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Sample records for disease faces continuing

  1. Global Binary Continuity for Color Face Detection With Complex Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavadi, Bhaskar; Mahendra Prashanth, K. V.; Joshi, Sujay S.; Suprathik, N.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to detect human faces in color images, with complex background. The proposed algorithm makes use of basically two color space models, specifically HSV and YCgCr. The color segmented image is filled uniformly with a single color (binary) and then all unwanted discontinuous lines are removed to get the final image. Experimental results on Caltech database manifests that the purported model is able to accomplish far better segmentation for faces of varying orientations, skin color and background environment.

  2. Managing urban flooding in the face of continuous change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zevenbergen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many cities around the world are facing the challenges of sustainable living and development and are exploring ways to enhance their ability to manage an uncertain future. Drivers and pressures include relative wealth; population growth; the provision of food; lifestyle expectations; energy and

  3. Foam-injected sandwich panels with continuous-reinforced facings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menrath, A.; Henning, F.; Huber, T.; Roch, A.; Riess, C.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic foam injection molding (FIM) in combination with insert molding (IM) offers a possibility to generate sandwich panels in a one-step process. The prepared face sheets are first positioned inside the mold. A preheating process is carried out using quartz infrared emitters, which are mounted on a linear robot, before the mold is closed. The injection of the gas/melt mixture is combined with an embossing of the mold to further improve the face-core-adhesion. Finally, to initiate the foaming process, adjust the extent of foaming of the core and achieve the desired component dimensions, a mold opening stroke is carried out. The process described was performed with different facing materials, layer dimensions and overall wall thicknesses. Drawn PP fabrics (Curv®) as well as PP/GF70 tapes and consolidated sheets (unidirectional) were used to generate sandwich panels in a range of 5 to 6.4 mm thickness. PP was also chosen to form the foamed core which, in combination with the Curv® face sheets, produces a fully recyclable self-reinforced polymer (SRP) composite. Detailed process descriptions and the results of bending tests demonstrate the high potential. Other focuses are the preheating process and the foam structure.

  4. Face proprioception does not modulate access to visual awareness of emotional faces in a continuous flash suppression paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, Sebastian; Osimo, Sofia A; Suran, Tiziano; Goldstein, Ariel; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida

    2017-05-01

    An important question in neuroscience is which multisensory information, presented outside of awareness, can influence the nature and speed of conscious access to our percepts. Recently, proprioceptive feedback of the hand was reported to lead to faster awareness of congruent hand images in a breaking continuous flash suppression (b-CFS) paradigm. Moreover, a vast literature suggests that spontaneous facial mimicry can improve emotion recognition, even without awareness of the stimulus face. However, integration of visual and proprioceptive information about the face to date has not been tested with CFS. The modulation of visual awareness of emotional faces by facial proprioception was investigated across three separate experiments. Face proprioception was induced with voluntary facial expressions or with spontaneous facial mimicry. Frequentist statistical analyses were complemented with Bayesian statistics. No evidence of multisensory integration was found, suggesting that proprioception does not modulate access to visual awareness of emotional faces in a CFS paradigm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Are we facing a noncommunicable disease pandemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke

    2017-03-01

    The global boom in premature mortality and morbidity from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) shares many similarities with pandemics of infectious diseases, yet public health professionals have resisted the adoption of this label. It is increasingly apparent that NCDs are actually communicable conditions, and although the vectors of disease are nontraditional, the pandemic label is apt. Arguing for a change in terminology extends beyond pedantry as the move carries serious implications for the public health community and the general public. Additional resources are unlocked once a disease reaches pandemic proportions and, as a long-neglected and underfunded group of conditions, NCDs desperately require a renewed sense of focus and political attention. This paper provides objections, definitions, and advantages to approaching the leading cause of global death through an alternative lens. A novel framework for managing NCDs is presented with reference to the traditional influenza pandemic response. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

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    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  7. Access to Awareness for Faces during Continuous Flash Suppression Is Not Modulated by Affective Knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Rabovsky

    Full Text Available It is a controversially debated topic whether stimuli can be analyzed up to the semantic level when they are suppressed from visual awareness during continuous flash suppression (CFS. Here, we investigated whether affective knowledge, i.e., affective biographical information about faces, influences the time it takes for initially invisible faces with neutral expressions to overcome suppression and break into consciousness. To test this, we used negative, positive, and neutral famous faces as well as initially unfamiliar faces, which were associated with negative, positive or neutral biographical information. Affective knowledge influenced ratings of facial expressions, corroborating recent evidence and indicating the success of our affective learning paradigm. Furthermore, we replicated shorter suppression durations for upright than for inverted faces, demonstrating the suitability of our CFS paradigm. However, affective biographical information did not modulate suppression durations for newly learned faces, and even though suppression durations for famous faces were influenced by affective knowledge, these effects did not differ between upright and inverted faces, indicating that they might have been due to low-level visual differences. Thus, we did not obtain unequivocal evidence for genuine influences of affective biographical information on access to visual awareness for faces during CFS.

  8. Continuity planning for workplace infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Nancy; Miller, Pamela Blair; Engle, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, business continuity plans prepare for worst-case scenarios; people plan for the exception rather than the common. Plans focus on infrastructure damage and recovery wrought by such disasters as hurricanes, terrorist events or tornadoes. Yet, another very real threat looms present every day, every season and can strike without warning, wreaking havoc on the major asset -- human capital. Each year, millions of dollars are lost in productivity, healthcare costs, absenteeism and services due to infectious, communicable diseases. Sound preventive risk management and recovery strategies can avert this annual decimation of staff and ensure continuous business operation. This paper will present a strong economic justification for the recognition, prevention and mitigation of communicable diseases as a routine part of continuity planning for every business. Recommendations will also be provided for environmental/engineering controls as well as personnel policies that address employee and customer protection, supply chain contacts and potential legal issues.

  9. Financial Conflicts Facing Late-Life Remarried Alzheimer's Disease Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Carey Wexler; Bauer, Jean W.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores financial conflicts faced by late-life remarried wives providing care for their husbands with Alzheimer's disease. Interviews with 9 women identified intergenerational secrets and tensions regarding financial and inheritance decisions. Participants' remarried spouse status, underlying family boundary ambiguities,…

  10. Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler; Brotherton, Chloe

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we investigate how a face is not a singular, invariable object, but may take on a variety of forms, and how new media has especially created new venues for the moldings of faces. We suggest that faces should be viewed in plural in order to emphasize the many different facial disp...

  11. Mental rotation of faces in healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra A Adduri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown that individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD develop visuospatial difficulties that affect their ability to mentally rotate objects. Surprisingly, the existing literature has generally ignored the impact of this mental rotation deficit on the ability of AD patients to recognize faces from different angles. Instead, the devastating loss of the ability to recognize friends and family members in AD has primarily been attributed to memory loss and agnosia in later stages of the disorder. The impact of AD on areas of the brain important for mental rotation should not be overlooked by face processing investigations -- even in early stages of the disorder. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study investigated the sensitivity of face processing in AD, young controls and older non-neurological controls to two changes of the stimuli -- a rotation in depth and an inversion. The control groups showed a systematic effect of depth rotation, with errors increasing with the angle of rotation, and with inversion. The majority of the AD group was not impaired when faces were presented upright and no transformation in depth was required, and were most accurate when all faces were presented in frontal views, but accuracy was severely impaired with any rotation or inversion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that with the onset of AD, mental rotation difficulties arise that affect the ability to recognize faces presented at different angles. The finding that a frontal view is "preferred" by these patients provides a valuable communication strategy for health care workers.

  12. Face of the giant panda sign in Wilson disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Chakraborty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wilson disease usually presents with neurologic or hepatic manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain is very informative in diagnosiing of this disease, especially in patients with neurological features. High T2 signal intensity in the corpus striatum is the most commonly encountered MRI finding. The 'face of the giant panda' sign is seen on axial T2-weighted MRI, and results from abnormal signal intensities in the midbrain. Though uncommon, the sign is considered as the pathognomonic MRI sign of Wilson disease.

  13. Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristine Køhler; Brotherton, Chloe

    2018-01-01

    for the face the be put into action. Based on an ethnographic study of Danish teenagers’ use of SnapChat we demonstrate how the face is used as a central medium for interaction with peers. Through the analysis of visual SnapChat messages we investigate how SnapChat requires the sender to put an ‘ugly’ face...... displays a single person make use of, and how this ‘pool of faces’ carries sociocultural meaning. While the past decades of swift technological development may seem to have diminished the role of face to face contact, the many new media has – on the contrary – established multiple new and innovative arenas...... forward. Especially the teenage girls engage in manipulating their faces into hideous expressions. However, this type of interaction is not random facial displays, but follow an ‘aesthetics of ugliness’. This aesthetics involve specific ways of looking ugly and is primarily performed by girls who have...

  14. Age-Related Differences in Brain Electrical Activity during Extended Continuous Face Recognition in Younger Children, Older Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W.; Glimmerveen, Johanna C.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.; Martens, Vanessa E. G.; de Bruin, Eveline A.

    2011-01-01

    To examine the development of recognition memory in primary-school children, 36 healthy younger children (8-9 years old) and 36 healthy older children (11-12 years old) participated in an ERP study with an extended continuous face recognition task (Study 1). Each face of a series of 30 faces was shown randomly six times interspersed with…

  15. Community-University Partnerships: Achieving continuity in the face of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Silka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A challenge that community-university partnerships everywhere will face is how to maintain continuity in the face of change. The problems besetting communities continually shift and the goals of the university partners often fluctuate. This article describes a decade-long strategy one university has successfully used to address this problem. Over the past ten years, a community-university partnership at the University of Massachusetts Lowell has used summer content funding to respond creativity to shifting priorities. Each summer a research-action project is developed that targets a different content issue that has emerged with unexpected urgency. Teams of graduate students and high school students are charged with investigating this issue under the auspices of the partnership. These highly varied topics have included immigrant businesses, youth asset mapping, women owned businesses, the housing crisis, social program cutbacks, sustainability, and economic development and the arts. Despite their obvious differences, these topics share underlying features that further partnership commitment and continuity. Each has an urgency: the information is needed quickly, often because some immediate policy change is under consideration. Each topic has the advantage of drawing on multiple domains: the topics are inherently interdisciplinary and because they do not “belong” to any single field, they lend themselves to disciplines pooling their efforts to achieve greater understanding. Each also has high visibility: their salience has meant that people were often willing to devote scarce resources to the issues and also that media attention could easily be gained to highlight the advantages of students, partners, and the university working together. And the topics themselves are generative: they have the potential to contribute in many different ways to teaching, research, and outreach. This paper ends with a broader consideration of how partnerships can

  16. The Changing Face of Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Etiology, Physiopathology, Epidemiology

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    Clemente Actis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context The term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD classically includes ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD. An abnormally increased mucosal permeability seems to underlie UC, whereas CD is thought to be the result of an immune deficiency state. Evidence Acquisition While these phenomena may well be labeled as genetic factors, the environment has its role as well. Drugs (chiefly, antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory molecules, with proton pump inhibitors recently joining the list and smoking habits are all being scrutinized as IBD causative factors. Results Once almost unknown, the prevalence of IBD, in the Eastern World and China, is now increasing by manifold, therefore arousing warning signals. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach will soon be necessary, to face the tenacious behavior of IBD, on a global perspective.

  17. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J.; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore

  18. ERP Correlates of Target-Distracter Differentiation in Repeated Runs of a Continuous Recognition Task with Emotional and Neutral Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treese, Anne-Cecile; Johansson, Mikael; Lindgren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The emotional salience of faces has previously been shown to induce memory distortions in recognition memory tasks. This event-related potential (ERP) study used repeated runs of a continuous recognition task with emotional and neutral faces to investigate emotion-induced memory distortions. In the second and third runs, participants made more…

  19. Continuous oxygen therapy for hypoxic pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringbaek, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Continuous oxygen therapy (COT) has become widely accepted in the last 20 years in patients with continuous hypoxemia. This review focuses on guidelines for COT, adherence to these guidelines, and the effect of COT on survival, hospitalization, and quality of life. Guidelines for COT are mainly...

  20. Cat Scratch Disease: The Story Continues

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    Mary Anne Opavsky

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present a perspective on the current state of knowledge of cat scratch disease (CSD, including the evidence for Bartonella henselae as the etiological agent, epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the disease, available diagnostic tests and current therapeutic options.

  1. Chronic diseases--facing a public health challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, L A; Wilks, R J; Forrester, T E

    2001-09-01

    Middle income countries like those in the Caribbean can feel proud of their achievements in health care. There has been a dramatic fall-off in infant mortality and crude mortality rates along with significant improvements in life expectancy at birth. However, these countries now find themselves grappling with the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and cancer. There are good data to support the view that some of these diseases, in particular diabetes mellitus, have assumed epidemic proportions and there is concern that this fact may have been missed by many because of the surreptitious onset, as is the nature of the chronic diseases. The impact of this epidemic may have suffered because of the higher profile of more topical issues like HIV/AIDS even though the former makes a larger contribution to morbidity and mortality statistics. It is now obvious that despite the impact of other factors, lifestyle changes are the major contributors to the epidemic. In populations of similar genetic stock, living in significantly different socio-economic circumstances, the impact of increased dietary salt, increasing obesity and decreased physical activity on the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and lipid disorders is unequivocal. Data from the developed world, which has already been through this epidemic of chronic diseases, have shown that increasing technological advances in medical care is an inefficient way to respond to the situation. A multi-sectoral approach is required to tackle this epidemic, including the provision of incentives for healthy eating and widespread opportunities for increased exercise and other physical activities. Continued research into the evolution of the epidemic, including reliable estimates via surveillance methods is a necessary component of our response. The problems and the solutions are not only the responsibilities of the health officials but must involve

  2. Continuing communicable disease burden in Eritrea | Mufunda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and methodsA retrospective study of the national health profile of Eritreans, focusing on acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI), tuberculosis (TB), diarrhoea, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV / AIDS, was done on data from 1998 to 2003 through a health information management system. Records ...

  3. Upper and Lower Face and Ideomotor Apraxia in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jay Guido Capone; Sergio Della Sala; Hans Spinnler; Annalena Venneri

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Apraxia of face movement in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been rarely investigated. This study aimed at investigating the frequency of lower (mouth, tongue and throat) and upper (eyes and eyebrows) face apraxia, in AD and its relationship with limb apraxia and severity of dementia. Methods: Fifty seven patients with AD were tested with a new standardised test of face apraxia including upper and lower face movements, which uses an item-difficulty weigthed scoring procedure, the IM...

