ulcerations, showed in- farction necrosis on histologic examination. The le- sions of each of

  4. Profiles of Patients Who Use Marijuana for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlin, Ann Marie; Long, Millie; Kappelman, Michael; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S

    2018-06-01

    Marijuana is legal in a number of states for indications that include inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and patients are interested in its potential benefits. We aimed to describe the legal use of marijuana in individuals with IBD in the USA who participate within the CCFA Partners internet-based cohort. A total of 2357 participants who lived in states where prescription or recreational marijuana was legal, were offered the opportunity to complete a survey on marijuana use and IBD symptoms including perceived benefits of therapy. Bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to determine factors associated with marijuana use. Surveys were completed by 1666 participants (71%) with only 214 (12.8%) indicating they had asked their medical doctor about its use and 73 actually using prescribed marijuana (4.4%). Within the respondent group (N = 1666), 234 participants lived where both medical and recreational marijuana is legal and 49 (20.9%) reported recreational marijuana use specifically for IBD. Users reported positive benefits (80.7%), but users also reported more depression, anxiety, pain interference, and lower social satisfaction than non-users. Those prescribed marijuana reported more active disease, and more use of steroids, narcotics, and zolpidem. Few IBD patients consulted their medical doctors about marijuana use or used prescription marijuana. Where recreational marijuana was available, usage rates were higher. Users reported benefits but also more IBD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and pain. Marijuana use may be higher in patients with IBD symptoms not well treated by conventional medical approaches.

  5. Medications Used for Cognitive Enhancement in Patients With Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yu Hsu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/aimsCognitive impairment, which frequently occurs in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease, has a significant impact on the daily lives of both patients and their family. Furthermore, since the medications used for cognitive enhancement have limited efficacy, the issue of cognitive enhancement still remains a clinically unsolved challenge.Sampling and methodsWe reviewed the clinical studies (published between 2007 and 2017 that focused on the efficacy of medications used for enhancing cognition in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease.ResultsAcetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are the standard treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Some studies have reported selective cognitive improvement in patients with schizophrenia following galantamine treatment. Newer antipsychotics, including paliperidone, lurasidone, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, and BL-1020, have also been reported to exert cognitive benefits in patients with schizophrenia. Dopaminergic medications were found to improve language function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, no beneficial effects on cognitive function were observed with dopamine agonists in patients with schizophrenia. The efficacies of nicotine and its receptor modulators in cognitive improvement remain controversial, with the majority of studies showing that varenicline significantly improved the cognitive function in schizophrenic patients. Several studies have reported that N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR enhancers improved the cognitive function in patients with chronic schizophrenia. NMDAR enhancers might also have cognitive benefits in patients with Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has also been demonstrated to have beneficial effects on attention, processing

  6. Influences of patient informed cognitive complaints on activities of daily living in patients with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Träger, Conny; Decker, Lone; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with bipolar disorder (BD) experience debilitating cognitive deficits, with risk of impaired occupational and psychosocial functioning. However, knowledge of how these deficits impact the patients’ ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL), tasks related to self...... Complaints in Bipolar Disorder Rating Assessment questionnaire (COBRA)) were included. Objective neurocognitive function was evaluated with a short comprehensive cognitive test battery and ADL ability was evaluated with the performance-based Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) in the homes......-care and domestic life is limited. We explored the relation between impaired cognitive function and the ability to perform ADL in patients with BD. A total of 42 outpatients (mean age 36 years (range 19.0–58.0 years), 69% women) with BD in remission and with subjective cognitive complaints (≥ 13 on the Cognitive...

  7. Classification deficits in Alzheimer's disease with special reference to living and nonliving things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanes, P; Goldblum, M C; Boller, F

    1996-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the hypothesis that visual similarity between exemplars within a semantic category may affect differentially the recognition process of living and nonliving things, according to task demands, in patients with semantic memory disorders. Thirty-nine Alzheimer's patients and 39 normal elderly subjects were presented with a task in which they had to classify pictures and words, depicting either living or nonliving things, at two levels of classification: subordinate (e.g., mammals versus birds or tools versus vehicles) and attribute (e.g., wild versus domestic animals or fast versus slow vehicles). Contrary to previous results (Montañes, Goldblum, & Boller, 1995) in a naming task, but as expected, living things were better classified than nonliving ones by both controls and patients. As expected, classifications at the subordinate level also gave rise to better performance than classifications at the attribute level. Although (and somewhat unexpectedly) no advantage of picture over word classification emerged, some effects consistent with the hypothesis that visual similarity affects picture classification emerged, in particular within a subgroup of patients with predominant verbal deficits and the most severe semantic memory disorders. This subgroup obtained a better score on classification of pictures than of words depicting living items (that share many visual features) when classification is at the subordinate level (for which visual similarity is a reliable clue to classification), but met with major difficulties when classifying those pictures at the attribute level (for which shared visual features are not reliable clues to classification). These results emphasize the fact that some "normal" effects specific to items in living and nonliving categories have to be considered among the factors causing selective category-specific deficits in patients, as well as their relevance in achieving tasks which require either

  8. Heart disease in patients with pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Raffaele; Piovella, Chiara; Prandoni, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    Several heart diseases are promoters of left-side cardiac thrombosis and could lead to arterial embolism. The same mechanism may be responsible for right-side cardiac thrombosis and therefore be a direct source of pulmonary embolism. Yasuoka et al. showed a higher incidence of perfusion defects in lung scan in patients with spontaneous echocontrast in the right atrium than in those without it (40% and 7% respectively; P=0.006). We recently assessed the prevalence of heart diseases in 11.236 consecutive patients older than 60 years discharged from Venetian hospitals with a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We observed a higher prevalence of all-cause heart diseases (odds ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.40) in patients with a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism alone (secondary or unprovoked) compared with those discharged with a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism associated with deep vein thrombosis, generating the hypothesis that some specific heart diseases in older patients could themselves be a possible source of pulmonary emboli. Further prospective studies are required to confirm these findings, which have the potential to open new horizons for the interpretation and management of venous thromboembolic disease.

  9. Pancytopenia in a Patient with Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Huai Heng; Tan, Florence

    2013-08-01

    Pancytopenia can rarely complicate Grave's disease. It can be due to uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis or as a result of rare side effect of antithyroid medication. Pernicious anemia leading to Vitamin B12 deficiency is another rare associated cause. We report a case of a patient with Grave's disease and undiagnosed pernicious anemia whom was assumed to have antithyroid drug induced pancytopenia. Failure to recognize this rare association of pernicious anemia as a cause of pancytopenia had resulted in delay in treatment and neurological complication in our patient.

  10. Cushing's disease in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Cardosa Samón

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cushing's disease arises from increased ACTH secretion from a pituitary tumor that stimulates the area fasciculata of the adrenal cortex and produces hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Objectives: To explain the clinical and humoral manifestations of Cushing's disease in elderly adults. Methods: The article is a descriptive and retrospective study of a case report on a 62 year old patient that is admitted to our Center with manifestations of facial plethora and centripetal obesity. Onset was characterized by hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Definitive diagnosis was Cushing's disease from a macroadenoma with increased ACTH secretion.

  11. [Metronome therapy in patients with Parkinson disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzensberger, W; Oberländer, U; Stecker, K

    1997-12-01

    We studied 10 patients with Parkinson's disease and 12 patients with Parkinson-plus-syndrome, trying to improve patients' gait by application of various external rhythmic stimuli, including metronome stimulation (96 beats per minute = middle andante). The test course of the patients was 4 x 10 meters and 3 U-turns. The patients' gait quality under stimulation was compared with their free walk (velocity, number of steps, number of freezing episodes). Metronome stimulation significantly reduced the time and number of steps needed for the test course and also diminished the number of freezing episodes. March music stimulation was less effective and tactile stimulation (rhythmically tapping on the patient's shoulder) even produced negative results. The positive effect of metronome stimulation was also found, when the tests were not performed inside the hospital building, but outside in the hospital parc. Metronome stimulation was comparably effective in both patient sub-groups examined in this study (M. Parkinson, Parkinson-plus-syndrome) and seems to be an important additional help in the treatment of these patients. Electronical metronomes are not expensive, easy in handling, and portable. A theoretical explanation of metronome stimulation effectivity in patients with Parkinson's disease still needs to be elucidated.

  12. Perioperative Management of Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissar, Lina; Almoallim, Hani; Albazli, Khaled; Alotaibi, Manal; Alwafi, Samar

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the assessment of patients with rheumatologic diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA), before undergoing orthopedic surgery. Perioperative assessment ensures an early diagnosis of the patient's medical condition, overall health, medical co-morbidities, and the assessment of the risk factors associated with the proposed procedures. Perioperative assessment allows for proper postoperative management of complications and of the management of drugs such as disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) and anti-platelets, and corticosteroids. The assessment also supports follow up plans, and patient education. Perioperative assessment enables the discussion of the proposed treatment plans and the factors associated with them in each case among the different specialists involved to facilitate an appropriate early decision-making about the assessment and treatment of patients with rheumatologic diseases. It also enables the discussion of both condition and procedure with the patient to ensure a good postoperative care. The article identifies the components of perioperative medical evaluation, discusses perioperative management of co-morbidities and the management of specific clinical problems related to RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, the management of DMARDs, like methotrexate (MTX) and biologic therapies, prophylactic antibiotics, and postoperative follow up, including patient education and rehabilitation PMID:24062860

  13. Learning disabilities in Darier's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodiuk-Gad, R; Lerner, M; Breznitz, Z; Cohen-Barak, E; Ziv, M; Shani-Adir, A; Amichai, B; Zlotogorski, A; Shalev, S; Rozenman, D

    2014-03-01

    Neuropsychiatric features and intellectual difficulties have been reported in studies of Darier's disease. Learning disabilities have never been reported or evaluated systematically in these patients. To assess the prevalence of learning disabilities in 76 patients with Darier's disease, and cognitive functioning in 19 of them. The data were collected by two methods: a questionnaire, as part of a larger study on the clinical characteristics of 76 patients; and neuropsychological measures for the assessment of learning disabilities in 19 of them. Thirty-one of the 76 patients reported learning disabilities (41%) and 56 (74%) reported a family history of learning disabilities. Significant differences were found between the 19 patients evaluated on cognitive tasks and a control group of 42 skilled learners on subtraction and multiplication tasks. Six (32%) of the 19 were identified as having reading difficulties and five (26%) exhibited low performance on the Concentration Performance Test. All patients had general cognitive ability in the average range. Findings suggest an association between Darier's disease and learning disabilities, a heretofore unreported association, pointing to the need to obtain personal and family history of such disabilities in order to refer cases of clinical concern for further study. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  14. [Tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis important opportunistic disease in AIDS patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska-Schönthaler, N; Schönthaler-Humiecka, J; Podlasin, R; Cholewińska, G; Rzeszkowicz, T; Mikuła, T; Horban, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the search was investigation of tuberculosis in AIDS patients. Each year 8-9 mln people fall ill of tuberculosis and one third of them die. To the infection of tuberculosis and fast development into active state are especially exposed people with AIDS. 696 people were examined on tuberculosis most of which were AIDS patients hospitalized and cured in Hospital of Infection Diseases and Prison Hospital. 159 patients were women and 537 were men. The average age was between 25 and 45 (70%). The investigated population was characterized according to age, social and living conditions, using drugs and former contact with tuberculosis. All patients suspected of tuberculosis had chest X-rayed, sputum, BAL and pleural liquor were taken to bacteriological examination when extrapulmonary tuberculosis was suspected. The material was taken adequately to the disease process: CSF, urine, lymph nodes, peritoneal fluids, blood, stool, swabs and other. Bacteriological investigations have been carried out by fast cultivating method since 1998 and rapid genetic method since 1999. Apart from modern, fast diagnostic methods, routine bacteriological procedures were applied in tuberculosis diagnosis. More than 30% of the examined population were from bad social-living conditions, 78% had risk factors, 65% were drug users. The analysis of the tuberculosis illness from 1997 to July 2001 shows growing tendency. Nowadays it is 20% cases proved by bacteriological diagnosis. The structure of falling ill with tuberculosis has changed. Considerable increase of extrapulmonary tuberculosis was observed, 20 patients died due to tuberculosis and 8 patients due to mycobacteriosis. Resistance of M.tub.complex occurred within the range of 10% cases.

  15. Living in rural New England amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen Paul T; Sheth Siddharth H; Lahey Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of depression as a complication of HIV infection is increasingly understood, and people living in rural areas are at increased risk for depression. However, it is not known whether living in rural areas amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV. Methods We compared the prevalence of depression between rural and metropolitan HIV patients seen at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock HIV Program in a retrospective cohort study. Using the validated Rural-Urban Co...

  16. Effect of Gait Retraining on Balance, Activities of Daily Living, Quality of Life and Depression in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Farhadian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stroke is one of the most common neurological disease and it is the main cause of physical and mental disability and staying in house. Gait difficulties have high incidence in patients with stroke. So the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of gait retraining on balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depressionin stroke patients. Methods: This study was a clinical trial without control group. Sampling was performed by convenience sampling method and 18 patients participated. After recording demographic data, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, SF36 questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory-II used in pre-test and post-test to assess balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depression, respectively .Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation coefficient and paired T-test. Results: The results showed statistically significant correlation in pre-test and difference between mean score of the all instruments before and after the intervention. Discussion: According to high prevalence of gait difficulties in stroke patients, it seems interventions in this area is necessary. Statistical results showed that the gait retraining intervention may have a positive effect on improving balance, activities of daily living, quality of life and depression of these patients. According to lack of information in this area, further research is needed.

  17. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Stenager, E

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population....... In the background population the median age at death was 80.69 years for men and 84.37 years for women. The SMR for men was 1.92 and for women 2.47. Infections, in particular lung infections, and heart diseases were the most common causes of death. Seventy percent of the death certificates had PD as a diagnosis....... CONCLUSION: It is likely that several factors can influence the changed mortality of PD: more effective treatment, changing diagnostic practice, and inter-disease competition....

  18. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  19. [Stoma care in patients with malignant disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Akiko; Suwa, Katsuhito

    2013-12-01

    The aim of stoma care and rehabilitation is improving the quality of life of the patient with a stoma. There are more than 1,700 stoma specialist nurses in Japan, eg, enterostomal therapists(ET)and wound, ostomy, and continence nurses(WOCN), who are involved in the care of patients with stomas. In this manuscript, we describe our role in the care of patients with temporary/permanent stomas created for emergency disease and/or palliative care, and the adverse effects of various current chemotherapies.

  20. Quantitative regional cerebral blood flow study with 123I-IMP in patients with dementia and in patients with poor activities of daily living

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamiya, Takashi

    1993-01-01

    N-isopropyl-p[ 123 I]iodoamphetamine ( 123 I-IMP) SPECT and quantitative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies were performed in 111 patients with cerebral disorders. Continuous arterial blood sampling method based on the microsphere model was used as a quantitative rCBF measurement. We evaluated rCBF in patients with dementia and also in patients with poor activities of daily living (ADL). Patients with dementia showed significant reduction of mean CBF in contrast to patients without dementia. Significant decrease of rCBF in the bilateral frontal cortex, parietal cortex and basal ganglia and the right temporal cortex were found in demented patients. Although patients with vascular dementia showed decreased rCBF in bilateral basal ganglia, demented patients with Parkinson's disease showed no significant reduction of rCBF in any region. Patients with poor ADL showed decreased rCBF in all brain regions. And particularly frontal and basal ganglionic defects were most pronounced. Patients with poor ADL resulting from cerebral infarction showed significant decrease of rCBF in bilateral basal ganglia. However, there was no significant correlation in Parkinson's disease between ADL and rCBF. The rCBF measurement with 123 I-IMP is useful for clinical evaluation of demented patients and patients with poor ADL. (author)

  1. Quantitative regional cerebral blood flow study with [sup 123]I-IMP in patients with dementia and in patients with poor activities of daily living

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwamiya, Takashi [Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine

    1993-11-01

    N-isopropyl-p[[sup 123]I]iodoamphetamine ([sup 123]I-IMP) SPECT and quantitative regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies were performed in 111 patients with cerebral disorders. Continuous arterial blood sampling method based on the microsphere model was used as a quantitative rCBF measurement. We evaluated rCBF in patients with dementia and also in patients with poor activities of daily living (ADL). Patients with dementia showed significant reduction of mean CBF in contrast to patients without dementia. Significant decrease of rCBF in the bilateral frontal cortex, parietal cortex and basal ganglia and the right temporal cortex were found in demented patients. Although patients with vascular dementia showed decreased rCBF in bilateral basal ganglia, demented patients with Parkinson's disease showed no significant reduction of rCBF in any region. Patients with poor ADL showed decreased rCBF in all brain regions. And particularly frontal and basal ganglionic defects were most pronounced. Patients with poor ADL resulting from cerebral infarction showed significant decrease of rCBF in bilateral basal ganglia. However, there was no significant correlation in Parkinson's disease between ADL and rCBF. The rCBF measurement with [sup 123]I-IMP is useful for clinical evaluation of demented patients and patients with poor ADL. (author).

  2. Electrocardiographic Characteristics of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnier, M.J.; Rutten, F.H.; Numans, M.E.; Kors, J.A.; Tan, H.L.; de Boer, A.; Hoes, A.W.; de Bruin, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiography (ECG) carries information about cardiac disease and prognosis, but studies comparing ECG characteristics between patients with and without COPD are lacking. We related ECG

  3. Modeling the live-pig trade network in Georgia: Implications for disease prevention and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Andrea Kukielka

    Full Text Available Live pig trade patterns, drivers and characteristics, particularly in backyard predominant systems, remain largely unexplored despite their important contribution to the spread of infectious diseases in the swine industry. A better understanding of the pig trade dynamics can inform the implementation of risk-based and more cost-effective prevention and control programs for swine diseases. In this study, a semi-structured questionnaire elaborated by FAO and implemented to 487 farmers was used to collect data regarding basic characteristics about pig demographics and live-pig trade among villages in the country of Georgia, where very scarce information is available. Social network analysis and exponential random graph models were used to better understand the structure, contact patterns and main drivers for pig trade in the country. Results indicate relatively infrequent (a total of 599 shipments in one year and geographically localized (median Euclidean distance between shipments = 6.08 km; IQR = 0-13.88 km pig movements in the studied regions. The main factors contributing to live-pig trade movements among villages were being from the same region (i.e., local trade, usage of a middleman or a live animal market to trade live pigs by at least one farmer in the village, and having a large number of pig farmers in the village. The identified villages' characteristics and structural network properties could be used to inform the design of more cost-effective surveillance systems in a country which pig industry was recently devastated by African swine fever epidemics and where backyard production systems are predominant.

  4. Asymmetrical Pedaling Patterns in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penko, Amanda L.; Hirsch, Joshua R.; Voelcker-Rehage, Claudia; Martin, Philip E.; Blackburn, Gordon; Alberts, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.5 million Americans are affected by Parkinson's disease [1] which includes the symptoms of postural instability and gait dysfunction. Currently, clinical evaluations of postural instability and gait dysfunction consist of a subjective rater assessment of gait patterns using items from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, and assessments can be insensitive to the effectiveness of medical interventions. Current research suggests the importance of cycling for Parkinson's disease patients, and while Parkinson's gait has been evaluated in previous studies, little is known about lower extremity control during cycling. The purpose of this study is to examine the lower extremity coordination patterns of Parkinson's patients during cycling. Methods Twenty five participants, ages 44-72, with a clinical diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease participated in an exercise test on a cycle ergometer that was equipped with pedal force measurements. Crank torque, crank angle and power produced by right and left leg were measured throughout the test to calculate Symmetry Index at three stages of exercise (20 Watt, 60 Watt, maximum performance). Findings Decreases in Symmetry Index were observed for average power output in Parkinson's patients as workload increased. Maximum power Symmetry Index showed a significant difference in symmetry between performance at both the 20 Watt and 60 Watt stage and the maximal resistance stage. Minimum power Symmetry Index did not show significant differences across the stages of the test. While lower extremity asymmetries were present in Parkinson's patients during pedaling, these asymmetries did not correlate to postural instability and gait dysfunction Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores. Interpretation This pedaling analysis allows for a more sensitive measure of lower extremity function than the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and may help to provide unique insight into current and

  5. Self-management programmes for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a call for a reconceptualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, Helga

    2013-03-01

    To synthesise findings from previously published studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Self-management is a widely valued concept to address contemporary issues of chronic health problems. Yet, findings of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are indecisive. Literature review of (1) previously published systematic reviews and (2) an integrative literature review. Synthesis of findings from previously published systematic reviews (n = 4) of the effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and an integrated review that was performed on papers published between January 2007-June 2012 (n = 9). Findings demonstrate that there are few studies on the effectiveness of self-management programmes on people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease despite more than a decade of research activities. Outcomes of the studies reveal some increase in health-related quality of life and reduction in use of healthcare resources. The methodological approaches vary, and the sample size is primarily small. Families are not acknowledged. Features of patient-centredness exist in self-management programmes, particularly in the more recent articles. The effectiveness of self-management programmes for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains indecisive. A reconceptualisation of self-management programmes is called for with attention to a family-centred, holistic and relational care focusing on living with and minimising the handicapping consequences of the health problems in their entirety. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Effect of live music therapy for patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Darcy D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify the effects of live music therapy interventions compared with preferred recorded music for patients undergoing MRI scans. To date, there has not been a published study involving the use of live music therapy during MRI scans. The current study investigated the differences between teenage through adult patients receiving live music therapy intervention during outpatient MRI scans versus the standard protocol of care listening to recorded music (N = 88). Subjects ranged in age from 15 to 93 years old. Results indicated subjects who received the live music therapy protocol reported significantly better perception of the MRI procedure (p music therapy protocol had fewer scans repeated due to movement. Of the repeated images, 26% occurred in the live music group and 73% occurred in the recorded music group. Subjects receiving live music therapy also requested less breaks from the scan. Two percent of the live music subjects requested a break and 17.6% of the control patients requested breaks. When comparing the same type of scan between groups, subjects receiving the live music protocol required less time to complete the scans. For lumbar scans without contrast (N = 14, n = 7, n = 7), live music subjects spent an average of 4.63 less min per scan for a total of 32 less min for 7 subjects. For brain scans (N = 8, n = 4, n = 4), live music subjects spent an average of 5.8 less min per scan for a total of 23 less min for 4 subjects. Results of the current study supports the use of live music therapy intervention for teenage and adult patients undergoing MRI scans to reduce patient anxiety and improve patient perception of the scan experience. Additionally, live music therapy has the potential to shorten the length of time required for patients to complete MRI scans due to decreased patient movements and fewer breaks requested during the scans. The cost savings impact of reduced procedure time can positively impact the

  7. Living with Chronic Kidney Disease : The role of illness perceptions, treatment perceptions and social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients, particularly patients on dialysis, often experience difficulties with participating in daily activities, including paid work. Restrictions on the quantity or quality of activities, may impede people’ perceived autonomy and self-esteem. This thesis addressed the

  8. Oral Hygiene in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Leonardo M; Portela de Oliveira, Millena Teles; Magalhaes, Wilrama B; Bastos, Poliana Lima

    2015-11-02

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder with a multifactorial etiology. The symptoms are characterized by motor disorders - tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability, which hinder oral hygiene. Oral and dental health in Parkinson's disease has been under-documented and findings are conflicting. Moreover, a number of dentists have limited experience regarding the management of these patients. This article reviews literature published within the last fifteen years, to better understand the impact of this disease in oral health. A literature search (MEDLINE and PUBMED), using keywords Parkinson Disease and Oral Hygiene, yielded 27 articles, from which 20 were selected. All of the articles were published in English in the last 15 years.

  9. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives: Patient Admission Video (Short Version)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is for hospital patients and visitors. It emphasizes two key points to help prevent infections: the importance of practicing hand hygiene while in the hospital, and that it's appropriate to ask or remind healthcare providers to practice hand hygiene.

  10. Increased Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Disease Prevalence in Domestic Hybrids Among Free-Living Wild Boar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedbloed, Daniel J; van Hooft, Pim; Lutz, Walburga; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; van Wieren, Sip E; Ydenberg, Ron C; Prins, Herbert H T

    2015-12-01

    Wildlife immune genes are subject to natural selection exerted by pathogens. In contrast, domestic immune genes are largely protected from pathogen selection by veterinary care. Introgression of domestic alleles into the wild could lead to increased disease susceptibility, but observations are scarce due to low introgression rates, low disease prevalence and reduced survival of domestic hybrids. Here we report the first observation of a deleterious effect of domestic introgression on disease prevalence in a free-living large mammal. A fraction of 462 randomly sampled free-living European wild boar (Sus scrofa) was genetically identified as recent wild boar-domestic pig hybrids based on 351 SNP data. Analysis of antibody prevalence against the bacterial pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhyo) showed an increased Mhyo prevalence in wild-domestic hybrids. We argue that the most likely mechanism explaining the observed association between domestic hybrid status and Mhyo antibody prevalence would be introgression of deleterious domestic alleles. We hypothesise that large-scale use of antibiotics in the swine breeding sector may have played a role in shaping the relatively deleterious properties of domestic swine immune genes and that domestic introgression may also lead to increased wildlife disease susceptibility in the case of other species.

  11. Living in rural New England amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of depression as a complication of HIV infection is increasingly understood, and people living in rural areas are at increased risk for depression. However, it is not known whether living in rural areas amplifies the risk of depression in patients with HIV. Methods We compared the prevalence of depression between rural and metropolitan HIV patients seen at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock HIV Program in a retrospective cohort study. Using the validated Rural-Urban Commuting Area Score, we categorized patients as living in small town/rural areas, micropolitan or metropolitan towns. Then, using a multivariate logistic regression model to adjust for demographic factors that differed between rural and metropolitan patients, we estimated the impact of living in rural areas on the odds of depression. Results Among 646 patients with HIV (185 small town/rural, 145 micropolitan, 316 metropolitan, rural patients were older, white, male, and men who have sex with men (ANOVA, F-statistic Conclusion HIV-infected patients living in rural areas, particularly those on antiretroviral therapy, are highly vulnerable to depression.

  12. Evaluating the Needs of Patients Living With Solid Tumor Cancer: A Survey Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, April L; Lorenz, Rebecca A; Buchanan, Paula M; McLaughlin, Laura

    2018-03-01

    To describe the unmet needs of adult patients living with solid tumor cancer. Survey design. Adult patients living with solid tumor cancer from two outpatient clinics were mailed the Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral to Care, a holistic screening questionnaire for assessing palliative care needs, and a demographics questionnaire. One hundred fifteen patients returned the instruments, corresponding to a 62% response rate. There were no significant differences by cancer type (breast, non-breast) or gender. However, Caucasians reported significantly more psychological issues, such as anxiety, than non-Caucasians ([ n = 101 (87.8%)] and [ n = 14 (12.2%)], respectively, p = .032). Older patients reported more concerns about loss of independence/activity ( p = .012) compared with younger age groups. Patients living with Stage III/IV cancer reported more distressed about independence/activity ( p = .034), family/social issues ( p = .007), and treatment side effects ( p = .027) than patients living with Stage I/II cancer. Patients living with solid tumor cancer have a myriad of unmet needs regardless of age, gender, cancer type, or cancer stage. There appears to be important differences by cancer stage. The Sheffield Profile for Assessment and Referral to Care questionnaire provides a holistic approach for nurses to identify unmet needs and concerns. Future research should explore the preferred methods of receiving support and information.

  13. Sexual Experiences of Chinese Patients Living With an Ostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yongyi; Tang, Xinhui; Chen, Yupan; Liu, Yangyu; Guo, Wei; Liu, Aizhong

    The purpose of this study was to examine the sexual experience of Chinese patients with ostomy and associated factors. A prospective descriptive study using self-report questionnaires. Seventy-five Chinese participants who underwent ostomy surgery in a large cancer specialist hospital in the Hunan province between 2008 and 2013. Data were collected face-to-face by the investigators in an outpatient setting from 75 participants who completed the Arizona Sexual Experience Inventory Scale (ASEX). The t test was used to compare variances between sexual function and dysfunction subgroups. A multiple linear regression model was used to analyze factors influencing sexual life after ostomy surgery. The mean ASEX score was 20.56 (5.378) years, which is higher than the standard for sexual dysfunction. The main subsection of sexual dysfunction included sexual arousal, orgasm ability, vaginal lubrication/penile erection, and sexual satisfaction. Significant differences in the ASEX score were observed in subgroups of age, gender, educational level, family relations, operation modes, stoma type, operation time, complications, supporters, self-care ability, and sexual life guidance. Multiple stepwise regression analysis indicated that family relations, operation modes, ostomy type, complications, and sexual life guidance affected sexual experience. The findings of this study demonstrate that patients with ostomy experience sexual dysfunction and many factors influence their quality of sexual life. WOC nurses and other healthcare providers should consider providing sexual health education for both the patient and spouse to improve the self-care capacity and quality of sexual life following ostomy surgery.

  14. Nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tie-mei; Yu, Shu-yang; Guo, Peng; Du, Yang; Hu, Yang; Piao, Ying-shan; Zuo, Li-jun; Lian, Teng-hong; Wang, Rui-dan; Yu, Qiu-jin; Jin, Zhao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parkinson disease (PD) is usually accompanied by numerous nonmotor symptoms (NMS), such as neuropsychiatric symptoms, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and sensory disturbances. However, it is not clear that the factors influencing the occurrence of NMS and its sequence with motor symptoms (MS). We conducted comprehensive assessments of NMS by using 13 scales in 1119 PD patients. A total of 70.8% PD patients present NMS. Olfactory dysfunction tends to occur in PD patients with older age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Older patients are more likely to have olfactory dysfunction before MS than younger patients. Rapid eye movement behavior disorder is more prone to happen in patients with older age, older onset age, more severe depression, sleep problems, and autonomic dysfunctions. Patients with rapid eye movement behavior disorder before MS are older in onset age than after group. Olfactory dysfunction, constipation, rapid eye movement behavior disorder, and depression, as early warning NMSs of PD, connected to each other. There is a clinical heterogeneity that older patients are more likely to have NMS before MS, while younger patients are opposite. PMID:27977578

  15. Articular manifestations in patients with Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-López, María Esther; Díez-Morrondo, Carolina; Sánchez-Andrade, Amalia; Pego-Reigosa, Robustiano; Díaz, Pablo; Castro-Gago, Manuel

    To determine the percentage of Lyme patients with articular manifestations in NW Spain and to know their evolution and response to treatment. A retrospective study (2006-2013) was performed using medical histories of confirmed cases of Lyme disease showing articular manifestations. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, together with the treatment and evolution of the patients, were analysed. Seventeen out of 108 LD confirmed patients (15.7%) showed articular manifestations. Regarding those 17 patients, 64.7%, 29.4% and 5.9% presented arthritis, arthralgia and bursitis, respectively. The knee was the most affected joint. Articular manifestations were often associated to neurological, dermatological and cardiac pathologies. Otherwise, most patients were in Stage III. The 11.8% of the cases progressed to a recurrent chronic arthritis despite the administration of an appropriate treatment. Lyme disease patients showing articular manifestations should be included in the diagnosis of articular affections in areas of high risk of hard tick bite, in order to establish a suitable and early treatment and to avoid sequels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  16. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. From miracle to reconciliation: a hermeneutic phenomenological study exploring the experience of living with Parkinson's disease following deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Ostergaard, Karen

    2010-10-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease is a promising treatment for patients who can no longer be treated satisfactorily with L-dopa. Deep Brain Stimulation is known to relieve motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease and improve quality of life. Focusing on how patients experience life when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation can provide essential information on the process patients go through when receiving a treatment that alters the body and changes the illness trajectory. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experience of living with Parkinson's disease when treated with Deep Brain Stimulation. The study was designed as a longitudinal study and data were gathered through qualitative in-depth interviews three times during the first year of treatment. Nine patients participated in the study. They were included when they had accepted treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's disease. Data collection and data analysis were inspired by the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of Van Manen. The treatment had a major impact on the body. Participants experienced great bodily changes and went through a process of adjustment in three phases during the first year of treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation. These stages were; being liberated: a kind of miracle, changes as a challenge: decline or opportunity and reconciliation: re-defining life with Parkinson's disease. The course of the process was unique for each participant, but dominant was that difficulties during the adjustment of stimulation and medication did affect the re-defining process. Patients go through a dramatic process of change following Deep Brain Stimulation. A changing body affects their entire lifeworld. Some adjust smoothly to changes while others are affected by loss of control, uncertainty and loss of everyday life as they knew it. These experiences affect the process of adjusting to life with Deep Brain Stimulation and re-define life with Parkinson's disease

  18. Intellectual function, activities of daily living and computerized tomography of the brain in geriatric demented patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omura, Fumiaki; Ogura, Chikara; Kishimoto, Akira; Okubo, Masayo; Imamoto, Atsushi; Tsuchie, Harutaka; Sugihara, Kanichiro; Fujii, Shozo.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty eight patients of geriatric dementia (mean age 74.9 years) were examined by computerized tomography (CT) and their intellectual functions and activities of daily living (ADL) were evaluated. CT was evaluated by both visual assessment method and direct measuring method. Intellectual function was evaluated by Jikei University dementia rating scale. ADL was evaluated by both Hasegawa's rating scale and Sengoku's rating scale. Results were as follows: significant influence by age was observed in intellectual functions and ADL of subjects above 75 years old. There were good correlations between the higher intellectual function, the better grooming and hygiene, and less needs of nursing care. The severe brain atrophy evaluated by the visual assessment method was correlated with the depressed level of intellectual function. When brain atrophy is mild despite high degree of dementia, reexamination should be made to explore somatic diseases inducing depression of mental activity. It also should be noted that sex and age difference is important in studying geriatric patients. (author)

  19. Acromegaly Is More Severe in Patients With AHR or AIP Gene Variants Living in Highly Polluted Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo, S; Ragonese, M; Puglisi, S; Romeo, P D; Torre, M L; Alibrandi, A; Scaroni, C; Occhi, G; Ceccato, F; Regazzo, D; De Menis, E; Sartorato, P; Arnaldi, G; Trementino, L; Trimarchi, F; Ferrau, F

    2016-04-01

    An increased prevalence of acromegaly was found some years ago in a highly polluted area in North-Eastern Sicily, where high concentration of nonmethane hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, and cadmium was found. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) pathway has a key role in detoxification of these compounds and in tumorigenesis. We correlated the occurrence of AHR and/or AHR-interacting protein (AIP) gene variants with acromegaly severity according to pollution exposition. This was an observational, perspective study conducted over 7 years in four Italian referral centers for pituitary diseases in which 210 patients with acromegaly were enrolled between 2008 and 2015. Genetic screening of patients for AHR and AIP variants. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological data of patients with and without AIP and/or AHR gene variants, living in polluted (high-risk for health, [HR]) or nonpolluted (NP) areas of five Italian regions were evaluated and compared. Among the 23 patients from HR areas, nine showed AHR or AIP variants. Mean IGF-I levels and pituitary tumor diameter were significantly higher in these nine patients (HR/VAR+) than in the other 14 (HR/VAR−) and in the 187 from NP areas (44 NP/VAR+). Somatostatin analogs significantly decreased mean GH and IGF-I levels in patients from NP areas and in HR/VAR− (GH P acromegaly, increased pituitary tumor size, and somatostatin analog resistance in patients living in HR areas.

