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Sample records for disease gene expression

  1. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  2. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  3. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. http://rged.wall-eva.net. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  5. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis and independent validation of key candidate genes. Prathima ... Table 2. Differentially expressed genes in CAD compared to age and gender matched controls. .... Regulation of nuclear pre-mRNA domain containing 1A.

  6. Dysregulation of RNA Mediated Gene Expression in Motor Neuron Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês do Carmo G; Rehorst, Wiebke A; Kye, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an important role for RNA-mediated gene expression in motor neuron diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and SMA (spinal muscular atrophy). ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder, whereby SMA or "children's Lou Gehrig's disease" is considered a pediatric neurodevelopmental disorder. Despite the difference in genetic causes, both ALS and SMA share common phenotypes; dysfunction/loss of motor neurons that eventually leads to muscle weakness and atrophy. With advanced techniques in molecular genetics and cell biology, current data suggest that these two distinct motor neuron diseases share more than phenotypes; ALS and SMA have similar cellular pathological mechanisms including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and dysregulation in RNA-mediated gene expression. Here, we will discuss the current findings on these two diseases with specific focus on RNA-mediated gene regulation including miRNA expression, pre-mRNA processing and RNA binding proteins.

  7. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  8. Ranking candidate disease genes from gene expression and protein interaction: a Katz-centrality based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    Full Text Available Many diseases have complex genetic causes, where a set of alleles can affect the propensity of getting the disease. The identification of such disease genes is important to understand the mechanistic and evolutionary aspects of pathogenesis, improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease, and aid in drug discovery. Current genetic studies typically identify chromosomal regions associated specific diseases. But picking out an unknown disease gene from hundreds of candidates located on the same genomic interval is still challenging. In this study, we propose an approach to prioritize candidate genes by integrating data of gene expression level, protein-protein interaction strength and known disease genes. Our method is based only on two, simple, biologically motivated assumptions--that a gene is a good disease-gene candidate if it is differentially expressed in cases and controls, or that it is close to other disease-gene candidates in its protein interaction network. We tested our method on 40 diseases in 58 gene expression datasets of the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database. On these datasets our method is able to predict unknown disease genes as well as identifying pleiotropic genes involved in the physiological cellular processes of many diseases. Our study not only provides an effective algorithm for prioritizing candidate disease genes but is also a way to discover phenotypic interdependency, cooccurrence and shared pathophysiology between different disorders.

  9. Genetics of sputum gene expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Qiu

    Full Text Available Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs. The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5, the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus.

  10. Genetics of Sputum Gene Expression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H.; Riley, John H.; Anderson, Wayne H.; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus. PMID:21949713

  11. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through global profiling, network analysis ... A_33_P3249595 B-cell CLL/lymphoma 11A (zinc finger protein). BCL11A. 2.29 ..... It acts as a cytoplasmic sensor for viral infection and ...

  12. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

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    Zhang Wujuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null. About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change, representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13 and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11 cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology.

  13. Fibrosis-Related Gene Expression in Single Ventricle Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Stephanie J; Siomos, Austine K; Garcia, Anastacia M; Nguyen, Hieu; SooHoo, Megan; Galambos, Csaba; Nunley, Karin; Stauffer, Brian L; Sucharov, Carmen C; Miyamoto, Shelley D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate fibrosis and fibrosis-related gene expression in the myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle with right ventricular failure. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on explanted right ventricular myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle disease and controls with nonfailing heart disease. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: single ventricle failing (right ventricular failure before or after stage I palliation), single ventricle nonfailing (infants listed for primary transplantation with normal right ventricular function), and stage III (Fontan or right ventricular failure after stage III). To evaluate subjects of similar age and right ventricular volume loading, single ventricle disease with failure was compared with single ventricle without failure and stage III was compared with nonfailing right ventricular disease. Histologic fibrosis was assessed in all hearts. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to identify differences in gene expression. Collagen (Col1α, Col3) expression is decreased in single ventricle congenital heart disease with failure compared with nonfailing single ventricle congenital heart disease (P = .019 and P = .035, respectively), and is equivalent in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and TIMP-4) are downregulated in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease (P = .0047, P = .013 and P = .013, respectively). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) are similar between nonfailing single ventricular heart disease and failing single ventricular heart disease, and between stage III heart disease and nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. There is no difference in the prevalence of right ventricular fibrosis by histology in subjects with single ventricular failure heart disease with right ventricular failure (18%) compared with those with normal right

  14. Clustering gene expression regulators: new approach to disease subtyping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Pyatnitskiy

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in modern medicine is to stratify different patient groups in terms of underlying disease molecular mechanisms as to develop more personalized approach to therapy. Here we propose novel method for disease subtyping based on analysis of activated expression regulators on a sample-by-sample basis. Our approach relies on Sub-Network Enrichment Analysis algorithm (SNEA which identifies gene subnetworks with significant concordant changes in expression between two conditions. Subnetwork consists of central regulator and downstream genes connected by relations extracted from global literature-extracted regulation database. Regulators found in each patient separately are clustered together and assigned activity scores which are used for final patients grouping. We show that our approach performs well compared to other related methods and at the same time provides researchers with complementary level of understanding of pathway-level biology behind a disease by identification of significant expression regulators. We have observed the reasonable grouping of neuromuscular disorders (triggered by structural damage vs triggered by unknown mechanisms, that was not revealed using standard expression profile clustering. For another experiment we were able to suggest the clusters of regulators, responsible for colorectal carcinoma vs adenoma discrimination and identify frequently genetically changed regulators that could be of specific importance for the individual characteristics of cancer development. Proposed approach can be regarded as biologically meaningful feature selection, reducing tens of thousands of genes down to dozens of clusters of regulators. Obtained clusters of regulators make possible to generate valuable biological hypotheses about molecular mechanisms related to a clinical outcome for individual patient.

  15. Assessment of gene expression profiles in peripheral occlusive arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenek, Serban; Nastase, Anca; Niculescu, Ana Maria; Baila, Sorin; Herlea, Vlad; Lazar, Vadimir; Paslaru, Liliana; Botezatu, Anca; Tomescu, Dana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Molecular events responsible for the onset and progression of peripheral occlusive arterial disease (POAD) are incompletely understood. Gene expression profiling may point out relevant features of the disease. Tissue samples were collected as operatory waste from a total of 36 patients with (n = 18) and without (n = 18) POAD. The tissues were histologically evaluated, and the patients with POAD were classified according to Leriche-Fontaine (LF) classification: 11% with stage IIB, 22% with stage III, and 67% with stage IV. Total RNA was isolated from all samples and hybridized onto Agilent 4×44K Oligo microarray slides. The bioinformatic analysis identified genes differentially expressed between control and pathologic tissues. Ten genes with a fold change ≥ 2 (1 with a fold change ≥ 1.8) were selected for quantitative polymerase chain reaction validation (GPC3, CFD, GDF10, ITLN1, TSPAN8, MMP28, NNMT, SERPINA5, LUM, and FDXR). C-reactive protein (CRP) was assessed with a specific assay, while nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) was evaluated in the patient serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A multiple regression analysis showed that the level of CRP in the serum is correlated with the POAD LF stages (r(2) = 0.22, P = 0.046) and that serum NNMT is higher in IV LF POAD patients (P = 0.005). The mRNA gene expression of LUM is correlated with the LF stage (r(2) = 0.45, P = 0.009), and the mRNA level of ITLN1 is correlated with the ankle-brachial index (r(2) = 0.42, P = 0.008). Our analysis shows that NNMT, ITLN1, LUM, CFD, and TSPAN8 in combination with other known markers, such as CRP, could be evaluated as a panel of biomarkers of POAD. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  17. Expression of novel Alzheimer's disease risk genes in control and Alzheimer's disease brains.

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    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD etiology is influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors. Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS for LOAD have identified 10 novel risk genes: ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CD33, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A6A, MS4A6E, and PICALM. We sought to measure the influence of GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and gene expression levels on clinical and pathological measures of AD in brain tissue from the parietal lobe of AD cases and age-matched, cognitively normal controls. We found that ABCA7, CD33, and CR1 expression levels were associated with clinical dementia rating (CDR, with higher expression being associated with more advanced cognitive decline. BIN1 expression levels were associated with disease progression, where higher expression was associated with a delayed age at onset. CD33, CLU, and CR1 expression levels were associated with disease status, where elevated expression levels were associated with AD. Additionally, MS4A6A expression levels were associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque scores, with elevated expression levels being associated with more advanced brain pathology. We failed to detect an association between GWAS SNPs and gene expression levels in our brain series. The minor allele of rs3764650 in ABCA7 is associated with age at onset and disease duration, and the minor allele of rs670139 in MS4A6E was associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque score. These findings suggest that expression of some GWAS genes, namely ABCA7, BIN1, CD33, CLU, CR1 and the MS4A family, are altered in AD brains.

  18. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  19. Gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the extent of coronary artery disease.

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    Peter R Sinnaeve

    Full Text Available Systemic and local inflammation plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, but the relationship of whole blood gene expression changes with coronary disease remains unclear. We have investigated whether gene expression patterns in peripheral blood correlate with the severity of coronary disease and whether these patterns correlate with the extent of atherosclerosis in the vascular wall. Patients were selected according to their coronary artery disease index (CADi, a validated angiographical measure of the extent of coronary atherosclerosis that correlates with outcome. RNA was extracted from blood of 120 patients with at least a stenosis greater than 50% (CADi > or = 23 and from 121 controls without evidence of coronary stenosis (CADi = 0. 160 individual genes were found to correlate with CADi (rho > 0.2, P<0.003. Prominent differential expression was observed especially in genes involved in cell growth, apoptosis and inflammation. Using these 160 genes, a partial least squares multivariate regression model resulted in a highly predictive model (r(2 = 0.776, P<0.0001. The expression pattern of these 160 genes in aortic tissue also predicted the severity of atherosclerosis in human aortas, showing that peripheral blood gene expression associated with coronary atherosclerosis mirrors gene expression changes in atherosclerotic arteries. In conclusion, the simultaneous expression pattern of 160 genes in whole blood correlates with the severity of coronary artery disease and mirrors expression changes in the atherosclerotic vascular wall.

  20. Gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.; Walters, R.A.; Enger, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    We prepared probes for isolating functional pieces of the metallothionein locus. The probes enabled a variety of experiments, eventually revealing two mechanisms for metallothionein gene expression, the order of the DNA coding units at the locus, and the location of the gene site in its chromosome. Once the switch regulating metallothionein synthesis was located, it could be joined by recombinant DNA methods to other, unrelated genes, then reintroduced into cells by gene-transfer techniques. The expression of these recombinant genes could then be induced by exposing the cells to Zn 2+ or Cd 2+ . We would thus take advantage of the clearly defined switching properties of the metallothionein gene to manipulate the expression of other, perhaps normally constitutive, genes. Already, despite an incomplete understanding of how the regulatory switch of the metallothionein locus operates, such experiments have been performed successfully

  1. Disease gene characterization through large-scale co-expression analysis.

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    Allen Day

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the post genome era, a major goal of biology is the identification of specific roles for individual genes. We report a new genomic tool for gene characterization, the UCLA Gene Expression Tool (UGET.Celsius, the largest co-normalized microarray dataset of Affymetrix based gene expression, was used to calculate the correlation between all possible gene pairs on all platforms, and generate stored indexes in a web searchable format. The size of Celsius makes UGET a powerful gene characterization tool. Using a small seed list of known cartilage-selective genes, UGET extended the list of known genes by identifying 32 new highly cartilage-selective genes. Of these, 7 of 10 tested were validated by qPCR including the novel cartilage-specific genes SDK2 and FLJ41170. In addition, we retrospectively tested UGET and other gene expression based prioritization tools to identify disease-causing genes within known linkage intervals. We first demonstrated this utility with UGET using genetically heterogeneous disorders such as Joubert syndrome, microcephaly, neuropsychiatric disorders and type 2 limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2 and then compared UGET to other gene expression based prioritization programs which use small but discrete and well annotated datasets. Finally, we observed a significantly higher gene correlation shared between genes in disease networks associated with similar complex or Mendelian disorders.UGET is an invaluable resource for a geneticist that permits the rapid inclusion of expression criteria from one to hundreds of genes in genomic intervals linked to disease. By using thousands of arrays UGET annotates and prioritizes genes better than other tools especially with rare tissue disorders or complex multi-tissue biological processes. This information can be critical in prioritization of candidate genes for sequence analysis.

  2. FocusHeuristics - expression-data-driven network optimization and disease gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Mathias; Du, Yang; Warsow, Gregor; Hamed, Mohamed; Endlich, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Sklarz, Lisa-Madeleine; Sender, Sina; Junghanß, Christian; Möller, Steffen; Fuellen, Georg; Struckmann, Stephan

    2017-02-16

    To identify genes contributing to disease phenotypes remains a challenge for bioinformatics. Static knowledge on biological networks is often combined with the dynamics observed in gene expression levels over disease development, to find markers for diagnostics and therapy, and also putative disease-modulatory drug targets and drugs. The basis of current methods ranges from a focus on expression-levels (Limma) to concentrating on network characteristics (PageRank, HITS/Authority Score), and both (DeMAND, Local Radiality). We present an integrative approach (the FocusHeuristics) that is thoroughly evaluated based on public expression data and molecular disease characteristics provided by DisGeNet. The FocusHeuristics combines three scores, i.e. the log fold change and another two, based on the sum and difference of log fold changes of genes/proteins linked in a network. A gene is kept when one of the scores to which it contributes is above a threshold. Our FocusHeuristics is both, a predictor for gene-disease-association and a bioinformatics method to reduce biological networks to their disease-relevant parts, by highlighting the dynamics observed in expression data. The FocusHeuristics is slightly, but significantly better than other methods by its more successful identification of disease-associated genes measured by AUC, and it delivers mechanistic explanations for its choice of genes.

  3. A novel joint analysis framework improves identification of differentially expressed genes in cross disease transcriptomic analysis

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    Wenyi Qin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Detecting differentially expressed (DE genes between disease and normal control group is one of the most common analyses in genome-wide transcriptomic data. Since most studies don’t have a lot of samples, researchers have used meta-analysis to group different datasets for the same disease. Even then, in many cases the statistical power is still not enough. Taking into account the fact that many diseases share the same disease genes, it is desirable to design a statistical framework that can identify diseases’ common and specific DE genes simultaneously to improve the identification power. Results We developed a novel empirical Bayes based mixture model to identify DE genes in specific study by leveraging the shared information across multiple different disease expression data sets. The effectiveness of joint analysis was demonstrated through comprehensive simulation studies and two real data applications. The simulation results showed that our method consistently outperformed single data set analysis and two other meta-analysis methods in identification power. In real data analysis, overall our method demonstrated better identification power in detecting DE genes and prioritized more disease related genes and disease related pathways than single data set analysis. Over 150% more disease related genes are identified by our method in application to Huntington’s disease. We expect that our method would provide researchers a new way of utilizing available data sets from different diseases when sample size of the focused disease is limited.

  4. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Wu, Long-Fei; Lu, Xin; Mo, Xing-Bo; Tang, Zai-Xiang; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested. Methods We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Results We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1), each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1). Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation. Conclusion The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:26352601

  5. Network analysis of differential expression for the identification of disease-causing genes.

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    Daniela Nitsch

    Full Text Available Genetic studies (in particular linkage and association studies identify chromosomal regions involved in a disease or phenotype of interest, but those regions often contain many candidate genes, only a few of which can be followed-up for biological validation. Recently, computational methods to identify (prioritize the most promising candidates within a region have been proposed, but they are usually not applicable to cases where little is known about the phenotype (no or few confirmed disease genes, fragmentary understanding of the biological cascades involved. We seek to overcome this limitation by replacing knowledge about the biological process by experimental data on differential gene expression between affected and healthy individuals. Considering the problem from the perspective of a gene/protein network, we assess a candidate gene by considering the level of differential expression in its neighborhood under the assumption that strong candidates will tend to be surrounded by differentially expressed neighbors. We define a notion of soft neighborhood where each gene is given a contributing weight, which decreases with the distance from the candidate gene on the protein network. To account for multiple paths between genes, we define the distance using the Laplacian exponential diffusion kernel. We score candidates by aggregating the differential expression of neighbors weighted as a function of distance. Through a randomization procedure, we rank candidates by p-values. We illustrate our approach on four monogenic diseases and successfully prioritize the known disease causing genes.

  6. Gene expression profile of peripheral blood monocytes: a step towards the molecular diagnosis of celiac disease?

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    Martina Galatola

    Full Text Available AIM: Celiac disease (CD is a multifactorial autoimmune disease induced by ingestion of gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Despite technological progress, the diagnosis of CD is still based on duodenal biopsy as it was 50 years ago. In this study we analysed the expression of CD-associated genes in small bowel biopsies of patients and controls in order to explore the multivariate pathway of the expression profile of CD patients. Then, using multivariant discriminant analysis, we evaluated whether the expression profiles of these genes in peripheral blood monocytes (PBMs differed between patients and controls. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven patients with active and 11 with treated CD, 40 healthy controls and 9 disease controls (Crohn's disease patients were enrolled. RESULTS: Several genes were differentially expressed in CD patients versus controls, but the analysis of each single gene did not provided a comprehensive picture. A multivariate discriminant analysis showed that the expression of 5 genes in intestinal mucosa accounted for 93% of the difference between CD patients and controls. We then applied the same approach to PBMs, on a training set of 20 samples. The discriminant equation obtained was validated on a testing cohort of 10 additional cases and controls, and we obtained a correct classification of all CD cases and of 91% of the control samples. We applied this equation to treated CD patients and to disease controls and obtained a discrimination of 100%. CONCLUSIONS: The combined expression of 4 genes allows one to discriminate between CD patients and controls, and between CD patients on a gluten-free diet and disease controls. Our results contribute to the understanding of the complex interactions among CD-associated genes, and they may represent a starting point for the development of a molecular diagnosis of celiac disease.

  7. Application of disease-associated differentially expressed genes – Mining for functional candidate genes for mastitis resistance in cattle

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    Schwerin Manfred

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study the mRNA differential display method was applied to identify mastitis-associated expressed DNA sequences based on different expression patterns in mammary gland samples of non-infected and infected udder quarters of a cow. In total, 704 different cDNA bands were displayed in both udder samples. Five hundred-and-thirty two bands, (75.6% were differentially displayed. Ninety prominent cDNA bands were isolated, re-amplified, cloned and sequenced resulting in 87 different sequences. Amongst the 19 expressed sequence tags showing a similarity with previously described genes, the majority of these sequences exhibited homology to protein kinase encoding genes (26.3%, to genes involved in the regulation of gene expression (26.3%, to growth and differentiation factor encoding genes (21.0% and to immune response or inflammation marker encoding genes (21.0%. These sequences were shown to have mastitis-associated expression in the udder samples of animals with and without clinical mastitis by quantitative RT-PCR. They were mapped physically using a bovine-hamster somatic cell hybrid panel and a 5000 rad bovine whole genome radiation hybrid panel. According to their localization in QTL regions based on an established integrated marker/gene-map and their disease-associated expression, four genes (AHCY, PRKDC, HNRPU, OSTF1 were suggested as potentially involved in mastitis defense.

  8. ZCCHC17 is a master regulator of synaptic gene expression in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomljanovic, Zeljko; Patel, Mitesh; Shin, William; Califano, Andrea; Teich, Andrew F

    2018-02-01

    In an effort to better understand the molecular drivers of synaptic and neurophysiologic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we analyzed neuronal gene expression data from human AD brain tissue to identify master regulators of synaptic gene expression. Master regulator analysis identifies ZCCHC17 as normally supporting the expression of a network of synaptic genes, and predicts that ZCCHC17 dysfunction in AD leads to lower expression of these genes. We demonstrate that ZCCHC17 is normally expressed in neurons and is reduced early in the course of AD pathology. We show that ZCCHC17 loss in rat neurons leads to lower expression of the majority of the predicted synaptic targets and that ZCCHC17 drives the expression of a similar gene network in humans and rats. These findings support a conserved function for ZCCHC17 between species and identify ZCCHC17 loss as an important early driver of lower synaptic gene expression in AD. Matlab and R scripts used in this paper are available at https://github.com/afteich/AD_ZCC. aft25@cumc.columbia.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    through global profiling, network analysis and independent validation of key candidate ... and IL8 showed >8-fold higher expression in cases relative to the controls implying their important role in CAD. ..... ducted on mice model, which was a cross hybridiza- .... Apostolakis S., Vogiatzi K., Amanatidou V. and Spandidos D. A..

  10. Gene Expression Differences in Peripheral Blood of Parkinson's Disease Patients with Distinct Progression Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Pinho

    Full Text Available The prognosis of neurodegenerative disorders is clinically challenging due to the inexistence of established biomarkers for predicting disease progression. Here, we performed an exploratory cross-sectional, case-control study aimed at determining whether gene expression differences in peripheral blood may be used as a signature of Parkinson's disease (PD progression, thereby shedding light into potential molecular mechanisms underlying disease development. We compared transcriptional profiles in the blood from 34 PD patients who developed postural instability within ten years with those of 33 patients who did not develop postural instability within this time frame. Our study identified >200 differentially expressed genes between the two groups. The expression of several of the genes identified was previously found deregulated in animal models of PD and in PD patients. Relevant genes were selected for validation by real-time PCR in a subset of patients. The genes validated were linked to nucleic acid metabolism, mitochondria, immune response and intracellular-transport. Interestingly, we also found deregulation of these genes in a dopaminergic cell model of PD, a simple paradigm that can now be used to further dissect the role of these molecular players on dopaminergic cell loss. Altogether, our study provides preliminary evidence that expression changes in specific groups of genes and pathways, detected in peripheral blood samples, may be correlated with differential PD progression. Our exploratory study suggests that peripheral gene expression profiling may prove valuable for assisting in prediction of PD prognosis, and identifies novel culprits possibly involved in dopaminergic cell death. Given the exploratory nature of our study, further investigations using independent, well-characterized cohorts will be essential in order to validate our candidates as predictors of PD prognosis and to definitively confirm the value of gene expression

  11. Gene co-expression networks shed light into diseases of brain iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Wiethoff, Sarah; Heidari, Moones; Johnstone, Daniel M; Botía, Juan A; Collingwood, Joanna F; Hardy, John; Milward, Elizabeth A; Ryten, Mina; Houlden, Henry

    2016-03-01

    Aberrant brain iron deposition is observed in both common and rare neurodegenerative disorders, including those categorized as Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), which are characterized by focal iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. Two NBIA genes are directly involved in iron metabolism, but whether other NBIA-related genes also regulate iron homeostasis in the human brain, and whether aberrant iron deposition contributes to neurodegenerative processes remains largely unknown. This study aims to expand our understanding of these iron overload diseases and identify relationships between known NBIA genes and their main interacting partners by using a systems biology approach. We used whole-transcriptome gene expression data from human brain samples originating from 101 neuropathologically normal individuals (10 brain regions) to generate weighted gene co-expression networks and cluster the 10 known NBIA genes in an unsupervised manner. We investigated NBIA-enriched networks for relevant cell types and pathways, and whether they are disrupted by iron loading in NBIA diseased tissue and in an in vivo mouse model. We identified two basal ganglia gene co-expression modules significantly enriched for NBIA genes, which resemble neuronal and oligodendrocytic signatures. These NBIA gene networks are enriched for iron-related genes, and implicate synapse and lipid metabolism related pathways. Our data also indicates that these networks are disrupted by excessive brain iron loading. We identified multiple cell types in the origin of NBIA disorders. We also found unforeseen links between NBIA networks and iron-related processes, and demonstrate convergent pathways connecting NBIAs and phenotypically overlapping diseases. Our results are of further relevance for these diseases by providing candidates for new causative genes and possible points for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Global gene expression analysis in a mouse model for Norrie disease: late involvement of photoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzner, Steffen; Prietz, Sandra; Feil, Silke; Nuber, Ulrike A; Ropers, H-Hilger; Berger, Wolfgang

    2002-09-01

    Mutations in the NDP gene give rise to a variety of eye diseases, including classic Norrie disease (ND), X-linked exudative vitreoretinopathy (EVRX), retinal telangiectasis (Coats disease), and advanced retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). The gene product is a cystine-knot-containing extracellular signaling molecule of unknown function. In the current study, gene expression was determined in a mouse model of ND, to unravel disease-associated mechanisms at the molecular level. Gene transcription in the eyes of 2-year-old Ndp knockout mice was compared with that in the eyes of age-matched wild-type control animals, by means of cDNA subtraction and microarrays. Clones (n = 3072) from the cDNA subtraction libraries were spotted onto glass slides and hybridized with fluorescently labeled RNA-derived targets. More than 230 differentially expressed clones were sequenced, and their expression patterns were verified by virtual Northern blot analysis. Numerous gene transcripts that are absent or downregulated in the eye of Ndp knockout mice are photoreceptor cell specific. In younger Ndp knockout mice (up to 1 year old), however, all these transcripts were found to be expressed at normal levels. The identification of numerous photoreceptor cell-specific transcripts with a reduced expression in 2-year-old, but not in young, Ndp knockout mice indicates that normal gene expression in these light-sensitive cells of mutant mice is established and maintained over a long period and that rods and cones are affected relatively late in the mouse model of ND. Obviously, the absence of the Ndp gene product is not compatible with long-term survival of photoreceptor cells in the mouse.

  13. Gene Expression Correlated with Severe Asthma Characteristics Reveals Heterogeneous Mechanisms of Severe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Brian D; Bleecker, Eugene R; Busse, William W; Erzurum, Serpil C; Gaston, Benjamin M; Jarjour, Nizar N; Meyers, Deborah A; Milosevic, Jadranka; Tedrow, John R; Wu, Wei; Kaminski, Naftali; Wenzel, Sally E

    2017-06-01

    Severe asthma (SA) is a heterogeneous disease with multiple molecular mechanisms. Gene expression studies of bronchial epithelial cells in individuals with asthma have provided biological insight and underscored possible mechanistic differences between individuals. Identify networks of genes reflective of underlying biological processes that define SA. Airway epithelial cell gene expression from 155 subjects with asthma and healthy control subjects in the Severe Asthma Research Program was analyzed by weighted gene coexpression network analysis to identify gene networks and profiles associated with SA and its specific characteristics (i.e., pulmonary function tests, quality of life scores, urgent healthcare use, and steroid use), which potentially identified underlying biological processes. A linear model analysis confirmed these findings while adjusting for potential confounders. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis constructed 64 gene network modules, including modules corresponding to T1 and T2 inflammation, neuronal function, cilia, epithelial growth, and repair mechanisms. Although no network selectively identified SA, genes in modules linked to epithelial growth and repair and neuronal function were markedly decreased in SA. Several hub genes of the epithelial growth and repair module were found located at the 17q12-21 locus, near a well-known asthma susceptibility locus. T2 genes increased with severity in those treated with corticosteroids but were also elevated in untreated, mild-to-moderate disease compared with healthy control subjects. T1 inflammation, especially when associated with increased T2 gene expression, was elevated in a subgroup of younger patients with SA. In this hypothesis-generating analysis, gene expression networks in relation to asthma severity provided potentially new insight into biological mechanisms associated with the development of SA and its phenotypes.

  14. Mucosal CCR1 gene expression as a marker of molecular activity in Crohn's disease: preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Maria; Mănuc, Teodora Ecaterina; Milanesi, Elena; Pleşea, Iancu Emil; Ţieranu, Eugen Nicolae; Popa, Caterina; Mănuc, Mircea; Preda, Carmen Monica; Ţieranu, Ioana; Diculescu, Mihai Mircea; Ionescu, Elena Mirela; Becheanu, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    A series of mechanisms of immune response, inflammation and apoptosis have been demonstrated to contribute to the appearance and evolution of Crohn's disease (CD) through the overexpression of several cytokines and chemokines in a susceptible host. The aim of this study was to identify the differences in gene expression profiles analyzing a panel of candidate genes in the mucosa from patients with active CD (CD-A), patients in remission (CD-R), and normal controls. Nine individuals were enrolled in the study: six CD patients (three with active lesions, three with mucosal healing) and three controls without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) seen on endoscopy. All the individuals underwent mucosal biopsy during colonoscopy. Gene expression levels of 84 genes previously associated with CD were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Ten genes out of 84 were found significantly differentially expressed in CD-A (CCL11, CCL25, DEFA5, GCG, IL17A, LCN2, REG1A, STAT3, MUC1, CCR1) and eight genes in CD-R (CASP1, IL23A, STAT1, STAT3, TNF, CCR1, CCL5, and HSP90B1) when compared to controls. A quantitative gene expression analysis revealed that CCR1 gene was more expressed in CD-A than in CD-R. Our data suggest that CCR1 gene may be a putative marker of molecular activity of Crohn's disease. Following these preliminary data, a confirmation in larger cohort studies could represent a useful method in order to identify new therapeutic targets.

  15. Alzheimer's Disease Risk Polymorphisms Regulate Gene Expression in the ZCWPW1 and the CELF1 Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD is a genetically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. Recent large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified more than twenty loci that modify risk for AD. Despite the identification of these loci, little progress has been made in identifying the functional variants that explain the association with AD risk. Thus, we sought to determine whether the novel LOAD GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs alter expression of LOAD GWAS genes and whether expression of these genes is altered in AD brains. The majority of LOAD GWAS SNPs occur in gene dense regions under large linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks, making it unclear which gene(s are modified by the SNP. Thus, we tested for brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs between LOAD GWAS SNPs and SNPs in high LD with the LOAD GWAS SNPs in all of the genes within the GWAS loci. We found a significant eQTL between rs1476679 and PILRB and GATS, which occurs within the ZCWPW1 locus. PILRB and GATS expression levels, within the ZCWPW1 locus, were also associated with AD status. Rs7120548 was associated with MTCH2 expression, which occurs within the CELF1 locus. Additionally, expression of several genes within the CELF1 locus, including MTCH2, were highly correlated with one another and were associated with AD status. We further demonstrate that PILRB, as well as other genes within the GWAS loci, are most highly expressed in microglia. These findings together with the function of PILRB as a DAP12 receptor supports the critical role of microglia and neuroinflammation in AD risk.

  16. A large-scale analysis of tissue-specific pathology and gene expression of human disease genes and complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Lage; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Karlberg, Erik, Olof, Linnart

    2008-01-01

    to be overexpressed in the normal tissues where defects cause pathology. In contrast, cancer genes and complexes were not overexpressed in the tissues from which the tumors emanate. We specifically identified a complex involved in XY sex reversal that is testis-specific and down-regulated in ovaries. We also......Heritable diseases are caused by germ-line mutations that, despite tissuewide presence, often lead to tissue-specific pathology. Here, we make a systematic analysis of the link between tissue-specific gene expression and pathological manifestations in many human diseases and cancers. Diseases were...

  17. A Pathway Based Classification Method for Analyzing Gene Expression for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyle, Nicola; Keohane, Aoife; Newhouse, Stephen; Lunnon, Katie; Johnston, Caroline; Soininen, Hilkka; Kloszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela; Kiddle, Steven; Dobson, Richard Jb

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that gene expression levels in blood may be able to differentiate subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from normal elderly controls and mild cognitively impaired (MCI) subjects. However, there is limited replicability at the single marker level. A pathway-based interpretation of gene expression may prove more robust. This study aimed to investigate whether a case/control classification model built on pathway level data was more robust than a gene level model and may consequently perform better in test data. The study used two batches of gene expression data from the AddNeuroMed (ANM) and Dementia Case Registry (DCR) cohorts. Our study used Illumina Human HT-12 Expression BeadChips to collect gene expression from blood samples. Random forest modeling with recursive feature elimination was used to predict case/control status. Age and APOE ɛ4 status were used as covariates for all analysis. Gene and pathway level models performed similarly to each other and to a model based on demographic information only. Any potential increase in concordance from the novel pathway level approach used here has not lead to a greater predictive ability in these datasets. However, we have only tested one method for creating pathway level scores. Further, we have been able to benchmark pathways against genes in datasets that had been extensively harmonized. Further work should focus on the use of alternative methods for creating pathway level scores, in particular those that incorporate pathway topology, and the use of an endophenotype based approach.

  18. Transcriptomic Analysis and the Expression of Disease-Resistant Genes in Oryza meyeriana under Native Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin He

    Full Text Available Oryza meyeriana (O. meyeriana, with a GG genome type (2n = 24, accumulated plentiful excellent characteristics with respect to resistance to many diseases such as rice shade and blast, even immunity to bacterial blight. It is very important to know if the diseases-resistant genes exist and express in this wild rice under native conditions. However, limited genomic or transcriptomic data of O. meyeriana are currently available. In this study, we present the first comprehensive characterization of the O. meyeriana transcriptome using RNA-seq and obtained 185,323 contigs with an average length of 1,692 bp and an N50 of 2,391 bp. Through differential expression analysis, it was found that there were most tissue-specifically expressed genes in roots, and next to stems and leaves. By similarity search against protein databases, 146,450 had at least a significant alignment to existed gene models. Comparison with the Oryza sativa (japonica-type Nipponbare and indica-type 93-11 genomes revealed that 13% of the O. meyeriana contigs had not been detected in O. sativa. Many diseases-resistant genes, such as bacterial blight resistant, blast resistant, rust resistant, fusarium resistant, cyst nematode resistant and downy mildew gene, were mined from the transcriptomic database. There are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes (Xa1 and Xa26 differentially or specifically expressed in O. meyeriana. The 4 Xa1 contigs were all only expressed in root, while three of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression level in leaves, two of Xa26 contigs have the highest expression profile in stems and one of Xa26 contigs was expressed dominantly in roots. The transcriptomic database of O. meyeriana has been constructed and many diseases-resistant genes were found to express under native condition, which provides a foundation for future discovery of a number of novel genes and provides a basis for studying the molecular mechanisms associated with disease

  19. Exploring matrix factorization techniques for significant genes identification of Alzheimer’s disease microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaohua

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wide use of high-throughput DNA microarray technology provide an increasingly detailed view of human transcriptome from hundreds to thousands of genes. Although biomedical researchers typically design microarray experiments to explore specific biological contexts, the relationships between genes are hard to identified because they are complex and noisy high-dimensional data and are often hindered by low statistical power. The main challenge now is to extract valuable biological information from the colossal amount of data to gain insight into biological processes and the mechanisms of human disease. To overcome the challenge requires mathematical and computational methods that are versatile enough to capture the underlying biological features and simple enough to be applied efficiently to large datasets. Methods Unsupervised machine learning approaches provide new and efficient analysis of gene expression profiles. In our study, two unsupervised knowledge-based matrix factorization methods, independent component analysis (ICA and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF are integrated to identify significant genes and related pathways in microarray gene expression dataset of Alzheimer’s disease. The advantage of these two approaches is they can be performed as a biclustering method by which genes and conditions can be clustered simultaneously. Furthermore, they can group genes into different categories for identifying related diagnostic pathways and regulatory networks. The difference between these two method lies in ICA assume statistical independence of the expression modes, while NMF need positivity constrains to generate localized gene expression profiles. Results In our work, we performed FastICA and non-smooth NMF methods on DNA microarray gene expression data of Alzheimer’s disease respectively. The simulation results shows that both of the methods can clearly classify severe AD samples from control samples, and

  20. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...

  1. Comparative Transcriptomic Profiling and Gene Expression for Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease in the Dog and Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg R. Markby

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Myxomatous mitral valve disease is the single most important mitral valve disease in both dogs and humans. In the case of the dog it is ubiquitous, such that all aged dogs will have some evidence of the disease, and for humans it is known as Barlow’s disease and affects up to 3% of the population, with an expected increase in prevalence as the population ages. Disease in the two species show many similarities and while both have the classic myxomatous degeneration only in humans is there extensive fibrosis. This dual pathology of the human disease markedly affects the valve transcriptome and the difference between the dog and human is dominated by changes in genes associated with fibrosis. This review will briefly examine the comparative valve pathology and then, in more detail, the transcriptomic profiling and gene expression reported so far for both species.

  2. Gene expression profiles in Parkinson disease prefrontal cortex implicate FOXO1 and genes under its transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dumitriu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. While the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD mainly takes place in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SN region, other brain areas, including the prefrontal cortex, develop Lewy bodies, the neuropathological hallmark of PD. We generated and analyzed expression data from the prefrontal cortex Brodmann Area 9 (BA9 of 27 PD and 26 control samples using the 44K One-Color Agilent 60-mer Whole Human Genome Microarray. All samples were male, without significant Alzheimer disease pathology and with extensive pathological annotation available. 507 of the 39,122 analyzed expression probes were different between PD and control samples at false discovery rate (FDR of 5%. One of the genes with significantly increased expression in PD was the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1 transcription factor. Notably, genes carrying the FoxO1 binding site were significantly enriched in the FDR-significant group of genes (177 genes covered by 189 probes, suggesting a role for FoxO1 upstream of the observed expression changes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from a recent meta-analysis of PD genome-wide association studies (GWAS were successfully genotyped in 50 out of the 53 microarray brains, allowing a targeted expression-SNP (eSNP analysis for 52 SNPs associated with PD affection at genome-wide significance and the 189 probes from FoxO1 regulated genes. A significant association was observed between a SNP in the cyclin G associated kinase (GAK gene and a probe in the spermine oxidase (SMOX gene. Further examination of the FOXO1 region in a meta-analysis of six available GWAS showed two SNPs significantly associated with age at onset of PD. These results implicate FOXO1 as a PD-relevant gene and warrant further functional analyses of its transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  3. Presymptomatic Diagnosis of Celiac Disease in Predisposed Children: The Role of Gene Expression Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatola, Martina; Cielo, Donatella; Panico, Camilla; Stellato, Pio; Malamisura, Basilio; Carbone, Lorenzo; Gianfrani, Carmen; Troncone, Riccardo; Greco, Luigi; Auricchio, Renata

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) has increased significantly in recent years, and risk prediction and early diagnosis have become imperative especially in at-risk families. In a previous study, we identified individuals with CD based on the expression profile of a set of candidate genes in peripheral blood monocytes. Here we evaluated the expression of a panel of CD candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from at-risk infants long time before any symptom or production of antibodies. We analyzed the gene expression of a set of 9 candidate genes, associated with CD, in 22 human leukocyte antigen predisposed children from at-risk families for CD, studied from birth to 6 years of age. Nine of them developed CD (patients) and 13 did not (controls). We analyzed gene expression at 3 different time points (age matched in the 2 groups): 4-19 months before diagnosis, at the time of CD diagnosis, and after at least 1 year of a gluten-free diet. At similar age points, controls were also evaluated. Three genes (KIAA, TAGAP [T-cell Activation GTPase Activating Protein], and SH2B3 [SH2B Adaptor Protein 3]) were overexpressed in patients, compared with controls, at least 9 months before CD diagnosis. At a stepwise discriminant analysis, 4 genes (RGS1 [Regulator of G-protein signaling 1], TAGAP, TNFSF14 [Tumor Necrosis Factor (Ligand) Superfamily member 14], and SH2B3) differentiate patients from controls before serum antibodies production and clinical symptoms. Multivariate equation correctly classified CD from non-CD children in 95.5% of patients. The expression of a small set of candidate genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells can predict CD at least 9 months before the appearance of any clinical and serological signs of the disease.

  4. Genetic variants alter T-bet binding and gene expression in mucosal inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Soderquest

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of CD4+ T cells into distinct T helper cell lineages is essential for protective immunity against infection, but aberrant T cell polarization can cause autoimmunity. The transcription factor T-bet (TBX21 specifies the Th1 lineage and represses alternative T cell fates. Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that may be causative for autoimmune diseases. The majority of these polymorphisms are located within non-coding distal regulatory elements. It is considered that these genetic variants contribute to disease by altering the binding of regulatory proteins and thus gene expression, but whether these variants alter the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors has not been determined. Here, we show that SNPs associated with the mucosal inflammatory diseases Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC and celiac disease, but not rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, are enriched at T-bet binding sites. Furthermore, we identify disease-associated variants that alter T-bet binding in vitro and in vivo. ChIP-seq for T-bet in individuals heterozygous for the celiac disease-associated SNPs rs1465321 and rs2058622 and the IBD-associated SNPs rs1551398 and rs1551399, reveals decreased binding to the minor disease-associated alleles. Furthermore, we show that rs1465321 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL for the neighboring gene IL18RAP, with decreased T-bet binding associated with decreased expression of this gene. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms may predispose individuals to mucosal autoimmune disease through alterations in T-bet binding. Other disease-associated variants may similarly act by modulating the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors in a tissue-selective and disease-specific manner.

  5. Influence of smoking on colonic gene expression profile in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Bjerrum, Jacob Tveiten; Csillag, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    the included material: CD smokers (n = 28) or never-smokers (n = 14) as compared to fifteen healthy controls (8 smokers and 7 never-smokers). RNA was isolated and gene expression assessed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0. Data were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA), Wilcoxon......BACKGROUND: The development and course of Crohn's disease (CD) is related to both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been found to exacerbate the course of CD by increasing the risk of developing fistulas and strictures as well as the need for surgery, possibly because of an interaction...... smokers). AIM: To identify any difference in gene expression of the descending colonic mucosa between smoking and never-smoking CD patients (and controls) by determining genetic expression profiles from microarray analysis. METHODS: Fifty-seven specimens were obtained by routine colonoscopy from...

  6. Gene expression patterns associated with neurological disease in human HIV infection.

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    Pietro Paolo Sanna

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis and nosology of HIV-associated neurological disease (HAND remain incompletely understood. Here, to provide new insight into the molecular events leading to neurocognitive impairments (NCI in HIV infection, we analyzed pathway dysregulations in gene expression profiles of HIV-infected patients with or without NCI and HIV encephalitis (HIVE and control subjects. The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA algorithm was used for pathway analyses in conjunction with the Molecular Signatures Database collection of canonical pathways (MSigDb. We analyzed pathway dysregulations in gene expression profiles of patients from the National NeuroAIDS Tissue Consortium (NNTC, which consists of samples from 3 different brain regions, including white matter, basal ganglia and frontal cortex of HIV-infected and control patients. While HIVE is characterized by widespread, uncontrolled inflammation and tissue damage, substantial gene expression evidence of induction of interferon (IFN, cytokines and tissue injury is apparent in all brain regions studied, even in the absence of NCI. Various degrees of white matter changes were present in all HIV-infected subjects and were the primary manifestation in patients with NCI in the absence of HIVE. In particular, NCI in patients without HIVE in the NNTC sample is associated with white matter expression of chemokines, cytokines and β-defensins, without significant activation of IFN. Altogether, the results identified distinct pathways differentially regulated over the course of neurological disease in HIV infection and provide a new perspective on the dynamics of pathogenic processes in the course of HIV neurological disease in humans. These results also demonstrate the power of the systems biology analyses and indicate that the establishment of larger human gene expression profile datasets will have the potential to provide novel mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of neurological disease in HIV

  7. A comprehensive analysis on preservation patterns of gene co-expression networks during Alzheimer's disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sumanta; Hossain, Sk Md Mosaddek; Khatun, Lutfunnesa; Mukhopadhyay, Anirban

    2017-12-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neuro-degenerative disruption of the brain which involves in large scale transcriptomic variation. The disease does not impact every regions of the brain at the same time, instead it progresses slowly involving somewhat sequential interaction with different regions. Analysis of the expression patterns of the genes in different regions of the brain influenced in AD surely contribute for a enhanced comprehension of AD pathogenesis and shed light on the early characterization of the disease. Here, we have proposed a framework to identify perturbation and preservation characteristics of gene expression patterns across six distinct regions of the brain ("EC", "HIP", "PC", "MTG", "SFG", and "VCX") affected in AD. Co-expression modules were discovered considering a couple of regions at once. These are then analyzed to know the preservation and perturbation characteristics. Different module preservation statistics and a rank aggregation mechanism have been adopted to detect the changes of expression patterns across brain regions. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway based analysis were also carried out to know the biological meaning of preserved and perturbed modules. In this article, we have extensively studied the preservation patterns of co-expressed modules in six distinct brain regions affected in AD. Some modules are emerged as the most preserved while some others are detected as perturbed between a pair of brain regions. Further investigation on the topological properties of preserved and non-preserved modules reveals a substantial association amongst "betweenness centrality" and "degree" of the involved genes. Our findings may render a deeper realization of the preservation characteristics of gene expression patterns in discrete brain regions affected by AD.

  8. Expression of REG family genes in human inflammatory bowel diseases and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikatsugu Tsuchida

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD reflects a balance between mucosal injury and reparative mechanisms. Some regenerating gene (Reg family members have been reported to be expressed in Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC and to be involved as proliferative mucosal factors in IBD. However, expression of all REG family genes in IBD is still unclear. Here, we analyzed expression of all REG family genes (REG Iα, REG Iβ, REG III, HIP/PAP, and REG IV in biopsy specimens of UC and CD by real-time RT-PCR. REG Iα, REG Iβ, and REG IV genes were overexpressed in CD samples. REG IV gene was also overexpressed in UC samples. We further analyzed the expression mechanisms of REG Iα, REG Iβ, and REG IV genes in human colon cells. The expression of REG Iα was significantly induced by IL-6 or IL-22, and REG Iβ was induced by IL-22. Deletion analyses revealed that three regions (− 220 to − 211, − 179 to − 156, and − 146 to − 130 in REG Iα and the region (− 274 to− 260 in REG Iβ promoter were responsible for the activation by IL-22/IL-6. The promoters contain consensus transcription factor binding sequences for MZF1, RTEF1/TEAD4, and STAT3 in REG Iα, and HLTF/FOXN2F in REG Iβ, respectively. The introduction of siRNAs for MZF1, RTEF1/TEAD4, STAT3, and HLTF/FOXN2F abolished the transcription of REG Iα and REG Iβ. The gene activation mechanisms of REG Iα/REG Iβ may play a role in colon mucosal regeneration in IBD.

  9. Retinal phenotype-genotype correlation of pediatric patients expressing mutations in the Norrie disease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei-Chi; Drenser, Kimberly; Trese, Michael; Capone, Antonio; Dailey, Wendy

    2007-02-01

    To correlate the ophthalmic findings of patients with pediatric vitreoretinopathies with mutations occurring in the Norrie disease gene (NDP). One hundred nine subjects with diverse pediatric vitreoretinopathies and 54 control subjects were enrolled in the study. Diagnoses were based on retinal findings at each patient's first examination. Samples of DNA from each patient underwent polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing of the NDP gene. Eleven male patients expressing mutations in the NDP gene were identified in the test group, whereas the controls demonstrated wild-type NDP. All patients diagnosed as having Norrie disease had mutations in the NDP gene. Four of the patients with Norrie disease had mutations involving a cysteine residue in the cysteine-knot motif. Four patients diagnosed as having familial exudative vitreoretinopathy were found to have noncysteine mutations. One patient with retinopathy of prematurity had a 14-base deletion in the 5' untranslated region (exon 1), and 1 patient with bilateral persistent fetal vasculature syndrome expressed a noncysteine mutation in the second exon. Mutations disrupting the cysteine-knot motif corresponded to severe retinal dysgenesis, whereas patients with noncysteine mutations had varying degrees of avascular peripheral retina, extraretinal vasculature, and subretinal exudate. Patients exhibiting severe retinal dysgenesis should be suspected of carrying a mutation that disrupts the cysteine-knot motif in the NDP gene.