  4. Not on the Face Alone: Perception of Contextualized Face Expressions in Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviezer, Hillel; Bentin, Shlomo; Hassin, Ran R.; Meschino, Wendy S.; Kennedy, Jeanne; Grewal, Sonya; Esmail, Sherali; Cohen, Sharon; Moscovitch, Morris

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that Huntington's disease mutation-carriers have deficient explicit recognition of isolated facial expressions. There are no studies, however, which have investigated the recognition of facial expressions embedded within an emotional body and scene context. Real life facial expressions are typically embedded in…

  5. Upper and Lower Face and Ideomotor Apraxia in Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Guido Capone

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apraxia of face movement in Alzheimer's disease (AD has been rarely investigated. This study aimed at investigating the frequency of lower (mouth, tongue and throat and upper (eyes and eyebrows face apraxia, in AD and its relationship with limb apraxia and severity of dementia.

  6. [The third and new face of Chagas disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pays, J-F

    2016-08-01

    After the publication of the results of the BENEFIT study concluding that the benznidazole (5 mg/kg/d/60 d) is ineffective to stop the progression of the established Chagas' cardiomyopathy in adults, the author evokes the new experiences and the new challenges of 2016 regarding Chagas disease while speculating on its future and by calling back some elements little known of his history, in particular the fact that it is Chagas who invented about it to some extent the concept of "neglected disease".

  7. Inflammatory bowel disease and anxiety: links, risks, and challenges faced

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    Bannaga AS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ayman S Bannaga,1 Christian P Selinger2 1Department of Gastroenterology, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster, UK; 2Department of Gastroenterology, St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD causes severe physical symptoms and is also associated with psychological comorbidities. Abnormal anxiety levels are found in up to 40% of patients with IBD. Anxiety symptoms are often related to flares of IBD but may persist in times of remission. Detection of anxiety disorder (AD in patients with IBD can be challenging. Patients with anxiety may also exhibit symptoms in keeping with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID. Evidence for the effectiveness of pharmacological and psychological therapies for anxiety stems from patients without IBD. Studies in patients with IBD have either been small or shown negative results. In light of this, a combined approach involving IBD physicians to improve disease control and psychologists or psychiatrists to treat anxiety is advised. This review examines the evidence of anxiety issues in IBD with a focus on extent of the problem, risk factors for anxiety, and the effectiveness of interventions. Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, anxiety

  8. The Many Faces of Elongator in Neurodevelopment and Disease

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    Marija Kojic

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system requires a variety of cellular activities, such as proliferation, migration, axonal outgrowth and guidance and synapse formation during the differentiation of neural precursors into mature neurons. Malfunction of these highly regulated and coordinated events results in various neurological diseases. The Elongator complex is a multi-subunit complex highly conserved in eukaryotes whose function has been implicated in the majority of cellular activities underlying neurodevelopment. These activities include cell motility, actin cytoskeleton organization, exocytosis, polarized secretion, intracellular trafficking, and the maintenance of neural function. Several studies have associated mutations in Elongator subunits with the neurological disorders familial dysautonomia, intellectual disability, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and rolandic epilepsy. Here, we review the various cellular activities assigned to this complex and discuss the implications for neural development and disease. Further research in this area has the potential to generate new diagnostic tools, better prevention strategies and more effective treatment options for a wide variety of neurological disorders.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease and anxiety: links, risks, and challenges faced

    OpenAIRE

    Bannaga AS; Selinger CP

    2015-01-01

    Ayman S Bannaga,1 Christian P Selinger2 1Department of Gastroenterology, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Doncaster, UK; 2Department of Gastroenterology, St James University Hospital, Leeds, UK Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) causes severe physical symptoms and is also associated with psychological comorbidities. Abnormal anxiety levels are found in up to 40% of patients with IBD. Anxiety symptoms are often related to flares of IBD but may persist in times of remission. Detection of anx...

  10. [Gumboro's disease continues to claim attention: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunius, W W; de Wit, J J

    1990-03-01

    An outbreak of Gumboro disease occurred at the end of 1988 on a broiler farm having four houses and birds of two different age groups. The infection 'lingered' in the subsequent flocks, a striking feature consisting in the fact that the pattern of disease was identical in almost every case. Symptoms of Gumboro disease were not observed in the compartment housing the oldest broilers. The birds in this house continued to show low titres at the close of the fattening period. Gumboro disease was observed on the 19th and 20th days of life or on the 29th-33rd days of life in the other houses. Mortality was highest in the latter case. The final conclusion is that the difference in age between the houses probably makes the high pressure of infection possible. Consistent vaccination reduced the problem of Gumboro disease on the farm.

  11. Cyber crime: can a standard risk analysis help in the challenges facing business continuity managers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Putte, Danny; Verhelst, Marc

    Risk management has never been easy. Finding efficient mitigating measures is not always straightforward. Finding measures for cyber crime, however, is a really huge challenge because cyber threats are changing all the time. As the sophistication of these threats is growing, their impact increases. Moreover, society and its economy have become increasingly dependent on information and communication technologies. Standard risk analysis methodologies will help to score the cyber risk and to place it in the risk tolerance matrix. This will allow business continuity managers to figure out if there is still a gap with the maximum tolerable outage for time-critical business processes and if extra business continuity measures are necessary to fill the gap.

  12. Another face of placebo: The lessebo effect in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A.; Shah, Prakesh; Marras, Connie; Tomlinson, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the impact of negative expectation related to receiving a placebo (the “lessebo effect”) on efficacy outcome measures of symptomatic treatments in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: We conducted meta-analyses of double-blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of dopamine agonists in PD and compared the pooled mean score change of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (mUPDRS) across active treatment arms according to the presence of a placebo arm or the probability of placebo assignment (0%, <50%, and 50%) of the original RCT. A mixed-effects model was used. Heterogeneity was assessed by subgroup analyses and meta-regression modeling. Results: A total of 28 study arms were extracted from active-controlled trials (3,277 patients) and 42 from placebo-controlled trials (4,554 patients). The overall difference between groups in the pooled mean score change in the mUPDRS was 1.6 units (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2, 3.0; p = 0.023), in favor of the active-controlled group. In subgroup analyses, this difference was of higher magnitude in the early PD group without motor fluctuations (3.3 mUPDRS units, 95% CI 1.1, 5.4; p = 0.003) and for study duration ≤12 weeks (4.1 mUPDRS units, 95% CI 1.0, 7.2; p = 0.009). There was no between-group difference using probability of placebo assignment as criterion. Conclusions: This study shows that the use of a placebo can be associated with a clinically significant reduction in the magnitude of change of the mUPDRS after an active treatment in RCTs for PD. These new findings have potential implications in the development of new treatments and appraisal of current treatment options for PD and possibly for other neurologic disorders. PMID:24658930

  13. Face of the giant panda sign in Wilson disease | Chakraborty | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wilson disease usually presents with neurological or hepatic manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain is most informative in diagnosing this disease, especially in patients with neurological features. High T2 signal intensity in the corpus striatum is the most commonly encountered MRI finding. The 'face ...

  14. Streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis: multiple faces of the same disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, O; Roset, A; Sobrino, B; Lora-Tamayo, J; Verdaguer, R; Jiménez-Mejias, E; Nolla, J M; Colmenero, J de D; Ariza, J

    2014-01-01

    The role of Streptococcus species as an aetiological microorganism of vertebral osteomyelitis (VO) is considered to be of little relevance. We aimed to describe a large number of cases of streptococcal vertebral osteomyelitis (SVO), to analyze the clinical features associated with different Streptococcus species, and to compare them with a cohort of patients with VO caused by Staphylococcus aureus. An incidence study and a retrospective, multicenter, observational clinical study of cases of SVO (1991-2011) were performed. Statistical comparison of SVO by different species and between them and staphylococcal VO was carried out. Over the whole period there was an increasing incidence in the number of VOs and SVOs per year (p viridans streptococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus pyogenes; n = 26) mimicked VO by S. aureus, and presented with more fever, neurological symptoms and paravertebral abscesses in comparison with those caused by the viridans group (remaining species). In contrast, the latter have a sub-acute clinical picture and were associated with the presence of endocarditis (p viridans SVOs, concomitant infection was specifically related to S. pneumoniae (p viridans group. Whereas non-viridans SVO mimics acute characteristics of VO caused by S. aureus, cases of viridans SVO are significantly more likely to have a sub-acute clinical presentation. The increased incidence of SVO during the last decades could support a new epidemiological scenario. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  15. Continuous Traumatic Situations in the Face of Ongoing Political Violence: The Relationship Between CTS and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Shoval-Zuckerman, Yael

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a literature review of the concept of continuous traumatic situations (CTS), which relates to residents living in ongoing situations of political violence and national security threats. The first aim of this review is to narrow the gap regarding knowledge about the concept of CTS by presenting findings from studies that have assessed the effects of CTS on civilian populations. The second aim is to describe CTS in a way that highlights the differences and similarities between posttraumatic stress disorder and responses to CTS. This distinction is a necessary precondition for examining CTS, as is a careful clinical analysis of the development and course of symptoms. This literature review also highlights the importance of adopting a supplementary perspective for understanding the psychological impact of ongoing exposure to real threats, which can be used as a basis for developing intervention strategies that are appropriate for coping with life in the context of persistent violence. CTS can be manifested as emotions, behaviors, and perceptions among individuals, families, communities, and societies. The nature of the proposed model of CTS is a circular one, combining past and future perceptions and emotional reactions that have resulted from continuous and repeated traumatic experiences over an extended period of time. This wider understanding reflects the complexity of the CTS phenomenon. Various micro and macro interventions relating to CTS as the result of political violence situations and national security threats are presented, and recommendations for practice, policy, and future research are offered. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K; Gerds, T A; Licht, R W

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic dialysis or renal transplantation. Continuing lithium (HR = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.37-0.90) and continuing anticonvulsants (HR = 0.53 (95% CI: 0.44-0.64) were associated with decreased rates of end-stage CKD. In the subcohorts of patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, continuing lithium was associated with decreased end-stage CKD (HR = 0.40 (95% CI: 0.17-0.98), whereas continuing anticonvulsants was not (HR = 0.70 (95% CI: 0.21-2.37). There were no interactions of continuing lithium and anticonvulsants. After an initial diagnosis of CKD, patients who are selected by their physicians to continue lithium treatment may not necessarily have an increased risk of developing end-stage CKD. Shifting to an anticonvulsant per se may not be associated with an advantage; however, this requires further investigation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Children and adolescents facing a continuous security threat: Aggressive behavior and post-traumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit

    2017-07-01

    There is extensive research evidence indicating that children and youth are the most vulnerable population for developing psychological symptoms relating to war and terror. Although studies have documented a wide range of detrimental emotional and behavioral effects of such exposure, much less is known about the effects of exposure to a continuous security threat for children and adolescents. Against this background, the current article examined the implications of continuous exposure to missile attacks among 1096 children and adolescents enrolled in public schools near the Israeli border with Gaza. Participants filled out quantitative questionnaires, which relate to the pathological consequences of continuous exposure to security threats, and to the role of the school and the community as a protective environment against disruptive behavior resulting from such exposure. The findings revealed that PTSS responses were mainly related to the security threat, whereas interpersonal aggression resulted from other types of traumatic events. Significant differences were found between aggression and posttraumatic symptoms, by age and gender. PTSS was found to be lower for older participants and higher for girls, whereas aggression was higher for boys and higher for older participants. Furthermore, the sense of belonging to the place of residence was negatively associated with PTSS as well as with aggressive behavior: the higher the participants' sense of belonging, the lower their levels of PTSS and aggressive responses. In contrast, the sense of belonging to the school was negatively associated only with aggressive behavior: the higher the participants' sense of belonging to the school, the lower their aggressive responses. The findings are discussed in the light of trauma theories and in light of the results of previous research. The study contributed to knowledge about the differential consequences of exposure to a security threat, and highlighted the importance of

  18. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from...... 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic...

  19. Using Interactive Animations to Enhance Teaching, Learning, and Retention of Respiration Pathway Concepts in Face-to-Face and Online High School, Undergraduate, and Continuing Education Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sederick C. Rice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One major tool set teachers/instructors can use is online interactive animations, which presents content in a way that helps pique students' interest and differentiates instructional content.  The Virtual Cell Animation Collections (VCAC, developed from the Molecular and Cellular Biology Learning Center, has developed a series of online interactive animations that provide teacher/instructors and students with immersive learning tools for studying and understanding respiration processes.  These virtual tools work as powerful instructional devices to help explain and reinforce concepts of metabolic pathways that would normally be taught traditionally using static textbook pages or by neumonic flashcards. High school, undergraduate, and continuing education students of today learn and retain knowledge differently than their predecessors.  Now teachers face new challenges and must engage and assess students, within a small window during classroom instruction, but also have the skills to provide useful content in distance learning environments.  Educators have to keep up with changing trends in education as a result of technological advances, higher student/teacher ratios, and the influence of social media on education. It is critical for teachers/instructors to be able to present content that not only keeps students interested but also helps bridge learning gaps. VCAC provides high school, undergraduate, and continuing education biology or life science teachers/instructors with classroom strategies and tools for introducing respiration content through free open source online resources. VCAC content supports the development of more inquiry-based classroom and distance-learning environments that can be facilitated by teachers/instructors, which helps improve retention of important respiration subject content and problem-based learning skills for students.

  20. Bag exchange in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis without use of a face mask: experience of five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, A E; Poli de Figueiredo, C E; d'Avila, D O

    2001-01-01

    This article describes our five-year experience of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) with bag exchanges performed without use of a face mask. The study took place in the renal unit at a university hospital. All patients admitted to the CAPD program from February 1995 to March 2000 were trained to perform bag exchanges without use of a face mask. Occurrence of peritonitis episodes was the outcome of interest. We evaluated 94 patients (52 women, 42 men) with a mean age of 48 +/- 21 years and a total follow-up of 50,502 patient-days. During that time, 79 episodes of peritonitis occurred in 46 patients, for a peritonitis rate of 0.57 episodes/year. The most frequently isolated micro-organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis in 20 patients (25.3%) and S. aureus in 11 patients (13.9%). Renal transplantation was the major cause of drop-out [23 patients (43.4%)], followed by peritonitis [14 patients (26.4%)], death due to cardiovascular complications [9 patients (17.0%)], loss of ultrafiltration [2 patients (3.8%)], and other causes [5 patients (9.4%)]. The probability of being free of peritonitis at 12 months was 0.60, and at 60 months, 0.37. Peritonitis rates during the study period were not different from those reported by other centers, supporting the hypothesis that routine use of a face mask during CAPD bag exchange may be unnecessary.