  20. [Anesthesia for patients with neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masafumi; Saito, Shigeru

    2010-09-01

    Several surgical treatments can be employed for the patients with neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer disease and spinal cord injury. It is possible that anesthesia related complications are induced in these neurologically complicated patients in the perioperative period. Respiratory dysfunction and autonomic nervous system dysfunction are most common in this population. Respiratory muscle weakness and bulbar palsy may cause aspiration pneumonia. Sometimes, postoperative ventilatory support is mandatory in these patients. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction may cause hypotension secondary to postural changes, blood loss, or positive airway pressure. Some therapeutic agents prescribed for neurological symptoms have drug interaction with anesthetic agents. Patients with motor neuron disease should be considered to be vulnerable to hyperkalemia in response to a depolarizing muscle relaxant. Although perioperative treatment guideline for most neurologic disorders has not been reported to lessen perioperative morbidity, knowledge of the clinical features and the interaction of common anesthetics with the drug therapy is important in planning intraoperative and postoperative management.

  1. Caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease patients in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease constitutes one of the leading causes of burden of disease, and it is the third leading disease in terms of economic and social costs. To analyze the burden and problems borne by informal caregivers of patients who suffer from Alzheimer's disease in Spain. We used the Survey on Disabilities, Autonomy and Dependency to obtain information on the characteristics of disabled people with Alzheimer's disease and the individuals who provide them with personal care. Additionally, statistical multivariate analyses using probit models were performed to analyze the burden placed on caregivers in terms of health, professional, and leisure/social aspects. 46% of informal caregivers suffered from health-related problems as a result of providing care, 90% had leisure-related problems, and 75% of caregivers under 65 years old admitted to suffering from problems related to their professional lives. The probability of a problem arising for an informal caregiver was positively associated with the degree of dependency of the person cared for. In the case of caring for a greatly dependent person, the probability of suffering from health-related problems was 22% higher, the probability of professional problems was 18% higher, and there was a 10% greater probability of suffering from leisure-related problems compared to non-dependents. The results show a part of the large hidden cost for society in terms of problems related to the burden lessened by the caregivers. This information should be a useful tool for designing policies focused toward supporting caregivers and improving their welfare.

  2. The MDS-UPDRS Part II (motor experiences of daily living) resulted useful for assessment of disability in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blazquez, Carmen; Rojo-Abuin, Jose Manuel; Alvarez-Sanchez, Mario; Arakaki, Tomoko; Bergareche-Yarza, Alberto; Chade, Anabel; Garretto, Nelida; Gershanik, Oscar; Kurtis, Monica M; Martinez-Castrillo, Juan Carlos; Mendoza-Rodriguez, Amelia; Moore, Henry P; Rodriguez-Violante, Mayela; Singer, Carlos; Tilley, Barbara C; Huang, Jing; Stebbins, Glenn T; Goetz, Christopher G; Martinez-Martin, Pablo

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the motor experiences of daily living section of the Movement Disorders Society-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS M-EDL) for assessing disability in PD patients; to determine the association between disability and quality of life; and to identify cut-off score ranges for no, mild, moderate and severe disability with this measure. International, observational, cross-sectional study of 435 PD patients, assessed with: MDS-UPDRS, Hoehn and Yahr staging, Rapid Assessment of Disability Scale, Clinical Impression of Severity Index for PD, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-8 and EQ-5D. Descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation coefficients, Kruskal-Wallis test for group comparisons, ordinal logistic regression analysis for setting cut-off values and a step-wise multiple linear regression model were calculated. MDS-UPDRS M-EDL correlated 0.70-0.80 with other disability measures, and -0.46 to 0.74 with quality of life scales. Scores significantly increased with higher disease duration and severity (p MDS-UPDRS nM-EDL section as the main determinant of M-EDL, followed by the rest of MDS-UPDRS sections (explained variance: 59%). MDS-UPDRS M-EDL proved to be useful for assessing disability in PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Limitations and consequences caused by work-related diseases in the worker’s lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Caroline Rodrigues

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the impacts of work-related diseases in the worker’s lives, as well as analyze the contributions of studies to the nursing science, especially in the area of occupational health nursing. It is an integrative review with the following guiding question: What are the limitations and consequences caused by cumulative trauma disorders (CTD in the worker’s lives reported in the nursing scientific production during the last five years (2006 to 2010. The descriptors used were: Cumulative Trauma Disorders and Occupational Health. We selected 14 articles and these were grouped according to common purposes, main limitations and consequences of CTD, and relevant information to contributions of studies in the area of Occupational Health Nursing. We concluded that the scientific production on this subject brings few effective contributions, and that further studies are needed to subsidize care strategies aimed at promoting health and quality of life of these workers.

  4. Microbiological diagnosis and antimicrobial sensitivity profiles in diseased free-living raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Anna; Baldomà, Laia; Molina-López, Rafael A; Martin, Marga; Darwich, Laila

    2017-08-01

    Free-living raptors (birds of prey) can act as reservoirs of potentially zoonotic agents, but they also can be affected by microorganisms as target hosts. In this retrospective study, microbiological results (n = 663) and antibiotic sensitivity profiles (n = 108) of bacterial isolates were analysed from diseased free-living raptors. Sixty-nine percent of cases (n = 457) yielded bacteria: 58% were in pure culture and 42% were of different species. Remarkably, samples from necropsies (47%) had higher percentage of pure isolations than those obtained from clinical (31%) samples (P raptors (P 3 antimicrobials. Detection in wildlife of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens that might be significant at the animal-human-ecosystem interface is of great relevance under the 'One Health' approach.

  5. Comparison of clinical features in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis living in an urban and rural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-J; Redd, M; Bayman, L; Frederickson, N; Valestin, J; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has been associated with exposure to aeroallergens. Living in different locations (urban vs. rural) could potentially expose individuals to different environmental factors. Currently, there is limited data on the matter, and all was based on small population studies that did not exclude proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-responsive esophageal eosinophilia in their cohort. The primary aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE in an urban versus rural population and compare demographic and clinical characteristics in patients that had been treated with high-dose PPI prior to diagnosis. Esophageal biopsies were obtained from a cohort of patients who presented with symptoms of dysphagia, odynophagia, globus sensation, and heartburn during a 10-year period. Only patients who had biopsies from the mid and distal esophagus with ≥20 eosinophils per high-power field while on high-dose PPI treatment during endoscopy were included. Urban population was defined as >1000 people/square mile, and rural population was defined as ≤1000 people/square mile (U.S. Census Bureau). Demographic data from each group was analyzed for age, sex, body mass index, duration of symptoms, and tobacco use. Chi-square analysis was used for frequencies with statistical significance defined as P ≤ 0.05. A total of 20 718 patients were identified and their records evaluated. From this cohort, 57 (0.28%) symptomatic patients (male/female: 39/18, mean age = 29.5 years) had biopsy-proven EoE (≥20 eosinophils/hpf) while on PPI treatment. Of those EoE patients, 29 (50.9%) reported living in rural area versus 28 (49.1%) living in the urban area. The most common medical history components included asthma (12.3%), and the most common presenting symptoms included dysphagia (50.9%), heartburn (26.3%), and nausea/vomiting (22.8%). The average duration of symptoms, body mass index, and smoking habits did not differ between the groups. Dysphagia was significantly

  6. Approaches to daily body condition management in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Terue

    2016-11-01

    To clarify the characteristics of sub-groups of patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease having similar approaches to daily body condition management. Prior literature has shed light on the experience of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and revealed that these patients engage in many activities and try different things in their daily lives to regulate and manage their body condition. The research so far has all been qualitative, comprising mostly interviews, and no quantitative studies have been performed. In this study, cluster analysis was used to show that subgroups of patients with similar characteristics undertake similar approaches to body condition management. Descriptive, correlational study. Invitations to participate in the survey were extended to patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cluster analysis was performed on the basis of questionnaire scores relating to nine different categories of daily body condition management actions. The characteristics of the body condition management approaches, in each subgroup, were investigated using analysis of variance and multiple comparisons. The cluster analysis produced six subgroups, each defined by the effort expended as part of their body condition management. The subgroups also differed depending on patient age and disease severity. Body condition management approaches taken by patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are overall, comprehensive approaches. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were subgrouped based on their engagement in body conditioning. Relationships between the subgroups and the engagement in body conditioning, age and shortness of breath severity were observed. The care of patient support should be comprehensive and depend on their age and the duration of the disease. In addition, it should be long term and recognise that the patients are living their own respective lives. Such considerations and

  7. Communicative aspects and coping strategies in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Pereira da Costa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD, which are the coping strategies used and the relation between type of coping, voice symptoms and communicative aspects. Method: 73 subjects, 33 in the experimental group, with diagnosis of PD, and 40 subjects in the control group, healthy and without vocal complaints. They underwent the following procedures: application of the Voice Symptons Scale – VoiSS – Brazilian Version, Voice Disability Coping Questionnaire – VDCQ – Brazilian Version, and the questionnaire Living with Dysarthria – LwD. Results: The experimental group showed deviations in all protocols: VDCQ (p<0.001, VoiSS (p<0.001, LwD (p<0.001. The most frequently used coping strategy was self-control (p<0.001. The correlation between vocal symptoms and communicative aspects showed that the greater the impairment in communication, the greater the VoiSS emotional scores and the greater will be the amount of voice symptoms and signs. However, the vocal signs and symptoms and communicative aspects showed no correlation with coping. Conclusion: Patients with PD have a high amount of vocal signs and symptoms and the higher the occurrence, the more the patient reports being difficult to live with dysarthria, particularly when there are deviations in the emotional domain.

  8. Communicative aspects and coping strategies in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Flávia Pereira da; Diaféria, Giovana; Behlau, Mara

    2016-01-01

    To investigate, in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the coping strategies; the most reported vocal symptoms; and the relation between coping, voice symptoms, and communicative aspects. Seventy-three subjects were included in the sample, 33 of which were participants in the experimental group (EG) with diagnosis of PD and 40 were control subjects, that is, healthy and without vocal complaints. They underwent the following procedures: application of Voice Symptoms Scale (VoiSS), Brazilian Version; Voice Disability Coping Questionnaire (VDCQ), Brazilian Version; and the questionnaire Living with Dysarthria (LwD). The EG presented deviations in all protocols: VDCQ, with the most frequently coping strategy being "self-control," VoiSS, with "Impairment" as the most prevalent domain, and LwD, presenting changes in all sections. Vocal signs and symptoms and communicative aspects were shown to have a regular correlation with coping. The correlation between vocal symptoms and communicative aspects was as follows: the greater the impairment in communication, the greater the VoiSS emotional scores and the more they complaint of voice-related signs and symptoms. Patients with PD use all kinds of coping strategies, but prefer using self-control. They present several vocal signs and symptoms, and "Impairment" was the most prevalent domain. There are difficulties in all aspects of communication. The higher the occurrence of vocal signs and symptoms, the more the patient reports the difficulties of living with dysarthria, particularly when deviations affect the emotional domain.

  9. Concern for Lost Income Following Donation Deters Some Patients From Talking to Potential Living Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, James R; Schold, Jesse D; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Taber, David J; Phan, Van; Baliga, Prabhakar K

    2016-12-01

    Some living kidney donors report lost income during recovery from surgery. Little is known about whether concern for living donor's lost income affects the decision to undergo donation evaluation and the willingness of transplant candidates to discuss living kidney donation (LKD) with others. To examine whether transplant patients were told by potential donors about lost income concerns and whether patients chose not to discuss LKD with others due to lost income concerns. Kidney transplant patients (185 wait-listed candidates, 171 deceased donor recipients, and 100 live donor recipients) at 2 centers completed a questionnaire to assess whether concern about donor's lost income was a consideration in discussion about LKD with others. One-third (32%) were told by a family member/friend that they were willing to donate but were concerned about potential lost income. The majority of those who expressed financial concern (64%) did not initiate donation evaluation. Many patients (42%) chose not to discuss living donation with a family member/friend due to concern about the impact of lost income on the donor. In the multivariable model, lower annual household income was the only statistically significant predictor of both having a potential donor expressing lost income concern and choosing not to talk to someone because of lost income concern. Findings from the current study underscore how concern about income loss for living donors may affect decision-making by both transplant candidates and potential donors.

  10. [NSAID GASTROPATHY IN PATIENTS WITH COMORBID DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, T E; Rykova, S M; Chukina, M A

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use in clinical practice of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), largely due to the general trend towards an aging population and, as a consequence, increase the number of individuals with comorbid conditions and diseases, including the most common are diseases of the cardiovascular system, diseases of the joints and spine, requiring of therapy with, combining the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. However, NSAIDs not only have favorable effects, but have quite a wide range of adverse effects, an important place among which is NSAID-induced gastropathy. The article deals with the rational choice of NSAIDs in patients depending on the degree of cardiovascular risk and gastrointenstinalnogo, as well as the possibility of preventing NSAID-associated gastropathy. Particular attention is paid to the choice of individual NSAIDs with regard to their pharmacological properties.

  11. Living with clipped wings-patients' experience of losing a leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Martinsen, Bente; Kjaer-Petersen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the lived experience of losing a leg as described by the patients themselves post-discharge. Studies have documented that regardless of aetiology patients are faced with severe physical as well as psychosocial challenges post-amputation. However, only few studies explore in-de...

  12. Quality of life in patients with sickle cell disease in Jamaica: rural-urban differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Monika R; Reid, Marvin E; Ali, Susanna B; Lipps, Garth; Williams-Green, Pauline

    2008-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) refers to people's ability to function in the ordinary tasks of living. It moves beyond direct manifestations of illness to the patient's personal morbidity. These assessments are an important aspect of chronic disease management. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a chronic and potentially, quite a debilitating disease. The disease is severe and may result in significant morbidity, as well as a shortened life span. It is the most common genetic disorder seen in Jamaica and impacts on physical, psychological, social and occupational wellbeing. Jamaica is a developing country where support systems that exist for patients with SCD are sparse. Health related QOL has been shown to be poorer in people living in the rural areas as compared with urban populations. Utilization of comprehensive sickle cells disease services has also been shown to be lower for individuals with the disease living in rural areas than for those living in urban areas. As there are rural-urban differences in Jamaica's health services, it is hypothesized that there may be rural-urban differences in the experiences of the disease and the QOL of these patients in these subgroups. The SF 36 v2 (Short Form 36) questionnaire has been validated for use in the Jamaican SCD population. This validated questionnaire was interviewer-administered to 166 patients presenting to an urban clinic for routine health maintenance visits and to 90 patients presenting to the rural clinics for routine visits. Socio-demographic information was also collected on these two groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to study predictors of QOL in these two sub-populations. The study received ethical approval from the University of the West Indies/University Hospital of the West Indies Ethics Committee. There were no significant differences in the measured socio-demographic characteristics of the rural and urban patients. Living in rural areas compared with urban areas (p <0.001), being

  13. [Leprosy: stigma and prejudice lived by institucionalized patients in Santa Catarina State, Brazil (1940-1960)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenstein, Miriam Süssking; Padilha, Maria Itayra; Costa, Eliani; Gregório, Vitória Regina Petters; Koerich, Ana Maria Espíndola; Ribas, Dorotéa Löes

    2008-01-01

    This study is a qualitative research with a socio-historic approach whose objective was to know the prejudice and stigma lived by the institutionalized patients/residents with hanseniase. To achieve this goal, three patients were intervewed who lived in a colony hospital during the research period, utilizing the oral history method. Data were collected and were further analysed, utilizing the stigma referencial. The results indicated that after the entry in the institution, these patients got their family bonds broken, lost their rights as citizens, regarding the situation, they took upon a new life, in a new environment. Concluding that, the nosocomial isolation for a long period of time (years of confinement and dismissal), caused the symbolic death of many patients that lived with the hope to cohabit with family and/or society.

  14. Traditional Chinese Medicine Improves Activities of Daily Living in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Weidong; Kwak, Shin; Liu, Yun; Sun, Yan; Fang, Zhenglong; Qin, Baofeng; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), named Zeng-xiao An-shen Zhi-chan 2 (ZAZ2), on patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Among 115 patients with idiopathic PD enrolled (mean age, 64.7 ± 10.2 years old), 110 patients (M = 65, F = 45; mean age, 64.9 ± 10.7 years old) completed the study. Patients took either ZAZ2 ( = 5 9 ) or placebo granule ( = 5 6 ) in a blind manner for 13 weeks while maintaining other anti-Parkinson medications unchanged. All participants ...

  15. BXSB/long-lived is a recombinant inbred strain containing powerful disease suppressor loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Michelle E K; Gabriel, Luisa; Rose, S Jane; Rogers, Nicola J; Izui, Shozo; Morley, Bernard J

    2007-08-15

    The BXSB strain of recombinant inbred mice develops a spontaneous pathology that closely resembles the human disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Six non-MHC loci, Yaa, Bxs1-4, and Bxs6, have been linked to the development of aspects of the disease while a further locus, Bxs5, may be a BXSB-derived disease suppressor. Disease development is delayed in a substrain of BXSB, BXSB/MpJScr-long-lived (BXSB/ll). We compared the genetic derivation of BXSB/ll mice to the original strain, BXSB/MpJ, using microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. These differences were clustered and included two regions known to be important in the disease-susceptibility of these mice, Bxs5 and 6, as well as regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 9, 11, 12, and 13. We compared BXSB/ll to >20 strains including the BXSB parental SB/Le and C57BL/6 strains. This revealed that BXSB/ll is a separate recombinant inbred line derived from SB/Le and C57BL/6, but distinctly different from BXSB, that most likely arose due to residual heterozygosity in the BXSB stock. Despite the continued presence of the powerful disease-susceptibility locus Bxs3, BXSB/ll mice do not develop disease. We propose that the disappearance of the disease phenotype in the BXSB/ll mice is due to the inheritance of one or more suppressor loci in the differentially inherited intervals between the BXSB/ll and BXSB strains.

  16. Characterization of the live salmonid movement network in Ireland: Implications for disease prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, T; More, S J; Geoghegan, F; McManus, C; Hill, A E; Martínez-López, B

    2015-11-01

    Live fish movement is considered as having an important role in the transmission of infectious diseases. For that reason, interventions for cost-effective disease prevention and control rely on a sound understanding of the patterns of live fish movements in a region or country. Here, we characterize the network of live fish movements in the Irish salmonid farming industry during 2013, using social network analysis and spatial epidemiology methods, and identify interventions to limit the risk of disease introduction and spread. In the network there were 62 sites sending and/or receiving fish, with a total of 130 shipments (84 arcs) comprising approx. 17.2 million fish during the year. Atlantic salmon shipments covered longer distances than trout shipments, with some traversing the entire country. The average shipment of Atlantic salmon was 146,186 (SD 194,344) fish, compared to 77,928 (127,009) for trout, however, variability was high. There were 3 periods where shipments peaked (February-April, June-September, and November), which were related to specific stages of fish. The network was disconnected and had two major weak components, the first one with 39 nodes (mostly Atlantic salmon sites), and the second one with 10 nodes (exclusively trout sites). Correlation between in and out-degree at each site and assortativity coefficient were slightly low and non-significant: -0.08 (95% CI: -0.22, 0.06) and -0.13 (95% CI: -0.36, 0.08), respectively, indicating random mixing with regard to node degree. Although competing models also produced a good fit to degree distribution, it is likely that the network possesses both small-world and scale-free topology. This would facilitate the spread and persistence of infection in the salmon production system, but would also facilitate the design of risk-based surveillance strategies by targeting hubs, bridges or cut-points. Using Infomap community detection algorithms, 2 major communities were identified within the giant weak

  17. Actigraphy monitoring of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weidong; Kwak, Shin; Li, Fuzhong; Wu, Chunlan; Chen, Yiyun; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Cai, Dingfang

    2013-07-02

    Although the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the "gold-standard" tool in assessing the severity of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), not all activity-related disease symptoms can be accurately captured by the well-established clinical rating scale. Using an alternative approach, this study examined the level of physical activity measured by actigraphy over time and whether change in physical activity was associated with disease severity assessed by UPDRS. We used a longitudinal design in which physical activity and disease severity were assessed repeatedly during a 4-month interval, over a 3-year observational period, in a sample of 61 patients with idiopathic PD and a control group of 32 neurologically intact individuals. Physical activity data during awake-time were analyzed using the power-law exponent (PLE) method. Correlational relationships between changes in maxima values of PLE and scores of total UPDRS, UPDRS-part II (Activities of Daily Living), and UPDRS-part III (Motor Examination) in patients with PD were examined. Results show an increase in maxima values of PLE and the UPDRS total score in PD patients and that there is a positive association between changes in maxima values and total UPDRS score (r=0.746, p=0.032), UPDRS-part II score (r=0.687, p=0.027), and UPDRS-part III score (r=0.893, p=0.018). There was no significant change in the level of physical activity over time for the controls. Findings from this study indicate that change in physical activity, as captured by actigraphy, is associated with increased severity in patients' clinical symptoms of PD over time. Thus, these data suggest that, when used in conjunction with the conventional UPDRS measure, an actigraphic measure of physical activity may provide clinicians an adjunct measurement approach to monitor patients' activity-based disease progression or responses to treatment in outpatient clinic settings. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by

  18. Symptom Status Predicts Patient Outcomes in Persons with HIV and Comorbid Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. Henderson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are living longer; therefore, they are more likely to suffer significant morbidity due to potentially treatable liver diseases. Clinical evidence suggests that the growing number of individuals living with HIV and liver disease may have a poorer health-related quality of life (HRQOL than persons living with HIV who do not have comorbid liver disease. Thus, this study examined the multiple components of HRQOL by testing Wilson and Cleary’s model in a sample of 532 individuals (305 persons with HIV and 227 persons living with HIV and liver disease using structural equation modeling. The model components include biological/physiological factors (HIV viral load, CD4 counts, symptom status (Beck Depression Inventory II and the Medical Outcomes Study HIV Health Survey (MOS-HIV mental function, functional status (missed appointments and MOS-HIV physical function, general health perceptions (perceived burden visual analogue scale and MOS-HIV health transition, and overall quality of life (QOL (Satisfaction with Life Scale and MOS-HIV overall QOL. The Wilson and Cleary model was found to be useful in linking clinical indicators to patient-related outcomes. The findings provide the foundation for development and future testing of targeted biobehavioral nursing interventions to improve HRQOL in persons living with HIV and liver disease.

  19. Practical treatment strategies for patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Daniel D; Lin, Peter

    2007-12-01

    With the "baby boomers" entering retirement and beyond and the life expectancy of the entire population increasing, the burden of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) grows alarmingly greater. Over 5 million people in the United States currently have AD, and that number could triple by 2050. The financial impact of caring for these patients is substantial. Estimates of direct and indirect costs are as high as $148 billion per year. In addition to its substantial economic impact, AD has devastating effects on patients and their families. Alzheimer's disease begins with gradual memory loss and progresses to personality change, behavioral disturbance, loss of executive function, and loss of the ability to perform basic activities of daily living, including eating, walking, dressing, and grooming. These impairments strain families and caregivers and create challenges to the care and safety of the patient as well as threaten the health and well-being of the caregiver. As the number of patients diagnosed with AD increases, there is an ever-growing need for early diagnosis, which often is first observed in the primary care setting. While AD cannot be reversed or stopped, disease progression can be delayed and quality of life enhanced with early diagnosis and treatment. Early and accurate diagnosis has become increasingly important and will become even more so with the anticipated new generation of medications. Though several consensus statements on diagnosis and treatment of AD have been developed, few primary care physicians routinely follow evidence-based guidelines in their clinical practices. A 2006 survey conducted by the American Academy of Family Physicians identified a moderate to high level of need for education on AD in a majority of respondents. This article illustrates the primary care management of AD beginning with diagnosis and concluding with autopsy. Enhancing diagnostic and treatment skills in primary care will promote earlier diagnosis, improved patient management

  20. Herbal medicine use among patients with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulunay, Munevver; Aypak, Cenk; Yikilkan, Hulya; Gorpelioglu, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is commonly used all over the world, and herbal medicines are the most preferred ways of CAM. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of herbal medicine use among patients with chronic diseases. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from April 2014 to December 2014 among patients who had been diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and hyperlipidemia (HL) in Family Medicine Department of Dışkapı Yıldırım Beyazıt Training and Research Hospital, in Ankara. A questionnaire about herbal drug use was applied by face to face interview to the participants. A total of 217 patients were included in this study. The mean age of the participants was 56.6 ± 9.7 years (55 male and 162 female). The rate of herbal medicine use was 29%. Herbal medicine use among female gender was significantly higher (P = 0.040). Conventional medication use was found to be lower among herbal medicine consumers. There was no relationship between herbal medicine use and type of chronic disease, living area, and occupation or education level. Most frequently used herbs were lemon (39.6%) and garlic (11.1%) for HT, cinnamon (12.7%) for DM, and walnut (6.3%) for HL. In this study, herbal medicine use was found to be higher among patients who had been diagnosed with chronic diseases. Therefore, physicians should be aware of herbal medicine usage of their patients and inform them about the effectivity and side effects of herbal medicines.

  1. Spiritual Needs of Patients with Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available For many patients confronted with chronic diseases, spirituality/religiosity is an important resource for coping. Patients often report unmet spiritual and existential needs, and spiritual support is also associated with better quality of life. Caring for spiritual, existential and psychosocial needs is not only relevant to patients at the end of their life but also to those suffering from long-term chronic illnesses. Spiritual needs may not always be associated with life satisfaction, but sometimes with anxiety, and can be interpreted as the patients’ longing for spiritual well-being. The needs for peace, health and social support are universal human needs and are of special importance to patients with long lasting courses of disease. The factor, Actively Giving, may be of particular importance because it can be interpreted as patients’ intention to leave the role of a `passive sufferer´ to become an active, self-actualizing, giving individual. One can identify four core dimensions of spiritual needs, i.e., Connection, Peace, Meaning/Purpose, and Transcendence, which can be attributed to underlying psychosocial, emotional, existential, and religious needs. The proposed model can provide a conceptual framework for further research and clinical practice. In fact, health care that addresses patients’ physical, emotional, social, existential and spiritual needs (referring to a bio-psychosocial-spiritual model of health care will contribute to patients’ improvement and recovery. Nevertheless, there are several barriers in the health care system that makes it difficult to adequately address these needs.

  2. Influence of tularemia live vaccine immunization on the immediate and end-results of combined treatment of patients with endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamyan, R.T.; Movsesyan, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Early and delayed results of the combined treatment (surgery + remote gamma therapy) of patients with corpus uteri carcinoma preliminary immunized with tularemia live vaccine (TLV). It is shown that the immunization of almost all indices of delayed treatment results ay all disease stages [ru

  3. Patients' Perspectives and Experiences Living with Systemic Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Thematic Synthesis of Qualitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Ayano; Tunnicliffe, David J; Thakkar, Vivek; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; O'Neill, Sean; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic, progressive autoimmune disease with major end-organ involvement. Much attention has been focused on the management of physical and clinical manifestations; however, the effect of the disease and treatment on the patient's identity, relationships, functioning, and mental well-being are less known. We aimed to describe the patients' perspectives and experiences of living with SSc. Electronic databases were searched to October 2014. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the findings. We included 26 studies involving 463 patients. Six key themes were identified: distressing appearance transformation (disturbing facial changes, stigmatizing sickness, unrecognizable self), palpable physical limitations (bodily restrictions, frustrating mind-body disconnect, pervasive fatigue, disabling pain), social impairment (breaking intimacy, struggling to fulfill family responsibilities, maintaining work, losing independence), navigating uncertainty (diagnostic ambiguity, medically fending for oneself, unpredictable course of illness), alone and misunderstood (fearful avoidance of fellow patients, invisible suffering), and gradual acceptance and relative optimism (adapting to change and accepting limitations, taking a positive spin, cautious hoping, empowering relationships, valuing medical support). SSc is a rare and unpredictable illness that undermines patients' sense of certainty and control and impairs their self-image, identity, and daily functioning. Patient-centered care that encompasses strategies to promote self-esteem, resilience, and self-efficacy may help to improve treatment satisfaction and health and quality of life outcomes for patients with SSc.

  4. Detection of arousals in Parkinson's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gertrud Laura; Kempfner, Jacob; Jennum, Poul

    2011-01-01

    sleepiness. Manual scoring of arousals is time-consuming and the inter-score agreement is highly varying especially for patients with sleep related disorders. The aim of this study was to design an arousal detection algorithm capable of detecting arousals from sleep, in both non-REM and REM sleep in patients......Arousal from sleep are short awakenings, which can be identified in the EEG as an abrupt change in frequency. Arousals can occur in all sleep stages and the number and frequency increase with age. Frequent arousals during sleep results in sleep fragmentation and is associated with daytime...... suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). The proposed algorithm uses features from EEG, EMG and the manual sleep stage scoring as input to a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). The performance of the algorithm has been assessed using polysomnographic (PSG) recordings from a total of 8 patients...

  5. [Psychopharmacotherapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C; Hiemke, C; Kahl, K G

    2012-11-01

    Increased cardiometabolic morbidity and increased overall mortality has been observed in patients with severe mental disorders. Therefore, cardiometabolic safety is an important issue in the treatment of patients with psychiatric disorders, in particular in patients with comorbid cardiometabolic diseases. Frequent adverse side effects include disturbances of lipid and glucose metabolism, body weight changes and alterations of the QTc interval. Dependent on the particular substance used and on factors concerning individual vulnerability, these side effects vary in relative frequency. Therefore, regular monitoring is recommended including ECG. Furthermore, interactions between different medicaments may occur, either leading to enhanced or decreased drug concentrations. Prior to psychopharmacological treatment, proper cardiological treatment is recommended. The management of cardiovascular risks under psychopharmacology requires interdisciplinary cooperation between the cardiologist, general practitioner and psychiatrist.

  6. Validation of Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL), a Performance- Based Measurement of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living for Patients with Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Huang, Mei-Feng; Chang, Chun-Wei; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lo, Yi-Ching; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cerebrovascular diseases often presented both cognitive and physical impairment. Disability in everyday functioning involving cognitive impairment among patients may be hard to completely rely on informants' reports, as their reports may be confounded with physical impairment. The aim of this study was to validate a performance-based measure of functional assessment, the Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL), for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) by examining its psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy. Ninety-seven patients with cerebrovascular diseases, including 30 with vascular dementia (VaD), 28 with mild cognitive impairment and 39 with no cognitive impairment, and 49 healthy control adults were recruited during study period. The TPIADL, as well as the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Lawton-IADL and Barthel Index (BI), were performed. The internal consistency, convergent and criteria validity of the TPIADL were examined. Cronbach's alpha of the TPIADL test was 0.84. The TPIADL scores were significantly correlated with the Lawton IADL (r = -0.587, p cognitive domain of Lawton IADL (r = -0.663) than with physical domain of Lawton IADL (r = -0.541). The area under the relative operating characteristic curve was 0.888 (95% CI = 0.812-0.965) to differentiate VaD from other groups. The optimal cut-off point of the TPIADL for detecting VaD was 6/7, which gives a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 84.5%. The TPIADL is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of IADL impairment in patients with VaD.

  7. Validation of Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL, a Performance- Based Measurement of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living for Patients with Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available Patients with cerebrovascular diseases often presented both cognitive and physical impairment. Disability in everyday functioning involving cognitive impairment among patients may be hard to completely rely on informants' reports, as their reports may be confounded with physical impairment. The aim of this study was to validate a performance-based measure of functional assessment, the Taiwan Performance-Based Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (TPIADL, for vascular cognitive impairment (VCI by examining its psychometric properties and diagnostic accuracy.Ninety-seven patients with cerebrovascular diseases, including 30 with vascular dementia (VaD, 28 with mild cognitive impairment and 39 with no cognitive impairment, and 49 healthy control adults were recruited during study period. The TPIADL, as well as the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE, Lawton-IADL and Barthel Index (BI, were performed. The internal consistency, convergent and criteria validity of the TPIADL were examined.Cronbach's alpha of the TPIADL test was 0.84. The TPIADL scores were significantly correlated with the Lawton IADL (r = -0.587, p <0.01. Notably, the TPIADL had a higher correlation coefficient with the cognitive domain of Lawton IADL (r = -0.663 than with physical domain of Lawton IADL (r = -0.541. The area under the relative operating characteristic curve was 0.888 (95% CI = 0.812-0.965 to differentiate VaD from other groups. The optimal cut-off point of the TPIADL for detecting VaD was 6/7, which gives a sensitivity of 73.3% and a specificity of 84.5%.The TPIADL is a brief and sensitive tool for the detection of IADL impairment in patients with VaD.

  8. Disease burden and patient reported outcomes among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: an ethnography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Siva Narayanan,1 Victoria Guyatt,2 Alessandra Franceschetti,3 Emily L Hautamaki1 1Ipsos Healthcare, Columbia, MD, USA; 2Ipsos Ethnography Centre of Excellence (ECE, London, UK; 3Ipsos Healthcare, London, UK Objectives: To assess the impact of psoriasis on health-related quality of life (HRQoL.Methods: An ethnographic study of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis was conducted in the US, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Brazil, and Canada to explore patients' views on treatment and the impact of psoriasis on HRQoL. Anthropologists and ethnographers spent a minimum of 5.5 hours with each consented patient and filmed their behaviors in everyday situations. Visual data and notes were analyzed to identify HRQoL-related themes.Results: The study included 50 adult patients. Patients described their appearance with disgust and self-loathing. Frustration was expressed due to a perceived lack of control of their lives. Prior to initiation of biologic treatment, daily rituals absorbed a good part of their day, including applying creams, checking one's appearance, and covering the body. Due to a lack of cultural discourse and patient's difficulty in articulating the impact of psoriasis, partners and family did not know how to react nor did they realize the full extent of the problem, and many patients experienced perceived social discrimination due to psoriasis, leaving them with feelings of isolation. Patients established on biologic treatment noticed a significant physical improvement and regained confidence, but psychosocial impacts, including social isolation, remained.Conclusion: This ethnographic study vividly depicted the unarticulated and emotional impact of psoriasis on the everyday lives of patients and presents an effective method of assessing HRQoL in chronic diseases.Keywords: psoriasis, health-related quality of life, ethnography, patient reported outcomes, conceptual model

  9. The Complexity of the Patient Perspective of Living with Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Vibeke; Riahi, Sam; Delmar, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    data on information related to the context of the patient’s daily life, family life and work life. The example provided in the article illustrates how the qualitative and quantitative information work as a synergy. Together, information gained from participant observations, on the challenge......The patients’ perspective is by nature complex. Investigating the patients’ perspective, which is important for the quality of care for patients living with atrial fibrillation, therefore calls for complex research processes. This article aims to illuminate the complexity of the patients......’ perspective of living with atrial fibrillation by combining qualitative and quantitative data sources and methods. Related to a one-year patient journey of living with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation it is here illustrated how scores from questionnaires can be explored by supporting the scores with qualitative...