  10. Prediction of graft-versus-host disease in humans by donor gene-expression profiling.

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    Chantal Baron

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD results from recognition of host antigens by donor T cells following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT. Notably, histoincompatibility between donor and recipient is necessary but not sufficient to elicit GVHD. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that some donors may be "stronger alloresponders" than others, and consequently more likely to elicit GVHD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To this end, we measured the gene-expression profiles of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells from 50 AHCT donors with microarrays. We report that pre-AHCT gene-expression profiling segregates donors whose recipient suffered from GVHD or not. Using quantitative PCR, established statistical tests, and analysis of multiple independent training-test datasets, we found that for chronic GVHD the "dangerous donor" trait (occurrence of GVHD in the recipient is under polygenic control and is shaped by the activity of genes that regulate transforming growth factor-beta signaling and cell proliferation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strongly suggest that the donor gene-expression profile has a dominant influence on the occurrence of GVHD in the recipient. The ability to discriminate strong and weak alloresponders using gene-expression profiling could pave the way to personalized transplantation medicine.

  11. Comprehensive analysis of gene-expression profile in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Wei L

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lei Wei,1,* Dong Xu,2,* Yechang Qian,1 Guoyi Huang,1 Wei Ma,1 Fangying Liu,1 Yanhua Shen,1 Zhongfu Wang,1 Li Li,1 Shanfang Zhang,1 Yafang Chen1 1Department of Respiratory Disease, Baoshan District Hospital of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine, Shanghai, 2Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To investigate the gene-expression profile of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients and explore the possible therapeutic targets. Methods: The microarray raw dataset GSE29133, including three COPD samples and three normal samples, was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus. After data preprocessing with the Affy package, Student’s t-test was employed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs. The up- and downregulated DEGs were then pooled for gene-ontology and pathway-enrichment analyses using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. The upstream regulatory elements of these DEGs were also explored by using Whole-Genome rVISTA. Furthermore, we constructed a protein–protein interaction (PPI network for DEGs. The surfactant protein D (SP-D serum level and HLA-A gene frequency in COPD patients and healthy controls were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Results: A total of 39 up- and 15 downregulated DEGs were screened. Most of the upregulated genes were involved in the immune response process, while the downregulated genes were involved in the steroid metabolic process. Moreover, we also found that HLA-A has the highest degree in the PPI network. The SP-D serum level and HLA-A gene frequency in COPD patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls (13.62±2.09 ng/mL vs 10.28±2.86 ng/mL; 62.5% vs 12.5%; P<0.05. Conclusion: Our results may help further the understanding of the mechanisms of

  12. Screening of potential biomarkers in uterine leiomyomas disease via gene expression profiling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuhui; Liu, Yanfei; Zhao, Jingrong; Liu, Yan

    2018-05-01

    The present study aimed to screen potential biomarkers for uterine leiomyomas disease, particularly target genes associated with the mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 12 (MED12) mutation. The microarray data of GSE30673, including 10 MED12 wild-type myometrium, 8 MED12 mutation leiomyoma and 2 MED12 wild-type leiomyoma samples, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Compared with myometrium samples, differently-expressed genes (DEGs) in the MED12 mutation and wild-type leiomyoma samples were identified using the Limma package. The two sets of DEGs obtained were intersected to screen common DEGs. The DEGs in the MED12 mutation and wild-type leiomyoma samples, and common DEGs were defined as group A, B and C. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery online tool. Based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, pathway relation networks were constructed. DEGs in GO terms and pathways were intersected to screen important DEGs. Subsequently, a gene co‑expression network was constructed and visualized using Cytoscape software. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression levels of important DEGs. A total of 1,258 DEGs in group A were screened, and enriched for extracellular matrix (ECM) organization and ECM‑receptor interaction. In addition, a total of 1,571 DEGs in group B were enriched for cell adhesion. Furthermore, 391 DEGs were involved in extracellular matrix organization. Pathway relation networks of group A, B and C were constructed with nodes of 48, 39, and 28, respectively. Finally, 135 important DEGs were obtained, including Acyl‑CoA synthetase medium‑chain family member 3, protein S (α) (PROS1) and F11 receptor. A gene co‑expression network with 68 nodes was constructed. The expression of caspase 1 (CASP1) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family member

  13. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer's Disease Affected Brain Regions.

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    Nisha Puthiyedth

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation.The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC, Hippocampus (HIP, Middle temporal gyrus (MTG, Posterior cingulate cortex (PC, Superior frontal gyrus (SFG and visual cortex (VCX brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets.We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD. In addition, we

  14. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) Gingival Gene Expression and GCF Concentration in Periodontal Health and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Amini Behbahani A; Sattari M; Mofid R; Ganji A

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a cytokine that is assumed to improve anti-microbial defense of epidermal and epithelial cells and the cells of gastrointestinal and respiratory systems. With respect to absence of enough relevant articles in this regard the aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between IL-22 gene expression in gingival tissues as well as its concentration in GCF and periodontal diseases. Gingival samples obtained from 60 patients of three different groups (healthy, gingivitis and chronic...

  15. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hä gg, Sara; Skogsberg, Josefin; Lundströ m, Jesper; Noori, Peri; Nilsson, Roland; Zhong, Hua; Maleki, Shohreh; Shang, Ming-Mei; Brinne, Bjö rn; Bradshaw, Maria; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Samnegå rd, Ann; Silveira, Angela; Kaplan, Lee M.; Gigante, Bruna; Leander, Karin; de Faire, Ulf; Rosfors, Stefan; Lockowandt, Ulf; Liska, Jan; Konrad, Peter; Takolander, Rabbe; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Schadt, Eric E.; Ivert, Torbjö rn; Hamsten, Anders; Tegné r, Jesper; Bjö rkegren, Johan

    2009-01-01

    of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two

  16. Gene expression profiling in cervical cancer: identification of novel markers for disease diagnosis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Cara M

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer. HPV contributes to neoplastic progression through the action of two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, which interfere with critical cell cycle pathways, p53, and retinoblastoma. However, evidence suggests that HPV infection alone is insufficient to induce malignant changes and other host genetic variations are important in the development of cervical cancer. Advances in molecular biology and high throughput gene expression profiling technologies have heralded a new era in biomarker discovery and identification of molecular targets related to carcinogenesis. These advancements have improved our understanding of carcinogenesis and will facilitate screening, early detection, management, and personalised targeted therapy. In this chapter, we have described the use of high density microarrays to assess gene expression profiles in cervical cancer. Using this approach we have identified a number of novel genes which are differentially expressed in cervical cancer, including several genes involved in cell cycle regulation. These include p16ink4a, MCM 3 and 5, CDC6, Geminin, Cyclins A-D, TOPO2A, CDCA1, and BIRC5. We have validated expression of mRNA using real-time PCR and protein by immunohistochemistry.

  17. Mechanisms of foot-and-mouth disease virus tropism inferred from differential tissue gene expression.

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    James J Zhu

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV targets specific tissues for primary infection, secondary high-titer replication (e.g. foot and mouth where it causes typical vesicular lesions and long-term persistence at some primary replication sites. Although integrin αVβ6 receptor has been identified as primary FMDV receptors in animals, their tissue distribution alone fails to explain these highly selective tropism-driven events. Thus, other molecular mechanisms must play roles in determining this tissue specificity. We hypothesized that differences in certain biological activities due to differential gene expression determine FMDV tropism and applied whole genome gene expression profiling to identify genes differentially expressed between FMDV-targeted and non-targeted tissues in terms of supporting primary infection, secondary replication including vesicular lesions, and persistence. Using statistical and bioinformatic tools to analyze the differential gene expression, we identified mechanisms that could explain FMDV tissue tropism based on its association with differential expression of integrin αVβ6 heterodimeric receptor (FMDV receptor, fibronectin (ligand of the receptor, IL-1 cytokines, death receptors and the ligands, and multiple genes in the biological pathways involved in extracellular matrix turnover and interferon signaling found in this study. Our results together with reported findings indicate that differences in (1 FMDV receptor availability and accessibility, (2 type I interferon-inducible immune response, and (3 ability to clear virus infected cells via death receptor signaling play roles in determining FMDV tissue tropism and the additional increase of high extracellular matrix turnover induced by FMDV infection, likely via triggering the signaling of highly expressed IL-1 cytokines, play a key role in the pathogenesis of vesicular lesions.

  18. Application of biclustering of gene expression data and gene set enrichment analysis methods to identify potentially disease causing nanomaterials

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    Andrew Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of diverse types of nanomaterials (NMs in commerce is growing at an exponential pace. As a result, human exposure to these materials in the environment is inevitable, necessitating the need for rapid and reliable toxicity testing methods to accurately assess the potential hazards associated with NMs. In this study, we applied biclustering and gene set enrichment analysis methods to derive essential features of altered lung transcriptome following exposure to NMs that are associated with lung-specific diseases. Several datasets from public microarray repositories describing pulmonary diseases in mouse models following exposure to a variety of substances were examined and functionally related biclusters of genes showing similar expression profiles were identified. The identified biclusters were then used to conduct a gene set enrichment analysis on pulmonary gene expression profiles derived from mice exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2, carbon black (CB or carbon nanotubes (CNTs to determine the disease significance of these data-driven gene sets.Results: Biclusters representing inflammation (chemokine activity, DNA binding, cell cycle, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS and fibrosis processes were identified. All of the NM studies were significant with respect to the bicluster related to chemokine activity (DAVID; FDR p-value = 0.032. The bicluster related to pulmonary fibrosis was enriched in studies where toxicity induced by CNT and CB studies was investigated, suggesting the potential for these materials to induce lung fibrosis. The pro-fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established. Although CB has not been shown to induce fibrosis, it induces stronger inflammatory, oxidative stress and DNA damage responses than nano-TiO2 particles.Conclusion: The results of the analysis correctly identified all NMs to be inflammogenic and only CB and CNTs as potentially fibrogenic. In addition to identifying several

  19. Expression of the NRF2 Target Gene NQO1 Is Enhanced in Mononuclear Cells in Human Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Jianlin; Rasmussen, Marianne; Dong, Qi-Rong

    2017-01-01

    increase in NQO1 gene expression in CKD 1-5 (n = 29; 3.5 for NQO1/ribosomal protein L41; p disease prevalence was higher in CKD 1-5 patients with higher compared to those with lower NQO1 gene expression (p = 0...

  20. A searchable cross-platform gene expression database reveals connections between drug treatments and disease

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    Williams Gareth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional data covering multiple platforms and species is collected and processed into a searchable platform independent expression database (SPIED. SPIED consists of over 100,000 expression fold profiles defined independently of control/treatment assignment and mapped to non-redundant gene lists. The database is thus searchable with query profiles defined over genes alone. The motivation behind SPIED is that transcriptional profiles can be quantitatively compared and ranked and thus serve as effective surrogates for comparing the underlying biological states across multiple experiments. Results Drug perturbation, cancer and neurodegenerative disease derived transcriptional profiles are shown to be effective descriptors of the underlying biology as they return related drugs and pathologies from SPIED. In the case of Alzheimer's disease there is high transcriptional overlap with other neurodegenerative conditions and rodent models of neurodegeneration and nerve injury. Combining the query signature with correlating profiles allows for the definition of a tight neurodegeneration signature that successfully highlights many neuroprotective drugs in the Broad connectivity map. Conclusions Quantitative querying of expression data from across the totality of deposited experiments is an effective way of discovering connections between different biological systems and in particular that between drug action and biological disease state. Examples in cancer and neurodegenerative conditions validate the utility of SPIED.

  1. Exploring gene expression signatures for predicting disease free survival after resection of colorectal cancer liver metastases.

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    Nikol Snoeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to identify and validate gene signatures that can predict disease free survival (DFS in patients undergoing a radical resection for their colorectal liver metastases (CRLM. METHODS: Tumor gene expression profiles were collected from 119 patients undergoing surgery for their CRLM in the Paul Brousse Hospital (France and the University Medical Center Utrecht (The Netherlands. Patients were divided into high and low risk groups. A randomly selected training set was used to find predictive gene signatures. The ability of these gene signatures to predict DFS was tested in an independent validation set comprising the remaining patients. Furthermore, 5 known clinical risk scores were tested in our complete patient cohort. RESULT: No gene signature was found that significantly predicted DFS in the validation set. In contrast, three out of five clinical risk scores were able to predict DFS in our patient cohort. CONCLUSIONS: No gene signature was found that could predict DFS in patients undergoing CRLM resection. Three out of five clinical risk scores were able to predict DFS in our patient cohort. These results emphasize the need for validating risk scores in independent patient groups and suggest improved designs for future studies.

  2. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here, we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (Ndp(AP)). In the CNS, Ndp(AP) expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of Ndp(AP) expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, Ndp(AP) expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Disease progression and phasic changes in gene expression in a mouse model of osteoarthritis.

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    Richard F Loeser

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and has multiple risk factors including joint injury. The purpose of this study was to characterize the histologic development of OA in a mouse model where OA is induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM model and to identify genes regulated during different stages of the disease, using RNA isolated from the joint "organ" and analyzed using microarrays. Histologic changes seen in OA, including articular cartilage lesions and osteophytes, were present in the medial tibial plateaus of the DMM knees beginning at the earliest (2 week time point and became progressively more severe by 16 weeks. 427 probe sets (371 genes from the microarrays passed consistency and significance filters. There was an initial up-regulation at 2 and 4 weeks of genes involved in morphogenesis, differentiation, and development, including growth factor and matrix genes, as well as transcription factors including Atf2, Creb3l1, and Erg. Most genes were off or down-regulated at 8 weeks with the most highly down-regulated genes involved in cell division and the cytoskeleton. Gene expression increased at 16 weeks, in particular extracellular matrix genes including Prelp, Col3a1 and fibromodulin. Immunostaining revealed the presence of these three proteins in cartilage and soft tissues including ligaments as well as in the fibrocartilage covering osteophytes. The results support a phasic development of OA with early matrix remodeling and transcriptional activity followed by a more quiescent period that is not maintained. This implies that the response to an OA intervention will depend on the timing of the intervention. The quiescent period at 8 weeks may be due to the maturation of the osteophytes which are thought to temporarily stabilize the joint.

  4. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  5. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Expression in Normal and Diseased Human Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oronzi Scott, M.; Sylvester, J. E.; Heiman-Patterson, T.; Shi, Y.-J.; Fieles, W.; Stedman, H.; Burghes, A.; Ray, P.; Worton, R.; Fischbeck, K. H.

    1988-03-01

    A probe for the 5' end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene was used to study expression of the gene in normal human muscle, myogenic cell cultures, and muscle from patients with DMD. Expression was found in RNA from normal fetal muscle, adult cardiac and skeletal muscle, and cultured muscle after myoblast fusion. In DMD muscle, expression of this portion of the gene was also revealed by in situ RNA hybridization, particularly in regenerating muscle fibers.

  6. Kernel-imbedded Gaussian processes for disease classification using microarray gene expression data

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    Cheung Leo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Designing appropriate machine learning methods for identifying genes that have a significant discriminating power for disease outcomes has become more and more important for our understanding of diseases at genomic level. Although many machine learning methods have been developed and applied to the area of microarray gene expression data analysis, the majority of them are based on linear models, which however are not necessarily appropriate for the underlying connection between the target disease and its associated explanatory genes. Linear model based methods usually also bring in false positive significant features more easily. Furthermore, linear model based algorithms often involve calculating the inverse of a matrix that is possibly singular when the number of potentially important genes is relatively large. This leads to problems of numerical instability. To overcome these limitations, a few non-linear methods have recently been introduced to the area. Many of the existing non-linear methods have a couple of critical problems, the model selection problem and the model parameter tuning problem, that remain unsolved or even untouched. In general, a unified framework that allows model parameters of both linear and non-linear models to be easily tuned is always preferred in real-world applications. Kernel-induced learning methods form a class of approaches that show promising potentials to achieve this goal. Results A hierarchical statistical model named kernel-imbedded Gaussian process (KIGP is developed under a unified Bayesian framework for binary disease classification problems using microarray gene expression data. In particular, based on a probit regression setting, an adaptive algorithm with a cascading structure is designed to find the appropriate kernel, to discover the potentially significant genes, and to make the optimal class prediction accordingly. A Gibbs sampler is built as the core of the algorithm to make

  7. Identification of differential gene expression patterns in human arteries from patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubbe, Jane; Skov, Vibe; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uremia accelerates atherosclerosis but little is known about affected pathways in human vasculature. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed arterial transcripts in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) Methods: Global mRNA expression was estimated by microarray...... hybridization in iliac arteries (n=14) from renal transplant recipients and compared with renal arteries from healthy living kidney donors (n=19) in study 1. Study 2 compared non-atherosclerotic internal mammary arteries (IMA) from five patients with elevated plasma creatinine levels and age and gender matched...... controls with normal levels. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry for selected proteins was performed on a subset of study 1 samples. RESULTS: 15 gene transcripts with fold changes (FC)>1.05 were significantly different between the two groups in study 1, with false discovery rates (FDR) of

  8. Gene expression signature is shared by patients with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia at the superior temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horesh, Y; Katsel, P; Haroutunian, V; Domany, E

    2011-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Schizophrenia are two common diseases of the brain with significant differences in neuropathology, etiology and symptoms. This dissimilarity in the two diseases makes a comparison of the two ideal for detecting molecular substrates that are common to brain disorders in general. In this study, we compared gene expression profiles across multiple brain areas, taken postmortem from patients with well-characterized Alzheimer's disease and Schizophrenia, and from cognitively normal control group with no neuro- or psychopathology. Although the totality of gene expression changes in the two diseases is dissimilar, a subset of genes appears to play a role in both diseases in specific brain regions. We find at Brodmann area 22, the superior temporal gyrus, a statistically significant number of genes with apparently disregulated expression in both diseases. Furthermore, we found genes that differentiate the two diseases from the control across multiple brain regions, and note that these genes were usually down-regulated. Brodmann area 8, part of the superior frontal cortex, is relatively abundant with them. We show overwhelming statistical evidence for Alzheimer's and Schizophrenia sharing a specific molecular background at the superior temporal gyrus. We suggest that impairment of the regulation of autophagy pathway is shared, in BA 22, by the two diseases. © 2010 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2010 EFNS.

  9. Functional categorization of gene expression changes in the cerebellum of a Cln3-knockout mouse model for Batten disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Andrew I; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mitchison, Hannah M; Nussbaum, Robert L; Pearce, David A

    2003-01-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or Batten Disease) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder of childhood. The disease is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and is the result of mutations in the CLN3 gene. One brain region severely affected in Batten disease is the cerebellum. Using a mouse model for Batten disease which shares pathological similarities to the disease in humans we have used oligonucleotide arrays to profile approximately 19000 mRNAs in the cerebellum. We have identified reproducible changes of twofold or more in the expression of 756 gene products in the cerebellum of 10-week-old Cln3-knockout mice as compared to wild-type controls. We have subsequently divided these genes with altered expression into 14 functional categories. We report a significant alteration in expression of genes associated with neurotransmission, neuronal cell structure and development, immune response and inflammation, and lipid metabolism. An apparent shift in metabolism toward gluconeogenesis is also evident in Cln3-knockout mice. Further experimentation will be necessary to understand the contribution of these changes in expression to a disease state. Detailed analysis of the functional consequences of altered expression of genes in the cerebellum of the Cln3-knockout mice may provide valuable clues in understanding the molecular basis of the pathological mechanisms underlying Batten disease.

  10. Tumor SHB gene expression affects disease characteristics in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalpour, Maria; Li, Xiujuan; Cavelier, Lucia; Gustafsson, Karin; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Höglund, Martin; Welsh, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The mouse Shb gene coding for the Src Homology 2-domain containing adapter protein B has recently been placed in context of BCRABL1-induced myeloid leukemia in mice and the current study was performed in order to relate SHB to human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Publicly available AML databases were mined for SHB gene expression and patient survival. SHB gene expression was determined in the Uppsala cohort of AML patients by qPCR. Cell proliferation was determined after SHB gene knockdown in leukemic cell lines. Despite a low frequency of SHB gene mutations, many tumors overexpressed SHB mRNA compared with normal myeloid blood cells. AML patients with tumors expressing low SHB mRNA displayed longer survival times. A subgroup of AML exhibiting a favorable prognosis, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a PMLRARA translocation, expressed less SHB mRNA than AML tumors in general. When examining genes co-expressed with SHB in AML tumors, four other genes ( PAX5, HDAC7, BCORL1, TET1) related to leukemia were identified. A network consisting of these genes plus SHB was identified that relates to certain phenotypic characteristics, such as immune cell, vascular and apoptotic features. SHB knockdown in the APL PMLRARA cell line NB4 and the monocyte/macrophage cell line MM6 adversely affected proliferation, linking SHB gene expression to tumor cell expansion and consequently to patient survival. It is concluded that tumor SHB gene expression relates to AML survival and its subgroup APL. Moreover, this gene is included in a network of genes that plays a role for an AML phenotype exhibiting certain immune cell, vascular and apoptotic characteristics.

  11. Decreased expression level of BER genes in Alzheimer's disease patients is not derivative of their DNA methylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinska, Agnieszka; Sitarek, Przemysław; Toma, Monika; Czarny, Piotr; Synowiec, Ewelina; Krupa, Renata; Wigner, Paulina; Bialek, Katarzyna; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Korycinska, Anna; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Szemraj, Janusz; Galecki, Piotr; Sliwinski, Tomasz

    2017-10-03

    Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease can be caused by accumulation of oxidative DNA damage resulting from altered expression of genes involved in the base excision repair system (BER). Promoter methylation can affect the profile of BER genes expression. Decreased expression of BER genes was observed in the brains of AD patients. The aim of our study was to compare the expression and methylation profiles of six genes coding for proteins involved in BER, namely: hOGG1, APE1, MUTYH, NEIL1, PARP1 and XRCC1, in the peripheral blood cells of AD patients and healthy volunteers. The study consisted of 100 persons diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease according to DSM-IV criteria, and 110 healthy volunteers. DNA and total RNA were isolated from venous blood cells. Promoter methylation profiles were obtained by High Resolution Melting (HRM) analysis of bisulfide converted DNA samples. Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes was employed for gene expression analysis. APE1, hOGG1, MUTYH, PARP1 and NEIL1 were significantly (pgenes. The methylation status of promoters is not associated with downregulation of BER genes. Our results show that downregulation of BER genes detected in peripheral blood samples could reflect the changes occurring in the brain of patients with AD, and may be a useful biomarker of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microarray analysis of gene expression by skeletal muscle of three mouse models of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

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    Kaiguo Mo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence implicates altered gene expression within skeletal muscle in the pathogenesis of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA. We therefore broadly characterized gene expression in skeletal muscle of three independently generated mouse models of this disease. The mouse models included a polyglutamine expanded (polyQ AR knock-in model (AR113Q, a polyQ AR transgenic model (AR97Q, and a transgenic mouse that overexpresses wild type AR solely in skeletal muscle (HSA-AR. HSA-AR mice were included because they substantially reproduce the KD/SBMA phenotype despite the absence of polyQ AR.We performed microarray analysis of lower hindlimb muscles taken from these three models relative to wild type controls using high density oligonucleotide arrays. All microarray comparisons were made with at least 3 animals in each condition, and only those genes having at least 2-fold difference and whose coefficient of variance was less than 100% were considered to be differentially expressed. When considered globally, there was a similar overlap in gene changes between the 3 models: 19% between HSA-AR and AR97Q, 21% between AR97Q and AR113Q, and 17% between HSA-AR and AR113Q, with 8% shared by all models. Several patterns of gene expression relevant to the disease process were observed. Notably, patterns of gene expression typical of loss of AR function were observed in all three models, as were alterations in genes involved in cell adhesion, energy balance, muscle atrophy and myogenesis. We additionally measured changes similar to those observed in skeletal muscle of a mouse model of Huntington's Disease, and to those common to muscle atrophy from diverse causes.By comparing patterns of gene expression in three independent models of KD/SBMA, we have been able to identify candidate genes that might mediate the core myogenic features of KD/SBMA.

  13. Cannabidiol Modulates the Expression of Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Genes in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaliana Libro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have emerged as a promising tool for the treatment of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The main neuropathological hallmarks of AD are senile plaques, composed of amyloid beta (Aβ, and neurofibrillary tangles, formed by hyperphosphorylated tau. However, current therapies for AD have shown limited efficacy. In this study, we evaluated whether pre-treatment with cannabidiol (CBD, at 5 μM concentration, modulated the transcriptional profile of MSCs derived from gingiva (GMSCs in order to improve their therapeutic potential, by performing a transcriptomic analysis by the next-generation sequencing (NGS platform. By comparing the expression profiles between GMSCs treated with CBD (CBD-GMSCs and control GMSCs (CTR-GMSCs, we found that CBD led to the downregulation of genes linked to AD, including genes coding for the kinases responsible of tau phosphorylation and for the secretases involved in Aβ generation. In parallel, immunocytochemistry analysis has shown that CBD inhibited the expression of GSK3β, a central player in AD pathogenesis, by promoting PI3K/Akt signalling. In order to understand through which receptor CBD exerted these effects, we have performed pre-treatments with receptor antagonists for the cannabinoid receptors (SR141716A and AM630 or for the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPVI. Here, we have proved that TRPV1 was able to mediate the modulatory effect of CBD on the PI3K/Akt/GSK3β axis. In conclusion, we have found that pre-treatment with CBD prevented the expression of proteins potentially involved in tau phosphorylation and Aβ production in GMSCs. Therefore, we suggested that GMSCs preconditioned with CBD possess a molecular profile that might be more beneficial for the treatment of AD.

  14. Expression Analysis of Gata4, Tbx5 and Nkx2.5 Genes Involved in Congenital Heart Disease

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    Mahta Mazaheri-Naeeini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most widespread congenital disease in newborn babies and is one of the main causes of death worldwide. The causal agent of heart congenital diseases is unknown but genetic factors have an important role in prevalence of disease. Objectives The main objective of this research is comparison of the gene expression level of three Gata4, Tbx5 and Nkx2.5 genes in three groups of children between 6 months and 13 year old with congenital heart disease. Patients and Methods In this case-control study, 30 samples from each cyanotic and acyanotic patients and 30 samples from healthy children as control were used. RNA extraction was done using commercial kit and gene expression analysis was performed by qRT-PCR approach in three replication using Gata4, Tbx5 and Nkx2.5 genes. Data analysis was done by REST software. Results The results of RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis of all sample showed high quantity and quality of genetic materials. Expression level of tested genes was reduced in two patients group. In cyanotic group reduction was more than acyanotic samples. All tested gene were reduced in both group. Tbx5 gene was suppressed more than other genes. Conclusions Based on our results we could conclude that a gene family play an important role in cardiogenesis process and heart formation. These genes are closely related together. So a genetic consultation for such diseases on parents of these patients to determine the probable genetic mutations is recommended.

  15. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher; Aucott, John N; Chiu, Charles Y

    2016-02-12

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the "window period" of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne infection in the United States, and some patients report lingering symptoms lasting months to years despite antibiotic treatment. To better understand the role of the human host response in acute Lyme disease and the

  16. Hepatic gene expression of Caucasian and African-American patients with obesity-related non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Maria; Hossain, Noreen; Afendy, Arian; Perry, Kellie; Goodman, Zachary D; Baranova, Ancha; Younossi, Zobair

    2010-05-01

    There is increasing data suggesting that African Americans with NAFLD tend to have less progressive liver disease. The aim of this study is to assess differences in the hepatic gene expression of African-American and Caucasian patients with NAFLD who had undergone bariatric surgery. A total of 94 patients (81 NAFLD and 13 weight-matched controls with normal liver biopsy) were included. Of the entire cohort, 73 were Caucasians and 21 were African Americans. All patients were undergoing bariatric surgery. Two liver biopsies were obtained at the time of surgery. One biopsy was snap-frozen for gene expression and the other biopsy was stained for pathologic assessment. Liver biopsy confirmed that 24 patients from our cohort had NASH while 57 had only simple steatosis. Snap-frozen liver biopsy specimens of these patients were then used for the RNA extraction. cDNA probes were hybridized with customized microarray gene chips containing 5,220 relevant genes. Gene expression profiles were compared between groups using significance analysis of microarrays algorithm. In comparison to all Caucasian patients, African-American patients had over-expression of EPB41L1, IGF2, FAH, ACSL4, FUT4, CYP3A (q values < 10(-4)). In comparison to Caucasian NAFLD patients, African-American NAFLD patients showed over-expression of EPB41L1 and ACSL4 genes. Finally, in comparison to Caucasian NASH patients, African-American NASH patients showed over-expression of GSTM 2, GSTM4 and GSTM5 as well as FH and ASCL4 genes. Some genes highlighted by this analysis, particularly cytochrome CYP3A and glutathione transferases GSTM2, 4, 5, were previously implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. African-American patients with biopsy-proven obesity-related NAFLD and NASH have a specific hepatic gene expression pattern that may explain their differences from Caucasian patients with NAFLD in developing progressive liver disease.

  17. Enhanced resistance to stripe rust disease in transgenic wheat expressing the rice chitinase gene RC24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuan; Wang, Jian; Du, Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Li, Lan; Xu, Ziqin

    2013-10-01

    Stripe rust is a devastating fungal disease of wheat worldwide which is primarily caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp tritici. Transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) expressing rice class chitinase gene RC24 were developed by particle bombardment of immature embryos and tested for resistance to Puccinia striiformis f.sp tritici. under greenhouse and field conditions. Putative transformants were selected on kanamycin-containing media. Polymease chain reaction indicated that RC24 was transferred into 17 transformants obtained from bombardment of 1,684 immature embryos. Integration of RC24 was confirmed by Southern blot with a RC24-labeled probe and expression of RC24 was verified by RT-PCR. Nine transgenic T1 lines exhibited enhanced resistance to stripe rust infection with lines XN8 and BF4 showing the highest level of resistance. Southern blot hybridization confirmed the stable inheritance of RC24 in transgenic T1 plants. Resistance to stripe rust in transgenic T2 and T3 XN8 and BF4 plants was confirmed over two consecutive years in the field. Increased yield (27-36 %) was recorded for transgenic T2 and T3 XN8 and BF4 plants compared to controls. These results suggest that rice class I chitinase RC24 can be used to engineer stripe rust resistance in wheat.

  18. Gradient phenomenon of multidrug resistance gene expression in breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy is related to disease progression

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    N. V. Litviakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examined 106 patients with breast cancer (BC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NАС. In the biopsy material, derived from primary tumor before NAC and surgical samples after chemotherapy the expression of 8 multidrug resistance genes (MDR ABCB1, АВСВ2, ABCC1, ABCC2, АВСС5, ABCG1, ABCG2 и MVP was evaluated using quantitative RT-PCR. During the NAC course 75 % of patients manifested gradient phenomenon for gene expression that means a unidirectional change in the expression of all five MDR genes ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1 и ABCG2 closely associated with the NAC efficacy: the reduction in MDR gene expression was related to good response to NAC while the expression increase associated with poor response to NAC. In 25% of patients there was no such change in studied gene expression that means the lack of a gradient phenomenon. The objective was to study whether gradient phenomenon for MDR gene expression during NAC is related to disease free survival in breast cancer patients. Five-year metastasis-free survival in patients having a gradient phenomenon was 73 % versus 39 % in patients who lack a gradient phenomenon (log-rank test p=0,0018. So, the presence of a gradient phenomenon in patients is appeared to be associated with a good disease prognosis. It is assumed that the gradiThe paper examined 106 patients with breast cancer (BC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NАС. In the biopsy material, derived from primary tumor before NAC and surgical samples after chemotherapy the expression of 8 multidrug resistance genes (MDR ABCB1, АВСВ2, ABCC1, ABCC2, АВСС5, ABCG1, ABCG2 и MVP was evaluated using quantitative RT-PCR. During the NAC course 75 % of patients manifested gradient phenomenon for gene expression that means a unidirectional change in the expression of all five MDR genes ABCB1, ABCC1, ABCC2, ABCG1 и ABCG2 closely associated with the NAC efficacy: the reduction in MDR gene expression was related to good

  19. Identification of a set of endogenous reference genes for miRNA expression studies in Parkinson's disease blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Alice; Foco, Luisa; Blankenburg, Hagen; Picard, Anne; Zanigni, Stefano; Zanon, Alessandra; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Schwienbacher, Christine

    2014-10-10

    Research on microRNAs (miRNAs) is becoming an increasingly attractive field, as these small RNA molecules are involved in several physiological functions and diseases. To date, only few studies have assessed the expression of blood miRNAs related to Parkinson's disease (PD) using microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Measuring miRNA expression involves normalization of qRT-PCR data using endogenous reference genes for calibration, but their choice remains a delicate problem with serious impact on the resulting expression levels. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of a set of commonly used small RNAs as normalizers and to identify which of these miRNAs might be considered reliable reference genes in qRT-PCR expression analyses on PD blood samples. Commonly used reference genes snoRNA RNU24, snRNA RNU6B, snoRNA Z30 and miR-103a-3p were selected from the literature. We then analyzed the effect of using these genes as reference, alone or in any possible combination, on the measured expression levels of the target genes miR-30b-5p and miR-29a-3p, which have been previously reported to be deregulated in PD blood samples. We identified RNU24 and Z30 as a reliable and stable pair of reference genes in PD blood samples.

  20. Digital Gene Expression Analysis to Screen Disease Resistance-Relevant Genes from Leaves of Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. Infected by Botrytis cinerea.

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    Saijie Gong

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. is a well-known traditional flower in China and is widely used for landscaping and garden greening due to its high ornamental value. However, disease spots usually appear after the flowering of the plant and may result in the withering of the plant in severe cases. This study examined the disease incidence in an herbaceous peony field in the Yangzhou region, Jiangsu Province. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, the disease in this area was identified as a gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Based on previously obtained transcriptome data, eight libraries generated from two herbaceous peony cultivars 'Zifengyu' and 'Dafugui' with different susceptibilities to the disease were then analyzed using digital gene expression profiling (DGE. Thousands of differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by comparing the eight samples, and these genes were annotated using the Gene ontology (GO and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG database. The pathways related to plant-pathogen interaction, secondary metabolism synthesis and antioxidant system were concentrated, and 51, 76, and 13 disease resistance-relevant candidate genes were identified, respectively. The expression patterns of these candidate genes differed between the two cultivars: their expression of the disease-resistant cultivar 'Zifengyu' sharply increased during the early stages of infection, while it was relatively subdued in the disease-sensitive cultivar 'Dafugui'. A selection of ten candidate genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR to validate the DGE data. These results revealed the transcriptional changes that took place during the interaction of herbaceous peony with B. cinerea, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of host resistance to gray mold.

  1. Gene expression profiling in psoriatic scalp hair follicles: clobetasol propionate shampoo 0.05% normalizes psoriasis disease markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, J; Reiniche, P; Fogel, P; Poulin, Y; Lui, H; Lynde, C; Shapiro, J; Villemagne, H; Soto, P; Voegel, J J

    2010-11-01

    Clobetasol propionate shampoo is effective and safe in treatment of scalp psoriasis (SP). Gene expression profiling of psoriatic skin biopsies led to the identification of numerous disease-related genes. However, it remained unknown whether the gene expression profile of hair follicles of SP patients was also affected. To determine whether psoriasis-related genes are differentially regulated in the hair follicles of SP patients and whether the modulation of these genes can be correlated with clinical severity scores. A single arm, open study was conducted in three centres. SP patients received daily treatment with clobetasol propionate shampoo. At Baseline, Weeks 2 and 4, investigators assessed clinical severity parameters and collected scalp hair follicles in anagen phase. Total RNA extracted from hair follicles was used to determine the expression level of 44 genes, which were reported previously to be upregulated in the skin of psoriasis patients. RNA of good quality and sufficient quantity was obtained from hair follicles of psoriasis patients and healthy volunteers (HV). The expression level of 10 inflammation-related genes was significantly increased in psoriatic hair follicles. The patient's exploratory transcriptomic score, defined as the mean fold modulation of these 10 genes compared with HV, correlated with clinical severity scores. Clobetasol propionate shampoo was effective in decreasing both the exploratory transcriptomics and the clinical severity scores. Hair follicles of SP patients are affected by the inflammatory process. The change in the expression level of inflammation-related genes correlates with the severity of the disease. © 2010 Galderma R&D. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis Reveals a Sustained Differential Gene Expression Signature in Patients Treated for Acute Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Jerome; Soloski, Mark J.; Swei, Andrea; Cheadle, Chris; Federman, Scot; Billaud, Jean-Noel; Rebman, Alison W.; Kabre, Beniwende; Halpert, Richard; Boorgula, Meher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, and approximately 10 to 20% of patients report persistent symptoms lasting months to years despite appropriate treatment with antibiotics. To gain insights into the molecular basis of acute Lyme disease and the ensuing development of post-treatment symptoms, we conducted a longitudinal transcriptome study of 29 Lyme disease patients (and 13 matched controls) enrolled at the time of diagnosis and followed for up to 6 months. The differential gene expression signature of Lyme disease following the acute phase of infection persisted for at least 3 weeks and had fewer than 44% differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in common with other infectious or noninfectious syndromes. Early Lyme disease prior to antibiotic therapy was characterized by marked upregulation of Toll-like receptor signaling but lack of activation of the inflammatory T-cell apoptotic and B-cell developmental pathways seen in other acute infectious syndromes. Six months after completion of therapy, Lyme disease patients were found to have 31 to 60% of their pathways in common with three different immune-mediated chronic diseases. No differential gene expression signature was observed between Lyme disease patients with resolved illness to those with persistent symptoms at 6 months post-treatment. The identification of a sustained differential gene expression signature in Lyme disease suggests that a panel of selected human host-based biomarkers may address the need for sensitive clinical diagnostics during the “window period” of infection prior to the appearance of a detectable antibody response and may also inform the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:26873097

  3. Genome-Wide Constitutively Expressed Gene Analysis and New Reference Gene Selection Based on Transcriptome Data: A Case Study from Poplar/Canker Disease Interaction

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    Jiaping Zhao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of transcriptome datasets for differential expression (DE genes have been widely used for understanding organismal biology, but these datasets also contain untapped information that can be used to develop more precise analytical tools. With the use of transcriptome data generated from poplar/canker disease interaction system, we describe a methodology to identify candidate reference genes from high-throughput sequencing data. This methodology will improve the accuracy of RT-qPCR and will lead to better standards for the normalization of expression data. Expression stability analysis from xylem and phloem of Populus bejingensis inoculated with the fungal canker pathogen Botryosphaeria dothidea revealed that 729 poplar transcripts (1.11% were stably expressed, at a threshold level of coefficient of variance (CV of FPKM < 20% and maximum fold change (MFC of FPKM < 2.0. Expression stability and bioinformatics analysis suggested that commonly used house-keeping (HK genes were not the most appropriate internal controls: 70 of the 72 commonly used HK genes were not stably expressed, 45 of the 72 produced multiple isoform transcripts, and some of their reported primers produced unspecific amplicons in PCR amplification. RT-qPCR analysis to compare and evaluate the expression stability of 10 commonly used poplar HK genes and 20 of the 729 newly-identified stably expressed transcripts showed that some of the newly-identified genes (such as SSU_S8e, LSU_L5e, and 20S_PSU had higher stability ranking than most of commonly used HK genes. Based on these results, we recommend a pipeline for deriving reference genes from transcriptome data. An appropriate candidate gene should have a unique transcript, constitutive expression, CV value of expression < 20% (or possibly 30% and MFC value of expression <2, and an expression level of 50–1,000 units. Lastly, when four of the newly identified HK genes were used in the normalization of expression data for 20

  4. Heterogeneous gene expression signatures correspond to distinct lung pathologies and biomarkers of disease severity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePianto, Daryle J; Chandriani, Sanjay; Abbas, Alexander R; Jia, Guiquan; N'Diaye, Elsa N; Caplazi, Patrick; Kauder, Steven E; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Karnik, Satyajit K; Ha, Connie; Modrusan, Zora; Matthay, Michael A; Kukreja, Jasleen; Collard, Harold R; Egen, Jackson G; Wolters, Paul J; Arron, Joseph R

    2015-01-01

    There is microscopic spatial and temporal heterogeneity of pathological changes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) lung tissue, which may relate to heterogeneity in pathophysiological mediators of disease and clinical progression. We assessed relationships between gene expression patterns, pathological features, and systemic biomarkers to identify biomarkers that reflect the aggregate disease burden in patients with IPF. Gene expression microarrays (N=40 IPF; 8 controls) and immunohistochemical analyses (N=22 IPF; 8 controls) of lung biopsies. Clinical characterisation and blood biomarker levels of MMP3 and CXCL13 in a separate cohort of patients with IPF (N=80). 2940 genes were significantly differentially expressed between IPF and control samples (|fold change| >1.5, p<0.05). Two clusters of co-regulated genes related to bronchiolar epithelium or lymphoid aggregates exhibited substantial heterogeneity within the IPF population. Gene expression in bronchiolar and lymphoid clusters corresponded to the extent of bronchiolisation and lymphoid aggregates determined by immunohistochemistry in adjacent tissue sections. Elevated serum levels of MMP3, encoded in the bronchiolar cluster, and CXCL13, encoded in the lymphoid cluster, corresponded to disease severity and shortened survival time (p<10(-7) for MMP3 and p<10(-5) for CXCL13; Cox proportional hazards model). Microscopic pathological heterogeneity in IPF lung tissue corresponds to specific gene expression patterns related to bronchiolisation and lymphoid aggregates. MMP3 and CXCL13 are systemic biomarkers that reflect the aggregate burden of these pathological features across total lung tissue. These biomarkers may have clinical utility as prognostic and/or surrogate biomarkers of disease activity in interventional studies in IPF. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Crosstalk between thyroid hormone receptor and liver X receptor in the regulation of selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1 gene expression.

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    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Selective Alzheimer's disease (AD indicator 1 (Seladin-1 has been identified as a gene down-regulated in the degenerated lesions of AD brain. Up-regulation of Seladin-1 reduces the accumulation of β-amyloid and neuronal death. Thyroid hormone (TH exerts an important effect on the development and maintenance of central nervous systems. In the current study, we demonstrated that Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the forebrain was increased in thyrotoxic mice compared with that of euthyroid mice. However, unexpectedly, no significant decrease in the gene and protein expression was observed in hypothyroid mice. Interestingly, an agonist of liver X receptor (LXR, TO901317 (TO administration in vivo increased Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the mouse forebrain only in a hypothyroid state and in the presence of mutant TR-β, suggesting that LXR-α would compensate for TR-β function to maintain Seladin-1 gene expression in hypothyroidism and resistance to TH. TH activated the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter (-1936/+21 bp and site 2 including canonical TH response element (TRE half-site in the region between -159 and -154 bp is responsible for the positive regulation. RXR-α/TR-β heterodimerization was identified on site 2 by gel-shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the recruitment of TR-β to site 2 and the recruitment was increased upon TH administration. On the other hand, LXR-α utilizes a distinct region from site 2 (-120 to -102 bp to activate the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter. Taking these findings together, we concluded that TH up-regulates Seladin-1 gene expression at the transcriptional level and LXR-α maintains the gene expression.

  6. Expression of the Bs2 pepper gene confers resistance to bacterial spot disease in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, T H; Dahlbeck, D; Clark, E T; Gajiwala, P; Pasion, R; Whalen, M C; Stall, R E; Staskawicz, B J

    1999-11-23

    The Bs2 resistance gene of pepper specifically recognizes and confers resistance to strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria that contain the corresponding bacterial avirulence gene, avrBs2. The involvement of avrBs2 in pathogen fitness and its prevalence in many X. campestris pathovars suggests that the Bs2 gene may be durable in the field and provide resistance when introduced into other plant species. Employing a positional cloning strategy, the Bs2 locus was isolated and the gene was identified by coexpression with avrBs2 in an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay. A single candidate gene, predicted to encode motifs characteristic of the nucleotide binding site-leucine-rich repeat class of resistance genes, was identified. This gene specifically controlled the hypersensitive response when transiently expressed in susceptible pepper and tomato lines and in a nonhost species, Nicotiana benthamiana, and was designated as Bs2. Functional expression of Bs2 in stable transgenic tomatoes supports its use as a source of resistance in other Solanaceous plant species.

  7. Temporal gene expression profiling reveals CEBPD as a candidate regulator of brain disease in prosaposin deficient mice

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    Ran Huimin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prosaposin encodes, in tandem, four small acidic activator proteins (saposins with specificities for glycosphingolipid (GSL hydrolases in lysosomes. Extensive GSL storage occurs in various central nervous system regions in mammalian prosaposin deficiencies. Results Our hypomorphic prosaposin deficient mouse, PS-NA, exhibited 45% WT levels of brain saposins and showed neuropathology that included neuronal GSL storage and Purkinje cell loss. Impairment of neuronal function was observed as early as 6 wks as demonstrated by the narrow bridges tests. Temporal transcriptome microarray analyses of brain tissues were conducted with mRNA from three prosaposin deficient mouse models: PS-NA, prosaposin null (PS-/- and a V394L/V394L glucocerebrosidase mutation combined with PS-NA (4L/PS-NA. Gene expression alterations in cerebrum and cerebellum were detectable at birth preceding the neuronal deficits. Differentially expressed genes encompassed a broad spectrum of cellular functions. The number of down-regulated genes was constant, but up-regulated gene numbers increased with age. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (CEBPD was the only up-regulated transcription factor in these two brain regions of all three models. Network analyses revealed that CEBPD has functional relationships with genes in transcription, pro-inflammation, cell death, binding, myelin and transport. Conclusion These results show that: 1 Regionally specific gene expression abnormalities precede the brain histological and neuronal function changes, 2 Temporal gene expression profiles provide insights into the molecular mechanism during the GSL storage disease course, and 3 CEBPD is a candidate regulator of brain disease in prosaposin deficiency to participate in modulating disease acceleration or progression.

  8. Mining pathway associations for disease-related pathway activity analysis based on gene expression and methylation data.