  1. Nonconscious Influences from Emotional Faces: A Comparison of Visual Crowding, Masking, and Continuous Flash Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eFaivre

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the study of nonconscious processing, different methods have been used in order to renderstimuli invisible. While their properties are well described, the level at which they disruptnonconscious processing remains unclear. Yet, such accurate estimation of the depth ofnonconscious processes is crucial for a clear differentiation between conscious and nonconsciouscognition. Here, we compared the processing of facial expressions rendered invisible through gazecontingentcrowding (GCC, masking, and continuous flash suppression (CFS, three techniquesrelying on different properties of the visual system. We found that both pictures and videos of happyfaces suppressed from awareness by GCC were processed such as to bias subsequent preferencejudgments. The same stimuli manipulated with visual masking and CFS did not bias significantlypreference judgments, although they were processed such as to elicit perceptual priming. Asignificant difference in preference bias was found between GCC and CFS, but not between GCCand masking. These results provide new insights regarding the nonconscious impact of emotionalfeatures, and highlight the need for rigorous comparisons between the different methods employedto prevent perceptual awareness.

  2. How 'blended' is blended learning?: students' perceptions of issues around the integration of online and face-to-face learning in a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) health care context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glogowska, Margaret; Young, Pat; Lockyer, Lesley; Moule, Pam

    2011-11-01

    This paper explores students' perceptions of blended learning modules delivered in a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) health care context in the UK. 'Blended learning' is the term used to describe a hybrid model of learning where traditional face-to-face teaching approaches and newer electronic learning activities and resources are utilised together. A new model of CPD for health care practitioners based on a blended learning approach was developed at a university in the south west of England. As part of the evaluation of the new modules, a qualitative study was conducted, in which 17 students who had experienced the modules were interviewed by telephone. Three main themes emerged from the interviews relating to the 'blended' nature of the blended learning modules. These were i) issues around the opportunities for discussion of online materials face-to-face; ii) issues of what material should be online versus face-to-face and iii) balancing online and face-to-face components. Teaching staff engaged in the development of blended learning courses need to pay particular attention to the ways in which they develop and integrate online and face-to-face materials. More attention needs to be paid to allowing opportunity for students to come together to create a 'community of inquiry'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Eye contact effects on social preference and face recognition in normal ageing and in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopis, D; Baltazar, M; Geronikola, N; Beaucousin, V; Conty, L

    2017-12-01

    Perceiving a direct gaze (i.e. another individual's gaze directed to the observer leading to eye contact) influences positively a wide range of cognitive processes. In particular, direct gaze perception is known to stimulate memory for other's faces and to increase their likeability. Alzheimer's disease (AD) results in social withdrawal and cognitive decline. However, patients show preserved eye contact behaviours until the middle stage of the disease. The eye contact effects could be preserved in AD and be used to compensate for cognitive and social deficits. Yet, it is unknown whether these effects are preserved in normal ageing. The aim of this study was to address whether the positive effects of eye contact on memory for faces and likeability of others are preserved in healthy older adults and in patients with early to mild AD. Nineteen AD patients, 20 older adults and 20 young adults participated in our study. Participants were first presented with faces displaying either direct or averted gaze and rated each face's degree of likeability. They were then asked to identify the faces they had previously seen during a surprise recognition test. Results showed that the effect of eye contact on other's likeability was preserved in normal ageing and in AD. By contrast, an effect of eye contact on memory for faces seems to emerge only in young participants, suggesting that this effect declines with ageing. Interestingly, however, AD patients show a positive correlation between ratings of likeability and recognition scores, suggesting that they implicitly allocated their encoding resources to most likeable faces. These results open a new way for a "compensating" therapy in AD.

  4. Influence of Education on Disease Activity and Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Data From the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Angela; Wong-Pak, Andrew; Peschken, Christine A; Silverman, Earl; Pineau, Christian; Smith, C Douglas; Arbillaga, Hector; Zummer, Michel; Bernatsky, Sasha; Hudson, Marie; Hitchon, Carol; Fortin, Paul R; Nevskaya, Tatiana; Pope, Janet E

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether socioeconomic status assessed by education is associated with disease activity and the risk of organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Data from the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus, a multicenter database of adult SLE patients, was used to compare education as either low (did not complete high school) or high (completed high school or further) for disease activity and damage. Education was also studied as a continuous variable. The relationships between education and SLE outcomes (any organ damage defined as a Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index [SDI] score ≥1, serious organ damage [SDI score ≥3], and end-stage renal disease) were evaluated using logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and disease duration. A total of 562 SLE patients met inclusion criteria (mean age 47 years, 91% female, and mean disease duration of 10 years); 81% had high education. The low education group was twice as likely to be work disabled (30%; P education was significantly associated with higher disease activity at enrollment into the 1000 Canadian Faces of Lupus database, after adjustment for age (at entry and at diagnosis), race/ethnicity, and sex (B 1.255 + 0.507 [SE], β = 0.115, P = 0.014). In our adjusted logistic regression models we were unable to demonstrate significant associations between education and SLE damage. Results did not change when varying the education variable. In this cohort, low education was associated cross-sectionally with higher disease activity and work disability, but not damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  5. Telephone Consultation as a Substitute for Routine Out-patient Face-to-face Consultation for Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Randomised Controlled Trial and Economic Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Akobeng, Anthony K.; O'Leary, Neil; Vail, Andy; Brown, Nailah; Widiatmoko, Dono; Fagbemi, Andrew; Thomas, Adrian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the use of telephone consultation in childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is lacking. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost consequences of telephone consultation compared with the usual out-patient face-to-face consultation for young people with IBD. Methods: We conducted a randomised-controlled trial in Manchester, UK, between July 12, 2010 and June 30, 2013. Young people (aged 8–16 years) with IBD were randomized to receive telephone consultation o...

  6. Telephone Consultation as a Substitute for Routine Out-patient Face-to-face Consultation for Children With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Randomised Controlled Trial and Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akobeng, Anthony K; O'Leary, Neil; Vail, Andy; Brown, Nailah; Widiatmoko, Dono; Fagbemi, Andrew; Thomas, Adrian G

    2015-09-01

    Evidence for the use of telephone consultation in childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is lacking. We aimed to assess the effectiveness and cost consequences of telephone consultation compared with the usual out-patient face-to-face consultation for young people with IBD. We conducted a randomised-controlled trial in Manchester, UK, between July 12, 2010 and June 30, 2013. Young people (aged 8-16 years) with IBD were randomized to receive telephone consultation or face-to-face consultation for 24 months. The primary outcome measure was the paediatric IBD-specific IMPACT quality of life (QOL) score at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included patient satisfaction with consultations, disease course, anthropometric measures, proportion of consultations attended, duration of consultations, and costs to the UK National Health Service (NHS). Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02319798. Eighty six patients were randomised to receive either telephone consultation (n = 44) or face-to-face consultation (n = 42). Baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced. At 12 months, there was no evidence of difference in QOL scores (estimated treatment effect in favour of the telephone consultation group was 5.7 points, 95% CI - 2.9 to 14.3; p = 0.19). Mean consultation times were 9.8 min (IQR 8 to 12.3) for telephone consultation, and 14.3 min (11.6 to 17.0) for face-to-face consultation with an estimated reduction (95% CI) of 4.3 (2.8 to 5.7) min in consultation times (p consultation had a mean cost of UK£35.41 per patient consultation compared with £51.12 for face-face consultation, difference £15.71 (95% CI 11.8-19.6; P consultation compared with face-to-face consultation with regard to improvements in QOL scores, and telephone consultation reduced consultation time and NHS costs. Telephone consultation is a cost-effective alternative to face-to-face consultation for the

  7. Continuous cardiac troponin I release in Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feustel, Andreas; Hahn, Andreas; Schneider, Christian; Sieweke, Nicole; Franzen, Wolfgang; Gündüz, Dursun; Rolfs, Arndt; Tanislav, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder also affecting the heart. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of cardiac troponin I (cTNI) elevation, a sensitive parameter reflecting myocardial damage, in a smaller cohort of FD-patients, and to analyze whether persistent cTNI can be a suitable biomarker to assess cardiac dysfunction in FD. cTNI values were determined at least twice per year in 14 FD-patients (6 males and 8 females) regularly followed-up in our centre. The data were related to other parameters of heart function including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI). Three patients (21%) without specific vascular risk factors other than FD had persistent cTNI-elevations (range 0.05-0.71 ng/ml, normal: gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in all three individuals with cTNI values ≥0.01, while none of the 11 patients with cTNI <0.01 showed a pathological enhancement (p<0.01). Two subjects with increased cTNI-values underwent coronary angiography, excluding relevant stenoses. A myocardial biopsy performed in one during this procedure demonstrated substantial accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in cardiomyocytes. Continuous cTNI elevation seems to occur in a substantial proportion of patients with FD. The high accordance with LGE, reflecting cardiac dysfunction, suggests that cTNI-elevation can be a useful laboratory parameter for assessing myocardial damage in FD.

  8. Deriving consumer-facing disease concepts for family health histories using multi-source sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Nathan C; Wood, Grant M; Haug, Peter J; Williams, Marc S

    2010-10-01

    The family health history has long been recognized as an effective way of understanding individuals' susceptibility to familial disease; yet electronic tools to support the capture and use of these data have been characterized as inadequate. As part of an ongoing effort to build patient-facing tools for entering detailed family health histories, we have compiled a set of concepts specific to familial disease using multi-source sampling. These concepts were abstracted by analyzing family health history data patterns in our enterprise data warehouse, collection patterns of consumer personal health records, analyses from the local state health department, a healthcare data dictionary, and concepts derived from genetic-oriented consumer education materials. Collectively, these sources yielded a set of more than 500 unique disease concepts, represented by more than 2500 synonyms for supporting patients in entering coded family health histories. We expect that these concepts will be useful in providing meaningful data and education resources for patients and providers alike.

  9. Continuous cardiac troponin I release in Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Feustel

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is a rare lysosomal storage disorder also affecting the heart. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of cardiac troponin I (cTNI elevation, a sensitive parameter reflecting myocardial damage, in a smaller cohort of FD-patients, and to analyze whether persistent cTNI can be a suitable biomarker to assess cardiac dysfunction in FD.cTNI values were determined at least twice per year in 14 FD-patients (6 males and 8 females regularly followed-up in our centre. The data were related to other parameters of heart function including cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI.Three patients (21% without specific vascular risk factors other than FD had persistent cTNI-elevations (range 0.05-0.71 ng/ml, normal: <0.01. cMRI disclosed late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in all three individuals with cTNI values ≥0.01, while none of the 11 patients with cTNI <0.01 showed a pathological enhancement (p<0.01. Two subjects with increased cTNI-values underwent coronary angiography, excluding relevant stenoses. A myocardial biopsy performed in one during this procedure demonstrated substantial accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 in cardiomyocytes.Continuous cTNI elevation seems to occur in a substantial proportion of patients with FD. The high accordance with LGE, reflecting cardiac dysfunction, suggests that cTNI-elevation can be a useful laboratory parameter for assessing myocardial damage in FD.

  10. Discrimination and categorization of emotional facial expressions and faces in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Recio, Laura; Martín, Pilar; Rubio, Sandra; Serrano, Juan M

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to compare the ability to discriminate and categorize emotional facial expressions (EFEs) and facial identity characteristics (age and/or gender) in a group of 53 individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and another group of 53 healthy subjects. On the one hand, by means of discrimination and identification tasks, we compared two stages in the visual recognition process that could be selectively affected in individuals with PD. On the other hand, facial expression versus gender and age comparison permits us to contrast whether the emotional or non-emotional content influences the configural perception of faces. In Experiment I, we did not find differences between groups, either with facial expression or age, in discrimination tasks. Conversely, in Experiment II, we found differences between the groups, but only in the EFE identification task. Taken together, our results indicate that configural perception of faces does not seem to be globally impaired in PD. However, this ability is selectively altered when the categorization of emotional faces is required. A deeper assessment of the PD group indicated that decline in facial expression categorization is more evident in a subgroup of patients with higher global impairment (motor and cognitive). Taken together, these results suggest that the problems found in facial expression recognition may be associated with the progressive neuronal loss in frontostriatal and mesolimbic circuits, which characterizes PD. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  11. The ABC of benign breast disease | Ndhluni | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benign breast disease is common, although the incidence is sparsely documented in the literature and is probably quite underestimated. The main reason is that it is regarded as unimportant, with far more attention being focused on breast cancer. However, benign breast disease is far more common than breast cancer.

  12. Newcastle disease vaccines- a solved problem or a continuous challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease (ND) has been defined by the World Organization for Animal Health as infection of poultry with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). Lesions affecting the neurological, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and reproductive systems are most often observed. The control of ND m...

  13. Chronic kidney disease – the silent epidemic | Davids | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 25, No 8 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  14. Challenges faced by primary care physicians when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellappans, Renukha; Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2015-08-27

    The aim of this study was to identify the challenges faced by primary care physicians (PCPs) when prescribing medications for patients with chronic diseases in a teaching hospital in Malaysia. 3 focus group discussions were conducted between July and August 2012 in a teaching primary care clinic in Malaysia. A topic guide was used to facilitate the discussions which were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a thematic approach. PCPs affiliated to the primary care clinic were purposively sampled to include a range of clinical experience. Sample size was determined by thematic saturation of the data. 14 family medicine trainees and 5 service medical officers participated in this study. PCPs faced difficulties in prescribing for patients with chronic diseases due to a lack of communication among different healthcare providers. Medication changes made by hospital specialists, for example, were often not communicated to the PCPs leading to drug duplications and interactions. The use of paper-based medical records and electronic prescribing created a dual record system for patients' medications and became a problem when the 2 records did not tally. Patients sometimes visited different doctors and pharmacies for their medications and this resulted in the lack of continuity of care. PCPs also faced difficulties in addressing patients' concerns, and dealing with patients' medication requests and adherence issues. Some PCPs lacked time and knowledge to advise patients about their medications and faced difficulties in managing side effects caused by the patients' complex medication regimen. PCPs faced prescribing challenges related to patients, their own practice and the local health system when prescribing for patients with chronic diseases. These challenges must be addressed in order to improve chronic disease management in primary care and, more importantly, patient safety. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  15. Infectious Diseases Continued to be the World's Core Challenge

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Plague epidemic is going on in Madagascar. Many countries are in constant worries that such deadly infectious diseases might be carried from one part of the world to them (3). Although member countries signed an international agreement to report outbreaks promptly to the. World Health Organization and take steps to.