  10. Living with bipolar disorder: the impact on patients, spouses, and their marital relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Danan, Dor; Bersudsky, Yuly; Osher, Yamima

    2016-03-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder are characterized by an unusually high divorce rate. As such, the purpose of the present study was to uncover information relating specifically to the impact of bipolar disorder on patients and spouses individually, and on the marital relationship from the perspectives of both patients and spouses. Eleven patients with bipolar disorder and ten spouses were interviewed separately about the impact of bipolar disorder on their lives and on their marital relationship. Data were analyzed using the grounded theory method. The impact of bipolar disorder for spouses included self-sacrifice, caregiving burden, emotional impact, and a sense of personal evolution. The impact of bipolar disorder on patients included an emotional impact, responsibility for self-care, and struggling socially and developmentally. When comparing patient and spouse perspectives on the impact of the disorder, neither the patient nor the spouse was able to accurately assess the impact of the disorder on their partner's lives. The impact of bipolar disorder on the relationship included volatility in the relationship, strengthening the relationship, weakening the relationship, and family planning. The research indicated that patients and partners alike struggle with the tremendous impact of bipolar disorder on their lives and on their relationships. Given the high rates of divorce and volatility in these relationships, healthcare professionals can provide (or refer to) emotional and practical support both to patients and spouses on their own, and as a couple in their clinics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The social and political lives of zoonotic disease models: narratives, science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Melissa; Scoones, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Zoonotic diseases currently pose both major health threats and complex scientific and policy challenges, to which modelling is increasingly called to respond. In this article we argue that the challenges are best met by combining multiple models and modelling approaches that elucidate the various epidemiological, ecological and social processes at work. These models should not be understood as neutral science informing policy in a linear manner, but as having social and political lives: social, cultural and political norms and values that shape their development and which they carry and project. We develop and illustrate this argument in relation to the cases of H5N1 avian influenza and Ebola, exploring for each the range of modelling approaches deployed and the ways they have been co-constructed with a particular politics of policy. Addressing the complex, uncertain dynamics of zoonotic disease requires such social and political lives to be made explicit in approaches that aim at triangulation rather than integration, and plural and conditional rather than singular forms of policy advice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlation between Cognitive Functions and Activity of Daily Living among Post-Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniawan Prakoso

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairment is one of the most common post-stroke complications; however, neither patients nor health professionals are often aware of this complication. The impact of cognitive impairment on quality of life is reflected through basic activity daily living (bADL and instrumental activity daily living (IADL. Prior studies concerning the correlation between cognitive impairment and activity daily living has shown contradictive results. This study was conducted in order to analyze the correlation between the cognitive functions and activity daily living in post stroke patients at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out to 23 post-stroke patients from September–November 2015. Samples were collected through consecutive sampling at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE was used to assess the cognitive functions and Lawton and Brody Scale to assess both bADL and IADL. Spearman correlation was selected to analyze the existing correlation between each cognitive domain and activity daily living. Results: Spearman statistical correlation showed an insignificant correlation between the cognitive functions and bADL (r2=0.181, p=0.408 and a significant correlation with IADL was obtained (r2=0.517, p=0.03. The only cognitive domain positively correlated with IADL was orientation to time and verbal recall. Conclusions: There is a correlation between cognitive functions and IADL among post-stroke patients at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital.

  13. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaharu Tabuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked.

  14. The monetary value of human lives lost due to neglected tropical diseases in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Mburugu, Gitonga N

    2017-12-18

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an important cause of death and disability in Africa. This study estimates the monetary value of human lives lost due to NTDs in the continent in 2015. The lost output or human capital approach was used to evaluate the years of life lost due to premature deaths from NTDs among 10 high/upper-middle-income (Group 1), 17 middle-income (Group 2) and 27 low-income (Group 3) countries in Africa. The future losses were discounted to their present values at a 3% discount rate. The model was re-analysed using 5% and 10% discount rates to assess the impact on the estimated total value of human lives lost. The estimated value of 67 860 human lives lost in 2015 due to NTDs was Int$ 5 112 472 607. Out of that, 14.6% was borne by Group 1, 57.7% by Group 2 and 27.7% by Group 3 countries. The mean value of human life lost per NTD death was Int$ 231 278, Int$ 109 771 and Int$ 37 489 for Group 1, Group 2 and Group 3 countries, respectively. The estimated value of human lives lost in 2015 due to NTDs was equivalent to 0.1% of the cumulative gross domestic product of the 53 continental African countries. Even though NTDs are not a major cause of death, they impact negatively on the productivity of those affected throughout their life-course. Thus, the case for investing in NTDs control should also be influenced by the value of NTD morbidity, availability of effective donated medicines, human rights arguments, and need to achieve the NTD-related target 3.3 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3 (on health) by 2030.

  15. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.; van der Valk, P.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van Herwaarden, C.; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  16. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monninkhof, E.M.; Valk, P.D.L.P.M. van der; Palen, J.A.M. van der; Herwaarden, C.L.A. van; Partridge, M.R.; Zielhuis, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

  17. The Harvard Automated Phone Task: new performance-based activities of daily living tests for early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gad A; Dekhtyar, Maria; Bruno, Jonathan M; Jethwani, Kamal; Amariglio, Rebecca E; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Rentz, Dorene M

    2015-12-01

    Impairment in activities of daily living is a major burden for Alzheimer's disease dementia patients and caregivers. Multiple subjective scales and a few performance-based instruments have been validated and proven to be reliable in measuring instrumental activities of daily living in Alzheimer's disease dementia but less so in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and preclinical Alzheimer's disease. To validate the Harvard Automated Phone Task, a new performance-based activities of daily living test for early Alzheimer's disease, which assesses high level tasks that challenge seniors in daily life. In a cross-sectional study, the Harvard Automated Phone Task was associated with demographics and cognitive measures through univariate and multivariate analyses; ability to discriminate across diagnostic groups was assessed; test-retest reliability with the same and alternate versions was assessed in a subset of participants; and the relationship with regional cortical thickness was assessed in a subset of participants. Academic clinical research center. One hundred and eighty two participants were recruited from the community (127 clinically normal elderly and 45 young normal participants) and memory disorders clinics at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital (10 participants with mild cognitive impairment). As part of the Harvard Automated Phone Task, participants navigated an interactive voice response system to refill a prescription (APT-Script), select a new primary care physician (APT-PCP), and make a bank account transfer and payment (APT-Bank). The 3 tasks were scored based on time, errors, and repetitions from which composite z-scores were derived, as well as a separate report of correct completion of the task. We found that the Harvard Automated Phone Task discriminated well between diagnostic groups (APT-Script: p=0.002; APT-PCP: pHarvard Automated Phone Task and executive function (APT-PCP: pHarvard Automated Phone Task, which

  18. The Harvard Automated Phone Task: new performance-based activities of daily living tests for early Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gad A.; Dekhtyar, Maria; Bruno, Jonathan M.; Jethwani, Kamal; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impairment in activities of daily living is a major burden for Alzheimer’s disease dementia patients and caregivers. Multiple subjective scales and a few performance-based instruments have been validated and proven to be reliable in measuring instrumental activities of daily living in Alzheimer’s disease dementia but less so in amnestic mild cognitive impairment and preclinical Alzheimer’s disease. Objective To validate the Harvard Automated Phone Task, a new performance-based activities of daily living test for early Alzheimer’s disease, which assesses high level tasks that challenge seniors in daily life. Design In a cross-sectional study, the Harvard Automated Phone Task was associated with demographics and cognitive measures through univariate and multivariate analyses; ability to discriminate across diagnostic groups was assessed; test-retest reliability with the same and alternate versions was assessed in a subset of participants; and the relationship with regional cortical thickness was assessed in a subset of participants. Setting Academic clinical research center. Participants One hundred and eighty two participants were recruited from the community (127 clinically normal elderly and 45 young normal participants) and memory disorders clinics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital (10 participants with mild cognitive impairment). Measurements As part of the Harvard Automated Phone Task, participants navigated an interactive voice response system to refill a prescription (APT-Script), select a new primary care physician (APT-PCP), and make a bank account transfer and payment (APT-Bank). The 3 tasks were scored based on time, errors, and repetitions from which composite z-scores were derived, as well as a separate report of correct completion of the task. Results We found that the Harvard Automated Phone Task discriminated well between diagnostic groups (APT-Script: p=0.002; APT-PCP: pHarvard Automated Phone

  19. Knowledge and Adherence to Medications among Palestinian Geriatrics Living with Chronic Diseases in the West Bank and East Jerusalem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Anas; Amro, Yazan; Kitaneh, Islam; Abu-Sharar, Salam; Sawalha, Maryam; Jamous, Abrar; Qiq, Muhannad; Makharzeh, Enas; Subb Laban, Bayan; Amro, Wafa; Amro, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background Adequate patient knowledge about medications is essential for appropriate drug taking behavior and patient adherence. This study aims to assess and quantify the level of knowledge and adherence to medications among Palestinian geriatrics living with chronic diseases and to investigate possible associated socio-demographic characteristics. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study during June 2013 and January 2014 among Palestinian geriatrics ≥60 years old living with chronic disease in the West Bank and East Jerusalem. A stratified random sample was selected and a questionnaire-assisted interview was applied for data collection. T-test was applied for bivariate analyzing and one-way ANOVA test was applied for multivariate analyses. Results A total of 1192 Palestinian geriatrics were studied. The average age was 70.3 (SD=8.58) years and ranged from 60-110 years. The sample comprised 659 (55.3%) females and 533 (44.7%) males. The global knowledge and global adherence scores were (67.57%) and (89.29%), respectively. Adequate levels of knowledge were 71.4%, and of adherence 75%, which were recorded for 705 (59.1%) and 1088 (91.3%) participants, respectively. Significant higher levels of global knowledge and global adherence were recorded for males, and for participants who hold a Bachelor’s degree, those who live on their own, and did physical activity for more than 40 hours/week (p-value <0.05). Furthermore, workers, participants with a higher monthly income, and non-smokers have a higher knowledge level with (p-value <0.05). We found positive correlation between participants’ global adherence and global knowledge (r=0.487 and p-value <0.001). Negative correlation was found between participants’ global knowledge and adherence with age (r= -0.236, p-value <0.001 and r= -0.211 and p-value <0.001, respectively. Negative correlation between global knowledge and the number of drugs taken (r= -0.130, p-value <0.001) was predicted

  20. Caring for Patients With Intractable Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nagase

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a qualitative descriptive study examining nurses’ attitudes about caring for patients with intractable neurological diseases, with a focus on dedication and conflicts. Semistructured interviews were conducted on 11 nurses with more than 5 years of clinical experience in addition to more than 3 years of experience in neurology wards. Senior nursing officers from each hospital selected the participants. In general, these nurses expressed distress over the inevitable progression of disease. Nurses talked about the “basis of dedication,” “conflicts with dedication,” “reorganization for maintaining dedication,” and “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment.” “Reorganization for maintaining dedication” meant that nurses were able to handle the prospect of rededicating themselves to their patients. Furthermore, “the reason for the change from conflict to commitment” referred to events that changed nurses’ outlooks on nursing care, their pride as nurses, or their learning experiences. They felt dedicated and conflicted both simultaneously and separately. While committing to their patients’ physical care, nurses were empowered to think positively and treat patients with dignity in spite of the care taking much time and effort, as well as entailing considerable risk.

  1. Isolation of live Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato spirochaetes from patients with undefined disorders and symptoms not typical for Lyme borreliosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudenko, Natalia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Vancová, Marie; Clark, K.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Oliver, J. H., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2016), 267.e9-267.e15 ISSN 1198-743X EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 278976 - ANTIGONE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : antibiotic treatment * live Borrelia burgdorferi * live Borrelia bissettii * Lyme borreliosis * recovery of live spirochaetes Subject RIV: FN - Epidemiology, Contagious Diseases ; Clinical Immunology Impact factor: 5.292, year: 2016

  2. Ureteric complications in live related donor renal transplantation - impact on graft and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Srivastava

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The study was performed with an aim to determine the incidence of ureteric complications in live related donor renal transplantation, and to study the effect of ureteric complications on long term graft and patient survival. Patients And Methods: Records of 1200 consecutive live related renal transplants done from 1989-2002 were reviewed. Twenty-six ureteric complications were noted to occur and treatment modalities employed were documented. In the non complication group sufficient data for evaluation was available in 867 patients. Survival analysis were performed using Kaplan-Meier techniques. Results: The overall incidence of urological complications is 2.9%. Complications occurred at a mean interval of 31.9 days after renal transplantation. Ureteric complications occurred in 2% patients with stented and 7.7% patients with non stented anastomosis (p=0.001. Mean follow up following renal transplantation was 37.4 months. Survival analysis showed that ureteric complications did not increase the risk of graft fai lu re or patient death. Conclusions: Ureteric complications in live related donor renal transplantation occurred in 2.9 % patients and did not impair graft and patient survival.

  3. Sexual Health Concerns in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Page Sexual Health Concerns in Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Lindsey Rosman , John M. Cahill , Susan L. McCammon , ... and difficulty achieving and maintaining an erection. 2 Cardiovascular disease and its treatment may also affect a man’s ...

  4. Patient Expectations and Perceptions of Goal-setting Strategies for Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Vibeke; Wright, Grace C; Bergman, Martin J; Tambiah, Jeyanesh; Taylor, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    To identify how patients perceive the broad effect of active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on their daily lives and indicate how RA disease management could benefit from the inclusion of individual goal-setting strategies. Two multinational surveys were completed by patients with RA. The "Good Days Fast" survey was conducted to explore the effect of disease on the daily lives and relationships of women with RA. The "Getting to Your Destination Faster" survey examined RA patients' treatment expectations and goal-setting practices. Respondents from all countries agreed that RA had a substantial negative effect on many aspects of their lives (work productivity, daily routines, participation in social and leisure activities) and emotional well-being (loss of self-confidence, feelings of detachment, isolation). Daily pain was a paramount issue, and being pain- and fatigue-free was considered the main indicator of a "good day." Setting personal, social, and treatment goals, as well as monitoring disease progress to achieve these, was considered very beneficial by patients with RA, but discussion of treatment goals seldom appeared to be a part of medical appointments. Many patients with RA feel unable to communicate their disease burden and treatment goals, which are critically important to them, to their healthcare provider (HCP). Insights gained from these 2 surveys should help to guide patients and HCP to better focus upon mutually defined goals for continued improvement of management and achievement of optimal care in RA.

  5. Olfactory training in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Haehner

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Decrease of olfactory function in Parkinson's disease (PD is a well-investigated fact. Studies indicate that pharmacological treatment of PD fails to restore olfactory function in PD patients. The aim of this investigation was whether patients with PD would benefit from "training" with odors in terms of an improvement of their general olfactory function. It has been hypothesized that olfactory training should produce both an improved sensitivity towards the odors used in the training process and an overall increase of olfactory function. METHODS: We recruited 70 subjects with PD and olfactory loss into this single-center, prospective, controlled non-blinded study. Thirty-five patients were assigned to the olfactory training group and 35 subjects to the control group (no training. Olfactory training was performed over a period of 12 weeks while patients exposed themselves twice daily to four odors (phenyl ethyl alcohol: rose, eucalyptol: eucalyptus, citronellal: lemon, and eugenol: cloves. Olfactory testing was performed before and after training using the "Sniffin' Sticks" (thresholds for phenyl ethyl alcohol, tests for odor discrimination, and odor identification in addition to threshold tests for the odors used in the training process. RESULTS: Compared to baseline, trained PD patients experienced a significant increase in their olfactory function, which was observed for the Sniffin' Sticks test score and for thresholds for the odors used in the training process. Olfactory function was unchanged in PD patients who did not perform olfactory training. CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that olfactory training may increase olfactory sensitivity in PD patients.

  6. Causes and timing of end-stage renal disease after living kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Arthur J; Berglund, Danielle M; Vock, David M; Ibrahim, Hassan N

    2018-05-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a risk after kidney donation. We sought, in a large cohort of kidney donors, to determine the causes of donor ESRD, the interval from donation to ESRD, the role of the donor/recipient relationship, and the trajectory of the estimated GFR (eGFR) from donation to ESRD. From 1/1/1963 thru 12/31/2015, 4030 individuals underwent living donor nephrectomy at our center, as well as ascertainment of ESRD status. Of these, 39 developed ESRD (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] at ESRD, 62.4 ± 14.1 years; mean interval between donation and ESRD, 27.1 ± 9.8 years). Donors developing ESRD were more likely to be male, as well as smokers, and younger at donation, and to have donated to a first-degree relative. Of donors with a known cause of ESRD (n = 25), 48% was due to diabetes and/or hypertension; only 2 from a disease that would have affected 1 kidney (cancer). Of those 25 with an ascertainable ESRD cause, 4 shared a similar etiology of ESRD with their recipient. Almost universally, thechange of eGFR over time was stable, until new-onset disease (kidney or systemic). Knowledge of factors contributing to ESRD after living kidney donation can improve donor selection and counseling, as well as long-term postdonation care. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Effectiveness of educational and social worker interventions to activate patients' discussion and pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, L Ebony; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Kraus, Edward S; Melancon, J Keith; Falcone, Brenda; Ephraim, Patti L; Jaar, Bernard G; Gimenez, Luis; Choi, Michael; Senga, Mikiko; Kolotos, Maria; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia; Cook, Courtney; Light, Laney; DePasquale, Nicole; Noletto, Todd; Powe, Neil R

    2013-03-01

    Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have difficulty becoming actively engaged in the pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation. The Talking About Live Kidney Donation (TALK) Study was a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of educational and social worker interventions designed to encourage early discussions and active pursuit of preemptive living donor kidney transplantation in patients with progressive CKD. We recruited participants with progressive CKD from academically affiliated nephrology practices in Baltimore, MD. Participants randomly received: (1) usual care (routine care with their nephrologists), the (2) TALK education intervention (video and booklet), or the (3) TALK social worker intervention (video and booklet plus patient and family social worker visits). We followed participants for 6 months to assess their self-reported achievement of behaviors reflecting their discussions about and/or pursuit of living donor kidney transplantation (discussions with family, discussions with physicians, initiating recipient evaluation, completing recipient evaluation, and identifying a potential living donor). We assessed outcomes through a questionnaire at 1-, 3-, and 6-months follow-up. Participants receiving usual care with their nephrologists (n = 44), TALK education (n = 43), and the TALK social worker (n = 43) were similar at baseline. TALK Study interventions improved participants' living donor kidney transplantation discussion and pursuit behaviors, with the social worker leading to greater patient activation (participants' predicted probability of achieving living donor kidney transplantation discussions, evaluations, or donor identification over 6 months): probabilities were 30% (95% CI, 20%-46%), 42% (95% CI, 33%-54%), and 58% (95% CI, 41%-83%), respectively, in the usual care, TALK education, and TALK social worker groups (P = 0.03). Our population was well educated and mostly insured, potentially limiting

  8. Health behavior of patients with ischemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł Węgorowski; Joanna Michalik; Rafał Zarzeczny; Renata Domżał-Drzewiecka; Grzegorz Nowicki

    2017-01-01

    Admission By analyzing the available scientific literature, it is possible to define ischemic heart disease as a set of disease symptoms that are a consequence of a chronic state of imbalance between the ability to supply nutrients and oxygen and the real need of myocardial cells for these substances. Adapting life-style behaviors to healthy living is a priority to prevent the onset and development of cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic heart disease, Purpose of research T...

  9. Infection and transmission of live recombinant Newcastle disease virus vaccines in Rock Pigeons, European House Sparrows, and Japanese Quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    In China and Mexico, engineered recombinant Newcastle disease virus (rNDV) strains are used as live vaccines for the control of Newcastle disease and as vectors to express the avian influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene to control avian influenza in poultry. In this study, non-target species wer...

  10. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990–2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Theo; Allen, Christine; Arora, Megha; Barber, R.M.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Brown, Alexandria; Carter, Austin; Casey, Daniel C.; Charlson, Fiona J.; Chen, Alan Z.; Geleijnse, J.M.

    2016-01-01


    Background

    Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases

  11. Epidemiology of viral haemorrhagic disease and myxomatosis in a free-living population of wild rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvete, C; Estrada, R; Villafuerte, R; Osácar, J J; Lucientes, J

    2002-06-22

    From January 1993 to June 1996, the epidemiology of myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease (VHD) was studied in a free-living population of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in Spain by means of serological surveys and radiotracking. Myxomatosis was endemic and associated with the breeding period. Its serological pattern was characterised by a 100 per cent prevalence of antibodies in adult rabbits and a rapid increase in antibodies in young rabbits in their first year. No mortality from myxomatosis was detected in adults, and mortality in young rabbits could not be estimated because of interference by predators and scavengers and the deaths of many radiotagged rabbits inside their burrows. VHD was also an endemic disease associated with the breeding period. Adults had a higher prevalence of antibodies against VHD than young rabbits, reaching values of 80 to 90 per cent. During the study, there was an increase in rabbit numbers as a result of a decrease in mortality from predation which was associated with an increase in mortality due to VHD and in the prevalence of antibodies to VHD. Mortality from VHD was lower in rabbits with VHD antibodies than in seronegative rabbits, but some mortality from the disease was also detected in seropositive rabbits. The annual mean mortality rate due to VHD in adult rabbits was estimated to be 21.8 per cent.

  12. Activities of daily living, depression, and quality of life in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake J Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study examined whether activities of daily living (ADL mediate the relationship between depression and health-related quality of life (HR-QOL in people with Parkinson's disease (PD. A cross-sectional, correlational research design examined data from 174 participants who completed the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-section 2 (UPDRS-section 2 [ADL]. Multiple Regression Analysis (MRA was used to examine the mediator model. Depression and ADL significantly (p<.001 predicted HR-QOL, and depression significantly (p<.001 predicted ADL. Whilst ADL did not impact on the relationship between depression and HR-QOL, there was a significant (p<.001 indirect effect of depression on HR-QOL via ADL, suggesting both direct and indirect (via ADL effects of depression on HR-QOL. The magnitude of this effect was moderate (R2 = .13. People with PD who report depression also experience greater difficulty completing ADL, which impacts upon their HR-QOL. It is recommended that clinicians adopt a multidisciplinary approach to care by combining pharmacological treatments with psycho/occupational therapy, thereby alleviating the heterogeneous impact of motor and non-motor symptoms on HR-QOL in people with PD.

  13. Living Within Limits: Unpleasant Experiences From the Perspective of Patients After Cardiac Surgery, a Content Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourghane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cardio vascular diseases (CVDs are the main cause of death around the world and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG has proven to be the most effective treatment for ischemic coronary heart diseases when other treatments are ineffective. Despite the perceived improvement in the health of patients undergoing CABG, there are problems that result from operations after they are discharged from hospital. Provision of information is an integral part of most psychological interventions. Having a clearer understanding of patients’ experiences will be helpful to healthcare workers with respect to patients’ care and education planning. Caring science places more attention on the patient's everyday life from his/her perspective. Most of the studies conducted in Iran used a quantitative method or measured care needs according to pre-defined criteria. Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of patients who have undergone cardiac surgery, in order to obtain a deeper understanding of what they experienced and what those who provide care for these patients experienced. Patients and Methods A qualitative design, using a content analysis approach, was adapted to collect the data and analyze the experiences of 18 patients after cardiac surgery through a purposive sampling strategy. After the selection of the participants, semi structured interviews were held in order to collect the data. Scientific accuracy, and rigor of the data and research ethics were respected. Results The data analysis revealed three main themes and 11 subthemes, categorized as conceptual and abstract, based on their nature: concern of going out therapeutic framework (Fear of the recurrence of heart attack, Fear of performing more activities than permitted, Fear of taking journeys, Fear of mass communication/Tired of living within the confines of the therapeutic framework (Need to take various medications, Dietary restrictions, Limitations in

  14. Protection conferred by a live avian metapneumovirus vaccine when co-administered with live La Sota Newcastle disease vaccine in chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ganapathy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the effects on specific pathogen-free (SPF chicks when avian metapneumovirus (aMPV and Newcastle disease virus (NDV La Sota strain vaccines are co-administered. Day-old SPF chicks were divided into five groups. The first group was inoculated with sterile water (SW and the rest of the groups were inoculated with live NDV vaccine VG/GA by the oculo-oral route. At 21 days-old, the unvaccinated chicks were again inoculated with SW. The four VG/GA-vaccinated groups were further inoculated with (i SW, (ii live aMPV vaccine, (iii live NDV La Sota, or (iv combined live NDV La Sota and live aMPV, respectively. Chicks were monitored for post-vaccination reactions and oropharyngeal swabs were collected for vaccines detection. Blood samples were collected to detect aMPV ELISA and NDV haemagglutination-inhibition antibodies. Twenty-one days following the second vaccination, six chicks from each group were challenged with virulent NDV or aMPV respectively. Chicks were monitored for clinical signs and mortality and oropharyngeal swabs collected for aMPV detection. Results showed that, when challenged with a virulent aMPV, both chicks previously vaccinated with VG/GA and subsequently given aMPV vaccine singly or in combination with La Sota were equally protected against clinical signs. Chicks that were vaccinated against NDV either once with VG/GA or followed by La Sota (singly or in combination with aMPV were fully protected when challenged with velogenic NDV. We concluded that simultaneous administration of live aMPV and NDV La Sota vaccines have no adverse effects on protection conferred by either live vaccine.

  15. [Two patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangma, H R; Smit, G P A; Kuks, J B M; Grevink, R G; Wolffenbuttel, B H R

    2008-10-18

    A 23-year-old woman and a 13-year-old boy were diagnosed with mitochondrial respiratory chain disease. The woman had muscle pain, fatigue and bilateral ophthalmoplegia--symptoms consistent with Kearns-Sayre syndrome. The boy had aspecific symptoms; eventually, reduced activity of complex 1 was found to be the cause of the mitochondrial respiratory chain disease in the boy and his mother, who had suffered from unexplained fatigue and muscle pain for 15 years. Mitochondrial diseases often involve several organ systems. Diagnosis can be difficult, because laboratory tests such as serum and urinary lactate and creatine kinase have low sensitivity and specificity. Biochemical assessment of muscle biopsy can reveal reduced oxidation ATP synthesis and sometimes specific abnormalities in individual protein complexes. DNA analysis may be helpful in demonstrating mitochondrial or nuclear mutations or deletions. The goal of treatment is to increase mitochondrial ATP production, improve clinical symptoms and enhance stamina. Replacement of the following substances (also referred to as cofactors) may be attempted: co-enzyme Q10, antioxidants (lipoic acid, vitamins C and E), riboflavin, thiamine, creatine and carnitine. Evidence regarding the optimal treatment approach is lacking; one usually has to rely on observing effects in the individual patient.

  16. Living donor risk model for predicting kidney allograft and patient survival in an emerging economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Mirza Naqi; Wong, Germaine; Aziz, Tahir; Abbas, Khawar; Adibul Hasan Rizvi, S

    2018-03-01

    Living donor kidney is the main source of donor organs in low to middle income countries. We aimed to develop a living donor risk model that predicts graft and patient survival in an emerging economy. We used data from the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT) database (n = 2283 recipients and n = 2283 living kidney donors, transplanted between 1993 and 2009) and conducted Cox proportional hazard analyses to develop a composite score that predicts graft and patient survivals. Donor factors age, creatinine clearance, nephron dose (estimated by donor/recipient body weight ratio) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) match were included in the living donor risk model. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for graft failures among those who received a kidney with living donor scores (reference to donor score of zero) of 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 1.14 (95%CI: 0.94-1.39), 1.24 (95%CI:1.03-1.49), 1.25 (95%CI:1.03-1.51) and 1.36 (95%CI:1.08-1.72) (P-value for trend =0.05). Similar findings were observed for patient survival. Similar to findings in high income countries, our study suggests that donor characteristics such as age, nephron dose, creatinine clearance and HLA match are important factors that determine the long-term patient and graft survival in low income countries. However, other crucial but undefined factors may play a role in determining the overall risk of graft failure and mortality in living kidney donor transplant recipients. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  17. Clinical outcomes of patients living with HIV visiting ART centre at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present retrospective study was aimed to provide information about the prevalence and clinical outcomes of patients living with HIV in Warangal District, in the Northern Telangana region, India. The national AIDS control organization and Kakatiya Medical College (KMC) Institutional Review Board reviewed and ...

  18. Effect of computerized cognitive rehabilitation program on cognitive function and activities of living in stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Chanuk; Yong, Mi-hyun; Chung, Jaeyeop; Yang, Yeongae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effect of cognitive rehabilitation using a computer on cognitive function and activities of daily living in stroke patients presenting impairment of cognitive function. [Subjects] Forty-six stroke patients were divided into two groups (a training group and control group) through random assignment. [Methods] The training group received rehabilitation therapy and an additional computerized cognitive rehabilitation program using The RehaCo...

  19. Young Age at Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes Is Associated with the Development of Celiac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Children Living in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pall, Harpreet; Newhook, Leigh A; Aaron, Hillary; Curtis, Joseph; Randell, Ed

    2015-10-14

    The objectives of this study were to establish the prevalence of positive antibodies to endomysium (EMA) and tissue transglutaminase (tTG) in children with type 1 diabetes living in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), and to examine clinical features associated with positive antibodies. Patients were recruited from the pediatric diabetes clinic. One hundred sixty-seven children with type 1 diabetes from the 280 children followed at the clinic were prospectively screened for celiac disease using EMA and tTG. The variables of Irish descent, age at onset of diabetes, duration of diabetes, sex, family history of celiac disease, hemoglobin A1C (A1C), ferritin, gastrointestinal symptoms, and body mass index were compiled for all patients. The group of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was compared to the group with negative antibodies. The prevalence of patients with positive antibodies to EMA and/or tTG was 16.8% (n = 28). One patient had also been previously diagnosed with symptomatic celiac disease. The two statistically significant variables with positive antibodies were an earlier age at onset of diabetes (Mann-Whitney U two-tailed test: mean difference 3.2 years, 95% CI 1.7-4.8 years, p celiac disease-associated antibodies in children living in NL with type 1 diabetes. Unlike other clinical features, an earlier age at onset of diabetes was predictive for positive antibodies. As the majority of children with positive antibodies did not have signs or symptoms of celiac disease, routine screening for celiac disease in type 1 diabetes is recommended.

  20. The meaning of living close to a person with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Mette; Graff, Caroline; Eriksdotter, Maria; Fugl-Meyer, Kerstin S; Schuster, Marja

    2016-09-01

    Only a few studies explore the lifeworld of the spouses of persons affected by early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study is to explore the lifeworld of spouses when their partners are diagnosed with AD, focusing on spouses' lived experience. The study employs an interpretative phenomenological framework. Ten in-depth interviews are performed. The results show that spouses' lifeworld changes with the diagnosis. They experience an imprisoned existence in which added obligations, fear, and worry keep them trapped at home, both physically and mentally. In their longing for freedom, new strategies and attitudes helps the spouses to create an extended "lived space" with their partner. The findings stress the importance of paying attention to the lifeworld of spouses and making clinical recommendations on this basis. Most importantly, the lifeworld perspective has implications for how we understand what care is. We hope to challenge all different healthcare professionals and invite them to discuss the deep meaning of care and the definition of being professional in encounters with vulnerable others from a lifeworld perspective.

  1. Malnutrition is associated with dementia severity and geriatric syndromes in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Demet; Büyükkoyuncu Pekel, Nilüfer; Kiliç, Ahmet Kasim; Tolgay, Elif Nalan; Tufan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). In this study, we aimed to screen for malnutrition and geriatric syndromes and seek their associations in patients with AD. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Katz Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) tests were applied. Mean daily oral fluid intake was assessed according to patients' and relatives' declarations. Seventy-six patients with a mean age of 79 ± 7.4 years were included. Most of the patients had mild or moderate dementia. Malnutrition was associated with increased rates of hospitalization and falls, dysphagia, insomnia, agitation, delusions, hallucinations, immobility, and incontinence. A daily fluid intake of immobility, falls, and increased hospitalization risk in these patients. Daily oral fluid intake may be a practical tool in the screening of malnutrition.

  2. Association between body mass index and activities of daily living in homecare patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Guzin Zeren; Egici, Memet Taskın; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain; Toprak, Dilek

    2017-01-01

    Overweight or obesity may cause many chronic illnesses. Furthermore, several studies have shown that high body mass index is associated with mortality and morbidity among the elderly. Therefore, obesity or being overweight could adversely affect the performance of activities of daily living. In this study our aim was to investigate the association between Body Mass Index and Activity of Daily Living in Homecare Patients. The records of 2016 from the homecare unit of Sisli Hamidiye Etfal Training and Research Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. During this period, 1105 patients visited this facility. Unconscious or bedridden patients (hemiplegia, hemiparesia, and tetraparesis) and patients with incomplete data were excluded from the study. Therefore, the survey was completed with 250 files, which included all the data needed for our research. Age, gender, Body Mass Index and Barthel Index scores were recorded to the statistical program; p≤0.05 was considered as statistically significant. One hundred fifty one (60.4%) were women, and 99 (39.6%) were men. The relations between gender and age, weight, and Barthel index scores were not statistically significant. There was a significant positive correlation between weight and Barthel index scores as well as between Body Mass Index and Barthel index scores (r = 0.190; p = 0.003). The patients were divided into two groups: Group-I (underweight and normal weight) and Group-II (overweight and obese). Group-II exhibited a much higher ability to perform Activity of Daily Living than Group-I (p = 0.002). Some studies report that obesity is protective against Activity of Daily Living, but the opposite is reported in some others. Our study showed increased values of Body Mass Index and Activity of Daily Living ability, which are indicative of protective effects. The relationship between Body Mass Index and physical disability is not yet proven to be linear.

  3. Lived Experiences of "Illness Uncertainty" of Iranian Cancer Patients: A Phenomenological Hermeneutic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajjadi, Moosa; Rassouli, Maryam; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Brant, Jeannine; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2016-01-01

    For cancer patients, uncertainty is a pervasive experience and a major psychological stressor that affects many aspects of their lives. Uncertainty is a multifaceted concept, and its understanding for patients depends on many factors, including factors associated with various sociocultural contexts. Unfortunately, little is known about the concept of uncertainty in Iranian society and culture. This study aimed to clarify the concept and explain lived experiences of illness uncertainty in Iranian cancer patients. In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, 8 cancer patients participated in semistructured in-depth interviews about their experiences of uncertainty in illness. Interviews continued until data saturation was reached. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, analyzed, and interpreted using 6 stages of the van Manen phenomenological approach. Seven main themes emerged from patients' experiences of illness uncertainty of cancer. Four themes contributed to uncertainty including "Complexity of Cancer," "Confusion About Cancer," "Contradictory Information," and "Unknown Future." Two themes facilitated coping with uncertainty including "Seeking Knowledge" and "Need for Spiritual Peace." One theme, "Knowledge Ambivalence," revealed the struggle between wanting to know and not wanting to know, especially if bad news was delivered. Uncertainty experience for cancer patients in different societies is largely similar. However, some experiences (eg, ambiguity in access to medical resources) seemed unique to Iranian patients. This study provided an outlook of cancer patients' experiences of illness uncertainty in Iran. Cancer patients' coping ability to deal with uncertainty can be improved.