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    Lee, Hyeonjeong; Shin, Miyoung

    2017-01-01

    The problem of discovering genetic markers as disease signatures is of great significance for the successful diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of complex diseases. Even if many earlier studies worked on identifying disease markers from a variety of biological resources, they mostly focused on the markers of genes or gene-sets (i.e., pathways). However, these markers may not be enough to explain biological interactions between genetic variables that are related to diseases. Thus, in this study, our aim is to investigate distinctive associations among active pathways (i.e., pathway-sets) shown each in case and control samples which can be observed from gene expression and/or methylation data. The pathway-sets are obtained by identifying a set of associated pathways that are often active together over a significant number of class samples. For this purpose, gene expression or methylation profiles are first analyzed to identify significant (active) pathways via gene-set enrichment analysis. Then, regarding these active pathways, an association rule mining approach is applied to examine interesting pathway-sets in each class of samples (case or control). By doing so, the sets of associated pathways often working together in activity profiles are finally chosen as our distinctive signature of each class. The identified pathway-sets are aggregated into a pathway activity network (PAN), which facilitates the visualization of differential pathway associations between case and control samples. From our experiments with two publicly available datasets, we could find interesting PAN structures as the distinctive signatures of breast cancer and uterine leiomyoma cancer, respectively. Our pathway-set markers were shown to be superior or very comparable to other genetic markers (such as genes or gene-sets) in disease classification. Furthermore, the PAN structure, which can be constructed from the identified markers of pathway-sets, could provide deeper insights into

  9. Gene knockout of tau expression does not contribute to the pathogenesis of prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Victoria A; Klemm, Helen M; Welton, Jeremy M; Masters, Colin L; Crouch, Peter; Cappai, Roberto; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D

    2011-11-01

    Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are a group of fatal and transmissible disorders affecting the central nervous system of humans and animals. The principal agent of prion disease transmission and pathogenesis is proposed to be an abnormal protease-resistant isoform of the normal cellular prion protein. The microtubule-associated protein tau is elevated in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. To determine whether tau expression contributes to prion disease pathogenesis, tau knockout and control wild-type mice were infected with the M1000 strain of mouse-adapted human prions. Immunohistochemical analysis for total tau expression in prion-infected wild-type mice indicated tau aggregation in the cytoplasm of a subpopulation of neurons in regions associated with spongiform change. Western immunoblot analysis of brain homogenates revealed a decrease in total tau immunoreactivity and epitope-specific changes in tau phosphorylation. No significant difference in incubation period or other disease features were observed between tau knockout and wild-type mice with clinical prion disease. These results demonstrate that, in this model of prion disease, tau does not contribute to the pathogenesis of prion disease and that changes in the tau protein profile observed in mice with clinical prion disease occurs as a consequence of the prion-induced pathogenesis.

  10. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

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    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  11. Amyloid protein-mediated differential DNA methylation status regulates gene expression in Alzheimer’s disease model cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Eun Nam; Ahn Jo, Sangmee; Oh, Seikwan; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Genome-wide DNA methylation pattern in Alzheimer’s disease model cell line. ► Integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles. ► Identify three Swedish mutant target genes; CTIF, NXT2 and DDR2 gene. ► The effect of Swedish mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and gene expression. -- Abstract: The Swedish mutation of amyloid precursor protein (APP-sw) has been reported to dramatically increase beta amyloid production through aberrant cleavage at the beta secretase site, causing early-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). DNA methylation has been reported to be associated with AD pathogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanism of APP-sw-mediated epigenetic alterations in AD pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We analyzed genome-wide interplay between promoter CpG DNA methylation and gene expression in an APP-sw-expressing AD model cell line. To identify genes whose expression was regulated by DNA methylation status, we performed integrated analysis of CpG methylation and mRNA expression profiles, and identified three target genes of the APP-sw mutant; hypomethylated CTIF (CBP80/CBP20-dependent translation initiation factor) and NXT2 (nuclear exporting factor 2), and hypermethylated DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2). Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine restored mRNA expression of these three genes, implying methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation. The profound alteration in the methylation status was detected at the −435, −295, and −271 CpG sites of CTIF, and at the −505 to −341 region in the promoter of DDR2. In the promoter region of NXT2, only one CpG site located at −432 was differentially unmethylated in APP-sw cells. Thus, we demonstrated the effect of the APP-sw mutation on alteration of DNA methylation and subsequent gene expression. This epigenetic regulatory mechanism may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  12. Changes in Pre- and Post-Exercise Gene Expression among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn K Coletta

    Full Text Available Decreased insulin sensitivity blunts the normal increase in gene expression from skeletal muscle after exercise. In addition, chronic inflammation decreases insulin sensitivity. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an inflammatory state. How CKD and, subsequently, kidney transplantation affects skeletal muscle gene expression after exercise are unknown.Study cohort: non-diabetic male/female 4/1, age 52±2 years, with end-stage CKD who underwent successful kidney transplantation. The following were measured both pre-transplant and post-transplant and compared to normals: Inflammatory markers, euglycemic insulin clamp studies determine insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle biopsies performed before and within 30 minutes after an acute exercise protocol. Microarray analyses were performed on the skeletal muscle using the 4x44K Whole Human Genome Microarrays. Since nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT plays an important role in T cell activation and calcineurin inhibitors are mainstay immunosuppression, calcineurin/NFAT pathway gene expression was compared at rest and after exercise. Log transformation was performed to prevent skewing of data and regression analyses comparing measures pre- and post-transplant performed.Markers of inflammation significantly improved post-transplantation. Insulin infusion raised glucose disposal slightly lower post-transplant compared to pre-transplant, but not significantly, thus concluding differences in insulin sensitivity were similar. The overall pattern of gene expression in response to exercise was reduced both pre-and post-transplant compared to healthy volunteers. Although significant changes were observed among NFAT/Calcineurin gene at rest and after exercise in normal cohort, there were no significant differences comparing NFAT/calcineurin pathway gene expression pre- and post-transplant.Despite an improvement in serum inflammatory markers, no significant differences in glucose disposal were observed post

  13. Specific reduction of calcium-binding protein (28-kilodalton calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and neurodegenerative diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacopino, A.M.; Christakos, S.

    1990-01-01

    The present studies establish that there are specific, significant decreases in the neuronal calcium-binding protein (28-kDa calbindin-D) gene expression in aging and in neurodegenerative diseases. The specificity of the changes observed in calbindin mRNA levels was tested by reprobing blots with calmodulin, cyclophilin, and B-actin cDNAs. Gross brain regions of the aging rat exhibited specific, significant decreases in calbindin·mRNA and protein levels in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and brain-stem region but not in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus. Discrete areas of the aging human brain exhibited significant decreases in calbindin protein and mRNA in the cerebellum, corpus striatum, and nucleus basalis but not in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, locus ceruleus, or nucleus raphe dorsalis. Comparison of diseased human brain tissue with age- and sex-matched controls yielded significant decreases calbindin protein and mRNA in the substantia nigra (Parkinson disease), in the corpus striatum (Huntington disease), in the nucleus basalis (Alzheimer disease), and in the hippocampus and nucleus raphe dorsalis (Parkinson, Huntington, and Alzheimer diseases) but not in the cerebellum, neocortex, amygdala, or locus ceruleus. These findings suggest that decreased calbindin gene expression may lead to a failure of calcium buffering or intraneuronal calcium homeostasis, which contributes to calcium-mediated cytotoxic events during aging and in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  14. Genome-wide gene expression array identifies novel genes related to disease severity and excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Yung-Che Chen

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify novel molecular associations between chronic intermittent hypoxia with re-oxygenation and adverse consequences in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We analyzed gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 48 patients with sleep-disordered breathing stratified into four groups: primary snoring (PS, moderate to severe OSA (MSO, very severe OSA (VSO, and very severe OSA patients on long-term continuous positive airway pressure treatment (VSOC. Comparisons of the microarray gene expression data identified eight genes up-regulated with OSA and down-regulated with CPAP treatment, and five genes down-regulated with OSA and up-regulated with CPAP treatment. Protein expression levels of two genes related to endothelial tight junction (AMOT P130, and PLEKHH3, and three genes related to anti-or pro-apoptosis (BIRC3, ADAR1 P150, and LGALS3 were all increased in the VSO group, while AMOT P130 was further increased, and PLEKHH3, BIRC3, and ADAR1 P150 were all decreased in the VSOC group. Subgroup analyses revealed that AMOT P130 protein expression was increased in OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness, BIRC3 protein expression was decreased in OSA patients with hypertension, and LGALS3 protein expression was increased in OSA patients with chronic kidney disease. In vitro short-term intermittent hypoxia with re-oxygenation experiment showed immediate over-expression of ADAR1 P150. In conclusion, we identified a novel association between AMOT/PLEKHH3/BIRC3/ADAR1/LGALS3 over-expressions and high severity index in OSA patients. AMOT and GALIG may constitute an important determinant for the development of hypersomnia and kidney injury, respectively, while BIRC3 may play a protective role in the development of hypertension.

  15. Using rule-based machine learning for candidate disease gene prioritization and sample classification of cancer gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Glaab

    Full Text Available Microarray data analysis has been shown to provide an effective tool for studying cancer and genetic diseases. Although classical machine learning techniques have successfully been applied to find informative genes and to predict class labels for new samples, common restrictions of microarray analysis such as small sample sizes, a large attribute space and high noise levels still limit its scientific and clinical applications. Increasing the interpretability of prediction models while retaining a high accuracy would help to exploit the information content in microarray data more effectively. For this purpose, we evaluate our rule-based evolutionary machine learning systems, BioHEL and GAssist, on three public microarray cancer datasets, obtaining simple rule-based models for sample classification. A comparison with other benchmark microarray sample classifiers based on three diverse feature selection algorithms suggests that these evolutionary learning techniques can compete with state-of-the-art methods like support vector machines. The obtained models reach accuracies above 90% in two-level external cross-validation, with the added value of facilitating interpretation by using only combinations of simple if-then-else rules. As a further benefit, a literature mining analysis reveals that prioritizations of informative genes extracted from BioHEL's classification rule sets can outperform gene rankings obtained from a conventional ensemble feature selection in terms of the pointwise mutual information between relevant disease terms and the standardized names of top-ranked genes.

  16. Using rule-based machine learning for candidate disease gene prioritization and sample classification of cancer gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Enrico; Bacardit, Jaume; Garibaldi, Jonathan M; Krasnogor, Natalio

    2012-01-01

    Microarray data analysis has been shown to provide an effective tool for studying cancer and genetic diseases. Although classical machine learning techniques have successfully been applied to find informative genes and to predict class labels for new samples, common restrictions of microarray analysis such as small sample sizes, a large attribute space and high noise levels still limit its scientific and clinical applications. Increasing the interpretability of prediction models while retaining a high accuracy would help to exploit the information content in microarray data more effectively. For this purpose, we evaluate our rule-based evolutionary machine learning systems, BioHEL and GAssist, on three public microarray cancer datasets, obtaining simple rule-based models for sample classification. A comparison with other benchmark microarray sample classifiers based on three diverse feature selection algorithms suggests that these evolutionary learning techniques can compete with state-of-the-art methods like support vector machines. The obtained models reach accuracies above 90% in two-level external cross-validation, with the added value of facilitating interpretation by using only combinations of simple if-then-else rules. As a further benefit, a literature mining analysis reveals that prioritizations of informative genes extracted from BioHEL's classification rule sets can outperform gene rankings obtained from a conventional ensemble feature selection in terms of the pointwise mutual information between relevant disease terms and the standardized names of top-ranked genes.

  17. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  18. Transcriptomic meta-analysis identifies gene expression characteristics in various samples of HIV-infected patients with nonprogressive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le-Le; Zhang, Zi-Ning; Wu, Xian; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Fu, Ya-Jing; Shang, Hong

    2017-09-12

    A small proportion of HIV-infected patients remain clinically and/or immunologically stable for years, including elite controllers (ECs) who have undetectable viremia (10 years). However, the mechanism of nonprogression needs to be further resolved. In this study, a transcriptome meta-analysis was performed on nonprogressor and progressor microarray data to identify differential transcriptome pathways and potential biomarkers. Using the INMEX (integrative meta-analysis of expression data) program, we performed the meta-analysis to identify consistently differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in nonprogressors and further performed functional interpretation (gene ontology analysis and pathway analysis) of the DEGs identified in the meta-analysis. Five microarray datasets (81 cases and 98 controls in total), including whole blood, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, were collected for meta-analysis. We determined that nonprogressors have reduced expression of important interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), CD38, lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) in whole blood, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed a significant enrichment in DEGs that function in the type I interferon signaling pathway. Upregulated pathways, including the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway in whole blood, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction in CD4 + T cells and the MAPK signaling pathway in CD8 + T cells, were identified in nonprogressors compared with progressors. In each metabolic functional category, the number of downregulated DEGs was more than the upregulated DEGs, and almost all genes were downregulated DEGs in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in the three types of samples. Our transcriptomic meta-analysis provides a comprehensive evaluation of the gene expression profiles in major blood types of nonprogressors, providing new insights in the understanding of HIV pathogenesis and developing strategies to delay HIV disease progression.

  19. Gene expression profiling to identify potentially relevant disease outcomes and support human health risk assessment for carbon black nanoparticle exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Julie A; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Moffat, Ivy; White, Paul A; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-07

    New approaches are urgently needed to evaluate potential hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials. Gene expression profiling provides information on potential modes of action and human relevance, and tools have recently become available for pathway-based quantitative risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use toxicogenomics in the context of human health risk assessment. We explore the utility of toxicogenomics in risk assessment, using published gene expression data from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 18, 54 and 162 μg Printex 90 carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP). Analysis of CBNP-perturbed pathways, networks and transcription factors revealed concomitant changes in predicted phenotypes (e.g., pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity), that correlated with dose and time. Benchmark doses (BMDs) for apical endpoints were comparable to minimum BMDs for relevant pathway-specific expression changes. Comparison to inflammatory lung disease models (i.e., allergic airway inflammation, bacterial infection and tissue injury and fibrosis) and human disease profiles revealed that induced gene expression changes in Printex 90 exposed mice were similar to those typical for pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Very similar fibrotic pathways were perturbed in CBNP-exposed mice and human fibrosis disease models. Our synthesis demonstrates how toxicogenomic profiles may be used in human health risk assessment of nanoparticles and constitutes an important step forward in the ultimate recognition of toxicogenomic endpoints in human health risk. As our knowledge of molecular pathways, dose-response characteristics and relevance to human disease continues to grow, we anticipate that toxicogenomics will become increasingly useful in assessing chemical toxicities and in human health risk assessment. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression profiling of cervical cancers in Indian women at different stages to identify gene signatures during progression of the disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Mulherkar, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with developing countries accounting for >80% of the disease burden. Although in the West, active screening has been instrumental in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, disease management is hampered due to lack of biomarkers for disease progression and defined therapeutic targets. Here we carried out gene expression profiling of 29 cervical cancer tissues from Indian women, spanning International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages of the disease from early lesion (IA and IIA) to progressive stages (IIB and IIIA–B), and identified distinct gene expression signatures. Overall, metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer and signaling pathways were found to be significantly upregulated, while focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and WNT signaling were downregulated. Additionally, we identified candidate biomarkers of disease progression such as SPP1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), STK17A, and DUSP1 among others that were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the samples used for microarray studies as well in an independent set of 34 additional samples. Integrative analysis of our results with other cervical cancer profiling studies could facilitate the development of multiplex diagnostic markers of cervical cancer progression

  1. Integrative Analysis of Hippocampus Gene Expression Profiles Identifies Network Alterations in Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Lanke

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder contributing to rapid decline in cognitive function and ultimately dementia. Most cases of AD occur in elderly and later years. There is a growing need for understanding the relationship between aging and AD to identify shared and unique hallmarks associated with the disease in a region and cell-type specific manner. Although genomic studies on AD have been performed extensively, the molecular mechanism of disease progression is still not clear. The major objective of our study is to obtain a higher-order network-level understanding of aging and AD, and their relationship using the hippocampal gene expression profiles of young (20–50 years, aging (70–99 years, and AD (70–99 years. The hippocampus is vulnerable to damage at early stages of AD and altered neurogenesis in the hippocampus is linked to the onset of AD. We combined the weighted gene co-expression network and weighted protein–protein interaction network-level approaches to study the transition from young to aging to AD. The network analysis revealed the organization of co-expression network into functional modules that are cell-type specific in aging and AD. We found that modules associated with astrocytes, endothelial cells and microglial cells are upregulated and significantly correlate with both aging and AD. The modules associated with neurons, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are downregulated and significantly correlate with AD than aging. The oligodendrocytes module does not show significant correlation with neither aging nor disease. Further, we identified aging- and AD-specific interactions/subnetworks by integrating the gene expression with a human protein–protein interaction network. We found dysregulation of genes encoding protein kinases (FYN, SYK, SRC, PKC, MAPK1, ephrin receptors and transcription factors (FOS, STAT3, CEBPB, MYC, NFKβ, and EGR1 in AD. Further, we found genes that encode proteins

  2. Expression of genes associated with immunity in the endometrium of cattle with disparate postpartum uterine disease and fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herath Shan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination of the uterine lumen with bacteria is ubiquitous in cattle after parturition. Some animals develop endometritis and have reduced fertility but others have no uterine disease and readily conceive. The present study tested the hypothesis that postpartum cattle that develop persistent endometritis and infertility are unable to limit the inflammatory response to uterine bacterial infection. Methods Endometrial biopsies were collected several times during the postpartum period from animals that were subsequently infertile with persistent endometritis (n = 4 or had no clinical disease and conceived to first insemination (n = 4. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the expression of candidate genes in the endometrial biopsies, including the Toll-like receptor (TLR 1 to 10 family of innate immune receptors, inflammatory mediators and their cognate receptors. Selected proteins were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results The expression of genes encoding pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukins (IL1A, IL1B and IL6, and nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2 were higher during the first week post partum than subsequently. During the first week post partum, there was higher gene expression in infertile than fertile animals of TLR4, the receptor for bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL1A and IL1B, and their receptor IL1R2. The expression of genes encoding other Toll-like receptors, transforming growth factor beta receptor 1 (TGFBR1 or prostaglandin E2 receptors (PTGER2 and PTGER4 did not differ significantly between the animal groups. Gene expression did not differ significantly between infertile and fertile animals after the first week postpartum. However, there were higher ratios of IL1A or IL1B mRNA to the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL10, during the first week post partum in the infertile than fertile animals, and the protein products of these genes were mainly localised to the epithelium

  3. Rice Gene Network Inferred from Expression Profiling of Plants Overexpressing OsWRKY13,a Positive Regulator of Disease Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deyun Qiu; Jun Xiao; Weibo Xie; Hongbo Liu; Xianghua Li; Lizhong Xiong; Shiping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating information indicates that plant disease resistance signaling pathways frequently interact with other pathways regulating developmental processes or abiotic stress responses. However, the molecular mechanisms of these types of crosstalk remain poorly understood in most cases. Here we report that OsWRKY13, an activator of rice resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens, appears to function as a convergent point for crosstalk among the pathogen-induced salicylate-dependent defense pathway and five other physiologic pathways. Genome-wide analysis of the expression profiles of OsWRKY13-overexpressing lines suggests that OsWRKY13 directly or indirectly regulates the expression of more than 500 genes that are potentially involved in different physiologic processes according to the classification of the Gene Ontology database. By comparing the expression patterns of genes functioning in known pathways or cellular processes of pathogen infection and the phenotypes between OsWRKY13-overexpressing and wildtype plants, our data suggest that OsWRKY13 is also a regulator of other physiologic processes during pathogen infection. The OsWRKY13-associated disease resistance pathway synergistically interacts via OsWRKY13 with the glutathione/glutaredoxin system and flavonoid biosynthesis pathway to monitor redox homeostasis and to putatively enhance the biosynthesis of antimicrobial flavonoid phytoalexins, respectively, in OsWRKY13-overexpressing lines. Meanwhile, the OsWRKY13-associated disease resistance pathway appears to interact antagonistically with the SNAC1-mediated abiotic stress defense pathway, jasmonic acid signaling pathway, and terpenoid metabolism pathway via OsWRKY13 to suppress salt and cold defense responses as well as to putatively retard rice growth and development.

  4. Inhibition of Super-Enhancer Activity in Autoinflammatory Site-Derived T Cells Reduces Disease-Associated Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Janneke G C; Vervoort, Stephin J; Tan, Sander C; Mijnheer, Gerdien; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van Wijk, Femke; Prakken, Berent J; Creyghton, Menno P; Coffer, Paul J; Mokry, Michal; van Loosdregt, Jorg

    2015-09-29

    The underlying molecular mechanisms for many autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an exceptionally well-suited model for studying autoimmune diseases due to its early onset and the possibility to analyze cells derived from the site of inflammation. Epigenetic profiling, utilizing primary JIA patient-derived cells, can contribute to the understanding of autoimmune diseases. With H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a disease-specific, inflammation-associated, typical enhancer and super-enhancer signature in JIA patient synovial-fluid-derived CD4(+) memory/effector T cells. RNA sequencing of autoinflammatory site-derived patient T cells revealed that BET inhibition, utilizing JQ1, inhibited immune-related super-enhancers and preferentially reduced disease-associated gene expression, including cytokine-related processes. Altogether, these results demonstrate the potential use of enhancer profiling to identify disease mediators and provide evidence for BET inhibition as a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of Super-Enhancer Activity in Autoinflammatory Site-Derived T Cells Reduces Disease-Associated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke G.C. Peeters

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The underlying molecular mechanisms for many autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is an exceptionally well-suited model for studying autoimmune diseases due to its early onset and the possibility to analyze cells derived from the site of inflammation. Epigenetic profiling, utilizing primary JIA patient-derived cells, can contribute to the understanding of autoimmune diseases. With H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation, we identified a disease-specific, inflammation-associated, typical enhancer and super-enhancer signature in JIA patient synovial-fluid-derived CD4+ memory/effector T cells. RNA sequencing of autoinflammatory site-derived patient T cells revealed that BET inhibition, utilizing JQ1, inhibited immune-related super-enhancers and preferentially reduced disease-associated gene expression, including cytokine-related processes. Altogether, these results demonstrate the potential use of enhancer profiling to identify disease mediators and provide evidence for BET inhibition as a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  6. S1 nuclease analysis of α-globin gene expression in preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease after transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helder, J.; Deisseroth, A.

    1987-01-01

    The loss of α-globin gene transcriptional activity rarely occurs as an acquired abnormality during the evolution of myeloproliferative disease or preleukemia. To test whether the mutation responsible for the loss of α-globin gene expression (hemoglobin H disease) in these patients is linked with the α-globin genes on chromosome 16, the authors transferred chromosome 16 from preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease to mouse erythroleukemia cells and measured the transcriptional activity of the human α-globin genes. After transfer to mouse erythroleukemia cells, the expression of human α-globin genes from the peripheral blood or marrow cells of preleukemic patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease was similar to that of human α-globin genes transferred to mouse erythroleukemia cells from normal donors. These data showed that factor(s) in the mouse erythroleukemia cell can genetically complement the α-globin gene defect in these preleukemia patients with acquired hemoglobin H disease and suggest that altered expression of a gene in trans to the α-globin gene may be responsible for the acquisition of hemoglobin H disease in these patients

  7. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Pasquale

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Celiac disease (CD is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten. Gluten-sensitive individuals (GS cannot tolerate gluten and may develop gastrointestinal symptoms similar to those in CD, but the overall clinical picture is generally less severe and is not accompanied by the concurrence of tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies or autoimmune comorbidities. By studying and comparing mucosal expression of genes associated with intestinal barrier function, as well as innate and adaptive immunity in CD compared with GS, we sought to better understand the similarities and differences between these two gluten-associated disorders. Methods CD, GS and healthy, gluten-tolerant individuals were enrolled in this study. Intestinal permeability was evaluated using a lactulose and mannitol probe, and mucosal biopsy specimens were collected to study the expression of genes involved in barrier function and immunity. Results Unlike CD, GS is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. In fact, this was significantly reduced in GS compared with controls (P = 0.0308, paralleled by significantly increased expression of claudin (CLDN 4 (P = 0.0286. Relative to controls, adaptive immunity markers interleukin (IL-6 (P = 0.0124 and IL-21 (P = 0.0572 were expressed at higher levels in CD but not in GS, while expression of the innate immunity marker Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 was increased in GS but not in CD (P = 0.0295. Finally, expression of the T-regulatory cell marker FOXP3 was significantly reduced in GS relative to controls (P = 0.0325 and CD patients (P = 0.0293. Conclusions This study shows that the two gluten-associated disorders, CD and GS, are different clinical entities, and it contributes to the characterization of GS as a condition associated with prevalent gluten-induced activation of innate, rather than adaptive, immune responses in the absence of detectable changes in mucosal barrier function.

  8. TLR4 Gene Expression and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Alzheimer's Disease and in Response to Hippocampal Deafferentation in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Justin; Picard, Cynthia; Frappier, Josée; Dea, Doris; Théroux, Louise; Poirier, Judes

    2018-01-01

    One important aspect in Alzheimer's disease pathology is the presence of chronic inflammation. Considering its role as a key receptor in the microglial innate immune system, TLR4 was shown to regulate the binding and phagocytosis of amyloid plaques by microglia in several mouse models of amyloidosis, as well as the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. To our knowledge, TLR4 and its association with cytokines have not been thoroughly examined in the brains of subjects affected with Alzheimer's disease. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in postmortem human brains, we observed increased expression for the TLR4 and TNF genes (p = 0.001 and p = 0.025, respectively), as well as a trend for higher IL6 gene expression in the frontal cortex of AD subjects when compared to age-matched controls. Similarly, using a mouse model of hippocampal deafferentation without amyloidosis, (i.e., the entorhinal cortex lesioned mouse), we observed significant increases in the expression of both the Tlr4 (p = 0.0367 and p = 0.0193 compared to sham-lesioned mice or to the contralateral side, respectively) and Il1b (p = 0.0055 and p = 0.0066 compared to sham-lesioned mice or to the contralateral side, respectively) genes in the deafferentation phase, but not during the ensuing reinnervation process. In conclusion, we suggest that the modulation of cytokines by TLR4 is differentially regulated whether by the presence of amyloid plaques or by the ongoing deafferentation process.

  9. Gene expression and gene therapy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, Claire; Couillaud, Franck; Moonen, Chrit T.W.

    2007-01-01

    The fast growing field of molecular imaging has achieved major advances in imaging gene expression, an important element of gene therapy. Gene expression imaging is based on specific probes or contrast agents that allow either direct or indirect spatio-temporal evaluation of gene expression. Direct evaluation is possible with, for example, contrast agents that bind directly to a specific target (e.g., receptor). Indirect evaluation may be achieved by using specific substrate probes for a target enzyme. The use of marker genes, also called reporter genes, is an essential element of MI approaches for gene expression in gene therapy. The marker gene may not have a therapeutic role itself, but by coupling the marker gene to a therapeutic gene, expression of the marker gene reports on the expression of the therapeutic gene. Nuclear medicine and optical approaches are highly sensitive (detection of probes in the picomolar range), whereas MRI and ultrasound imaging are less sensitive and require amplification techniques and/or accumulation of contrast agents in enlarged contrast particles. Recently developed MI techniques are particularly relevant for gene therapy. Amongst these are the possibility to track gene therapy vectors such as stem cells, and the techniques that allow spatiotemporal control of gene expression by non-invasive heating (with MRI guided focused ultrasound) and the use of temperature sensitive promoters. (orig.)

  10. Thiopurine treatment in patients with Crohn's disease leads to a selective reduction of an effector cytotoxic gene expression signature revealed by whole-genome expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, G; Baggen, J M; van Bodegraven, A A; Mulder, C J J; Kraal, G; Zwiers, A; Horrevoets, A J; van der Pouw Kraan, C T M

    2013-07-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, as a result of aberrant activation of the innate immune system through TLR stimulation by bacterial products. The conventional immunosuppressive thiopurine derivatives (azathioprine and mercaptopurine) are used to treat CD. The effects of thiopurines on circulating immune cells and TLR responsiveness are unknown. To obtain a global view of affected gene expression of the immune system in CD patients and the treatment effect of thiopurine derivatives, we performed genome-wide transcriptome analysis on whole blood samples from 20 CD patients in remission, of which 10 patients received thiopurine treatment, compared to 16 healthy controls, before and after TLR4 stimulation with LPS. Several immune abnormalities were observed, including increased baseline interferon activity, while baseline expression of ribosomal genes was reduced. After LPS stimulation, CD patients showed reduced cytokine and chemokine expression. None of these effects were related to treatment. Strikingly, only one highly correlated set of 69 genes was affected by treatment, not influenced by LPS stimulation and consisted of genes reminiscent of effector cytotoxic NK cells. The most reduced cytotoxicity-related gene in CD was the cell surface marker CD160. Concordantly, we could demonstrate an in vivo reduction of circulating CD160(+)CD3(-)CD8(-) cells in CD patients after treatment with thiopurine derivatives in an independent cohort. In conclusion, using genome-wide profiling, we identified a disturbed immune activation status in peripheral blood cells from CD patients and a clear treatment effect of thiopurine derivatives selectively affecting effector cytotoxic CD160-positive cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential expression of genes encoding anti-oxidant enzymes in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata (Gould) selected for disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Dixon, Tom J; Devic, Emilie; Adlard, Robert D; Barnes, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) selectively bred for disease resistance (R) and wild-caught control oysters (W) were exposed to a field infection of disseminating neoplasia. Cumulative mortality of W oysters (31.7%) was significantly greater than R oysters (0.0%) over the 118 days of the experiment. In an attempt to understand the biochemical and molecular pathways involved in disease resistance, differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between R and W S. glomerata hemocytes were identified using the PCR technique, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH). Sequencing of 300 clones from two SSH libraries revealed 183 distinct sequences of which 113 shared high similarity to sequences in the public databases. Putative function could be assigned to 64 of the sequences. Expression of nine ESTs homologous to genes previously shown to be involved in bivalve immunity was further studied using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The base-line expression of an extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) and a small heat shock protein (sHsP) were significantly increased, whilst peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and interferon inhibiting cytokine factor (IK) were significantly decreased in R oysters. From these results it was hypothesised that R oysters would be able to generate the anti-parasitic compound, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) faster and to higher concentrations during respiratory burst due to the differential expression of genes for the two anti-oxidant enzymes of ecSOD and Prx6. To investigate this hypothesis, protein extracts from hemolymph were analysed for oxidative burst enzyme activity. Analysis of the cell free hemolymph proteins separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) failed to detect true superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity by assaying dismutation of superoxide anion in zymograms. However, the ecSOD enzyme appears to generate hydrogen peroxide, presumably via another process, which is yet to be elucidated. This

  12. Differential gene expression in porcine SK6 cells infected with wild-type and SAP domain-mutant foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zixin; Yang, Fan; Cao, Weijun; Zhang, Xiangle; Jin, Ye; Mao, Ruoqing; Du, Xiaoli; Li, Weiwei; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zhu, Zixiang; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-06-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of a highly contagious disease in livestock. The viral proteinase L(pro) of FMDV is involved in pathogenicity, and mutation of the L(pro) SAP domain reduces FMDV pathogenicity in pigs. To determine the gene expression profiles associated with decreased pathogenicity in porcine cells, we performed transcriptome analysis using next-generation sequencing technology and compared differentially expressed genes in SK6 cells infected with FMDV containing L(pro) with either a wild-type or mutated version of the SAP domain. This analysis yielded 1,853 genes that exhibited a ≥ 2-fold change in expression and was validated by real-time quantitative PCR detection of several differentially expressed genes. Many of the differentially expressed genes correlated with antiviral responses corresponded to genes associated with transcription factors, immune regulation, cytokine production, inflammatory response, and apoptosis. Alterations in gene expression profiles may be responsible for the variations in pathogenicity observed between the two FMDV variants. Our results provided genes of interest for the further study of antiviral pathways and pathogenic mechanisms related to FMDV L(pro).

  13. Further characterization of HDAC and SIRT gene expression patterns in pancreatic cancer and their relation to disease outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ouaïssi

    Full Text Available Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is ranking 4 for patient' death from malignant disease in Western countries, with no satisfactory treatment. We re-examined more precisely the histone deacetylases (HDAC and Sirtuin (SIRT gene expression patterns in pancreatic cancer with more pancreatic tumors and normal tissues. We also examined the possible relationship between HDAC gene expression levels and long term disease outcome. Moreover, we have evaluated by using an in vitro model system of human pancreatic tumor cell line whether HDAC7 knockdown may affect the cell behavior. We analyzed 29 pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA, 9 chronic pancreatitis (CP, 8 benign pancreatic (BP and 11 normal pancreatic tissues. Concerning pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we were able to collect biopsies at the tumor periphery. To assess the possible involvement of HDAC7 in cell proliferation capacity, we have generated recombinant human Panc-1 tumor which underexpressed or overexpressed HDAC7. The expression of HDAC1,2,3,4,7 and Nur77 increased in PA samples at levels significantly higher than those observed in the CP group (p = 0.0160; 0.0114; 0.0227; 0.0440; 0.0136; 0.0004, respectively. The expression of HDAC7, was significantly greater in the PA compared with BP tissue samples (p = 0.05. Mean mRNA transcription levels of PA for HDAC7 and HDAC2 were higher when compared to their counterpart biopsies taken at the tumor periphery (p = 0.0346, 0.0053, respectively. Moreover, the data obtained using confocal microscopy and a quantitative method of immunofluorescence staining strongly support the HDAC7 overexpression in PA surgical specimens. The number of deaths and recurrences at the end of follow up were significantly greater in patients with overexpression of HDAC7. Interestingly, the rate of growth was significantly reduced in the case of cell carrying shRNA construct targeting HDAC7 encoding gene when compared to the parental Panc-1 tumor cells (p = 0.0015 at 48 h and 96

  14. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology.

  15. High-resolution gene expression profiling using RNA sequencing in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in mouse models of colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holgersen, Kristine; Kutlu, Burak; Fox, Brian

    2015-01-01

    pathways and assess the similarity between the experimental models and human disease. RNA sequencing was performed on colon biopsies from CD patients, UC patients and non-IBD controls. Genes shown to be significantly dysregulated in human IBD were used to study gene expression in colons from a piroxicam......Proper interpretation of data from preclinical animal studies requires a thorough knowledge about the pathophysiology of both the human disease and animal models. In this study, the expression of IBD-associated genes was characterised in mouse models of colitis to examine the underlying molecular......-accelerated colitis interleukin-10 knockout (PAC IL-10 k.o.), an adoptive transfer (AdTr) and a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis mouse model. 92 out of 115 literature-defined genes linked to IBD were significantly differentially expressed in inflamed mucosa of CD and/or UC patients compared with non-IBD controls...

  16. Gene expression profiling in necrotizing enterocolitis reveals pathways common to those reported in Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay, Éric; Thibault, Marie-Pier; Ferretti, Emanuela; Babakissa, Corentin; Bertelle, Valérie; Bettolli, Marcos; Burghardt, Karolina Maria; Colombani, Jean-François; Grynspan, David; Levy, Emile; Lu, Peng; Mayer, Sandeep; Ménard, Daniel; Mouterde, Olivier; Renes, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most frequent life-threatening gastrointestinal disease experienced by premature infants in neonatal intensive care units. The challenge for neonatologists is to detect early clinical manifestations of NEC. One strategy would be to identify specific markers that could be used as early diagnostic tools to identify preterm infants most at risk of developing NEC or in the event of a diagnostic dilemma of suspected disease. As a first...

  17. Comparing cancer vs normal gene expression profiles identifies new disease entities and common transcriptional programs in AML patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jendholm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has been used extensively to characterize cancer, identify novel subtypes, and improve patient stratification. However, it has largely failed to identify transcriptional programs that differ between cancer and corresponding normal cells and has not been efficient in iden......-karyotype AML, which allowed for the generation of a highly prognostic survival signature. Collectively, our CvN method holds great potential as a tool for the analysis of gene expression profiles of cancer patients....

  18. Gene expression profiling in necrotizing enterocolitis reveals pathways common to those reported in Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    É. Tremblay (Éric); M.-P. Thibault (Marie-Pier); E. Ferretti (Emanuela); C. Babakissa (Corentin); V. Bertelle (Valérie); M. Bettolli (Marcos); K.M. Burghardt (Karolina Maria); J.-F. Colombani (Jean-François); D. Grynspan (David); E. Levy (Emile); P. Lu (Peng); S. Mayer (Sandeep); D. Ménard (Daniel); O. Mouterde (Olivier); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); E.G. Seidman (Ernest G.); J.-F. Beaulieu (Jean-François)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most frequent life-threatening gastrointestinal disease experienced by premature infants in neonatal intensive care units. The challenge for neonatologists is to detect early clinical manifestations of NEC. One strategy would be to

  19. Variants in RET Associated With Hirschsprung's Disease Affect Binding of Transcription Factors and Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sribudiani, Yunia; Metzger, Marco; Osinga, Jan; Rey, Amanda; Burns, Alan J.; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two noncoding variations in RET-the T allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2435357 (Enh1:C>T) and the A allele of the SNP rs2506004 (Enh2:C>A)-are associated with Hirschsprung's disease. These SNPs are in strong linkage disequilibrium and located in an enhancer

  20. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, Leonard I.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on 'suicide gene therapy' of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k + ) has been use for 'suicide' in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k + gene expression where the H S V-1 t k + gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([ 18 F]F H P G; [ 18 F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([ 123 / 131 I]I V R F U; [ 124 / 131I ]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [ 123 / 131I ]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k + reporter gene will be presented

  1. Imaging gene expression in gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, Leonard I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Gene therapy can be used to introduce new genes, or to supplement the function of indigenous genes. At the present time, however, there is non-invasive test to demonstrate efficacy of the gene transfer and expression processes. It has been postulated that scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the site at which the transferred gene is expressed, and the degree of expression, both of which are critical issue for safety and clinical efficacy. Many current studies are based on `suicide gene therapy` of cancer. Cells modified to express these genes commit metabolic suicide in the presence of an enzyme encoded by the transferred gene and a specifically-convertible pro drug. Pro drug metabolism can lead to selective metabolic trapping, required for scintigraphy. Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (H S V-1 t k{sup +}) has been use for `suicide` in vivo tumor gene therapy. It has been proposed that radiolabelled nucleosides can be used as radiopharmaceuticals to detect H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene expression where the H S V-1 t k{sup +} gene serves a reporter or therapeutic function. Animal gene therapy models have been studied using purine-([{sup 18} F]F H P G; [{sup 18} F]-A C V), and pyrimidine- ([{sup 123}/{sup 131} I]I V R F U; [{sup 124}/{sup 131I}]) antiviral nucleosides. Principles of gene therapy and gene therapy imaging will be reviewed and experimental data for [{sup 123}/{sup 131I}]I V R F U imaging with the H S V-1 t k{sup +} reporter gene will be presented

  2. Expression of the genes dual oxidase 2, lipocalin 2 and regenerating islet-derived 1 alpha in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csillag, C.; Nielsen, O.H.; Vainer, Ben

    2007-01-01

    colonoscopically from 33 CD patients and from 17 control subjects. All controls and 10 CD patients were medication-free at the time of colonoscopy. The Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChip Array was used for gene profiling. Hybridization data were analysed with dChip software. Results were confirmed by real......-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Protein product expression of selected genes was assessed by immunohistochemistry using the Envision+ visualization technique. RESULTS: The expression profile was not homogeneous with the statistical cut-point settings applied. In comparison......, fold change 3.9), codes for a mitogenic protein; this could not be confirmed by RT-PCR. Medication-free patients had no differentially expressed genes as compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry indicated that these proteins were produced by epithelial cells (REG1A, LCN2) and leucocytes (DUOX2...

  3. Gene expression inference with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifei; Li, Yi; Narayan, Rajiv; Subramanian, Aravind; Xie, Xiaohui

    2016-06-15

    Large-scale gene expression profiling has been widely used to characterize cellular states in response to various disease conditions, genetic perturbations, etc. Although the cost of whole-genome expression profiles has been dropping steadily, generating a compendium of expression profiling over thousands of samples is still very expensive. Recognizing that gene expressions are often highly correlated, researchers from the NIH LINCS program have developed a cost-effective strategy of profiling only ∼1000 carefully selected landmark genes and relying on computational methods to infer the expression of remaining target genes. However, the computational approach adopted by the LINCS program is currently based on linear regression (LR), limiting its accuracy since it does not capture complex nonlinear relationship between expressions of genes. We present a deep learning method (abbreviated as D-GEX) to infer the expression of target genes from the expression of landmark genes. We used the microarray-based Gene Expression Omnibus dataset, consisting of 111K expression profiles, to train our model and compare its performance to those from other methods. In terms of mean absolute error averaged across all genes, deep learning significantly outperforms LR with 15.33% relative improvement. A gene-wise comparative analysis shows that deep learning achieves lower error than LR in 99.97% of the target genes. We also tested the performance of our learned model on an independent RNA-Seq-based GTEx dataset, which consists of 2921 expression profiles. Deep learning still outperforms LR with 6.57% relative improvement, and achieves lower error in 81.31% of the target genes. D-GEX is available at https://github.com/uci-cbcl/D-GEX CONTACT: xhx@ics.uci.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Related Gene Expression Changes in a Cellular and Animal Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Su Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We employed transcriptome analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor related gene expression changes in cellular and animal models of Parkinson’s disease (PD. We used a well-known Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+ to induce neuronal apoptosis in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. The MPP+-treatment of SH-SY5Y cells was capable of inducing neuro-apoptosis, but it remains unclear what kinds of transcriptional genes are affected by MPP+ toxicity. Therefore the pathways that were significantly perturbed in MPP+ treated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were identified based on genome-wide gene expression data at two time points (24 and 48 h. We found that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR pathway-related genes showed significantly differential expression at all time points. The EGFR pathway has been linked to diverse cellular events such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Further, to evaluate the functional significance of the altered EGFR related gene expression observed in MPP+-treated SH-SY5Y cells, the EGFR related GJB2 (Cx26 gene expression was analyzed in an MPP+-intoxicated animal PD model. Our findings identify that the EGFR signaling pathway and its related genes, such as Cx26, might play a significant role in dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal cell death during the process of neuro-apoptosis and therefore can be focused on as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Regulation of eucaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, R.; Ptashne, M.S

    1989-05-23

    This patent describes a method of regulating the expression of a gene in a eucaryotic cell. The method consists of: providing in the eucaryotic cell, a peptide, derived from or substantially similar to a peptide of a procaryotic cell able to bind to DNA upstream from or within the gene, the amount of the peptide being sufficient to bind to the gene and thereby control expression of the gene.

  6. Development of a blood-based gene expression algorithm for assessment of obstructive coronary artery disease in non-diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Stephen G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in gene expression in peripheral blood cells have been shown to be sensitive to the presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD. A non-invasive blood test that could reliably assess obstructive CAD likelihood would have diagnostic utility. Results Microarray analysis of RNA samples from a 195 patient Duke CATHGEN registry case:control cohort yielded 2,438 genes with significant CAD association (p RT-PCR analysis of these 113 genes in a PREDICT cohort of 640 non-diabetic subject samples was used for algorithm development. Gene expression correlations identified clusters of CAD classifier genes which were reduced to meta-genes using LASSO. The final classifier for assessment of obstructive CAD was derived by Ridge Regression and contained sex-specific age functions and 6 meta-gene terms, comprising 23 genes. This algorithm showed a cross-validated estimated AUC = 0.77 (95% CI 0.73-0.81 in ROC analysis. Conclusions We have developed a whole blood classifier based on gene expression, age and sex for the assessment of obstructive CAD in non-diabetic patients from a combination of microarray and RT-PCR data derived from studies of patients clinically indicated for invasive angiography. Clinical trial registration information PREDICT, Personalized Risk Evaluation and Diagnosis in the Coronary Tree, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00500617

  7. Differential Gene Expression and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Seroude

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that an intricate program of gene expression controls progression through the different stages in development. The equally complex biological phenomenon known as aging is genetically determined and environmentally modulated. This review focuses on the genetic component of aging, with a special emphasis on differential gene expression. At least two genetic pathways regulating organism longevity act by modifying gene expression. Many genes are also subjected to age-dependent transcriptional regulation. Some age-related gene expression changes are prevented by caloric restriction, the most robust intervention that slows down the aging process. Manipulating the expression of some age-regulated genes can extend an organism's life span. Remarkably, the activity of many transcription regulatory elements is linked to physiological age as opposed to chronological age, indicating that orderly and tightly controlled regulatory pathways are active during aging.

  8. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hägg, Sara

    2009-12-04

    Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n =66/tissue) and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n =40/tissue) isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n =15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes) in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n= 3958 genes). In the second step (performed within tissue clusters), one atherosclerotic lesion (n =49/48) and one visceral fat (n =59) cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P=0.008 and P=0.00015). The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n =55/54) relating to carotid stenosis (P =0.04), 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n= 16/17, P<10 -27and-30). Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML) pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module). In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the Amodule was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004). The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2) was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2, and by the

  9. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  10. Mining gene expression data of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi Guo

    Full Text Available Microarray produces a large amount of gene expression data, containing various biological implications. The challenge is to detect a panel of discriminative genes associated with disease. This study proposed a robust classification model for gene selection using gene expression data, and performed an analysis to identify disease-related genes using multiple sclerosis as an example.Gene expression profiles based on the transcriptome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of 44 samples from 26 multiple sclerosis patients and 18 individuals with other neurological diseases (control were analyzed. Feature selection algorithms including Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve, and Boruta algorithms were jointly performed to select candidate genes associating with multiple sclerosis. Multiple classification models categorized samples into two different groups based on the identified genes. Models' performance was evaluated using cross-validation methods, and an optimal classifier for gene selection was determined.An overlapping feature set was identified consisting of 8 genes that were differentially expressed between the two phenotype groups. The genes were significantly associated with the pathways of apoptosis and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction. TNFSF10 was significantly associated with multiple sclerosis. A Support Vector Machine model was established based on the featured genes and gave a practical accuracy of ∼86%. This binary classification model also outperformed the other models in terms of Sensitivity, Specificity and F1 score.The combined analytical framework integrating feature ranking algorithms and Support Vector Machine model could be used for selecting genes for other diseases.

  11. Bursal transcriptome profiling of different inbred chicken lines reveals key differentially expressed genes at 3 days post-infection with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhanah, Mohd Isa; Yasmin, Abd Rahaman; Mat Isa, Nurulfiza; Hair-Bejo, Mohd; Ideris, Aini; Powers, Claire; Oladapo, Omobolanle; Nair, Venugopal; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Ghazali, Ahmad-Kamal; Yee, Wai-Yan; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2018-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease in the poultry industry and causes immunosuppression in chickens. Genome-wide regulations of immune response genes of inbred chickens with different genetic backgrounds, following very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) infection are poorly characterized. Therefore, this study aims to analyse the bursal tissue transcriptome of six inbred chicken lines 6, 7, 15, N, O and P following infection with vvIBDV strain UK661 using strand-specific next-generation sequencing, by highlighting important genes and pathways involved in the infected chicken during peak infection at 3 days post-infection. All infected chickens succumbed to the infection without major variations among the different lines. However, based on the viral loads and bursal lesion scoring, lines P and 6 can be considered as the most susceptible lines, while lines 15 and N were regarded as the least affected lines. Transcriptome profiling of the bursa identified 4588 genes to be differentially expressed, with 2985 upregulated and 1642 downregulated genes, in which these genes were commonly or uniquely detected in all or several infected lines. Genes that were upregulated are primarily pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and IFN-related. Various genes that are associated with B-cell functions and genes related to apoptosis were downregulated, together with the genes involved in p53 signalling. In conclusion, bursal transcriptome profiles of different inbred lines showed differential expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, Th1 cytokines, JAK-STAT signalling genes, MAPK signalling genes, and their related pathways following vvIBDV infection.