  16. Understanding perception of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among general practitioners, physicians, and pulmonologists in India: Results from a face-to-face survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Challenges exist in the diagnosis, management and follow-up of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in India. Lack of awareness of the disease, its symptoms and its implications may significantly contribute in preventing individuals with symptoms from seeking advice from their primary care physicians or eliminating risk factors. This cross-sectional survey aimed to explore the attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge of doctors (general practitioners [GPs], physicians and pulmonologists related to COPD recognition, diagnosis, and treatment in India. Methods: Data was collated from 91 randomly selected GPs, physicians and pulmonologists through a questionnaire and face-to-face interviews, in 8 cities of India. Results: The response rate to the survey was 68% (61 out of 91. Majority of the doctors (90% of GPs-physicians and 82% of pulmonologists reported that patients with COPD visit them at moderate to severe stages of the disease. 44% of the GPs and physicians reported that they had never performed spirometry to make a diagnosis of COPD. About 35% of doctors reported that COPD occurred only in smokers. The most common reported barriers to the treatment of COPD were difficulty in explaining COPD to the patients, poor patient compliance to the prescribed treatment and the inability of patients to give up smoking. Most doctors agreed that compliance with treatment is a major concern in patients with COPD due to an ageing population, existence of limited therapeutic options and presence of comorbidities. Conclusion: The results of this cross-sectional survey of doctors in India, highlighted the need for increasing the awareness about COPD at both doctor and patients level to overcome the prevalent under-diagnosis and under-treatment in COPD.

  17. An investigation into the challenges facing the future provision of continuing professional development for allied health professionals in a changing healthcare environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, Vivien

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines current challenges facing healthcare providers and education providers in trying to ensure Allied Health Professionals (AHPs) are fit for practice, in a climate driven by financial constraints and service improvement directives from the Department of Health (DH). Research was undertaken in 2009 to investigate the current provision of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the southwest region of England. The purpose was to define exactly what problems existed with this provision, and to propose changes which could be implemented in order to ensure that the provision meets the needs of stakeholders in future years.

  18. Spaced Retrieval Enhances Memory for a Name-Face-Occupation Association in Older Adults with Probable Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Katie E.; Walvoord, Ashley A. G.; Hawley, Karri S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors trained 4 older adults with probable Alzheimer's disease to recall a name-face-occupation association using the spaced retrieval technique. Six training sessions were administered over a 2-week period. On each trial, participants selected a target photograph and stated the target name and occupation at increasingly longer retention…

  19. [To face up the disease strategy as a risk factor for the life style in type 2 diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Rocha, Santiago Aritio; Galicia-Rodríguez, Liliana; Vargas-Daza, Emma Rosa; Martínez-González, Lidia; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    To identify to the life style as a risk factor after the strategy of facing the disease in type 2 diabetic patients. A study of cases and controls was made in patients with type 2 diabetes of five primary care units in the metropolitan area of Queretaro city. The sample size was of 48 patients by group. They were chosen by quota in the waiting room. Sociodemographic variables and health aspects were included in the questionnaire. The life style was investigated by the Instrument to Measure the Style of Life in Diabetics (IMEVID). For the evaluation of type of facing the scale of Strategy of Facing was used as opposed to extreme risks. Measures of central tendency, χ² and odds ratio were included. The type of active facing was a risk factor for the style of life with a p = 0.0001. The strategy of active facing disease is a risk factor for the style of life in the type 2 diabetic patient.

  20. Continuity of Care to Optimize Chronic Disease Management in the Community Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This evidence-based analysis reviews relational and management continuity of care. Relational continuity refers to the duration and quality of the relationship between the care provider and the patient. Management continuity ensures that patients receive coherent, complementary, and timely care. There are 4 components of continuity of care: duration, density, dispersion, and sequence. Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to determine if continuity of care is associated with decreased health resource utilization, improved patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database were searched for studies on continuity of care and chronic disease published from January 2002 until December 2011. Review Methods Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and observational studies were eligible if they assessed continuity of care in adults and reported health resource utilization, patient outcomes, or patient satisfaction. Results Eight systematic reviews and 13 observational studies were identified. The reviews concluded that there is an association between continuity of care and outcomes; however, the literature base is weak. The observational studies found that higher continuity of care was frequently associated with fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Three systematic reviews reported that higher continuity of care is associated with improved patient satisfaction, especially among patients with chronic conditions. Limitations Most of the studies were retrospective cross-sectional studies of large administrative databases. The databases do not capture information on trust and confidence in the provider, which is a critical component of relational continuity of care. The definitions for the selection of patients from the databases varied across studies. Conclusions There is low quality evidence that: Higher

  1. Famous faces and voices: Differential profiles in early right and left semantic dementia and in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzi, Simona; Baldinelli, Sara; Ranaldi, Valentina; Fabi, Katia; Cafazzo, Viviana; Fringuelli, Fabio; Silvestrini, Mauro; Provinciali, Leandro; Reverberi, Carlo; Gainotti, Guido

    2017-01-08

    Famous face and voice recognition is reported to be impaired both in semantic dementia (SD) and in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), although more severely in the former. In AD a coexistence of perceptual impairment in face and voice processing has also been reported and this could contribute to the altered performance in complex semantic tasks. On the other hand, in SD both face and voice recognition disorders could be related to the prevalence of atrophy in the right temporal lobe (RTL). The aim of the present study was twofold: (1) to investigate famous faces and voices recognition in SD and AD to verify if the two diseases show a differential pattern of impairment, resulting from disruption of different cognitive mechanisms; (2) to check if face and voice recognition disorders prevail in patients with atrophy mainly affecting the RTL. To avoid the potential influence of primary perceptual problems in face and voice recognition, a pool of patients suffering from early SD and AD were administered a detailed set of tests exploring face and voice perception. Thirteen SD (8 with prevalence of right and 5 with prevalence of left temporal atrophy) and 25 CE patients, who did not show visual and auditory perceptual impairment, were finally selected and were administered an experimental battery exploring famous face and voice recognition and naming. Twelve SD patients underwent cerebral PET imaging and were classified in right and left SD according to the onset modality and to the prevalent decrease in FDG uptake in right or left temporal lobe respectively. Correlation of PET imaging and famous face and voice recognition was performed. Results showed a differential performance profile in the two diseases, because AD patients were significantly impaired in the naming tests, but showed preserved recognition, whereas SD patients were profoundly impaired both in naming and in recognition of famous faces and voices. Furthermore, face and voice recognition disorders prevailed in SD

  2. Feasibility of an online and a face-to-face version of a self-management program for young adults with a rheumatic disease: experiences of young adults and peer leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, Judy; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Scholtus, Lieske; de Vos, André; Zwier, Matthijs; Bijlsma, Hans; Kruize, Aike A

    2014-03-25

    Based on the self-efficacy theory, an online and a face-to-face self-management programs 'Challenge your Arthritis' for young adults with a rheumatic disease have recently been developed. These two courses are led by young peer leaders. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of the online and face-to-face self-management program. Feasibility was evaluated on items of perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, user-acceptance, and adherence to both programs in young adults and peer leaders. Additional analyses of interactions on the e-Health applications, discussion board and chat board, were conducted. Twenty-two young adults with a diagnosed rheumatic disease participated in the study: 12 young adults followed the online program and 10 followed the face-to-face program. Both programs appeared to be feasible, especially in dealing with problems in daily life, and the participants indicated the time investment as 'worthwhile'. In using the online program, no technical problems occurred. Participants found the program easy to use, user friendly, and liked the 'look and feel' of the program. Both the online and the face-to-face versions of a self-management program. 'Challenge your arthritis' were found to be feasible and well appreciated by young adults with a rheumatic disease. Because these programs are likely to be a practical aid to health practices, a randomized controlled study to investigate the effects on patient outcomes is planned.

  3. 8.2  kW high beam quality quasi-continuous-wave face-pumped Nd:YAG slab amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong-Zheng; Xu, Yi-Ting; Guo, Ya-Ding; Wang, Bao-Shan; Xu, Jian; Xu, Jia-Lin; Gao, Hong-Wei; Yuan, Lei; Yuan, Hong-Tao; Lin, Yan-Yong; Xiao, Yun-Sheng; Bo, Yong; Peng, Qin-Jun; Lei, Wen-Qiang; Cui, Da-Fu; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2015-06-01

    An 8 kW level quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) face-pumped 1064 nm slab laser with high beam quality was developed by a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system. A single-mode fiber seed laser was amplified by two-stage single-pass Nd:YAG rod preamplifiers and four face-pumped Nd:YAG slab amplifiers. The slab amplifiers were well designed with uniform pumping and uniform cooling for well-distributed thermal and stress. A dynamically feedbacked optical aberration compensation device was employed to correct low-order optical aberration, and the residue high-order optical aberration was corrected by an adaptive optics system. The QCW MOPA delivered up to an average power of 8.2 kW with a pulse duration of 200 μs at a repetition rate of 400 Hz. The beam quality factor was measured to be β=3.5.

  4. Putting A Face On Rare Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who have a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Photo Courtesy of: Patricia Weltin That has ... daughters with a rare and potentially dangerous disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a connective tissue disorder causing joint ...

  5. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 10. Turning a New Leaf H. Y. Mohan Ram talks to Sujata Varadarajan. H Y Mohan Ram Sujata Varadarajan. Face to Face Volume 14 Issue 10 October 2009 pp 1003-1017 ...

  6. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 3. Symmetry and Mathematics: Pioneering Insights into the Structure of Physics. Urjit A Yajnik. Face to Face Volume 20 Issue 3 March 2015 pp 264-276. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Face to Face

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungfalk, Michael; Rossen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    Blended learning in education is the combination of face‐to‐face seminars and on‐line work based on the internet. We have investigated which factors that we found were important in designing and conducting face‐to‐face seminars in order to facilitate learning processes in the periods of on...

  8. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 1. Do We Learn to See? Torsten Wiesel Prasanna Venkhatesh Venkataramani. Face to Face Volume 16 Issue 1 January 2011 pp 88-99. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Face to Face

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 5. Science is Not a Zero-Sum Game. Devendra Mani. Face to Face Volume 19 Issue 5 May 2014 pp 471-477. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/019/05/0471-0477. Author Affiliations.

  10. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease : the changing face of clinical management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, Albert C M; Devuyst, Olivier; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Walz, Gerd; Knoers, VVAM

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease is the most common inherited kidney disease and accounts for 7-10% of all patients on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Although first reported 500 years ago, this disorder is still regarded as untreatable and its pathogenesis is poorly understood

  11. The Missing Link between Faces and Names: Evidence from Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabria, Marco; Sabio, Alicia; Martin, Clara; Hernandez, Mireia; Juncadella, Montserrat; Gascon-Bayarri, Jordi; Rene, Ramon; Ortiz-Gil, Jordi; Ugas, Lidia; Costa, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Retrieval of proper names is a cause of concern and complaint among elderly adults and it is an early symptom of patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). While it is well established that AD patients have deficits of proper name retrieval, the nature of such impairment is not yet fully understood.…

  12. 76 FR 12081 - Notice of Two-Year Continuation of Disease Management Demonstration Project for TRICARE Standard...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Notice of Two-Year Continuation of Disease...: Notice of Two-Year Continuation of Disease Management Demonstration Project for TRICARE Standard... demonstration will be effective April 1, 2011 and will continue for a period of two years until March 31, 2013...

  13. A New Face of Cardiac Emergencies: Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic is a major health challenge of the twenty-first century as the transition from infectious complications to noncommunicable disease becomes more evident. These patients may present to the emergency department with a variety of cardiovascular diseases, such as acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, pericardial disease, infective endocarditis, venothromboembolism, and other conditions. Increased awareness is needed among health care professionals to enhance adequate identification and promote prompt management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interval training versus continuous exercise in patients with coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Adrian D; Rajopadhyaya, Kanchani; Bentley, David J; Beltrame, John F; Aromataris, Edoardo C

    2015-02-01

    High aerobic capacity is inversely related to cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Recent studies suggest greater improvements in aerobic capacity with high-intensity interval training (interval) compared to moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise (continuous). Therefore we perform a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of INTERVAL versus CONTINUOUS in aerobic capacity, amongst patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and preserved ejection fraction We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Australia and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register, clinicaltrials.gov and TROVE for randomised controlled trials comparing INTERVAL with CONTINUOUS in patients with CAD. Studies published in the English language up to December 2013 were eligible for inclusion. Aerobic capacity, quantified by peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) post exercise training was extracted and compared post-intervention between INTERVAL and CONTINUOUS by way of a fixed model meta-analysis. Secondary outcomes including anaerobic threshold, blood pressure and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) were also analysed. Six independent studies with 229 patients (n=99 randomised to INTERVAL) were included in the meta-analysis. There was a significantly higher increase in VO2peak following INTERVAL compared to CONTINUOUS (Weighted Mean Difference=1.53 ml•kg(-1)min(-1), 95% CI 0.84 to 2.23) with homogeneity displayed between studies (Chi Squared=2.69; P=0.7). Significant effects of INTERVAL compared to CONTINUOUS were also found for anaerobic threshold but not systolic blood pressure. In patients with CAD, INTERVAL appears more effective than CONTINUOUS for the improvement of aerobic capacity in patients with CAD. However, long-term studies assessing morbidity and mortality following INTERVAL are required before this approach can be more widely adopted. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the

  15. ABCC6 and Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum: The Face of a Rare Disease from Genetics to Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Karobi; Garcia, Sonia; Jaldin, Michelle; Etoundi, Clementine; Cooper, Donna; Roland, Anna; Dixon, Patrice; Reyes, Sandra; Turan, Sevilay; Terry, Sharon; Dean, Michael

    2017-07-11

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the mineralization of connective tissues in the body. Primary manifestation of PXE occurs in the tissues of the skin, eyes, and cardiovascular system. PXE is primarily caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. The ABCC6 gene encodes the trans-membrane protein ABCC6, which is highly expressed in the kidneys and liver. PXE has high phenotypic variability, which may possibly be affected by several modifier genes. Disease advocacy organizations have had a pivotal role in bringing rare disease research to the forefront and in helping to sustain research funding for rare genetic diseases in order to help find a treatment for these diseases, pseudoxanthoma elasticum included. Because of these initiatives, individuals affected by these conditions benefit by being scientifically informed about their condition, having an effective support mechanism, and also by contributing to scientific research efforts and banking of biological samples. This rapid progress would not have been possible without the aid of disease advocacy organizations such as PXE International.