  4. Survival of Alzheimer's disease patients in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Seok Min; Lee, Kang Soo; Seo, Sang Won; Chin, Juhee; Kang, Sue J; Moon, So Young; Na, Duk L; Cheong, Hae-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    The natural history of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has rarely been studied in the Korean population. Our study on survival analyses in Korean AD patients potentially provides a basis for cross-cultural comparisons. We studied 724 consecutive patients from a memory disorder clinic in a tertiary hospital in Seoul, who were diagnosed as having AD between April 1995 and December 2005. Deaths were identified by the Statistics Korea database. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis, and a Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess factors related to patient survival. The overall median survival from the onset of first symptoms and from the time of diagnosis was 12.6 years (95% confidence interval 11.7-13.4) and 9.3 years (95% confidence interval 8.7-9.9), respectively. The age of onset, male gender, history of diabetes mellitus, lower Mini-Mental State Examination score, and higher Clinical Dementia Rating score were negatively associated with survival. There was a reversal of risk of AD between early-onset and later-onset AD, 9.1 years after onset. The results of our study show a different pattern of survival compared to those studies carried out with western AD populations. Mortality risk of early-onset AD varied depending on the duration of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Impact of living environment on 2-year mortality in elderly maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hung Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies on risk factors of mortality in elderly patients with hemodialysis usually focus on comorbidities, nutrition, and inflammation. Discussion on the correlation between living environment and mortality of these patients is limited. METHODS: A total of 256 elderly hemodialysis patients participated in this 2-year prospective observational study. The subjects were divided into 2 subgroups based on whether they were living in Taipei Basin (n = 63 or not (n = 193. Demographic, hematological, nutritional, inflammatory, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained for cross-sectional analysis. Causes of death and mortality rates were also analyzed for each subgroup. RESULTS: Patients in the basin group had a higher incidence of combined protein-energy wasting and inflammation than those in the around basin group. At the end of the 2-year follow-up, 68 patients had died. Univariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that a very advanced age, basin group, serum albumin levels, serum creatinine levels, non-anuria, and the complications of stroke and CAD were associated with 2-year mortality. Meanwhile, log high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels were not associated with 2-year mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that basin group, serum albumin levels, and the complications of stroke and CAD were significant risk factors for 2-year mortality in these patients. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicate that factors such as living in the Taipei Basin with higher air pollutant levels in elderly hemodialysis patients is associated with protein-energy wasting and inflammation, as well as 2-year mortality. These findings suggest that among this population, living environment is as important as comorbidities and nutrition. Furthermore, air pollution should be getting more attention especially in the overcrowding Basin topography.

  6. Impact of living environment on 2-year mortality in elderly maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Ja-Liang; Lin-Tan, Dan-Tzu; Chen, Kuan-Hsing; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Studies on risk factors of mortality in elderly patients with hemodialysis usually focus on comorbidities, nutrition, and inflammation. Discussion on the correlation between living environment and mortality of these patients is limited. A total of 256 elderly hemodialysis patients participated in this 2-year prospective observational study. The subjects were divided into 2 subgroups based on whether they were living in Taipei Basin (n = 63) or not (n = 193). Demographic, hematological, nutritional, inflammatory, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained for cross-sectional analysis. Causes of death and mortality rates were also analyzed for each subgroup. Patients in the basin group had a higher incidence of combined protein-energy wasting and inflammation than those in the around basin group. At the end of the 2-year follow-up, 68 patients had died. Univariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed that a very advanced age, basin group, serum albumin levels, serum creatinine levels, non-anuria, and the complications of stroke and CAD were associated with 2-year mortality. Meanwhile, log high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were not associated with 2-year mortality. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that basin group, serum albumin levels, and the complications of stroke and CAD were significant risk factors for 2-year mortality in these patients. The results of this study indicate that factors such as living in the Taipei Basin with higher air pollutant levels in elderly hemodialysis patients is associated with protein-energy wasting and inflammation, as well as 2-year mortality. These findings suggest that among this population, living environment is as important as comorbidities and nutrition. Furthermore, air pollution should be getting more attention especially in the overcrowding Basin topography.

  7. Prognostic factors for weight loss over 1-year period in patients recently diagnosed with mild Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie-Louise H; Waldorff, Frans B; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for weight loss in patients recently diagnosed with mild Alzheimer disease (AD), with special emphasis on the patients' social participation and living arrangements. The data used in this study was part of the Danish Alzheimer Intervention......%. Furthermore, the results suggested a trend that for men, living alone was a risk factor for losing weight, whereas for women living with somebody was associated with a higher risk. However, further studies are pertinent within this area. As weight loss is a predictor of mortality in patients with AD...

  8. Treatment choice, satisfaction and quality of life in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaglen, Helen M; Tamatea, Jade A U; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S

    2018-04-06

    Thyrotoxicosis, most often caused by Graves' disease (GD), when treated inadequately may result in premature mortality. There is little consensus as to which of the 3 treatment options available - antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine (RAI) and surgery, is better. (i) To assess factors involved in treatment choice and treatment satisfaction in patients treated for Graves' disease; (ii) To assess quality of life (QoL) following treatment of Graves' disease. Participants were selected from a prospective study cohort assessing thyrotoxicosis incidence and severity. Of the 172 eligible patients with Graves' disease, 123 treated patients participated (64% had received ATD only, 11% RAI and 25% total thyroidectomy, the latter 2 usually after a period of ATD), along with 18 untreated patients with newly diagnosed Graves' disease (overall participation rate, 73%). Consented patients completed a questionnaire detailing factors involved in treatment choice, QoL and satisfaction with treatment. Participants reported that the most important factors in choosing a treatment were the following: the effects on activities of daily living, concern about use of radioiodine, possibility of depression or anxiety, and doctor's recommendations. Satisfaction levels were high across all 3 treatment types. QoL 1-year following treatment was higher than in untreated patients, and comparable with other international studies. Patient satisfaction with therapy and QoL does not differ by treatment type. Therefore, clinical and social factors, in combination with patient choice and resource availability, should determine which treatment modality patients with Graves' disease should receive. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R. M.; Uil, J. J.; Mulder, C. J.; Heymans, H. S.

    1993-01-01

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  10. INTESTINAL PERMEABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE AND RELATIVES OF PATIENTS WITH CELIAC-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANELBURG, RM; UIL, JJ; MULDER, CJJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    The functional integrity of the small bowel is impaired in coeliac disease. Intestinal permeability, as measured by the sugar absorption test probably reflects this phenomenon. In the sugar absorption test a solution of lactulose and mannitol was given to the fasting patient and the

  11. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth-Gomér Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce. In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. Method The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. Results No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no

  12. Behavioral interventions for coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth-Gomér, Kristina

    2012-02-02

    There is a strong clinical need to provide effective stress reduction programs for patients with an acute coronary syndrome. Such programs for men have been implemented and their cardiovascular health benefit documented. For women such programs are scarce.In this report, The feasibility of a cognitive method that was recently demonstrated to prolong lives of women is tested. A setting with gender segregated groups was applied. The principles of a behavioural health educational program originally designed to attenuate the stress of patients with coronary prone behaviours were used as a basis for the intervention method. For the groups of female patients this method was tailored according to female stressors and for the groups of men according to male stressors. The same core stress reduction program was used for women and men, but the contents of discussions and responses to the pre planned program varied. These were continuously monitored throughout the fifteen sessions. Implementation group: Thirty consecutive patients, eleven women and nineteen men, hospitalized for an acute coronary syndrome were included in this intervention. All expressed their need to learn how to cope with stress in daily life and were highly motivated. Five groups, three groups of men and two groups of women were formed. Psychological assessments were made immediately before and after completion of the program. No gender differences in the pre planned programs were found, but discussion styles varied between the women and men, Women were more open and more personal. Family issues were more frequent than job issues, although all women were employed outside their homes. Men talked about concrete and practical things, mostly about their jobs, and not directly about their feelings. Daily stresses of life decreased significantly for both men and women, but more so for women. Depressive thoughts were low at baseline, and there was no change over time. In contrast, anxiety scores were high at

  13. Near patient cholesterol testing in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, S D; Jones, A; Wilmink, A B; Bradbury, A W

    2003-09-01

    To assess the bias, precision and utility of the Bioscanner 2000 for near patient testing of total cholesterol (NPTC) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). One hundred consecutive patients attending a hospital-based clinic with symptomatic PAD underwent non-fasting NPTC using finger prick blood sample and a laboratory total cholesterol (TC) using blood drawn from an antecubital fossa vein. The Bioscanner 2000 showed good precision with a coefficient of variation of 1.8-3.8%. NPTC was significantly lower than laboratory TC (mean (S.D.) 4.67 (1.1) vs. 5.12 (1.2) mmol/l), p Bioscanner 2000 compared to laboratory testing, which was demonstrated to be a systematic bias using a Bland-Altman plot. Almost half (46%) of the readings differed by > 0.5 mmol/l, 16% by > 1.0 mmol/l and 3% by > 2 mmol/l. This means that if the cut-off for statin treatment were taken as a TC of 5.0 or 3.5 mmol/l then, based on NPTC, alone 18 and 6% of patients, respectively, would not have received a statin. In the present study, NPTC significantly under-estimated TC when compared to laboratory testing. However, in the majority of cases, this would not have affected the decision to prescribe a statin and NPTC testing allows the immediate institution or titration of statin treatment.

  14. The role of patients' explanatory models and daily-lived experience in hypertension self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhour, Barbara G; Cohn, Ellen S; Cortés, Dharma E; Solomon, Jeffrey L; Fix, Gemmae M; Elwy, A Rani; Mueller, Nora; Katz, Lois A; Haidet, Paul; Green, Alexander R; Borzecki, Ann M; Kressin, Nancy R

    2012-12-01

    Uncontrolled hypertension remains a significant problem for many patients. Few interventions to improve patients' hypertension self-management have had lasting effects. Previous work has focused largely on patients' beliefs as predictors of behavior, but little is understood about beliefs as they are embedded in patients' social contexts. This study aims to explore how patients' "explanatory models" of hypertension (understandings of the causes, mechanisms or pathophysiology, course of illness, symptoms and effects of treatment) and social context relate to their reported daily hypertension self-management behaviors. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with a diverse group of patients at two large urban Veterans Administration Medical centers. PARTICIPANTS (OR PATIENTS OR SUBJECTS): African-American, white and Latino Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care patients with uncontrolled blood pressure. We conducted thematic analysis using tools of grounded theory to identify key themes surrounding patients' explanatory models, social context and hypertension management behaviors. Patients' perceptions of the cause and course of hypertension, experiences of hypertension symptoms, and beliefs about the effectiveness of treatment were related to different hypertension self-management behaviors. Moreover, patients' daily-lived experiences, such as an isolated lifestyle, serious competing health problems, a lack of habits and routines, barriers to exercise and prioritizing lifestyle choices, also interfered with optimal hypertension self-management. Designing interventions to improve patients' hypertension self-management requires consideration of patients' explanatory models and their daily-lived experience. We propose a new conceptual model - the dynamic model of hypertension self-management behavior - which incorporates these key elements of patients' experiences.

  15. Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Vania López Rodríguez; Emilio Carpio Muñoz; Vicente Fardales Macías; Iralys Benítez Guzmán

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease is related with multiple risk factors. Those patients with human immunodeficiency virus have higher risk of presenting this disease and it is usually more serious in these cases. Objective: To describe the prevalence of Chronic Inflammatory Periodontal Disease in patients with HIV. Methods: Descriptive, observational, cross-sectional study including patients with HIV in Sancti Spiritus province. The occurrence of the disease was determi...

  16. Profiling of Alzheimer's disease patients in Puerto Rico: A comparison of two distinct socioeconomic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Mercado, Clara L; Figueroa, Raúl; Acosta, Heriberto; Arnold, Steven E; Vega, Irving E

    2016-01-01

    The Latino/Hispanic community in the United States is at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease than other ethnic groups. Specifically, Caribbean Hispanics showed a more severe Alzheimer's disease symptomatology than any other ethnic group. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the mortality rate associated with Alzheimer's disease in Puerto Rico is higher than that reported in the United States. Moreover, the mortality rate associated with Alzheimer's disease was higher among Puerto Rican living in Puerto Rico than those in the mainland United States. There is also a differential geographical distribution of mortality rate associated with Alzheimer's disease in Puerto Rico, which may be associated with differential socioeconomic status and/or access to healthcare. However, there is no information regarding the clinical profile of Alzheimer's disease patients in Puerto Rico. Here, we present the results of a retrospective study directed to profile Alzheimer's disease patients clustered into two groups based on areas previously determined with low (Metro Region) and high (Northwest-Central Region) mortality rate associated with Alzheimer's disease in Puerto Rico. Significant difference in the age-at-diagnosis and years of education was found among patients within the two studied regions. Despite these differences, both regions showed comparable levels of initial and last Mini Mental State Examination scores and rate of cognitive decline. Significant difference was also observed in the occurance of co-morbidities associated with Alzheimer's disease. The differential profile of Alzheimer's disease patients correlated with differences in socioeconomic status between these two regions, suggesting that covariant associated with social status may contribute to increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Further studies should be conducted to determine the role of socioeconomic factors and healthy living practices as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Determining the efficacy of rasagiline in reducing bradykinesia among Parkinson's disease patients: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Dee E; Buck, Philip O

    2011-09-01

    Bradykinesia has a significant impact on the lives of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Consequently, treating this symptom is of particular concern for patients and clinicians. A number of studies have documented the efficacy of rasagiline in reducing the severity of PD symptoms. To summarize studies that specifically examined the impact of rasagiline on bradykinesia symptoms in PD patients across disease severity. The EMBASE database was searched for relevant articles published between 2000 and November 2010. Three studies were identified that explicitly examined the effect of rasagiline on the bradykinesia subscale of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor examination. In each, 1 mg/day rasagiline significantly reduced bradykinesia scores in patients. As a monotherapy or an adjunctive therapy, rasagiline is an effective drug for reducing the severity of bradykinesia in PD patients. Copyright © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.

  18. Time estimation in mild Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelli Paolo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time information processing relies on memory, which greatly supports the operations of hypothetical internal timekeepers. Scalar Expectancy Theory (SET postulates the existence of a memory component that is functionally separated from an internal clock and other processing stages. SET has devised several experimental procedures to map these cognitive stages onto cerebral regions and neurotransmitter systems. One of these, the time bisection procedure, has provided support for a dissociation between the clock stage, controlled by dopaminergic systems, and the memory stage, mainly supported by cholinergic neuronal networks. This study aimed at linking the specific memory processes predicted by SET to brain mechanisms, by submitting time bisection tasks to patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD, that are known to present substantial degeneration of the fronto-temporal regions underpinning memory. Methods Twelve mild AD patients were required to make temporal judgments about intervals either ranging from 100 to 600 ms (short time bisection task or from 1000 to 3000 ms (long time bisection task. Their performance was compared with that of a group of aged-matched control participants and a group of young control subjects. Results Long time bisection scores of AD patients were not significantly different from those of the two control groups. In contrast, AD patients showed increased variability (as indexed by increased WR values in timing millisecond durations and a generalized inconsistency of responses over the same interval in both the short and long bisection tasks. A similar, though milder, decreased millisecond interval sensitivity was found for elderly subjects. Conclusion The present results, that are consistent with those of previous timing studies in AD, are interpreted within the SET framework as not selectively dependent on working or reference memory disruptions but as possibly due to distortions in different

  19. Spirituality, psychological well-being, and HIV symptoms for African Americans living with HIV disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, C L; Holzemer, W L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to explore the contribution of spiritual well-being and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) symptoms to psychological well-being measured by depression, hope, and state-trait anxiety in a sample of 117 African-American men and women with a mean age of 38 years living with HIV disease. Of the respondents, 26% had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and 74% were HIV seropositive. Each participant completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Sign and Symptom Checklist for Persons with HIV Disease, the Spiritual Well-Being Scale, the Nowotny Hope Scale, State-Trait Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory. The findings suggest that existential well-being, a spiritual indicator of meaning and purpose, more than religious well-being, was significantly related to the participants' psychological well-being. In addition, HIV symptoms were found to be significant predictors of psychological well-being. These findings support the need for nurses to continue exploring ways to integrate and support spirituality within the domains of clinical practice.

  20. Live Attenuated Pertussis Vaccine BPZE1 Protects Baboons Against Bordetella pertussis Disease and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papin, James F.; Lecher, Sophie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Thalen, Marcel; Solovay, Ken; Rubin, Keith; Mielcarek, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Evidence suggests that the resurgence of pertussis in many industrialized countries may result from the failure of current vaccines to prevent nasopharyngeal colonization by Bordetella pertussis, the principal causative agent of whooping cough. Here, we used a baboon model to test the protective potential of the novel, live attenuated pertussis vaccine candidate BPZE1. A single intranasal/intratracheal inoculation of juvenile baboons with BPZE1 resulted in transient nasopharyngeal colonization and induction of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin A to all antigens tested, while causing no adverse symptoms or leukocytosis. When BPZE1-vaccinated baboons were challenged with a high dose of a highly virulent B. pertussis isolate, they were fully protected against disease, whereas naive baboons developed illness (with 1 death) and leukocytosis. Total postchallenge nasopharyngeal virulent bacterial burden of vaccinated animals was substantially reduced (0.002%) compared to naive controls, providing promising evidence in nonhuman primates that BPZE1 protects against both pertussis disease and B. pertussis infection. PMID:28535276

  1. Preoperative management in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Eliana

    2017-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-sufficient geographical areas and is characterized by the presence in patients' serum of autoantibodies directed against the thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) that cause overproduction and release of thyroid hormones. Clinical presentation results from both hyperthyroidism and underlying autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical features and biochemical abnormalities. If serum thyrotropin (TSH) is low, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations should be measured to distinguish between subclinical (with normal circulating thyroid hormones) and overt hyperthyroidism (with increased circulating thyroid hormones). Graves' disease is treated with any of three effective and relatively safe initial treatment options: antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine ablation (RAIU), and surgery. Total thyroidectomy is favored in several clinical situations, such as intolerance, ineffectiveness or recurrence after ATD treatment, radioiodine therapy contraindicated, documented or suspected thyroid malignancy, one or more large thyroid nodules, coexisting moderate-to-severe active Graves' orbitopathy, women planning a pregnancy within 6 months. Whenever surgery is selected as treatment, selection of an expert high-volume thyroid surgeons is fundamental and careful preoperative management is essential to optimize surgical outcomes. Pretreatment with ATDs in order to promptly achieve the euthyroid state is recommended to avoid the risk of precipitating thyroid storm during surgery. For the majority of patients, euthyroidism is achieved after few weeks of ATD treatment. Beta-blockers, such as propranolol, are often added effectively to control hyperthyroid symptoms. Saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) or potassium iodine (Lugol's solution), given for a short period prior to surgery, in order to reduce both thyroid hormone release and thyroid gland

  2. Radiation therapy in patients with hematologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennequin, C.; Maylin, C.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation therapy has a significant place in the treatment of hematologic diseases. Irradiation is a key component of the treatment strategy for Hodgkin's disease and has benefited from clinical studies aimed at improving its therapeutic index. There have been many recent improvements, in particular with regard to accuracy of techniques, imagery, dosimetry, and implementation of quality-control procedures. In localized non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the gold-standard treatment is radiation therapy coupled with a short course of chemotherapy. In contrast, the place of irradiation in disseminated lymphomas remains to be defined. Prophylactic irradiation of the brain is still used in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Radiation therapy is of value as palliative treatment of bone lesions of myeloma, in chemo-resistant lymphomas, and in relapses of leukemia. Total body irradiation is a cumbersome but irreplaceable method, which has also benefited from recent clinical and biological studies. Optimal radiation therapy with the best possible therapeutic index requires adequate technological and human resources. (authors). 30 refs., 1 tab

  3. Kleptomania in Patients with Neuro-Behçet's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Kıyat-Atamer, Aslı; Tüzün, Erdem; Kürtüncü, Murat; Baral-Kulaksızoğlu, Işın; Akman Demir, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to characterize the prevalence and clinical features of kleptomania, an impulse control disorder, in patients with Behçet's disease involving the central nervous system. Subjects and Methods Medical records of 350 patients with neuro-Behçet's disease were evaluated, and clinical and neuropsychological features of patients with kleptomania were noted. Results Of the 350 neuro-Behçet's disease patients 6 (1.7%) had presented with symptoms that fulfilled the cr...

  4. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005...... nonrandomized study, our data suggest that patients with carcinoid heart disease who undergo hepatic resection have decreased cardiac progression and improved prognosis. Eligible patients should be considered for hepatic surgery Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  5. Prognosis of patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beil, M; Sviri, S; de la Guardia, V; Stav, I; Ben-Chetrit, E; van Heerden, P V

    2017-01-01

    Variable mortality rates have been reported for patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Due to the absence of appropriate control groups in previous studies, it is not known whether the presence of a rheumatic disease constitutes a risk factor. Moreover, the accuracy of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score for predicting outcome in this group of patients has been questioned. The primary goal of this study was to compare outcome of patients with rheumatic diseases admitted to a medical ICU to those of controls. The records of all patients admitted between 1 April 2003 and 30 June 2014 (n=4020) were screened for the presence of a rheumatic disease during admission (n=138). The diagnosis of a rheumatic disease was by standard criteria for these conditions. An age- and gender-matched control group of patients without a rheumatic disease was extracted from the patient population in the database during the same period (n=831). Mortality in ICU, in hospital and after 180 days did not differ significantly between patients with and without rheumatic diseases. There was no difference in the performance of the APACHE II score for predicting outcome in patients with rheumatic diseases and controls. This score, as well as a requirement for the use of inotropes or vasopressors, accurately predicted hospital mortality in the group of patients with rheumatic diseases. In conclusion, patients with a rheumatic condition admitted to intensive care do not do significantly worse than patients without such a disease.

  6. Pain Management for Persons Living With HIV Disease: Experience With Interprofessional Education in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Carla S; Pappas, Gregory; Henley, Yvonne; Kangalawe, Angela Kaiza; Oyebola, Folaju Olusegun; Obiefune, Michael; Nwene, Ejike; Stanis-Ezeobi, Winifred; Enejoh, Victor; Nwizu, Chidi; Nwandu, Anthea Nwandu; Memiah, Peter; Etienne-Mesubi, Martine; Oni, Babatunji; Amoroso, Anthony; Redfield, Robert R

    2015-08-01

    Pain management (PM) has not been routinely incorporated into HIV/AIDS care and treatment in resource-constrained settings. We describe training for multidisciplinary teams tasked with integrating care management into HIV clinics to address pain for persons living with HIV in Nigeria. Education on PM was provided to mixed-disciplinary teams including didactic and iterative sessions following home and hospital visits. Participants identified challenges and performed group problem solving. HIV trainers identified barriers to introducing PM reflecting views of the patient, providers, culture, and the health environment. Implementation strategies included (1) building upon existing relationships; (2) preliminary advocacy; (3) attention to staff needs; and (4) structured data review. Implementing PM in Nigerian HIV clinics requires recognition of cultural beliefs. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Quality of life in Parkinson's disease patients: progression markers of mild to moderate stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Raissa Carla; Zonta, Marise Bueno; Araújo, Ana Paula Serra de; Israel, Vera Lúcia; Teive, Hélio A G

    2017-08-01

    To investigate which factors are associated with the quality of life decline in Parkinson's disease patients from mild to moderate stages. The Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 were used to evaluate clinical/functional data and the quality of life. The markers of clinical/functional worsening were drooling (p life was related to stigma (p = 0.043), greater impairment in cognition (p = 0.002), mobility (p = 0.013) and for daily living activities (p = 0.05), and was considered more significant in men, married, older individuals, and those with a longer time of disease. The quality of life worsening markers at the moderate stage were related to stigma, worsening of cognition, and to greater impairment in mobility and daily living activities.

  8. Lived experience in patients with recurrent glioblastoma in Japan: A narrative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Chikada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is well known to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. Patients with GBM in progression-free survival (PFS may be relatively stable and can often maintain their quality of life. Thus, PFS is a desirable goal. In Japan, the median PFS is 11 months. It is difficult to grasp a patient's thoughts and hopes when, after PFS, they are readmitted due to recurrence or acute deterioration. Therefore, this study aimed to de-scribe the lived experience of illness in patients with recurrent GBM, focusing on PFS. We enrolled five patients into the study; however, only four patients completed data collection. Data were collected using semi-structured inter-views. We also conducted a thematic narrative analysis. As a result, we generated one overall theme: Even in vul-nerable and constrained daily lives, the aim was gaining a sense of stability—and maintaining it steadily—as far as possible, on their own. That sense of stability is fragile so that maintaining equilibrium is a precarious enterprise. Moreover, in PFS, participants were trying to maintain equilibrium by reevaluating themselves and sometimes giving up something, although they received support from people around them. We infer that it is important for nurses to assess and understand the fluctuations in that sense of stability through continuous involvement with patients. An interdisciplinary approach and lateral integration of care are important to meet the needs of GBM patients. This understanding will lead to nursing supports that help patients live with stability, pride, and dignity.

  9. The lived experience of autologous stem cell-transplanted patients: Post-transplantation and before discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnasser, Qasem; Abu Kharmah, Salahel Deen; Attia, Manal; Aljafari, Akram; Agyekum, Felicia; Ahmed, Falak Aftab

    2018-04-01

    To explore the lived experience of the patients post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and specifically after engraftment and before discharge. Patients post-stem cell transplantation experience significant changes in all life aspects. Previous studies carried out by other researchers focused mainly on the postdischarge experience, where patients reported their perceptions that have always been affected by the life post-transplantation and influenced by their surroundings. The lived experience of patients, specifically after engraftment and prior to discharge (the "transition" phase), has not been adequately explored in the literature. Doing so might provide greater insight into the cause of change post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study is a phenomenological description of the participants' perception about their lived experience post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study used Giorgi's method of analysis. Through purposive sampling, 15 post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients were recruited. Data were collected by individual interviews. Data were then analysed based on Giorgi's method of analysis to reveal the meaning of a phenomenon as experienced through the identification of essential themes. The analysis process revealed 12 core themes covered by four categories that detailed patients lived experience post-haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The four categories were general transplant experience, effects of transplantation, factors of stress alleviation and finally life post-transplantation. This study showed how the haematopoietic stem cell transplantation affected the patients' physical, psychological and spiritual well-being. Transplantation also impacted on the patients' way of thinking and perception of life. Attending to patients' needs during transplantation might help to alleviate the severity of the effects and therefore improve experience. Comprehensive information about transplantation needs

  10. [Health valuations for patients with chronic ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, M; Farin, E

    2011-08-01

    The study deals with the question of how patients with chronic ischemic heart disease assess different health situations that can be achieved by rehabilitation. Furthermore it examines which factors influence these health valuations and whether the predictors vary depending on the level of education. The health valuations of n = 331 patients with chronic ischemic heart disease are compiled using visual analogue scales (VAS). In addition to sociodemographic questions, generic and illness-specific scales (SF-12, MacNew) for the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) are used as potential predictors of the health valuations. Additional basic medical data were provided by the physician. Hierarchical regression analyses are conducted; the sociodemographic, medical and HRQOL variables are included stepwise. Since many variables are observed for the regression models, an imputation of missing values is made. The health dimensions "Self-care and domestic life" and "Mobility" are assigned the highest values on the VAS. The lowest preference is assigned to the dimensions "Reduction of symptoms" and "Information about the disease". The differences between the health dimensions are statistically significant. Sociodemographic variables explain up to 3.6% of the variance of health valuations, with level of education and living with a partner being the most important predictors. The medical variables included in the second step explain between 2.1 and 6.8% incremental variance; the most important predictor is the operation performed prior to rehabilitation (bypass, heart valve). The HRQOL variables in the third block provide 7.1-24.9% incremental explanation of variance, by far the highest percentage. This is mainly achieved using the 3 MacNew scales (emotional, social and physical functioning). The overall explanation of variance for the health valuations is 17.1-28.8%. For patients with a higher level of education, the total explanation of variance is about 9.2% higher on

  11. Role of CT in patients with prostatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizako, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kaji, Yasushi; Moriyama, Masahiro; Ishida, Tetsuya

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of CT in patients with and without prostatic disease. CT and MR findings were reviewed in 25 patients without known prostatic disease, 11 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 11 patients with prostatic cancer. Differential attenuation allowed for distinction of the peripheral zone and inner gland of the prostate by CT in 72% of normal patients. The distinction rate of prostatic zonal anatomy by CT decreased to 30% in the diseased group. When zonal anatomy of the prostate is not visualized on pelvic enhanced CT, the presence of prostatic disease might be considered. (author)

  12. HIV-related symptoms and patient clusters among Chileans living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, A X; Norr, K F; Pérez, C M; Levy, J A; Park, C G; Kim, M J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying both Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related and co-morbid symptoms experienced by people living with HIV (PLWH) who are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment is a major challenge for healthcare providers globally. Yet, little research to date has examined the symptoms of illness experienced by PLWH including patients living in Central and South American. To address this gap, this study was designed to identify symptoms of HIV by socio-demographic and/or clinical characteristics among Chilean patients living with the virus. A convenience sample of 209 Chilean PLWH was recruited from an outpatient clinic in Santiago, Chile. A structured interview was used to elicit socio-demographic information and HIV symptoms status. Additional clinical information was obtained through a review of the participants' medical records. Results show that patients' most commonly reported HIV-related symptoms were fear/worries (66%), anxiety (52%), gas/bloating (50%), and thirst (50%). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive association between the number of reported HIV-related symptoms and number of years living with HIV. Having completed college was negatively associated with number of symptoms. Latent class analysis indicated that PLWH in the sample who had completed college were two times more likely to experience a mild intensity of HIV-related symptoms than their lesser educated counterparts. Similarly, logistic regression revealed that college-educated PLWH were twice as likely to be classified in the subgroup reporting mild intensity of symptoms than those who lacked a college degree. Overall, the study's results reveal that many Chilean PLWH, even those with high CD4 counts and low or undetectable viral loads, are not symptom free. The findings point to the need for clinicians to tailor a plan of care for individuals living with HIV that is based on their symptomatology.

  13. Disability, Activities of Daily Living and Self Efficacy in Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukadder Mollaoglu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess patients’ disability, activities of daily living and self-efficacy patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD and continuos ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD, to examine the relationship between them. Material and Methods: This study was carried with 152 patients as sample group. In this study, three instruments were used: Personal Information Form, Brief Disability Questionnaire, Katz\\'s Activity\\'s of Daily Living Index and Lawton and Brody\\'s Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Index and Self-efficacy Assessment Form. Data collected from the study was analyzed using percent, mean, Tukey test, significance test of two means, One-way variant analysis and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: The study results demonstrate that while there is a correlation between self-care ability and age, education level, marital status and additional health problems, factors such as age, gender, education level, work status, income level, social insurance status and frequency of hemodialysis application determine self-efficacy. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between patients’ disability and activities of daily living , self-efficacy. It was determined that as the level of disability increases self-efficiacy level decreases. Conclusions: Dialysis application affects patients’ disability, activities of daily living and self-efficacy levels. In view of this study’s results, it is recommended to organize education programs to increase self-efficacy levels of dialysis patients and prepare comprehensive plans including patients’ families. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 181-186

  14. Differences in Medication Adherence between Living and Deceased Donor Kidney Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhaerynck, K; Schmid-Mohler, G; Kiss, A; Steiger, J; Wüthrich, R P; Bock, A; De Geest, S

    2014-01-01

    Literature review suggests that adherence to immunosuppressive drugs may be lower in recipients of living than of deceased donor kidney grafts, possibly because of profile differences. To compare the level of immunosuppressive adherence levels between patients with deceased and living (-related; -unrelated) donor grafts in Switzerland. Using data from two similar cross-sectional studies at two transplant centers in Switzerland, the level of adherence between the two groups was compared. Medication adherence was assessed by self-report or electronic monitoring. Possible explanatory factors included age, beliefs regarding immunosuppressive drugs, depressive symptomatology, pre-emptive transplantation, and the number of transplants received, were also considered. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted non-adherence odds were 2 to 3 times higher in living-related than deceased donor transplantation (ORs: 2.09-3.05; padherence in recipients of living-related donor kidneys, possibly owing to differences in patient profile (ie, health beliefs regarding their immunosuppressive needs), knowledge of which may enhance adherence if addressed.

  15. Comparison of Multiple Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Indices in Chinese COPD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinsong; Miller, Anastasia; Li, Yongxia; Lan, Qinqin; Zhang, Ning; Chai, Yanling; Hai, Bing

    2018-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious chronic condition with a global impact. Symptoms of COPD include progressive dyspnea, breathlessness, cough, and sputum production, which have a considerable impact on the lives of patients. In addition to the human cost of living with COPD and the resulting death, COPD entails a huge economic burden on the Chinese population, with patients spending up to one-third of the average family income on COPD management in some regions is clinically beneficial to adopt preventable measures via prudent COPD care utilization, monetary costs, and hospitalizations. Toward this end, this study compared the relative effectiveness of six indices in predicting patient healthcare utilization, cost of care, and patient health outcome. The six assessment systems evaluated included the three multidimensional Body mass index, Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise capacity index, Dyspnea, Obstruction, Smoking, Exacerbation (DOSE) index, and COPD Assessment Test index, or the unidimensional measures that best predict the future of patient healthcare utilization, cost of care, and patient health outcome among Chinese COPD patients. Multiple linear regression models were created for each healthcare utilization, cost, and outcome including a single COPD index and the same group of demographic variables for each of the outcomes. We conclude that the DOSE index facilitates the prediction of patient healthcare utilization, disease expenditure, and negative clinical outcomes. Our study indicates that the DOSE index has a potential role beyond clinical predictions. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  16. Impact of specialist palliative care on coping with Parkinson's disease: patients and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Nathan J; Frizelle, Dorothy; Adams, Debi; Johnson, Miriam J

    2018-01-09

    UK guidelines recommend palliative care access for people with Parkinson's disease; however, this remains sporadic, and it is unknown whether specialist palliative care helps patients and carers cope with this distressing condition. This study aimed to explore whether, and how, access to specialist palliative care services affected patients' and carers' coping with Parkinson's disease. Semistructured interviews were conducted, audio-recorded and verbatim transcribed. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants were patients with advanced idiopathic Parkinson's disease (n=3), and carers of people with Parkinson's disease (n=5, however, one diagnosis was reviewed) receiving care from an integrated specialist palliative care and Parkinson's disease service in North East England. Access to specialist palliative care helped participants cope with some aspects of advanced Parkinson's disease. Three superordinate themes were developed:' managing uncertainty', 'impacts on the self' and 'specialist palliative care maintaining a positive outlook'. Specialist palliative care helped patients and carers cope with advanced Parkinson's disease. Specialist palliative care is a complex intervention that acknowledges the complex and holistic nature of Parkinson's disease, enabling health in some domains despite continued presence of pathology. These exploratory findings support the utility of this approach for people living with Parkinson's disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Assessment of the quality of life of patients with peripheral vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Bayreuth Univ.; Niechzial, M.; Nagel, E.; Bohndorf, K.