  12. Overexpression of GRß in colonic mucosal cell line partly reflects altered gene expression in colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zsolt; Acs, Bence; Butz, Henriett; Feldman, Karolina; Marta, Alexa; Szabo, Peter M; Baghy, Kornelia; Pazmany, Tamas; Racz, Karoly; Liko, Istvan; Patocs, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) plays a crucial role in inflammatory responses. GR has several isoforms, of which the most deeply studied are the GRα and GRß. Recently it has been suggested that in addition to its negative dominant effect on GRα, the GRß may have a GRα-independent transcriptional activity. The GRß isoform was found to be frequently overexpressed in various autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, we wished to test whether the gene expression profile found in a GRß overexpressing intestinal cell line (Caco-2GRß) might mimic the gene expression alterations found in patients with IBD. Whole genome microarray analysis was performed in both normal and GRß overexpressing Caco-2 cell lines with and without dexamethasone treatment. IBD-related genes were identified from a meta-analysis of 245 microarrays available in online microarray deposits performed on intestinal mucosa samples from patients with IBD and healthy individuals. The differentially expressed genes were further studied using in silico pathway analysis. Overexpression of GRß altered a large proportion of genes that were not regulated by dexamethasone suggesting that GRß may have a GRα-independent role in the regulation of gene expression. About 10% of genes differentially expressed in colonic mucosa samples from IBD patients compared to normal subjects were also detected in Caco-2 GRß intestinal cell line. Common genes are involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation. Overexpression of GRß in intestinal cells may affect appropriate mucosal repair and intact barrier function. The proposed novel role of GRß in intestinal epithelium warrants further studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inducible expression of Bs2 R gene from Capsicum chacoense in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) confers enhanced resistance to citrus canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendín, Lorena Noelia; Orce, Ingrid Georgina; Gómez, Rocío Liliana; Enrique, Ramón; Grellet Bournonville, Carlos Froilán; Noguera, Aldo Sergio; Vojnov, Adrián Alberto; Marano, María Rosa; Castagnaro, Atilio Pedro; Filippone, María Paula

    2017-04-01

    Transgenic expression of the pepper Bs2 gene confers resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) pathogenic strains which contain the avrBs2 avirulence gene in susceptible pepper and tomato varieties. The avrBs2 gene is highly conserved among members of the Xanthomonas genus, and the avrBs2 of Xcv shares 96% homology with the avrBs2 of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), the causal agent of citrus canker disease. A previous study showed that the transient expression of pepper Bs2 in lemon leaves reduced canker formation and induced plant defence mechanisms. In this work, the effect of the stable expression of Bs2 gene on citrus canker resistance was evaluated in transgenic plants of Citrus sinensis cv. Pineapple. Interestingly, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of epicotyls was unsuccessful when a constitutive promoter (2× CaMV 35S) was used in the plasmid construction, but seven transgenic lines were obtained with a genetic construction harbouring Bs2 under the control of a pathogen-inducible promoter, from glutathione S-transferase gene from potato. A reduction of disease symptoms of up to 70% was observed in transgenic lines expressing Bs2 with respect to non-transformed control plants. This reduction was directly dependent on the Xcc avrBs2 gene since no effect was observed when a mutant strain of Xcc with a disruption in avrBs2 gene was used for inoculations. Additionally, a canker symptom reduction was correlated with levels of the Bs2 expression in transgenic plants, as assessed by real-time qPCR, and accompanied by the production of reactive oxygen species. These results indicate that the pepper Bs2 resistance gene is also functional in a family other than the Solanaceae, and could be considered for canker control.

  14. Modulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver by probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Diaz, Julio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Fontana, Luis; Gil, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The potential for the positive manipulation of the gut microbiome through the introduction of beneficial microbes, as also known as probiotics, is currently an active area of investigation. The FAO/WHO define probiotics as live microorganisms that confer a health benefit to the host when administered in adequate amounts. However, dead bacteria and bacterial molecular components may also exhibit probiotic properties. The results of clinical studies have demonstrated the clinical potential of probiotics in many pathologies, such as allergic diseases, diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and viral infection. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of probiotics, most of which involve gene expression regulation in specific tissues, particularly the intestine and liver. Therefore, the modulation of gene expression mediated by probiotics is an important issue that warrants further investigation. In the present paper, we performed a systematic review of the probiotic-mediated modulation of gene expression that is associated with the immune system and inflammation. Between January 1990 to February 2014, PubMed was searched for articles that were published in English using the MeSH terms “probiotics" and "gene expression" combined with “intestines", "liver", "enterocytes", "antigen-presenting cells", "dendritic cells", "immune system", and "inflammation". Two hundred and five original articles matching these criteria were initially selected, although only those articles that included specific gene expression results (77) were later considered for this review and separated into three major topics: the regulation of immunity and inflammatory gene expression in the gut, in inflammatory diseases of the gut and in the liver. Particular strains of Bifidobacteria, Lactobacilli, Escherichia coli, Propionibacterium, Bacillus and Saccharomyces influence the gene expression of mucins, Toll-like receptors, caspases, nuclear factor-κB, and

  15. Unique gene expression and MR T2 relaxometry patterns define chronic murine dextran sodium sulphate colitis as a model for connective tissue changes in human Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Breynaert

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronically relapsing inflammation, tissue remodeling and fibrosis are hallmarks of inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in connective tissue in a chronic murine model resulting from repeated cycles of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS ingestion, to mimic the relapsing nature of the human disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to DSS in drinking water for 1 week, followed by a recovery phase of 2 weeks. This cycle of exposure was repeated for up to 3 times (9 weeks in total. Colonic inflammation, fibrosis, extracellular matrix proteins and colonic gene expression were studied. In vivo MRI T 2 relaxometry was studied as a potential non-invasive imaging tool to evaluate bowel wall inflammation and fibrosis. RESULTS: Repeated cycles of DSS resulted in a relapsing and remitting disease course, which induced a chronic segmental, transmural colitis after 2 and 3 cycles of DSS with clear induction of fibrosis and remodeling of the muscular layer. Tenascin expression mirrored its expression in Crohn's colitis. Microarray data identified a gene expression profile different in chronic colitis from that in acute colitis. Additional recovery was associated with upregulation of unique genes, in particular keratins, pointing to activation of molecular pathways for healing and repair. In vivo MRI T2 relaxometry of the colon showed a clear shift towards higher T2 values in the acute stage and a gradual regression of T2 values with increasing cycles of DSS. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated cycles of DSS exposure induce fibrosis and connective tissue changes with typical features, as occurring in Crohn's disease. Colonic gene expression analysis revealed unique expression profiles in chronic colitis compared to acute colitis and after additional recovery, pointing to potential new targets to intervene with the induction of fibrosis. In vivo T2 relaxometry is a promising non-invasive assessment of

  16. Gene expression profile associated with superimposed non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younossi, Zobair M; Afendy, Arian; Stepanova, Maria; Hossain, Noreen; Younossi, Issah; Ankrah, Kathy; Gramlich, Terry; Baranova, Ancha

    2009-10-01

    Hepatic steatosis occurs in 40-70% of patients chronically infected with hepatitis C virus [chronic hepatitis C (CH-C)]. Hepatic steatosis in CH-C is associated with progressive liver disease and a low response rate to antiviral therapy. Gene expression profiles were examined in CH-C patients with and without hepatic steatosis, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. This study included 65 CH-C patients who were not receiving antiviral treatment. Total RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, quantified and used for one-step reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to profile 153 mRNAs that were normalized with six 'housekeeping' genes and a reference RNA. Multiple regression and stepwise selection assessed differences in gene expression and the models' performances were evaluated. Models predicting the grade of hepatic steatosis in patients with CH-C genotype 3 involved two genes: SOCS1 and IFITM1, which progressively changed their expression level with the increasing grade of steatosis. On the other hand, models predicting hepatic steatosis in non-genotype 3 patients highlighted MIP-1 cytokine encoding genes: CCL3 and CCL4 as well as IFNAR and PRKRIR. Expression levels of PRKRIR and SMAD3 differentiated patients with and without superimposed NASH only in the non-genotype 3 cohort (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve=0.822, P-value 0.006]. Gene expression signatures related to hepatic fibrosis were not genotype specific. Gene expression might predict moderate to severe hepatic steatosis, NASH and fibrosis in patients with CH-C, providing potential insights into the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in these patients.

  17. Theobromine-Induced Changes in A1 Purinergic Receptor Gene Expression and Distribution in a Rat Brain Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola-Precoma, Jesus; Padilla, Karla; Rodríguez-Cruz, Alfredo; Berumen, Laura C; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly characterized by accumulation in the brain of extra- and intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins, respectively, which selectively affect specific regions, particularly the neocortex and the hippocampus. Sporadic AD is mainly caused by an increase in apolipoprotein E, a component of chylomicrons, which are cholesterol transporters in the brain. Recent studies have shown that high lipid levels, especially cholesterol, are linked to AD. Adenosine is an atypical neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological functions by activating four P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) and P2 purinergic receptors that are G protein-coupled. A1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, which could be related to AD. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a lard-enriched diet (LED) on cognitive and memory processes in adult rats (6 months of age) as well as the effect of theobromine on these processes. The results indicated that the fat-enriched diet resulted in a long-term deterioration in cognitive and memory functions. Increased levels of Aβ protein and IL-1β were also observed in the rats fed with a high-cholesterol diet, which were used to validate the AD animal model. In addition, the results of qPCR and immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease in gene expression and distribution of A1 purinegic receptor, respectively, in the hippocampus of LED-fed rats. Interestingly, theobromine, at both concentrations tested, restored A1 receptor levels and improved cognitive functions and Aβ levels for a dose of 30 mg/L drinking water.

  18. GSEH: A Novel Approach to Select Prostate Cancer-Associated Genes Using Gene Expression Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjin; Choi, Sang-Min; Park, Sanghyun

    2018-01-01

    When a gene shows varying levels of expression among normal people but similar levels in disease patients or shows similar levels of expression among normal people but different levels in disease patients, we can assume that the gene is associated with the disease. By utilizing this gene expression heterogeneity, we can obtain additional information that abets discovery of disease-associated genes. In this study, we used collaborative filtering to calculate the degree of gene expression heterogeneity between classes and then scored the genes on the basis of the degree of gene expression heterogeneity to find "differentially predicted" genes. Through the proposed method, we discovered more prostate cancer-associated genes than 10 comparable methods. The genes prioritized by the proposed method are potentially significant to biological processes of a disease and can provide insight into them.

  19. Evidence of correlation between TGFBR2 gene expression mediated by NF-kB signaling pathways and Kawasaki disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qinling; Yuan, Shuhua; Yuan, Dawei

    2017-09-15

    We explored the correlation between the TGFBR2 gene that is mediated by NF-kb signaling pathways and the pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease in children. In this study, 43 children with Kawasaki disease from April 2014 to January 2016 at our hospital were selected as the observation group, and 42 healthy children were selected as the control group. The mRNA expression levels of NF-kb gene and TGFBR2 gene in different groups were detected using fluorescence quantitative PCR. The protein expression levels of the NF-kb and TGFBR2 were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in different groups. The expression levels of NF-kb and TGFBR2 in the observation group and the control group were detected using immunohistochemistry. Compared to the control group, the mRNA expression levels of NF-kb and TGFBR2 were 12.3 times and 27.5 times as high as those in the control group respectively and there were significant differences between the two groups (pkb and TGFBR2 in the control group (0.87±0.12, 1.25±0.18) ug/l and those in the observation group (3.27±0.17, 8.16±0.22) ug/l (pkB and TGFBR2 in children with Kawasaki disease were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects (pkB signaling pathways.

  20. Genome-wide identification and quantification of cis- and trans-regulated genes responding to Marek’s disease virus infection via analysis of allele-specific expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eMaceachern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marek’s disease (MD is a commercially important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by Marek’s disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment vaccinal control measures. To identify high-confidence candidate MD resistance genes, we conducted a genome-wide screen for allele-specific expression (ASE amongst F1 progeny of two inbred chicken lines that differ in MD resistance. High throughput sequencing was used to profile transcriptomes from pools of uninfected and infected individuals at 4 days post-infection to identify any genes showing ASE in response to MDV infection. RNA sequencing identified 22,655 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of which 5,360 in 3,773 genes exhibited significant allelic imbalance. Illumina GoldenGate assays were subsequently used to quantify regulatory variation controlled at the gene (cis and elsewhere in the genome (trans by examining differences in expression between F1 individuals and artificial F1 RNA pools over 6 time periods in 1,536 of the most significant SNPs identified by RNA sequencing. Allelic imbalance as a result of cis-regulatory changes was confirmed in 861 of the 1,233 GoldenGate assays successfully examined. Furthermore we have identified 7 genes that display trans-regulation only in infected animals and approximately 500 SNP that show a complex interaction between cis- and trans-regulatory changes. Our results indicate ASE analyses are a powerful approach to identify regulatory variation responsible for differences in transcript abundance in genes underlying complex traits. And the genes with SNPs exhibiting ASE provide a strong foundation to further investigate the causative polymorphisms and genetic mechanisms for MD resistance. Finally, the methods used here for identifying specific genes and SNPs may have practical implications for applying marker-assisted selection to complex traits that are

  1. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

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    Andrzej Szkaradkiewicz

    Full Text Available In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4 and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains, multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2 and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3. Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1 high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains. In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes.

  2. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  3. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  4. Use of Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Expression as a Reliable Marker for Prognosis and Minimal Residual Disease Monitoring in Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Normal Karyotype Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Irena; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Ugrin, Milena; Virijevic, Marijana; Vidovic, Ana; Tomin, Dragica; Suvajdzic Vukovic, Nada; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2017-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) represents the largest group of AML patients classified with an intermediate prognosis. A constant need exists to introduce new molecular markers for more precise risk stratification and for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene transcripts was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The bone marrow samples were collected at the diagnosis from 104 AML-NK patients and from 34 of these patients during follow-up or disease relapse. We found that overexpression of the WT1 gene (WT1 high status), present in 25.5% of patients, was an independent unfavorable factor for achieving complete remission. WT1 high status was also associated with resistance to therapy and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. Assessment of the log reduction value of WT1 expression, measured in paired diagnosis/complete remission samples, revealed that patients with a log reduction of < 2 had a tendency toward shorter disease-free survival and overall survival and a greater incidence of disease relapse. Combining WT1 gene expression status with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutational status, we found that the tumor behavior of intermediate patients (FLT3-ITD - /NPM1 - double negative) with WT1 high status is almost the same as the tumor behavior of the adverse risk group. WT1 expression status represents a good molecular marker of prognosis, response to treatment, and MRD monitoring. Above all, the usage of the WT1 expression level as an additional marker for more precise risk stratification of AML-NK patients could lead to more adapted, personalized treatment protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  6. Efficacy of Spirulina platensis diet supplements on disease resistance and immune-related gene expression in Cyprinus carpio L. exposed to herbicide atrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Samah R; Reda, Rasha M; Awad, Ashraf

    2017-08-01

    The present study evaluated the immunotoxicological effects of the herbicide atrazine (ATZ) at sub-lethal concentrations and the potential ameliorative influence of Spirulina platensis (SP) over a sub-chronic exposure period on Cyprinus carpio L., also known as common carp. Common carp was sampled after a 40-days exposure to ATZ (428 μg/L) and SP (1%), individually or in combination to assess the non-specific immune response, changes in mRNA expression of immune-related genes [lysozyme (LYZ), immunoglobulin M (IgM), and complement component 3 (C3)] in the spleen, and inflammatory cytokines (interleukins IL-1ß and IL-10) in the head kidney using real-time PCR. Additionally, disease resistance to Aeromonas sobria was evaluated. The results revealed that ATZ exposure caused a significant decline in most of the hematological variables, lymphocyte viability, and lysozyme and bactericidal activity. Moreover, ATZ increased the susceptibility to disease, reflected by a significantly lower post-challenge survival rate of the carp. ATZ may induce dysregulated expression of immune-related genes leading to downregulation of mRNA levels of IgM and LYZ in the spleen. However, expression of C3 remained unaffected. Of the cytokine-related genes examined, IL-1B was up-regulated in the head kidney. In contrast, the expression of IL-10 gene was down-regulated in the ATZ-exposed group. The SP supplementation resulted in a significant improvement in most indices; however, these values did not match with that of the controls. These results may conclude that ATZ affects both innate and adaptive immune responses through the negative transcriptional effect on genes involved in immunity and also due to the inflammation of the immune organs. In addition, dietary supplements with SP could be useful for modulation of the immunity in response to ATZ exposure, thereby presenting a promising feed additive for carps in aquaculture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mucosal Expression of Type 2 and Type 17 Immune Response Genes Distinguishes Ulcerative Colitis From Colon-Only Crohn's Disease in Treatment-Naive Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael J; Karns, Rebekah; Vallance, Jefferson E; Bezold, Ramona; Waddell, Amanda; Collins, Margaret H; Haberman, Yael; Minar, Phillip; Baldassano, Robert N; Hyams, Jeffrey S; Baker, Susan S; Kellermayer, Richard; Noe, Joshua D; Griffiths, Anne M; Rosh, Joel R; Crandall, Wallace V; Heyman, Melvin B; Mack, David R; Kappelman, Michael D; Markowitz, James; Moulton, Dedrick E; Leleiko, Neal S; Walters, Thomas D; Kugathasan, Subra; Wilson, Keith T; Hogan, Simon P; Denson, Lee A

    2017-05-01

    There is controversy regarding the role of the type 2 immune response in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC)-few data are available from treatment-naive patients. We investigated whether genes associated with a type 2 immune response in the intestinal mucosa are up-regulated in treatment-naive pediatric patients with UC compared with patients with Crohn's disease (CD)-associated colitis or without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and whether expression levels are associated with clinical outcomes. We used a real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction array to analyze messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in rectal mucosal samples from 138 treatment-naive pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease, as well as those from 49 children without IBD (controls), enrolled in a multicenter prospective observational study from 2008 to 2012. Results were validated in real-time reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses of rectal RNA from an independent cohort of 34 pediatric patients with IBD and macroscopic rectal disease and 17 controls from Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. We measured significant increases in mRNAs associated with a type 2 immune response (interleukin [IL]5 gene, IL13, and IL13RA2) and a type 17 immune response (IL17A and IL23) in mucosal samples from patients with UC compared with patients with colon-only CD. In a regression model, increased expression of IL5 and IL17A mRNAs distinguished patients with UC from patients with colon-only CD (P = .001; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.72). We identified a gene expression pattern in rectal tissues of patients with UC, characterized by detection of IL13 mRNA, that predicted clinical response to therapy after 6 months (odds ratio [OR], 6.469; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.553-26.94), clinical response after 12 months (OR, 6.125; 95% CI, 1.330-28.22), and remission after 12 months (OR, 5

  8. Association of Body Mass Index with DNA Methylation and Gene Expression in Blood Cells and Relations to Cardiometabolic Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joehanes, Roby; Liu, Chunyu; Aslibekyan, Stella; Demerath, Ellen W.; Guan, Weihua; Zhi, Degui; Willinger, Christine; Courchesne, Paul; Multhaup, Michael; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Schadt, Eric E.; Bressler, Jan; North, Kari; Sundström, Johan; Gustafsson, Stefan; Shah, Sonia; McRae, Allan F.; Harris, Sarah E.; Gibson, Jude; Redmond, Paul; Corley, Janie; Starr, John M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Wray, Naomi R.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Feinberg, Andrew; Fornage, Myriam; Pankow, James S.; Lind, Lars; Fox, Caroline; Ingelsson, Erik; Arnett, Donna K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liang, Liming; Levy, Daniel; Deary, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The link between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases in the general population remains uncertain. Methods and Findings We conducted an association study of body mass index (BMI) and differential methylation for over 400,000 CpGs assayed by microarray in whole-blood-derived DNA from 3,743 participants in the Framingham Heart Study and the Lothian Birth Cohorts, with independent replication in three external cohorts of 4,055 participants. We examined variations in whole blood gene expression and conducted Mendelian randomization analyses to investigate the functional and clinical relevance of the findings. We identified novel and previously reported BMI-related differential methylation at 83 CpGs that replicated across cohorts; BMI-related differential methylation was associated with concurrent changes in the expression of genes in lipid metabolism pathways. Genetic instrumental variable analysis of alterations in methylation at one of the 83 replicated CpGs, cg11024682 (intronic to sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 [SREBF1]), demonstrated links to BMI, adiposity-related traits, and coronary artery disease. Independent genetic instruments for expression of SREBF1 supported the findings linking methylation to adiposity and cardiometabolic disease. Methylation at a substantial proportion (16 of 83) of the identified loci was found to be secondary to differences in BMI. However, the cross-sectional nature of the data limits definitive causal determination. Conclusions We present robust associations of BMI with differential DNA methylation at numerous loci in blood cells. BMI-related DNA methylation and gene expression provide mechanistic insights into the relationship between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases. PMID:28095459

  9. Association of Body Mass Index with DNA Methylation and Gene Expression in Blood Cells and Relations to Cardiometabolic Disease: A Mendelian Randomization Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M Mendelson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The link between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases in the general population remains uncertain.We conducted an association study of body mass index (BMI and differential methylation for over 400,000 CpGs assayed by microarray in whole-blood-derived DNA from 3,743 participants in the Framingham Heart Study and the Lothian Birth Cohorts, with independent replication in three external cohorts of 4,055 participants. We examined variations in whole blood gene expression and conducted Mendelian randomization analyses to investigate the functional and clinical relevance of the findings. We identified novel and previously reported BMI-related differential methylation at 83 CpGs that replicated across cohorts; BMI-related differential methylation was associated with concurrent changes in the expression of genes in lipid metabolism pathways. Genetic instrumental variable analysis of alterations in methylation at one of the 83 replicated CpGs, cg11024682 (intronic to sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 [SREBF1], demonstrated links to BMI, adiposity-related traits, and coronary artery disease. Independent genetic instruments for expression of SREBF1 supported the findings linking methylation to adiposity and cardiometabolic disease. Methylation at a substantial proportion (16 of 83 of the identified loci was found to be secondary to differences in BMI. However, the cross-sectional nature of the data limits definitive causal determination.We present robust associations of BMI with differential DNA methylation at numerous loci in blood cells. BMI-related DNA methylation and gene expression provide mechanistic insights into the relationship between DNA methylation, obesity, and adiposity-related diseases.

  10. Investigation of gene expression and serum levels of PIN1 and eNOS with high blood pressure in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Mina; Nikanfar, Masoud; Khakikhatibi, Fatemeh; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Nourazarian, Seyed Manuchehr; Biray Avci, Cigir; Nourazarian, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    According to evidence, Alzheimer's disease is known as one of the most serious neurodegenerative diseases, for which hypertension has been observed to be a key risk factor. Therefore, this study aims to examine the relationship between the PIN1 and eNOS genes expression, as well as serum levels and hypertension in Alzheimer's disease sufferers. Blood samples were obtained from subjects who were divided into four groups: the control group, normotensive Alzheimer's patients, the Alzheimer's sufferers group with hypertension, and the healthy group with only hypertension, considering the inhibition of confounding factors. Thereafter, eNOS and PIN1 genes expression along with serum levels were studied. Based on the obtained results, a statistically significant correlation didn't exist between serum level of PIN1 and the systolic and diastolic blood pressure, between serum level of eNOS and diastolic blood pressure in the norm tension Alzheimer's disease patients, between serum levels of PIN1, eNOS and systolic blood pressure, and between serum eNOS and systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the patients with hypertension (pdiseases in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Multi-layered Quantitative In Vivo Expression Atlas of the Podocyte Unravels Kidney Disease Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus M. Rinschen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Damage to and loss of glomerular podocytes has been identified as the culprit lesion in progressive kidney diseases. Here, we combine mass spectrometry-based proteomics with mRNA sequencing, bioinformatics, and hypothesis-driven studies to provide a comprehensive and quantitative map of mammalian podocytes that identifies unanticipated signaling pathways. Comparison of the in vivo datasets with proteomics data from podocyte cell cultures showed a limited value of available cell culture models. Moreover, in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids uncovered surprisingly rapid synthesis of mitochondrial proteins under steady-state conditions that was perturbed under autophagy-deficient, disease-susceptible conditions. Integration of acquired omics dimensions suggested FARP1 as a candidate essential for podocyte function, which could be substantiated by genetic analysis in humans and knockdown experiments in zebrafish. This work exemplifies how the integration of multi-omics datasets can identify a framework of cell-type-specific features relevant for organ health and disease. : The podocyte forms the most outer and essential part of the renal filter and restricts the passage of proteins from blood to urine. Rinschen et al. combine deep proteomic and transcriptomic data with protein dynamics from native mouse podocytes to reveal insights into podocyte biology and to identify candidate disease genes. Keywords: end-stage renal disease, systems biology, proteinuria, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, pulse SILAC, metabolism, slit diaphragm, hereditary nephrotic syndrome, kinase, proteostasis

  12. Characterization of Timed Changes in Hepatic Copper Concentrations, Methionine Metabolism, Gene Expression, and Global DNA Methylation in the Jackson Toxic Milk Mouse Model of Wilson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anh Le

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wilson disease (WD is characterized by hepatic copper accumulation with progressive liver damage to cirrhosis. This study aimed to characterize the toxic milk mouse from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA (tx-j mouse model of WD according to changes over time in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, global DNA methylation, and gene expression from gestational day 17 (fetal to adulthood (28 weeks. Methods: Included liver histology and relevant biochemical analyses including hepatic copper quantification, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH liver levels, qPCR for transcript levels of genes relevant to methionine metabolism and liver damage, and DNA dot blot for global DNA methylation. Results: Hepatic copper was lower in tx-j fetuses but higher in weanling (three weeks and adult tx-j mice compared to controls. S-adenosylhomocysteinase transcript levels were significantly lower at all time points, except at three weeks, correlating negatively with copper levels and with consequent changes in the SAM:SAH methylation ratio and global DNA methylation. Conclusion: Compared to controls, methionine metabolism including S-adenosylhomocysteinase gene expression is persistently different in the tx-j mice with consequent alterations in global DNA methylation in more advanced stages of liver disease. The inhibitory effect of copper accumulation on S-adenosylhomocysteinase expression is associated with progressively abnormal methionine metabolism and decreased methylation capacity and DNA global methylation.

  13. Gene expression profiling of anti-GBM glomerulonephritis model: the role of NF-kappaB in immune complex kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju Han; Ha, Il Soo; Hwang, Chang-Il; Lee, Young-Ju; Kim, Jihoon; Yang, Seung-Hee; Kim, Yon Su; Cao, Yun Anna; Choi, Sangdun; Park, Woong-Yang

    2004-11-01

    Immune complexes may cause an irreversible onset of chronic renal disease. Most patients with chronic renal disease undergo a final common pathway, marked by glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. We attempted to draw a molecular map of anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) glomerulonephritis in mice using oligonucleotide microarray technology. Kidneys were harvested at days 1, 3, 7, 11, and 16 after inducing glomerulonephritis by using anti-GBM antibody. In parallel with examining the biochemical and histologic changes, gene expression profiles were acquired against five pooled control kidneys. Gene expression levels were cross-validated by either reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR, or immunohistochemistry. Pathologic changes in anti-GBM glomerulonephritis were confirmed in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 strains. Among the 13,680 spotted 65mer oligonucleotides, 1112 genes showing significant temporal patterns by permutation analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple testing correction [false discovery ratio (FDR) mouse anti-GBM glomerulonephritis model, providing a comprehensive overview on the mechanism governing the initiation and the progression of inflammatory renal disease.

  14. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  15. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  16. Gene design, cloning and protein-expression methods for high-value targets at the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, Amy; Haffner, Taryn; Ng, Nathan; Lorimer, Don; Staker, Bart; Stewart, Lance

    2011-01-01

    An overview of one salvage strategy for high-value SSGCID targets is given. Any structural genomics endeavor, particularly ambitious ones such as the NIAID-funded Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) and Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Disease (CSGID), face technical challenges at all points of the production pipeline. One salvage strategy employed by SSGCID is combined gene engineering and structure-guided construct design to overcome challenges at the levels of protein expression and protein crystallization. Multiple constructs of each target are cloned in parallel using Polymerase Incomplete Primer Extension cloning and small-scale expressions of these are rapidly analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Using the methods reported here, which have proven particularly useful for high-value targets, otherwise intractable targets can be resolved

  17. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raynald eCossard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function.The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabitis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction, whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression.We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals and without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content.We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g. NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8 or GRIM-19 human orthologs in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm.All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression.

  18. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    (ectoderm) specification with co-opted functions in notochord formation in chordates and left/right determination in ambulacrarians and vertebrates. The caudal ortholog, TtrCdx, is first expressed in the ectoderm of the gastrulating embryo in the posterior region of the blastopore. Its expression stays......The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa...... completion of larval development, which is marked by a three-lobed body with larval setae. Expression starts at gastrulation in two areas lateral to the blastopore and subsequently extends over the animal pole of the gastrula. With elongation of the gastrula, expression at the animal pole narrows to a small...

  19. Evaluation of the Role of -137G/C Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (rs187238 and Gene Expression Levels of the IL-18 in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

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    Fatemeh Hoseini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Interleukin-18 (IL-18 is a proinflammatory and proatherogenic cytokine, and its genetic variations may contribute to the development of coronary artery disease (CAD. We sought to investigate the role of -137G/C polymorphism and gene expression levels of IL-18 in patients with CAD. Methods: The study population included 100 patients with angiographically proven CAD and 100 matched controls. Total RNA and DNA were extracted from leukocytes using appropriate kits. The genotype of -137G/C polymorphism and gene expression level of IL-18 was determined using allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR and real-time (RT-PCR assay, respectively. Results: The genotypic and allelic distribution of IL-18 -137G/C polymorphism was not significantly different between the two groups (p > 0.050. Moreover, the -137G/C polymorphism did not increase the risk of CAD in dominant and recessive genetic models (p > 0.050. However, subgroup analysis of CAD patients revealed that the IL-18 -137G/C polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of CAD in hypertensive patients (odds ratio (OR = 7.51; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.24–25.17; p = 0.019 and smokers (OR = 4.90; 95% CI: 1.21–19.70; p = 0.031 but not in the diabetic subpopulation (p = 0.261. The genotype distribution of IL-18 -137G/C genetic polymorphism was significantly different among patients with one, two, and three stenotic vessels (p < 0.050. The gene expression level of IL-18 was significantly higher in the CAD group than the control group (p < 0.001. Moreover, the carriers of CC genotype had significantly lower gene expression levels of IL-18 than carriers of GG genotype (p < 0.050.Conclusions: The -137G/C polymorphism of IL-18 may be associated with the CAD risk in hypertensive and smoker subgroup of CAD patients. The -137G/C polymorphism seems to play an important role in determining the severity of CAD. Increased IL-18 gene expression level is a significant risk

  20. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

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    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  1. Cloning of fusion protein gene of Newcastle disease virus into a baculovirus derived bacmid shuttle vector, in order to express it in insect cell line

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    Hashemzadeh MS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Newcastle disease virus (NDV is one of the major pathogens in poultry and vaccination is intended to control the disease, as an effective solution, yet. Fusion protein (F on surface of NDV, has a fundamental role in virus pathogenicity and can induce protective immunity, alone. With this background, here our aim was to construct a baculovirus derived recombinant bacmid shuttle vector (encoding F-protein in order to express it in insect cell line. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, at first complete F gene from avirulent strain La Sota of NDV was amplified by RT-PCR to produce F cDNA. The amplicon was cloned into T/A cloning vector and afterwards into pFastBac Dual donor plasmid. After the verification of cloning process by two methods, PCR and enzymatic digestion analysis, the accuracy of F gene sequence was confirmed by sequencing. Finally, F-containing recombinant bacmid was subsequently generated in DH10Bac cell and the construct production was confirmed by a special PCR panel, using F specific primers and M13 universal primers. Results: Analysis of confirmatory tests showed that the recombinant bacmid, expressing of F-protein gene in correct sequence and framework, has been constructed successfully. Conclusion: The product of this F-containing recombinant bacmid, in addition to its independent application in the induction of protective immunity, can be used with the other individual recombinant baculoviruses, expressing HN and NP genes to produce NDV-VLPs in insect cell line.

  2. Analysis of TIR- and non-TIR-NBS-LRR disease resistance gene analogous in pepper: characterization, genetic variation, functional divergence and expression patterns

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    Wan Hongjian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. is one of the most important vegetable crops worldwide. However, its yield and fruit quality can be severely threatened by several pathogens. The plant nucleotide-binding site (NBS-leucine-rich repeat (LRR gene family is the largest class of known disease resistance genes (R genes effective against such pathogens. Therefore, the isolation and identification of such R gene homologues from pepper will provide a critical foundation for improving disease resistance breeding programs. Results A total of 78 R gene analogues (CaRGAs were identified in pepper by degenerate PCR amplification and database mining. Phylogenetic tree analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences for 51 of these CaRGAs with typically conserved motifs ( P-loop, kinase-2 and GLPL along with some known R genes from Arabidopsis and tomato grouped these CaRGAs into the non-Toll interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-NBS-LRR (CaRGAs I to IV and TIR-NBS-LRR (CaRGAs V to VII subfamilies. The presence of consensus motifs (i.e. P-loop, kinase-2 and hydrophobic domain is typical of the non-TIR- and TIR-NBS-LRR gene subfamilies. This finding further supports the view that both subfamilies are widely distributed in dicot species. Functional divergence analysis provided strong statistical evidence of altered selective constraints during protein evolution between the two subfamilies. Thirteen critical amino acid sites involved in this divergence were also identified using DIVERGE version 2 software. Analyses of non-synonymous and synonymous substitutions per site showed that purifying selection can play a critical role in the evolutionary processes of non-TIR- and TIR-NBS-LRR RGAs in pepper. In addition, four specificity-determining positions were predicted to be responsible for functional specificity. qRT-PCR analysis showed that both salicylic and abscisic acids induce the expression of CaRGA genes, suggesting that they may primarily be involved in

  3. Expression of genes for microRNA-processing enzymes is altered in advanced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Haveesh; Estep, Michael; Birerdinc, Aybike; Afendy, Arian; Moazzez, Amir; Elariny, Hazem; Goodman, Zachary; Chandhoke, Vikas; Baranova, Ancha; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-08-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNA) have been linked to the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). First transcribed as pri-miRNA, these molecules are further processed by a complex of endonuclear and cytosolic RNA binding molecules to form mature miRNAs. The aim of this study is to investigate mechanisms of miRNA regulation in the visceral adipose of obese NAFLD patients via measuring expression of miRNA processing enzymes and pri-miRNA. Total RNAs were extracted from visceral adipose tissue (VAT) samples collected from patients undergoing bariatric surgery. All patients had biopsy-proven NAFLD (NASH patients [n = 12] and non-NASH NAFLD [n = 12]). For each patient, we profiled mRNA levels for three miRNA processing elements (Drosha, DGCR8, and Dicer1) and seven pri-miRNAs (pri-miR-125b-2, pri-miR-16-2, pri-miR-26a-1, pri-miR-26a-2, pri-miR-7-1, pri-miR-7-2, and pri-miR-7-3). Expression of Dicer1, Drosha and DGCR8 was significantly increased within the NASH cohort along with expression of pri-miR-7-1. The presence of focal necrosis on the liver biopsy correlated significantly with levels of Dicer1 and DGRC8. Both NASH and ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes correlated negatively with the expression levels of hsa-miR-125b. Histologic NASH correlated positively with the expression levels of pri-miR-16-2 and pri-miR-7-1. The presence of the hepatocyte's ballooning degeneration in the liver biopsy correlated positively with pri-miR-26a-1 and pri-miR-7-1. The expression profile of pri-miR-125b-2 also correlated positively with body mass index. Our findings support the hypothesis that VAT-derived miRNA may contribute to the pathogenesis of NASH in obese patients. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  5. The correlation of serum S100β protein levels and hippocampal Seladin-1 gene expression in a rat model of sporadic Alzheimer\\\\\\'s disease

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    Soheila Hosseinzadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Seladin-1 protein protects the neural cells against amyloid beta toxicity and its expression decreased in vulnerable regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD brains. On the other hand, changes in serum levels of S100 have been considered as a marker of brain damage in neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, this study was carried out to determine the relation between the change profile of serum S100β protein levels and hippocampal Seladin-1 gene expression in a rat model of sporadic AD. Methods: In this experimental study that established in Department of Neuroscience, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Science, from March 2011 to April 2013, 72 animals were randomly divided into control, 4, 7, 14, and 21days ICV-STZ/Saline administrated rats. Alzheimer's model was induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV injections of streptozotocin (STZ [3 mg/kg] on days 1 and 3. Serum levels of S100β and hippocampal Seladin-1 gene expression were evalu-ated in experimental groups. The initial and step-through latencies (STL were deter-mined using passive avoidance test. Results: Serum levels of S100β were significantly different between the STZ-7 day and STZ-14 day groups in comparison with the control, saline and STZ-4 day groups. As well as, there was a significant difference between the STZ-7 day group in comparison with the STZ-14 day and STZ-21 day groups (P=0.0001. Hippocampal Seladin-1 gene expression in STZ-14 day and STZ-21 day groups significantly decreased as compared to the control, saline and STZ-4 day groups (P=0.0001. However, significant correla-tion was detected between serum S100β protein decrement and Seladin-1 down regula-tion (P=0.001. Also, the STL was significantly decreased in 21 days ICV-STZ adminis-trated rats as compared to the control or saline groups (P=0.001. Conclusion: Monitoring the changes of serum S100β protein levels by relationship with changes in hippocampal Seladin-1

  6. Kinetics of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha gene expression and their relationship with disease progression after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, In Soon; Cho, Sungae; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2013-05-01

    Guinea pig is one of the most suitable animal models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection since it shows similarities to pulmonary infection in humans. Although guinea pig shows hematogenous spread of M. tb infection into the whole body, immunological studies have mainly focused on granulomatous tissues in lungs and spleens. In order to investigate the time-course of disease pathogenesis and immunological profiles in each infected organ, we performed the following approaches with guinea pigs experimentally infected with M. tb over a 22-week post-infection period. We examined body weight changes, M. tb growth curve, cytokine gene expression (IFN-γ and TNF-α), and histopathology in liver, spleen, lungs and lymph nodes of infected guinea pigs. The body weights of infected guinea pigs did not increase as much as uninfected ones and the number of M. tb bacilli in their organs increased except bronchotracheal lymph node during the experimental period. The gene expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was induced between 3 and 6 weeks of infection; however, kinetic profiles of cytokine gene expression showed heterogeneity among organs over the study period. Histophathologically granulomatous lesions were developed in all four organs of infected guinea pigs. Although IFN-γ and TNF-α gene expression profiles showed heterogeneity, the granuloma formation was clearly observed in every organ regardless of whether the number of bacilli increased or decreased. However, this protective immunity was accompanied with severe tissue damage in all four organs, which may lead to the death of guinea pigs.

  7. Alzheimer's disease susceptibility variants in the MS4A6A gene are associated with altered levels of MS4A6A expression in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proitsi, Petroula; Lee, Sang Hyuck; Lunnon, Katie; Keohane, Aoife; Powell, John; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Furney, Simon; Soininen, Hilkka; Kłoszewska, Iwona; Mecocci, Patrizia; Tsolaki, Magda; Vellas, Bruno; Lovestone, Simon; Hodges, Angela

    2014-02-01

    An increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) has previously been found to be associated with variants at the MS4A6A locus. We sought to identify which genes and transcripts in this region have altered expression in AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and are influenced by the AD risk variant(s), as a first step to understanding the molecular basis of AD susceptibility at this locus. Common variants located within highly expressed MS4A6A transcripts were significantly associated with AD and MS4A6A expression levels in blood from MCI and AD subjects (p < 0.05, rs610932, rs7232, rs583791). More copies of the protective (minor) allele were associated with lower MS4A6A expression of each transcript (e.g., p = 0.019; rs610932-total MS4A6A). Furthermore, in heterozygous AD subjects, relative expression of the protective allele of V4-MS4A6A transcripts was lower (p < 0.008). Irrespective of genotype, MS4A6A transcripts were increased in blood from people with AD (p < 0.003), whereas lower expression of full length V1-MS4A6A (p = 0.002) and higher expression of V4-MS4A6A (p = 1.8 × 10(-4)) were observed in MCI, relative to elderly controls. The association between genotype and expression was less consistent in brain, although BA9 did have a similar genotype association with V4-MS4A6A transcripts as in blood. MS4A6A transcripts were widely expressed in tissues and cells, with the exception of V4-MS4A6A, which was not expressed in neuronal cells. Together these results suggest that high levels of MS4A6A in emerging AD pathology are detrimental. Persons with MCI may lower MS4A6A expression to minimize detrimental disease associated MS4A6A activity. However, those with the susceptibility allele appear unable to decrease expression sufficiently, which may explain their increased risk for developing AD. Inhibiting MS4A6A may therefore promote a more neuroprotective phenotype, although further work is needed to establish whether this is the case. Copyright © 2014

  8. Gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, M J; Gaballa, M A

    2001-01-01

    Somatic gene therapy of vascular diseases is a promising new field in modern medicine. Recent advancements in gene transfer technology have greatly evolved our understanding of the pathophysiologic role of candidate disease genes. With this knowledge, the expression of selective gene products provides the means to test the therapeutic use of gene therapy in a multitude of medical conditions. In addition, with the completion of genome sequencing programs, gene transfer can be used also to study the biologic function of novel genes in vivo. Novel genes are delivered to targeted tissue via several different vehicles. These vectors include adenoviruses, retroviruses, plasmids, plasmid/liposomes, and oligonucleotides. However, each one of these vectors has inherent limitations. Further investigations into developing delivery systems that not only allow for efficient, targeted gene transfer, but also are stable and nonimmunogenic, will optimize the clinical application of gene therapy in vascular diseases. This review further discusses the available mode of gene delivery and examines six major areas in vascular gene therapy, namely prevention of restenosis, thrombosis, hypertension, atherosclerosis, peripheral vascular disease in congestive heart failure, and ischemia. Although we highlight some of the recent advances in the use of gene therapy in treating vascular disease discovered primarily during the past two years, many excellent studies published during that period are not included in this review due to space limitations. The following is a selective review of practical uses of gene transfer therapy in vascular diseases. This review primarily covers work performed in the last 2 years. For earlier work, the reader may refer to several excellent review articles. For instance, Belalcazer et al. (6) reviewed general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. Gene therapy in restenosis and stimulation of

  9. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation

    OpenAIRE

    An, L; Xie, H; Chin, MH; Obradovic, Z; Smith, DJ; Megalooikonomou, V

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we presen...

  10. Host Gene Expression Analysis in Sri Lankan Melioidosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-19

    CCL5 Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 /RANTES. IFNγ Interferon gamma TNFα Tumor necrosis factor alpha HMGB1 High mobility group box 1 protein /high...aim of this study was to analyze gene expression levels of human host factors in melioidosis patients and establish useful correlation with disease...PBMC’s) of study subjects. Gene expression profiles of 25 gene targets including 19 immune response genes and 6 epigenetic factors were analyzed by

  11. Gene expression of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin in the white adipose tissue of obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Ancha; Gowder, Shobha J; Schlauch, Karen; Elariny, Hazem; Collantes, Rochelle; Afendy, Arian; Ong, Janus P; Goodman, Zachary; Chandhoke, Vikas; Younossi, Zobair M

    2006-09-01

    Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ that secretes a variety of metabolically important substances including adipokines. These factors affect insulin sensitivity and may represent a link between obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (DM), and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This study uses real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) quantification of mRNAs encoding adiponectin, leptin, and resistin on snap-frozen samples of intra-abdominal adipose tissue of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery were studied. Patients were classified into two groups: Group A (with insulin resistance) (N=11; glucose 149.84 +/- 40.56 mg/dL; serum insulin 8.28 +/- 3.52 microU/mL), and Group B (without insulin resistance) (N=10; glucose 102.2 +/- 8.43 mg/dL; serum insulin 3.431 +/- 1.162 microU/mL). Adiponectin mRNA in intra-abdominal adipose tissue and serum adiponectin levels were significantly lower in Group A compared to Group B patients (P<0.016 and P<0.03, respectively). Although serum resistin was higher in Group A than in Group B patients (P<0.005), resistin gene expression was not different between the two groups. Finally, for leptin, neither serum level nor gene expression was different between the two groups. Serum adiponectin level was the only predictor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in this study (P=0.024). Obese patients with insulin resistance have decreased serum adiponectin and increased serum resistin. Additionally, adiponectin gene expression is also decreased in the adipose tissue of these patients. This low level of adiponectin expression may predispose patients to the progressive form of NAFLD or NASH.

  12. Cerebrovascular gene expression in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Frederiksen, Simona Denise; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a hemodynamic disorder and one of the most important and well-established risk factors for vascular diseases such as stroke. Blood vessels exposed to chronic shear stress develop structural changes and remodeling of the vascular wall through many complex mechanisms. However......, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Hypertension-susceptible genes may provide a novel insight into potential molecular mechanisms of hypertension and secondary complications associated with hypertension. The aim of this exploratory study was to identify gene expression differences......, the identified genes in the middle cerebral arteries from spontaneously hypertensive rats could be possible mediators of the vascular changes and secondary complications associated with hypertension. This study supports the selection of key genes to investigate in the future research of hypertension-induced end...