  16. continuity of care and avoidable hospitalizations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Po; Wu, Shiao-Chi; Huang, Shu-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studied suggest that better continuity of care could result in better health outcomes. However, few studies have examined the relationship between continuity of care and avoidable hospitalizations. A retrospective cohort study design was adopted. We used secondary data analysis based on claim data regarding health care utilization under a universal coverage health insurance scheme in Taiwan. The study population included 3,015 subjects who were newly diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 2006. The main outcome was COPD-related avoidable hospitalization, and the continuity of care index (COCI) was used to measure continuity of care. A logistic regression model was used to control for sex, age, low-income status, and health status. With regard to the effects of continuity of care on avoidable hospitalizations, dose-response trends were observed. The logistic regression model showed that after controlling for covariables, subjects in the low COCI group were 129% (adjusted odds ratio, 2.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-4.15) more likely to undergo COPD-related avoidable hospitalizations than those in the high COCI group. Patients with COPD with higher continuity of care had a significantly lower likelihood of avoidable hospitalization. To prevent future hospitalizations, health policy stakeholders should encourage physicians and patients to develop long-term relationships to further improve their health outcomes. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  17. Analysis of bacterial communities in rhizosphere soil of continuously cropped healthy and diseased konjac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinping; Jiao, Zhenbiao; Zhou, Jie; Guo, Fengling; Ding, Zili; Qiu, Zhengming

    2017-07-01

    The bacterial community and diversity in healthy and diseased konjac rhizosphere soils with different ages of continuous cropping were investigated using next-generation sequencing. The results demonstrated that the number of years of continuous cropping significantly altered soil bacterial community and diversity. Soil bacterial Shannon diversity index and Chao 1 index decreased with the increasing cropping years of konjac. After 1 year of cropping, the soil exhibited the highest bacterial relative abundance and diversity. Of the 44 bacterial genera (relative abundance ratio of genera greater than 0.3%), 14 were significantly affected by the duration of continuous cropping and plant status. With increasing continuous cropping, Alicyclobacillus decreased, while Achromobacter, Lactobacillus, Kaistobacter, Rhodoplanes increased after 3 years continuous cropping. Continuous cropping altered the structure and composition of the soil bacterial community, which led to the reduction in the beneficial bacteria and multiplication of harmful bacteria. These results will improve our understanding of soil microbial community regulation and soil health maintenance in konjac farm systems.

  18. The Multiple Faces of RAGE - Opportunities for Therapeutic Intervention in Aging and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This review focuses on the multi-ligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). The accumulation of the multiple ligands of RAGE in cellular stress milieux links RAGE to the pathobiology of chronic disease and natural aging. Areas Covered In this review, we present a discussion on the ligands of RAGE and the implications of these ligand families in disease. We review the recent literature on the role of ligand-RAGE interaction in the consequences of natural aging; the macro- and microvascular complications of diabetes; obesity and insulin resistance; autoimmune disorders and chronic inflammation; tumors and Alzheimer’s disease. We discuss the mechanisms of RAGE signaling through its intracellular binding effector molecule, the formin DIAPH1. Physico-chemical evidence by which the RAGE cytoplasmic domain binds to the FH1 (formin homology 1) domain of DIAPH1, and the consequences, is also reviewed. Expert Opinion We discuss the modalities of RAGE antagonism currently in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Finally, we present the rationale behind potentially targeting the RAGE cytoplasmic domain-DIAPH1 interaction as a logical strategy for therapeutic intervention in the pathological settings of chronic diseases and aging in which RAGE ligands accumulate and signal. PMID:26558318

  19. The multiple faces of RAGE--opportunities for therapeutic intervention in aging and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the multi-ligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily--receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). The accumulation of the multiple ligands of RAGE in cellular stress milieux links RAGE to the pathobiology of chronic disease and natural aging. In this review, we present a discussion on the ligands of RAGE and the implications of these ligand families in disease. We review the recent literature on the role of ligand-RAGE interaction in the consequences of natural aging; the macro- and microvascular complications of diabetes; obesity and insulin resistance; autoimmune disorders and chronic inflammation; and tumors and Alzheimer's disease. We discuss the mechanisms of RAGE signaling through its intracellular binding effector molecule--the formin DIAPH1. Physicochemical evidence of how the RAGE cytoplasmic domain binds to the FH1 (formin homology 1) domain of DIAPH1, and the consequences thereof, are also reviewed. We discuss the modalities of RAGE antagonism currently in preclinical and clinical studies. Finally, we present the rationale behind potentially targeting the RAGE cytoplasmic domain-DIAPH1 interaction as a logical strategy for therapeutic intervention in the pathological settings of chronic diseases and aging wherein RAGE ligands accumulate and signal.

  20. Face-Referenced Measurement of Perioral Stiffness and Speech Kinematics in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shin Ying; Barlow, Steven M.; Lee, Jaehoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Perioral biomechanics, labial kinematics, and associated electromyographic signals were sampled and characterized in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) as a function of medication state. Method: Passive perioral stiffness was sampled using the OroSTIFF system in 10 individuals with PD in a medication ON and a medication OFF state…

  1. Current concepts on the pathophysiology of idiopathic chronic adult hydrocephalus: Are we facing another neurodegenerative disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Láez, R; Valle-San Román, N; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E M; Marco-de Lucas, E; Berciano Blanco, J A; Vázquez-Barquero, A

    2016-06-10

    Since its description five decades ago, the pathophysiology of idiopathic chronic adult hydrocephalus (iCAH) has been traditionally related to the effect that ventricular dilatation exerts on the structures surrounding the ventricular system. However, altered cerebral blood flow, especially a reduction in the CSF turnover rate, are starting to be considered the main pathophysiological elements of this disease. Compression of the pyramidal tract, the frontostriatal and frontoreticular circuits, and the paraventricular fibres of the superior longitudinal fasciculus have all been reported in iCAH. At the level of the corpus callosum, gliosis replaces a number of commissural tracts. Cerebral blood flow is also altered, showing a periventricular watershed region limited by the subependymal arteries and the perforating branches of the major arteries of the anterior cerebral circulation. The CSF turnover rate is decreased by 75%, leading to the reduced clearance of neurotoxins and the interruption of neuroendocrine and paracrine signalling in the CSF. iCAH presents as a complex nosological entity, in which the effects of subcortical microangiopathy and reduced CSF turnover play a key role. According to its pathophysiology, it is simpler to think of iCAH more as a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer disease or Binswanger disease than as the classical concept of hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Mariana; Santos, Angela dos; Lages, Neusa; Correia, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Steinert's disease is an intrinsic disorder of the muscle with multisystem manifestations. Myotonia may affect any muscle group, is elicited by several factors and drugs used in general anesthesia like hypnotics, sedatives and opioids. Although some authors recommend the use of regional anesthesia or combined anesthesia with low doses of opioids, the safest anesthetic technique still has to be established. We performed a continuous spinal anesthesia in a patient with Steinert's disea...

  3. Effect of Head and Face Massage on Agitation in Elderly Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Keshavarz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Management of agitation in Alzheimer's patients with non-invasive treatment methods, such as massage therapy, is of paramount importance. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the effects of head and face massage on agitation in elderly Alzheimer’s patients living in nursing homes in Yazd, Iran. Method: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on two groups (n=35 in each group from 26 September to 5 October 2016. For the patients in the intervention group, massage therapy was performed using the effleurage and compression techniques, and no intervention was implemented in the control group. The usual way to control the symptoms of agitation was physical restraint. The Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI was used to measure the agitation level. The data were analyzed by performing Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney tests in SPSS, version 18. Results: The mean ages of the intervention and control groups were 82.2±10.6 and 81.5±9.6 years, respectively. The mean scores of agitation in the intervention and control groups decreased from 77.2±14.4 and 82.1±17.3 before the intervention to 49.7±6.0 and 80.8±18.3 after the intervention, respectively. The results showed a significant difference between the two groups after the intervention (P

  4. Certainties and Uncertainties Facing Emerging Respiratory Infectious Diseases: Lessons from SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Chun Chen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Every emerging infectious disease is a challenge to the whole of mankind. There are uncertainties regarding whether there will be a pandemic, if it will be caused by the highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, when or where it will occur, how imminent or how severe it will be. No one can accurately predict if and when a given virus will become a pandemic virus. Pandemic prevention strategies must be based on preparing for the unexpected and being capable of reacting accordingly. There is growing evidence that infection control measures were helpful in containment of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS as well as avian influenza. Compliance of standard infection control measures, intensive promotion of hand and respiratory hygiene, vigilance and triage of patients with febrile illness, and specific infection control measures are key components to contain a highly contagious disease in hospital and to protect healthcare workers, patients and visitors. The importance of standard precautions for any patient and cleaning and disinfection for the healthcare environment cannot be overemphasized. SARS illustrated dramatically the potential of air travel and globalization for the dissemination of an emerging infectious disease. To prevent the potential serious consequences of pandemic influenza, timely implementation of pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical interventions locally within the outbreak area is the key to minimizing global spread. Herein, we relate our perspective on useful lessons derived from a review of the SARS epidemic that may be useful to physicians, especially when looking ahead to the next epidemic.

  5. Continuous elemental enteral alimentation in the treatment of children and adolescents with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C L; Roulet, M; Roy, C C; Weber, A; Lapointe, N

    1982-01-01

    Ten pediatric patients, aged 8.5-19 years, with active symptomatic Crohn's disease, received a three-week period of continuous elemental enteral alimentation with no other form of treatment. All patients in this study were selected according to the following criteria, which were applied consecutively: (1) newly diagnosed patients with no previous treatment for Crohn's disease, (2) disease activity index over 200, and (3) no complication requiring surgery. All patients experienced a clinical remission and improved their immunologic and nutritional status during the elemental enteral alimentation. The mean disease activity index for the whole group was 307.0 +/- 23.6 (range: 203 to 413) before and 69.2 +/- 11.4 (range: 15 to 114) after the feeding period. Significant increases in body weight, triceps skinfold, mid-arm circumference, serum transferrin and mean percentage of T lymphocytes were also observed. Following cessation of enteral alimentation, a small declining dose of prednisone was used during a one-year follow-up period. Eight of the ten patients were still in clinical remission three months after the feeding period and their nutritional status had continued to improve during that period of time.

  6. The influence of patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure and patient's attitude in face of disease controlling medicine intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida A Moura Strelec

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between blood pressure control and the following: the Morisky-Green test, the patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure, the patient's attitude in face of medicine intake, the patient's attendance at medical consultations, and the subjective physician's judgment. METHODS: We studied 130 hypertensive patients with the following characteristics: 73% females, 60±11 years, 58% married, 70% white, 45% retired, 45% with incomplete elementary schooling, 64% had a familial income of 1 to 3 minimum wages, body mass index of 30±7 kg/m², consciousness regarding the disease for a mean period of 11±9.5 years, and mean treatment duration of 8 ±7 years. RESULTS: Only 35% of the hypertensive individuals had blood pressure under control and a longer duration of treatment (10±7 vs 7±6.5 years; P<0.05. The retiree predominated. The result of the Morisky-Green test did not relate to blood pressure control. In evaluating the attitude in face of medicine intake, the controlled patients achieved significantly higher scores than did the noncontrolled patients (8±1.9 vs 7 ±2, P<0.05. The hypertensive patients had higher levels of consciousness regarding their disease and its treatment, and most (70% patients attended 3 or 4 medical consultations, which did not influence blood pressure control. The physicians attributed significantly higher scores regarding adherence to treatment to controlled patients (6±0.8 vs 5±1.2; P<0.05. CONCLUSION: Consciousness regarding the disease, the Morisky-Green test, and attendance to medical consultations did not influence blood pressure control.

  7. Effects of a face-to-face self-management program on knowledge, self-care practice and kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease before the renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun Sung; Lee, Jia

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a face-to-face self-management educational program on knowledge, self-care practice and kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) before kidney replacement therapy. This study employed a nonequivalent control group, non-synchronized design. Data were collected from 61 patients with CKD visiting an outpatient department of nephrology in a university hospital in Seoul, South Korea. The experimental group (n=31) took the pre-test, then after 3 weeks, face-to-face education and individualized consultation (1st intervention), after a week of self-practice, the 1st post-test, followed by re-enforcement education and consultation (2nd intervention), and 4 weeks later, the 2nd post-test. The control group (n=30) took the pre-test and post-tests at 4 and 8 weeks. Scores for knowledge of CKD and self-care practice over time improved significantly in the experimental group compared to the control group. Kidney function did not improve significantly in the experimental group. Health care providers can identify various and individualized needs, and provide effective education and consultation through face to face self-management for patients with chronic irreversible illnesses. Nurses can coordinate for these program by designing and providing systematic and effective education.

  8. Autoimmune hepatitis, one disease with many faces: Etiopathogenetic, clinico-laboratory and histological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatselis, Nikolaos K; Zachou, Kalliopi; Koukoulis, George K; Dalekos, George N

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an unresolving progressive liver disease of unknown etiology characterized by hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies detection and interface hepatitis. Due to the absence of specific diagnostic markers and the large heterogeneity of its clinical, laboratory and histological features, AIH diagnosis may be potentially difficult. Therefore, in this in-depth review we summarize the substantial progress on etiopathogenesis, clinical, serological and histological phenotypes of AIH. AIH has a global distribution affecting any age, both sexes and all ethnic groups. Clinical manifestations vary from asymptomatic to severe or rarely fulminant hepatitis. Hypergammaglobulinemia with selective elevation of IgG is found in most cases. Autoimmune attack is perpetuated, possibly via molecular mimicry, and favored by the impaired control of T-regulatory cells. Histology (interface hepatitis, emperipolesis and hepatic rosette formation) and autoantibodies detection although not pathognomonic, are still the hallmark for a timely diagnosis. AIH remains a major diagnostic challenge. AIH should be considered in every case in the absence of viral, metabolic, genetic and toxic etiology of chronic or acute hepatitis. Laboratory personnel, hepato-pathologists and clinicians need to become more familiar with disease expressions and the interpretation of liver histology and autoimmune serology to derive maximum benefit for the patient. PMID:25574080

  9. The new face of rheumatic heart disease in South West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinwusi PO

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patience Olayinka Akinwusi,1,2 Johnson Olarewaju Peter,2 Adebayo Tolulope Oyedeji,2 Abiona Oluwadamilola Odeyemi21Department of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Osun State University, 2Department of Medicine, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, NigeriaPurpose: To determine the current prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD, clinical features, types of valvular lesions, complications and mortality, at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, South West Nigeria.Methods: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of all the cases of RHD seen in the medical outpatient clinics and wards of LAUTECH for 9 years, from January 2003 to December 2011. Statistical analysis of data obtained was done using SPSS 16. Results: The total number of attendees of all the medical outpatient clinics during the 9-year period was 67,378, with a subset of 9423 attending the cardiology clinic. There were 11 cases of RHD, which translates to a prevalence of 0.16/1000 and 1.2/1000 for medical outpatient clinics and the cardiology clinic respectively. The mean age of the patients was 25.64 ± 9.65 years, age range 14–40 years and male to female ratio of 1:1.2. The most common valve affected was mitral (90.9%, followed by the aortic (36.4%, and the tricuspid (18.2%. Mitral and aortic lesions coexisted in 18.2% of the patients, and late presentation was common in all RHD cases. Heart failure was the most common complication (90.9%. Other complications were secondary pulmonary hypertension (36.4%, infective endocarditis (27.3%, atrial fibrillation (27.3%, cardioembolic cerebrovascular disease (18.2%, and atrial flutter (9.1%. Mortality was 9.1%, while only one patient (9.1% had definitive surgery. Financial constraints precluded others from having definitive surgery.Conclusion: The prevalence of RHD has declined considerably as a result of improvements in the primary health care delivery system, with widespread use

  10. Pretty leprosy: Another face of Hansen’s disease! A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prem Anand

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pretty leprosy is one of the rare severe forms of lepromatous leprosy. It is a reaction pattern that occurs in untreated pure primitive diffuse lepromatous leprosy or lepromatous leprosy. The skin of the patient is diffusely infiltrated and shiny, so that natural wrinkles are obliterated. It generates a moist and myxoedematous complexion imparting a healthy aspect to the patient. Thus the disease got the name. In this review we have reviewed almost all available literature to point more light toward the clinical variant pretty leprosy. A search was made in PubMed central to know the availability of information about pretty leprosy, but the response was nil for pretty leprosy. 37 articles were spotted in PubMed media on Lucioleprosy; 3 review articles are present and the rest were case reports.