    2003-01-01

    The Medical Outcome Short Form 36 is commonly used as a generic quality of life measure in the assessment of vascular disease. The Claudication Scale CLAU-S, the PAVK-86 Fragebogen, and the Walking Impairment Questionnaire WIQ are validated disease-specific questionnaires for intermittent claudication. A disease specific tool for critical ischaemia is lacking. Quality of life of patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease is not only impaired in the physical functioning domains (mobility, self care, activities of daily living), but moreover in their social and emotional wellbeing. This situation worsens under conservative treatment. Angioplasty and operation procedure similar improvements in all dimensions of hrQOL. As radiological interventional procedures just aim to improve hrQOL and do not bring a definite cure for the underlying disease, patients perception of their quality of life should be taken into account both in the indication for angioplasty and for the scientific evaluation of new treatment modalities. (orig.) [de

  18. Prognostic factors for weight loss over 1-year period in patients recently diagnosed with mild Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.L.; Waldorff, F.B.; Waldemar, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for weight loss in patients recently diagnosed with mild Alzheimer disease (AD), with special emphasis on the patients' social participation and living arrangements. The data used in this study was part of the Danish Alzheimer Intervention...

  19. Listening to Bodies and Watching Machines: Developing Health Information Skills, Tools and Services for People Living with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbold, Natalya

    2013-01-01

    When patients need information, they may visit a doctor, ask a nurse, or look online. But these are not the only sources of information used by patients. This paper examines discussion threads in online renal support groups to describe how people living with kidney failure conceive of help, information and support. I use Actor Network Theory to…

  20. Living with incurable oesophageal cancer. A phenomenological hermeneutical interpretation of patient stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Missel, Malene; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    results in an analysis of these stories. RESULTS: Through the analysis of the narrative interviews, phenomena of the patients' life world appear which are described in themes such as debut of the illness, denial, the person's own suspicion, existential turning point, despair, hope, the body, affirmation......PURPOSE: The study explores how patients diagnosed with incurable oesophageal cancer experience living with the illness, and provides insight into and an understanding of the patients' situation, reality and phenomena in their life world. METHOD: The method takes a phenomenological......-hermeneutic approach, inspired by the French philosopher Paul Ricoeur's narrative theory on mimesis as the structure and process of the method, and Ricoeur's theory of interpretation for the analysis of patient stories. The stories materialise from narrative interviews, and the phenomena of the patients' life world...

  1. Experiences of Patients Living With Heart Failure: A Descriptive Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Alvin Chuen Wei; Tan, Khoon Kiat; Huang Gan, Juvena Chew; Wang, Wenru

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences, needs, and coping strategies of patients living with heart failure in Singapore. A descriptive qualitative design was used. A purposive sample of 15 informants was recruited from two cardiology wards of a tertiary public hospital in Singapore. Individual face-to-face interviews were conducted with a semistructured interview guideline that was developed based on a review of the literature and a pilot study. Content analysis was adopted to analyze the data, and four main categories were identified: perceived causes, manifestations, and prognosis; enduring emotions; managing the condition; and needs from health care professionals. The informants were overwhelmed with the experience of living with heart failure due to the disruptive and uncertain nature of the condition. This study offers health care professionals practical and useful suggestions when providing holistic care for patients with heart failure. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Prevalence of mucocutaneous findings in Celiac disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Yayla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy which develops as a result of exposure to gluten in food products in individuals with a genetic predisposition. Gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal clinical findings can be seen in these patients. An increased frequence of autoimmune diseases has been reported in patients with celiac disease. Some dermatological diseases, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata and recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been reported to be more common among patients with celiac disease. However, there are no controlled studies on this subject. The aim of this study was to identify the mucocutaneous symptoms seen in celiac patients and to compare these findings with a control group. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine celiac patients and 54 age-and sex-matched healthy volunteers were included in the study. In the patient group, celiac disease history, height and weight parameters, the medications of the patients, compliance to a gluten-free diet, concomitant skin disorders and additional illnesses were questioned; height and weight parameters, diagnosed illnesses, and medications were questioned in the control group. Dermatological analyses were performed in all participants. Results: Mucocutaneous findings were found to be present in 38 patients (77.6% in the celiac patient group and in 31 (57.4% individuals in the control group. The presence of mucocutaneous findings in celiac patients was significantly more common than in the control group. While immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases were detected in 8 celiac patients (16.3%, none of the individuals in the control group had immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and a statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. Conclusion: In celiac patients, the frequency of immune-mediated mucocutaneous diseases and all mucocutaneous diseases were found to be increased. Therefore, we suggest

  3. Lumbar Spine Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Joshua E; Hughes, Alexander; Sama, Andrew; Weinstein, Joseph; Kaplan, Leon; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2015-10-21

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition. The literature on patients with Parkinson disease and spine surgery is limited, but increased complications have been reported. All patients with Parkinson disease undergoing lumbar spine surgery between 2002 and 2012 were identified. Patients' charts, radiographs, and outcome questionnaires were reviewed. Parkinson disease severity was assessed with use of the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale. Complications and subsequent surgeries were analyzed. Risk for reoperation was assessed. Ninety-six patients underwent lumbar spine surgery. The mean patient age was 63.0 years. The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. The Parkinson disease severity stage was Parkinson disease severity stage of ≥3 (p Parkinson disease is good, with improvement of spine-related pain. A larger prospective study is warranted. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  4. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  5. Patient education in the management of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Brown, James Pr; Clark, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and improve prognosis. Cardiac rehabilitation is a complex multifaceted....... To explore the potential study level predictors of the effects of patient education in patients with CHD (e.g. individual versus group intervention, timing with respect to index cardiac event). SEARCH METHODS: We updated searches from the previous Cochrane review, by searching the Cochrane Central Register.......5%) versus 12/102 (11.8%); random effects RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.26 to 1.48; very low quality of evidence). However, there was some evidence of a reduction with education in fatal and/or non-fatal cardiovascular events (2 studies, 310 studies; 21/152 (13.8%) versus 61/158 (38.6%); random effects RR 0.36, 95% CI 0...

  6. ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE ON MAINTENANCE HEMODIALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Aijaz Ahmed, Dr. Muhammad Nadeem Ahsan, Dr. Pooran Mal*, Dr. Hamid Nawaz Ali Memon, Dr. Samreen and Dr. Sajjad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of ischemic heart disease in patients of chronic kidney disease on maintenance hemodialysis Patients and Methods: A total of 160 patients with diagnosis of CKD in department of Nephrology, Liaquat National Hospital Karachi were recruited in this six months cross sectional study. Demographic information was recorded. Then patients were underwent ECG. Reports were assessed and ischemic heart disease was labeled while all the data was collected using the pro...

  7. Prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients affected by Addison's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagi, Federico; Campanella, Jonia; Soriani, Alessandra; Vailati, Alberto; Corazza, Gino R

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that coeliac disease is associated with autoimmune endocrine diseases, such as autoimmune thyroid disease and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Recently, coeliac disease has been shown in approximately 10% of patients with autoimmune Addison's disease. Addison's disease is the most common cause of primary adrenocortical insufficiency and it shares several clinical features with coeliac disease. Although hyperpigmentation and hypotension are the most specific signs, gastrointestinal symptoms are common and can be the first complaints of the patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of coeliac disease in Italian patients with Addison's disease. Seventeen consecutive patients affected by Addison's disease (14 F, mean age 53.9 years, range 26-79 years) were enrolled in the study. Eleven of them were affected by Addison's disease associated with autoimmune thyroid disease and/or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus; the other 6 patients were suffering from isolated Addison's disease. Diagnosis had been performed at the age of 40.5 years (range 23-55). Steroid treatment had already been started in 16 of the patients. Endomysial antibodies were tested in all of them and a duodenal biopsy was taken in those found to be positive for antiendomysial antibody (EMA). One out of 17 patients was found to be EMA positive. Duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of coeliac disease by showing subtotal villous atrophy. Although we studied only a small sample, our preliminary results confirmed that Addison's disease is associated with coeliac disease, being present in 5.9% of patients with Addison's disease. Since the symptoms can be similar and treatment of Addison's disease can mask coeliac disease, this association should always be actively investigated.

  8. Therapeutic Argentine tango dancing for people living with Parkinson’s disease: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Blandy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals living with Parkinson’s disease (PD can experience a range of movement disorders. Therapeutic dance is enjoyable and thought to improve mobility, balance and well being in some people with PD. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a 4 week Argentine tango dance program for people with PD. Methods: Six community dwelling individuals with mild-moderate PD were recruited from Parkinson’s support groups, movement disorder clinics and the Parkinson’s disease Association in Australia. To minimise falls risk, participants were required to be less than 75 years of age and physically independent (Hoehn and Yahr stages I-III. They were also required to speak English. Participants attended a 1 hour dance class at a dance studio twice per week for 4 weeks. A professional dance instructor led and choreographed the classes. Physiotherapists were present to assist participants during the class and served as dance partners as necessary. The primary outcome was feasibility which was determined by measures of recruitment, adherence, attrition, safety (falls, near misses and adverse events and resource requirements. Secondary measures included the Beck Depression Inventory and the Euroqol-5D, administered at baseline and post intervention. Therapy outcomes pre and post-intervention were analysed descriptively as medians and inter-quartile ranges and using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank tests.Results: The Argentine tango dance intervention was shown to be safe, with no adverse events. Adherence to the dance program was 89%. Depression scores improved after intervention (p=0.04. Some challenges were associated with the need to quickly recruitment participants and supplying physiotherapists to act as dance partners. Conclusion: The program was shown to be feasible and safe for people with mild to moderately severe PD.

  9. [Increased IL-4 production in response to virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis patients with advanced disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Diane J; Martins, Marta S; Costa, Leonor M; Freire, Mónica S; Arroz, Maria J; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ventura, Fernando A

    2005-01-01

    The study was designed to compare immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli and antigens in healthy Portuguese subjects and pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB), and to correlate immune status with clinical severity of tuberculosis disease. PBMC were cultured and stimulated with live and killed M. tuberculosis H37Rv and purified protein derivative (PPD) and lymphoproliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-5/IL-4 by these cultures were evaluated by the use of ELISA and multi-parameter flow cytometry. PBMC from 30 tuberculosis patients demonstrated significantly reduced amounts of proliferation and IFN-gamma when stimulated with live M. tuberculosis compared the control group. Of 15 tuberculosis patients tested for intracellular IL-4 following stimulation with M. tuberculosis, 7 showed greatly increased IL-4 production in CD8+ and gammadelta+ T cells. Tuberculosis patients demonstrated an increase of intracellular IL-4 after PBMC were stimulated with live M. tuberculosis in the CD4+ phenotype, but more notably in CD8+ and gammadelta TCR+ subsets. Increased production of IL-4 in tuberculosis patients was primarily in individuals with advanced involvement of lung parenchymal with high bacterial loads in sputum. These results suggest that an alteration in type 1 and type 2 cytokine balance can occur in patients with tuberculosis at an advanced clinical stage of disease.

  10. Features of Coping with Disease in Iranian Multiple Sclerosis Patients: a Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Ali; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid; Ebadi, Abbas

    2018-03-01

    Introduction: Coping with disease is of the main components improving the quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients. Identifying the characteristics of this concept is based on the experiences of patients. Using qualitative research is essential to improve the quality of life. This study was conducted to explore the features of coping with the disease in patients with multiple sclerosis. Method: In this conventional content analysis study, eleven multiple sclerosis patients from Iran MS Society in Tehran (Iran) participated. Purposive sampling was used to select participants. Data were gathered using semi structured interviews. To analyze data, a conventional content analysis approach was used to identify meaning units and to make codes and categories. Results: Results showed that features of coping with disease in multiple sclerosis patients consists of (a) accepting the current situation, (b) maintenance and development of human interactions, (c) self-regulation and (d) self-efficacy. Each of these categories is composed of sub-categories and codes that showed the perception and experience of patients about the coping with disease. Conclusion: Accordingly, a unique set of features regarding features of coping with the disease were identified among the patients with multiple sclerosis. Therefore, working to ensure the emergence of, and subsequent reinforcement of these features in MS patients can be an important step in improving the adjustment and quality of their lives.

  11. Living Gluten Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease" Articles Celiac Disease Changes Everything / What is Celiac Disease? / Symptoms, Diagnosis & Treatment / Four Inches and Seven Pounds… / Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 ...

  12. The lived experience of fibromyalgia in female patients, a phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuytack Francesca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia is a chronic syndrome with no cure. A thorough understanding of the illness experience is therefore key in the palliative care of patients with this condition. In search for supportive treatments fibromyalgia patients often attend a chiropractor or other manual therapist. Knowledge of the meaning and reality of living with this condition to the patient could be considered essential to any health care practitioner playing a role in the management. This study aimed to gain a better understanding of the subjective experience of fibromyalgia, focusing on the personal, occupational and social impact of the condition on patients' lives. This included exploring the patients' views about the future. Methods This study employed descriptive phenomenology and adopted Husserl's concept of transcendental subjectivity or "bracketing". This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews and was undertaken to obtain rich data that reflected the essence of the participants' experience. Participants consisted of six female volunteers, diagnosed with fibromyalgia by the University Hospital Gent, Belgium. Data were analysed using a thematic framework. Results Fibromyalgia pervaded all aspects of life. Four main themes arose from data analysis, namely; the impact of fibromyalgia on patients' occupational and personal life, the impact on their future and aspects of social interaction. Nearly all participants had stopped working, giving rise to feelings of uselessness and loss of identity. Leisure activities were also greatly affected. Fibromyalgia was said to alter family bonds, some of which were reinforced, others were broken. The diagnosis was seen as a relief, marking an end to a period of uncertainty. Participants reported ambivalence in interaction. Despite some positive encounters, frustration arising from perceived incomprehension dominated. Consequently patients preferred not to share their experiences. Conclusions The

  13. Clinically Unsuspected Prion Disease Among Patients With Dementia Diagnoses in an Alzheimer's Disease Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Ryan A; Blase, J L; Mercaldo, N D; Harvey, A R; Schonberger, L B; Kukull, W A; Belay, E D

    2015-12-01

    Brain tissue analysis is necessary to confirm prion diseases. Clinically unsuspected cases may be identified through neuropathologic testing. National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) Minimum and Neuropathologic Data Set for 1984 to 2005 were reviewed. Eligible patients had dementia, underwent autopsy, had available neuropathologic data, belonged to a currently funded Alzheimer's Disease Center (ADC), and were coded as having an Alzheimer's disease clinical diagnosis or a nonprion disease etiology. For the eligible patients with neuropathology indicating prion disease, further clinical information, collected from the reporting ADC, determined whether prion disease was considered before autopsy. Of 6000 eligible patients in the NACC database, 7 (0.12%) were clinically unsuspected but autopsy-confirmed prion disease cases. The proportion of patients with dementia with clinically unrecognized but autopsy-confirmed prion disease was small. Besides confirming clinically suspected cases, neuropathology is useful to identify unsuspected clinically atypical cases of prion disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. The best interests of persistently vegetative patients: to die rather that to live?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tak Kwong; Tipoe, George Lim

    2014-03-01

    Adults without the capacity to make their own medical decisions have their rights protected under the Mental Capacity Act (2005) in the UK. The underlying principle of the court's decisions is the best interests test, and the evaluation of best interests is a welfare appraisal. Although the House of Lords in the well-known case of Bland held that the decision to withhold treatment for patients in a persistent vegetative state should not be based on their best interests, judges in recent cases have still held that the best interests of persistently vegetative patients demand that the right to die with dignity prevails over society's interest to preserve life. The basis of suggesting that it is in the best interests for one who is alive (although vegetative) in peace to die in peace is weak. Even if it may not be in their best interests to live on, it may not be so to die either. The phrase 'the right to dignity/to die with dignity' has been misused as a trump card to justify the speculation that a vegetative patient would necessarily refuse to live on machines. Without disrespect to the court's decision, we argue that the use of the best interests test to authorise withdrawing/withholding treatment from persistently vegetative patients without an advance directive is problematic. We propose that the court could have reached the same decision by considering only the futility of treatment without working through the controversial best interests of the patient.

  15. The Effect of Live Spontaneous Harp Music on Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Marie Chiasson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the effect of live, spontaneous harp music on individual patients in an intensive care unit (ICU, either pre- or postoperatively. The purpose was to determine whether this intervention would serve as a relaxation or healing modality, as evidenced by the effect on patient’s pain, heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and heart rate variability. Each consenting patient was randomly assigned to receive either a live 10-minute concert of spontaneous music played by an expert harpist or a 10-minute rest period. Spontaneous harp music significantly decreased patient perception of pain by 27% but did not significantly affect heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, or heart rate variability. Trends emerged, although being not statistically significant, that systolic blood pressure increased while heart rate variability decreased. These findings may invoke patient engagement, as opposed to relaxation, as the underlying mechanism of the decrease in the patients’ pain and of the healing benefit that arises from the relationship between healer, healing modality, and patient.

  16. Procedural learning changes in patients with Wilson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumei Jiang; Xiang Shen; Xiaoping Wang; Wenjie Li

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we compared explicit memory performance, using the Wechsler Memory Scale, and implicit memory performance, using the Nissen software version of the serial reaction time task, in patients with Wilson's disease to normal controls. The Wilson's disease patients exhibited deficits in explicit memory tasks, such as figure recall and understanding memory. Moreover, the Wilson's disease patients exhibited deficits in implicit memory tasks, including significantly prolonged response times. These findings indicate that Wilson's disease patients have explicit and implicit partial memory impairments.

  17. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E.

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  18. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2015-05-13

    This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  19. Support needs of people living with Mycobacterium ulcerans (Buruli ulcer) disease in a Ghana rural community: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effah, Alex; Ersser, Steven J; Hemingway, Ann

    2017-12-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans (also known as Buruli ulcer) disease is a rare skin disease which is prevalent in rural communities in the tropics mostly in Africa. Mortality rate is low, yet morbidity and consequent disabilities affect the quality of life of sufferers. The aim of this paper is to use the grounded theory method to explore the support needs of people living with the consequences of Buruli ulcer in an endemic rural community in Ghana. We used the grounded theory research approach to explore the experiences of people living with Mycobacterium ulcerans in a rural district in Ghana and provide a basis to understand the support needs of this group. The key support needs identified were: functional limitations, fear and frequency of disease recurrence, contracture of limbs and legs, loss of sensation and numbness in the affected body area, lack of information from health professionals about self-care, feeling tired all the time, insomnia, lack of good diet, lack of access to prostheses, having to walk long distances to access health services, and loss of educational opportunities. The study discusses how the systematically derived qualitative data has helped to provide a unique insight and advance our understanding of the support needs of people living with BU and how they live and attempt to adapt their lives with disability. We discuss how the availability of appropriate interventions and equipment could help them self-manage their condition and improve access to skin care services. The support needs of this vulnerable group were identified from a detailed analysis of how those living with BU coped with their lives. A key issue is the lack of education to assist self-management and prevent deterioration. Further research into the evaluation of interventions to address these support needs is necessary including self-management strategies. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  20. Examining Success of Communication Strategies Used by Formal Caregivers Assisting Individuals with Alzheimer's Disease during an Activity of Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rozanne; Rochon, Elizabeth; Mihailidis, Alex; Leonard, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how formal (i.e., employed) caregivers' use verbal and nonverbal communication strategies while assisting individuals with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) during the successful completion of an activity of daily living (ADL). Based on the literature, the authors hypothesized that caregivers' use of 1 proposition,…

  1. Confirmation and phylogenetic analysis of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus in free-living rabbits from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bildt, M. W. G.; van Bolhuis, G. H.; van Zijderveld, F.; van Riel, D.; Drees, J. M.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.; Kuiken, T.

    2006-01-01

    The number of free-living European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in the Netherlands has declined dramatically in recent years. Although rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) infection has been implicated as a possible cause of this decline, the definitive diagnosis has not been reported. We

  2. Gender differences in asbestos exposure and disease location in 327 patients with mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panou, Vasiliki; Weinreich, Ulla Moller; Bak, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Region of North Denmark has a high incidence of malignant mesothelioma (MM) of 6.2/100.000 for men and 1/100.000 for women mainly due to large-scale use of chrysotile asbestos.Aims: The aim of the study is to investigate gender differences in asbestos exposure and disease location...... workers; domestic, referring to patients living with an asbestos worker; environmental, defined as living or working within 10.000 meters from asbestos emitting location; unknown, where no source of asbestos exposure could be identified. MM location was classified as pleural (MPM) or peritoneal (MAM...

  3. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use two weeks preceding endoscopic analysis and patients with oesophageal disease were excluded from further study. Korle-Bu receives out-patient referrals from sever- al primary and specialist centres across Southern Ghana. One hundred ...

  4. Physical Activity Recommendations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Zuidema, Menno J.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity recommendations are hardly studied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and specifically recommendations that are individualized to a patient's aerobic fitness level are not studied. Objectives: To compare individualized (relative) and

  5. Can Patients with Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Can Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Take Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs? ... It also does not upset the gastrointestinal tract. Can People With CVD Take an NSAID? If you ...

  6. Implementation of an Integrative Holistic Healthcare Model for People Living with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer-Aboff, Ingrid; Prettyman, Allen

    2015-06-01

    Research demonstrates that people with Parkinson's disease (PD) benefit greatly from multidisciplinary medical care. Delaware does not have a Movement Disorder Center or a movement disorder specialist. To address this issue, the University of Delaware Nurse Managed Health Center (NMHC) developed a novel PD Telehealth Clinic serving individuals with PD and their caregivers throughout Delaware. The PD clinic is based on a collaborative framework that uses synchronous videoconferencing telehealth technology to bring together out-of-state clinicians and scientists with expertise in PD to help deliver specialized care to PD patients and their caregivers. The team includes a movement disorder specialist, psychologists, nurse practitioners, researchers, physical and speech therapists, exercise physiologists, nutritionists, and graduate students. The PD Clinic delivery model seamlessly blends telehealth provider and onsite provider interactions, enabling the diagnosis, treatment, and ongoing management of PD. In the first 6 months of the Parkinson's clinic opening, the nurse practitioners along with the movement disorder specialist evaluated 36 PD patients. Several patients have received recommendations to change their medication regimen by the movement disorder specialist. About 20 patients were referred to physical therapy, 7 to speech therapy, 9 to mental health services, 1 to occupational therapy, and 12 to local support groups. The location of the NMHC-PD clinic has reduced travel time and distance by as much as 1.5 hr or 80 miles, each way, and wait time for a new patient appointment is less than 3 months. The NMHC - PD Telehealth Clinic provides access to specialized multidisciplinary and advanced care and was successfully implemented. This model can be replicated in other nurse managed health centers across the United States. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  7. 'Being in it together': living with a partner receiving deep brain stimulation for advanced Parkinson's disease--a hermeneutic phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haahr, Anita; Kirkevold, Marit; Hall, Elisabeth O C; Østergaard, Karen

    2013-02-01

    This article is a report of an exploration of the lived experience of being a spouse to a person living with advanced Parkinson's disease, before and during the first year of deep brain stimulation. Parkinson's disease is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease. It has a profound impact on the everyday life for patients and spouses. Deep brain stimulation is offered with the aim of reducing symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The treatment is known to improve quality of life for patients, but little is known of how spouses experience life following their partners' treatment. A longitudinal interview study with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Ten spouses were included in the study. Data were gathered in 2007-2008, through qualitative in-depth interviews with spouses once before and three times during the first year of their partners' treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation. Data collection and data analysis were influenced by the hermeneutic phenomenological methodology of van Manen. The uniting theme 'Solidarity - the base for joined responsibility and concern' was the foundation for the relationship between spouses and their partners. Before treatment, the theme 'Living in partnership' was dominant. After treatment two dichotomous courses were described 'A sense of freedom embracing life' and 'The challenge of changes and constraint'. Spouses are deeply involved in their partners' illness and their experience of life is highly affected by their partners' illness, both before and after deep brain stimulation. The relationship is founded on solidarity and responsibility, which emphasizes spouses' need to be informed and involved in the process following Deep Brain Stimulation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Psychotropic medication use among patients with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Haley M; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Green, Peter H R; Lebwohl, Benjamin

    2018-03-27

    Celiac disease is a multi-system disorder with manifestations that may result in psychiatric disorders. We assessed the prevalence of medication use to treat psychiatric disorders in celiac disease patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy over 9-years at a celiac disease referral center. We compared the prevalence of psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients (n = 1293) to a control group (n = 1401) with abdominal pain or reflux. Among all patients the mean age was 48.4 years, most were female (69.5%), and 22.7% used any psychotropic medication. There was no difference between overall psychotropic medication use among celiac disease patients and controls (23.9% vs 21.8%, OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.96-1.39, p = 0.12). However, those with celiac disease were more likely to use antidepressants on univariate (16.4% vs 13.4%, p = 0.03) and multivariate analysis (OR 1.28; 95% CI 1.03-1.59; p = 0.03). Use of psychotropic medications was not associated with disease duration or mode of presentation of celiac disease. Celiac disease patients use psychotropic medications at similar rates as those with other gastrointestinal diseases, though subgroup analysis suggests they may use more antidepressants. Future studies should investigate whether celiac disease is associated with mood disorders that are not treated with medications.

  9. Live pig markets in eastern Indonesia: Trader characteristics, biosecurity and implications for disease spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Geong, Maria; Abdurrahman, Muktasam; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2016-03-01

    Classical swine fever has been negatively impacting pig production in Nusa Tenggara Timur province in eastern Indonesia since its introduction in the 1990s, with live market trade contributing to disease spread. To understand market trader knowledge and practices regarding pig management, biosecurity, pig movements and pig health (specifically CSF), a repeated survey was conducted with pig sellers and pig buyers at 9 market sites across West Timor and the islands of Flores and Sumba. A total of 292 sellers and 281 buyers were interviewed in 2009 during two periods (rounds), a high-demand month (September) and a low-demand month (November). Information was collected via questionnaire. The majority of traders were male (sellers: 89%; buyers: 87%) with the highest level of completed education being primary school (sellers: 48%; buyers: 41%). The primary occupation of most respondents was farming: 90% of sellers and 87% of buyers were smallholder pig farmers and tended to sell their own home-raised pigs at market (52%). Pigs were sold for monetary gain either for primary (52%) or extra income (44%). Markets tended to be selected based on a good reputation (62%), a location close to residence (62%) and having the desired pig type (59%). Pig sales through markets were reported to be highest from August to October with 31% of sellers trading pigs at two or more markets. Prices at market were significantly higher on Sumba compared to West Timor and cross-bred pigs were significantly more expensive than indigenous pigs. Understanding of CSF and biosecurity was limited: 85% of sellers and 83% of buyers had no prior knowledge of CSF. Fifty-four percent of sellers reported no use of any biosecurity practices at market. Most respondents (88%) were able to recognise at least one clinical sign of a sick pig. Informal pig movements were also identified: 18% of pig buyers purchased pigs directly from other farmers. This study has provided baseline information on market trader

  10. Heterozygote to homozygote related living donor liver transplantation in maple syrup urine disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N; Loveland, J; Zuckerman, M; Moshesh, P; Britz, R; Botha, J

    2015-05-01

    Liver transplantation is an accepted treatment modality in the management of MSUD. To our knowledge, ours is only the second successful case to date of a patient with MSUD receiving an allograft from an RLD who is a heterozygous carrier for the disease. In view of the worldwide shortage of available organs for transplantation, heterozygote to homozygote transplantation in the setting of MSUD may provide a viable alternative for those awaiting transplantation. We report on the case of a two-yr-old infant with MSUD, who received a left lateral segment (segments II and III) liver transplant from his mother, a heterozygote carrier of one of the three abnormal genes implicated in MSUD. Post-operative BCAA levels normalized in our patient and remained so on an unrestricted protein diet and during times of physiological stress. To date, this is only the second case of a successful RLD liver transplant in a child with MSUD. Preliminary results indicate that RLD liver transplants are at least equivalent to deceased donor liver transplants in the treatment of MSUD, although longer term follow-up is required. Heterozygote to homozygote RLD transplant in patients with MSUD presents a new pool of potential liver donors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. High prevalence of non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors amongst adults living with HIV in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pheak Chhoun

    Full Text Available With rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy for HIV, there are rising life expectancies among people living with HIV. As a result, co-morbidity from non-communicable diseases in those living and aging with HIV is increasingly being reported. Published data on this issue have been limited in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia and associated risk factors in adults living with HIV in Cambodia.This cross-sectional study was conducted in five provinces of Cambodia from May-June 2015. Information was obtained on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire, and anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed with fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl, hypertension with systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg and hypercholesterolemia with fasting blood cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to explore risk factors.The study sample included 510 adults living with HIV; 67% were female, with a mean age of 45 (standard deviation = 8 years. Of these, 8.8% had diabetes mellitus, 15.1% had hypertension and 34.7% had hypercholesterolemia. Of the total participants with non-communicable diseases (n = 244, 47.8% had one or more diseases, and 75% were not aware of their diseases prior to the study: new disease was diagnosed in 90% of diabetes mellitus, 44% of hypertension and 90% of hypercholesterolemia. Single disease occurred in 81%, dual disease in 17% and triple disease in 2%. In adjusted analyses, those consuming 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings as significantly with diabetes mellitus, those eating 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings and using lard for cooking were significantly associated with hypertension, and those being unemployed, having monthly income less than 100

  12. The spectrum of bone disease in Jordanian hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, Nidal A.; Al-Mansour, M.; Sroujieh, Ahmad S.; Wahbeh, A.; Ailabouni, W.; Hamzah, Y.; Mahafzah, W.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of mineral abnormalities and bone disease (BD) in hemodialysis patients at Jordan University Hospital (JUH), Amman, Jordan. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 patients (38 males and 25 females), mean age 44.19 years (range 17-76 years), with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on regular hemodialysis at JUH between November 2004 and April 2005. All patients have undergone complete blood count, chemistry profile, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and plain x-rays. Bone disorders were identified in 45 patients on x-rays (70%). Osteopenia was found in 43 patients (68.3%), subperiosteal resorption in 24 patients (38.3%) and metastatic calcification in 22 patients (35%). Hypocalcemia was found in 28.6% and hypercalcemia in 7.9%. All patients were taking calcium carbonate, and 55.5% of patients were on vitamin D supplements. The calcium levels in 63.5% and the phosphorus levels in 50.8% of patients were within the recommended guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Serum i-PTH level was above 300 pg/ml high turnover bone disease in 24.6% of patients, 21.3% had iPTH of 150-300 pg/ml target, and 44.3% had i-PTH levels below 100 pg/mL suggesting a dynamic bone disease. Patients with severe bone disease had a statistically significant higher iPTH levels (p<0.005). Bone disease and mineral abnormalities are common in hemodialysis patients at JUH. Earlier detection of bone disease and better overall management strategy may reduce the frequency and severity of bone disease in CKD patients in Jordan. (author)

  13. Periodontal diseases and caries experience of diabetic patients in an Arabian community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlKhateeb, T. L; AlAmoudi, N. H; Fatani, H. H; Mira, S. A; Ardawi, M. S

    1991-01-01

    A group of diabetic patients living in an Arabian community were matched by sex and age with a non-diabetic control group. Examination for periodontal status and dental caries was carried out on the matched pairs. Diabetics exhibited more gingival inflammation and increased probing depths when com pared with age-/sex-matched controls. The caries experience of diabetic patients was higher than that of normal groups. The findings of this study highlight the urgent need to develop a preventive dental program for diabetic patients so as to minimize their experience of dental disease. (author)

  14. A cell transportation solution that preserves live circulating tumor cells in patient blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L; Ershler, William B; Le, Huyen; Ho, David H

    2016-05-06

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are typically collected into CellSave fixative tubes, which kills the cells, but preserves their morphology. Currently, the clinical utility of CTCs is mostly limited to their enumeration. More detailed investigation of CTC biology can be performed on live cells, but obtaining live CTCs is technically challenging, requiring blood collection into biocompatible solutions and rapid isolation which limits transportation options. To overcome the instability of CTCs, we formulated a sugar based cell transportation solution (SBTS) that stabilizes cell viability at ambient temperature. In this study we examined the long term viability of human cancer cell lines, primary cells and CTCs in human blood samples in the SBTS for transportation purposes. Four cell lines, 5 primary human cells and purified human PBMCs were tested to determine the viability of cells stored in the transportation solution at ambient temperature for up to 7 days. We then demonstrated viability of MCF-7 cells spiked into normal blood with SBTS and stored for up to 7 days. A pilot study was then run on blood samples from 3 patients with metastatic malignancies stored with or without SBTS for 6 days. CTCs were then purified by Ficoll separation/microfilter isolation and identified using CTC markers. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue or CellTracker™ live cell stain. Our results suggest that primary/immortalized cell lines stored in SBTS remain ~90% viable for > 72 h. Further, MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood remain viable when stored with SBTS for up to 7 days. Finally, live CTCs were isolated from cancer patient blood samples kept in SBTS at ambient temperature for 6 days. No CTCs were isolated from blood samples stored without SBTS. In this proof of principle pilot study we show that viability of cell lines is preserved for days using SBTS. Further, this solution can be used to store patient derived blood samples for eventual isolation of viable CTCs after

  15. A cell transportation solution that preserves live circulating tumor cells in patient blood samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefansson, Steingrimur; Adams, Daniel L.; Ershler, William B.; Le, Huyen; Ho, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are typically collected into CellSave fixative tubes, which kills the cells, but preserves their morphology. Currently, the clinical utility of CTCs is mostly limited to their enumeration. More detailed investigation of CTC biology can be performed on live cells, but obtaining live CTCs is technically challenging, requiring blood collection into biocompatible solutions and rapid isolation which limits transportation options. To overcome the instability of CTCs, we formulated a sugar based cell transportation solution (SBTS) that stabilizes cell viability at ambient temperature. In this study we examined the long term viability of human cancer cell lines, primary cells and CTCs in human blood samples in the SBTS for transportation purposes. Four cell lines, 5 primary human cells and purified human PBMCs were tested to determine the viability of cells stored in the transportation solution at ambient temperature for up to 7 days. We then demonstrated viability of MCF-7 cells spiked into normal blood with SBTS and stored for up to 7 days. A pilot study was then run on blood samples from 3 patients with metastatic malignancies stored with or without SBTS for 6 days. CTCs were then purified by Ficoll separation/microfilter isolation and identified using CTC markers. Cell viability was assessed using trypan blue or CellTracker™ live cell stain. Our results suggest that primary/immortalized cell lines stored in SBTS remain ~90 % viable for > 72 h. Further, MCF-7 cells spiked into whole blood remain viable when stored with SBTS for up to 7 days. Finally, live CTCs were isolated from cancer patient blood samples kept in SBTS at ambient temperature for 6 days. No CTCs were isolated from blood samples stored without SBTS. In this proof of principle pilot study we show that viability of cell lines is preserved for days using SBTS. Further, this solution can be used to store patient derived blood samples for eventual isolation of viable CTCs

  16. Patients' experiences of living with and receiving treatment for fibromyalgia syndrome: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carville Serene F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS presents a challenge for patients and health care staff across many medical specialities. The aetiology is multi-dimensional, involving somatic, psychological and social factors. Patients' views were obtained to understand their experience of living with this long-term condition, using qualitative interviews. Methods 12 patients were recruited and stratified by age, gender and ethnicity from one rheumatology outpatient clinic, and a departmental held database of patients diagnosed with FMS. Results Patients' accounts of their experience of FMS resonated well with two central concepts: social identity and illness intrusiveness. These suggested three themes for the analytical framework: life before and after diagnosis (e.g. lack of information about FMS, invisibility of FMS; change in health identity (e.g. mental distress, impact on social life and perceived quality of care (e.g. lack of contact with nurses, attitudes of specialists. The information provided from one male participant did not differ from the female patients, but black and ethnic community patients expressed a degree of suspicion towards the medication prescribed, and the attitudes displayed by some doctors, a finding that has not been previously reported amongst this patient group. Patients expected more consultation time and effective treatment than they received. Subjective experiences and objective physical and emotional changes were non-overlapping. Patients' accounts revealed that their physical, mental and social health was compromised, at times overwhelming and affected their identity. Conclusion FMS is a condition that intrudes upon many aspects of patients' lives and is little understood. At the same time, it is a syndrome that evokes uneasiness in health care staff (as current diagnostic criteria are not well supported by objective markers of physiological or biochemical nature, and indeed because of doubt about the existence

  17. Prevalence and overlap of Disease Management Program diseases in older hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne; Sivertsen, Ditte Maria

    2017-01-01

    Many countries, like Denmark, have tailored Disease Management Programs (DMPs) based on patients having single chronic diseases [defined institutionally as "program diseases" (PDs)], which can complicate treatment for those with multiple chronic diseases. The aims of this study were (a) to assess...... the prevalence and overlap among acutely hospitalized older medical patients of PDs defined by the DMPs, and (b) to examine transitions between different departments during hospitalization and mortality and readmission within two time intervals among patients with the different PDs. We conducted a registry study...... of 4649 acutely hospitalized medical patients ≥65 years admitted to Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark, in 2012, and divided patients into six PD groups (type 2 diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disease, dementia and cancer), each...