  13. Expression of Transketolase like gene 1 (TKTL1 predicts disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy

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    Hofmann Wolf-Karsten

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended as standard therapy. So far, no predictive or prognostic molecular factors for patients undergoing multimodal treatment are established. Increased angiogenesis and altered tumour metabolism as adaption to hypoxic conditions in cancers play an important role in tumour progression and metastasis. Enhanced expression of Vascular-endothelial-growth-factor-receptor (VEGF-R and Transketolase-like-1 (TKTL1 are related to hypoxic conditions in tumours. In search for potential prognostic molecular markers we investigated the expression of VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2 and TKTL1 in patients with LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab. Methods Tumour and corresponding normal tissue from pre-therapeutic biopsies of 33 patients (m: 23, f: 10; median age: 61 years with LARC treated in phase-I and II trials with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (cetuximab, irinotecan, capecitabine in combination with radiotherapy were analysed by quantitative PCR. Results Significantly higher expression of VEGFR-1/2 was found in tumour tissue in pre-treatment biopsies as well as in resected specimen after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy compared to corresponding normal tissue. High TKTL1 expression significantly correlated with disease free survival. None of the markers had influence on early response parameters such as tumour regression grading. There was no correlation of gene expression between the investigated markers. Conclusion High TKTL-1 expression correlates with poor prognosis in terms of 3 year disease-free survival in patients with LARC treated with intensified neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and may therefore serve as a molecular prognostic marker which should be further evaluated in randomised clinical trials.

  14. Using gene expression noise to understand gene regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsky, B.; Neuert, G.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression "noise," has been suggested as a

  15. Methionine-supplemented diet affects the expression of cardiovascular disease-related genes and increases inflammatory cytokines in mice heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Alexandre Ferro; Amaral, Catia Lira do; Venancio, Vinicius Paula; Machado, Carla da Silva; Hernandes, Lívia Cristina; Santos, Patrick Wellington da Silva; Curi, Rui; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2017-01-01

    Some important environmental factors that influence the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) include tobacco, excess alcohol, and unhealthy diet. Methionine obtained from the diet participates in the synthesis of DNA, proteins, lipids and affects homocysteine levels, which is associated with the elevated risk for CVD development. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the manner in which dietary methionine might affect cellular mechanisms underlying CVD occurrence. Swiss albino mice were fed either control (0.3% DL-methionine), methionine-supplemented (2% DL-methionine), or a methionine-deprived diet (0% DL-methionine) over a 10-week period. The parameters measured included plasma homocysteine concentrations, oxidative stress by reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß, TNF-α, and IL-6, as well as expression of genes associated with CVD. The levels of apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5), a regulator of plasma triglycerides, were measured. The methionine-supplemented diet increased oxidative stress by lowering the GSH/GSSG ratio in heart tissues and decreased expression of the genes Apob, Ctgf, Serpinb2, Spp1, Il1b, and Sell, but elevated expression of Thbs4, Tgfb2, Ccr1, and Vegfa. Methionine-deprived diet reduced expression of Col3a1, Cdh5, Fabp3, Bax, and Hbegf and increased expression of Sell, Ccl5, Itga2, Birc3, Msr1, Bcl2a1a, Il1r2, and Selp. Methionine-deprived diet exerted pro-inflammatory consequences as evidenced by elevated levels of cytokines IL-1ß, TNF-α, and IL-6 noted in liver. Methionine-supplemented diet increased hepatic IL-6 and cardiac TNF-α. Both methionine supplementation and deprivation lowered hepatic levels of APOA5. In conclusion, data demonstrated that a methionine-supplemented diet modulated important biological processes associated with high risk of CVD development.

  16. Imbalanced Protein Expression Patterns of Anabolic, Catabolic, Anti-Catabolic and Inflammatory Cytokines in Degenerative Cervical Disc Cells: New Indications for Gene Therapeutic Treatments of Cervical Disc Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mern, Demissew S.; Beierfuß, Anja; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A.

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001) were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix

  17. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Holland, Jason W

    2013-07-16

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate/inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell/antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease.

  18. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell / antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease. PMID:23865616

  19. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor pathway genes in chicken embryo fibroblasts from chickens resistant and susceptible to Marek's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunshi, Santosh; Cheng, Hans H

    2014-03-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against pathogens in vertebrates and invertebrates. However, the role of TLR in non-MHC genetic resistance or susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) in the chicken is yet to be elucidated. Chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells from MD susceptible and resistant lines were infected either with Marek's disease virus (MDV) or treated with polyionosinic-polycytidylic acid, a synthetic analog of dsRNA, and the expression of TLR and pro-inflammatory cytokines was studied at 8 and 36 h posttreatment by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Findings of the present study reveal that MDV infection and polyionosinic-polycytidylic acid treatment significantly elevated the mRNA expression of TLR3, IL6, and IL8 in both susceptible and resistant lines. Furthermore, basal expression levels in uninfected CEF for TLR3, TLR7, and IL8 genes were significantly higher in resistant chickens compared with those of susceptible chickens. Our results suggest that TLR3 together with pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a significant role in genetic resistance to MD.

  20. Fish oil feeding attenuates neuroinflammatory gene expression without concomitant changes in brain eicosanoids and docosanoids in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopperton, Kathryn E; Trépanier, Marc-Olivier; James, Nicholas C E; Chouinard-Watkins, Raphaël; Bazinet, Richard P

    2018-03-01

    Neuroinflammation is a recognized hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, along with accumulation of amyloid-β plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and synaptic loss. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and molecules derived from them, including eicosapentaenoic acid-derived eicosanoids and docosahexaenoic acid-derived docosanoids, are known to have both anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, while human observational data links consumption of these fatty acids to a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease. Few studies have examined the neuroinflammation-modulating effects of n-3 PUFA feeding in an Alzheimer's disease-related model, and none have investigated whether these effects are mediated by changes in brain eicosanoids and docosanoids. Here, we use both a fat-1 transgenic mouse and a fish oil feeding model to study the impact of increasing tissue n-3 PUFA on neuroinflammation and the production of pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. Fat-1 mice, transgenic animals that can convert n-6 to n-3 PUFA, and their wildtype littermates were fed diets containing either fish oil (high n-3 PUFA) or safflower oil (negligible n-3 PUFA) from weaning to 12 weeks. Animals then underwent intracerebroventricular infusion of either amyloid-β 1-40 or a control peptide. Hippocampi were collected from non-surgery and surgery animals 10 days after infusion. Microarray was used to measure enrichment of inflammation-associated gene categories and expression of genes involved in the synthesis of lipid mediators. Results were validated by real-time PCR in a separate cohort of animals. Lipid mediators were measured via liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Fat-1 and wildtype mice fed fish oil had higher total hippocampal DHA than wildtype mice fed the safflower oil diet. The safflower-fed mice, but not the fat-1 or fish oil-fed mice, had significantly increased expression in gene ontology categories associated with inflammation in response to amyloid

  1. Effects of Endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia on Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression of Pine Wood Nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and Pine Wilt Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Xi He

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pine wilt disease (PWD caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is responsible for devastating epidemics in pine trees in Asia and Europe. Recent studies showed that bacteria carried by the PWN might be involved in PWD. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction between bacteria and the PWN remained unclear. Now that the whole genome of B. xylophilus (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus is published, transcriptome analysis is a unique method to study the role played by bacteria in PWN. In this study, the transcriptome of aseptic B. xylophilus, B. xylophilus treated with endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NSPmBx03 and fungus B. xylophilus were sequenced. We found that 61 genes were up-regulated and 830 were down-regulated in B. xylophilus after treatment with the endobacterium; 178 genes were up-regulated and 1122 were down-regulated in fungus B. xylophilus compared with aseptic B. xylophilus. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were used to study the significantly changed biological functions and pathways for these differentially expressed genes. Many pathogenesis-related genes, including glutathinone S-transferase, pectate lyase, ATP-binding cassette transporter and cytochrome P450, were up-regulated after B. xylophilus were treated with the endobacterium. In addition, we found that bacteria enhanced the virulence of PWN. These findings indicate that endobacteria might play an important role in the development and virulence of PWN and will improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the interaction between bacteria and the PWN.

  2. Effects of Endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) on Pathogenesis-Related Gene Expression of Pine Wood Nematode (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) and Pine Wilt Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Long-Xi; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Xue, Qi; Qiu, Xiu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) caused by the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is responsible for devastating epidemics in pine trees in Asia and Europe. Recent studies showed that bacteria carried by the PWN might be involved in PWD. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction between bacteria and the PWN remained unclear. Now that the whole genome of B. xylophilus (Bursaphelenchus xylophilus) is published, transcriptome analysis is a unique method to study the role played by bacteria in PWN. In this study, the transcriptome of aseptic B. xylophilus, B. xylophilus treated with endobacterium (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia NSPmBx03) and fungus B. xylophilus were sequenced. We found that 61 genes were up-regulated and 830 were down-regulated in B. xylophilus after treatment with the endobacterium; 178 genes were up-regulated and 1122 were down-regulated in fungus B. xylophilus compared with aseptic B. xylophilus. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analyses were used to study the significantly changed biological functions and pathways for these differentially expressed genes. Many pathogenesis-related genes, including glutathinone S-transferase, pectate lyase, ATP-binding cassette transporter and cytochrome P450, were up-regulated after B. xylophilus were treated with the endobacterium. In addition, we found that bacteria enhanced the virulence of PWN. These findings indicate that endobacteria might play an important role in the development and virulence of PWN and will improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the interaction between bacteria and the PWN. PMID:27231904

  3. Based on Molecular Profiling of Gene Expression, Palmoplantar Pustulosis and Palmoplantar Pustular Psoriasis Are Highly Related Diseases that Appear to Be Distinct from Psoriasis Vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bissonnette

    Full Text Available There is a controversy surrounding the existence of palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP and palmoplantar pustular psoriasis (PPPP as separate clinical entities or as variants of the same clinical entity. We used gene expression microarray to compare gene expression in PPP and PPPP.Skin biopsies from subjects with PPP (3, PPPP (6, psoriasis vulgaris (10 and acral skin from normal subjects (7 were analyzed using gene expression microarray. Principal component analysis showed that PPP and PPPP were different from psoriasis vulgaris and normal acral skin. However gene expression of PPP and PPPP clustered together and could not be used to differentiate PPP from PPPP. Gene-wise comparison between PPP and PPPP found no gene to be differentially expressed at a false discovery rate lower than 0.05. Surprisingly we found a higher expression of several genes involved in neural pathways (e.g. GPRIN and ADAM23 in PPP/PPPP as compared to psoriasis vulgaris and normal acral skin. Immunohistochemistry confirmed those findings and showed a keratinocyte localization for those proteins.PPP and PPPP could not be differentiated using gene expression microarray suggesting that they are not distinct clinical entities. Increased expression of GPRIN1, and ADAM23 in keratinocytes suggests that these proteins could be new therapeutic targets for PPP/PPPP.

  4. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, M.C.; Monsuur, A.J.; Poell, J.; Slot, R. van 't; Meijer, J.W.R.; Meijer, G.A.; Mulder, C.J.; Mearin, M.L.; Wijmenga, C.

    2007-01-01

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  5. The SPINK gene family and celiac disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wapenaar, Martin C.; Monsuur, Alienke J.; Poell, Jos; Slot, Ruben Van 't; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Mulder, Chris J.; Mearin, Maria Luisa; Wijmenga, Cisca

    The gene family of serine protease inhibitors of the Kazal type (SPINK) are functional and positional candidate genes for celiac disease (CD). Our aim was to assess the gut mucosal gene expression and genetic association of SPINK1, -2, -4, and -5 in the Dutch CD population. Gene expression was

  6. A constructive approach to gene expression dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J.C.; Akutsu, T.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, experiments on mRNA abundance (gene expression) have revealed that gene expression shows a stationary organization described by a scale-free distribution. Here we propose a constructive approach to gene expression dynamics which restores the scale-free exponent and describes the intermediate state dynamics. This approach requires only one assumption: Markov property

  7. Gliadin stimulation of murine macrophage inflammatory gene expression and intestinal permeability are MyD88-dependent: role of the innate immune response in Celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Karen E; Sapone, Anna; Fasano, Alessio; Vogel, Stefanie N

    2006-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured. Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of CD. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with CD.

  8. Gene expression profiling of chicken intestinal host responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.

    2007-01-01

    Chicken lines differ in genetic disease susceptibility. The scope of the research described in this thesis was to identify genes involved in genetic disease resistance in the chicken intestine. Therefore gene expression in the jejunum was investigated using a microarray approach. An intestine

  9. CDX2 gene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaoaut, H.H.; Mokhtar, D.A.; Samy, R.M.; Omar, Sh.A.; Khames, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    CDX genes are classically known as regulators of axial elongation during early embryogenesis. An unsuspected role for CDX genes has been revealed during hematopoietic development. The CDX gene family member CDX2 belongs to the most frequent aberrantly expressed proto-oncogenes in human acute leukemias and is highly leukemogenic in experimental models. We used reversed transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the expression level of CDX2 gene in 30 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis and 30 healthy volunteers. ALL patients were followed up to detect minimal residual disease (MRD) on days 15 and 42 of induction. We found that CDX2 gene was expressed in 50% of patients and not expressed in controls. Associations between gene expression and different clinical and laboratory data of patients revealed no impact on different findings. With follow up, we could not confirm that CDX2 expression had a prognostic significance.

  10. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Li; Xie, Hongbo; Chin, Mark H; Obradovic, Zoran; Smith, Desmond J; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios

    2009-04-29

    Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we present an approach for identifying the relation between gene expression maps obtained by voxelation and gene functions. To analyze the dataset, we chose typical genes as queries and aimed at discovering similar gene groups. Gene similarity was determined by using the wavelet features extracted from the left and right hemispheres averaged gene expression maps, and by the Euclidean distance between each pair of feature vectors. We also performed a multiple clustering approach on the gene expression maps, combined with hierarchical clustering. Among each group of similar genes and clusters, the gene function similarity was measured by calculating the average gene function distances in the gene ontology structure. By applying our methodology to find similar genes to certain target genes we were able to improve our understanding of gene expression patterns and gene functions. By applying the clustering analysis method, we obtained significant clusters, which have both very similar gene expression maps and very similar gene functions respectively to their corresponding gene ontologies. The cellular component ontology resulted in prominent clusters expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The molecular function ontology gave prominent clusters in cortex, corpus callosum and hypothalamus. The biological process ontology resulted in clusters in cortex, hypothalamus and choroid plexus. Clusters from all three ontologies combined were most prominently expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The experimental

  11. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Desmond J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we present an approach for identifying the relation between gene expression maps obtained by voxelation and gene functions. Results To analyze the dataset, we chose typical genes as queries and aimed at discovering similar gene groups. Gene similarity was determined by using the wavelet features extracted from the left and right hemispheres averaged gene expression maps, and by the Euclidean distance between each pair of feature vectors. We also performed a multiple clustering approach on the gene expression maps, combined with hierarchical clustering. Among each group of similar genes and clusters, the gene function similarity was measured by calculating the average gene function distances in the gene ontology structure. By applying our methodology to find similar genes to certain target genes we were able to improve our understanding of gene expression patterns and gene functions. By applying the clustering analysis method, we obtained significant clusters, which have both very similar gene expression maps and very similar gene functions respectively to their corresponding gene ontologies. The cellular component ontology resulted in prominent clusters expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The molecular function ontology gave prominent clusters in cortex, corpus callosum and hypothalamus. The biological process ontology resulted in clusters in cortex, hypothalamus and choroid plexus. Clusters from all three ontologies combined were most prominently expressed in

  12. Expression profiling identifies genes involved in emphysema severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowman Rayleen V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major public health problem. The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in emphysema severity in COPD patients. Gene expression profiling was performed on total RNA extracted from non-tumor lung tissue from 30 smokers with emphysema. Class comparison analysis based on gas transfer measurement was performed to identify differentially expressed genes. Genes were then selected for technical validation by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR if also represented on microarray platforms used in previously published emphysema studies. Genes technically validated advanced to tests of biological replication by qRT-PCR using an independent test set of 62 lung samples. Class comparison identified 98 differentially expressed genes (p p Gene expression profiling of lung from emphysema patients identified seven candidate genes associated with emphysema severity including COL6A3, SERPINF1, ZNHIT6, NEDD4, CDKN2A, NRN1 and GSTM3.

  13. Insulin/IGF signaling-related gene expression in the brain of a sporadic Alzheimer's disease monkey model induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjeon; Kim, Young-Hyun; Park, Sang-Je; Huh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Sun-Uk; Kim, Ji-Su; Jeong, Kang-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Min; Hong, Yonggeun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Chang, Kyu-Tae

    2014-01-01

    We reported previously that the intracerebroventricular streptozotocin (icv-STZ)-treated cynomolgus monkey showed regionally specific glucose hypometabolism in FDG-PET imaging, similar to that observed in the early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). However, further pathological analyses of this model at the molecular level are needed to validate it as a feasible model for sAD. Two cynomolgus monkeys were injected with 2 mg/kg STZ into the cerebellomedullary cistern at day 1, 7 and 14. Two control monkeys were given normal saline. At 5 months after injection, the expression levels of genes encoding 9 upstream molecules in insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling and markers for 4 cell-type populations in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, posterior cingulate, precuneus, and occipital cortex of control and icv-STZ treated cynomolgus monkeys were examined. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses demonstrated that the overall mRNA expression of insulin/IGF signaling-related genes was mainly impaired in the anterior part of the cerebrum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus, similar to the early stage of sAD. The changes were accompanied by the loss of oligodendrocytes and neurons. The posterior part of the cerebrum did not show degenerative alterations. The present study provides important fundamental information on the icv-STZ monkey model for sAD. These results may help guide future studies using this model for the investigation of pathological mechanisms and the development of drugs for sAD.

  14. Dynamics of Colonization and Expression of Pathogenicity Related Genes in Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri during Chickpea Vascular Wilt Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha L Upasani

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri (Foc is a constant threat to chickpea productivity in several parts of the world. Understanding the molecular basis of chickpea-Foc interaction is necessary to improve chickpea resistance to Foc and thereby the productivity of chickpea. We transformed Foc race 2 using green fluorescent protein (GFP gene and used it to characterize pathogen progression and colonization in wilt-susceptible (JG62 and wilt-resistant (Digvijay chickpea cultivars using confocal microscopy. We also employed quantitative PCR (qPCR to estimate the pathogen load and progression across various tissues of both the chickpea cultivars during the course of the disease. Additionally, the expression of several candidate pathogen virulence genes was analyzed using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR, which showed their characteristic expression in wilt-susceptible and resistant chickpea cultivars. Our results suggest that the pathogen colonizes the susceptible cultivar defeating its defense; however, albeit its entry in the resistant plant, further proliferation is severely restricted providing an evidence of efficient defense mechanism in the resistant chickpea cultivar.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of curcumin action: gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishodia, Shishir

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin derived from the tropical plant Curcuma longa has a long history of use as a dietary agent, food preservative, and in traditional Asian medicine. It has been used for centuries to treat biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. The preventive and therapeutic properties of curcumin are associated with its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties. Extensive research over several decades has attempted to identify the molecular mechanisms of curcumin action. Curcumin modulates numerous molecular targets by altering their gene expression, signaling pathways, or through direct interaction. Curcumin regulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNF, IL-1), growth factors (e.g., VEGF, EGF, FGF), growth factor receptors (e.g., EGFR, HER-2, AR), enzymes (e.g., COX-2, LOX, MMP9, MAPK, mTOR, Akt), adhesion molecules (e.g., ELAM-1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), apoptosis related proteins (e.g., Bcl-2, caspases, DR, Fas), and cell cycle proteins (e.g., cyclin D1). Curcumin modulates the activity of several transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1, STAT) and their signaling pathways. Based on its ability to affect multiple targets, curcumin has the potential for the prevention and treatment of various diseases including cancers, arthritis, allergies, atherosclerosis, aging, neurodegenerative disease, hepatic disorders, obesity, diabetes, psoriasis, and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of modulation of gene expression by curcumin. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... that the method can be applied to modulating the expression of native genes on the chromosome. We constructed a series of strains in which the expression of the las operon, containing the genes pfk, pyk, and ldh, was modulated by integrating a truncated copy of the pfk gene. Importantly, the modulation affected...

  17. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    knockout and strong overexpression. However, applications such as metabolic optimization and control analysis necessitate a continuous set of expression levels with only slight increments in strength to cover a specific window around the wildtype expression level of the studied gene; this requirement can......The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene...

  18. Correlation of HAMP gene polymorphisms and expression with the susceptibility and length of hospital stays in Taiwanese children with Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsing-Fang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Yu, Hong-Ren; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Huang, Fu-Chen; Lo, Mao-Hung; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Chen, Su-Fen; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a form of systemic vasculitis. Regarding its pathogenesis, HAMP gene encoding hepcidin, which is significant for iron metabolism, has a vital function. In this study, we recruited a total of 381 KD patients for genotyping. Data from 997 subjects (500 subjects from cohort 1; 497 subjects from cohort 2) were used for analysis. Using TaqMan allelic discrimination, we determined five tag SNPs (rs916145, rs10421768, rs3817623, rs7251432, and rs2293689). Treatment outcome data related to such clinical phenotypes as coronary artery lesions (CAL), coronary artery aneurysms (CAA), and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) effects were also collected. Furthermore, we measured plasma hepcidin levels with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that HAMP gene polymorphism (rs7251432, and rs2293689) was significantly correlated with KD risk and that plasma hepcidin levels both before and after IVIG treatment had a significantly positive correlation with length of hospital stays (R = 0.217, p = 0.046 and R = 0.381, p < 0.0001, respectively). In contrast, plasma hepcidin levels has a negative correlation with KD patients’ albumin levels (R = −0.27, p < 0.001) prior to IVIG treatment. This study's findings indicate that HAMP might have a role in the disease susceptibility, as well as its expressions correlated length of hospital stays, and albumin levels in Taiwanese children with KD. PMID:28881695

  19. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Maziah, M.; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F.

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g−1 in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  20. Over-Expression of the Pikh Gene with a CaMV 35S Promoter Leads to Improved Blast Disease (Magnaporthe oryzae) Tolerance in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Maziah, M; Sahebi, Mahbod; Ashkani, Sadegh; Taheri, Sima; Jahromi, Mohammad F

    2016-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a rice blast fungus and plant pathogen that causes a serious rice disease and, therefore, poses a threat to the world's second most important food security crop. Plant transformation technology has become an adaptable system for cultivar improvement and to functionally analyze genes in plants. The objective of this study was to determine the effects (through over-expressing and using the CaMV 35S promoter) of Pikh on MR219 resistance because it is a rice variety that is susceptible to the blast fungus pathotype P7.2. Thus, a full DNA and coding DNA sequence (CDS) of the Pikh gene, 3172 bp, and 1206 bp in length, were obtained through amplifying the gDNA and cDNA template from a PH9-resistant rice variety using a specific primer. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology was also used to introduce the Pikh gene into the MR219 callus. Subsequently, transgenic plants were evaluated from the DNA to protein stages using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), semi-quantitative RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Transgenic plants were also compared with a control using a real-time quantification technique (to quantify the pathogen population), and transgenic and control plants were challenged with the local most virulent M. oryzae pathotype, P7.2. Based on the results, the Pikh gene encodes a hydrophilic protein with 18 sheets, 4 helixes, and 21 coils. This protein contains 401 amino acids, among which the amino acid sequence from 1 to 376 is a non-cytoplasmic region, that from 377 to 397 is a transmembrane region, and that from 398 to 401 is a cytoplasmic region with no identified disordered regions. The Pikh gene was up-regulated in the transgenic plants compared with the control plants. The quantity of the amino acid leucine in the transgenic rice plants increased significantly from 17.131 in the wild-type to 47.865 mg g(-1) in transgenic plants. The M. oryzae population was constant at 31, 48

  1. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armita Nourmohammad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis.

  2. Transient gene expression in serum-free suspension-growing mammalian cells for the production of foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Clara Mignaqui

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. It produces severe economic losses in the livestock industry. Currently available vaccines are based on inactivated FMD virus (FMDV. The use of empty capsids as a subunit vaccine has been reported to be a promising candidate because it avoids the use of virus in the vaccine production and conserves the conformational epitopes of the virus. In this report, we explored transient gene expression (TGE in serum-free suspension-growing mammalian cells for the production of FMDV recombinant empty capsids as a subunit vaccine. The recombinant proteins produced, assembled into empty capsids and induced protective immune response against viral challenge in mice. Furthermore, they were recognized by anti-FMDV bovine sera. By using this technology, we were able to achieve expression levels that are compatible with the development of a vaccine. Thus, TGE of mammalian cells is an easy to perform, scalable and cost-effective technology for the production of a recombinant subunit vaccine against FMDV.

  3. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  4. Effects of Bacillus subtilis on the growth performance, digestive enzymes, immune gene expression and disease resistance of white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zokaeifar, Hadi; Balcázar, José Luis; Saad, Che Roos; Kamarudin, Mohd Salleh; Sijam, Kamaruzaman; Arshad, Aziz; Nejat, Naghmeh

    2012-10-01

    We studied the effect of two probiotic Bacillus subtilis strains on the growth performance, digestive enzyme activity, immune gene expression and disease resistance of juvenile white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei). A mixture of two probiotic strains, L10 and G1 in equal proportions, was administered at two different doses 10(5) (BM5) and 10(8) (BM8) CFU g(-1) feed to shrimp for eight weeks. In comparison to untreated control group, final weight, weight gain and digestive enzyme activity were significantly greater in shrimp fed BM5 and BM8 diets. Significant differences for specific growth rate (SGR) and survival were recorded in shrimp fed BM8 diet as compared with the control; however, no significant differences were recorded for food conversion ratio (FCR) among all the experimental groups. Eight weeks after the start of the feeding period, shrimp were challenged with Vibrio harveyi. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in shrimp survival between probiotic and control groups. Cumulative mortality of the control group was 63.3%, whereas cumulative mortality of the shrimp that had been given probiotics was 20.0% with BM8 and 33.3% with BM5. Subsequently, real-time PCR was employed to determine the mRNA levels of prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), lipopolysaccharide- and β-1,3-glucan-binding protein (LGBP) and serine protein (SP). The expression of all immune-related genes studied was significantly up-regulated (P growth performance and disease resistance through an enhanced immune response in shrimp. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; G?ttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete ...

  6. Decision tree-based method for integrating gene expression, demographic, and clinical data to determine disease endotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complex diseases are often difficult to diagnose, treat, and study due to the multi-factorial nature of the etiology. Significant challenges exist with regard to how to segregate indivdiuals into suitable subtypes of the disease. Here, we examine a range of methods for evaluati...

  7. Inhibition of Super-Enhancer Activity in Autoinflammatory Site-Derived T Cells Reduces Disease-Associated Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, Janneke G C; Vervoort, Stephin J; Tan, Sander C; Mijnheer, Gerdien; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; van Wijk, Femke; Prakken, Berent J; Creyghton, Menno P; Coffer, Paul J; Mokry, Michal; van Loosdregt, Jorg

    2015-01-01

    The underlying molecular mechanisms for many autoimmune diseases are poorly understood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an exceptionally well-suited model for studying autoimmune diseases due to its early onset and the possibility to analyze cells derived from the site of inflammation.

  8. A Genetic Variant Associated with Five Vascular Diseases Is a Distal Regulator of Endothelin-1 Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, Rajat M.; Hadaya, Joseph; Trehan, Aditi; Zekavat, Seyedeh M.; Roselli, Carolina; Klarin, Derek; Emdin, Connor A.; Hilvering, Catharina R.E.; Bianchi, Valerio; Mueller, Christian; Khera, Amit V.; Ryan, Russell J.H.; Engreitz, Jesse M.; Issner, Robbyn; Shoresh, Noam; Epstein, Charles B.; de Laat, Wouter; Brown, Jonathan D.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Bernstein, Bradley E.; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) implicate the PHACTR1 locus (6p24) in risk for five vascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, migraine headache, cervical artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, and hypertension. Through genetic fine mapping, we prioritized rs9349379, a common

  9. The evolution of gene expression in primates

    OpenAIRE

    Tashakkori Ghanbarian, Avazeh

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of a gene’s expression profile is commonly assumed to be independent of its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between expression of neighboring genes in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes, genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their e...

  10. Differentially expressed genes in iron-induced prion protein conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minsun; Kim, Eun-hee; Choi, Bo-Ran; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP C ) to the protease-resistant isoform is the key event in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, including transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Increased iron in prion-related disease has been observed due to the prion protein-ferritin complex. Additionally, the accumulation and conversion of recombinant PrP (rPrP) is specifically derived from Fe(III) but not Fe(II). Fe(III)-mediated PK-resistant PrP (PrP res ) conversion occurs within a complex cellular environment rather than via direct contact between rPrP and Fe(III). In this study, differentially expressed genes correlated with prion degeneration by Fe(III) were identified using Affymetrix microarrays. Following Fe(III) treatment, 97 genes were differentially expressed, including 85 upregulated genes and 12 downregulated genes (≥1.5-fold change in expression). However, Fe(II) treatment produced moderate alterations in gene expression without inducing dramatic alterations in gene expression profiles. Moreover, functional grouping of identified genes indicated that the differentially regulated genes were highly associated with cell growth, cell maintenance, and intra- and extracellular transport. These findings showed that Fe(III) may influence the expression of genes involved in PrP folding by redox mechanisms. The identification of genes with altered expression patterns in neural cells may provide insights into PrP conversion mechanisms during the development and progression of prion-related diseases. - Highlights: • Differential genes correlated with prion degeneration by Fe(III) were identified. • Genes were identified in cell proliferation and intra- and extracellular transport. • In PrP degeneration, redox related genes were suggested. • Cbr2, Rsad2, Slc40a1, Amph and Mvd were expressed significantly.

  11. Large scale gene expression meta-analysis reveals tissue-specific, sex-biased gene expression in humans

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    Benjamin Mayne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The severity and prevalence of many diseases are known to differ between the sexes. Organ specific sex-biased gene expression may underpin these and other sexually dimorphic traits. To further our understanding of sex differences in transcriptional regulation, we performed meta-analyses of sex biased gene expression in multiple human tissues. We analysed 22 publicly available human gene expression microarray data sets including over 2500 samples from 15 different tissues and 9 different organs. Briefly, by using an inverse-variance method we determined the effect size difference of gene expression between males and females. We found the greatest sex differences in gene expression in the brain, specifically in the anterior cingulate cortex, (1818 genes, followed by the heart (375 genes, kidney (224 genes, colon (218 genes and thyroid (163 genes. More interestingly, we found different parts of the brain with varying numbers and identity of sex-biased genes, indicating that specific cortical regions may influence sexually dimorphic traits. The majority of sex-biased genes in other tissues such as the bladder, liver, lungs and pancreas were on the sex chromosomes or involved in sex hormone production. On average in each tissue, 32% of autosomal genes that were expressed in a sex-biased fashion contained androgen or estrogen hormone response elements. Interestingly, across all tissues, we found approximately two-thirds of autosomal genes that were sex-biased were not under direct influence of sex hormones. To our knowledge this is the largest analysis of sex-biased gene expression in human tissues to date. We identified many sex-biased genes that were not under the direct influence of sex chromosome genes or sex hormones. These may provide targets for future development of sex-specific treatments for diseases.

  12. Microarray gene expression profiling and analysis in renal cell carcinoma

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    Sadhukhan Provash

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common cancer in adult kidney. The accuracy of current diagnosis and prognosis of the disease and the effectiveness of the treatment for the disease are limited by the poor understanding of the disease at the molecular level. To better understand the genetics and biology of RCC, we profiled the expression of 7,129 genes in both clear cell RCC tissue and cell lines using oligonucleotide arrays. Methods Total RNAs isolated from renal cell tumors, adjacent normal tissue and metastatic RCC cell lines were hybridized to affymatrix HuFL oligonucleotide arrays. Genes were categorized into different functional groups based on the description of the Gene Ontology Consortium and analyzed based on the gene expression levels. Gene expression profiles of the tissue and cell line samples were visualized and classified by singular value decomposition. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the expression alterations of selected genes in RCC. Results Selected genes were annotated based on biological processes and clustered into functional groups. The expression levels of genes in each group were also analyzed. Seventy-four commonly differentially expressed genes with more than five-fold changes in RCC tissues were identified. The expression alterations of selected genes from these seventy-four genes were further verified using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Detailed comparison of gene expression patterns in RCC tissue and RCC cell lines shows significant differences between the two types of samples, but many important expression patterns were preserved. Conclusions This is one of the initial studies that examine the functional ontology of a large number of genes in RCC. Extensive annotation, clustering and analysis of a large number of genes based on the gene functional ontology revealed many interesting gene expression patterns in RCC. Most

  13. Molecular subsets in the gene expression signatures of scleroderma skin.

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    Ausra Milano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is a clinically heterogeneous disease with a complex phenotype. The disease is characterized by vascular dysfunction, tissue fibrosis, internal organ dysfunction, and immune dysfunction resulting in autoantibody production.We analyzed the genome-wide patterns of gene expression with DNA microarrays in skin biopsies from distinct scleroderma subsets including 17 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc, 7 patients with SSc with limited scleroderma (lSSc, 3 patients with morphea, and 6 healthy controls. 61 skin biopsies were analyzed in a total of 75 microarray hybridizations. Analysis by hierarchical clustering demonstrates nearly identical patterns of gene expression in 17 out of 22 of the forearm and back skin pairs of SSc patients. Using this property of the gene expression, we selected a set of 'intrinsic' genes and analyzed the inherent data-driven groupings. Distinct patterns of gene expression separate patients with dSSc from those with lSSc and both are easily distinguished from normal controls. Our data show three distinct patient groups among the patients with dSSc and two groups among patients with lSSc. Each group can be distinguished by unique gene expression signatures indicative of proliferating cells, immune infiltrates and a fibrotic program. The intrinsic groups are statistically significant (p<0.001 and each has been mapped to clinical covariates of modified Rodnan skin score, interstitial lung disease, gastrointestinal involvement, digital ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and disease duration. We report a 177-gene signature that is associated with severity of skin disease in dSSc.Genome-wide gene expression profiling of skin biopsies demonstrates that the heterogeneity in scleroderma can be measured quantitatively with DNA microarrays. The diversity in gene expression demonstrates multiple distinct gene expression programs in the skin of patients with scleroderma.

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Xeroderma Pigmentosum

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    Bowden Nikola A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP is a rare recessive disorder that is characterized by extreme sensitivity to UV light. UV light exposure results in the formation of DNA damage such as cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts. Nucleotide excision repair (NER orchestrates the removal of cyclobutane dimers and (6-4 photoproducts as well as some forms of bulky chemical DNA adducts. The disease XP is comprised of 7 complementation groups (XP-A to XP-G, which represent functional deficiencies in seven different genes, all of which are believed to be involved in NER. The main clinical feature of XP is various forms of skin cancers; however, neurological degeneration is present in XPA, XPB, XPD and XPG complementation groups. The relationship between NER and other types of DNA repair processes is now becoming evident but the exact relationships between the different complementation groups remains to be precisely determined. Using gene expression analysis we have identified similarities and differences after UV light exposure between the complementation groups XP-A, XP-C, XP-D, XP-E, XP-F, XP-G and an unaffected control. The results reveal that there is a graded change in gene expression patterns between the mildest, most similar to the control response (XP-E and the severest form (XP-A of the disease, with the exception of XP-D. Distinct differences between the complementation groups with neurological symptoms (XP-A, XP-D and XP-G and without (XP-C, XP-E and XP-F were also identified. Therefore, this analysis has revealed distinct gene expression profiles for the XP complementation groups and the first step towards understanding the neurological symptoms of XP.

  15. Gene expression profiling in necrotizing enterocolitis reveals pathways common to those reported in Crohn?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tremblay, ?ric; Thibault, Marie-Pier; Ferretti, Emanuela; Babakissa, Corentin; Bertelle, Val?rie; Bettolli, Marcos; Burghardt, Karolina Maria; Colombani, Jean-Fran?ois; Grynspan, David; Levy, Emile; Lu, Peng; Mayer, Sandeep; M?nard, Daniel; Mouterde, Olivier; Renes, Ingrid B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most frequent life-threatening gastrointestinal disease experienced by premature infants in neonatal intensive care units. The challenge for neonatologists is to detect early clinical manifestations of NEC. One strategy would be to identify specific markers that could be used as early diagnostic tools to identify preterm infants most at risk of developing NEC or in the event of a diagnostic dilemma of suspected disease. As a first step in this...

  16. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

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    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  17. Gene therapy for ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Melissa M; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-05-01

    The eye is an easily accessible, highly compartmentalised and immune-privileged organ that offers unique advantages as a gene therapy target. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been implicated as potentially efficacious therapies. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Proof-of-concept for vector-based gene therapies has also been established in several experimental models of human ocular diseases. After nearly two decades of ocular gene therapy research, preliminary successes are now being reported in phase 1 clinical trials for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis. This review describes current developments and future prospects for ocular gene therapy. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the performance and regulation of recombinant adeno-associated virus- and lentivirus-mediated ocular gene transfer. Gene therapy prospects have advanced for a variety of retinal disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa, retinoschisis, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. Advances have also been made using experimental models for non-retinal diseases, such as uveitis and glaucoma. These methodological advancements are critical for the implementation of additional gene-based therapies for human ocular diseases in the near future.

  18. PRAME Gene Expression in Acute Leukemia and Its Clinical Significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Kai; Wang, Xiao-ming; Fu, Rong; Ruan, Er-bao; Liu, Hui; Shao, Zong-hong

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the expression of the preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) gene in acute leukemia and its clinical significance. The level of expressed PRAME mRNA in bone marrow mononuclear cells from 34 patients with acute leukemia (AL) and in 12 bone marrow samples from healthy volunteers was measured via RT-PCR. Correlation analyses between PRAME gene expression and the clinical characteristics (gender, age, white blood count, immunophenotype of leukemia, percentage of blast cells, and karyotype) of the patients were performed. The PRAME gene was expressed in 38.2% of all 34 patients, in 40.7% of the patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML, n=27), and in 28.6% of the patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=7), but was not expressed in the healthy volunteers. The difference in the expression levels between AML and ALL patients was statistically significant. The rate of gene expression was 80% in M 3 , 33.3% in M 2 , and 28.6% in M 5 . Gene expression was also found to be correlated with CD15 and CD33 expression and abnormal karyotype, but not with age, gender, white blood count or percentage of blast cells. The PRAME gene is highly expressed in acute leukemia and could be a useful marker to monitor minimal residual disease. This gene is also a candidate target for the immunotherapy of acute leukemia

  19. Brain transcriptomes of harbor seals demonstrate gene expression patterns of animals undergoing a metabolic disease and a viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Rosales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of marine mammals can be difficult to diagnose because of their life history and protected status. Stranded marine mammals have been a particularly useful resource to discover and comprehend the diseases that plague these top predators. Additionally, advancements in high-throughput sequencing (HTS has contributed to the discovery of novel pathogens in marine mammals. In this study, we use a combination of HTS and stranded harbor seals (Phoca vitulina to better understand a known and unknown brain disease. To do this, we used transcriptomics to evaluate brain tissues from seven neonatal harbor seals that expired from an unknown cause of death (UCD and compared them to four neonatal harbor seals that had confirmed phocine herpesvirus (PhV-1 infections in the brain. Comparing the two disease states we found that UCD animals showed a significant abundance of fatty acid metabolic transcripts in their brain tissue, thus we speculate that a fatty acid metabolic dysregulation contributed to the death of these animals. Furthermore, we were able to describe the response of four young harbor seals with PhV-1 infections in the brain. PhV-1 infected animals showed a significant ability to mount an innate and adaptive immune response, especially to combat viral infections. Our data also suggests that PhV-1 can hijack host pathways for DNA packaging and exocytosis. This is the first study to use transcriptomics in marine mammals to understand host and viral interactions and assess the death of stranded marine mammals with an unknown disease. Furthermore, we show the value of applying transcriptomics on stranded marine mammals for disease characterization.

  20. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  1. Contrasting gene expression patterns induced by levodopa and pramipexole treatments in the rat model of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taravini, Irene R.; Larramendy, Celia; Gomez, Gimena; Saborido, Mariano D.; Spaans, Floor; Fresno, Cristobal; Gonzalez, German A.; Fernandez, Elmer; Murer, Mario G.; Gershanik, Oscar S.

    Whether the treatment of Parkinson's disease has to be initiated with levodopa or a D2 agonist like pramipexole remains debatable. Levodopa is more potent against symptoms than D2 agonists, but D2 agonists are less prone to induce motor complications and may have neuroprotective effects. Although

  2. Glia Open Access Database (GOAD) : A comprehensive gene expression encyclopedia of glia cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, Inge R.; Noback, Michiel; Bijlsma, Marieke; Duong, Kim N.; van der Geest, Marije A.; Ketelaars, Peer T.; Brouwer, Nieske; Vainchtein, Ilia D.; Eggen, Bart J. L.; Boddeke, Hendrikus W. G. M.

    Recently, the number of genome-wide transcriptome profiles of pure populations of glia cells has drastically increased, resulting in an unprecedented amount of data that offer opportunities to study glia phenotypes and functions in health and disease. To make genome-wide transcriptome data easily

  3. A Multi-layered Quantitative In Vivo Expression Atlas of the Podocyte Unravels Kidney Disease Candidate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinschen, Markus M; Gödel, Markus; Grahammer, Florian; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Helmstädter, Martin; Kretz, Oliver; Zarei, Mostafa; Braun, Daniela A; Dittrich, Sebastian; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Schroder, Patricia; Teetzen, Carolin; Gee, HeonYung; Daouk, Ghaleb; Pohl, Martin; Kuhn, Elisa; Schermer, Bernhard; Küttner, Victoria; Boerries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Schiffer, Mario; Bergmann, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Dengjel, Joern; Benzing, Thomas; Huber, Tobias B

    2018-05-22

    Damage to and loss of glomerular podocytes has been identified as the culprit lesion in progressive kidney diseases. Here, we combine mass spectrometry-based proteomics with mRNA sequencing, bioinformatics, and hypothesis-driven studies to provide a comprehensive and quantitative map of mammalian podocytes that identifies unanticipated signaling pathways. Comparison of the in vivo datasets with proteomics data from podocyte cell cultures showed a limited value of available cell culture models. Moreover, in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids uncovered surprisingly rapid synthesis of mitochondrial proteins under steady-state conditions that was perturbed under autophagy-deficient, disease-susceptible conditions. Integration of acquired omics dimensions suggested FARP1 as a candidate essential for podocyte function, which could be substantiated by genetic analysis in humans and knockdown experiments in zebrafish. This work exemplifies how the integration of multi-omics datasets can identify a framework of cell-type-specific features relevant for organ health and disease. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy [Davis, CA; Bachkirova, Elena [Davis, CA; Rey, Michael [Davis, CA

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  5. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  6. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  7. Step into the groove : engineered transcription factors as modulators of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.E.; Verschure, P.J.; Gommans, W.M.; Haisma, H.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of dysregulated gene expression in causing numerous diseases opens up new possibilities for the development of innovative therapeutics. In this chapter, we first describe different mechanisms of misregulated gene expression resulting in various

  8. A Critical Perspective On Microarray Breast Cancer Gene Expression Profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontrop, H.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays offer biologists an exciting tool that allows the simultaneous assessment of gene expression levels for thousands of genes at once. At the time of their inception, microarrays were hailed as the new dawn in cancer biology and oncology practice with the hope that within a decade diseases

  9. Determinants of human adipose tissue gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viguerie, Nathalie; Montastier, Emilie; Maoret, Jean-José

    2012-01-01

    weight maintenance diets. For 175 genes, opposite regulation was observed during calorie restriction and weight maintenance phases, independently of variations in body weight. Metabolism and immunity genes showed inverse profiles. During the dietary intervention, network-based analyses revealed strong...... interconnection between expression of genes involved in de novo lipogenesis and components of the metabolic syndrome. Sex had a marked influence on AT expression of 88 transcripts, which persisted during the entire dietary intervention and after control for fat mass. In women, the influence of body mass index...... on expression of a subset of genes persisted during the dietary intervention. Twenty-two genes revealed a metabolic syndrome signature common to men and women. Genetic control of AT gene expression by cis signals was observed for 46 genes. Dietary intervention, sex, and cis genetic variants independently...

  10. Deriving Trading Rules Using Gene Expression Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian VISOIU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents how buy and sell trading rules are generated using gene expression programming with special setup. Market concepts are presented and market analysis is discussed with emphasis on technical analysis and quantitative methods. The use of genetic algorithms in deriving trading rules is presented. Gene expression programming is applied in a form where multiple types of operators and operands are used. This gives birth to multiple gene contexts and references between genes in order to keep the linear structure of the gene expression programming chromosome. The setup of multiple gene contexts is presented. The case study shows how to use the proposed gene setup to derive trading rules encoded by Boolean expressions, using a dataset with the reference exchange rates between the Euro and the Romanian leu. The conclusions highlight the positive results obtained in deriving useful trading rules.

  11. Polycistronic gene expression in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Tabea; Meyer, Vera

    2017-09-25

    Genome mining approaches predict dozens of biosynthetic gene clusters in each of the filamentous fungal genomes sequenced so far. However, the majority of these gene clusters still remain cryptic because they are not expressed in their natural host. Simultaneous expression of all genes belonging to a biosynthetic pathway in a heterologous host is one approach to activate biosynthetic gene clusters and to screen the metabolites produced for bioactivities. Polycistronic expression of all pathway genes under control of a single and tunable promoter would be the method of choice, as this does not only simplify cloning procedures, but also offers control on timing and strength of expression. However, polycistronic gene expression is a feature not commonly found in eukaryotic host systems, such as Aspergillus niger. In this study, we tested the suitability of the viral P2A peptide for co-expression of three genes in A. niger. Two genes descend from Fusarium oxysporum and are essential to produce the secondary metabolite enniatin (esyn1, ekivR). The third gene (luc) encodes the reporter luciferase which was included to study position effects. Expression of the polycistronic gene cassette was put under control of the Tet-On system to ensure tunable gene expression in A. niger. In total, three polycistronic expression cassettes which differed in the position of luc were constructed and targeted to the pyrG locus in A. niger. This allowed direct comparison of the luciferase activity based on the position of the luciferase gene. Doxycycline-mediated induction of the Tet-On expression cassettes resulted in the production of one long polycistronic mRNA as proven by Northern analyses, and ensured comparable production of enniatin in all three strains. Notably, gene position within the polycistronic expression cassette matters, as, luciferase activity was lowest at position one and had a comparable activity at positions two and three. The P2A peptide can be used to express at

  12. Profiling Gene Expression in Germinating Brassica Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung Ryoul; Wang, Yi-Hong; Hasenstein, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    Based on previously developed solid-phase gene extraction (SPGE) we examined the mRNA profile in primary roots of Brassica rapa seedlings for highly expressed genes like ACT7 (actin7), TUB (tubulin1), UBQ (ubiquitin), and low expressed GLK (glucokinase) during the first day post-germination. The assessment was based on the mRNA load of the SPGE probe of about 2.1 ng. The number of copies of the investigated genes changed spatially along the length of primary roots. The expression level of all genes differed significantly at each sample position. Among the examined genes ACT7 expression was most even along the root. UBQ was highest at the tip and root-shoot junction (RS). TUB and GLK showed a basipetal gradient. The temporal expression of UBQ was highest in the MZ 9 h after primary root emergence and higher than at any other sample position. Expressions of GLK in EZ and RS increased gradually over time. SPGE extraction is the result of oligo-dT and oligo-dA hybridization and the results illustrate that SPGE can be used for gene expression profiling at high spatial and temporal resolution. SPGE needles can be used within two weeks when stored at 4 °C. Our data indicate that gene expression studies that are based on the entire root miss important differences in gene expression that SPGE is able to resolve for example growth adjustments during gravitropism.