  11. The influence of patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure and patient's attitude in face of disease controlling medicine intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelec, Maria Aparecida A Moura; Pierin, Angela M G; Mion, Décio

    2003-10-01

    To assess the relation between blood pressure control and the following: the Morisky-Green test, the patient's consciousness regarding high blood pressure, the patient's attitude in face of medicine intake, the patient's attendance at medical consultations, and the subjective physician's judgment. We studied 130 hypertensive patients with the following characteristics: 73% females, 60 +/- 11 years, 58% married, 70% white, 45% retired, 45% with incomplete elementary schooling, 64% had a familial income of 1 to 3 minimum wages, body mass index of 30 +/- 7 kg/m , consciousness regarding the disease for a mean period of 11 +/- 9.5 years, and mean treatment duration of 8 +/- 7 years. Only 35% of the hypertensive individuals had blood pressure under control and a longer duration of treatment (10 +/- 7 vs 7 +/- 6.5 years; Pface of medicine intake, the controlled patients achieved significantly higher scores than did the noncontrolled patients (8 +/- 1.9 vs 7 +/- 2, Pconsciousness regarding their disease and its treatment, and most (70%) patients attended 3 or 4 medical consultations, which did not influence blood pressure control. The physicians attributed significantly higher scores regarding adherence to treatment to controlled patients (6 +/- 0.8 vs 5 +/- 1.2; PConsciousness regarding the disease, the Morisky-Green test, and attendance to medical consultations did not influence blood pressure control.

  12. Continuous elemental enteral alimentation in children with Crohn's disease and growth failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C L; Roulet, M; Roy, C C; Weber, A

    1980-12-01

    Four children aged (11.7-13.5 yr) with protracted growth retardation related to Crohn's disease, received a 6-wk period of continuous elemental enteral alimentation with no other form of treatment. Despite drug therapy the yearly height and weight gain velocities of these children (1.7 +/- 0.3 cm and -0.8 +/- 1.4 kg, respectively) had been abnormal during the previous 2 yr. All patients experienced a complete remission of symptoms, improved nutritional status, and significant height (1.8 +/- 0.3 cm) and weight (3.8 +/- 0.5 kg) gains during the 67 wk of treatment. After cessation of elemental enteral alimentation, 3 of the 4 patients continued to grow, and over a period of 4.5 mo from the beginning of this form of nutritional therapy, they gained an average of 5.0 +/- 1.6 kg and 3.5 +/- 0.3 cm. The disease became active thereafter, and the 3 children resumed their previously abnormal growth patterns during the ensuing year. The 4th patient had surgery 2 mo after elemental enteral alimentation and experienced a subsequent second spurt of growth and pubertal changes. This study suggests that a relatively short course of elemental enteral alimentation leads to a temporary resumption of growth in children with severe growth failure and Crohn's disease. The possibility that repeated courses of elemental enteral alimentation might be beneficial needs to be explored.

  13. The Janus Face of NKT Cell Function in Autoimmunity and Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torina, Alessandra; Guggino, Giuliana; La Manna, Marco Pio; Sireci, Guido

    2018-02-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) are a subset of T lymphocytes bridging innate and adaptive immunity. These cells recognize self and microbial glycolipids bound to non-polymorphic and highly conserved CD1d molecules. Three NKT cell subsets, type I, II, and NKT-like expressing different antigen receptors (TCR) were described and TCR activation promotes intracellular events leading to specific functional activities. NKT can exhibit different functions depending on the secretion of soluble molecules and the interaction with other cell types. NKT cells act as regulatory cells in the defense against infections but, on the other hand, their effector functions can be involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory disorders due to their exposure to different microbial or self-antigens, respectively. A deep understanding of the biology and functions of type I, II, and NKT-like cells as well as their interplay with cell types acting in innate (neuthrophils, innate lymphoid cells, machrophages, and dendritic cells) and adaptive immunity (CD4⁺,CD8⁺, and double negative T cells) should be important to design potential immunotherapies for infectious and autoimmune diseases.

  14. Chronic disease in childhood and adolescence: continuity of care in the Health Care Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Medeiros da Nóbrega

    Full Text Available abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the continuity of care for children and adolescents with chronic diseases in the health care network. METHODS This qualitative study was conducted between February and October 2013 with 12 families, six health managers, and 14 health professionals from different health care services in a municipality of the state of Paraíba, Brazil, using focal groups, semi-structured interviews, and medical record consultation. The data were analyzed by triangulation and thematic analysis. RESULTS Two categories were created: “health care management” and “(discontinuity of care.” We found gaps in the system, including poor data recording aimed to facilitate follow-up and guide the planning actions as well as sporadic and discoordinate services with a limited flow of information, which hinders follow-up over time. CONCLUSION Continuity of care in the health care network is limited and creates the need to develop strategies to improve these services.

  15. [Progress in improvement of continuous monoculture cropping problem in Panax ginseng by controlling soil-borne disease management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dong, Lin-Lin; Xu, Jiang; Chen, Jun-Wen; Li, Xi-Wen; Chen, Shi-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The continuous monoculture cropping problem severely has hindered the land resource of Panax ginseng cultivation and threatened the sustainable development of ginseng industry. There are comprehensive factors causing the continuous monoculture cropping problem, such as deterioration of soil physical and chemical properties, accumulation of allelochemical, increase of pesticide residue and heavy metal, imbalance of rhizospheric micro-ecosystem, and increase of soil-borne diseases. Among soil-borne disease was one of the key factors. More than 40 soil-borne diseases have been reported in the ginseng cultivation, especially, the diseases were more serious in the ginseng replanting land. Here main soil-borne diseases and their prevention way have been summarized, and we try to provide the effective improvement strategy of continuous monoculture cropping problem focusing on the disease control and offer reference for overcoming the ginseng continuous monoculture cropping problem. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Initial diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Australia: views from the coal face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznicki, Bonnie; Walters, Haydn; Walters, Julia; Peterson, Gregory; Bereznicki, Luke

    2017-07-01

    Early diagnosis and management can mitigate the long-term morbidity and mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To gain insights into the initial diagnostic process and early management of COPD by Australian general practitioners (GP). A random sample of Australian GP was invited to complete a postal survey, which assessed familiarity with and use of contemporary practice guidelines, diagnostic criteria and management preferences for COPD. A total of 233 GP completed the survey. While most GP based a COPD diagnosis on smoking history (94.4%), symptoms (91.0%) and spirometry (88.8%), only 39.9% of respondents recorded a formal diagnosis of COPD after the patient's first symptomatic presentation. Tiotropium was the preferred treatment in 77.3% of GP for the initial management of COPD, while only 27.5% routinely recommended pulmonary rehabilitation. GP routinely recorded patients' smoking status and offered smoking cessation advice, but the timing of this advice varied. Less than half of the respondents routinely used COPD management guidelines or tools and resources provided by the Australian Lung Foundation. There is scope for major improvement in GP familiarity with and use of COPD management guidelines and readily available tools and resources. Some systematic issues were highlighted in the Australian primary care setting, such as a reactive and relatively passive and delayed approach to diagnosis, potentially delayed smoking cessation advice and underutilisation of pulmonary rehabilitation. There is an urgent need to devise strategies for improving patient outcomes in COPD using resources that are readily available. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  17. Nutritional therapy - Facing the gap between coeliac disease and gluten-free food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foschia, Martina; Horstmann, Stefan; Arendt, Elke K; Zannini, Emanuele

    2016-12-19

    The market of gluten-free bakery products is considerably growing since better diagnostic methods allow identifying an increasing number of people suffering coeliac disease and other gluten-related disorders such as dermatitis herpetiformis, gluten ataxia, wheat allergy and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity. The only and safe treatment available nowadays for these types of disorders is to follow a strict and permanent lifelong gluten-free diet. Beside the people needing to follow a gluten-free diet for health reasons, a new segment of consumers has arisen who consume gluten-free products as a lifestyle choice. Among the bakery products, bread is a major staple food consumed daily all over the world. The dough and bread quality characteristics (such as gas retaining ability, mixing tolerance, resistance to stretch and extensibility and crumb structure) are mostly attributed to the presence of gluten. Despite the improved quality of gluten-free breads in the last number of years, most products on the market are still described as low quality product. In addition to the low overall quality of gluten-free products, the nutritional value of a large number of them is quite poor. In this context, this review gives an overview on the consumers, which need to follow a gluten-free diet for health reasons. The trends in this gluten-free bakery segment will also be reviewed based on the current analysis of marketing studies. An overview of the major ingredients used in gluten-free bread products will be given. The choice of the ingredients discussed in this paper is based on a comprehensive study of the leading gluten-free breads available on the market, as well as a detailed study of the scientific literature. The impact of the various ingredients on bread-making process and bread quality is also part of this review. Major emphasis will be placed on the application of sourdough as a means to improve gluten-free bread quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Continuous cerebroventricular administration of dopamine: A new treatment for severe dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laloux, C; Gouel, F; Lachaud, C; Timmerman, K; Do Van, B; Jonneaux, A; Petrault, M; Garcon, G; Rouaix, N; Moreau, C; Bordet, R; Duce, J A; Devedjian, J C; Devos, D

    2017-07-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) depletion of dopamine in the nigro-striatal pathway is a main pathological hallmark that requires continuous and focal restoration. Current predominant treatment with intermittent oral administration of its precursor, Levodopa (l-dopa), remains the gold standard but pharmacological drawbacks trigger motor fluctuations and dyskinesia. Continuous intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of dopamine previously failed as a therapy because of an inability to resolve the accelerated dopamine oxidation and tachyphylaxia. We aim to overcome prior challenges by demonstrating treatment feasibility and efficacy of continuous i.c.v. of dopamine close to the striatum. Dopamine prepared either anaerobically (A-dopamine) or aerobically (O-dopamine) in the presence or absence of a conservator (sodium metabisulfite, SMBS) was assessed upon acute MPTP and chronic 6-OHDA lesioning and compared to peripheral l-dopa treatment. A-dopamine restored motor function and induced a dose dependent increase of nigro-striatal tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in mice after 7days of MPTP insult that was not evident with either O-dopamine or l-dopa. In the 6-OHDA rat model, continuous circadian i.c.v. injection of A-dopamine over 30days also improved motor activity without occurrence of tachyphylaxia. This safety profile was highly favorable as A-dopamine did not induce dyskinesia or behavioral sensitization as observed with peripheral l-dopa treatment. Indicative of a new therapeutic strategy for patients suffering from l-dopa related complications with dyskinesia, continuous i.c.v. of A-dopamine has greater efficacy in mediating motor impairment over a large therapeutic index without inducing dyskinesia and tachyphylaxia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mortality trends for ischemic heart disease in China: an analysis of 102 continuous disease surveillance points from 1991 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xia; Ren, Hongyan; Ma, Enbo; Yang, Gonghuan

    2017-07-25

    In the past 20 years, the trends of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality in China have been described in divergent claims. This research analyzes mortality trends for IHD by using the data from 102 continuous Disease Surveillance Points (DSP) from 1991 to 2009. The 102 continuous DSP covered 7.3 million people during the period 1991-2000, and then were expanded to a population of 52 million in the same areas for 2004-2009. The data were adjusted by using garbage code redistribution and underreporting rate, mapped from international classification of diseases ICD-9 to ICD-10. The mortality rates for IHD were further adjusted by the crude death proportion multiplied by the total number of deaths in the mortality envelope, which was calculated by using logr t  = a + bt. Age-standard death rates (ASDRs) were computed using China's 2010 census population structure. Trend in IHD was calculated from ASDRs by using a joinpoint regression model. The IHD ASDRs increased in total in regions with an average annual percentage change (AAPC) 4.96%, especially for the Southwest (AAPC = 7.97%) and Northeast areas (AAPC = 7.10%), and for male and female subjects (with 5% AAPC) as well. In rural areas, the year 2000 was a cut-off point for mortality rate with annual percentage change increasing from 3.52% in 1991-2000 to 9.02% in 2000-2009, which was much higher than in urban areas (AAPC = 1.05%). And the proportion of deaths increased in older adults, and more male deaths occurred before age 60 compared to female deaths. By observing a wide range of areas across China from 1991 to 2009, this paper concludes that the ASDR trend for IHD increased. These trends reflect changes in the Chinese standard of living and lifestyle with diets higher in fat, higher blood lipids and increased body weight.

  20. The importance of continuity in inhaler device choice for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjermer, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled therapies are central to the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Physicians consider many factors when selecting the most appropriate inhaler device, including device efficacy and the cost to the health care system. This review aims to discuss the factors that are important when considering inhaler devices and the importance of continuity in the choice of inhaler device. A large number of factors can contribute to therapeutic outcomes with inhalation devices. The inhalation technique is critical to treatment success and differs substantially between inhaler devices. Misuse of an inhaler is common, and thorough training of patients and physicians is important to ensure correct utilization. Patient satisfaction is an important consideration because it is significantly correlated with compliance and better outcomes. Financial pressures contribute to decision making: although selecting the less expensive inhaler device might reduce direct treatment costs, it can have a large impact on disease control and the patient's well-being. Switching may be associated with a poor inhalation technique, reduced disease control and quality of life, increased use of other treatments and health care resources, and a greater chance of unsuccessful treatment. Nonconsensual switches can result in patient discontent, reduced confidence in the medication, and uncertainty regarding the degree of disease control. It is recommended that patients with stable disease remain on their current device. If a switch is considered, the patient should be consulted and the physician should take into account the patient's preference, their ability to correctly use the device, and the availability of the preferred drug in the preferred device.