  18. Exploring hope and healing in patients living with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustache, Chloe; Jibb, Emily; Grossman, Mary

    2014-09-01

    To explore the experience and meaning of hope in relation to the healing process of patients living with stage IIIb or IV non-small cell lung cancer. Interpretative qualitative study design. Peter Brojde Lung Cancer Centre in the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 12 English- and French-speaking patients, aged 36-78 years. One 60-90-minute semistructured interview per participant was conducted. An inductive approach to data analysis was taken, involving immersion in the data, coding, classifying, and creating linkages. Four main themes emerged: (a) the morass of shattered hope, (b) tentative steps toward a new hope paradigm, (c) reframing hope within the context of a life-threatening illness, and (d) strengthening the link between hope and wellness. Patients described a process where hope was diminished or lost entirely, regained, and reshaped as they learned to live and grow following their diagnosis. This study adds to the literature by describing the dynamic nature of hope as well as factors facilitating or hindering the hope process. It demonstrates how finding meaning, a structural component of healing, can be used to envision a new hopeful future. This study suggests hope and healing cannot exist in isolation, and highlights the importance of understanding the fluctuating nature of hope in patients with advanced lung cancer to foster it, therefore promoting healing.

  19. Celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases in patients with collagenous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigren, Lina; Tysk, Curt; Ström, Magnus; Kilander, Anders F; Hjortswang, Henrik; Bohr, Johan; Benoni, Cecilia; Larson, Lasse; Sjöberg, Klas

    2013-08-01

    Collagenous colitis (CC) is associated with autoimmune disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between CC and autoimmune disorders in a Swedish multicenter study. Patients with CC answered questionnaires about demographic data and disease activity. The patient's files were scrutinized for information about autoimmune diseases. A total number of 116 CC patients were included; 92 women, 24 men, median age 62 years (IQR 55-73). In total, 30.2% had one or more autoimmune disorder. Most common were celiac disease (CeD; 12.9%) and autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD, 10.3%), but they also had Sjögren's syndrome (3.4%), diabetes mellitus (1.7%) and conditions in skin and joints (6.0%). Patients with associated autoimmune disease had more often nocturnal stools. The majority of the patients with associated CeD or ATD got these diagnoses before the colitis diagnosis. Autoimmune disorders occurred in one-third of these patients, especially CeD. In classic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease is described in contrast to CC where no cases occurred. Instead, CeD was prevalent, a condition not reported in classic IBD. Patients with an associated autoimmune disease had more symptoms. Patients with CC and CeD had an earlier onset of their colitis. The majority of the patients with both CC and CeD were smokers. Associated autoimmune disease should be contemplated in the follow-up of these patients.

  20. Mental Health-Ill Health Differences in Disease Severity and Its Sociodemographic Biobehavioral Predictors Among Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezakhani Moghaddam, Hamed; Nadrian, Haidar; Abbagolizadeh, Nategh; Babazadeh, Towhid; Aghemiri, Mehran; Fathipour, Asaad

    2018-01-01

    Our aim in this cross-sectional study was to investigate mental health-ill health differences in disease severity and its sociodemographic biobehavioral predictors among patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Applying convenient sampling, 180 patients with knee OA in Tabriz, Iran, were recruited to participate in completing a three-section questionnaire (SF-12, Lequesne Algofunctional Index and Self-Management Behaviors Scale). Separate hierarchical multiple linear regressions were performed with OA severity as dependent variable: one for OA patients with positive mental health and other for OA patients with mental disorders symptoms. Among the patients with positive mental health, but not those with symptoms of mental disorder, pain management, duration of OA, physical activity management, living alone, and level of education were significant predictors of disease severity. Health care providers with a better understanding on the determinants of disease severity by mental health status may identify vulnerable patients and develop targeted interventions to foster disease management behaviors among OA patients.

  1. Patient-centered care in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der

    2015-01-01

    Patient centeredness means providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions’.The concept assumes that both physicians and patients are experts; physicians in diagnostic and

  2. Primary headaches in pediatric patients with chronic rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluduz, Derya; Tavsanli, Mustafa Emir; Uygunoğlu, Uğur; Saip, Sabahattin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur; Ozge, Aynur; Temel, Gulhan Orekici

    2014-11-01

    To assess the presence, prevalence and clinical characteristics of primary headaches in pediatric patients with chronic rheumatic diseases such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), and to analyze the common pathophysiological mechanisms. In this noncontrolled, cross-sectional study, a semi-structured 53 item headache questionnaire was administered to subjects with FMF and JIA, and interviewed a total sample size of 601 patients younger than16years of age. The questionnaires were then analyzed according to the International Headache Society's diagnostic criteria. Children with FMF (n=378) and JIA (n=223) were studied. Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to whether the subjects reported headache or not. 29.5% of subjects with FMF reported having migraine, 37.6% probable migraine and 32.9% tension type headache (TTH). In JIA group 28.2% were diagnosed with migraine; 41.2% with probable migraine and 30.6% with TTH. No significant difference was found between all subjects with (n=258) and without (n=343) headache for variables such as living in a crowded family (p=0.95), being the first child in the family (p=0.63), academic achievement of the child (p=0.63), high education level (higher than high school) of the mother (p=0.52) and father (p=0.46). The presence of systemic disease was reported not to be effecting the daily life at the time of evaluation by 90.2% of the children with headache and 91.0% of the children without headache (p=0.94). 81.4% of the children reported their headaches were not aggravating with the exacerbation periods of their systemic disease. Family history of hypertension was reported higher by the subjects with headache (13.5% with headache and 4.0% without headache p=0.001). Diabetes mellitus was also reported higher (5.8% with headache; 0.5% without headache; p=0.006). Family history of headache was reported in 28.2% of the patients with headache whereas it was 17.4% of the

  3. An Investigation into the Role of Mobile Technology in Collaborative Disease Management for Persons Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sultan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes and other chronic non-communicable diseases represent a leading threat to health care and human development. The authors discusses how mobile technology can achieve collaborative disease management (CDM within a population living with Type 2 diabetes. We introduces a framework for CDM using mobile technologies. While it can be applied to the management of any disease, we describe a specific instance for diabetes peer-support. In this paper, we validate the framework through the development and testing of a Mobile Health initiative called Mobile Diabetes Self-Management Support (DSMS. It allows persons living with diabetes to learn from each others’ experiences through a virtual support group. The paper presents two user studies conducted. The first study captured the participants’ initial perceptions of the application in a controlled environment and the second study investigated system usage and collaboration when the application was used in their personal settings.

  4. Localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy (LIVE) for surgical guidance in 16 skull base patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerle, Stephan K; Daly, Michael J; Chan, Harley; Vescan, Allan; Witterick, Ian; Gentili, Fred; Zadeh, Gelareh; Kucharczyk, Walter; Irish, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Previous preclinical studies of localized intraoperative virtual endoscopy-image-guided surgery (LIVE-IGS) for skull base surgery suggest a potential clinical benefit. The first aim was to evaluate the registration accuracy of virtual endoscopy based on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging under clinical conditions. The second aim was to implement and assess real-time proximity alerts for critical structures during skull base drilling. Patients consecutively referred for sinus and skull base surgery were enrolled in this prospective case series. Five patients were used to check registration accuracy and feasibility with the subsequent 11 patients being treated under LIVE-IGS conditions with presentation to the operating surgeon (phase 2). Sixteen skull base patients were endoscopically operated on by using image-based navigation while LIVE-IGS was tested in a clinical setting. Workload was quantitatively assessed using the validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire. Real-time localization of the surgical drill was accurate to ~1 to 2 mm in all cases. The use of 3-mm proximity alert zones around the carotid arteries and optic nerve found regular clinical use, as the median minimum distance between the tracked drill and these structures was 1 mm (0.2-3.1 mm) and 0.6 mm (0.2-2.5 mm), respectively. No statistical differences were found in the NASA-TLX indicators for this experienced surgical cohort. Real-time proximity alerts with virtual endoscopic guidance was sufficiently accurate under clinical conditions. Further clinical evaluation is required to evaluate the potential surgical benefits, particularly for less experienced surgeons or for teaching purposes. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  5. Interprofessional Education Perceptions of Dental Assisting and Radiologic Technology Students Following a Live Patient Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddington, Amanda R; Egli, Amy J; Schmuck, Heather M

    2018-05-01

    Health professions students are often unaware of other health care providers' roles or professional expertise due to most education taking place within their single profession. This pattern may be even more prevalent for baccalaureate and associate degree programs since most interprofessional education (IPE) occurs in predoctoral programs and, when IPE is incorporated into allied health professions education, it often utilizes simulation instead of live patient experiences. The aim of this study was to determine if radiologic technology and dental assisting students' perceptions changed regarding interprofessional practice and teamwork after an IPE activity with actual patients. The participants were students in the University of Southern Indiana (USI) radiologic technology and dental assisting programs. This mixed-methods pilot study conducted in 2017 collected quantitative and qualitative data from pre and post surveys, the researchers' observations of student interactions during live patient assessment and acquisition of panoramic images, and large-group discussion. Twenty-five of the 26 students who participated in the IPE program completed both pre and post surveys, for a 96% response rate. The results showed significant differences in the participants' perceptions from the pre to post surveys on a wide variety of survey items. Most notable were the positive changes in perceptions related to trust in judgment of others within their profession (p=0.001), relationships with other professions (p=0.002), and thinking highly of other professions (p=0.002). Overall, this study found that incorporating the IPE activity with a live patient into these radiologic technology and dental assisting programs improved the students' perceptions of other allied health professionals. Future research should include more participants to increase sample size and add quantitative data collection.

  6. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  7. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung; Yoo, Jae-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid.

  8. Profiles of recreational activities of daily living (RADL) in patients with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael; Gehrke, G; Geiselmann, B

    2009-12-01

    Activities of daily living, play a key role in the measurement of functional health as defined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and in prevention and treatment of mental or somatic illnesses. From a clinical context it is important to discriminate between basic "activities of daily living, ADL", "intentional activities of daily living, IADL", and "recreational activities of daily living, RADL". While ADL and IADL have gained much attention in dementia, the elderly, or severe somatic illnesses, there is a lack of research on RADL, which are important in depression, anxiety, or other neurotic disorders. 154 unselected inpatients of a department of behavioral and psychosomatic medicine filled in the "Check List of Recreational Activities" to assess the rates and profiles of RADL. Patients reported on average 19.3 (s.d. 7.0) activities (range 4 - 40), i.e. males 21.3 (s.d. 6.5, 9 - 34) and females 18.9 (s.d. 7.1, 4 - 40). Most frequent RADL were passive and unspecific activities like "watching tv" (93.4%). Least frequent were activities which need special skills or preparation like "horse back riding" (0.7%). Low rates were also found for activities which are in the centre of inpatient occupational therapy like "ceramics" (4.7%) or "silk-painting" (2.6%). There are differences between sexes but not in respect to age (18 to 60), sick leave and unemployment, or diagnostic status. When patients were asked what they would like to do in the future, the same activity profile emerged as when looking at what they had done in the last month The data give a reference profile for recreational activities, help to define what can be considered a normal frequency and spectrum of RADL, and, by this, can guide therapeutic interventions.

  9. "It's Not Me, It's Not Really Me." Insights From Patients on Living With Systemic Sclerosis: An Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpton, Daniel; Thakkar, Vivek; O'Neill, Sean; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Craig, Jonathan C; Tong, Allison

    2017-11-01

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) experience severe physical limitations and psychological morbidity, but their lived experience remains underrepresented and is reflected in the scarcity of evidence-based patient-centered interventions. We aimed to describe patients' perspectives of SSc to inform strategies to improve their care. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with 30 adult patients with limited cutaneous or diffuse cutaneous SSc in Australia. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using HyperRESEARCH software. Six themes were identified: bodily malfunction (restrictive pain, debilitating physical changes, pervasive exhaustion), deprivation of social function (loss of work and career, social isolation, threat to traditional roles, loss of intimacy), disintegration of identity (stigmatizing physical changes, disassociated self-image, extinguished hopes, alone and powerless, invisibility of illness), insecurity of care (unrecognized disease, ambiguity around diagnosis and cause, information insufficiency, resigning to treatment limitations, seeking reassurance, fear of progression), avoiding the sick role (evading thoughts of sickness, protecting family, favorable comparison), and perseverance and hope (positive stoicism, optimism about treatment and monitoring, taking control of own health, pursuing alternative treatments, transcending illness through support). SSc inflicts major bodily and social restrictions that crush patients' identity and self-image. Uncertainties about the cause, diagnosis, and prognosis can undermine confidence in care, leading to anxiety and therapeutic nihilism. Access to psychosocial care to support the patients' role and functioning capacity, as well as communication and education that explicitly address their concerns regarding management may potentially improve treatment satisfaction, self-efficacy, adherence, and outcomes in patients with SSc. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Predictors of patient dependence in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benke, Thomas; Sanin, Günter; Lechner, Anita; Dal-Bianco, Peter; Ransmayr, Gerhard; Uranüs, Margarete; Marksteiner, Josef; Gaudig, Maren; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    Patient dependence has rarely been studied in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). To identify factors which predict patient dependence in mild-to-moderate AD. We studied 398 non-institutionalized AD patients (234 females) of the ongoing Prospective Registry on Dementia (PRODEM) in Austria. The Dependence Scale (DS) was used to assess patient dependence. Patient assessment comprised functional abilities, neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive functions. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify predictors of patient dependence. AD patients were mildly-to-moderately impaired (mean scores and SDs were: CDR 0.84 ± 0.43; DAD 74.4 ± 23.3, MMSE = 22.5 ± 3.6). Psychopathology and caregiver burden were in the low range (mean NPI score 13.2, range 0 to 98; mean ZBI score 18, range 0-64). Seventy five percent of patients were classified as having a mild level of patient dependence (DS sum score 0 to 6). Patient dependence correlated significantly and positively with age, functional measures, psychopathology and depression, disease duration, and caregiver burden. Significant negative, but low correlations were found between patient dependence, cognitive variables, and global cognition. Activities of daily living, patient age, and disease severity accounted for 63% of variance in patient dependence, whereas cognitive variables accounted for only 11%. Dependence in this cohort was mainly related to age and functional impairment, and less so to cognitive and neuropsychiatric variables. This differs from studies investigating patients in more advanced disease stages which found abnormal behavior and impairments of cognition as main predictors of patient dependence.

  11. Report of 3 Patients With Urea Cycle Defects Treated With Related Living-Donor Liver Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özçay, Figen; Barış, Zeren; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Nihan; Torgay, Adnan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Urea cycle defects are a group of metabolic disorders caused by enzymatic disruption of the urea cycle pathway, transforming nitrogen to urea for excretion from the body. Severe cases present in early infancy with life-threatening metabolic decompensation, and these episodes of hyperammonemia can be fatal or result in permanent neurologic damage. Despite the progress in pharmacologic treatment, long-term survival is poor especially for severe cases. Liver transplant is an alternative treatment option, providing sufficient enzymatic activity and decreasing the risk of metabolic decompensation. Three patients with urea cycle defects received related living-donor liver transplants at our hospital. Patients presented with late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, argininosuccinate lyase deficiency, and citrullinemia. Maximum pretransplant ammonia levels were between 232 and 400 μmol/L (normal range is 18-72 μmol/L), and maximum posttransplant values were 52 to 94 μmol/L. All patients stopped medical treatment and dietary protein restriction for urea cycle defects after transplant. The patient with late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency already had motor deficits related to recurrent hyperammonemia attacks pretransplant. A major improvement could not be achieved, and he is wheelchair dependent at the age of 6 years. The other 2 patients had normal motor and mental skills before transplant, which have continued 12 and 14 months after transplant. Hepatic artery thrombosis in the patient with the ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, intraabdominal infection in the patient with argininosuccinate lyase deficiency, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the patient with citrullinemia were early postoperative complications. Histopathologic changes in livers explanted from patients with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and citrullinemia were nonspecific. The argininosuccinate lyase-deficient patient had portoportal fibrosis and cirrhotic

  12. Ability to perform Actvities of Daily Living among patients with bipolar disorder in remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Lone; Träger, Conny; Miskowiak, Kamilla

    2017-01-01

    in the community. While participants reported decreased ADL ability, especially within instrumental ADL, they had a tendency towards evaluating themselves as more competent than what was observed. No relationships between measures of observed and self-reported ADL ability were found. Conclusion: Overall, patients......ABSTRACT Aims: Patients with bipolar disorder often experience disability in terms of cognitive impairments and activity limitations even in remission. However, knowledge is sparse concerning the ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL) during remission. The aim of this study was to (1......) investigate the observed and self-reported ability to perform ADL tasks and (2) examine the association between observed and self-reported ability to perform ADL in patients with bipolar disorder in remission. Methods: The observed ADL ability was assessed with the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills...

  13. Quality of life in Alzheimer disease: a comparison of patients' and caregivers' points of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucchella, Chiara; Bartolo, Michelangelo; Bernini, Sara; Picascia, Marta; Sinforiani, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Unlike in other chronic diseases, the Quality of Life (QoL) of patients affected by Alzheimer Disease (AD) has not been well established, primarily because of the difficulties stemming from the study of patients with cognitive disorders. Because no cure is currently available for AD, the optimization of QoL represents the best possible outcome attainable in all stages of disease, making QoL assessment mandatory. This study identified variables related to patients' QoL and examined the agreement between patients' and caregivers' QoL ratings. A total of 135 dyads (patient and principal caregiver) were enrolled in the study. Patients' QoL evaluations showed a negative relationship with depressive mood and a positive relationship with Activities of Daily Living (ADL), whereas caregivers' QoL ratings showed a negative relationship with patients' depressive mood and behavioral disturbances. Caregivers tended to underestimate patients' QoL compared with the patients' own self-evaluations, with patients' dependency in performing ADL and behavioral disorders as well as caregivers' burdens and depression being the main factors associated with the discrepancy in these evaluations. These findings suggest that the use of proxies as a substitute for the self-report of QoL data should be treated with caution, always accounting for the presence of potential bias.

  14. Urinary Exertion Of Calcium By Urinary Stone Disease Patients And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To compare the urinary excretion of calcium by subjects in a known area of high incidence of urinary stone disease, and a known area of low incidence, 12 adult male patients with idiopathic calcigerous urinary stone disease in south-East Nigeria and 55 similar patients from Scotland, United Kingdom were analyzed ...

  15. Profile of Ear Diseases among Elderly Patients in Sagamu, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of screening for hearing impairment in the elderly patients was also stressed. KEYWORDS: Cerumen, Ear disease, Elderly, Otitis, Presbycusis. Erratum Note: Olusola AS on the article “Profile of Ear Diseases among Elderly Patients in Sagamu, South-Western Nigeria” on Page Nig. J. Med 2013. 143-147.

  16. Lived experience of the intensive care unit for patients who experienced delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehorne, Karen; Gaudine, Alice; Meadus, Robert; Solberg, Shirley

    2015-11-01

    Delirium is a common occurrence for patients in the intensive care unit and can have a profound and lasting impact on them. Few studies describe the experience of intensive care patients who have had delirium. To understand the lived experience of intensive care for critically ill patients who experienced delirium. The study participants consisted of 7 men and 3 women, 46 to 70 years old, who had delirium according to the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. The van Manen method of hermeneutic phenomenology was used, and data collection entailed audio recorded semistructured interviews. Four themes were detected: "I can't remember," "Wanting to make a connection," "Trying to get it straight," and "Fear and safety concerns." Nurses working in intensive care units need to assess patients for delirium, assess the mental status of patients who have delirium, and help patients and patients' families learn about and deal with the psychological effects of the intensive care unit experience. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal diseases in patients with severe liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZANG Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs are an important factor affecting the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases, and their early diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. The four most commonly seen IFDs are candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and pneumocystis pneumonia. We should pay attention to the risk of developing IFDs in patients with severe liver diseases during clinical management. Particularly, early diagnosis and proper treatment of IFDs are important in high-risk patients. These are vital to improving the prognosis of patients with severe liver diseases.

  18. Proportion of patients in the Uganda rheumatic heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proportion of patients in the Uganda rheumatic heart disease registry with advanced ... of Cardiology guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. ... disease that require surgical treatment yet they cannot access this therapy due to ... By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read Titles This Journal is Open Access.

  19. Factors associated with gastro-duodenal disease in patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a high prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease in sub Saharan Africa. Peptic ulcer disease in dyspeptic patients, 24.5%, was comparable to prevalence of gastro-duodenal disease among symptomatic individuals in developed countries (12 – 25%). Limited data exists regarding its associated risk ...

  20. Neighbourhood immigration, health care utilization and outcomes in patients with diabetes living in the Montreal metropolitan area (Canada): a population health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanasse, Alain; Courteau, Josiane; Orzanco, Maria Gabriela; Bergeron, Patrick; Cohen, Alan A; Niyonsenga, Théophile

    2015-04-09

    Understanding health care utilization by neighbourhood is essential for optimal allocation of resources, but links between neighbourhood immigration and health have rarely been explored. Our objective was to understand how immigrant composition of neighbourhoods relates to health outcomes and health care utilization of individuals living with diabetes. This is a secondary analysis of administrative data using a retrospective cohort of 111,556 patients living with diabetes without previous cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and living in the metropolitan region of Montreal (Canada). A score for immigration was calculated at the neighbourhood level using a principal component analysis with six neighbourhood-level variables (% of people with maternal language other than French or English, % of people who do not speak French or English, % of immigrants with different times since immigration (immigration scores, those living in neighbourhoods with high immigration scores were less likely to die, to suffer a CVD event, to frequently visit general practitioners, but more likely to visit emergency departments or a specialist and to use an antidiabetic drug. These differences remained after controlling for patient-level variables such as age, sex, and comorbidities, as well as for neighbourhood attributes like material and social deprivation or living in the urban core. In this study, patients with diabetes living in neighbourhoods with high immigration scores had different health outcomes and health care utilizations compared to those living in neighbourhoods with low immigration scores. Although we cannot disentangle the individual versus the area-based effect of immigration, these results may have an important impact for health care planning.

  1. Use of in-patient hospital beds by people living in residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, P; Wundke, R; Whitehead, C; Williamson, L; Baggoley, C

    2000-01-01

    There is concern that people living in residential care in Australia make significant and often inappropriate use of acute in-patient hospital services. To date, no factual information has been collected in Australia and its absence may allow myths and negative stereotypes to proliferate. To determine how and why people living in residential care in Australia use in-patient hospital beds. To determine the outcome of hospitalisation and functional status at 3 months following discharge. Prospective study of 184 consecutive admissions to hospital following Emergency Department (ED) attendance involving people aged over 65 years and living in residential care in southern Adelaide, South Australia. Information was obtained from the facilities' transfer letters, and where these were inadequate or absent, telephone interviews were held with residential care staff. 153 people accounted for the 184 admissions. They had a mean age of 84 years and 69% were female. 61% came from hostels and 35% from nursing homes. They had a wide range of clinical problems and twice as many were admitted to medical than to surgical units. Their mean length of hospital stay was 7.9 days, 2.3 days higher than for non-same-day patients and was higher for hostel than for nursing home residents. All but two admissions were considered unavoidable though the provision of specialised care within residential care could have prevented a further 19 (10%) admissions. 96% of admissions resulted in survival to leave hospital and in 74%, people returned directly to their place of origin. At 3 months follow-up, a further 20% of the group had died while 5% were in hospital. In all, 14% of the original group were in a different long-term care facility while 56% were living at their former residence. People living in residential care are often hospitalised because of acute illness. In the vast majority of cases hospitalisation is both appropriate and unavoidable. Most did not require prolonged hospitalisation

  2. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  3. Patient-reported disease knowledge and educational needs in Lynch syndrome: findings of an interactive multidisciplinary patient conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Sarah A; Mork, Maureen; Vilar, Eduardo; Peterson, Susan K; Lu, Karen; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; You, Yiqian Nancy

    2014-02-05

    Patients with Lynch Syndrome, the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, benefit from genetic education and family counseling regarding diagnostic testing and cancer surveillance/prevention recommendations. Although genetic counseling is currently the most common venue where such education and counseling takes place, little is known about the level of disease knowledge and education needs as directly reported by patients and families with Lynch Syndrome. Furthermore, experiences with forums for larger-scale knowledge transfer have been limited in the current literature. We conducted a one-day interactive multidisciplinary patient conference, designed to complement individual genetic counseling for updating disease knowledge, supportive networking and needs assessment among Lynch Syndrome patients and their family members. The patient conference was designed utilizing the conceptual framework of action research. Paired pre- and post-conference surveys were administered to 44 conference participants anonymously to assess patient-reported disease knowledge and education needs. A multidisciplinary team of expert providers utilized a variety of educational formats during the one-day conference. Four main focus areas were: genetic testing, surveillance/prevention, living with Lynch Syndrome, and update on research. Thirty-two participants (73%) completed the pre-conference, and 28 (64%) participants completed the post-conference surveys. Nineteen respondents were affected and the remaining were unaffected. The scores of the disease-knowledge items significantly increased from 84% pre- to 92% post-conference (p = 0.012). Patients reported a high level of satisfaction and identified further knowledge needs in nutrition (71%), surveillance/prevention options (71%), support groups (36%), cancer risk assessment (32%), active role in medical care (32%), and research opportunities (5%). Our experience with a dedicated patient education conference focused on

  4. Tradução, adaptação cultural e análise das propriedades psicométricas do Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ para avaliação funcional de pacientes com a doença de Alzheimer Translation, cultural adaptation and psychometric analysis of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ for functional assessment of patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME Medeiros

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Realizar a tradução e a adaptação transcultural de um instrumento de medida do desempenho das atividades de vida diária de pacientes com a doença de Alzheimer e analisar as suas propriedades psicométricas. MÉTODOS: A amostra foi composta por 60 pacientes e os respectivos 60 cuidadores. A pesquisa ocorreu com a tradução do instrumento pela técnica de retrotradução associada ao método bilíngue. A versão traduzida foi respondida pelo cuidador e o Mini Exame do Estado Mental (MEEM aplicado ao paciente. A análise psicométrica foi realizada por meio da validade das medidas do instrumento. RESULTADOS: Os resultados verificaram uma correlação inversamente significativa (-0,793 ao nível de 5% entre os instrumentos, com uma explicação da variância total de 62%. As matrizes de correlação interitens demonstraram que alguns itens se correlacionam com as medidas globais de capacidade funcional de forma pouco positiva e significante. A correlação realizada entre os itens do instrumento traduzido com o MEEM permitiu testar a coerência interna do instrumento com um já validado. As variáveis correlacionadas significativamente com o MEEM foram selecionadas, sugerindo um instrumento mais condensado. Por meio do teste t para amostras correlacionadas, as médias do ADLQ-versão traduzida e versão condensada não diferem estatisticamente ao nível de 5% de significância, de forma que a simplificação do instrumento não alterou a média do nível de dependência funcional. A análise fatorial realizada pela rotação Varimax indicou seis dimensões. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo disponibiliza uma nova ferramenta de avaliação funcional, visando contribuir para a mensuração mais cuidadosa do estado funcional do paciente por todos os profissionais da área da saúde.OBJECTIVES: To translate and cross-culturally adapt an instrument that measures the performance of Alzheimer's patients in their activities of daily living and to

  5. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  6. The Language of Coping: Understanding Filipino Geriatric Patients' Hemodialysis Lived Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Chy, Mark Anthony S.; Concepcion, April Faye P.; Conferido, Alvin John C.; Coretico, Kristine I.

    2009-01-01

    The majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Hemodialysis is a process of removing metabolic waste, other poisons, and excess fluids from the blood and replacing essential blood constituents through a dialysis machine. With hemodialysis causing stress not only to physical status but also to…

  7. The art of treating Parkinson disease in the older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel Kam Yin

    2003-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that increases sharply after the sixth decade. There are many disorders in the elderly that exhibit some parkinsonian signs that can be confused with PD. This article discusses the diagnostic and management issues of PD in the elderly patient. Levo-dopa (L-dopa) therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for PD in the elderly. After 5-8 years of treatment, monitor complications such as fluctuations and dyskinesia usually occur and adjunct therapy may be required. Dopamine agonists can be used to smooth out motor fluctuations and amantadine is sometimes useful for dyskinesia. However, the adverse drug effects of adjunct therapy in the elderly are more common than with L-dopa alone, and risks need to be weighed up against benefits. Nonmotor complications including dementia, psychosis, depression, autonomic dysfunction and somnolence are common and require special attention. Late stage problems such as aspiration, difficulties with activities of daily living or recurrent falls require a multidisciplinary approach. Anticholinergic drugs such as benztropine and benzhexol are best avoided because of the high risk of major side effects.

  8. Characterization of Burning Mouth Syndrome in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenfant, David; Rompré, Pierre H; Rei, Nathalie; Jodoin, Nicolas; Soland, Valerie Lynn; Rey, Veronica; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Rascol, Olivier; Blanchet, Pierre J

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and characteristics of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in a Parkinson's disease (PD) population through a self-administered, custom-made survey. A total of 218 surveys were collected during regular outpatient visits at two Movement Disorders Clinics in Montreal (Canada) and Toulouse (France) to gather information about pain experience, PD-related symptoms, and oral and general health. A neurologist confirmed the diagnosis of PD, drug treatment, Hoehn-Yahr stage, and Schwab & England Activity of Daily Living score. Data between groups were compared using the independent samples Mann-Whitney U test and two-sided exact Fisher test. Data from 203 surveys were analyzed. BMS was reported by eight subjects (seven females and one male), resulting in a prevalence of 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.1-7.8). Five participants with chronic nonburning oral pain were excluded. PD severity and levodopa equivalent daily dose did not differ between non-BMS and BMS participants. Mean poor oral health index was higher in BMS compared to non-BMS subjects (49.0 vs 32.2 points, P syndrome. This survey yielded a low prevalence of BMS in PD patients, indicating no strong link between the two conditions. An augmenting effect such as that resulting from drug treatment in restless legs syndrome or sensory neuropathy cannot be excluded.

  9. Quality of life for patients living with ostomies: influence of contact with an ostomy nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovitch, Sharon A; Sharp, Robbie; Harduar-Morano, Laurel

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether or not contact with a WOC nurse improves quality of life for ostomy patients. Home health care agencies, hospitals, and a durable medical equipment company in northern Florida were contacted to participate in the study. The role of the participating facilities was to address the provided envelopes and mail the patient survey packet (introductory letter, Ostomy Quality of Life Questionnaire [OQLQ], and demographic survey) directly to the patient. The mean age or respondents was 62 years, and the mean time of living with an ostomy was 10 years. Ninety-six percent of the sample participants did not attend support groups, yet nearly 50% reported receiving education following discharge home. Analysis of OQLQ scores revealed statistically significant differences based on who the respondent lived with, the number of comorbidities, how the respondent received supplies, and the type of appliance worn. There was no significant difference between respondents who saw an ostomy nurse and those who did not among the various sections of the OQLQ, even though 83% indicated seeing an ostomy nurse. Body image was a concern to respondents. The data demonstrated that most participants maintained satisfactory quality of life despite the presence of an ostomy. Individuals who were working part-time had a better health-related quality of life than those who worked full-time. More than 50% of our study sample participants reported satisfaction with the healthcare services they received, regardless of whether services were provided by a WOC or a nonspecialist nurse.

  10. Urgent Living-Donor Liver Transplantation in a Patient With Concurrent Active Tuberculosis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, B-H; Park, J-I; Lee, S-G

    2018-04-01

    Although active tuberculosis (TB) is considered a contraindication for liver transplantation (LT), this is the only treatment in patients with liver failure and concurrent active TB. We report a case with successful urgent living-donor LT for irreversible liver failure in the presence of active TB. A 48-year-old man, with a history of decompensated alcoholic liver cirrhosis, was presented with stupor. At admission, his consciousness had deteriorated to semi-coma, and his renal function also rapidly deteriorated to hepatorenal syndrome. A preoperative computed tomography scan of the chest revealed several small cavitary lesions in both upper lobes, and acid-fast bacillus stain from his sputum was graded 2+. Adenosine deaminase levels from ascites were elevated, suggesting TB peritonitis. A first-line anti-TB drug regimen was started immediately (rifampin, isoniazid, levofloxacin, and amikacin). An urgent living-donor LT was performed 2 days later. After LT, the regimen was changed to second-line anti-TB drugs (amikacin, levofloxacin, cycloserine, and pyridoxine). The sputum acid-fast bacillus stain tested negative on postoperative day 10. His liver function remained well preserved, even after the reversion to first-line anti-TB treatment. The patient recovered without any anti-TB medication-related complications and was discharged. LT can be prudently performed as a life-saving option, particularly for patients with liver failure and concurrent active TB. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Epiretinal membrane removal in patients with Stargardt disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Bhende

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiretinal membranes (ERMs in Stargardt disease have been known to undergo spontaneous separation in children. Results of surgical intervention in adult patients with Stargardt disease have rarely been reported. A retrospective review of results of surgical intervention for ERM causing visual impairment in two adult patients of Stargardt disease was carried out. Both patients developed ERM in one eye during their follow-up period with the resultant drop in their preexisting visual acuity. Postsurgery, restoration of foveal contour with some improvement in visual acuity was observed in both patients. No adverse effect of surgery was noted.