  13. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  14. Increased baseline RUNX2, caspase 3 and p21 gene expressions in the peripheral blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients are associated with improved clinical response to methotrexate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetina, Elena V; Demidova, Natalia V; Markova, Galina A; Taskina, Elena A; Glukhova, Svetlana I; Karateev, Dmitry E

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the potential of the baseline gene expression in the whole blood of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug-naïve rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients for predicting the response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Twenty-six control subjects and 40 RA patients were examined. Clinical, immunological and radiographic parameters were assessed before and after 24 months of follow-up. The gene expressions in the whole blood were measured using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The protein concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were used to suggest thresholds that were associated with the prediction of the response. Decreases in the disease activity at the end of the study were accompanied by significant increases in joint space narrowing score (JSN). Positive correlations between the expressions of the Unc-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) genes with the level of C-reactive protein and MMP-9 expression with Disease Activity Score of 28 joints (DAS28) and swollen joint count were noted at baseline. The baseline tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α gene expression was positively correlated with JSN at the end of the follow-up, whereas p21, caspase 3, and runt-related transcription factor (RUNX)2 were correlated with the ΔDAS28 values. Our results suggest that the expressions of MMP-9 and ULK1 might be associated with disease activity. Increased baseline gene expressions of RUNX2, p21 and caspase 3 in the peripheral blood might predict better responses to MTX therapy. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Quick and sensitive determination of gene expression of fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... from fatty acid synthase (FAS) with a different glucose level in ... By using the following formula, this study was able to quantify the mRNA expression of ... hypertension, heart disease and diabetes. ... regulation of gene expression has emerged in recent ... stages of adipocyte meta-bolism are relatively well.

  16. Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battle, Alexis; Brown, Christopher D.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Aguet, François; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Gelfand, Ellen T.; Getz, Gad; Hadley, Kane; Handsaker, Robert E.; Huang, Katherine H.; Kashin, Seva; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Lek, Monkol; Li, Xiao; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Nedzel, Jared L.; Nguyen, Duyen T.; Noble, Michael S.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Trowbridge, Casandra A.; Tukiainen, Taru; Abell, Nathan S.; Balliu, Brunilda; Barshir, Ruth; Basha, Omer; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Brown, Andrew; Castel, Stephane E.; Chen, Lin S.; Chiang, Colby; Conrad, Donald F.; Cox, Nancy J.; Damani, Farhan N.; Davis, Joe R.; Delaneau, Olivier; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eskin, Eleazar; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Frésard, Laure; Gamazon, Eric R.; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Gewirtz, Ariel D. H.; Gliner, Genna; Gloudemans, Michael J.; Guigo, Roderic; Hall, Ira M.; Han, Buhm; He, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression

  17. Chromatin loops, gene positioning, and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, S.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments and intense research over the last years have led to a better understanding of the 3D structure of the genome and its influence on genome function inside the cell nucleus. We will summarize topological studies performed on four model gene loci: the alpha- and beta-globin

  18. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruissen, Fred; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    In 1995, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) was developed as a versatile tool for gene expression studies. SAGE technology does not require pre-existing knowledge of the genome that is being examined and therefore SAGE can be applied to many different model systems. In this chapter, the SAGE

  19. A Gene Expression Classifier of Node-Positive Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F. Meeh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We used digital long serial analysis of gene expression to discover gene expression differences between node-negative and node-positive colorectal tumors and developed a multigene classifier able to discriminate between these two tumor types. We prepared and sequenced long serial analysis of gene expression libraries from one node-negative and one node-positive colorectal tumor, sequenced to a depth of 26,060 unique tags, and identified 262 tags significantly differentially expressed between these two tumors (P < 2 x 10-6. We confirmed the tag-to-gene assignments and differential expression of 31 genes by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, 12 of which were elevated in the node-positive tumor. We analyzed the expression levels of these 12 upregulated genes in a validation panel of 23 additional tumors and developed an optimized seven-gene logistic regression classifier. The classifier discriminated between node-negative and node-positive tumors with 86% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of the classifier revealed an area under the curve of 0.86. Experimental manipulation of the function of one classification gene, Fibronectin, caused profound effects on invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells in vitro. These results suggest that the development of node-positive colorectal cancer occurs in part through elevated epithelial FN1 expression and suggest novel strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of advanced disease.

  20. Expression of Sox genes in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Watanabe, Momoko; Idrus, Erik; Nagai, Takahiro; Oommen, Shelly; Maeda, Takeyasu; Hagiwara, Nobuko; Que, Jianwen; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Sox gene family play roles in many biological processes including organogenesis. We carried out comparative in situ hybridization analysis of seventeen sox genes (Sox1-14, 17, 18, 21) during murine odontogenesis from the epithelial thickening to the cytodifferentiation stages. Localized expression of five Sox genes (Sox6, 9, 13, 14 and 21) was observed in tooth bud epithelium. Sox13 showed restricted expression in the primary enamel knots. At the early bell stage, three Sox genes (Sox8, 11, 17 and 21) were expressed in pre-ameloblasts, whereas two others (Sox5 and 18) showed expression in odontoblasts. Sox genes thus showed a dynamic spatio-temporal expression during tooth development.

  1. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  2. Altered cell cycle-related gene expression in brain and lymphocytes from a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease [amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (PS1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras, Noemí; Bartolomé, Fernando; Alquézar, Carolina; Antequera, Desireé; Muñoz, Úrsula; Carro, Eva; Martín-Requero, Ángeles

    2012-09-01

    Cumulative evidence indicates that aberrant re-expression of many cell cycle-related proteins and inappropriate neuronal cell cycle control are critical events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Evidence of cell cycle activation in post-mitotic neurons has also been observed in murine models of AD, despite the fact that most of these mice do not show massive loss of neuronal bodies. Dysfunction of the cell cycle appears to affect cells other than neurons, as peripheral cells, such as lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients with AD, show an altered response to mitogenic stimulation. We sought to determine whether cell cycle disturbances are present simultaneously in both brain and peripheral cells from the amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin 1 (PS1) mouse model of AD, in order to validate the use of peripheral cells from patients not only to study cell cycle abnormalities as a pathogenic feature of AD, but also as a means to test novel therapeutic approaches. By using cell cycle pathway-specific RT(2)Profiler™ PCR Arrays, we detected changes in a number of cell cycle-related genes in brain as well as in lymphocytes from APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, we found enhanced 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into DNA in lymphocytes from APP/PS1 mice, and increased expression of the cell proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cdkn2a, as detected by immunohistochemistry in cortical neurons of the APP/PS1 mice. Taken together, the cell cycle-related changes in brain and blood cells reported here support the mitosis failure hypothesis in AD and validate the use of peripheral cells as surrogate tissue to study the molecular basis of AD pathogenesis. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Gastric Cancer Associated Genes Identified by an Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is one of the most severe complex diseases with high morbidity and mortality in the world. The molecular mechanisms and risk factors for this disease are still not clear since the cancer heterogeneity caused by different genetic and environmental factors. With more and more expression data accumulated nowadays, we can perform integrative analysis for these data to understand the complexity of gastric cancer and to identify consensus players for the heterogeneous cancer. In the present work, we screened the published gene expression data and analyzed them with integrative tool, combined with pathway and gene ontology enrichment investigation. We identified several consensus differentially expressed genes and these genes were further confirmed with literature mining; at last, two genes, that is, immunoglobulin J chain and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 17, were screened as novel gastric cancer associated genes. Experimental validation is proposed to further confirm this finding.

  4. Site-specific variation in gene expression from Symbiodinium spp. associated with offshore and inshore Porites astreoides in the lower Florida Keys is lost with bleaching and disease stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Hauff Salas

    Full Text Available Scleractinian coral are experiencing unprecedented rates of mortality due to increases in sea surface temperatures in response to global climate change. Some coral species however, survive high temperature events due to a reduced susceptibility to bleaching. We investigated the relationship between bleaching susceptibility and expression of five metabolically related genes of Symbiodinium spp. from the coral Porites astreoides originating from an inshore and offshore reef in the Florida Keys. The acclimatization potential of Symbiodinium spp. to changing temperature regimes was also measured via a two-year reciprocal transplant between the sites. Offshore coral fragments displayed significantly higher expression in Symbiodinium spp. genes PCNA, SCP2, G3PDH, PCP and psaE than their inshore counterparts (p<0.05, a pattern consistent with increased bleaching susceptibility in offshore corals. Additionally, gene expression patterns in Symbiodinium spp. from site of origin were conserved throughout the two-year reciprocal transplant, indicating acclimatization did not occur within this multi-season time frame. Further, laboratory experiments were used to investigate the influence of acute high temperature (32°C for eight hours and disease (lipopolysaccharide of Serratia marcescens on the five metabolically related symbiont genes from the same offshore and inshore P. astreoides fragments. Gene expression did not differ between reef fragments, or as a consequence of acute exposure to heat or heat and disease, contrasting to results found in the field. Gene expression reported here indicates functional variation in populations of Symbiodinium spp. associated with P. astreoides in the Florida Keys, and is likely a result of localized adaptation. However, gene expression patterns observed in the lab imply that functional variation in zooxanthellae observed under conditions of chronic moderate stress is lost under the acute extreme conditions studied here.

  5. Identifying key genes in rheumatoid arthritis by weighted gene co-expression network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunhui; Lv, Qi; Teng, Songsong; Yu, Yinxian; Niu, Kerun; Yi, Chengqin

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to identify rheumatoid arthritis (RA) related genes based on microarray data using the WGCNA (weighted gene co-expression network analysis) method. Two gene expression profile datasets GSE55235 (10 RA samples and 10 healthy controls) and GSE77298 (16 RA samples and seven healthy controls) were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus database. Characteristic genes were identified using metaDE package. WGCNA was used to find disease-related networks based on gene expression correlation coefficients, and module significance was defined as the average gene significance of all genes used to assess the correlation between the module and RA status. Genes in the disease-related gene co-expression network were subject to functional annotation and pathway enrichment analysis using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Characteristic genes were also mapped to the Connectivity Map to screen small molecules. A total of 599 characteristic genes were identified. For each dataset, characteristic genes in the green, red and turquoise modules were most closely associated with RA, with gene numbers of 54, 43 and 79, respectively. These genes were enriched in totally enriched in 17 Gene Ontology terms, mainly related to immune response (CD97, FYB, CXCL1, IKBKE, CCR1, etc.), inflammatory response (CD97, CXCL1, C3AR1, CCR1, LYZ, etc.) and homeostasis (C3AR1, CCR1, PLN, CCL19, PPT1, etc.). Two small-molecule drugs sanguinarine and papaverine were predicted to have a therapeutic effect against RA. Genes related to immune response, inflammatory response and homeostasis presumably have critical roles in RA pathogenesis. Sanguinarine and papaverine have a potential therapeutic effect against RA. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Pervasive Effects of Aging on Gene Expression in Wild Wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charruau, Pauline; Johnston, Rachel A.; Stahler, Daniel R.; Lea, Amanda; Snyder-Mackler, Noah; Smith, Douglas W.; vonHoldt, Bridgett M.; Cole, Steven W.; Tung, Jenny; Wayne, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gene expression levels change as an individual ages and responds to environmental conditions. With the exception of humans, such patterns have principally been studied under controlled conditions, overlooking the array of developmental and environmental influences that organisms encounter under conditions in which natural selection operates. We used high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of whole blood to assess the relative impacts of social status, age, disease, and sex on gene expression levels in a natural population of gray wolves (Canis lupus). Our findings suggest that age is broadly associated with gene expression levels, whereas other examined factors have minimal effects on gene expression patterns. Further, our results reveal evolutionarily conserved signatures of senescence, such as immunosenescence and metabolic aging, between wolves and humans despite major differences in life history and environment. The effects of aging on gene expression levels in wolves exhibit conservation with humans, but the more rapid expression differences observed in aging wolves is evolutionarily appropriate given the species’ high level of extrinsic mortality due to intraspecific aggression. Some expression changes that occur with age can facilitate physical age-related changes that may enhance fitness in older wolves. However, the expression of these ancestral patterns of aging in descendant modern dogs living in highly modified domestic environments may be maladaptive and cause disease. This work provides evolutionary insight into aging patterns observed in domestic dogs and demonstrates the applicability of studying natural populations to investigate the mechanisms of aging. PMID:27189566

  7. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics.

  8. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-05-18

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  9. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. RESULTS: Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  10. A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ormestad Mattias

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As whole genome and transcriptome sequencing gets cheaper and faster, a great number of 'exotic' animal models are emerging, rapidly adding valuable data to the ever-expanding Evo-Devo field. All these new organisms serve as a fantastic resource for the research community, but the sheer amount of data, some published, some not, makes detailed comparison of gene expression patterns very difficult to summarize - a problem sometimes even noticeable within a single lab. The need to merge existing data with new information in an organized manner that is publicly available to the research community is now more necessary than ever. Description In order to offer a homogenous way of storing and handling gene expression patterns from a variety of organisms, we have developed the first web-based comparative gene expression database for invertebrates that allows species-specific as well as cross-species gene expression comparisons. The database can be queried by gene name, developmental stage and/or expression domains. Conclusions This database provides a unique tool for the Evo-Devo research community that allows the retrieval, analysis and comparison of gene expression patterns within or among species. In addition, this database enables a quick identification of putative syn-expression groups that can be used to initiate, among other things, gene regulatory network (GRN projects.

  11. Adaptive Evolution of Gene Expression in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammad, Armita; Rambeau, Joachim; Held, Torsten; Kovacova, Viera; Berg, Johannes; Lässig, Michael

    2017-08-08

    Gene expression levels are important quantitative traits that link genotypes to molecular functions and fitness. In Drosophila, population-genetic studies have revealed substantial adaptive evolution at the genomic level, but the evolutionary modes of gene expression remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that adaptation dominates the evolution of gene expression levels in flies. We show that 64% of the observed expression divergence across seven Drosophila species are adaptive changes driven by directional selection. Our results are derived from time-resolved data of gene expression divergence across a family of related species, using a probabilistic inference method for gene-specific selection. Adaptive gene expression is stronger in specific functional classes, including regulation, sensory perception, sexual behavior, and morphology. Moreover, we identify a large group of genes with sex-specific adaptation of expression, which predominantly occurs in males. Our analysis opens an avenue to map system-wide selection on molecular quantitative traits independently of their genetic basis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  13. Gene expression in the aging human brain: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Adith; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Baune, Bernhard T; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2016-03-01

    The review aims to provide a summary of recent developments in the study of gene expression in the aging human brain. Profiling differentially expressed genes or 'transcripts' in the human brain over the course of normal aging has provided valuable insights into the biological pathways that appear activated or suppressed in late life. Genes mediating neuroinflammation and immune system activation in particular, show significant age-related upregulation creating a state of vulnerability to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disease in the aging brain. Cellular ionic dyshomeostasis and age-related decline in a host of molecular influences on synaptic efficacy may underlie neurocognitive decline in later life. Critically, these investigations have also shed light on the mobilization of protective genetic responses within the aging human brain that help determine health and disease trajectories in older age. There is growing interest in the study of pre and posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and the role of noncoding RNAs in particular, as mediators of the phenotypic diversity that characterizes human brain aging. Gene expression studies in healthy brain aging offer an opportunity to unravel the intricately regulated cellular underpinnings of neurocognitive aging as well as disease risk and resiliency in late life. In doing so, new avenues for early intervention in age-related neurodegenerative disease could be investigated with potentially significant implications for the development of disease-modifying therapies.

  14. Dynamic association rules for gene expression data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Chuan; Tsai, Tsung-Hsien; Chung, Cheng-Han; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-10-14

    DAR algorithm not only was able to identify a set of differentially expressed genes that largely agreed with that of other methods, but also provided an efficient and accurate way to find influential genes of a disease. In the paper, the well-established association rule mining technique from marketing has been successfully modified to determine the minimum support and minimum confidence based on the concept of confidence interval and hypothesis testing. It can be applied to gene expression data to mine significant association rules between gene regulation and phenotype. The proposed DAR algorithm provides an efficient way to find influential genes that underlie the phenotypic variance.

  15. Stochastic gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ilka Schultheiß; Pietsch, Jessica Magdalena; Keizer, Emma Mathilde; Greese, Bettina; Balkunde, Rachappa; Fleck, Christian; Hülskamp, Martin

    2017-12-14

    Although plant development is highly reproducible, some stochasticity exists. This developmental stochasticity may be caused by noisy gene expression. Here we analyze the fluctuation of protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the photoconvertible KikGR marker, we show that the protein expressions of individual cells fluctuate over time. A dual reporter system was used to study extrinsic and intrinsic noise of marker gene expression. We report that extrinsic noise is higher than intrinsic noise and that extrinsic noise in stomata is clearly lower in comparison to several other tissues/cell types. Finally, we show that cells are coupled with respect to stochastic protein expression in young leaves, hypocotyls and roots but not in mature leaves. Our data indicate that stochasticity of gene expression can vary between tissues/cell types and that it can be coupled in a non-cell-autonomous manner.

  16. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Berk, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Munkholm K, Vinberg M, Berk M, Kessing LV. State-related alterations of gene expression in bipolar disorder: a systematic review. Bipolar Disord 2012: 14: 684-696. © 2012 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:  Alterations in gene expression in bipolar disorder...... have been found in numerous studies. It is unclear whether such alterations are related to specific mood states. As a biphasic disorder, mood state-related alterations in gene expression have the potential to point to markers of disease activity, and trait-related alterations might indicate...... vulnerability pathways. This review therefore evaluated the evidence for whether gene expression in bipolar disorder is state or trait related. Methods:  A systematic review, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guideline for reporting systematic reviews, based...

  17. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  18. Gene expression variability in human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun Yang

    Full Text Available Interindividual variability in the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (DMETs in human liver may contribute to interindividual differences in drug efficacy and adverse reactions. Published studies that analyzed variability in the expression of DMET genes were limited by sample sizes and the number of genes profiled. We systematically analyzed the expression of 374 DMETs from a microarray data set consisting of gene expression profiles derived from 427 human liver samples. The standard deviation of interindividual expression for DMET genes was much higher than that for non-DMET genes. The 20 DMET genes with the largest variability in the expression provided examples of the interindividual variation. Gene expression data were also analyzed using network analysis methods, which delineates the similarities of biological functionalities and regulation mechanisms for these highly variable DMET genes. Expression variability of human hepatic DMET genes may affect drug-gene interactions and disease susceptibility, with concomitant clinical implications.

  19. Gene expression in periodontal tissues following treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenacher Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In periodontitis, treatment aimed at controlling the periodontal biofilm infection results in a resolution of the clinical and histological signs of inflammation. Although the cell types found in periodontal tissues following treatment have been well described, information on gene expression is limited to few candidate genes. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the expression profiles of immune and inflammatory genes in periodontal tissues from sites with severe chronic periodontitis following periodontal therapy in order to identify genes involved in tissue homeostasis. Gingival biopsies from 12 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were taken six to eight weeks following non-surgical periodontal therapy, and from 11 healthy controls. As internal standard, RNA of an immortalized human keratinocyte line (HaCaT was used. Total RNA was subjected to gene expression profiling using a commercially available microarray system focusing on inflammation-related genes. Post-hoc confirmation of selected genes was done by Realtime-PCR. Results Out of the 136 genes analyzed, the 5% most strongly expressed genes compared to healthy controls were Interleukin-12A (IL-12A, Versican (CSPG-2, Matrixmetalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1, Down syndrome critical region protein-1 (DSCR-1, Macrophage inflammatory protein-2β (Cxcl-3, Inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (BIRC-1, Cluster of differentiation antigen 38 (CD38, Regulator of G-protein signalling-1 (RGS-1, and Finkel-Biskis-Jinkins murine osteosarcoma virus oncogene (C-FOS; the 5% least strongly expressed genes were Receptor-interacting Serine/Threonine Kinase-2 (RIP-2, Complement component 3 (C3, Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (COX-2, Interleukin-8 (IL-8, Endothelin-1 (EDN-1, Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-2 (PAI-2, Matrix-metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14, and Interferon regulating factor-7 (IRF-7. Conclusion Gene expression profiles found in periodontal tissues following

  20. A human model for multigenic inheritance : Phenotypic expression in Hirschsprung disease requires both the RET gene and a new 9q31 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolk, S; Pelet, A; Hofstra, RMW; Angrist, M; Salomon, R; Croaker, D; Buys, CHCM; Lyonnet, S; Chakravarti, A

    2000-01-01

    Reduced penetrance in genetic disorders may be either dependent or independent of the genetic background of gene carriers. Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) demonstrates a complex pattern of inheritance with approximate to 50% of familial cases being heterozygous for mutations in the receptor tyrosine

  1. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanai Itai

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory receptors (ORs are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information.

  2. Gene expression patterns in pancreatic tumors, cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anson W Lowe

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancers of the pancreas originate from both the endocrine and exocrine elements of the organ, and represent a major cause of cancer-related death. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of gene expression for pancreatic tumors, the normal pancreas, and nonneoplastic pancreatic disease.DNA microarrays were used to assess the gene expression for surgically derived pancreatic adenocarcinomas, islet cell tumors, and mesenchymal tumors. The addition of normal pancreata, isolated islets, isolated pancreatic ducts, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines enhanced subsequent analysis by increasing the diversity in gene expression profiles obtained. Exocrine, endocrine, and mesenchymal tumors displayed unique gene expression profiles. Similarities in gene expression support the pancreatic duct as the origin of adenocarcinomas. In addition, genes highly expressed in other cancers and associated with specific signal transduction pathways were also found in pancreatic tumors.The scope of the present work was enhanced by the inclusion of publicly available datasets that encompass a wide spectrum of human tissues and enabled the identification of candidate genes that may serve diagnostic and therapeutic goals.

  3. Regulation of Gene Expression in Protozoa Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Gomez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

  4. Regulation of gene expression in protozoa parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Consuelo; Esther Ramirez, M; Calixto-Galvez, Mercedes; Medel, Olivia; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2010-01-01

    Infections with protozoa parasites are associated with high burdens of morbidity and mortality across the developing world. Despite extensive efforts to control the transmission of these parasites, the spread of populations resistant to drugs and the lack of effective vaccines against them contribute to their persistence as major public health problems. Parasites should perform a strict control on the expression of genes involved in their pathogenicity, differentiation, immune evasion, or drug resistance, and the comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in that control could help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. However, until now these mechanisms are poorly understood in protozoa. Recent investigations into gene expression in protozoa parasites suggest that they possess many of the canonical machineries employed by higher eukaryotes for the control of gene expression at transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and epigenetic levels, but they also contain exclusive mechanisms. Here, we review the current understanding about the regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium sp., Trypanosomatids, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis.

  5. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.; Mallick, B. K.

    2013-01-01

    graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which

  6. Gene Expression and Microarray Investigation of Dendrobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blood glucose > 16.7 mmol/L were used as the model group and treated with Dendrobium mixture. (DEN ... Keywords: Diabetes, Gene expression, Dendrobium mixture, Microarray testing ..... homeostasis in airway smooth muscle. Am J.

  7. Identification of genes showing differential expression profile ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3Department of Natural Sciences, International Christian University, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8585, Japan ... the changes of expression predicted from gene function suggested association ... ate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University.

  8. Drosophila melanogaster gene expression changes after spaceflight.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gene expression levels were determined in 3rd instar and adult Drosophila melanogaster reared during spaceflight to elucidate the genetic and molecular mechanisms...

  9. Exertional Heat Illness and Human Gene Expression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sonna, L.A; Sawka, M. N; Lilly, C. M

    2007-01-01

    Microarray analysis of gene expression at the level of RNA has generated new insights into the relationship between cellular responses to acute heat shock in vitro, exercise, and exertional heat illness...

  10. Expression Profiling of Tyrosine Kinase Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weier, Heinz

    2000-01-01

    ... of these genes parallels the progression of tumors to a more malignant phenotype. We developed a DNA micro-array based screening system to monitor the level of expression of tyrosine kinase (tk...

  11. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  12. Identification of genes preferentially expressed during

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    雨林木风

    2012-08-16

    Aug 16, 2012 ... The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method conducted to generate ... which showed the lack of genomic information currently available for lily. ..... characterization of genes expressed during somatic embryo.

  13. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  14. A compendium of canine normal tissue gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Briggs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our understanding of disease is increasingly informed by changes in gene expression between normal and abnormal tissues. The release of the canine genome sequence in 2005 provided an opportunity to better understand human health and disease using the dog as clinically relevant model. Accordingly, we now present the first genome-wide, canine normal tissue gene expression compendium with corresponding human cross-species analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Affymetrix platform was utilized to catalogue gene expression signatures of 10 normal canine tissues including: liver, kidney, heart, lung, cerebrum, lymph node, spleen, jejunum, pancreas and skeletal muscle. The quality of the database was assessed in several ways. Organ defining gene sets were identified for each tissue and functional enrichment analysis revealed themes consistent with known physio-anatomic functions for each organ. In addition, a comparison of orthologous gene expression between matched canine and human normal tissues uncovered remarkable similarity. To demonstrate the utility of this dataset, novel canine gene annotations were established based on comparative analysis of dog and human tissue selective gene expression and manual curation of canine probeset mapping. Public access, using infrastructure identical to that currently in use for human normal tissues, has been established and allows for additional comparisons across species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data advance our understanding of the canine genome through a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in a diverse set of tissues, contributing to improved functional annotation that has been lacking. Importantly, it will be used to inform future studies of disease in the dog as a model for human translational research and provides a novel resource to the community at large.

  15. Evaluation of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-12-14

    Dec 14, 2011 ... MADS family of TFs control floral organ identity within each whorl of the flower by activating downstream genes. Measuring gene expression in different tissue types and developmental stages is of fundamental importance in TFs functional research. In last few years, quantitative real-time. PCR (qRT-PCR) ...

  16. PRAME gene expression profile in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Vulcani-Freitas

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant tumors of central nervous system in the childhood. The treatment is severe, harmful and, thus, has a dismal prognosis. As PRAME is present in various cancers, including meduloblastoma, and has limited expression in normal tissues, this antigen can be an ideal vaccine target for tumor immunotherapy. In order to find a potential molecular target, we investigated PRAME expression in medulloblastoma fragments and we compare the results with the clinical features of each patient. Analysis of gene expression was performed by real-time quantitative PCR from 37 tumor samples. The Mann-Whitney test was used to analysis the relationship between gene expression and clinical characteristics. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. PRAME was overexpressed in 84% samples. But no statistical association was found between clinical features and PRAME overexpression. Despite that PRAME gene could be a strong candidate for immunotherapy since it is highly expressed in medulloblastomas.

  17. Comparative gene expression between two yeast species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics brings insight into sequence evolution, but even more may be learned by coupling sequence analyses with experimental tests of gene function and regulation. However, the reliability of such comparisons is often limited by biased sampling of expression conditions and incomplete knowledge of gene functions across species. To address these challenges, we previously systematically generated expression profiles in Saccharomyces bayanus to maximize functional coverage as compared to an existing Saccharomyces cerevisiae data repository. Results In this paper, we take advantage of these two data repositories to compare patterns of ortholog expression in a wide variety of conditions. First, we developed a scalable metric for expression divergence that enabled us to detect a significant correlation between sequence and expression conservation on the global level, which previous smaller-scale expression studies failed to detect. Despite this global conservation trend, between-species gene expression neighborhoods were less well-conserved than within-species comparisons across different environmental perturbations, and approximately 4% of orthologs exhibited a significant change in co-expression partners. Furthermore, our analysis of matched perturbations collected in both species (such as diauxic shift and cell cycle synchrony demonstrated that approximately a quarter of orthologs exhibit condition-specific expression pattern differences. Conclusions Taken together, these analyses provide a global view of gene expression patterns between two species, both in terms of the conditions and timing of a gene's expression as well as co-expression partners. Our results provide testable hypotheses that will direct future experiments to determine how these changes may be specified in the genome.

  18. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P

    2012-09-15

    Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Source code under GPL license is available from the author. peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at.

  20. Bayesian assignment of gene ontology terms to gene expression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykacek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Gene expression assays allow for genome scale analyses of molecular biological mechanisms. State-of-the-art data analysis provides lists of involved genes, either by calculating significance levels of mRNA abundance or by Bayesian assessments of gene activity. A common problem of such approaches is the difficulty of interpreting the biological implication of the resulting gene lists. This lead to an increased interest in methods for inferring high-level biological information. A common approach for representing high level information is by inferring gene ontology (GO) terms which may be attributed to the expression data experiment. Results: This article proposes a probabilistic model for GO term inference. Modelling assumes that gene annotations to GO terms are available and gene involvement in an experiment is represented by a posterior probabilities over gene-specific indicator variables. Such probability measures result from many Bayesian approaches for expression data analysis. The proposed model combines these indicator probabilities in a probabilistic fashion and provides a probabilistic GO term assignment as a result. Experiments on synthetic and microarray data suggest that advantages of the proposed probabilistic GO term inference over statistical test-based approaches are in particular evident for sparsely annotated GO terms and in situations of large uncertainty about gene activity. Provided that appropriate annotations exist, the proposed approach is easily applied to inferring other high level assignments like pathways. Availability: Source code under GPL license is available from the author. Contact: peter.sykacek@boku.ac.at PMID:22962488

  1. GSNFS: Gene subnetwork biomarker identification of lung cancer expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doungpan, Narumol; Engchuan, Worrawat; Chan, Jonathan H; Meechai, Asawin

    2016-12-05

    Gene expression has been used to identify disease gene biomarkers, but there are ongoing challenges. Single gene or gene-set biomarkers are inadequate to provide sufficient understanding of complex disease mechanisms and the relationship among those genes. Network-based methods have thus been considered for inferring the interaction within a group of genes to further study the disease mechanism. Recently, the Gene-Network-based Feature Set (GNFS), which is capable of handling case-control and multiclass expression for gene biomarker identification, has been proposed, partly taking into account of network topology. However, its performance relies on a greedy search for building subnetworks and thus requires further improvement. In this work, we establish a new approach named Gene Sub-Network-based Feature Selection (GSNFS) by implementing the GNFS framework with two proposed searching and scoring algorithms, namely gene-set-based (GS) search and parent-node-based (PN) search, to identify subnetworks. An additional dataset is used to validate the results. The two proposed searching algorithms of the GSNFS method for subnetwork expansion are concerned with the degree of connectivity and the scoring scheme for building subnetworks and their topology. For each iteration of expansion, the neighbour genes of a current subnetwork, whose expression data improved the overall subnetwork score, is recruited. While the GS search calculated the subnetwork score using an activity score of a current subnetwork and the gene expression values of its neighbours, the PN search uses the expression value of the corresponding parent of each neighbour gene. Four lung cancer expression datasets were used for subnetwork identification. In addition, using pathway data and protein-protein interaction as network data in order to consider the interaction among significant genes were discussed. Classification was performed to compare the performance of the identified gene subnetworks with three

  2. Reference Gene Screening for Analyzing Gene Expression Across Goat Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2 in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  3. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Andre M.G.F.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies

  4. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Andre M.G.F.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies.

  5. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Min Song

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3, the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA by: i introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs. We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG) has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3), the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA) by: i) introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii) parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii) developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs). We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

  7. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

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    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  8. Effects of dietary inulin and mannan oligosaccharide on immune related genes expression and disease resistance of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Liu, Hong; Dai, Xilin; Li, Jingjing; Ding, Fujiang

    2018-05-01

    The effects of inulin and mannan oligosaccharide (MOS) at different doses (2.5, 4 and 10 mg/g) in singular or combined diet on growth rate, immune related genes expression, and resistance to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Vibrio alginolyticus in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) were investigated. At the end of 28-day singular feeding experiment, the highest values of specific growth rate (SGR) and the expression of toll-like receptor1, 2 and 3 (TLR1, 2, 3), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), crustin, anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) as well as prophenoloxidase (proPO) were observed in shrimp individually fed with 5 mg/g dietary inulin or MOS, respectively. Compared with individual treatments, diet containing combined prebiotics (5 mg/g inulin and MOS) significantly improved the expression of TLRs, STAT, proPO, crustin and ALF in L. vannamei after four-week feeding. Additionally, Pacific white shrimp fed with combined dietary prebiotics showed significantly higher expression of immune related genes and lower cumulative mortality in WSSV and Vibrio alginolyticus challenges, compared to the singular feeding groups and control. These results in the present study demonstrated that the combined supplementation of inulin (5 mg/g) and MOS (5 mg/g) remarkably enhanced innate immune response and pathogen resistance of shrimp, and should be considered as a promising immunostimulatory additive for the culture of Pacific white shrimp. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An ex vivo evaluation of the efficacy of andrographolide in modulating differential expression of transcription factors and target genes in periodontal cells and its potential role in treating periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambili R; Janam, Prasanthila; Saneesh Babu, P S; Prasad, Manu; Vinod, D; Anil Kumar, P R; Kumary, T V; Asha Nair, S; Radhakrishna Pillai, M

    2017-01-20

    Andrographolide is a herbal extract traditionally used in South Asian countries for treating inflammatory diseases. To evaluate the efficacy of andrographolide in management of periodontal disease which is a highly prevalent oral disease. Periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) were cultured from healthy and diseased periodontium using explant culture methods. The safe dose of AG was determined using MTT assay. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) of the most important periodontopathogen, P gingivalis was used to activate NF-κB and STAT3 in PDLF. The efficacy of AG in inhibiting NF-κB and STAT3 was analyzed using immunofluorescence. Down regulation of expression of target genes of these transcription factors related to inflammation and bone resorption were analyzed using real time PCR. AG up to the concentration of 25μM was found to be safe as determined by MTT assay. Statistically significant activation of NF-κB and STAT3 in cultured PDLF was observed in diseased group compared to healthy controls before and after LPS challenge. 5μM AG pretreatment significantly inhibited activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and down regulated expression of inflammatory and bone resorptive genes in cultured PDLF. The findings of the present study propose the adjunctive use of a novel herbal drug andrographolide as a promising host modulation agent for periodontal therapy by inhibiting NF-κB and STAT3 activation and inhibition of inflammation and bone resorption related genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  11. Gene Expression Signature in Endemic Osteoarthritis by Microarray Analysis

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    Xi Wang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck Disease (KBD is an endemic osteochondropathy with an unknown pathogenesis. Diagnosis of KBD is effective only in advanced cases, which eliminates the possibility of early treatment and leads to an inevitable exacerbation of symptoms. Therefore, we aim to identify an accurate blood-based gene signature for the detection of KBD. Previously published gene expression profile data on cartilage and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from adults with KBD were compared to select potential target genes. Microarray analysis was conducted to evaluate the expression of the target genes in a cohort of 100 KBD patients and 100 healthy controls. A gene expression signature was identified using a training set, which was subsequently validated using an independent test set with a minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR algorithm and support vector machine (SVM algorithm. Fifty unique genes were differentially expressed between KBD patients and healthy controls. A 20-gene signature was identified that distinguished between KBD patients and controls with 90% accuracy, 85% sensitivity, and 95% specificity. This study identified a 20-gene signature that accurately distinguishes between patients with KBD and controls using peripheral blood samples. These results promote the further development of blood-based genetic biomarkers for detection of KBD.

  12. Caffeine exposure alters cardiac gene expression in embryonic cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiefan; Mei, Wenbin; Barbazuk, William B.; Rivkees, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in utero caffeine treatment at embryonic day (E) 8.5 alters DNA methylation patterns, gene expression, and cardiac function in adult mice. To provide insight into the mechanisms, we examined cardiac gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression in cardiomyocytes shortly after exposure to physiologically relevant doses of caffeine. In HL-1 and primary embryonic cardiomyocytes, caffeine treatment for 48 h significantly altered the expression of cardiac structural genes (Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b, Tnni3), hormonal genes (Anp and BnP), cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2c, Mef2d, Nfatc1), and microRNAs (miRNAs; miR208a, miR208b, miR499). In addition, expressions of these genes were significantly altered in embryonic hearts exposed to in utero caffeine. For in utero experiments, pregnant CD-1 dams were treated with 20–60 mg/kg of caffeine, which resulted in maternal circulation levels of 37.3–65.3 μM 2 h after treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on embryonic ventricles treated with vehicle or 20 mg/kg of caffeine daily from E6.5-9.5. Differential expression (DE) analysis revealed that 124 genes and 849 transcripts were significantly altered, and differential exon usage (DEU) analysis identified 597 exons that were changed in response to prenatal caffeine exposure. Among the DE genes identified by RNA sequencing were several cardiac structural genes and genes that control DNA methylation and histone modification. Pathway analysis revealed that pathways related to cardiovascular development and diseases were significantly affected by caffeine. In addition, global cardiac DNA methylation was reduced in caffeine-treated cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data demonstrate that caffeine exposure alters gene expression and DNA methylation in embryonic cardiomyocytes. PMID:25354728

  13. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression.

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    Hunter B Fraser

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or "noise." Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  14. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-15

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  15. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Hirsh, Aaron E.; Giaever, Guri; Kumm, Jochen; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or noise. Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection

  16. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal Çalışkan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhinovirus (RV is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs, namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5 and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3. The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  17. Host genetic variation influences gene expression response to rhinovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, Minal; Baker, Samuel W; Gilad, Yoav; Ober, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Rhinovirus (RV) is the most prevalent human respiratory virus and is responsible for at least half of all common colds. RV infections may result in a broad spectrum of effects that range from asymptomatic infections to severe lower respiratory illnesses. The basis for inter-individual variation in the response to RV infection is not well understood. In this study, we explored whether host genetic variation is associated with variation in gene expression response to RV infections between individuals. To do so, we obtained genome-wide genotype and gene expression data in uninfected and RV-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 98 individuals. We mapped local and distant genetic variation that is associated with inter-individual differences in gene expression levels (eQTLs) in both uninfected and RV-infected cells. We focused specifically on response eQTLs (reQTLs), namely, genetic associations with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV infection. We identified local reQTLs for 38 genes, including genes with known functions in viral response (UBA7, OAS1, IRF5) and genes that have been associated with immune and RV-related diseases (e.g., ITGA2, MSR1, GSTM3). The putative regulatory regions of genes with reQTLs were enriched for binding sites of virus-activated STAT2, highlighting the role of condition-specific transcription factors in genotype-by-environment interactions. Overall, we suggest that the 38 loci associated with inter-individual variation in gene expression response to RV-infection represent promising candidates for affecting immune and RV-related respiratory diseases.

  18. A hybrid approach of gene sets and single genes for the prediction of survival risks with gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Davis, Ronald W; Xiao, Wenzhong

    2015-01-01

    Accumulated biological knowledge is often encoded as gene sets, collections of genes associated with similar biological functions or pathways. The use of gene sets in the analyses of high-throughput gene expression data has been intensively studied and applied in clinical research. However, the main interest remains in finding modules of biological knowledge, or corresponding gene sets, significantly associated with disease conditions. Risk prediction from censored survival times using gene sets hasn't been well studied. In this work, we propose a hybrid method that uses both single gene and gene set information together to predict patient survival risks from gene expression profiles. In the proposed method, gene sets provide context-level information that is poorly reflected by single genes. Complementarily, single genes help to supplement incomplete information of gene sets due to our imperfect biomedical knowledge. Through the tests over multiple data sets of cancer and trauma injury, the proposed method showed robust and improved performance compared with the conventional approaches with only single genes or gene sets solely. Additionally, we examined the prediction result in the trauma injury data, and showed that the modules of biological knowledge used in the prediction by the proposed method were highly interpretable in biology. A wide range of survival prediction problems in clinical genomics is expected to benefit from the use of biological knowledge.

  19. Gene expression in the tanoak-Phytophthora ramorum interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; Hardeep Fai; Brian Knaus; Richard Cronn; Jessica W. Wright

    2012-01-01

    Disease processes are dynamic, involving a suite of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen, all within a single tissue. As such, they lend themselves well to transcriptomic analysis. Here we focus on a generalist invasive pathogen (Phytophthora ramorum) and its most susceptible California Floristic Province native host, tanoak (...

  20. Hericium caput-medusae (Bull.:Fr.) Pers. polysaccharide enhance innate immune response, immune-related genes expression and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Changlong; Wang, Jiazhen; Wang, Yuqiong; Dong, Wenlong; Shan, Xiaofeng; Lou, Yujie; Gao, Yunhang

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to add 0, 400, 800 or 1200 mg/kg of Hericium caput-medusae polysaccharide (HCMP) to the basal diet of grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and determine effects on humoral innate immunity, expression of immune-related genes and disease resistance. Adding HCMP enhanced (P < 0.05) bactericidal activity at 1, 2 and 3 weeks and also lysozyme activity, complement C3, and SOD activity at 2 and 3 weeks. Supplementing 800 or 1200 mg/kg of HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks increased (P < 0.05) serum concentrations of total protein, albumin and globulin. Two immune-related genes (IL-1β and TNF-α) were up-regulated (P < 0.05) in HCMP supplemented groups given 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP after 2 and 3 weeks of feeding. Expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was down-regulated (P < 0.05) after receiving 800 or 1200 mg/kg HCMP for 2 or 3 weeks. Fish fed 800 mg/kg HCMP had maximal disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila (65.4%). In conclusion, HCMP enhanced immune response and expression of immune-related genes and increased disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila in grass carp, with greatest effects in fish given 800 mg/kg HCMP for 3 weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene regulatory networks elucidating huanglongbing disease mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Martinelli

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas, especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein - protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation, sucrose metabolism (upregulation, and starch biosynthesis (upregulation. In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70 was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur.

  2. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  3. Quantitative Expression Analysis of APP Pathway and Tau Phosphorylation-Related Genes in the ICV STZ-Induced Non-Human Primate Model of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Je Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins in the brain, such as amyloid-β (Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau, is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Previously, we developed and validated a novel non-human primate model for sporadic AD (sAD research using intracerebroventricular administration of streptozotocin (icv STZ. To date, no characterization of AD-related genes in different brain regions has been performed. Therefore, in the current study, the expression of seven amyloid precursor protein (APP pathway-related and five tau phosphorylation-related genes was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR experiments, using two matched-pair brain samples from control and icv STZ-treated cynomolgus monkeys. The genes showed similar expression patterns within the control and icv STZ-treated groups; however, marked differences in gene expression patterns were observed between the control and icv STZ-treated groups. Remarkably, other than β-secretase (BACE1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5, all the genes tested showed similar expression patterns in AD models compared to controls, with increased levels in the precuneus and occipital cortex. However, significant changes in gene expression patterns were not detected in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, or posterior cingulate. Based on these results, we conclude that APP may be cleaved via the general metabolic mechanisms of increased α- and γ-secretase levels, and that hyperphosphorylation of tau could be mediated by elevated levels of tau protein kinase, specifically in the precuneus and occipital cortex.

  4. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  5. Expression Study of Banana Pathogenic Resistance Genes

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    Fenny M. Dwivany

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Banana is one of the world's most important trade commodities. However, infection of banana pathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum race 4 is one of the major causes of decreasing production in Indonesia. Genetic engineering has become an alternative way to control this problem by isolating genes that involved in plant defense mechanism against pathogens. Two of the important genes are API5 and ChiI1, each gene encodes apoptosis inhibitory protein and chitinase enzymes. The purpose of this study was to study the expression of API5 and ChiI1 genes as candidate pathogenic resistance genes. The amplified fragments were then cloned, sequenced, and confirmed with in silico studies. Based on sequence analysis, it is showed that partial API5 gene has putative transactivation domain and ChiI1 has 9 chitinase family GH19 protein motifs. Data obtained from this study will contribute in banana genetic improvement.

  6. Dlx homeobox gene family expression in osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lézot, F; Thomas, B L; Blin-Wakkach, C; Castaneda, B; Bolanos, A; Hotton, D; Sharpe, P T; Heymann, D; Carles, G F; Grigoriadis, A E; Berdal, A

    2010-06-01

    Skeletal growth and homeostasis require the finely orchestrated secretion of mineralized tissue matrices by highly specialized cells, balanced with their degradation by osteoclasts. Time- and site-specific expression of Dlx and Msx homeobox genes in the cells secreting these matrices have been identified as important elements in the regulation of skeletal morphology. Such specific expression patterns have also been reported in osteoclasts for Msx genes. The aim of the present study was to establish the expression patterns of Dlx genes in osteoclasts and identify their function in regulating skeletal morphology. The expression patterns of all Dlx genes were examined during the whole osteoclastogenesis using different in vitro models. The results revealed that Dlx1 and Dlx2 are the only Dlx family members with a possible function in osteoclastogenesis as well as in mature osteoclasts. Dlx5 and Dlx6 were detected in the cultures but appear to be markers of monocytes and their derivatives. In vivo, Dlx2 expression in osteoclasts was examined using a Dlx2/LacZ transgenic mouse. Dlx2 is expressed in a subpopulation of osteoclasts in association with tooth, brain, nerve, and bone marrow volumetric growths. Altogether the present data suggest a role for Dlx2 in regulation of skeletal morphogenesis via functions within osteoclasts. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Norrie disease gene is distinct from the monoamine oxidase genes

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, Katherine B.; Ozelius, Laurie; Corey, Timothy; Rinehart, William B.; Liberfarb, Ruth; Haines, Jonathan; Chen, Wei Jane; Norio, Reijo; Sankila, Eeva; de la Chapelle, Albert; Murphy, Dennis L.; Gusella, James; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1989-01-01

    The genes for MAO-A and MAO-B appear to be very close to the Norrie disease gene, on the basis of loss and /or disruption of the MAO genes and activities in atypical Norrie disease patients deleted for the DXS7 locus; linkage among the MAO genes, the Norrie disease gene, and the DXS7 locus; and mapping of all these loci to the chromosomal region Xp11. The present study provides evidence that the MAO genes are not disrupted in “classic” Norrie disease patients. Genomic DNA from these “nondelet...