  1. Mortality trends for ischemic heart disease in China: an analysis of 102 continuous disease surveillance points from 1991 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past 20 years, the trends of ischemic heart disease (IHD mortality in China have been described in divergent claims. This research analyzes mortality trends for IHD by using the data from 102 continuous Disease Surveillance Points (DSP from 1991 to 2009. Method The 102 continuous DSP covered 7.3 million people during the period 1991–2000, and then were expanded to a population of 52 million in the same areas for 2004–2009. The data were adjusted by using garbage code redistribution and underreporting rate, mapped from international classification of diseases ICD-9 to ICD-10. The mortality rates for IHD were further adjusted by the crude death proportion multiplied by the total number of deaths in the mortality envelope, which was calculated by using logrt = a + bt. Age-standard death rates (ASDRs were computed using China’s 2010 census population structure. Trend in IHD was calculated from ASDRs by using a joinpoint regression model. Results The IHD ASDRs increased in total in regions with an average annual percentage change (AAPC 4.96%, especially for the Southwest (AAPC = 7.97% and Northeast areas (AAPC = 7.10%, and for male and female subjects (with 5% AAPC as well. In rural areas, the year 2000 was a cut-off point for mortality rate with annual percentage change increasing from 3.52% in 1991–2000 to 9.02% in 2000–2009, which was much higher than in urban areas (AAPC = 1.05%. And the proportion of deaths increased in older adults, and more male deaths occurred before age 60 compared to female deaths. Conclusion By observing a wide range of areas across China from 1991 to 2009, this paper concludes that the ASDR trend for IHD increased. These trends reflect changes in the Chinese standard of living and lifestyle with diets higher in fat, higher blood lipids and increased body weight.

  2. Continuous-data diagnostic tests for paratuberculosis as a multistage disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Nils; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jørgensen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    We devised a general method for interpretation of multistage diseases using continuous-data diagnostic tests. As an example, we used paratuberculosis as a multistage infection with 2 stages of infection as well as a noninfected state. Using data from a Danish research project, a fecal culture...... testing scheme was linked to an indirect ELISA and adjusted for covariates (parity, age at first calving, and days in milk). We used the log-transformed optical densities in a Bayesian network to obtain the probabilities for each of the 3 infection stages for a given optical density (adjusted...... for covariates). The strength of this approach was that the uncertainty associated with a test was imposed directly on the individual test result rather than aggregated into the population-based measures of test properties (i.e., sensitivity and specificity)...

  3. A guide for identification and continuing care of adult congenital heart disease patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, S; Lamb, J; Haines, A; O'Dell, S; Thomas, G; Sethi, S; Ratcliffe, J; Chisholm, S; Vaughan, J; Mahadevan, V S

    2013-03-10

    Surgical and other advances in the treatment and care of congenital heart disease have resulted in a significant increase in the number of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD), many of whom have no regular cardiology follow-up. Optimised care for ACHD patients requires continuity of specialist and shared care and education of practitioners and patients. The challenges for managing ACHD were identified by a Health Needs Assessment in the North West and are addressed within the UK Department of Health's ACHD Commissioning Guide. An ACHD model of care was recommended in the North West of England and developed by the three North West Cardiac & Stroke Networks. Within this, a Task Group focused on the role of primary care in the identification and continuing care of ACHD patients. A feasibility study demonstrated that existing diagnostic Read Codes can identify ACHD patients on general practice registers. An ACHD Toolkit was developed to provide algorithms to guide the appropriate management of ACHD patients through primary, secondary and/or specialist ACHD care and to improve education/knowledge amongst primary care staff about ACHD and its wider implications. Early findings during the development of this Toolkit illustrate a wide disparity of provision between current and optimal management strategies. Patients lost to follow-up have already been identified and their management modified. By focusing on identifying ACHD patients in primary care and organising/delivering ACHD services, the ACHD Toolkit could help to improve quality, timeliness of care, patient experience and wellbeing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Yamaguchi Facial Expression-Making Task in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Novel and Enjoyable Make-a-Face Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoharu Yamaguchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the ability to make emotional facial expressions, we newly developed the Yamaguchi facial expression-making task (Y-FEMT. Method: We recruited 20 normal controls and 61 outpatients: 10 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, 34 with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and 17 with moderate AD. In the Y-FEMT, smile and anger expressions were made by arranging face parts. We examined the relationship between each Y-FEMT score and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE score or overlapping figure identification test (Fig-test. Results: The Total score (0–20 was nearly achieved in controls (18.9 ± 1.4 and declined with AD progression (aMCI 17.2 ± 2.4, mild AD 15.7 ± 2.6, moderate AD 12.3 ± 2.7. The Anger score (0–10 was significantly lower than the Smile score (0–10 in mild and moderate AD (p = 0.007 and p = 0.006, respectively. The Structure score (0–6 each correlated well with both the MMSE score (r = 0.44, p Conclusion: The Y-FEMT pleasantly assessed the ability to make emotional facial expressions without special equipment. Furthermore, the Y-FEMT may provide helpful clues for caregivers to achieve good communication with AD patients for better care.

  5. Continuity of care to optimize chronic disease management in the community setting: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This evidence-based analysis reviews relational and management continuity of care. Relational continuity refers to the duration and quality of the relationship between the care provider and the patient. Management continuity ensures that patients receive coherent, complementary, and timely care. There are 4 components of continuity of care: duration, density, dispersion, and sequence. The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to determine if continuity of care is associated with decreased health resource utilization, improved patient outcomes, and patient satisfaction. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database were searched for studies on continuity of care and chronic disease published from January 2002 until December 2011. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, and observational studies were eligible if they assessed continuity of care in adults and reported health resource utilization, patient outcomes, or patient satisfaction. Eight systematic reviews and 13 observational studies were identified. The reviews concluded that there is an association between continuity of care and outcomes; however, the literature base is weak. The observational studies found that higher continuity of care was frequently associated with fewer hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Three systematic reviews reported that higher continuity of care is associated with improved patient satisfaction, especially among patients with chronic conditions. Most of the studies were retrospective cross-sectional studies of large administrative databases. The databases do not capture information on trust and confidence in the provider, which is a critical component of relational continuity of care. The definitions for the selection of patients from the databases varied across studies. There is low quality evidence that: Higher continuity of care is associated with decreased health service utilization.There is

  6. Sodium and Its Role in Cardiovascular Disease – The Debate Continues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yee Wen; Baqar, Sara; Jerums, George; Ekinci, Elif I.

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines have recommended significant reductions in dietary sodium intake to improve cardiovascular health. However, these dietary sodium intake recommendations have been questioned as emerging evidence has shown that there is a higher risk of cardiovascular disease with a low sodium diet, including in individuals with type 2 diabetes. This may be related to the other pleotropic effects of dietary sodium intake. Therefore, despite recent review of dietary sodium intake guidelines by multiple organizations, including the dietary guidelines for Americans, American Diabetes Association, and American Heart Association, concerns about the impact of the degree of sodium restriction on cardiovascular health continue to be raised. This literature review examines the effects of dietary sodium intake on factors contributing to cardiovascular health, including left ventricular hypertrophy, heart rate, albuminuria, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone system activation, serum lipids, insulin sensitivity, sympathetic nervous system activation, endothelial function, and immune function. In the last part of this review, the association between dietary sodium intake and cardiovascular outcomes, especially in individuals with diabetes, is explored. Given the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in individuals with diabetes and the increasing incidence of diabetes worldwide, this review is important in summarizing the recent evidence regarding the effects of dietary sodium intake on cardiovascular health, especially in this population. PMID:28066329

  7. Meningococcal serogroup Y disease in Europe: Continuation of high importance in some European regions in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Emonet, Stéphane; Fazio, Cecilia; Jacobsson, Susanne; Koliou, Maria; Kuusi, Markku; Pace, David; Paragi, Metka; Pysik, Alexander; Simões, Maria João; Skoczynska, Anna; Stefanelli, Paola; Toropainen, Maija; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Tzanakaki, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis or meningococcus is divided into 12 distinct serogroups of which A, B, C, W, X, and Y are medically most important and cause health problems in different parts of the world. The epidemiology of N. meningitidis is unpredictable over time and across geographic regions. Globally, serogoup A has been prevalent in the African “meningitis belt” whereas serogroup B and C have predominated in Europe. In a paper published earlier in this journal1, an increase in serogroup Y invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in some European countries was reported based on the epidemiological data for 2010, 2011 and 2012. Here, we report additional data from 30 European countries indicating that high or increased serogroup Y disease levels have continued in 2013 in certain regions of Europe. In the Western and Central Europe, there were no major changes in the proportion of serogroup Y IMD cases in 2013 compared to 2012. In the Scandinavian countries, proportion of serogroup Y disease remained high, ranging from 26% to 51% in 2013. This was in contrast to Baltic, Eastern and most Southern European countries, where the proportion of serogroup Y IMD was low similarly to previous years. For the last 2 decades, the mean age of patients affected by serogroup Y was 41 y for 7 countries from which data was available and 50% of cases were in patients aged 45 to 88 y. The age distribution of serogroup Y was bimodal and did not change significantly despite the increase of the total number and the proportion of serogroup Y IMD in some European regions. PMID:26036710

  8. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making : An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease

  9. Chronic disease in childhood and adolescence: continuity of care in the Health Care Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Vanessa Medeiros da; Silva, Maria Elizabete de Amorim; Fernandes, Leiliane Teixeira Bento; Viera, Claudia Silveira; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva; Collet, Neusa

    2017-06-12

    To evaluate the continuity of care for children and adolescents with chronic diseases in the health care network. This qualitative study was conducted between February and October 2013 with 12 families, six health managers, and 14 health professionals from different health care services in a municipality of the state of Paraíba, Brazil, using focal groups, semi-structured interviews, and medical record consultation. The data were analyzed by triangulation and thematic analysis. Two categories were created: "health care management" and "(dis)continuity of care." We found gaps in the system, including poor data recording aimed to facilitate follow-up and guide the planning actions as well as sporadic and discoordinate services with a limited flow of information, which hinders follow-up over time. Continuity of care in the health care network is limited and creates the need to develop strategies to improve these services. Analisar a continuidade do cuidado à criança/adolescente com doença crônica na rede de atenção à saúde. Pesquisa qualitativa realizada entre fevereiro e outubro de 2013 com 12 familiares, seis gestores e 14 profissionais de saúde de diferentes serviços da rede de saúde de um município da Paraíba através das técnicas de grupo focal, entrevista semiestruturada e consulta a prontuários. A triangulação dos dados e a análise temática subsidiaram a interpretação dos dados. Foram construídas duas categorias: "Gestão da atenção à saúde" e "(Des)continuidade do cuidado". Constataram-se lacunas como a ausência de cadastro para favorecer o acompanhamento e nortear o planejamento de ações; atendimento pontual e desarticulado entre os serviços com fragilidade no fluxo de informações, que obstaculizam o seguimento ao longo do tempo. A continuidade do cuidado na rede de atenção à saúde está fragilizada e há necessidade do desenvolvimento de estratégias que a favoreçam.

  10. Exploration of EEG features of Alzheimer's disease using continuous wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanian, Parham; Devilbiss, David M; Hess, Terry; Bernstein, Allan; Simon, Adam J; Ashrafiuon, Hashem

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a novel approach to elucidate several discriminating EEG features of Alzheimer's disease. The approach is based on the use of a variety of continuous wavelet transforms, pairwise statistical tests with multiple comparison correction, and several decision tree algorithms, in order to choose the most prominent EEG features from a single sensor. A pilot study was conducted to record EEG signals from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy age-matched control (CTL) subjects using a single dry electrode device during several eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) resting conditions. We computed the power spectrum distribution properties and wavelet and sample entropy of the wavelet coefficients time series at scale ranges approximately corresponding to the major brain frequency bands. A predictive index was developed using the results from statistical tests and decision tree algorithms to identify the most reliable significant features of the AD patients when compared to healthy controls. The three most dominant features were identified as larger absolute mean power and larger standard deviation of the wavelet scales corresponding to 4-8 Hz (θ) during EO and lower wavelet entropy of the wavelet scales corresponding to 8-12 Hz (α) during EC, respectively. The fourth reliable set of distinguishing features of AD patients was lower relative power of the wavelet scales corresponding to 12-30 Hz (β) followed by lower skewness of the wavelet scales corresponding to 2-4 Hz (upper δ), both during EO. In general, the results indicate slowing and lower complexity of EEG signal in AD patients using a very easy-to-use and convenient single dry electrode device.

  11. Diagnosis of digestive functional disease by the statistics of continuous monitoring of esophageal acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Landa, Rogelio; Cardenas Cardenas, Eduardo; Fossion, Ruben; Pérez Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2014-11-01

    Technological advances in the last few decennia allow the monitoring of many physiological observables in a continuous way, which in physics is called a "time series". The best studied physiological time series is that of the heart rhythm, which can be derived from an electrocardiogram (ECG). Studies have shown that a healthy heart is characterized by a complex time series and high heart rate variability (HRV). In adverse conditions, the cardiac time series degenerates towards randomness (as seen in, e.g., fibrillation) or rigidity (as seen in, e.g., ageing), both corresponding to a loss of HRV as described by, e.g., Golberger et. al [1]. Cardiac and digestive rhythms are regulated by the autonomous nervous system (ANS), that consists of two antagonistic branches, the orthosympathetic branch (ONS) that accelerates the cardiac rhythm but decelerates the digestive system, and the parasympathetic brand (PNS) that works in the opposite way. Because of this reason, one might expect that the statistics of gastro-esophageal time series, as described by Gardner et. al. [2,3], reflects the health state of the digestive system in a similar way as HRV in the cardiac case, described by Minocha et. al. In the present project, we apply statistical methods derived from HRV analysis to time series of esophageal acidity (24h pHmetry). The study is realized on data from a large patient population from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán. Our focus is on patients with functional disease (symptoms but no anatomical damage). We find that traditional statistical approaches (e.g. Fourier spectral analysis) are unable to distinguish between different degenerations of the digestive system, such as gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID).

  12. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The article presents three contemporary art projects that, in various ways, thematise questions regarding numerical representation of the human face in relation to the identification of faces, for example through the use of biometric video analysis software, or DNA technology. The Dutch...... artist Marnix de Nijs' Physiognomic Scrutinizer is an interactive installation whereby the viewer's face is scanned and identified with historical figures. The American artist Zach Blas' project Fag Face Mask consists of three-dimensional portraits that blend biometric facial data from 30 gay men's faces...

  13. Continuing Medical Education Improves Gastroenterologists' Compliance with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Quality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Tamar; Moreo, Kathleen; Carter, Jeffrey D; Greene, Laurence; Patel, Barry; Higgins, Peter D R

    2016-07-01

    Low rates of compliance with quality measures for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been reported for US gastroenterologists. We assessed the influence of quality improvement (QI) education on compliance with physician quality reporting system (PQRS) measures for IBD and measures related to National Quality Strategy (NQS) priorities. Forty community-based gastroenterologists participated in the QI study; 20 were assigned to educational intervention and control groups, respectively. At baseline, randomly selected charts of patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis were retrospectively reviewed for the gastroenterologists' performance of 8 PQRS IBD measures and 4 NQS-related measures. The intervention group participated in a series of accredited continuing medical education (CME) activities focusing on QI. Follow-up chart reviews were conducted 6 months after the CME activities. Independent t tests were conducted to compare between-group differences in baseline-to-follow-up rates of documented compliance with each measure. The analysis included 299 baseline charts and 300 follow-up charts. The intervention group had significantly greater magnitudes of improvement than the control group for the following measures: assessment of IBD type, location, and activity (+14 %, p = 0.009); influenza vaccination (+13 %, p = 0.025); pneumococcal vaccination (+20 %, p = 0.003); testing for latent tuberculosis before anti-TNF-α therapy (+10 %, p = 0.028); assessment of hepatitis B virus status before anti-TNF-α therapy (+9 %, p = 0.010); assessment of side effects (+17 %, p = 0.048), and counseling patients about cancer risks (+13 %, p = 0.013). QI-focused CME improves community-based gastroenterologists' compliance with IBD quality measures and measures aligned with NQS priorities.