  12. Naphthalene-based fluorescent probes for glutathione and their applications in living cells and patients with sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Kwon, Younghee; Chung, Kyung Soo; Lim, Chang Su; Lee, Dayoung; Yue, Yongkang; Yoon, Jisoo; Kim, Gyoungmi; Nam, Sang-Jip; Chung, Youn Wook; Kim, Hwan Myung; Yin, Caixia; Ryu, Ji-Hwan; Yoon, Juyoung

    2018-01-01

    Rationale: Among the biothiols-related diseases, sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection and can result in severe oxidative stress and damage to multiple organs. In this study, we aimed to develop a fluorescence chemosensor that can both detect GSH and further predict sepsis. Methods: In this study, two new naphthalene dialdehyde compounds containing different functional groups were synthesized, and the sensing abilities of these compounds towards biothiols and its applications for prediction of sepsis were investigated. Results: Our study revealed that the newly developed probe 6-methoxynaphthalene-2, 3-dicarbaldehyde (MNDA) has two-photon is capable of detecting GSH in live cells with two-photon microscopy (TPM) under the excitation at a wavelength of 900 nm. Furthermore, two GSH detection probes naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and 6-fluoronaphthalene-2,3-dicarbaldehyde (FNDA) not only can detect GSH in living cells, but also showed clinical significance for the diagnosis and prediction of mortality in patients with sepsis. Conclusions: These results open up a promising direction for further medical diagnostic techniques. PMID:29507630

  13. Celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mıhçı, Ercan; Nur, Banu Güzel; Berker-Karaüzüm, Sibel; Yılmaz, Aygen; Artan, Reha

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder characterized by intolerance to the dietary grain protein gluten. An increased prevalence of celiac disease has been reported in Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, but there has been only few previous reports with respect to the association of celiac disease in Williams-Beuren syndrome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of celiac disease in our 24 Williams-Beuren syndrome patients. Gastrointestinal problems and celiac disease symptoms of patients were noted. All patients were analyzed by the titer of tissue transglutaminases IgA and IgG. HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy was performed to the patients with positive serology. We also performed gluten free diet in the presence of compatible symptoms, serology, HLA genotyping and intestinal biopsy. In our study, two patients had positive tTG antibodies, but only one had positive biopsy finding for celiac disease. The frequency of celiac disease in patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome was estimated as 1/24 (4.1%). Though the number of participants in this study was limited, the results show that the frequency of celiac disease is higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome compared to the general population. We suggest that a high suspicion and testing for celiac disease should be recommended at certain intervals in all cases with Williams-Beuren syndrome to detect the cause of growth retardation and gastrointestinal problems.

  14. Parkinson's Disease Videos

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... live well with Parkinson's disease. Learn More Expert Care Patient Centered Care Centers of Excellence Bringing Care to You Expert Care Programs Professional Education Expert ...

  15. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...

  16. Gas Bubble Disease in the Brain of a Living California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bonn, William; Dennison, Sophie; Cook, Peter; Fahlman, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A yearling California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) was admitted into rehabilitation with signs of cerebellar pathology. Diagnostic imaging that included radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated space-occupying lesions predominantly in the cerebellum that were filled partially by CSF-like fluid and partially by gas, and cerebral lesions that were fluid filled. Over a maximum period of 4 months, the brain lesions reduced in size and the gas resorbed and was replaced by CSF-like fluid. In humans, the cerebellum is known to be essential for automating practiced movement patterns (e.g., learning to touch-type), also known as procedural learning or the consolidation of "motor memory." To test the animal in this study for motor memory deficits, an alternation task in a two-choice maze was utilized. The sea lion performed poorly similar to another case of pneumocerebellum previously reported, and contrary to data acquired from a group of sea lions with specific hippocampal injury. The learning deficits were attributed to the cerebellar injury. These data provide important insight both to the clinical presentation and behavioral observations of cerebellar injury in sea lions, as well as providing an initial model for long-term outcome following cerebellar injury. The specific etiology of the gas could not be determined. The live status of the patient with recovery suggests that the most likely etiologies for the gas are either de novo formation or air emboli secondary to trauma. A small air gun pellet was present within and was removed from soft tissues adjacent to the tympanic bulla. While no evidence to support the pellet striking bone was found, altered dive pattern associated with this human interaction may have provided the opportunity for gas bubble formation to occur. The similarity in distribution of the gas bubble related lesions in this case compared with another previously published case of pneumocerebellum suggests that preferential

  17. Gas bubble disease in the brain of a living California sea lion (Zalophus californianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William George Van Bonn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A yearling California sea lion (Zalophus californianus was admitted into rehabilitation with signs of cerebellar pathology. Diagnostic imaging that included radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated space-occupying lesions predominantly in the cerebellum that were filled partially by CSF-like fluid and partially by gas, and cerebral lesions that were fluid filled. Over a maximum period of four months, the brain lesions reduced in size and the gas resorbed and was replaced by CSF-like fluid. To test the animal in this study for motor memory deficits, an alternation task in a two-choice maze was utilized. The sea lion performed poorly similar to another case of pneumocerebellum previously reported, and contrary to data acquired from a group of sea lions with specific hippocampal injury. The learning deficits were attributed to the cerebellar injury. These data provide important insight both to the clinical presentation and behavioral observations of cerebellar injury in sea lions, as well as providing an initial model for long-term outcome following cerebellar injury. The specific etiology of the gas could not be determined. The live status of the patient with recovery suggests that the most likely etiologies for the gas are either de novo formation or air emboli secondary to trauma. A small air gun pellet was present within and was removed from soft tissues adjacent to the tympanic bulla. While no evidence to support the pellet striking bone was found, altered dive pattern associated with this human interaction may have provided the opportunity for gas bubble formation to occur. The similarity in distribution of the gas bubble related lesions in this case compared with another previously published case of pneumocerebellum suggests that preferential perfusion of the brain, and more specifically the cerebellum, may occur during diving events.

  18. [The older patient with malignant diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buske, C; Hiddemann, W

    2007-11-01

    Most malignancies show a steep increase of incidence with growing age. Because of this age specific incidence and the general aging of the population in western industrial countries the number of elderly cancer patients continuously and rapidly increases. Despite this development elderly cancer patients are currently underrepresented in clinical trials. This is caused in part by the lack of a common definition of the elderly patient and by the fact that a part of the elderly patients suffers from co-morbidities, not allowing a more dose intense treatment in these patients. It is one of the key current challenges to compensate this deficit and to develop therapeutic concepts specifically for the elderly patients, taking the individual somatic, but also social situation and finally the quality and perspective of life of the elderly patient into account.

  19. Pet ownership may attenuate loneliness among older adult primary care patients who live alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Conwell, Yeates; Bowen, Connie; Van Orden, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Older adults who report feelings of loneliness are at increased risk for a range of negative physical and mental health outcomes, including early mortality. Identifying potential sources of social connectedness, such as pet ownership, could add to the understanding of how to promote health and well-being in older adults. The aim of this study is to describe the association of pet ownership and loneliness. The current study utilizes cross-sectional survey data from a sample (N = 830) of older adult primary care patients (age ≥ 60 years). Pet owners were 36% less likely than non-pet owners to report loneliness, in a model controlling for age, living status (i.e., alone vs. not alone), happy mood, and seasonal residency (adjOR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.41-0.98, p pet ownership and living status (b = -1.60, p pet was associated with the greatest odds of reporting feelings of loneliness. The findings suggest that pet ownership may confer benefits for well-being, including attenuating feelings of loneliness and its related sequelae, among older adults who live alone.

  20. How does an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) affect the lives of patients and their families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Marion; Jones, Tina

    2002-06-01

    This study aimed to identify the lived experience of patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and their families. The methodology used was interpretative phenomenology. Unstructured interviews were conducted with three family members and three ICD recipients. Using a methodological approach outlined by van Manen, the participants transcribed texts were analysed looking for similar concepts and ideas that developed into themes that explicated the meaning of this phenomena. The themes that emerged were: dependence, which encompassed their perceptions about the life-saving device; the memory of their first defibrillation experience; lifestyle changes, which incorporated modification techniques; lack of control, which highlighted feelings such as fear, anxiety and powerlessness; mind game, which illustrated psychological challenges; and the issue of security, demonstrating how 'being there' and not 'being there' impacted on their everyday lives. The long-term outcomes of living with an ICD are important considerations for all health-care providers. This research highlights the everyday activities of recipients, the lifestyle changes they have made, the emotional significance of the device and the psychological coping strategies that the participants have adopted. The findings of this research will allow health-care professionals to be better prepared to provide education and support for ICD recipients and their families in regards to issues related to insertion of the device during the postinsertion recovery period and for long-term management after hospital discharge.

  1. Brazilian Dental Students' Attitudes About Provision of Care for Patients Living in Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Beatriz Ferraz; Madathil, Sreenath; Zuanon, Angela Cristina Cilense; Bedos, Christophe; Nicolau, Belinda

    2017-11-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate dental students' attitudes toward people living in poverty and the extent to which their perceptions were associated with their willingness to treat those patients in their future practice. All 910 dental students enrolled in three Brazilian public universities in 2010 were invited to take part in a cross-sectional survey. A total of 766 students (83.7% response rate) completed the self-administered questionnaire on their perceptions of and attitudes about poverty and their intention to provide dental care to poor people. The responding students showed slightly positive attitudes about people living in poverty; however, a high percentage (35%) reported thinking they were different from the rest of the population. Nevertheless, most of these students expressed willingness to provide care to underserved populations in their future practice; this willingness was found to be associated with their beliefs about poverty (OR 1.65; 95% CI=1.41-1.94). Overall, the study found that these dental students had altruistic views toward people living in poverty. However, they seemed to lack a deep understanding of poverty that may prevent them from acting on their good intentions.

  2. Treatment of patients with minimal stage IIIA Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powlis, W.D.; Mauch, P.; Goffman, T.; Goodman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment recommendations for patients with upper abdominal Stage IIIA Hodgkin's (III1A) disease have varied widely. The current study reports on a combined institutional retrospective review of 85 patients with surgically staged III1A Hodgkin's disease. Twenty-two patients received combined modality therapy (CMT), 36 patients were treated initially with total nodal irradiation (TNI), and 27 with mantle and para-aortic radiotherapy (MPA). Patients treated with CMT had an actuarial 8-year freedom from relapse (FFR) of 96% as compared to a FFR of 51% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.002), and a FFR of 54% in MPA treated patients (p = 0.004). Of the 11 relapses in MPA treated patients, 7 had a component of their failure in the untreated pelvic or inguinal nodes. The patients treated with CMT had an 8-year actuarial survival of 100% as compared to 79% in TNI treated patients (p = 0.055) and 78% in patients treated with MPA (p = 0.025). Histology and the number of splenic nodules were the most important prognostic variables. Patients with MC/LD histology and greater than or equal to 5 splenic nodules have a high risk of relapse (10/13) when treated with radiation alone (TNI or MPA). We recommend CMT for this group of patients. Patients with NS/LP histology and 1-4 splenic nodules represent a favorable subset of Stage III1A patients. Only 4/21 patients have relapsed and all 21 patients are currently alive without disease regardless of treatment. We currently feel that patients with Stage III1A Hodgkin's disease with NS/LP histology and splenic disease limited to 1-4 nodules are good candidates for MPA as an alternative to TNI or CMT

  3. Physical Exercise with Music Maintains Activities of Daily Living in Patients with Dementia: Mihama-Kiho Project Part 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masayuki; Ogawa, Jun-Ichi; Tokita, Tomoko; Nakaguchi, Noriko; Nakao, Koji; Kida, Hirotaka; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that combined non-pharmacological interventions are more beneficial than single interventions for primary and secondary prevention of dementia. We previously reported enhanced effects of physical exercise with music (ExM) on cognitive function in normal elderly people compared to exercise alone. To identify if ExM improves cognitive function and activities of daily livings (ADLs) in dementia patients over cognitive stimulation (CS). We enrolled 85 patients with mild to moderate dementia. Forty-three subjects performed ExM developed by the Yamaha Music Foundation, and 42 subjects performed cognitive stimulation using portable game consoles and drills involving easy calculations, mazes, and mistake-searching in pictures. Interventions were performed once a week for 40 minutes. Before and after the six-month intervention, patients were assessed using neuropsychological batteries, and ADLs were assessed by patients' caregivers using the functional independence measure (FIM). Voxel-based specific regional analysis system for Alzheimer's disease (VSRAD) was used to assess medial temporal lobe atrophy. Twenty-three subjects dropped out during the intervention. Thirty-one patients from each group were analyzed. Post-intervention, both groups showed significantly improved visuospatial function. Significant benefits were observed in psychomotor speed or memory in the ExM or CS groups, respectively. FIM scores, reflecting ADLs, and VSRAD scores were significantly preserved in the ExM group, but significantly worsened in the CS group. ExM produced greater positive effects on cognitive function and ADLs in patients with mild to moderate dementia than CS, excluding memory. Optimal interventions for dementia will likely be achieved by combining ExMand CS.

  4. [Vitamins and microelements in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małgorzewicz, Sylwia; Jankowska, Magdalena; Kaczkan, Małgorzata; Czajka, Beata; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2014-01-01

    The supply of vitamins and microelements in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very important and requires special attention. CKD patients presented deficiency of these substances in the diet and in organism, but also excess of fat-soluble vitamins or trace elements is observed. Studies indicate that deficiency of vitamins and antioxidants in diet and also enhanced oxidative stress are cause of many complications for example: accelerated process of arteriosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  5. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  6. Wolman disease in patients with familial hemophagocytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solaf Elsayed

    2015-09-26

    Sep 26, 2015 ... Marine Gil b ... many inborn errors of metabolism and lysosomal storage diseases in which hemophagocytic ... The diagnosis of secondary HLH is usually made in association with infection by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or para-.

  7. Patient Disease Perceptions and Coping Strategies for Arthritis in a Developing Nation: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogart Laura M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little prior research on the burden of arthritis in the developing world. We sought to document how patients with advanced arthritis living in the Dominican Republic are affected by and cope with their disease. Methods We conducted semi-structured, one-to-one interviews with economically disadvantaged Dominican patients with advanced knee and/or hip arthritis in the Dominican Republic. The interviews, conducted in Spanish, followed a moderator's guide that included topics such as the patients' understanding of disease etiology, their support networks, and their coping mechanisms. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim in Spanish, and systematically analyzed using content analysis. We assessed agreement in coding between two investigators. Results 18 patients were interviewed (mean age 60 years, median age 62 years, 72% women, 100% response rate. Patients invoked religious and environmental theories of disease etiology, stating that their illness had been caused by God's will or through contact with water. While all patients experienced pain and functional limitation, the social effects of arthritis were gender-specific: women noted interference with homemaking and churchgoing activities, while men experienced disruption with occupational roles. The coping strategies used by patients appeared to reflect their beliefs about disease causation and included prayer and avoidance of water. Conclusions Patients' explanatory models of arthritis influenced the psychosocial effects of the disease and coping mechanisms used. Given the increasing reach of global health programs, understanding these culturally influenced perceptions of disease will be crucial in successfully treating chronic diseases in the developing world.

  8. Lymphoma InterVEntion (LIVE) - patient-reported outcome feedback and a web-based self-management intervention for patients with lymphoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Lindy P J; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; van den Berg, Sanne W; Prins, Judith B; Husson, Olga; Mols, Floortje; Brands-Nijenhuis, Angelique V M; Tick, Lidwine; Oerlemans, Simone

    2017-04-28

    Patients with lymphoma are at risk of experiencing adverse physical and psychosocial problems from their cancer and its treatment. Regular screening of these symptoms by the use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could increase timely recognition and adequate symptom management. Moreover, self-management interventions intend to enhance knowledge and skills and empower patients to better manage their disease and related problems. The objective of the Lymphoma InterVEntion (LIVE) trial is to examine whether feedback to patients on their PROs and access to a web-based, self-management intervention named Living with lymphoma will increase self-management skills and satisfaction with information, and reduce psychological distress. The LIVE randomised controlled trial consists of three arms: (1) standard care, (2) PRO feedback, and (3) PRO feedback and the Living with lymphoma intervention. Patients who have been diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, as registered in the Netherlands Cancer Registry in various hospitals will be selected for participation. Patients are invited via their haemato-oncologist 6 to 15 months after diagnosis. The PRO feedback includes a graphical overview of patients' own symptom and functioning scores and an option to compare their scores with those of other patients with lymphoma and a normative population of the same age and sex. The Living with lymphoma intervention is based on cognitive behavioural therapy components and includes information, assignments, assessments, and videos. Changes in outcomes from baseline to 16 weeks, 12, and 24 months post intervention will be measured. Primary outcomes are self-management skills, satisfaction with information, and psychological distress. Secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, illness perceptions, fatigue, and health care use. The results of the LIVE trial will provide novel insights into whether access to PRO feedback

  9. Coronary artery disease in patients with cerebrovascular disease: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokey, R.; Rolak, L.A.; Harati, Y.; Kutka, N.; Verani, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the cause of death in most patients who have transient ischemic attacks or stroke. Evaluation for this condition is not routinely performed in such patients, and no prospective studies have been reported. We prospectively examined 50 consecutive patients with transient ischemic attacks or mild stroke to determine the prevalence and importance of coronary artery disease. All patients were examined by a cardiologist and underwent both exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and exercise radionuclide ventriculography. Sixteen patients were suspected to have coronary artery disease on the basis of clinical evaluation. In 15 of these the was confirmed by the nuclear scans. The remaining 34 patients had no clinical evidence of heart disease, yet 14 had abnormal cardiac scans. Twenty of 22 patients with abnormal scans who underwent cardiac catheterization had significant coronary artery disease or a cardiomyopathy. The discovery of heart disease altered clinical management in 13 patients. Overall, 29 of 50 patients had significant coronary artery disease, compared with a 7% prevalence of the condition in other patients of similar age at the same institution

  10. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  11. Risk of primary biliary cirrhosis in patients with coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Blomqvist, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several case reports, but only a few studies, have examined the coexistence of coeliac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis. AIM: To estimate the risk of primary biliary cirrhosis in two national cohorts of patients with coeliac disease in Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: Through record...... linkage all Danish patients hospitalised with coeliac disease were followed for possible occurrence of primary biliary cirrhosis from 1 January 1977 until 31 December 1992. All patients hospitalised with coeliac disease in Sweden from 1987 to 1996 were also followed in a separate analysis. RESULTS......: A total of 896 patients with coeliac disease were identified in Denmark with a median follow up period of 9.1 years for a total of 8040 person-years at risk. Two cases of primary biliary cirrhosis were observed where 0.07 were expected, giving a standardised incidence ratio of 27.6 (95% confidence...

  12. Analysis of electrocardiogram in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazović, Biljana; Svenda, Mirjana Zlatković; Mazić, Sanja; Stajić, Zoran; Delić, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is defined as a persistent airflow limitation usually progressive and not fully reversible to treatment. The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severity of disease is confirmed by spirometry. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produces electrical changes in the heart which shows characteristic electrocardiogram pattern. The aim of this study was to observe and evaluate diagnostic values of electrocardiogram changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with no other comorbidity. We analyzed 110 electrocardiogram findings in clinically stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the forced expiratory volume in the first second, ratio of forces expiratory volume in the first second to the fixed vital capacity, chest radiographs and electrocardiogram changes such as p wave height, QRS axis and voltage, right bundle branch block, left bundle branch block, right ventricular hypertrophy, T wave inversion in leads V1-V3, S1S2S3 syndrome, transition zone in praecordial lead and QT interval. We found electrocardiogram changes in 64% patients, while 36% had normal electrocardiogram. The most frequent electrocardiogram changes observed were transition zone (76.36%) low QRS (50%) and p pulmonale (14.54%). Left axis deviation was observed in 27.27% patients. Diagnostic values of electrocardiogram in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients should be screened electrocardiographically in addition to other clinical investigations.

  13. Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Truelsen, Thomas Clement

    2016-01-01

    common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015. METHODS: We estimated...... incidence and prevalence by age, sex, cause, year, and geography with a wide range of updated and standardised analytical procedures. Improvements from GBD 2013 included the addition of new data sources, updates to literature reviews for 85 causes, and the identification and inclusion of additional studies...... causes of years lived with disability (YLDs) on a global basis. NCDs accounted for 18 of the leading 20 causes of age-standardised YLDs on a global scale. Where rates were decreasing, the rate of decrease for YLDs was slower than that of years of life lost (YLLs) for nearly every cause included in our...

  14. Adult Congenital Heart Disease Patients Experience Similar Symptoms of Disease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedars, Ari M; Stefanescu Schmidt, Ada; Broberg, Craig; Zaidi, Ali; Opotowsky, Alexander; Grewal, Jasmine; Kay, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami B; Novak, Eric; Spertus, John

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of objective data on the symptoms characterizing disease activity among adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The purpose of this study was to elicit the most important symptoms from patients across the spectrum of ACHD and to examine whether reported symptoms were similar across the spectrum of ACHD as a foundation for creating a patient-reported outcome measure(s). We constructed a 39-item survey using input from physicians specializing in ACHD to assess the symptoms patients associate with disease activity. Patients (n=124) prospectively completed this survey, and the results were analyzed based on underlying anatomy and disease complexity. A confirmatory cohort of patients (n=40) was then recruited prospectively to confirm the validity of the initial data. When grouped based on underlying anatomy, significant differences in disease-related symptom rankings were found for only 6 of 39 symptoms. Six symptoms were identified which were of particular significance to patients, regardless of underlying anatomy. Patients with anatomy of great complexity experienced greater overall symptom severity than those with anatomy of low or moderate complexity, attributable exclusively to higher ranking of 5 symptoms. The second patient cohort had symptom experiences similar to those of the initial cohort, differing in only 5 of 39 symptoms. This study identified 6 symptoms relevant to patients across the spectrum of ACHD and remarkable homogeneity of patient experience, suggesting that a single disease-specific patient-reported outcome can be created for quality and outcome assessments. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Abdominal fat and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Beate G.; Visseren, Frank L. J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    Objective: We investigated whether the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be explained by intra-abdominal fat accumulation and compared different measures of adiposity as predictors of CHD in patients with PAD. Research Methods

  16. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn's disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B 12 , folic acid and homocysteine. Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn's disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn's disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease.

  17. Conservative Measures for Managing Constipation in Patients Living With a Colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Barbara; Bobkiewicz, Adam; Studniarek, Adam; Szmyt, Krzsztof; Krokowicz, Łukasz; Matysiak, Konrad; Szmeja, Jacek; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Drews, Michał; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a conservative regimen for the treatment of constipation in persons living with a colostomy. Prospective, noncontrolled, single-center study. The study sample comprised 35 patients with a colostomy who were diagnosed with constipation. Subjects with morphologic changes causing constipation such as stomal stenosis and neoplastic and inflammatory changes were excluded. The study was conducted in the Proctology and Stoma Outpatient Clinic at Poznan University of Medical Sciences. Patients at our Stoma Outpatient Clinic underwent baseline evaluation, and those with symptoms of constipation (prolonged periods between bowel movements, passage of pasty or hardened fecal effluent, and associated symptoms such as abdominal discomfort or bloating, flatulence, and pain with passage of effluent into the stoma) received individualized dietary recommendations that typically included an increase in dietary fiber and fluid intake, along with increased fluid intake. The outcomes of dietary changes were evaluated during a follow-up visit 3 months later. If dietary changes alone did not improve constipation symptoms, we prescribed a psyllium-based bulk-forming agent, an osmotic stool softener, and a probiotic, with or without a prokinetic agent such as metoclopramide taken 3 times daily. Dietary interventions alone were deemed successful in 60% of study subjects (n = 21); the remaining 14 patients required additional treatment. Dietary modifications alone relieved constipation in more than half of a group of 35 patients with constipation. We therefore recommend a trial of dietary modifications prior to the initiation of pharmacotherapy in patients with a colostomy.

  18. Addiction or pseudoaddiction in sickle cell disease patients: Time to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this report is to highlight the background factors associated with opioid abuse among Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) patients. Patients: Eleven patients aged 13-53 years (mean, 26.1yrs) which included six female and five male were seen in the last six year at a tertiary health facility. The modes of ...

  19. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  20. Colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Halfvarson, Jonas; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed C...... preventive strategies in order to avoid CRC in IBD patients. The achieved knowledge may also be relevant for other inflammation-associated cancers.......The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), may be complicated by colorectal cancer (CRC). In a recent population-based cohort study of 47 347 Danish patients with IBD by Tine Jess and colleagues 268 patients with UC and 70 patients with CD developed CRC...... during 30 years of observation. The overall risk of CRC among patients with UC and CD was comparable with that of the general population. However, patients diagnosed with UC during childhood or as adolescents, patients with long duration of disease and those with concomitant primary sclerosing...

  1. Living-related liver transplantation for patients with fulminant and subfulminant hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, S; Hashikura, Y; Mita, A; Kubota, T; Chisuwa, H; Nakazawa, Y; Ikegami, T; Terada, M; Miyagawa, S; Kawasaki, S

    1999-12-01

    The prognosis for patients with fulminant (FHF) or subfulminant hepatic failure (SFHF) has improved since the introduction of liver transplantation. However, the death rate of patients awaiting liver transplantation is high, possibly because of the difficulty in obtaining grafts in a timely manner, given the relative shortage of cadaveric donors. Between June 1990 and June 1999, 106 patients underwent living-related liver transplantation (LRLT) at Shinshu University Hospital. Among them, 8 patients had FHF and 6 had SFHF; these 14 patients are the subjects of this report. The graft volumes (GV) ranged from 231 mL to 625 mL, corresponding to 35% to 105% of the recipients' standard liver volume (SLV). The postoperative courses of all donors were uneventful. Following liver transplantation, all grafts functioned favorably, with normalization of serum total bilirubin within 3 to 5 days and normalization of coagulation profiles within 4 to 7 days. Thirteen of the 14 recipients are still alive. The actuarial 6-month, 1-year, and 5-year survival rates were 100%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. In the present study, when the ratio of the GV to the recipient's SLV was more than 35%, the graft was able to support the patient's metabolic demand after liver transplantation for FHF or SFHF. Because of the urgent nature of liver transplantation in this clinical condition, concerns over informed consent may be even greater than for elective LRLT. Nevertheless, the high success rate and low donor risk may justify this option for pediatric patients, as well as for a limited population of adult patients suffering from FHF or SFHF.

  2. Valuation of transfusion-free living in MDS: results of health utility interviews with patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lübbert Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study measured how myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS patients value transfusion independence (TI, reduced transfusions (RT and transfusion-dependence (TD using health utility assessment methodology. Methods 47 MDS patients were interviewed, US (n = 8, France (n = 9, Germany (n = 9 and the UK (n = 21, to elicit the utility value of TI, RT and TD. Health states were developed based on literature; patient forum discussions; and were validated by a hematologist. Face-to-face interviews used the feeling thermometer Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and the Time Trade-Off (TTO method to value the health states on a 0 (dead to 1 (perfect health scale. Socio-demographic, clinical, and quality-of-life (EQ-5D characteristics were surveyed to describe the patient sample. Results and Discussion The mean age was 67 years (range: 29-83; 45% male, 70% retired; 40% had secondary/high school education, or higher (32%, and 79% lived with family, a partner or spouse, or friends. The mean time from MDS diagnosis was 5 years (range:1-23. Most patients (87% received previous transfusions and 49% had received a transfusion in the last 3 months. Mean EQ-5D index score was 0.78; patients reported at least some problem with mobility (45%, usual activities (40%, pain/discomfort (47%, and anxiety/depression (34%. Few patients had difficulty understanding the VAS (n = 3 and TTO (n = 4 exercises. Utility scores for TI were higher than for RT (0.84 vs. 0.77; p Conclusion Patients value TI, suggesting an important role for new treatments aiming to achieve greater TI in MDS. These results can be used in preference-based health economic evaluation of new MDS treatments, such as in future cost-utility studies.

  3. Cardiovascular disease in patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila S. V. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on hemodialysis (HD in Brazil. Their mean age was 47 ± 39 years. The main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases were arterial hypertension (89.4%, dyslipidemia (78.3%, low high-density lipoprotein levels (84.2% and low physical activity (64.1%. Family history of coronary insufficiency and high low-density lipoprotein levels were significantly associated with coronary artery disease (P = 0.005 and P = 0.029, respectively. Sedentary life style, diabetes mellitus, secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperglycemia also showed a significant association with the underlying vascular disease (P = 0.017, P = 0.039, P = 0.037 and P = 0.030, respectively. Hypercalcemia, hypertension and black race were factors significantly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (P = 0.01, P = 0.0013 and P = 0.024, respectively. Our study shows that the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases in patients with ESRD were left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerotic disease, valvular disease and coronary artery disease. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were the common risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify the main cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors in 160 patients with ESRD on HD in a single center in Brazil.

  4. Cumulative live birth rates after IVF in patients with polycystic ovaries: phenotype matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Michel; Pareyn, Stéphanie; Drakopoulos, Panagiotis; Raimundo, José M; Anckaert, Ellen; Santos-Ribeiro, Samuel; Polyzos, Nikolaos P; Tournaye, Herman; Blockeel, Christophe

    2018-05-07

    Do cumulative live birth rates (CLBR) vary among women with different polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes who undergo IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment? In this retrospective cohort study, data from 567 patients undergoing an assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycle between January 2010 and December 2015 were collected. Demographical traits, cycle characteristics and clinical and laboratory data were analysed. After conventional ovarian stimulation using a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol, the median number of oocytes retrieved ranged between 11 and 13.5 and did not differ significantly among the studied groups. Live birth rate (LBR) after fresh embryo transfer and CLBR after transfer of all fresh and vitrified embryos were significantly lower in women with hyperandrogenic PCOS phenotypes A (LBR 16.7%, CLBR 25.8%) and C (LBR 18.5%, CLBR 27.8%) compared with women with normoandrogenic PCOS phenotype D (LBR 33.7%, CLBR 48%) (P-value for LBR 0.01 and 0.03, respectively; P-value for CLBR 0.002 and 0.01, respectively) and controls with a polycystic ovarian morphology (LBR 37.1%, CLBR 53.3%) (P-value for LBR 0.002 and 0.01, respectively; P-value for CLBR counselling and tailored approaches when treating PCOS patients with hyperandrogenism who require ART. Copyright © 2018 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Celiac Disease in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis-Related Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Putman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Both cystic fibrosis (CF and celiac disease can cause low bone mineral density (BMD and fractures. Celiac disease may occur at a higher frequency in patients with CF than the general population, and symptoms of these conditions may overlap. We report on two patients presenting with CF-related bone disease in the past year who were subsequently found to have concurrent celiac disease. Because adherence to a gluten-free diet may improve BMD in patients with celiac disease, this could have important implications for treatment. Clinicians should consider screening for celiac disease in patients with CF who have low BMD, worsening BMD in the absence of other risk factors, and/or difficult to treat vitamin D deficiency.

  6. Efficacy, Safety, and Interactions of a Live Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Vaccine for Chickens Based on Strain IBD V877.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerligs, Harm J; Ons, Ellen; Boelm, Gert Jan; Vancraeynest, Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is a highly contagious disease in young chickens which can result in high morbidity and mortality and also in great economic losses. The main target for the virus is the lymphoid tissue with a special predilection for the bursa of Fabricius. Several vaccines are available to control the disease. Intermediate plus vaccines are used in chickens with high maternal antibody titers which face high infection pressure. An example of an intermediate plus vaccine is a live vaccine based on IBD strain V877. The results of an efficacy study in commercial broilers with different levels of maternally derived antibodies (MDA) showed that the V877-based IBD vaccine can break through maternal antibody titers of higher than 1100 as determined by an IBD ELISA. The safety of the vaccine was demonstrated in a study in which specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens were vaccinated with a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain and a tenfold dose of the vaccine strain after five back passages in SPF chickens. The vaccine virus caused lesions, as could be expected for an intermediate plus vaccine, but the scores were not much higher than the maximal scores allowed for mild IBD vaccines in the European Pharmacopoeia, and reversion to virulence was absent. In studies in SPF chickens, there were no negative impacts by the IBD V877 vaccine on the efficacy of a live QX-like IB vaccine and a live Newcastle disease La Sota vaccine in vaccination challenge studies, although the IBD vaccine had a negative effect on the antibody response generated by the QX-like IB vaccine. It is concluded that the IBD V877 vaccine has the capacity to break through high levels of MDA, has a satisfactory safety profile, and interactions with other live vaccines are limited. In order to limit bursal lesions after vaccination it is recommended to confirm the presence of MDA before vaccinating with the V877 vaccine.

  7. Disease trajectories in nursing home patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husebo, B.S.; Hylen Randhoff, A.; Sandvik, R.; Omland, G.; Gysels, M.; Francke, A.; Hertogh, C.; Ribbe, M.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Research aims: About 17 500 patients die in Norwegian nursing homes (NH) every year, 14-27% of these patients have diagnoses of cancer, 75% heart failure, and 80% dementia. Little is known about their last months and days regarding medical treatment, needs for multi-professional care, advance

  8. Stage 1 development of a patient-reported experience measure (PREM) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan; Andrew, Sharon; Hodson, Matthew; Roberts, C Michael

    2017-07-24

    The study aimed to explore patients' experience of living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their perspective of their community healthcare for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to extract affective responses in order to develop potential items for a patient-reported experience measure for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Qualitative face-face interviews were conducted, in the community, with 64 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease recruited from General Practices and Breathe-Easy community groups in the Outer North East, East and City areas of London and Essex, UK. A two phase analysis of the qualitative data was conducted to identify themes arising from patients' description of living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and their perceptions of their community healthcare and subsequently the affective responses underlying the themes raised by patients, which gave emotional colour to the themes, bringing the thematic analysis closer to the subjective patient experience. Five themes were identified from the interview data: 'Journey to diagnosis'; 'Smoking'; 'Usual care'; 'My everyday life'; and 'Exacerbations'. Twenty-one affective responses were identified and categorised as either 'negative', 'positive' or 'bivalent'. 'Frustration', a negative affective response was prevalent in four themes. 'Gratitude', 'hope' and 'happiness/enjoyment' were among the more positive responses more prevalent across several themes. By conducting a novel two-way analysis (thematic and affective) it was possible to identify themes and affective responses that were aligned to those themes. This enabled the development of 38 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-specific experience items to take forward for further testing including item reduction and validity and reliability in the next stage of the patient-reported experience measure development. GIVING IMPORTANCE TO PATIENTS' EMOTIONS: An exploration of patient perceptions of living with

  9. The Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Turkey: The TURKFAB Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kultigin Turkmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fabry disease is a treatable cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD characterized by a genetic deficiency of α-galactosidase A. European Renal Best Practice (ERBP recommends screening for Fabry disease in CKD patients. However, this is based on expert opinion and there are no reports of the prevalence of Fabry disease in stage 1-5 CKD. Hence, we investigated the prevalence of Fabry disease in CKD patients not receiving renal replacement therapy. Methods: This prospective study assessed α-galactosidase activity in dried blood spots in 313 stage 1-5 CKD patients, 167 males, between ages of 18-70 years whose etiology of CKD was unknown and were not receiving renal replacement therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed by GLA gene mutation analysis. Results: Three (all males of 313 CKD patients (0.95% were diagnosed of Fabry disease, for a prevalence in males of 1.80%. Family screening identified 8 aditional Fabry patients with CKD. Of a total of 11 Fabry patients, 7 were male and started enzyme replacement therapy and 4 were female. The most frequent manifestations in male patients were fatigue (100%, tinnitus, vertigo, acroparesthesia, hypohidrosis, cornea verticillata and angiokeratoma (all 85%, heat intolerance (71%, and abdominal pain (57%. The most frequent manifestations in female patients were fatigue and cornea verticillata (50%, and tinnitus, vertigo and angiokeratoma (25%. Three patients had severe episodic abdominal pain attacks and proteinuria, and were misdiagnosed as familial Mediterranean fever. Conclusions: The prevalence of Fabry disease in selected CKD patients is in the range found among renal replacement therapy patients, but the disease is diagnosed at an earlier, treatable stage. These data support the ERBP recommendation to screen for Fabry disease in patients with CKD of unknown origin.