  8. Analysis of meniscal degeneration and meniscal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton James H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menisci play a vital role in load transmission, shock absorption and joint stability. There is increasing evidence suggesting that OA menisci may not merely be bystanders in the disease process of OA. This study sought: 1 to determine the prevalence of meniscal degeneration in OA patients, and 2 to examine gene expression in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Methods Studies were approved by our human subjects Institutional Review Board. Menisci and articular cartilage were collected during joint replacement surgery for OA patients and lower limb amputation surgery for osteosarcoma patients (normal control specimens, and graded. Meniscal cells were prepared from these meniscal tissues and expanded in monolayer culture. Differential gene expression in OA meniscal cells and normal meniscal cells was examined using Affymetrix microarray and real time RT-PCR. Results The grades of meniscal degeneration correlated with the grades of articular cartilage degeneration (r = 0.672; P HLA-DPA1, integrin, beta 2 (ITGB2, ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1, ankylosis, progressive homolog (ANKH and fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7, were expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells compared to normal meniscal cells. Importantly, many of the genes that have been shown to be differentially expressed in other OA cell types/tissues, including ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 5 (ADAMTS5 and prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES, were found to be expressed at significantly higher levels in OA meniscal cells. This consistency suggests that many of the genes detected in our study are disease-specific. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OA is a whole joint disease. Meniscal cells may play an active role in the development of OA. Investigation of the gene expression profiles of OA meniscal cells may reveal new therapeutic targets for OA therapy and also may uncover novel

  9. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, R

    1986-01-01

    A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these DNA segments bind to a common, apparently limiting, transacting factor. Conventional techniques (Bal deletions, site directed mutagenesis, etc.) have been used to precisely identify the DNA sequences responsible for these effects. The emerging picture is complex: they have identified multiple, separate transcriptional signals, essential for maximal promoter activation and tissue specific expression. Some of these signals show a negative effect on transcription in fibroblast cell lines.

  10. Aging and gene expression in the primate brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter B Fraser

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that gene expression levels in many organisms change during the aging process, and the advent of DNA microarrays has allowed genome-wide patterns of transcriptional changes associated with aging to be studied in both model organisms and various human tissues. Understanding the effects of aging on gene expression in the human brain is of particular interest, because of its relation to both normal and pathological neurodegeneration. Here we show that human cerebral cortex, human cerebellum, and chimpanzee cortex each undergo different patterns of age-related gene expression alterations. In humans, many more genes undergo consistent expression changes in the cortex than in the cerebellum; in chimpanzees, many genes change expression with age in cortex, but the pattern of changes in expression bears almost no resemblance to that of human cortex. These results demonstrate the diversity of aging patterns present within the human brain, as well as how rapidly genome-wide patterns of aging can evolve between species; they may also have implications for the oxidative free radical theory of aging, and help to improve our understanding of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Aging and Gene Expression in the Primate Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, Hunter B.; Khaitovich, Philipp; Plotkin, Joshua B.; Paabo, Svante; Eisen, Michael B.

    2005-02-18

    It is well established that gene expression levels in many organisms change during the aging process, and the advent of DNA microarrays has allowed genome-wide patterns of transcriptional changes associated with aging to be studied in both model organisms and various human tissues. Understanding the effects of aging on gene expression in the human brain is of particular interest, because of its relation to both normal and pathological neurodegeneration. Here we show that human cerebral cortex, human cerebellum, and chimpanzee cortex each undergo different patterns of age-related gene expression alterations. In humans, many more genes undergo consistent expression changes in the cortex than in the cerebellum; in chimpanzees, many genes change expression with age in cortex, but the pattern of changes in expression bears almost no resemblance to that of human cortex. These results demonstrate the diversity of aging patterns present within the human brain, as well as how rapidly genome-wide patterns of aging can evolve between species; they may also have implications for the oxidative free radical theory of aging, and help to improve our understanding of human neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... caused down-regulation of structural proteins e.g. sarcospan and catalytic enzymes. Injection of DNA induced down-regulation of intracellular transport proteins e.g. sentrin. The effects on muscle fibres were transient as the expression profiles 3 weeks after treatment were closely related......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  13. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - a fully automated, miniaturized instrument for measuring gene expression in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio; Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kianoosh

    2012-07-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecrafts opens the doors to a large number of experiments on the influence of space environment on biological systems that will profoundly impact our ability to conduct safe and effective space travel, and might also shed light on terrestrial physiology or biological function and human disease and aging processes. Measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, determine metabolic basis of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance, test our ability to sustain and grow in space organisms that can be used for life support and in situ resource utilization during long-duration space exploration, and monitor both the spacecraft environment and crew health. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology and medicine. Accordingly, supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measuring microbial expression of thousands of genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing bacterial cell walls, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing it on a microarray and (4) providing electrochemical readout, all in a microfluidics cartridge. The prototype under development is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by the NASA Small Spacecraft Office. The first target application is to cultivate and measure gene expression of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, i.e. a cyanobacterium known to exhibit remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions

  14. Quantitative analysis of protein and gene expression in salivary glands of Sjogren's-like disease NOD mice treated by bone marrow soup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Misuno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cell extract (termed as BM Soup has been demonstrated to repair irradiated salivary glands (SGs and restore saliva secretion in our previous study. In the present study, we aim to investigate if the function of damaged SGs in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice can be restored by BM Soup treatment and the molecular alterations associated with the treatment. METHODS: Whole BM cells were lysed and soluble intracellular contents ("BM Soup" were injected I.V. into NOD mice. Tandem mass tagging with 2-D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify proteins in the submandibular glands (SMGs between untreated and BM Soup-treated mice. Quantitative PCR was used to identify genes with altered expression in the treated mice. RESULTS BM SOUP: restored salivary flow rates to normal levels and significantly reduced the focus scores of SMGs in NOD mice. More than 1800 proteins in SMG cells were quantified by the proteomic approach. Many SMG proteins involved in inflammation and apoptosis were found to be down-regulated whereas those involved in salivary gland biology and development/regeneration were up-regulated in the BM Soup-treated mice. qPCR analysis also revealed expression changes of growth factors and cytokines in the SMGs of the treated NOD mice. CONCLUSION: BM Soup treatment is effective to restore the function of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Through gene/protein expression analysis, we have found that BM Soup treatment might effectuate via inhibiting apoptosis, focal adhesion and inflammation whereas promoting development, regeneration and differentiation of the SG cells in NOD mice. These findings provide important insights on the potential mechanisms underlying the BM Soup treatment for functional restoration of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Additional studies are needed to further confirm the identified target genes and their related signaling pathways that are responsible for the BM Soup treatment.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Protein and Gene Expression in Salivary Glands of Sjogren’s-Like Disease NOD Mice Treated by Bone Marrow Soup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misuno, Kaori; Khalili, Saeed; Huang, Junwei; Liu, Younan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bone marrow cell extract (termed as BM Soup) has been demonstrated to repair irradiated salivary glands (SGs) and restore saliva secretion in our previous study. In the present study, we aim to investigate if the function of damaged SGs in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be restored by BM Soup treatment and the molecular alterations associated with the treatment. Methods Whole BM cells were lysed and soluble intracellular contents (“BM Soup”) were injected I.V. into NOD mice. Tandem mass tagging with 2-D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify proteins in the submandibular glands (SMGs) between untreated and BM Soup-treated mice. Quantitative PCR was used to identify genes with altered expression in the treated mice. Results BM Soup restored salivary flow rates to normal levels and significantly reduced the focus scores of SMGs in NOD mice. More than 1800 proteins in SMG cells were quantified by the proteomic approach. Many SMG proteins involved in inflammation and apoptosis were found to be down-regulated whereas those involved in salivary gland biology and development/regeneration were up-regulated in the BM Soup-treated mice. qPCR analysis also revealed expression changes of growth factors and cytokines in the SMGs of the treated NOD mice. Conclusion BM Soup treatment is effective to restore the function of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Through gene/protein expression analysis, we have found that BM Soup treatment might effectuate via inhibiting apoptosis, focal adhesion and inflammation whereas promoting development, regeneration and differentiation of the SG cells in NOD mice. These findings provide important insights on the potential mechanisms underlying the BM Soup treatment for functional restoration of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Additional studies are needed to further confirm the identified target genes and their related signaling pathways that are responsible for the BM Soup treatment. PMID:24489858

  16. Quantitative analysis of protein and gene expression in salivary glands of Sjogren's-like disease NOD mice treated by bone marrow soup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misuno, Kaori; Tran, Simon D; Khalili, Saeed; Huang, Junwei; Liu, Younan; Hu, Shen

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow cell extract (termed as BM Soup) has been demonstrated to repair irradiated salivary glands (SGs) and restore saliva secretion in our previous study. In the present study, we aim to investigate if the function of damaged SGs in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be restored by BM Soup treatment and the molecular alterations associated with the treatment. Whole BM cells were lysed and soluble intracellular contents ("BM Soup") were injected I.V. into NOD mice. Tandem mass tagging with 2-D liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify proteins in the submandibular glands (SMGs) between untreated and BM Soup-treated mice. Quantitative PCR was used to identify genes with altered expression in the treated mice. restored salivary flow rates to normal levels and significantly reduced the focus scores of SMGs in NOD mice. More than 1800 proteins in SMG cells were quantified by the proteomic approach. Many SMG proteins involved in inflammation and apoptosis were found to be down-regulated whereas those involved in salivary gland biology and development/regeneration were up-regulated in the BM Soup-treated mice. qPCR analysis also revealed expression changes of growth factors and cytokines in the SMGs of the treated NOD mice. BM Soup treatment is effective to restore the function of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Through gene/protein expression analysis, we have found that BM Soup treatment might effectuate via inhibiting apoptosis, focal adhesion and inflammation whereas promoting development, regeneration and differentiation of the SG cells in NOD mice. These findings provide important insights on the potential mechanisms underlying the BM Soup treatment for functional restoration of damaged SGs in NOD mice. Additional studies are needed to further confirm the identified target genes and their related signaling pathways that are responsible for the BM Soup treatment.

  17. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages) seed coats (globular and torpedo stages) and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages) and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST) (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011) were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152) had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid clones that comprise

  18. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  19. Disease duration and age influence CARD15 expression in Crohn’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Poniewierka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the susceptibility genes in Crohn’s disease (CD is CARD15. Our study examined the relationship between peripheral CARD15 expression and phenotype and duration of CD, treatment methods and inflammatory indices. Sixty patients with CD and 30 healthy volunteers as controls were enrolled in the study. Total RNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with E.Z.N.A. Total RNA Kit (Omega Bio-tek then quantitative real-time PCR was performed on the ABI Prism 7900 HT Real-Time PCR System. CARD15 gene expression in PBMCs in CD was significantly higher than in the control group. The highest level of gene expression was found in CD patients in the fourth decade of life. The mRNA level of the CARD15 gene was higher in patients with disease duration between 12 and 60 months. A positive correlation was found between erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and gene expression level. Gene expression increased with increasing level of C-reactive protein and ESR, but it was not statistically significant. CARD15 expression significantly decreased in CD patients treated with anti-TNFα agents compared to azathioprine or steroid treatment groups. Expression of the CARD15 gene in Crohn›s disease is higher than in healthy individuals. Disease duration and age of patients seem to be the most important factors influencing CARD15 expression.

  20. Lithium ions induce prestalk-associated gene expression and inhibit prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorien J.M.; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Spek, Wouter; Schaap, Pauline

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Li+ on two types of cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression and on basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) levels. Li+ effectively inhibits cyclic AMP-induced prespore gene expression, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 2mM-LiCl.

  1. Scaling of gene expression data allowing the comparison of different gene expression platforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ruissen, Fred; Schaaf, Gerben J.; Kool, Marcel; Baas, Frank; Ruijter, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) and microarrays have found a widespread application, but much ambiguity exists regarding the amalgamation of the data resulting from these technologies. Cross-platform utilization of gene expression data from the SAGE and microarray technology could reduce

  2. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  3. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae, juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately. Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis.

  4. The Guinea Pig as a Model for Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease (AD): The Impact of Cholesterol Intake on Expression of AD-Related Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Daniel; Wijaya, Linda; Laws, Simon M.; Taddei, Kevin; Newman, Morgan; Lardelli, Michael; Martins, Ralph N.; Verdile, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the guinea pig, Cavia porcellus, as a model for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), both in terms of the conservation of genes involved in AD and the regulatory responses of these to a known AD risk factor - high cholesterol intake. Unlike rats and mice, guinea pigs possess an Aβ peptide sequence identical to human Aβ. Consistent with the commonality between cardiovascular and AD risk factors in humans, we saw that a high cholesterol diet leads to up-regulation of BACE1 (β-secretase) transcription and down-regulation of ADAM10 (α-secretase) transcription which should increase release of Aβ from APP. Significantly, guinea pigs possess isoforms of AD-related genes found in humans but not present in mice or rats. For example, we discovered that the truncated PS2V isoform of human PSEN2, that is found at raised levels in AD brains and that increases γ-secretase activity and Aβ synthesis, is not uniquely human or aberrant as previously believed. We show that PS2V formation is up-regulated by hypoxia and a high-cholesterol diet while, consistent with observations in humans, Aβ concentrations are raised in some brain regions but not others. Also like humans, but unlike mice, the guinea pig gene encoding tau, MAPT, encodes isoforms with both three and four microtubule binding domains, and cholesterol alters the ratio of these isoforms. We conclude that AD-related genes are highly conserved and more similar to human than the rat or mouse. Guinea pigs represent a superior rodent model for analysis of the impact of dietary factors such as cholesterol on the regulation of AD-related genes. PMID:23805206

  5. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gen...

  6. Prolonged Expression of Secreted Enzymes in Dogs After Liver-Directed Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons: Implications for Non-Viral Gene Therapy of Systemic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Hyland, Kendra A; Hall, Bryan C; Bell, Jason B; Olson, Erik R; Rusten, Myra Urness; Hunter, David W; Ellinwood, N Matthew; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2017-07-01

    The non-viral, integrating Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is efficient in treating systemic monogenic disease in mice, including hemophilia A and B caused by deficiency of blood clotting factors and mucopolysaccharidosis types I and VII caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and β-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency, respectively. Modified approaches of the hydrodynamics-based procedure to deliver transposons to the liver in dogs were recently reported. Using the transgenic canine reporter secreted alkaline phosphatase (cSEAP), transgenic protein in the plasma was demonstrated for up to 6 weeks post infusion. This study reports that immunosuppression of dogs with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) prolonged the presence of cSEAP in the circulation up to 5.5 months after a single vector infusion. Transgene expression declined gradually but appeared to stabilize after about 2 months at approximately fourfold baseline level. Durability of transgenic protein expression in the plasma was inversely associated with transient increase of liver enzymes alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in response to the plasmid delivery procedure, which suggests a deleterious effect of hepatocellular toxicity on transgene expression. GdCl 3 treatment was ineffective for repeat vector infusions. In parallel studies, dogs were infused with potentially therapeutic transposons. Activities of transgenic IDUA and GUSB in plasma peaked at 50-350% of wildtype, but in the absence of immunosuppression lasted only a few days. Transposition was detectable by excision assay only when the most efficient transposase, SB100X, was used. Dogs infused with transposons encoding canine clotting factor IX (cFIX) were treated with GdCl 3 and showed expression profiles similar to those in cSEAP-infused dogs, with expression peaking at 40% wt (2 μg/mL). It is concluded that GdCl 3 can support extended transgene expression after hydrodynamic introduction of SB transposons in dogs, but that alternative

  7. Metallothionein gene expression in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Metallothioneins (MTs are a group of low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich proteins. In general, MT is known to modulate three fundamental processes: (1 the release of gaseous mediators such as hydroxyl radical or nitric oxide, (2 apoptosis and (3 the binding and exchange of heavy metals such as zinc, cadmium or copper. Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between the expression of MT with invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis in various cancers. Most of the previous studies primarily used immunohistochemistry to analyze localization of MT in renal cell carcinoma (RCC. No information is available on the gene expression of MT2A isoform in different types and grades of RCC. Materials and Methods: In the present study, total RNA was isolated from 38 histopathologically confirmed cases of RCC of different types and grades. Corresponding adjacent normal renal parenchyma was taken as control. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR analysis was done for the MT2A gene expression using b-actin as an internal control. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS software. Results: The MT2A gene expression was found to be significantly increased (P < 0.01 in clear cell RCC in comparison with the adjacent normal renal parenchyma. The expression of MT2A was two to three-fold higher in sarcomatoid RCC, whereas there was no change in papillary and collecting duct RCC. MT2A gene expression was significantly higher in lower grade (grades I and II, P < 0.05, while no change was observed in high-grade tumor (grade III and IV in comparison to adjacent normal renal tissue. Conclusion: The first report of the expression of MT2A in different types and grades of RCC and also these data further support the role of MT2A in tumorigenesis.

  8. Analysis of baseline gene expression levels from ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of gene expression profiling to predict chemical mode of action would be enhanced by better characterization of variance due to individual, environmental, and technical factors. Meta-analysis of microarray data from untreated or vehicle-treated animals within the control arm of toxicogenomics studies has yielded useful information on baseline fluctuations in gene expression. A dataset of control animal microarray expression data was assembled by a working group of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute's Technical Committee on the Application of Genomics in Mechanism Based Risk Assessment in order to provide a public resource for assessments of variability in baseline gene expression. Data from over 500 Affymetrix microarrays from control rat liver and kidney were collected from 16 different institutions. Thirty-five biological and technical factors were obtained for each animal, describing a wide range of study characteristics, and a subset were evaluated in detail for their contribution to total variability using multivariate statistical and graphical techniques. The study factors that emerged as key sources of variability included gender, organ section, strain, and fasting state. These and other study factors were identified as key descriptors that should be included in the minimal information about a toxicogenomics study needed for interpretation of results by an independent source. Genes that are the most and least variable, gender-selectiv

  9. Gene expression of the endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Morten; Martin-Bertelsen, Tomas; Friis-Hansen, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    that the endolymphatic sac has multiple and diverse functions in the inner ear. Objectives:The objective of this study was to provide a comprehensive review of the genes expressed in the endolymphatic sac in the rat and perform a functional characterization based on measured mRNA abundance. Methods:Microarray technology...

  10. Gene expression in early stage cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biewenga, Petra; Buist, Marrije R.; Moerland, Perry D.; van Thernaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van Kampen, Antoine H. C.; ten Kate, Fiebo J. W.; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Pelvic lymph node metastases are the main prognostic factor for survival in early stage cervical cancer, yet accurate detection methods before surgery are lacking. In this study, we examined whether gene expression profiling can predict the presence of lymph node metastasis in early stage

  11. Shrinkage Approach for Gene Expression Data Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haman, Jiří; Valenta, Zdeněk; Kalina, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 65-65 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : shrinkage estimation * covariance matrix * high dimensional data * gene expression Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  12. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Zachary P.; Crew, Rebecca M.; Brandt, Kevin S.; Ullmann, Amy J.; Schriefer, Martin E.; Molins, Claudia R.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing. PMID:26376927

  13. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Zachary P; Crew, Rebecca M; Brandt, Kevin S; Ullmann, Amy J; Schriefer, Martin E; Molins, Claudia R; Gilmore, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Dissection of regulatory networks that are altered in disease via differential co-expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Amar

    Full Text Available Comparing the gene-expression profiles of sick and healthy individuals can help in understanding disease. Such differential expression analysis is a well-established way to find gene sets whose expression is altered in the disease. Recent approaches to gene-expression analysis go a step further and seek differential co-expression patterns, wherein the level of co-expression of a set of genes differs markedly between disease and control samples. Such patterns can arise from a disease-related change in the regulatory mechanism governing that set of genes, and pinpoint dysfunctional regulatory networks. Here we present DICER, a new method for detecting differentially co-expressed gene sets using a novel probabilistic score for differential correlation. DICER goes beyond standard differential co-expression and detects pairs of modules showing differential co-expression. The expression profiles of genes within each module of the pair are correlated across all samples. The correlation between the two modules, however, differs markedly between the disease and normal samples. We show that DICER outperforms the state of the art in terms of significance and interpretability of the detected gene sets. Moreover, the gene sets discovered by DICER manifest regulation by disease-specific microRNA families. In a case study on Alzheimer's disease, DICER dissected biological processes and protein complexes into functional subunits that are differentially co-expressed, thereby revealing inner structures in disease regulatory networks.

  15. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  16. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  17. Comparative gene expression of intestinal metabolizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Chul; Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo-Min; Lee, Dong-Goo; Abd El-Aty, A M; Kim, Jin-Suk; Sun, Duxin; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the expression profiles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the intestine of mouse, rat and human. Total RNA was isolated from the duodenum and the mRNA expression was measured using Affymetrix GeneChip oligonucleotide arrays. Detected genes from the intestine of mouse, rat and human were ca. 60% of 22690 sequences, 40% of 8739 and 47% of 12559, respectively. Total genes of metabolizing enzymes subjected in this study were 95, 33 and 68 genes in mouse, rat and human, respectively. Of phase I enzymes, the mouse exhibited abundant gene expressions for Cyp3a25, Cyp4v3, Cyp2d26, followed by Cyp2b20, Cyp2c65 and Cyp4f14, whereas, the rat showed higher expression profiles of Cyp3a9, Cyp2b19, Cyp4f1, Cyp17a1, Cyp2d18, Cyp27a1 and Cyp4f6. However, the highly expressed P450 enzymes were CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP4F3, CYP2C18, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A7, CYP11B1 and CYP2B6 in the human. For phase II enzymes, glucuronosyltransferase Ugt1a6, glutathione S-transferases Gstp1, Gstm3 and Gsta2, sulfotransferase Sult1b1 and acyltransferase Dgat1 were highly expressed in the mouse. The rat revealed predominant expression of glucuronosyltransferases Ugt1a1 and Ugt1a7, sulfotransferase Sult1b1, acetyltransferase Dlat and acyltransferase Dgat1. On the other hand, in human, glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, glutathione S-transferases MGST3, GSTP1, GSTA2 and GSTM4, sulfotransferases ST1A3 and SULT1A2, acetyltransferases SAT1 and CRAT, and acyltransferase AGPAT2 were dominantly detected. Therefore, current data indicated substantial interspecies differences in the pattern of intestinal gene expression both for P450 enzymes and phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. This genomic database is expected to improve our understanding of interspecies variations in estimating intestinal prehepatic clearance of oral drugs.

  18. Decreased expression of the APOA1–APOC3–APOA4 gene cluster is associated with risk of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Q

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiao Lin,1 Yunpeng Cao,2 Jie Gao3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Fourth Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, 2Neural Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Anatomy, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Background: Apolipoprotein is genetically associated with the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 genes are closely linked and located on human chromosome 11. Therefore, this gene cluster may be related to the risk of AD.Patients and methods: A total of 147 AD patients and 160 healthy controls were randomly recruited from June 2013 to August 2014. APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 levels were measured using real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results: APOA1, APOC3 and APOA4 levels were significantly lower in AD patients than controls (P<0.01. APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 levels were negatively related with the severities of AD determined by Clinical Dementia Rating scores (P<0.01. APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 levels showed a negative relation with Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores and a positive relation with RAND 36-item health-survey scores (P<0.01. There was a decreased trend for levels of APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 in AD patients.Conclusion: Low levels of APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 are associated with risk of AD. APOA1, APOC3, and APOA4 should be developed as combined drugs for the therapy of AD. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, APOA1–APOC3–APOA4 gene cluster, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, RAND 36-item health survey, real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR

  19. Prokaryotic Expression of Truncate F Protein Gene of Newcastle Disease Virus%截短NDV F蛋白的原核表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰; 王宇鹏; 刘振格; 杨鸣发; 林红丽; 田斌; 侯喜林

    2013-01-01

    根据NDV LaSota株F基因已知的抗原表位,对F蛋白进行分段表达。应用RT-PCR方法分段扩增F基因,并将其克隆到pET30a(+)原核表达载体上,得到重组质粒pET30-F780和pET30-F760,将质粒导入BL21(ED3)感受态中,经IPTG诱导表达。表达的重组蛋白通过SDS-PAGE和Westem-blotting方法进行鉴定。表达的两段蛋白大小约为31.1 kDa和27.9 kDa,与预期的蛋白分子量大小相符。Western blot分析表明重组蛋白可以和NDV抗体发生特异性反应。成功构建了原核表达质粒pET-F780和pET-F760,并获得了高效表达,通过Western blot分析表明重组蛋白具有良好的免疫反应性。%According to the epitopes of F gene of NDV LaSota strain,the F gene truncated two fragments were expressed in E.coli BL21 (ED3)strain. The two truncate F gene amplified by RT-PCR were inserted into pET30 (+),a prokaryotic expression vector. The recombinant plasmid pET30-F780 and pET30-F760 were transformed into BL21(ED3)competent cells. SDS-PAGE and Western-blotting screened the recombinant proteins induced by IPTG in E.coli. The size of the recombinant proteins were 31.1 kDa and 27.9 kDa,which were also consistent with those expected. Western-blotting showed that F780 and F760 were of immunogenicity.The recombinant plasmids were constructed,called pET-F780 and pET-F760,which were expressed the corresponding proteins with better immunoreactivity.

  20. Expression of minichromosome maintenance genes in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong HB

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Hongbin Zhong,1,* Bin Chen,1,* Henrique Neves,2 Jinchun Xing,1 Youxin Ye,1 Ying Lin,1 Guohong Zhuang,3 Shu-Dong Zhang,4 Jiyi Huang,1,5 Hang Fai Kwok2 1Xiang’an Branch, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Taipa, Macau SAR; 3Medical College of Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian, People’s Republic of China; 4Northern Ireland Centre for Stratified Medicine, Biomedical Sciences Research Institute, Ulster University, Londonderry, UK; 5The First Clinical School of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Minichromosome maintenance (MCM proteins play an essential role in DNA replication. They have been shown to be overexpressed in various types of cancer. However, the role of this family in renal cell carcinoma (RCC is widely unknown. In this study, we have identified a number of RCC datasets in the Gene Expression Omnibus database and also investigated the correlation between the expression levels of MCM genes and clinicopathological parameters. We found that the expression levels of MCM genes are positively correlated with one another. Expression levels of MCM2, MCM5, MCM6, and MCM7, but not of MCM3 and MCM4, were higher in RCC compared to paired adjacent normal tissue. Only the expression level of MCM4, but not of other MCMs, was positively correlated with tumor grade. In addition, a high-level expression of MCM2 in either primary tumor or metastases of RCC predicted a shorter disease-free survival time, while a high-level expression of MCM4 or MCM6 in primary tumor was also associated with poorer disease-free survival. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that patients with their primary RCC overexpressing 2 or more MCM genes had a shorter disease-free survival time, while those with RCC metastases overexpressing 3 or more MCM genes had a shorter

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa: genes and disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Ponzin, Diego; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy.

  2. Evolutionary dynamics of human autoimmune disease genes and malfunctioned immunological genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podder Soumita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the main issues of molecular evolution is to divulge the principles in dictating the evolutionary rate differences among various gene classes. Immunological genes have received considerable attention in evolutionary biology as candidates for local adaptation and for studying functionally important polymorphisms. The normal structure and function of immunological genes will be distorted when they experience mutations leading to immunological dysfunctions. Results Here, we examined the fundamental differences between the genes which on mutation give rise to autoimmune or other immune system related diseases and the immunological genes that do not cause any disease phenotypes. Although the disease genes examined are analogous to non-disease genes in product, expression, function, and pathway affiliation, a statistically significant decrease in evolutionary rate has been found in autoimmune disease genes relative to all other immune related diseases and non-disease genes. Possible ways of accumulation of mutation in the three steps of the central dogma (DNA-mRNA-Protein have been studied to trace the mutational effects predisposed to disease consequence and acquiring higher selection pressure. Principal Component Analysis and Multivariate Regression Analysis have established the predominant role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in guiding the evolutionary rate of immunological disease and non-disease genes followed by m-RNA abundance, paralogs number, fraction of phosphorylation residue, alternatively spliced exon, protein residue burial and protein disorder. Conclusions Our study provides an empirical insight into the etiology of autoimmune disease genes and other immunological diseases. The immediate utility of our study is to help in disease gene identification and may also help in medicinal improvement of immune related disease.

  3. Gene expression in cortex and hippocampus during acute pneumococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittwer Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high mortality (~30% and morbidity. Up to 50% of survivors are affected by neurological sequelae due to a wide spectrum of brain injury mainly affecting the cortex and hippocampus. Despite this significant disease burden, the genetic program that regulates the host response leading to brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis is largely unknown. We used an infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis to assess gene expression profiles in cortex and hippocampus at 22 and 44 hours after infection and in controls at 22 h after mock-infection with saline. To analyze the biological significance of the data generated by Affymetrix DNA microarrays, a bioinformatics pipeline was used combining (i a literature-profiling algorithm to cluster genes based on the vocabulary of abstracts indexed in MEDLINE (NCBI and (ii the self-organizing map (SOM, a clustering technique based on covariance in gene expression kinetics. Results Among 598 genes differentially regulated (change factor ≥ 1.5; p ≤ 0.05, 77% were automatically assigned to one of 11 functional groups with 94% accuracy. SOM disclosed six patterns of expression kinetics. Genes associated with growth control/neuroplasticity, signal transduction, cell death/survival, cytoskeleton, and immunity were generally upregulated. In contrast, genes related to neurotransmission and lipid metabolism were transiently downregulated on the whole. The majority of the genes associated with ionic homeostasis, neurotransmission, signal transduction and lipid metabolism were differentially regulated specifically in the hippocampus. Of the cell death/survival genes found to be continuously upregulated only in hippocampus, the majority are pro-apoptotic, while those continuously upregulated only in cortex are anti-apoptotic. Conclusion Temporal and spatial analysis of gene expression in experimental pneumococcal meningitis identified potential

  4. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  5. Structure and expression of thyroglobulin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassart, G; Brocas, H; Christophe, D; de Martynoff, G; Leriche, A; Mercken, L; Pohl, V; van Heuverswyn, B [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Biologie Humaine et Nucleaire (IRIBHN), Faculte de Medecine, Universite libre de Bruxelles, Campus Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium)

    1982-01-01

    Thyroglobulin is composed of two 300000 dalton polypeptide chains, translated from an 8000 base mRNA. Preparation of a full length cDNA and its cloning in E. coli have lead to the demonstration that the polypeptides of thyroglobulin protomers were identical. Used as molecular probes, the cloned cDNA allowed the isolation of a fragment of thyroglobulin gene. Electron microscopic studies have demonstrated that this gene contains more than 90 % intronic material separating small size exons (<200 bp). Sequencing of bovine thyroglobulin structural gene is in progress. Preliminary results show evidence for the existence of repetitive segments. Availability of cloned DNA complementary to bovine and human thyroglobulin mRNA allows the study of genetic defects of thyroglobulin gene expression in the human and in various animal models.

  6. Digital gene expression analysis of gene expression differences within Brassica diploids and allopolyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinjin; Wang, Yue; Zhu, Bao; Fang, Tingting; Fang, Yujie; Wang, Youping

    2015-01-27

    Brassica includes many successfully cultivated crop species of polyploid origin, either by ancestral genome triplication or by hybridization between two diploid progenitors, displaying complex repetitive sequences and transposons. The U's triangle, which consists of three diploids and three amphidiploids, is optimal for the analysis of complicated genomes after polyploidization. Next-generation sequencing enables the transcriptome profiling of polyploids on a global scale. We examined the gene expression patterns of three diploids (Brassica rapa, B. nigra, and B. oleracea) and three amphidiploids (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. carinata) via digital gene expression analysis. In total, the libraries generated between 5.7 and 6.1 million raw reads, and the clean tags of each library were mapped to 18547-21995 genes of B. rapa genome. The unambiguous tag-mapped genes in the libraries were compared. Moreover, the majority of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were explored among diploids as well as between diploids and amphidiploids. Gene ontological analysis was performed to functionally categorize these DEGs into different classes. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis was performed to assign these DEGs into approximately 120 pathways, among which the metabolic pathway, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, and peroxisomal pathway were enriched. The non-additive genes in Brassica amphidiploids were analyzed, and the results indicated that orthologous genes in polyploids are frequently expressed in a non-additive pattern. Methyltransferase genes showed differential expression pattern in Brassica species. Our results provided an understanding of the transcriptome complexity of natural Brassica species. The gene expression changes in diploids and allopolyploids may help elucidate the morphological and physiological differences among Brassica species.

  7. Multitarget Effects of Danqi Pill on Global Gene Expression Changes in Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyan Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Danqi pill (DQP is a widely prescribed traditional Chinese medicine (TCM in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study is to systematically characterize altered gene expression pattern induced by myocardial ischemia (MI in a rat model and to investigate the effects of DQP on global gene expression. Global mRNA expression was measured. Differentially expressed genes among the sham group, model group, and DQP group were analyzed. The gene ontology enrichment analysis and pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes were carried out. We quantified 10,813 genes. Compared with the sham group, expressions of 339 genes were upregulated and 177 genes were downregulated in the model group. The upregulated genes were enriched in extracellular matrix organization, response to wounding, and defense response pathways. Downregulated genes were enriched in fatty acid metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, PPAR signaling pathways, and so forth. This indicated that energy metabolic disorders occurred in rats with MI. In the DQP group, expressions of genes in the altered pathways were regulated back towards normal levels. DQP reversed expression of 313 of the 516 differentially expressed genes in the model group. This study provides insight into the multitarget mechanism of TCM in the treatment of complex diseases.

  8. Expression of Five Neuroblastoma Genes in Bone Marrow or Blood of Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Neuroblastoma Provides a New Biomarker for Disease and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marachelian, Araz; Villablanca, Judith G; Liu, Cathy W; Liu, Betty; Goodarzian, Fariba; Lai, Hollie A; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Tran, Hung C; Parra, Jaime A; Gallego, Richard; Bedrossian, Nora; Young, Sabrina; Czarnecki, Scarlett; Kennedy, Rebekah; Weiss, Brian D; Goldsmith, Kelly; Granger, Meaghan; Matthay, Katherine K; Groshen, Susan; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Sposto, Richard; Seeger, Robert C

    2017-09-15

    Purpose: We determined whether quantifying neuroblastoma-associated mRNAs (NB-mRNAs) in bone marrow and blood improves assessment of disease and prediction of disease progression in patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma. Experimental Design: mRNA for CHGA, DCX, DDC, PHOX2B, and TH was quantified in bone marrow and blood from 101 patients concurrently with clinical disease evaluations. Correlation between NB-mRNA (delta cycle threshold, Δ C t , for the geometric mean of genes from the TaqMan Low Density Array NB5 assay) and morphologically defined tumor cell percentage in bone marrow, 123 I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) Curie score, and CT/MRI-defined tumor longest diameter was determined. Time-dependent covariate Cox regression was used to analyze the relationship between Δ C t and progression-free survival (PFS). Results: NB-mRNA was detectable in 83% of bone marrow (185/223) and 63% (89/142) of blood specimens, and their Δ C t values were correlated (Spearman r = 0.67, P neuroblastoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(18); 5374-83. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Global transcriptional analysis of psoriatic skin and blood confirms known disease-associated pathways and highlights novel genomic "hot spots" for differentially expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Alvin B; Icen, Murat; Smith, Jason R; Sinha, Animesh A

    2012-07-01

    There are major gaps in our knowledge regarding the exact mechanisms and genetic basis of psoriasis. To investigate the pathogenesis of psoriasis, gene expression in 10 skin (5 lesional, 5 nonlesional) and 11 blood (6 psoriatic, 5 nonpsoriatic) samples were examined using Affymetrix HG-U95A microarrays. We detected 535 (425 upregulated, 110 downregulated) DEGs in lesional skin at 1% false discovery rate (FDR). Combining nine microarray studies comparing lesional and nonlesional psoriatic skin, 34.5% of dysregulated genes were overlapped in multiple studies. We further identified 20 skin and 2 blood associated transcriptional "hot spots" at specified genomic locations. At 5% FDR, 11.8% skin and 10.4% blood DEGs in our study mapped to one of the 12 PSORS loci. DEGs that overlap with PSORS loci may offer prioritized targets for downstream genetic fine mapping studies. Novel DEG "hot spots" may provide new targets for defining susceptibility loci in future studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A silk peptide fraction restores cognitive function in AF64A-induced Alzheimer disease model rats by increasing expression of choline acetyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yeseul [College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Hoon [Department of Food Science and Technology, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Su Kil [Division of Marine Molecular Biotechnology, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Park, Dongsun [College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Gwi Yeong; Yeon, Sungho [Department of Food Science and Technology, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Yong [Worldway Co., Ltd., Sejong (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ehn-Kyoung [College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Joo, Seong Soo [Division of Marine Molecular Biotechnology, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Heon-Sang, E-mail: hsjeong@cbu.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Technology, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Bae, E-mail: solar93@cbu.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Medical Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a silk peptide fraction obtained by incubating silk proteins with Protease N and Neutrase (SP-NN) on cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease model rats. In order to elucidate underlying mechanisms, the effect of SP-NN on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNA was assessed in F3.ChAT neural stem cells and Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells; active amino acid sequence was identified using HPLC-MS. The expression of ChAT mRNA in F3.ChAT cells increased by 3.79-fold of the control level by treatment with SP-NN fraction. The active peptide in SP-NN was identified as tyrosine-glycine with 238.1 of molecular weight. Male rats were orally administered with SP-NN (50 or 300 mg/kg) and challenged with a cholinotoxin AF64A. As a result of brain injury and decreased brain acetylcholine level, AF64A induced astrocytic activation, resulting in impairment of learning and memory function. Treatment with SP-NN exerted recovering activities on acetylcholine depletion and brain injury, as well as cognitive deficit induced by AF64A. The results indicate that, in addition to a neuroprotective activity, the SP-NN preparation restores cognitive function of Alzheimer disease model rats by increasing the release of acetylcholine. - Highlights: • Cognition-enhancing effects of SP-NN, a silk peptide preparation, were investigated. • SP-NN enhanced ChAT mRNA expression in F3.ChAT neural stem cells and Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells. • Active molecule was identified as a dipeptide composed of tyrosine-glycine. • SP-NN reversed cognitive dysfunction elicited by AF64A. • Neuroprotection followed by increased acetylcholine level was achieved with SP-NN.

  11. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance to antimicr......It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... the transition to biofilm growth, and these included genes expressed under oxygen-limiting conditions, genes encoding (putative) transport proteins, putative oxidoreductases and genes associated with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Of particular interest was the observation that many of the genes altered...... in expression have no current defined function. These genes, as well as those induced by stresses relevant to biofilm growth such as oxygen and nutrient limitation, may be important factors that trigger enhanced resistance mechanisms of sessile communities to antibiotics and hydrodynamic shear forces....

  12. Capturing heterogeneity in gene expression studies by surrogate variable analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T Leek

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available It has unambiguously been shown that genetic, environmental, demographic, and technical factors may have substantial effects on gene expression levels. In addition to the measured variable(s of interest, there will tend to be sources of signal due to factors that are unknown, unmeasured, or too complicated to capture through simple models. We show that failing to incorporate these sources of heterogeneity into an analysis can have widespread and detrimental effects on the study. Not only can this reduce power or induce unwanted dependence across genes, but it can also introduce sources of spurious signal to many genes. This phenomenon is true even for well-designed, randomized studies. We introduce "surrogate variable analysis" (SVA to overcome the problems caused by heterogeneity in expression studies. SVA can be applied in conjunction with standard analysis techniques to accurately capture the relationship between expression and any modeled variables of interest. We apply SVA to disease class, time course, and genetics of gene expression studies. We show that SVA increases the biological accuracy and reproducibility of analyses in genome-wide expression studies.

  13. Impact of methoxyacetic acid on mouse Leydig cell gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methoxyacetic acid (MAA is the active metabolite of the widely used industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, which is associated with various developmental and reproductive toxicities, including neural toxicity, blood and immune disorders, limb degeneration and testicular toxicity. Testicular toxicity is caused by degeneration of germ cells in association with changes in gene expression in both germ cells and Sertoli cells of the testis. This study investigates the impact of MAA on gene expression in testicular Leydig cells, which play a critical role in germ cell survival and male reproductive function. Methods Cultured mouse TM3 Leydig cells were treated with MAA for 3, 8, and 24 h and changes in gene expression were monitored by genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Results A total of 3,912 MAA-responsive genes were identified. Ingenuity Pathway analysis identified reproductive system disease, inflammatory disease and connective tissue disorder as the top biological functions affected by MAA. The MAA-responsive genes were classified into 1,366 early responders, 1,387 mid-responders, and 1,138 late responders, based on the time required for MAA to elicit a response. Analysis of enriched functional clusters for each subgroup identified 106 MAA early response genes involved in transcription regulation, including 32 genes associated with developmental processes. 60 DNA-binding proteins responded to MAA rapidly but transiently, and may contribute to the downstream effects of MAA seen for many mid and late response genes. Genes within the phosphatidylinositol/phospholipase C/calcium signaling pathway, whose activity is required for potentiation of nuclear receptor signaling by MAA, were also enriched in the set of early MAA response genes. In contrast, many of the genes responding to MAA at later time points encode membrane proteins that contribute to cell adhesion and membrane signaling. Conclusions These findings

  14. Aberrant Gene Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    model to investigate the role of telomerase in AML, we were able to translate the observed effect into human AML patients and identify specific genes involved, which also predict survival patterns in AML patients. During these studies we have applied methods for investigating differentially expressed......-based gene-lookup webservices, called HemaExplorer and BloodSpot. These web-services support the aim of making data and analysis of haematopoietic cells from mouse and human accessible for researchers without bioinformatics expertise. Finally, in order to aid the analysis of the very limited number...

  15. DEXTER: Disease-Expression Relation Extraction from Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Samir; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Ross, Karen E; Hu, Yu; Wu, Cathy H; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2018-01-01

    Gene expression levels affect biological processes and play a key role in many diseases. Characterizing expression profiles is useful for clinical research, and diagnostics and prognostics of diseases. There are currently several high-quality databases that capture gene expression information, obtained mostly from large-scale studies, such as microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies, in the context of disease. The scientific literature is another rich source of information on gene expression-disease relationships that not only have been captured from large-scale studies but have also been observed in thousands of small-scale studies. Expression information obtained from literature through manual curation can extend expression databases. While many of the existing databases include information from literature, they are limited by the time-consuming nature of manual curation and have difficulty keeping up with the explosion of publications in the biomedical field. In this work, we describe an automated text-mining tool, Disease-Expression Relation Extraction from Text (DEXTER) to extract information from literature on gene and microRNA expression in the context of disease. One of the motivations in developing DEXTER was to extend the BioXpress database, a cancer-focused gene expression database that includes data derived from large-scale experiments and manual curation of publications. The literature-based portion of BioXpress lags behind significantly compared to expression information obtained from large-scale studies and can benefit from our text-mined results. We have conducted two different evaluations to measure the accuracy of our text-mining tool and achieved average F-scores of 88.51 and 81.81% for the two evaluations, respectively. Also, to demonstrate the ability to extract rich expression information in different disease-related scenarios, we used DEXTER to extract information on differential expression information for 2024 genes in lung

  16. Expression of the β-1,3-glucanase gene bgn13.1 from Trichoderma harzianum in strawberry increases tolerance to crown rot diseases but interferes with plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, José A; Barceló, Marta; Pliego, Clara; Rey, Manuel; Caballero, José L; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Ruano-Rosa, David; López-Herrera, Carlos; de Los Santos, Berta; Romero-Muñoz, Fernando; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    The expression of antifungal genes from Trichoderma harzianum, mainly chitinases, has been used to confer plant resistance to fungal diseases. However, the biotechnological potential of glucanase genes from Trichoderma has been scarcely assessed. In this research, transgenic strawberry plants expressing the β-1,3-glucanase gene bgn13.1 from T. harzianum, under the control of the CaMV35S promoter, have been generated. After acclimatization, five out of 12 independent lines analysed showed a stunted phenotype when growing in the greenhouse. Moreover, most of the lines displayed a reduced yield due to both a reduction in the number of fruit per plant and a lower fruit size. Several transgenic lines showing higher glucanase activity in leaves than control plants were selected for pathogenicity tests. When inoculated with Colletotrichum acutatum, one of the most important strawberry pathogens, transgenic lines showed lower anthracnose symptoms in leaf and crown than control. In the three lines selected, the percentage of plants showing anthracnose symptoms in crown decreased from 61 % to a mean value of 16.5 %, in control and transgenic lines, respectively. Some transgenic lines also showed an enhanced resistance to Rosellinia necatrix, a soil-borne pathogen causing root and crown rot in strawberry. These results indicate that bgn13.1 from T. harzianum can be used to increase strawberry tolerance to crown rot diseases, although its constitutive expression affects plant growth and fruit yield. Alternative strategies such as the use of tissue specific promoters might avoid the negative effects of bgn13.1 expression in plant performance.

  17. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  18. Decomposition of gene expression state space trajectories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C Mar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Representing and analyzing complex networks remains a roadblock to creating dynamic network models of biological processes and pathways. The study of cell fate transitions can reveal much about the transcriptional regulatory programs that underlie these phenotypic changes and give rise to the coordinated patterns in expression changes that we observe. The application of gene expression state space trajectories to capture cell fate transitions at the genome-wide level is one approach currently used in the literature. In this paper, we analyze the gene expression dataset of Huang et al. (2005 which follows the differentiation of promyelocytes into neutrophil-like cells in the presence of inducers dimethyl sulfoxide and all-trans retinoic acid. Huang et al. (2005 build on the work of Kauffman (2004 who raised the attractor hypothesis, stating that cells exist in an expression landscape and their expression trajectories converge towards attractive sites in this landscape. We propose an alternative interpretation that explains this convergent behavior by recognizing that there are two types of processes participating in these cell fate transitions-core processes that include the specific differentiation pathways of promyelocytes to neutrophils, and transient processes that capture those pathways and responses specific to the inducer. Using functional enrichment analyses, specific biological examples and an analysis of the trajectories and their core and transient components we provide a validation of our hypothesis using the Huang et al. (2005 dataset.

  19. Identification of differentially expressed genes in childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nian-Zhen; Chen, Xiu-Juan; Mu, Yu-Hua; Wang, Hewen

    2018-05-01

    Asthma has been the most common chronic disease in children that places a major burden for affected people and their families.An integrated analysis of microarrays studies was performed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in childhood asthma compared with normal control. We also obtained the differentially methylated genes (DMGs) in childhood asthma according to GEO. The genes that were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated were identified. Functional annotation and protein-protein interaction network construction were performed to interpret biological functions of DEGs. We performed q-RT-PCR to verify the expression of selected DEGs.One DNA methylation and 3 gene expression datasets were obtained. Four hundred forty-one DEGs and 1209 DMGs in childhood asthma were identified. Among which, 16 genes were both differentially expressed and differentially methylated in childhood asthma. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxicity pathway, Jak-STAT signaling pathway, and Wnt signaling pathway were 3 significantly enriched pathways in childhood asthma according to our KEGG enrichment analysis. The PPI network of top 20 up- and downregulated DEGs consisted of 822 nodes and 904 edges and 2 hub proteins (UBQLN4 and MID2) were identified. The expression of 8 DEGs (GZMB, FGFBP2, CLC, TBX21, ALOX15, IL12RB2, UBQLN4) was verified by qRT-PCR and only the expression of GZMB and FGFBP2 was inconsistent with our integrated analysis.Our finding was helpful to elucidate the underlying mechanism of childhood asthma and develop new potential diagnostic biomarker and provide clues for drug design.