  10. Motivations of women in Uganda living with rheumatic heart disease: A mixed methods study of experiences in stigma, childbearing, anticoagulation, and contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew Y; Nabbaale, Juliet; Nalubwama, Haddy; Okello, Emmy; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Longenecker, Christopher T; Webel, Allison R

    2018-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of premature mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Women of reproductive age are a unique and vulnerable group of RHD patients, due to increased risk of cardiovascular complications and death during pregnancy. Yet, less than 5% of women of childbearing age with RHD in LMICs use contraceptives, and one in five pregnant women with RHD take warfarin despite known teratogenicity. It is unclear whether this suboptimal contraception and anticoagulant use during pregnancy is due to lack of health system resources, limited health literacy, or social pressure to bear children. We conducted a mixed methods study of 75 women living with RHD in Uganda. Questionnaires were administered to 50 patients. Transcripts from three focus groups with 25 participants were analyzed using qualitative description methodology. Several themes emerged from the focus groups, including pregnancy as a calculated risk; misconceptions about side-effects of contraceptives and anticoagulation; reproductive decision-making control by male partners, in-laws, or physicians; abandonment of patients by male partners; and considerable stigma against heart disease patients for both their reproductive and financial limitations (often worse than that directed against HIV patients). All questionnaire respondents were told by physicians that their hearts were not strong enough to support a pregnancy. Only 14% used contraception while taking warfarin. All participants felt that society would look poorly on a woman who cannot have children due to a heart condition. To our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study of female RHD patients and their attitudes toward cardiovascular disorders and reproduction. Our results suggest that health programs targeting heart disease in LMICs must pay special attention to the needs of women of childbearing age. There are opportunities for improved family/societal education programs and community engagement

  11. Novel combined management approaches to patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, J

    2017-03-01

    Most patients we care for today suffer from more than one chronic disease, and multimorbidity is a rapidly growing challenge. Concomitant cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes represent a large proportion of all patients in cardiology, nephrology and diabetology. These entities commonly overlap due to their negative effects on vascular function and an accelerated atherosclerosis progression. At the same time, a progressive subspecialisation has caused the cardiologist to treat 'only' the heart, nephrologists 'only' the kidneys and endocrinologists' 'only' diabetes. Studies and guidelines follow the same pattern. This often requires patients to visit specialists for each field, with a risk of both under-diagnosis and under-treatment. From the patient's perspective, there is a great need for coordination and facilitation of the care, not only to reduce disease progression but also to improve quality of life. Person-centred integrated clinics for patients with cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes are a promising approach for complex chronic disease management.

  12. Patient-reported dietetic care post hospital for free-living patients: a Canadian Malnutrition Task Force Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, H; Payette, H; Laporte, M; Bernier, P; Allard, J; Duerksen, D; Gramlich, L; Jeejeebhoy, K

    2018-02-01

    Transitions out of hospital can influence recovery. Ideally, malnourished patients should be followed by someone with nutrition expertise, specifically a dietitian, post discharge from hospital. Predictors of dietetic care post discharge are currently unknown. The present study aimed to determine the patient factors independently associated with 30-days post hospital discharge dietetic care for free-living patients who transitioned to the community. Nine hundred and twenty-two medical or surgical adult patients were recruited in 16 acute care hospitals in eight Canadian provinces on admission. Eligible patients could speak English or French, provide their written consent, were anticipated to have a hospital stay of ≥2 days and were not considered palliative. Telephone interviews were completed with 747 (81%) participants using a standardised questionnaire to determine whether dietetic care occurred post discharge; 544 patients discharged to the community were included in the multivariate analyses, excluding those who were admitted to nursing homes or rehabilitation facilities. Covariates during and post hospitalisation were collected prospectively and used in logistic regression analyses to determine independent patient-level predictors. Dietetic care post discharge was reported by 61/544 (11%) of participants and was associated with severe malnutrition [Subjective Global Assessment category C: odd's ratio (OR) 2.43 (1.23-4.83)], weight loss post discharge [(OR 2.86 (1.45-5.62)], comorbidity [(OR 1.09 (1.02-1.17)] and a dietitian consultation on admission [(OR 3.41 (1.95-5.97)]. Dietetic care post discharge occurs in few patients, despite the known high prevalence of malnutrition on admission and discharge. Dietetic care in hospital was the most influential predictor of post-hospital care. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  13. [Consumer surveys among hospitalized patients with lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humborstad, O T; Omenaas, E; Gulsvik, A

    2001-03-30

    The aim of our survey was to record the experiences of hospitalised patients with respiratory diseases in order to create a more patient-friendly department. Our study included 609 patients (response rate 70%) with a median age of 64 years (range 13-91) who were discharged from the Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital in October 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 268 patients had obstructive lung disease, 82 had lung cancer. They answered a questionnaire with 24 questions. Patient reception to the ward and staff knowledge of the patients' illnesses, were for the physicians rated as good or better by 92% and 79% and for the nurses by 94% and 70% respectively. 16% of the patients experienced insecurity, 17% anxiety, 12% helplessness, 9% loneliness and 12% little say in the decision making process. Trend factors for these emotional experiences were female sex, old age, obstructive lung disease and long stay in hospital. Patients aged 50 to 69 years and patients with lung cancer had the lowest rate of negative emotional experiences. Despite staff awareness of the prevalence and of the patients' emotional experiences and the risk factors involved, there was no clear reduction of negative experiences in the later surveys compared to the first survey. Patients in a university hospital with respiratory diseases showed unchanged experiences of health care and personal emotions in repeated surveys over a period of five years.

  14. Nonmotor symptoms in patients suffering from motor neuron diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Günther

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The recently postulated disease spreading hypothesis has gained much attention, especially for Parkinson’s disease (PD. The various nonmotor symptoms (NMS in neurodegenerative diseases would be much better explained by this hypothesis than by the degeneration of disease-specific cell populations. Motor neuron disease (MND is primarily known as a group of diseases with a selective loss of motor function. Recent evidence, however, suggests disease spreading into nonmotor brain regions also in MND. The aim of this study was to comprehensively detect NMS in patients suffering from MND.Methods: We used a self-rating questionnaire including 30 different items of gastrointestinal, autonomic, neuropsychiatric and sleep complaints (NMSQuest which is an established tool in PD patients. 90 MND patients were included and compared to 96 controls.Results: In total, MND patients reported significantly higher NMS scores (median: 7 points in comparison to controls (median: 4 points. Dribbling, impaired taste/smelling, impaired swallowing, weight loss, loss of interest, sad/blues, falling and insomnia were significantly more prevalent in MND patients compared to controls. Interestingly excessive sweating was more reported in the MND group. Correlation analysis revealed an increase of total NMS score with disease progression.Conclusions: NMS in MND patients seemed to increase with disease progression which would fit with the recently postulated disease spreading hypothesis. The total NMS score in the MND group significantly exceeded the score for the control group, but only 8 of the 30 single complaints of the NMSQuest were significantly more often reported by MND patients. Dribbling, impaired swallowing, weight loss and falling could primarily be connected to motor neuron degeneration and declared as motor symptoms in MND.

  15. Clinical impact of exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Marko; Jug, Borut; Lenasi, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and decreased health-related quality of life are hallmarks of peripheral arterial disease. About one-third of peripheral arterial disease patients have intermittent claudication with deleterious effects on everyday activities, such as walking. Exercise training improves peripheral arterial disease symptoms and is recommended as first line therapy for peripheral arterial disease. This review examines the effects of exercise training beyond improvements in walking distance, namely on vascular function, parameters of inflammation, activated hemostasis and oxidative stress, and quality of life. Exercise training not only increases walking distance and physiologic parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease, but also improves the cardiovascular risk profile by helping patients achieve better control of hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and dyslipidemia, thus further reducing cardiovascular risk and the prevalence of coexistent atherosclerotic diseases. American guidelines suggest supervised exercise training, performed for a minimum of 30-45 min, at least three times per week, for at least 12 weeks. Walking is the most studied exercise modality and its efficacy in improving cardiovascular parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease has been extensively proven. As studies have shown that supervised exercise training improves walking performance, cardiovascular parameters and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease, it should be encouraged and more often prescribed.

  16. POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN A PATIENT WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... bossing with a depressed nasal bridge, bowing of the lower extremeties, trident hands, lumbar lordosis, ... cystic enlargement, is one of the most common dominantly inherited conditions and is an important ... addition to other autosomal dominant inherited diseases like tuberous sclerosis and von Hippel- ...

  17. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article deals with these aspects, including follow-up guidelines and management and treatment ... those with ischaemic heart disease also require cardiac review at least once a year. .... doses when fluid losses are high, e.g. sweating in hot environments, ... dried beans, lentils, offal, salmon, chocolate, cola drinks and.

  18. Heart disease in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashournia, Hamoun; Johansen, Frank Ted; Folkestad, Lars

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare, inherited systemic connective tissue disease that causes decreased bioavailability of collagen type 1. Collagen type 1 is the most abundant connective tissue in the body and a key part of many organs. While the bone phenotype in OI is well des...

  19. Wolman disease in patients with familial hemophagocytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major signs and symptoms include hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, anemia, leucopenia or thrombocytopenias which resemble many inborn errors of metabolism and lysosomal storage diseases in which hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis has also been reported as a secondary association. Case reports: We report three ...

  20. Rare disease patients in China anticipate the sunlight of legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J J; Song, P P; Tang, W

    2013-06-01

    It is estimated that there are over ten million rare disease patients in China currently. Due to a lack of effective drugs and reimbursement regulations for medical expenses the diseases bring most patients enormous physical suffering and psychological despair. Past experience in other countries such as the United States, Japan, and the European Union have shown that legislation is the critical step to improve the miserable situation of rare disease patients. Laws and regulations for rare diseases in these countries prescribe a series of incentives for research and development of orphan drugs which turn out to obviously allow these drugs to flourish. Legislation has also established a drug reimbursement system to reduce the medical burden of the patients. These measures effectively protect the rights and interests of patients with rare diseases. In China, legislation for rare diseases has begun to attract the attention of authorities. It is anticipated that relevant laws and regulations will be established as early as possible to provide safeguards for rare disease patients in China.

  1. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-01-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 ± 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p [de

  2. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: An ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Uhrenfeldt

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients’ (aged 74 years and older experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients’ experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer.

  3. The Functional Living Index-Cancer is a reliable and valid instrument in Chinese cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Y T; Lee, Alvina H K; Tung, Stewart Y; Wong, Janet Y H; Chan, Y M; Goh, Cynthia R; Cheung, Y B

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the linguistic and psychometric properties of the Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC) in assessing the quality of life of Chinese cancer patients. The English FLIC was translated into Traditional Chinese by the standard forward-backward procedure. After cognitive debriefing, a Traditional Chinese FLIC was administered to 500 cancer patients in a major public hospital in Hong Kong. Of which, 200 were invited to complete the questionnaire in 2 weeks. To identify a scale structure appropriate to Chinese, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed on two randomly split halves of the sample. We identified five scales of the Traditional Chinese FLIC which assess the physical, psychological, hardship, nausea and social aspects. These five scales and the overall scale demonstrated satisfactory fit and had the alpha coefficient ranged from 0.68 to 0.92. The intra-class correlation coefficient ranged from 0.67 to 0.88. In addition, all FLIC scales were negatively associated with the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status and, also except for the psychological scale, had lower scores in patients who were treated by chemotherapy. The Traditional Chinese FLIC is an appropriate health indicator for Chinese cancer patients.

  4. CD4 T lymphocyte counts in patients undergoing splenectomy during living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsuda, Koji; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mistuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hara, Takanobu; Kugiyama, Tota; Baimakhanov, Zhassulan; Ono, Shinichiro; Kitasato, Amane; Fujita, Fumihiko; Kanetaka, Kengo; Kuroki, Tamotsu

    2016-02-01

    The role of splenectomy in increasing the CD4-positive T lymphocyte counts (hereafter: CD4 counts) and the CD4 to CD8 ratio have not yet been fully investigated, especially in the case of HIV-positive patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT). The change in the total lymphocyte counts of 32 patients who underwent one-stage splenectomy with living donor (LD) LT with (n=13) or without rituximab (RTX, n=19) therapy were examined to validate our cohort of ABO-incompatible LDLT with RTX. Subsequently, perioperative changes in CD4 counts and the CD 4 to CD8 ratio were measured in 13 patients who underwent ABO-incompatible LDLT/RTX with splenectomy. (1) The administration of RTX did not significantly affect the total lymphocyte counts of patients after LDLT/splenectomy in any of the observation periods. (2) The CD4 counts were significantly higher at 2years after LDLT in comparison to the perioperative CD4 counts but not within the 3-month period (p=0.039). The CD4/CD8 ratio gradually decreased after LDLT/splenectomy under RTX treatment. An immediate increase in the CD4 counts therefore cannot be expected after LDLT with splenectomy. The total lymphocyte and CD4 counts were rather stable in the peritransplant period even in ABO incompatible LDLT with RTX. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurological symptoms in patients with biopsy proven celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürk, Katrin; Farecki, Marie-Louise; Lamprecht, Georg; Roth, Guenter; Decker, Patrice; Weller, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Oertel, Wolfang

    2009-12-15

    In celiac disease (CD), the gut is the typical manifestation site but atypical neurological presentations are thought to occur in 6 to 10% with cerebellar ataxia being the most frequent symptom. Most studies in this field are focused on patients under primary neurological care. To exclude such an observation bias, patients with biopsy proven celiac disease were screened for neurological disease. A total of 72 patients with biopsy proven celiac disease (CD) (mean age 51 +/- 15 years, mean disease duration 8 +/- 11 years) were recruited through advertisements. All participants adhered to a gluten-free diet. Patients were interviewed following a standard questionnaire and examined clinically for neurological symptoms. Medical history revealed neurological disorders such as migraine (28%), carpal tunnel syndrome (20%), vestibular dysfunction (8%), seizures (6%), and myelitis (3%). Interestingly, 35% of patients with CD reported of a history of psychiatric disease including depression, personality changes, or even psychosis. Physical examination yielded stance and gait problems in about one third of patients that could be attributed to afferent ataxia in 26%, vestibular dysfunction in 6%, and cerebellar ataxia in 6%. Other motor features such as basal ganglia symptoms, pyramidal tract signs, tics, and myoclonus were infrequent. 35% of patients with CD showed deep sensory loss and reduced ankle reflexes in 14%. Gait disturbances in CD do not only result from cerebellar ataxia but also from proprioceptive or vestibular impairment. Neurological problems may even develop despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. (c) 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Screening Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz; Akdam, Hakan; Dursun, Belda; Alp, Alper; Sağlam Eyiler, Funda; Akın, Davut; Gün, Yelda; Hüddam, Bülent; Batmazoğlu, Mehmet; Gibyeli Genek, Dilek; Pirinççi, Serhat; Ersoy, İsmail Rıfkı; Üzüm, Atilla; Soypaçacı, Zeki; Tanrısev, Mehmet; Çolak, Hülya; Demiral Sezer, Sibel; Bozkurt, Gökay; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Akyüz Ünsal, Ayşe İpek; Ünübol, Mustafa; Uslu, Meltem; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Günel, Ceren; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Ünsal, Alparslan; Akar, Harun; Okyay, Pınar

    2017-11-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked inherited, rare, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder, affecting multiple organs due to the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. The prevalence has been reported to be 0.15-1% in hemodialysis patients; however, the information on the prevalence in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease. The patients older than 18 years, enclosing KDIGO 2012 chronic kidney disease definitions, not on dialysis, were enrolled. Dried blood spots on Guthrie papers were used to analyze α-Gal A enzyme and genetic analysis was performed in individuals with enzyme activity ≤1.2 μmol/L/h. A total of 1453 chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis from seven clinics in Turkey were screened. The mean age of the study population was 59.3 ± 15.9 years. 45.6% of patients were female. The creatinine clearance of 77.3% of patients was below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , 8.4% had proteinuria, and 2.5% had isolated microscopic hematuria. The mean value of patients' α-Gal A enzyme was detected as 2.93 ± 1.92 μmol/L/h. 152 patients had low levels of α-Gal A enzyme activity (≤1.2 μmol/L/h). In mutation analysis, A143T and D313Y variants were disclosed in three male patients. The prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis was found to be 0.2% (0.4% in male, 0.0% in female). Fabry's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic kidney disease with unknown etiology even in the absence of symptoms and signs suggestive of Fabry's disease.

  7. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  8. Free-living gait characteristics in ageing and Parkinson's disease: impact of environment and ambulatory bout length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Din, Silvia; Godfrey, Alan; Galna, Brook; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn

    2016-05-12

    Gait is emerging as a powerful diagnostic and prognostic tool, and as a surrogate marker of disease progression for Parkinson's disease (PD). Accelerometer-based body worn monitors (BWMs) facilitate the measurement of gait in clinical environments. Moreover they have the potential to provide a more accurate reflection of gait in the home during habitual behaviours. Emerging research suggests that measurement of gait using BWMs is feasible but this has not been investigated in depth. The aims of this study were to explore (i) the impact of environment and (ii) ambulatory bout (AB) length on gait characteristics for discriminating between people with PD and age-matched controls. Fourteen clinically relevant gait characteristics organised in five domains (pace, variability, rhythm, asymmetry, postural control) were quantified using laboratory based and free-living data collected over 7 days using a BWM placed on the lower back in 47 PD participants and 50 controls. Free-living data showed that both groups walked with decreased pace and increased variability, rhythm and asymmetry compared to walking in the laboratory setting. Four of the 14 gait characteristics measured in free-living conditions were significantly different between controls and people with PD compared to two measured in the laboratory. Between group differences depended on bout length and were more apparent during longer ABs. ABs ≤ 10s did not discriminate between groups. Medium to long ABs highlighted between-group significant differences for pace, rhythm and asymmetry. Longer ABs should therefore be taken into account when evaluating gait characteristics in free-living conditions. This study provides encouraging results to support the use of a single BWM for free-living gait evaluation in people with PD with potential for research and clinical application.

  9. Local anesthesia selection algorithm in patients with concomitant somatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, E N; Sokhov, S T; Letunova, N Y; Orekhova, I V; Gromovik, M V; Erilin, E A; Ryazantsev, N A

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents basic principles of local anesthesia selection in patients with concomitant somatic diseases. These principles are history taking; analysis of drugs interaction with local anesthetic and sedation agents; determination of the functional status of the patient; patient anxiety correction; dental care with monitoring of hemodynamics parameters. It was found that adhering to this algorithm promotes prevention of urgent conditions in patients in outpatient dentistry.

  10. Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Psoriasis Patients About the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Küçükünal

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study evaluates the patients’ knowledge, opinions and attitudes about psoriasis.Materials and Methods: A total of 111 patients over the age of 18, clinically and histopathologically diagnosed with chronic plaque-type psoriasis were included in the study. Patients who have psychiatric illness and inadequate intelligence were excluded. A questionnaire including items on knowledge, opinions and attitudes on psoriasis were filled out by the patients and the results were analyzed statistically.Results: One hundred-eleven (45 female, 66 male patients were included in our study. 6.3% of patients did not know the diagnosis of their disease. 68.5% of patients thought that psoriasis was a contagious disease while18% thought that psoriasis was a hereditary condition. 88.3% of patients declined that they were informed about the disease by the doctor. 62.2% of patients believed that they had adequate information about psoriasis. 51.4% of patients believed that doctors gave them enough information about psoriasis. 44.1% of patients knew that psoriasis was aggravated by stress while 38.7% did not know any of the aggravating factors of psoriasis. 70.3% of patients believed that psoriasis would spread if not treated. Patients mostly (98.2% had idea about topical treatment options. 82% of patients were afraid of having psoriasis on their face. 5.4% of patients were uncomfortable with the idea of their partners’ having psoriasis. 72.1%, 88.3%, 72.1% of patients reported no negative effect of psoriasis on their relations with friends, family members, work or school life, respectivelyDiscussion: Our results showed that psoriasis patients do not have adequate knowledge about the disease. We think that dermatologists should pay more attention to inform and raise awareness of patie

  11. Frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, R.; Ghaffar, T.; Khan, I.; Muhammad, R.; Salman, S.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) is considered as risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) along with other risk factors. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pulmonology and Cardiology wards/OPD's of Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar. Patients more than 35 years of age, diagnosed with CAD of either gender were included. Patients already diagnosed with COPD, recent myocardial infarction (within 7 days), left ventricular impairment, pneumothorax, bronchiectasis, comatose patient, asthmatic and those with chest trauma were excluded. All the patients underwent spirometry examination before and after administration of salbutamol (5 mg for 5 minutes) via nebulizer. FEV1/FVC less than 70% confirmed the presence of COPD. Results: Out of 151 patients, 57 (37.7%) were found to have COPD. Among them, 39 (68.42%) were male and 18 (31.57%) were female. Among male patients with COPD, 82.05% (n=32) were smokers and 17.94% (n=7) were nonsmokers while in females with COPD no one was smoker. Conclusion: COPD is an under-diagnosed progressive disease in patients with high risk patients with coronary artery disease. (author)

  12. Recruiting older patients with peripheral arterial disease: evaluating challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostow, Diana P; Hirsch, Alan T; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a group of syndromes characterized by chronic and progressive atherosclerosis with a high burden of physical disability and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recruiting patients for clinical research is therefore challenging. In this article, we describe and evaluate our methods for recruiting participants for a cross-sectional feasibility study of PAD, nutritional status, and body composition. We used convenience and purposive sampling approaches to identify potential participants. Between May 2012 and April 2013, 1,446 patients were identified, and 165 patients (11.4%) responded to recruitment requests. The final enrollment was 64 participants (64/1,446; 4.4%), and four subjects (6.3%) subsequently withdrew from the study. Recruiting PAD patients presents a variety of challenges, due largely to the burdens of living with coexistent illnesses, and patients' reluctance or inability to travel for research. In this article, we delineate suggestions for improving the efficacy of recruitment methods in future PAD studies.

  13. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  14. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  15. Generalized Vitiligo Associated Autoimmune Diseases in Japanese Patients Their Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Narita

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Among Japanese vitiligo patients, there is a subgroup with strong evidence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo, but also to autoimmune thyroid disease and other autoimmune disorders.

  16. Proportion of patients in the Uganda rheumatic heart disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The optimum management strategy was determined according to the 2012 European Society of Cardiology guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease. Results: Out of the 551 patient's records evaluated, 398 (72.3%) required ...

  17. Hypoglycemia in Patients with Diabetes and Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen Alsahli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic limitations in this situation.

  18. Suicide and patients with neurologic diseases. Methodologic problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The suicide risk in patients with many neurologic diseases has been reported to be greater than that in the general population. Studies on the subject are, however, often encumbered with methodologic problems. We appraised these problems and, based on an evaluation, reappraised knowledge...... of the suicide risk in patients with specific neurologic diseases. DATA SOURCE: Using the computerized database MEDLINE, we identified all published reports with the key words suicide, attempted suicide, and neurologic diseases. STUDY SELECTION: We assessed and reviewed studies concerning the most common...... of the studies, the methods used gave rise to uncertainty about the conclusion presented. CONCLUSION: An increased suicide risk was found in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis and spinal cord lesions as well as in selected groups of patients with epilepsy. In other neurologic diseases, the suicide risk...

  19. Steroid allergy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malik, M

    2007-11-01

    Background: Contact allergy to a steroid enema leading to worsening of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has recently been reported. This study was designed to look for evidence of steroid allergy in patients with IBD.

  20. Study of cardiovascular diseases in hospitalized AECOPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El-Shabrawy

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in patients hospitalized for COPD in Zagazig University Hospital was high. Age, sex and CVD trends, as well as life style changes, should be considered when prevention and control strategies are formulated.

  1. Pregnancy Outcome among Patients with Sickle Cell Disease in Jos

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zamzar

    The antenatal complications included anaemia (62.9%), vaso-oclusive. (bone pain) ... Conclusion: Pregnancy in sickle cell disease patients is associated with high maternal and perinatal morbidity .... and malaria (25.7%) were other common.

  2. Towards safer surgery in patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshikhes, Abdul-Wahed N.

    2007-01-01

    Surgery in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) has been associated with high morbidity and mortality. In recent years, a marked improvement in the safety of surgery and anesthesia in this high-risk group of patients has been witnessed; owing to the improvements in surgical and anesthetic care, greater awareness of pathophysiology of disease, proper perioperative preparation and attention to factors predisposing to vasoocclusive crises. However, this is not paralleled by similar improvement in countries where the disease is not prevalent. Greater population mobility in recent years makes recognition of surgical manifestations of the disease and awareness of perioperative management of sickle cell patients undergoing surgical interventions of paramount importance. This article aims to summarize steps towards safer surgery in patients with SCD. (author)

  3. Mitochondrial Diseases: Clinical Features- Management of Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Koc

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are unique organells which their own DNA in cells. Human mitochondrial DNA is circular, double-stranded molecule and small. Because all mitochondria are contributed by the ovum during the formation of the zygote, the mitochondrial genom is transmitted by maternal inheritance. Multisystem disorders such as deafness, cardiomyopathy, miyopathy can be seen in mitochondrial diseases. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(0.100: 14-31

  4. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, R.; Schnedl, W.J.; Hoier, S.; Piswanger-Soelkner, C.; Lipp, R.W.; Daxboeck, F.; Reisinger, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  5. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in patients with cat-scratch disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, R.; Schnedl, W.J.; Hoier, S. [Div. of Infectious Diseases, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Piswanger-Soelkner, C.; Lipp, R.W. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Graz (Austria); Daxboeck, F. [Clinical Inst. for Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Div. of Hospital Hygiene, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Reisinger, E.C. [Div. of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Aim: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy images various neoplastic, granulomatous, and auto-immun diseases. Cat-scratch disease in an infectious granulomatous disease usually affecting the lymphnodes. It is not known whether cat-scratch disease provides positive somatostatin receptor scintigrams. Patients, methods: twelve patients with lymphadenitis and suspected cat-scratch disease were investigated by immunofluorescence antibody testing and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. Suppurated lymphnodes were extracted or drained and Bartonella henselae specific PCR was then performed. Results: eleven of 12 patients showed IgG antibodies against B. henselea. SRS showed positive scintigraphic results in 6 of 11 patients with CSD. B. henselae DNA was detected in tissue of lymphnodes from 4 of 5 patients with lymphnode extraction or lymphnode drainage. SRS demonstrated positive scintigrams in all patients with a positive PCR. In one patient with suspected CSD SRS was negative as well as antibody testing. Conclusion: somatostatin receptor scintigraphy correlated with positive Bartonella henselae specific PCR tests and positive Bartonella henselae specific antibody tests in patients with CSD. (orig.)

  6. Social Support: a Key Variable for Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Management in Hispanic Patients with Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa T. Brooks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases, including rheumatic diseases, can cause immense physical and psychosocial burden for patients. Many Hispanics suffering with arthritis face activity limitations. Social support, or the functional content of relationships, may be important to consider when examining treatment and outcomes for Hispanic individuals. Participants were recruited from an urban community health center (CHC as part of a larger health behavior study. A cross-sectional, descriptive, mixed methods analysis was conducted to explore the role of social support in the sample. Only Hispanic/Latino patients (n = 46 were included in this analysis. Interviews were conducted in both English and Spanish. The majority of the sample (87% perceived some presence of social support in their lives. The two most commonly cited types of social support were emotional and instrumental. The two most common sources of social support were family members other than spouses (52.2% and spouses (32.6%. Body mass index (BMI was significantly correlated with the number of perceived sources of support. The presence or absence and the role of social support in supporting optimal health outcomes should be considered for Hispanics with chronic rheumatic diseases. Involving family members and spouses in the plan of care for this population could facilitate health promotion and chronic disease management.

  7. Pattern of skin diseases in patients visiting a tertiary care health facility at hyderabad, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, K.N.; Soomro, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The morbidity associated with skin diseases makes them an important public health problem. Very scanty literature is found on the problem which is either disease-based, community based or a specified population group-based. objective of this study was to assess the pattern of skin diseases in patients and to determine their relation with demographic characteristics. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted at dermatology out-patient department of liaquat university hospital, jamshoro, pakistan for the period from 10th january to 10th february 2008. Four hundred and eleven patients were enrolled during the study period. The study population comprised of newly diagnosed cases as well as relapsing cases presenting at the facility. The criterion for registering the patients was clinical diagnosis although few cases were supported by investigations, too. The data was collected through a pre-designed questionnaire and analysed through spss-12. Result: Skin problems are fairly common among children and women. in children of less than 10 years age, 82.5% visiting the facility suffer from infectious skin diseases. among the infectious diseases, scabies is highly prevalent disease (45.5%). the majority of the patients belong to rural or slum areas (77.2%), low socio-economic strata (68.9%), and living in overcrowded families (82%). a strong association between skin infections and water inadequacy (p=0.016) was found, and scabies shows a strong statistical association with overcrowding (p=0.025). Conclusion: The skin diseases involve every age strata of our population but it is fairly common in younger age group, women, and people who do not practice hygiene. Out-reach services for the rural and slum communities and health education will give good results on prevention of skin diseases. (author)

  8. [Subclinical and established kidney disease in recently diagnosed hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel Angel; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; Grandes, Gonzalo; Recio-Rodríguez, José Ignacio; Castaño Sánchez, Yolanda; Rodríguez Sánchez, Emiliano; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2010-03-06

    To estimate renal disease in recently diagnosed hypertensive patients, and to identify factors related to renal disease. Cross-sectional study, with 425 hypertensive patients recently diagnosed in primary health care; renal disease was estimated with serum creatinine, albumin/creatinine index and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We analyzed cardiovascular risk factors (CRF), subclinical organ injury and cardiovascular disease following the criteria of the 2007 European Guide of Hypertension. Average age: 58,96 +/- 12,73 years old, 63,3% male. We found dyslipemia in 80%, abdominal obesity in 49% and metabolic syndrome in 36% patients. These patients showed increased serum creatinine 3,3%, a reduction in GFR 9,6%, hidden renal disease 6,4%, microalbuminuria 7,5% and nephropathy 2,4%. Hypertensive patients with renal disease (17,88%) were older, with higher systolic pressure, higher incidence of metabolic syndrome, abnormal carotid intima-media thickness and ankle-arm index, and presence of cardiovascular disease. Variables associated with renal disease were metabolic syndrome (odds ratio = 11,12) and ankle-arm index (odds ratio = 17,55). Variables related to creatinina were sex, ankle-arm index and metabolic syndrome; variables related to GFR were sex, age, ankle-arm index, metabolic syndrome and body mass index (BMI); variables related with albumin/creatinine index included diabetes mellitus. Renal disease is detected in about 2 out of 10 hypertensive patients, when, besides serum creatinina, we analyze albumin/creatinine index and GFR. Metabolic syndrome and ankle-arm index are the main variables associated with renal disease. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options.

  10. Reasons for living and hope as the protective factors against suicidality in Chinese patients with depression: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xingwei; Wang, Qin; Wang, Xiang; Cai, Taisheng

    2016-07-20

    The risk factors of suicidal ideation and attempts have been discussed in many researches. Few studies have examined reasons for living and hope as protective factors against suicide in a clinical population. It is unclear if these factors help to reduce suicide rates in patients with depression. The study aimed to assess the role of reasons for living and hope in the identification and reduction of suicidality and explore the influence of reasons for living or hope in the transition from suicidal ideation to suicide attempts. Patients with depression (N = 115) completed the Beck Depression Inventory, Reasons for Living Inventory, and Adult Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire. There were significant correlations among depression, hope, total reasons for living, and suicidal ideation and attempts. Further, after controlling for depression, reasons for living and hope had significant main effects on suicidal ideation. Hope also had a significant predictive effect in the transition of suicidal ideation to suicide attempt. We concluded that reasons for living and hope may protect against suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with depression. Especially hope could reduce the possibility of suicide attempt.

  11. Environmental factors in a population-based inception cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burisch, J; Pedersen, Natalia; Cukovic-Cavka, S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior ...... and Western European patients differed in environmental factors prior to diagnosis. Eastern European patients exhibited higher occurrences of suspected risk factors for IBD included in the Western lifestyle.......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing in Eastern Europe possibly due to changes in environmental factors towards a more "westernised" standard of living. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in exposure to environmental factors prior...... to diagnosis in Eastern and Western European IBD patients. METHODS: The EpiCom cohort is a population-based, prospective inception cohort of 1560 unselected IBD patients from 31 European countries covering a background population of 10.1 million. At the time of diagnosis patients were asked to complete an 87...

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome.

  13. ANTITHROMBOTIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH VALVULAR HEART DISEASE: WHAT'S NEW?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of modern data and an analysis of the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery published in 2017 regarding the use of antithrombotic therapy in patients with valvular heart disease. The results of studies devoted to the use of new oral anticoagulants in patients with valvular heart disease are demonstrated.

  14. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  15. Duodopa pump treatment in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsborg, Merete; Korbo, Lise; Regeur, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump. Monothe......Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) often develop motor complications including fluctuations and involuntary movements (dyskinesias). In Denmark, treatment has comprised Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) since the late 1990s, and as from 2002 use of a subcutaneous apomorphine pump...

  16. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease that affects 2-3% of the population and shares pathophysiologic mechanisms and risk factors with cardiovascular diseases. Studies have suggested psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and Danish guidelines...... on cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have recently been published. We provide a short review of the current evidence and the Danish guidelines....