  20. Identification of valid reference genes for the normalization of RT qPCR gene expression data in human brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Rivka

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of gene expression in post mortem human brain can contribute to understanding of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT qPCR is often used to analyse gene expression. The validity of results obtained using RT qPCR is reliant on accurate data normalization. Reference genes are generally used to normalize RT qPCR data. Given that expression of some commonly used reference genes is altered in certain conditions, this study aimed to establish which reference genes were stably expressed in post mortem brain tissue from individuals with AD, PD or DLB. Results The present study investigated the expression stability of 8 candidate reference genes, (ubiquitin C [UBC], tyrosine-3-monooxygenase [YWHAZ], RNA polymerase II polypeptide [RP II], hydroxymethylbilane synthase [HMBS], TATA box binding protein [TBP], β-2-microglobulin [B2M], glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH], and succinate dehydrogenase complex-subunit A, [SDHA] in cerebellum and medial temporal gyrus of 6 AD, 6 PD, 6 DLB subjects, along with 5 matched controls using RT qPCR (TaqMan® Gene Expression Assays. Gene expression stability was analysed using geNorm to rank the candidate genes in order of decreasing stability in each disease group. The optimal number of genes recommended for accurate data normalization in each disease state was determined by pairwise variation analysis. Conclusion This study identified validated sets of mRNAs which would be appropriate for the normalization of RT qPCR data when studying gene expression in brain tissue of AD, PD, DLB and control subjects.

  1. A gene co-expression network in whole blood of schizophrenia patients is independent of antipsychotic-use and enriched for brain-expressed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone de Jong

    Full Text Available Despite large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS, the underlying genes for schizophrenia are largely unknown. Additional approaches are therefore required to identify the genetic background of this disorder. Here we report findings from a large gene expression study in peripheral blood of schizophrenia patients and controls. We applied a systems biology approach to genome-wide expression data from whole blood of 92 medicated and 29 antipsychotic-free schizophrenia patients and 118 healthy controls. We show that gene expression profiling in whole blood can identify twelve large gene co-expression modules associated with schizophrenia. Several of these disease related modules are likely to reflect expression changes due to antipsychotic medication. However, two of the disease modules could be replicated in an independent second data set involving antipsychotic-free patients and controls. One of these robustly defined disease modules is significantly enriched with brain-expressed genes and with genetic variants that were implicated in a GWAS study, which could imply a causal role in schizophrenia etiology. The most highly connected intramodular hub gene in this module (ABCF1, is located in, and regulated by the major histocompatibility (MHC complex, which is intriguing in light of the fact that common allelic variants from the MHC region have been implicated in schizophrenia. This suggests that the MHC increases schizophrenia susceptibility via altered gene expression of regulatory genes in this network.

  2. Myocardial Gene Expression of T-bet, GATA-3, Ror-γt, FoxP3, and Hallmark Cytokines in Chronic Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy: An Essentially Unopposed TH1-Type Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gabriel Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy (CCC, a late consequence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy with prognosis worse than those of noninflammatory etiology (NIC. Although the T cell-rich myocarditis is known to play a pathogenetic role, the relative contribution of each of the functional T cell subsets has never been thoroughly investigated. We therefore assessed gene expression of cytokines and transcription factors involved in differentiation and effector function of each functional T cell subset (TH1/TH2/TH17/Treg in CCC, NIC, and heart donor myocardial samples. Methods and Results. Quantitative PCR showed markedly upregulated expression of IFN-γ and transcription factor T-bet, and minor increases of GATA-3; FoxP3 and CTLA-4; IL-17 and IL-18 in CCC as compared with NIC samples. Conversely, cytokines expressed by TH2 cells (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 or associated with Treg (TGF-β and IL-10 were not upregulated in CCC myocardium. Expression of TH1-related genes such as T-bet, IFN-γ, and IL-18 correlated with ventricular dilation, FoxP3, and CTLA-4. Conclusions. Results are consistent with a strong local TH1-mediated response in most samples, possibly associated with pathological myocardial remodeling, and a proportionally smaller FoxP3+CTLA4+ Treg cell population, which is unable to completely curb IFN-γ production in CCC myocardium, therefore fueling inflammation.

  3. Differential gene expression patterns between smokers and non‐smokers: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rick; Brooks, Andy; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Grootheest, Gerard; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Jan H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanisms causing smoking‐induced health decline are largely unknown. To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in cause and consequences of smoking behavior, we conducted a genome‐wide gene expression study in peripheral blood samples targeting 18 238 genes. Data of 743 smokers, 1686 never smokers and 890 ex‐smokers were available from two population‐based cohorts from the Netherlands. In addition, data of 56 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for ever smoking were used. One hundred thirty‐two genes were differentially expressed between current smokers and never smokers (P smokers into account, expression of these 132 genes was classified into reversible (94 genes), slowly reversible (31 genes), irreversible (6 genes) or inconclusive (1 gene). Expression of 6 of the 132 genes (three reversible and three slowly reversible) was confirmed to be reactive to smoking as they were differentially expressed in monozygotic pairs discordant for smoking. Cis‐expression quantitative trait loci for GPR56 and RARRES3 (downregulated in smokers) were associated with increased number of cigarettes smoked per day in a large genome‐wide association meta‐analysis, suggesting a causative effect of GPR56 and RARRES3 expression on smoking behavior. In conclusion, differential gene expression patterns in smokers are extensive and cluster in several underlying disease pathways. Gene expression differences seem mainly direct consequences of smoking, and largely reversible after smoking cessation. However, we also identified DNA variants that may influence smoking behavior via the mediating gene expression. PMID:26594007

  4. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko; Harushima, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Hironori; Mochizuki, Takako; Fujita, Masahiro; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Kurata, Nori

    2015-01-01

    Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue

  5. Neonatal maternal deprivation response and developmental changes in gene expression revealed by hypothalamic gene expression profiling in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ding

    Full Text Available Neonatal feeding problems are observed in several genetic diseases including Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. Later in life, individuals with PWS develop hyperphagia and obesity due to lack of appetite control. We hypothesized that failure to thrive in infancy and later-onset hyperphagia are related and could be due to a defect in the hypothalamus. In this study, we performed gene expression microarray analysis of the hypothalamic response to maternal deprivation in neonatal wild-type and Snord116del mice, a mouse model for PWS in which a cluster of imprinted C/D box snoRNAs is deleted. The neonatal starvation response in both strains was dramatically different from that reported in adult rodents. Genes that are affected by adult starvation showed no expression change in the hypothalamus of 5 day-old pups after 6 hours of maternal deprivation. Unlike in adult rodents, expression levels of Nanos2 and Pdk4 were increased, and those of Pgpep1, Ndp, Brms1l, Mett10d, and Snx1 were decreased after neonatal deprivation. In addition, we compared hypothalamic gene expression profiles at postnatal days 5 and 13 and observed significant developmental changes. Notably, the gene expression profiles of Snord116del deletion mice and wild-type littermates were very similar at all time points and conditions, arguing against a role of Snord116 in feeding regulation in the neonatal period.

  6. Blood Gene Expression Predicts Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

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    Richard Danger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS, the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, leads to poor long-term survival after lung transplantation. Identifying predictors of BOS is essential to prevent the progression of dysfunction before irreversible damage occurs. By using a large set of 107 samples from lung recipients, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of whole blood to identify early biomarkers of BOS, including samples from 49 patients with stable function for at least 3 years, 32 samples collected at least 6 months before BOS diagnosis (prediction group, and 26 samples at or after BOS diagnosis (diagnosis group. An independent set from 25 lung recipients was used for validation by quantitative PCR (13 stables, 11 in the prediction group, and 8 in the diagnosis group. We identified 50 transcripts differentially expressed between stable and BOS recipients. Three genes, namely POU class 2 associating factor 1 (POU2AF1, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A (TCL1A, and B cell lymphocyte kinase, were validated as predictive biomarkers of BOS more than 6 months before diagnosis, with areas under the curve of 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78 respectively. These genes allow stratification based on BOS risk (log-rank test p < 0.01 and are not associated with time posttransplantation. This is the first published large-scale gene expression analysis of blood after lung transplantation. The three-gene blood signature could provide clinicians with new tools to improve follow-up and adapt treatment of patients likely to develop BOS.

  7. Expression of Nrf2 in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Chenere P; Glass, Charles A; Montgomery, Marshall B; Lindl, Kathryn A; Ritson, Gillian P; Chia, Luis A; Hamilton, Ronald L; Chu, Charleen T; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L

    2007-01-01

    In response to oxidative stress, the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus and transactivates expression of genes with antioxidant activity. Despite this cellular mechanism, oxidative damage is abundant in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (AD and PD). To investigate mechanisms by which Nrf2 activity may be aberrant or insufficient in neurodegenerative conditions, we assessed Nrf2 localization in affected brain regions of AD, Lewy body variant of AD (LBVAD), and PD. By immunohistochemistry, Nrf2 is expressed in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of neurons in normal hippocampi with predominant expression in the nucleus. In AD and LBVAD, Nrf2 was predominantly cytoplasmic in hippocampal neurons and was not a major component of beta amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles. By immunoblotting, we observed a significant decrease in nuclear Nrf2 levels in AD cases. In contrast, Nrf2 was strongly nuclear in PD nigral neurons but cytoplasmic in substantia nigra of normal, AD, and LBVAD cases. These findings suggest that Nrf2-mediated transcription is not induced in neurons in AD despite the presence of oxidative stress. In PD, nuclear localization of Nrf2 is strongly induced, but this response may be insufficient to protect neurons from degeneration.

  8. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  9. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Tamer Z. [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbial Molecular Biology, AGERI, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Division of Biomedical Sciences, Zewail University, Zewail City of Science and Technology, Giza 12588 (Egypt); Zhang, Fengrui [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Thiem, Suzanne M., E-mail: smthiem@msu.edu [Department of Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  10. Screening key genes for abdominal aortic aneurysm based on gene expression omnibus dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Huang, Jingyong; Ni, Haizhen; Yu, Guanfeng

    2018-02-13

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common cardiovascular system disease with high mortality. The aim of this study was to identify potential genes for diagnosis and therapy in AAA. We searched and downloaded mRNA expression data from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from AAA and normal individuals. Then, Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis, transcriptional factors (TFs) network and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network were used to explore the function of genes. Additionally, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was used to validate the expression of identified genes. Finally, the diagnostic value of identified genes was accessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in GEO database. A total of 1199 DEGs (188 up-regulated and 1011 down-regulated) were identified between AAA and normal individual. KEGG pathway analysis displayed that vascular smooth muscle contraction and pathways in cancer were significantly enriched signal pathway. The top 10 up-regulated and top 10 down-regulated DEGs were used to construct TFs and PPI networks. Some genes with high degrees such as NELL2, CCR7, MGAM, HBB, CSNK2A2, ZBTB16 and FOXO1 were identified to be related to AAA. The consequences of IHC staining showed that CCR7 and PDGFA were up-regulated in tissue samples of AAA. ROC analysis showed that NELL2, CCR7, MGAM, HBB, CSNK2A2, ZBTB16, FOXO1 and PDGFA had the potential diagnostic value for AAA. The identified genes including NELL2, CCR7, MGAM, HBB, CSNK2A2, ZBTB16, FOXO1 and PDGFA might be involved in the pathology of AAA.

  11. Three gene expression vector sets for concurrently expressing multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Takashi; Makino, Harumi; Ogura, Akira; Matsuda, Fumio; Kondo, Akihiko

    2014-05-01

    Yeast has the potential to be used in bulk-scale fermentative production of fuels and chemicals due to its tolerance for low pH and robustness for autolysis. However, expression of multiple external genes in one host yeast strain is considerably labor-intensive due to the lack of polycistronic transcription. To promote the metabolic engineering of yeast, we generated systematic and convenient genetic engineering tools to express multiple genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We constructed a series of multi-copy and integration vector sets for concurrently expressing two or three genes in S. cerevisiae by embedding three classical promoters. The comparative expression capabilities of the constructed vectors were monitored with green fluorescent protein, and the concurrent expression of genes was monitored with three different fluorescent proteins. Our multiple gene expression tool will be helpful to the advanced construction of genetically engineered yeast strains in a variety of research fields other than metabolic engineering. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-term expression of glomerular genes in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittka, Dominik; Banas, Bernhard; Lennartz, Laura; Putz, Franz Josef; Eidenschink, Kathrin; Beck, Sebastian; Stempfl, Thomas; Moehle, Christoph; Reichelt-Wurm, Simone; Banas, Miriam C

    2018-01-11

    Although diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause for end-stage renal disease in western societies, its pathogenesis still remains largely unclear. A different gene pattern of diabetic and healthy kidney cells is one of the probable explanations. Numerous signalling pathways have emerged as important pathophysiological mechanisms for diabetes-induced renal injury. Glomerular cells, as podocytes or mesangial cells, are predominantly involved in the development of diabetic renal lesions. While many gene assays concerning DN are performed with whole kidney or renal cortex tissue, we isolated glomeruli from black and tan, brachyuric (BTBR) obese/obese (ob/ob) and wildtype mice at four different timepoints (4, 8, 16 and 24 weeks) and performed an mRNA microarray to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). In contrast to many other diabetic mouse models, these homozygous ob/ob leptin-deficient mice develop not only a severe type 2 diabetes, but also diabetic kidney injury with all the clinical and especially histologic features defining human DN. By functional enrichment analysis we were able to investigate biological processes and pathways enriched by the DEGs at different disease stages. Altered expression of nine randomly selected genes was confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction from glomerular RNA. Ob/ob type 2 diabetic mice showed up- and downregulation of genes primarily involved in metabolic processes and pathways, including glucose, lipid, fatty acid, retinol and amino acid metabolism. Members of the CYP4A and ApoB family were found among the top abundant genes. But more interestingly, altered gene loci showed enrichment for processes and pathways linked to angioneogenesis, complement cascades, semaphorin pathways, oxidation and reduction processes and renin secretion. The gene profile of BTBR ob/ob type 2 diabetic mice we conducted in this study can help to identify new key players in molecular pathogenesis of diabetic kidney

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L I [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  15. Symbiont modulates expression of specific gene categories in Angomonas deanei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Loureiro Penha

    Full Text Available Trypanosomatids are parasites that cause disease in humans, animals, and plants. Most are non-pathogenic and some harbor a symbiotic bacterium. Endosymbiosis is part of the evolutionary process of vital cell functions such as respiration and photosynthesis. Angomonas deanei is an example of a symbiont-containing trypanosomatid. In this paper, we sought to investigate how symbionts influence host cells by characterising and comparing the transcriptomes of the symbiont-containing A. deanei (wild type and the symbiont-free aposymbiotic strains. The comparison revealed that the presence of the symbiont modulates several differentially expressed genes. Empirical analysis of differential gene expression showed that 216 of the 7625 modulated genes were significantly changed. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the largest categories of genes that downregulated in the absence of the symbiont were those involved in oxidation-reduction process, ATP hydrolysis coupled proton transport and glycolysis. In contrast, among the upregulated gene categories were those involved in proteolysis, microtubule-based movement, and cellular metabolic process. Our results provide valuable information for dissecting the mechanism of endosymbiosis in A. deanei.

  16. ABCG2 in peptic ulcer: gene expression and mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagacka-Kubiak, Aleksandra; Żebrowska, Marta; Wosiak, Agnieszka; Balcerczak, Mariusz; Mirowski, Marek; Balcerczak, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the participation of polymorphism at position C421A and mRNA expression of the ABCG2 gene in the development of peptic ulcers, which is a very common and severe disease. ABCG2, encoded by the ABCG2 gene, has been found inter alia in the gastrointestinal tract, where it plays a protective role eliminating xenobiotics from cells into the extracellular environment. The materials for the study were biopsies of gastric mucosa taken during a routine endoscopy. For genotyping by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) at position C421A, DNA was isolated from 201 samples, while for the mRNA expression level by real-time PCR, RNA was isolated from 60 patients. The control group of healthy individuals consisted of 97 blood donors. The dominant genotype in the group of peptic ulcer patients and healthy individuals was homozygous CC. No statistically significant differences between healthy individuals and the whole group of peptic ulcer patients and, likewise, between the subgroups of peptic ulcer patients (infected and uninfected with Helicobacter pylori) were found. ABCG2 expression relative to GAPDH expression was found in 38 of the 60 gastric mucosa samples. The expression level of the gene varies greatly among cases. The statistically significant differences between the intensity (p = 0.0375) of H. pylori infection and ABCG2 gene expression have been shown. It was observed that the more intense the infection, the higher the level of ABCG2 expression.

  17. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression ... These include clusterin, methionine adenosyl transferase IIα, and prostate-specific ..... MAGEE1 melanoma antigen and no similarity was found with the ...

  18. Rubisco activity and gene expression of tropical tree species under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Young

    2013-05-15

    May 15, 2013 ... Proteomics analysis associated with gene expression of plants reveal .... Consequently, Rubisco enzyme plays a role in assi- milating into ... technique for examining gene expression encoded at the. mRNA level .... Ammonia.

  19. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in .... 24, 701–713. Bate N. and Twell D. 1998 Functional architecture of a late pollen .... Manzara T. and Gruissem W. 1988 Organization and expression.

  20. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  1. Decorin gene expression and its regulation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez-DelValle, Cristina; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Castro-Munozledo, Federico [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Kuri-Harcuch, Walid, E-mail: walidkuri@gmail.com [Department of Cell Biology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apdo. Postal 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We showed that cultured human diploid epidermal keratinocytes express and synthesize decorin. {yields} Decorin is found intracytoplasmic in suprabasal cells of cultures and in human epidermis. {yields} Decorin mRNA expression in cHEK is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. {yields} Decorin immunostaining of psoriatic lesions showed a lower intensity and altered intracytoplasmic arrangements. -- Abstract: In various cell types, including cancer cells, decorin is involved in regulation of cell attachment, migration and proliferation. In skin, decorin is seen in dermis, but not in keratinocytes. We show that decorin gene (DCN) is expressed in the cultured keratinocytes, and the protein is found in the cytoplasm of differentiating keratinocytes and in suprabasal layers of human epidermis. RT-PCR experiments showed that DCN expression is regulated by pro-inflammatory and proliferative cytokines. Our data suggest that decorin should play a significant role in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, cutaneous homeostasis and dermatological diseases.

  2. Mining gene expression data by interpreting principal components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi Ali

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are many methods for analyzing microarray data that group together genes having similar patterns of expression over all conditions tested. However, in many instances the biologically important goal is to identify relatively small sets of genes that share coherent expression across only some conditions, rather than all or most conditions as required in traditional clustering; e.g. genes that are highly up-regulated and/or down-regulated similarly across only a subset of conditions. Equally important is the need to learn which conditions are the decisive ones in forming such gene sets of interest, and how they relate to diverse conditional covariates, such as disease diagnosis or prognosis. Results We present a method for automatically identifying such candidate sets of biologically relevant genes using a combination of principal components analysis and information theoretic metrics. To enable easy use of our methods, we have developed a data analysis package that facilitates visualization and subsequent data mining of the independent sources of significant variation present in gene microarray expression datasets (or in any other similarly structured high-dimensional dataset. We applied these tools to two public datasets, and highlight sets of genes most affected by specific subsets of conditions (e.g. tissues, treatments, samples, etc.. Statistically significant associations for highlighted gene sets were shown via global analysis for Gene Ontology term enrichment. Together with covariate associations, the tool provides a basis for building testable hypotheses about the biological or experimental causes of observed variation. Conclusion We provide an unsupervised data mining technique for diverse microarray expression datasets that is distinct from major methods now in routine use. In test uses, this method, based on publicly available gene annotations, appears to identify numerous sets of biologically relevant genes. It

  3. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  4. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling

  5. Enhanced gene ranking approaches using modified trace ratio algorithm for gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Mishra

    Full Text Available Microarray technology enables the understanding and investigation of gene expression levels by analyzing high dimensional datasets that contain few samples. Over time, microarray expression data have been collected for studying the underlying biological mechanisms of disease. One such application for understanding the mechanism is by constructing a gene regulatory network (GRN. One of the foremost key criteria for GRN discovery is gene selection. Choosing a generous set of genes for the structure of the network is highly desirable. For this role, two suitable methods were proposed for selection of appropriate genes. The first approach comprises a gene selection method called Information gain, where the dataset is reformed and fused with another distinct algorithm called Trace Ratio (TR. Our second method is the implementation of our projected modified TR algorithm, where the scoring base for finding weight matrices has been re-designed. Both the methods' efficiency was shown with different classifiers that include variants of the Artificial Neural Network classifier, such as Resilient Propagation, Quick Propagation, Back Propagation, Manhattan Propagation and Radial Basis Function Neural Network and also the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier. In the study, it was confirmed that both of the proposed methods worked well and offered high accuracy with a lesser number of iterations as compared to the original Trace Ratio algorithm. Keywords: Gene regulatory network, Gene selection, Information gain, Trace ratio, Canonical correlation analysis, Classification

  6. Studying the Complex Expression Dependences between Sets of Coexpressed Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Huerta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms simplify the orchestration of gene expression by coregulating genes whose products function together in the cell. The use of clustering methods to obtain sets of coexpressed genes from expression arrays is very common; nevertheless there are no appropriate tools to study the expression networks among these sets of coexpressed genes. The aim of the developed tools is to allow studying the complex expression dependences that exist between sets of coexpressed genes. For this purpose, we start detecting the nonlinear expression relationships between pairs of genes, plus the coexpressed genes. Next, we form networks among sets of coexpressed genes that maintain nonlinear expression dependences between all of them. The expression relationship between the sets of coexpressed genes is defined by the expression relationship between the skeletons of these sets, where this skeleton represents the coexpressed genes with a well-defined nonlinear expression relationship with the skeleton of the other sets. As a result, we can study the nonlinear expression relationships between a target gene and other sets of coexpressed genes, or start the study from the skeleton of the sets, to study the complex relationships of activation and deactivation between the sets of coexpressed genes that carry out the different cellular processes present in the expression experiments.

  7. The relationship among gene expression, the evolution of gene dosage, and the rate of protein evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Gout

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of selective constraints affecting genes is a major issue in biology. It is well established that gene expression level is a major determinant of the rate of protein evolution, but the reasons for this relationship remain highly debated. Here we demonstrate that gene expression is also a major determinant of the evolution of gene dosage: the rate of gene losses after whole genome duplications in the Paramecium lineage is negatively correlated to the level of gene expression, and this relationship is not a byproduct of other factors known to affect the fate of gene duplicates. This indicates that changes in gene dosage are generally more deleterious for highly expressed genes. This rule also holds for other taxa: in yeast, we find a clear relationship between gene expression level and the fitness impact of reduction in gene dosage. To explain these observations, we propose a model based on the fact that the optimal expression level of a gene corresponds to a trade-off between the benefit and cost of its expression. This COSTEX model predicts that selective pressure against mutations changing gene expression level or affecting the encoded protein should on average be stronger in highly expressed genes and hence that both the frequency of gene loss and the rate of protein evolution should correlate negatively with gene expression. Thus, the COSTEX model provides a simple and common explanation for the general relationship observed between the level of gene expression and the different facets of gene evolution.

  8. Retrotransposons as regulators of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Lucas, Bronwyn A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-02-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are both a boon and a bane to eukaryotic organisms, depending on where they integrate into the genome and how their sequences function once integrated. We focus on two types of TEs: long interspersed elements (LINEs) and short interspersed elements (SINEs). LINEs and SINEs are retrotransposons; that is, they transpose via an RNA intermediate. We discuss how LINEs and SINEs have expanded in eukaryotic genomes and contribute to genome evolution. An emerging body of evidence indicates that LINEs and SINEs function to regulate gene expression by affecting chromatin structure, gene transcription, pre-mRNA processing, or aspects of mRNA metabolism. We also describe how adenosine-to-inosine editing influences SINE function and how ongoing retrotransposition is countered by the body's defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Characterization of differentially expressed genes involved in pathways associated with gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    Full Text Available To explore the patterns of gene expression in gastric cancer, a total of 26 paired gastric cancer and noncancerous tissues from patients were enrolled for gene expression microarray analyses. Limma methods were applied to analyze the data, and genes were considered to be significantly differentially expressed if the False Discovery Rate (FDR value was 2. Subsequently, Gene Ontology (GO categories were used to analyze the main functions of the differentially expressed genes. According to the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG database, we found pathways significantly associated with the differential genes. Gene-Act network and co-expression network were built respectively based on the relationships among the genes, proteins and compounds in the database. 2371 mRNAs and 350 lncRNAs considered as significantly differentially expressed genes were selected for the further analysis. The GO categories, pathway analyses and the Gene-Act network showed a consistent result that up-regulated genes were responsible for tumorigenesis, migration, angiogenesis and microenvironment formation, while down-regulated genes were involved in metabolism. These results of this study provide some novel findings on coding RNAs, lncRNAs, pathways and the co-expression network in gastric cancer which will be useful to guide further investigation and target therapy for this disease.

  10. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  11. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...... in cell adhesion and the cytoskeleton. If the proteins involved in tethering cells to the extracellular matrix are important in conferring drug resistance, it may be possible to improve chemotherapy by designing drugs that target these proteins....

  12. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  13. Gene expression analysis of FABP4 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkarim Yasin Karim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Gastric cancer has high incidence and mortality rate in several countries and is still one of the most frequent and lethal disease. In this study, we aimed to determine diagnostic markers in gastric cancer by molecular techniques; include mRNA expression analysis of FABP4 gene. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 gene encodes the fatty acid binding protein found in adipocytes. The protein encoded by FABP4 are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. It is thought that FABPs roles include fatty acid uptake, transport, and metabolism. Material and Methods: Total RNA were extracted from paired tumor and normal tissues of 47 gastric cancer. The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was measured employing semi- quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR. Results: The mRNA expression level of FABP4 was significantly decreased (down- regulated. Conclusion: Down-regulation of FABP4 gene seems to occur at the initial steps of gastric cancer development. In order to confirm the relationship between the gastric tumor and FABP4 gene, further analysis like immunohistochemistry and epigenetc techniques are necessary. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 248-252

  14. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsu Nakajima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data.

  15. Inferring gene expression dynamics via functional regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal gene expression profiles characterize the time-dynamics of expression of specific genes and are increasingly collected in current gene expression experiments. In the analysis of experiments where gene expression is obtained over the life cycle, it is of interest to relate temporal patterns of gene expression associated with different developmental stages to each other to study patterns of long-term developmental gene regulation. We use tools from functional data analysis to study dynamic changes by relating temporal gene expression profiles of different developmental stages to each other. Results We demonstrate that functional regression methodology can pinpoint relationships that exist between temporary gene expression profiles for different life cycle phases and incorporates dimension reduction as needed for these high-dimensional data. By applying these tools, gene expression profiles for pupa and adult phases are found to be strongly related to the profiles of the same genes obtained during the embryo phase. Moreover, one can distinguish between gene groups that exhibit relationships with positive and others with negative associations between later life and embryonal expression profiles. Specifically, we find a positive relationship in expression for muscle development related genes, and a negative relationship for strictly maternal genes for Drosophila, using temporal gene expression profiles. Conclusion Our findings point to specific reactivation patterns of gene expression during the Drosophila life cycle which differ in characteristic ways between various gene groups. Functional regression emerges as a useful tool for relating gene expression patterns from different developmental stages, and avoids the problems with large numbers of parameters and multiple testing that affect alternative approaches.

  16. Life cycle analysis of kidney gene expression in male F344 rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Kwekel

    Full Text Available Age is a predisposing condition for susceptibility to chronic kidney disease and progression as well as acute kidney injury that may arise due to the adverse effects of some drugs. Age-related differences in kidney biology, therefore, are a key concern in understanding drug safety and disease progression. We hypothesize that the underlying suite of genes expressed in the kidney at various life cycle stages will impact susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. Therefore, establishing changes in baseline expression data between these life stages is the first and necessary step in evaluating this hypothesis. Untreated male F344 rats were sacrificed at 2, 5, 6, 8, 15, 21, 78, and 104 weeks of age. Kidneys were collected for histology and gene expression analysis. Agilent whole-genome rat microarrays were used to query global expression profiles. An ANOVA (p1.5 in relative mRNA expression, was used to identify 3,724 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Principal component analyses of these DEGs revealed three major divisions in life-cycle renal gene expression. K-means cluster analysis identified several groups of genes that shared age-specific patterns of expression. Pathway analysis of these gene groups revealed age-specific gene networks and functions related to renal function and aging, including extracellular matrix turnover, immune cell response, and renal tubular injury. Large age-related changes in expression were also demonstrated for the genes that code for qualified renal injury biomarkers KIM-1, Clu, and Tff3. These results suggest specific groups of genes that may underlie age-specific susceptibilities to adverse drug reactions and disease. This analysis of the basal gene expression patterns of renal genes throughout the life cycle of the rat will improve the use of current and future renal biomarkers and inform our assessments of kidney injury and disease.

  17. Heart morphogenesis gene regulatory networks revealed by temporal expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jonathon T; Demarest, Bradley; Gorsi, Bushra; Smith, Megan; Yost, H Joseph

    2017-10-01

    During embryogenesis the heart forms as a linear tube that then undergoes multiple simultaneous morphogenetic events to obtain its mature shape. To understand the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) driving this phase of heart development, during which many congenital heart disease malformations likely arise, we conducted an RNA-seq timecourse in zebrafish from 30 hpf to 72 hpf and identified 5861 genes with altered expression. We clustered the genes by temporal expression pattern, identified transcription factor binding motifs enriched in each cluster, and generated a model GRN for the major gene batteries in heart morphogenesis. This approach predicted hundreds of regulatory interactions and found batteries enriched in specific cell and tissue types, indicating that the approach can be used to narrow the search for novel genetic markers and regulatory interactions. Subsequent analyses confirmed the GRN using two mutants, Tbx5 and nkx2-5 , and identified sets of duplicated zebrafish genes that do not show temporal subfunctionalization. This dataset provides an essential resource for future studies on the genetic/epigenetic pathways implicated in congenital heart defects and the mechanisms of cardiac transcriptional regulation. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences in rice evolution result in two contrasting types of differentially expressed genes

    KAUST Repository

    Horiuchi, Youko

    2015-12-23

    Background Since the development of transcriptome analysis systems, many expression evolution studies characterized evolutionary forces acting on gene expression, without explicit discrimination between global expression differences and tissue specific expression differences. However, different types of gene expression alteration should have different effects on an organism, the evolutionary forces that act on them might be different, and different types of genes might show different types of differential expression between species. To confirm this, we studied differentially expressed (DE) genes among closely related groups that have extensive gene expression atlases, and clarified characteristics of different types of DE genes including the identification of regulating loci for differential expression using expression quantitative loci (eQTL) analysis data. Results We detected differentially expressed (DE) genes between rice subspecies in five homologous tissues that were verified using japonica and indica transcriptome atlases in public databases. Using the transcriptome atlases, we classified DE genes into two types, global DE genes and changed-tissues DE genes. Global type DE genes were not expressed in any tissues in the atlas of one subspecies, however changed-tissues type DE genes were expressed in both subspecies with different tissue specificity. For the five tissues in the two japonica-indica combinations, 4.6 ± 0.8 and 5.9 ± 1.5 % of highly expressed genes were global and changed-tissues DE genes, respectively. Changed-tissues DE genes varied in number between tissues, increasing linearly with the abundance of tissue specifically expressed genes in the tissue. Molecular evolution of global DE genes was rapid, unlike that of changed-tissues DE genes. Based on gene ontology, global and changed-tissues DE genes were different, having no common GO terms. Expression differences of most global DE genes were regulated by cis-eQTLs. Expression

  19. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene-disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S

    2014-06-15

    Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies-for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies-for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene-disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better-it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has bigdata.ices.utexas.edu/project/gene-disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. [Weighted gene co-expression network analysis in biomedicine research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Li; Ye, Hua; Tu, Wei

    2017-11-25

    High-throughput biological technologies are now widely applied in biology and medicine, allowing scientists to monitor thousands of parameters simultaneously in a specific sample. However, it is still an enormous challenge to mine useful information from high-throughput data. The emergence of network biology provides deeper insights into complex bio-system and reveals the modularity in tissue/cellular networks. Correlation networks are increasingly used in bioinformatics applications. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) tool can detect clusters of highly correlated genes. Therefore, we systematically reviewed the application of WGCNA in the study of disease diagnosis, pathogenesis and other related fields. First, we introduced principle, workflow, advantages and disadvantages of WGCNA. Second, we presented the application of WGCNA in disease, physiology, drug, evolution and genome annotation. Then, we indicated the application of WGCNA in newly developed high-throughput methods. We hope this review will help to promote the application of WGCNA in biomedicine research.

  1. Interactive visualization of gene regulatory networks with associated gene expression time series data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, M.A.; Hijum, van S.A.F.T.; Lulko, A.T.; Kuipers, O.P.; Roerdink, J.B.T.M.; Linsen, L.; Hagen, H.; Hamann, B.

    2008-01-01

    We present GENeVis, an application to visualize gene expression time series data in a gene regulatory network context. This is a network of regulator proteins that regulate the expression of their respective target genes. The networks are represented as graphs, in which the nodes represent genes,

  2. Characterization of the MLO gene family in Rosaceae and gene expression analysis in Malus domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessina, Stefano; Pavan, Stefano; Catalano, Domenico; Gallotta, Alessandra; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling; Malnoy, Mickael; Schouten, Henk J

    2014-07-22

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a major fungal disease of thousands of plant species, including many cultivated Rosaceae. PM pathogenesis is associated with up-regulation of MLO genes during early stages of infection, causing down-regulation of plant defense pathways. Specific members of the MLO gene family act as PM-susceptibility genes, as their loss-of-function mutations grant durable and broad-spectrum resistance. We carried out a genome-wide characterization of the MLO gene family in apple, peach and strawberry, and we isolated apricot MLO homologs through a PCR-approach. Evolutionary relationships between MLO homologs were studied and syntenic blocks constructed. Homologs that are candidates for being PM susceptibility genes were inferred by phylogenetic relationships with functionally characterized MLO genes and, in apple, by monitoring their expression following inoculation with the PM causal pathogen Podosphaera leucotricha. Genomic tools available for Rosaceae were exploited in order to characterize the MLO gene family. Candidate MLO susceptibility genes were identified. In follow-up studies it can be investigated whether silencing or a loss-of-function mutations in one or more of these candidate genes leads to PM resistance.

  3. Republished review: Gene therapy for ocular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Melissa M; Tuo, Jingsheng; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2011-07-01

    The eye is an easily accessible, highly compartmentalised and immune-privileged organ that offers unique advantages as a gene therapy target. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been implicated as potentially efficacious therapies. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Proof-of-concept for vector-based gene therapies has also been established in several experimental models of human ocular diseases. After nearly two decades of ocular gene therapy research, preliminary successes are now being reported in phase 1 clinical trials for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis. This review describes current developments and future prospects for ocular gene therapy. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the performance and regulation of recombinant adeno-associated virus- and lentivirus-mediated ocular gene transfer. Gene therapy prospects have advanced for a variety of retinal disorders, including retinitis pigmentosa, retinoschisis, Stargardt disease and age-related macular degeneration. Advances have also been made using experimental models for non-retinal diseases, such as uveitis and glaucoma. These methodological advancements are critical for the implementation of additional gene-based therapies for human ocular diseases in the near future.

  4. Norrie disease gene is distinct from the monoamine oxidase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, K B; Ozelius, L; Corey, T; Rinehart, W B; Liberfarb, R; Haines, J; Chen, W J; Norio, R; Sankila, E; de la Chapelle, A

    1989-09-01

    The genes for MAO-A and MAO-B appear to be very close to the Norrie disease gene, on the basis of loss and/or disruption of the MAO genes and activities in atypical Norrie disease patients deleted for the DXS7 locus; linkage among the MAO genes, the Norrie disease gene, and the DXS7 locus; and mapping of all these loci to the chromosomal region Xp11. The present study provides evidence that the MAO genes are not disrupted in "classic" Norrie disease patients. Genomic DNA from these "nondeletion" Norrie disease patients did not show rearrangements at the MAOA or DXS7 loci. Normal levels of MAO-A activities, as well as normal amounts and size of the MAO-A mRNA, were observed in cultured skin fibroblasts from these patients, and MAO-B activity in their platelets was normal. Catecholamine metabolites evaluated in plasma and urine were in the control range. Thus, although some atypical Norrie disease patients lack both MAO-A and MAO-B activities, MAO does not appear to be an etiologic factor in classic Norrie disease.

  5. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  6. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  7. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo M Airoldi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  8. PREDICTION OF THE COURSE OF OSTEOARTHROSIS FROM mTOR (MAMMALIAN TARGET OF RAPAMYCIN GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Chetina

    2012-01-01

    Results. Analysis of gene expression in the outpatients with OA identified two subgroups: in one subgroup (n = 13 mTOR expression was considerably much less than that in the control group; the expression of ATG1 and p21 did not differ greatly from the control and that of caspase 3 and TNF-α was significantly higher. The other outpatients (n = 20 and all the examined patients needing endoprosthetic replacement were ascertained to have a higher gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, caspase 3, and TNF-α than in the control group. Before endoprosthetic replacement, severe joint destruction in patients with OA was associated with enhanced gene expression of mTOR, ATG1, p21, and caspase 3. Conclusion. In early-stage disease, increased mTOR gene expression may serve as a prognostic marker of the severity of the disease and articular cartilage destruction.

  9. Embryonic exposure to an aqueous coal dust extract results in gene expression alterations associated with the development and function of connective tissue and the hematological system, immunological and inflammatory disease, and cancer in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Wirbisky-Hershberger, Sara E; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; de la Rosa, Jesus; Freeman, Jennifer L

    2018-03-01

    Coal mining is one of the economic activities with the greatest impact on environmental quality. At all stages contaminants are released as particulates such as coal dust. The first aim of this study was to obtain an aqueous coal dust extract and characterize its composition in terms of trace elements by ICP-MS. In addition, the developmental toxicity of the aqueous coal extract was evaluated using zebrafish (Danio rerio) after exposure to different concentrations (0-1000 ppm; μg mL -1 ) to establish acute toxicity, morphology and transcriptome changes. Trace elements within the aqueous coal dust extract present at the highest concentrations (>10 ppb) included Sr, Zn, Ba, As, Cu and Se. In addition, Cd and Pb were found in lower concentrations. No significant difference in mortality was observed (p > 0.05), but a delay in hatching was found at 0.1 and 1000 ppm (p 0.05). Transcriptomic results of zebrafish larvae revealed alterations in 77, 61 and 1376 genes in the 1, 10, and 100 ppm groups, respectively. Gene ontology analysis identified gene alterations associated with the development and function of connective tissue and the hematological system, as well as pathways associated with apoptosis, the cell cycle, transcription, and oxidative stress including the MAPK signaling pathway. In addition, altered genes were associated with cancer; connective tissue, muscular, and skeletal disorders; and immunological and inflammatory diseases. Overall, this is the first study to characterize gene expression alterations in response to developmental exposure to aqueous coal dust residue from coal mining with transcriptome results signifying functions and systems to target in future studies.

  10. In-silico gene co-expression network analysis in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with reference to haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic fungus is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease globally affecting millions of people. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily hydrolases enzyme in the fungi, in particular, is known to be responsible in the pathogenesis by adhering to the tissue. Hence, identification of novel drug targets is essential. Aims: In-silico based identification of co-expressed genes along with HAD superfamily hydrolase in P. brasiliensis during the morphogenesis from mycelium to yeast to identify possible genes as drug targets. Materials and Methods: In total, four datasets were retrieved from the NCBI-gene expression omnibus (GEO database, each containing 4340 genes, followed by gene filtration expression of the data set. Further co-expression (CE study was performed individually and then a combination these genes were visualized in the Cytoscape 2. 8.3. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and standard deviation value of the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene was obtained from the expression data and this value was subsequently used for the CE calculation purpose by selecting specific correlation power and filtering threshold. Results: The 23 genes that were thus obtained are common with respect to the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene. A significant network was selected from the Cytoscape network visualization that contains total 7 genes out of which 5 genes, which do not have significant protein hits, obtained from gene annotation of the expressed sequence tags by BLAST X. For all the protein PSI-BLAST was performed against human genome to find the homology. Conclusions: The gene co-expression network was obtained with respect to HAD superfamily dehalogenase gene in P. Brasiliensis.

  11. Glycomic Expression in Esophageal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mohanty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is among the most common post translation modifications of proteins in humans. Decades of research have demonstrated that aberrant glycosylation can lead to malignant degeneration. Glycoproteomic studies in the past several years have identified techniques that can successfully characterize a glycan or glycan profile associated with a high-grade dysplastic or malignant state. This review summarizes the current glycomic and glycoproteomic literature with specific reference to esophageal cancer. Esophageal adenocarcinoma represents a highly morbid and mortal cancer with a defined progression from metaplasia (Barrett's esophagus to dysplasia to neoplasia. This disease is highlighted because (1 differences in glycan profiles between the stages of disease progression have been described in the glycoproteomic literature; (2 a glycan biomarker that identifies a given stage may be used as a predictor of disease progression and thus may have significant influence over clinical management; and (3 the differences in glycan profiles between disease and disease-free states in esophageal cancer are more dramatic than in other cancers.

  12. Basal gene expression by lung CD4+ T cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease identifies independent molecular correlates of airflow obstruction and emphysema extent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Freeman

    Full Text Available Lung CD4+ T cells accumulate as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD progresses, but their role in pathogenesis remains controversial. To address this controversy, we studied lung tissue from 53 subjects undergoing clinically-indicated resections, lung volume reduction, or transplant. Viable single-cell suspensions were analyzed by flow cytometry or underwent CD4+ T cell isolation, followed either by stimulation with anti-CD3 and cytokine/chemokine measurement, or by real-time PCR analysis. In lung CD4+ T cells of most COPD subjects, relative to lung CD4+ T cells in smokers with normal spirometry: (a stimulation induced minimal IFN-γ or other inflammatory mediators, but many subjects produced more CCL2; (b the T effector memory subset was less uniformly predominant, without correlation with decreased IFN-γ production. Analysis of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cells of all subjects identified a molecular phenotype, mainly in COPD, characterized by markedly reduced mRNA transcripts for the transcription factors controlling TH1, TH2, TH17 and FOXP3+ T regulatory subsets and their signature cytokines. This mRNA-defined CD4+ T cell phenotype did not result from global inability to elaborate mRNA; increased transcripts for inhibitory CD28 family members or markers of anergy; or reduced telomerase length. As a group, these subjects had significantly worse spirometry, but not DLCO, relative to subjects whose lung CD4+ T cells expressed a variety of transcripts. Analysis of mRNA transcripts of unstimulated lung CD4+ T cell among all subjects identified two distinct molecular correlates of classical COPD clinical phenotypes: basal IL-10 transcripts correlated independently and inversely with emphysema extent (but not spirometry; by contrast, unstimulated IFN-γ transcripts correlated independently and inversely with reduced spirometry (but not reduced DLCO or emphysema extent. Aberrant lung CD4+ T cells polarization appears to be common in advanced

  13. Genetic anaylsis of a disease resistance gene from loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinghua Huang; Nili Jin; Alex Diner; Chuck Tauer; Yan Zhang; John Damicone

    2003-01-01

    Rapid advances in molecular genetics provide great opportunities for studies of host defense mechanisms. Examination of plant responses to disease at the cellular and molecular level permits both discovery of changes in gene expression in the tissues attacked by pathogens, and identification of genetic components involved in the interaction between host and pathogens....

  14. Classification across gene expression microarray studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuner Ruprecht

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of gene expression microarray studies represents an important resource in biomedical research. As a result, gene expression based diagnosis has entered clinical practice for patient stratification in breast cancer. However, the integration and combined analysis of microarray studies remains still a challenge. We assessed the potential benefit of data integration on the classification accuracy and systematically evaluated the generalization performance of selected methods on four breast cancer studies comprising almost 1000 independent samples. To this end, we introduced an evaluation framework which aims to establish good statistical practice and a graphical way to monitor differences. The classification goal was to correctly predict estrogen receptor status (negative/positive and histological grade (low/high of each tumor sample in an independent study which was not used for the training. For the classification we chose support vector machines (SVM, predictive analysis of microarrays (PAM, random forest (RF and k-top scoring pairs (kTSP. Guided by considerations relevant for classification across studies we developed a generalization of kTSP which we evaluated in addition. Our derived version (DV aims to improve the robustness of the intrinsic invariance of kTSP with respect to technologies and preprocessing. Results For each individual study the generalization error was benchmarked via complete cross-validation and was found to be similar for all classification methods. The misclassification rates were substantially higher in classification across studies, when each single study was used as an independent test set while all remaining studies were combined for the training of the classifier. However, with increasing number of independent microarray studies used in the training, the overall classification performance improved. DV performed better than the average and showed slightly less variance. In

  15. Gene Expression Correlation for Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbing Ling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor prognosis for late-stage, high-grade, and recurrent cancers has been motivating cancer researchers to search for more efficient biomarkers to identify the onset of cancer. Recent advances in constructing and dynamically analyzing biomolecular networks for different types of cancer have provided a promising novel strategy to detect tumorigenesis and metastasis. The observation of different biomolecular networks associated with normal and cancerous states led us to hypothesize that correlations for gene expressions could serve as valid indicators of early cancer development. In this pilot study, we tested our hypothesis by examining whether the mRNA expressions of three randomly selected cancer-related genes PIK3C3, PIM3, and PTEN were correlated during cancer progression and the correlation coefficients could be used for cancer diagnosis. Strong correlations (0.68≤r≤1.0 were observed between PIK3C3 and PIM3 in breast cancer, between PIK3C3 and PTEN in breast and ovary cancers, and between PIM3 and PTEN in breast, kidney, liver, and thyroid cancers during disease progression, implicating that the correlations for cancer network gene expressions could serve as a supplement to current clinical biomarkers, such as cancer antigens, for early cancer diagnosis.

  16. Codon usage and amino acid usage influence genes expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-02-01

    Highly expressed genes in any species differ in the usage frequency of synonymous codons. The relative recurrence of an event of the favored codon pair (amino acid pairs) varies between gene and genomes due to varying gene expression and different base composition. Here we propose a new measure for predicting the gene expression level, i.e., codon plus amino bias index (CABI). Our approach is based on the relative bias of the favored codon pair inclination among the genes, illustrated by analyzing the CABI score of the Medicago truncatula genes. CABI showed strong correlation with all other widely used measures (CAI, RCBS, SCUO) for gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, CABI outperforms all other measures by showing better correlation with the wet-lab data. This emphasizes the importance of the neighboring codons of the favored codon in a synonymous group while estimating the expression level of a gene.

  17. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metasta