  14. Significant relationship between soil bacterial community structure and incidence of bacterial wilt disease under continuous cropping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Siyuan; Niu, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Chao; Xiao, Yunhua; Chen, Wu; Dai, Linjian; Liu, Xueduan; Yin, Huaqun

    2017-03-01

    Soil bacteria are very important in biogeochemical cycles and play significant role in soil-borne disease suppression. Although continuous cropping is responsible for soil-borne disease enrichment, its effect on tobacco plant health and how soil bacterial communities change are yet to be elucidated. In this study, soil bacterial communities across tobacco continuous cropping time-series fields were investigated through high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes. The results showed that long-term continuous cropping could significantly alter soil microbial communities. Bacterial diversity indices and evenness indices decreased over the monoculture span and obvious variations for community structures across the three time-scale tobacco fields were detected. Compared with the first year, the abundances of Arthrobacter and Lysobacter showed a significant decrease. Besides, the abundance of the pathogen Ralstonia spp. accumulated over the monoculture span and was significantly correlated with tobacco bacterial wilt disease rate. Moreover, Pearson's correlation demonstrated that the abundance of Arthrobacter and Lysobacter, which are considered to be beneficial bacteria had significant negative correlation with tobacco bacterial wilt disease. Therefore, after long-term continuous cropping, tobacco bacterial wilt disease could be ascribed to the alteration of the composition as well as the structure of the soil microbial community.

  15. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home ... All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help PTSD ...

  16. Long-term treatment with inhaled budesonide in persons with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who continue smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauwels, RA; Lofdahl, CG; Laitinen, LA; Schouten, JP; Postma, DS; Pride, NB; Ohlsson, SV

    1999-01-01

    Background and Methods Although patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) should stop smoking, some do not. In a double-blind, pla cebo-controlled study, we evaluated the effect of the inhaled glucocorticoid budesonide in subjects with mild COPD who continued smoking. After a

  17. If It Doesn't Work, Why Do We Still Do It? The Continuing Use of Subtalar Joint Neutral Theory in the Face of Overpowering Critical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harradine, Paul; Gates, Lucy; Bowen, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    The use of subtalar joint neutral (STJN) in the assessment and treatment of foot-related musculoskeletal symptomology is common in daily practice and still widely taught. The main pioneer of this theory was Dr Merton L. Root, and it has been labeled with a variety of names: "the foot morphology theory," "the subtalar joint neutral theory," or simply "Rootian theory" or "Root model." The theory's core concepts still underpin a common approach to musculoskeletal assessment of the foot, as well as the consequent design of foot orthoses. The available literature continues to point to Dr Root's theory as the most prevalently utilized. Concurrently, the worth of this theory has been challenged due to its poor reliability and limited external validity. This Viewpoint reviews the main clinical areas of the STJN theory, and concludes with a possible explanation and concerns for its ongoing use. To support our view, we will discuss (1) historical inaccuracies, (2) challenges with reliability, and (3) concerns with validity. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(3):130-132. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.0604.

  18. How is continuity of care experienced by people living with chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Sarah; Pollock, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    To explore patients' perceptions of continuity of care within a hospital-based specialist service. Patient journeys through health care are becoming increasingly complex. For patients with chronic conditions, the longevity of their illness and common multiple co-morbidities make this complexity more pronounced. Continuity of care is most challenging to provide for these patients. A multifaceted model of continuity is widely accepted, but despite this, much literature focuses exclusively on relational aspects. In addition, the majority of the literature has focused on primary and family care settings whilst continuity within specialist and hospital care has not been widely researched. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Thirteen semi-structured interviews with patients accessing services as at a Renal and Transplant Unit at a UK hospital were conducted in 2014. Data were analysed thematically to identify commonality as well as diversity amongst participants. Five themes of time, being known, knowledge, knowing the system and responsibility were identified within patient experiences of continuity. The multidisciplinary team was more important in relational continuity than literature has previously suggested. Patients' expectations in relation to continuity were notably different in their interactions with hospital-based services in comparison with community and family-based care. Patients accessing specialist care services may perceive continuity differently to those receiving care in the community. Generic guidance concerned with patient experience outcomes may be difficult to implement in practice. Nurses and the wider healthcare team play a fundamental role within the provision of continuity, even in predominantly medically led specialist services. The differences between primary and secondary care in terms of patient expectation and experience should be recognised to ensure effective models of care are implemented which both meet patient expectations and

  19. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    perception of faces and words is affected by unilateral posterior stroke. Two patients with lesions in their dominant hemisphere and two with lesions in their non-dominant hemisphere were tested on sensitive tests of face and word perception during the stable phase of recovery. Despite all patients having...... unilateral lesions, we found no patient with a selective deficit in either reading or face processing. Rather, the patients showing a deficit in processing either words or faces were also impaired with the other category. One patient performed within the normal range on all tasks. In addition, all patients...... performed within normal range on at least one test of visual categorisation, strongly suggesting that their abnormal performance with words and faces does not represent a generalised visuo-perceptual deficit. Our results suggest that posterior areas in both hemispheres may be critical for both reading...

  20. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? ... types of therapy that are proven to work. Learn more about Prolonged Exposure (PE) and Cognitive Processing ...

  1. About Face

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    Full Text Available Skip to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search ...

  2. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Michael W. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Veitch, Dallas P. [Dept. of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Aisen, Paul S. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Beckett, Laurel A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Cairns, Nigel J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Green, Robert C. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Harvey, Danielle [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Jack, Clifford R. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Jagust, William [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Morris, John C. [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Petersen, Ronald C. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Salazar, Jennifer [Univ. of Southern California, San Diego, CA (United States); Saykin, Andrew J. [Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shaw, Leslie M. [Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Toga, Arthur W. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Trojanowski, John Q. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Overall, the goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connectivity analyses, and a highly automated immunoassay platform and mass spectroscopy approach for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis. A Systems Biology/pathway approach will be used to identify genetic factors for subject selection/enrichment. Amyloid positron emission tomography scanning will be standardized using the Centiloid method. The Brain Health Registry will help recruit subjects and monitor subject cognition. Multimodal analyses will provide insight into AD pathophysiology and disease progression. Finally, ADNI-3 will aim to inform AD treatment trials and facilitate development of AD disease-modifying treatments.

  3. Non-oral Continuous Drug Delivery Techniques in Parkinson's Disease: For Whom, When, and How?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timpka, Jonathan; Henriksen, Tove; Odin, Per

    2016-01-01

    to a reduced capacity to buffer dopamine, which could increase the vulnerability to a pulsatile administration of drugs. The term continuous drug delivery (CDD) describes the process of delivering drugs continuously with the aim of achieving CDS. There are three principal techniques for non-oral CDD......: continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion CSAi), levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel infusion (LCIGi), and transdermal rotigotine therapy. CDD has repeatedly been shown effective in the day-to-day treatment of PD patients. Although this review does not replace local guidelines regarding the use...... of the included non-oral CDD-based therapies, we have compiled the current base of evidence or consensus view with the intention of facilitating both the selection and the use in a clinical setting. The indications for CSAi and LCIGi are very similar and are centered around motor complications in advanced PD...

  4. The Regional Network for Asian Schistosomiasis and Other Helminth Zoonoses (RNAS(+)) target diseases in face of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Utzinger, Jürg; Lv, Shan; Qian, Ying-Jun; Li, Shi-Zhu; Wang, Qiang; Bergquist, Robert; Vounatsou, Penelope; Li, Wei; Yang, Kun; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2010-01-01

    Climate change-according to conventional wisdom-will result in an expansion of tropical parasitic diseases in terms of latitude and altitude, with vector-borne diseases particularly prone to change. However, although a significant rise in temperature occurred over the past century, there is little empirical evidence whether climate change has indeed favoured infectious diseases. This might be explained by the complex relationship between climate change and the frequency and the transmission dynamics of infectious diseases, which is characterised by nonlinear associations and countless other complex factors governing the distribution of infectious diseases. Here, we explore whether and how climate change might impact on diseases targeted by the Regional Network for Asian Schistosomiasis and Other Helminth Zoonoses (RNAS(+)). We start our review with a short summary of the current evidence-base how climate change affects the distribution of infectious diseases. Next, we introduce biology-based models for predicting the distribution of infectious diseases in a future, warmer world. Two case studies are presented: the classical RNAS(+) disease schistosomiasis and an emerging disease, angiostrongyliasis, focussing on their occurrences in the People's Republic of China. Strengths and limitations of current models for predicting the impact of climate change on infectious diseases are discussed, and we propose model extensions to include social and ecological factors. Finally, we recommend that mitigation and adaptation strategies to diminish potential negative effects of climate change need to be developed in concert with key stakeholders so that surveillance and early-warning systems can be strengthened and the most vulnerable population groups protected. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolonged continuous exposure to high fine particulate matter associated with cardiovascular and respiratory disease mortality in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Yin, Qian; Tong, Shilu; Ren, Zhoupeng; Hu, Maogui; Zhang, Hongrui

    2017-11-01

    Although many studies examined the effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on the deaths of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and respiratory disease (RD), few research has paid attention to the effects of prolonged continuous exposure to high PM2.5 pollution. This study estimated the excess risks (ER) of CVD and RD mortalities associated with prolonged continuous exposure to high PM2.5 pollution for the whole population and specific subsociodemographic groups in Beijing, which is the capital city of China with over 20 million residents and having severe PM2.5 pollution problems. Our results suggested that when high PM2.5 pollution occurred continuously, at various thresholds and durations, the adverse effects on CVD and RD mortalities varied significantly. The CVD mortality risks in association with prolonged continuous high PM2.5 pollution exposure were more serious for single individuals (including unmarried, divorced, and widowed), illiterate and outdoor workers than for other specific subsociodemographic groups. When the daily PM2.5 concentration higher than 105 μg/m3 consecutively occurs, at the ninth day, the ERs of CVD death for single individuals, illiterate and outdoor workers groups reached to 45% (95% CI: 22, 71), 51% (95% CI: 28, 79) and 53% (95% CI: 29, 82) respectively. On the other hand, prolonged continuous high PM2.5 pollution level appeared to contribute a higher proportion of RD deaths among illiterate and outdoor workers, but less significant for the other specific subsociodemographic groups. When the duration with daily PM2.5 pollution higher than 115 μg/m3 reached to six days, the ERs for outdoor workers and illiterate attributed to prolonged continuous PM2.5 pollution exposure increased 36% (95% CI: 5, 76) and 49% (95% CI: 16, 91) respectively.

  6. Did transmission of Helicobacter pylori from humans cause a disease outbreak in a colony of Stripe-faced Dunnarts (Sminthopsis macroura?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Every Alison L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes a range of pathologies in the stomachs of infected humans, it has become apparent that Helicobacters are found in a diverse range of animal species where they are frequently associated with disease. In 2003 and 2004, there were two outbreaks of increased mortality associated with gastric bleeding and weight-loss in a captive colony of the Australian marsupial, the Stripe-faced Dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura. The presence of gastric pathology led to an investigation of potential Helicobacter pathogenesis in these animals. Histological examination revealed the presence of gastritis, and PCR analysis confirmed the presence of Helicobacter infection in the stomachs of these marsupials. Surprisingly, sequencing of 16S rRNA from these bacteria identified the species as H. pylori and PCR confirmed the strain to be positive for the important pathogenesis factor, cagA. We therefore describe, for the first time, an apparent reverse zoonotic infection of Stripe-faced Dunnarts with H. pylori. Already prone to pathological effects of stress (as experienced during breeding season, concomitant H. pylori infection appears to be a possible essential but not sufficient co-factor in prototypic gastric bleeding and weight loss in these marsupials. The Stripe-faced Dunnart could represent a new model for investigating Helicobacter-driven gastric pathology. Infections from their human handlers, specifically of H. pylori, may be a potential risk to captive colonies of marsupials.

  7. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3: Continued innovation for clinical trial improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Michael W; Veitch, Dallas P; Aisen, Paul S; Beckett, Laurel A; Cairns, Nigel J; Green, Robert C; Harvey, Danielle; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Morris, John C; Petersen, Ronald C; Salazar, Jennifer; Saykin, Andrew J; Shaw, Leslie M; Toga, Arthur W; Trojanowski, John Q

    2017-05-01

    The overall goal of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is to validate biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) clinical trials. ADNI-3, which began on August 1, 2016, is a 5-year renewal of the current ADNI-2 study. ADNI-3 will follow current and additional subjects with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment, and AD using innovative technologies such as tau imaging, magnetic resonance imaging sequences for connectivity analyses, and a highly automated immunoassay platform and mass spectroscopy approach for cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis. A Systems Biology/pathway approach will be used to identify genetic factors for subject selection/enrichment. Amyloid positron emission tomography scanning will be standardized using the Centiloid method. The Brain Health Registry will help recruit subjects and monitor subject cognition. Multimodal analyses will provide insight into AD pathophysiology and disease progression. ADNI-3 will aim to inform AD treatment trials and facilitate development of AD disease-modifying treatments. Copyright © 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Incorporating exposure to pitch canker disease to support management decisions of Pinus pinaster Ait. in the face of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Varela, María Jesús; Alía, Ricardo; Pórtoles, Javier; Gonzalo, Julián; Soliño, Mario; Grivet, Delphine; Raposo, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is gravely affecting forest ecosystems, resulting in large distribution shifts as well as in increasing infection diseases and biological invasions. Accordingly, forest management requires an evaluation of exposure to climate change that should integrate both its abiotic and biotic components. Here we address the implications of climate change in an emerging disease by analysing both the host species (Pinus pinaster, Maritime pine) and the pathogen’s (Fusarium circinatum, pitch canker) environmental suitability i.e. estimating the host’s risk of habitat loss and the disease`s future environmental range. We constrained our study area to the Spanish Iberian Peninsula, where accurate climate and pitch canker occurrence databases were available. While P. pinaster is widely distributed across the study area, the disease has only been detected in its north-central and north-western edges. We fitted species distribution models for the current distribution of the conifer and the disease. Then, these models were projected into nine Global Climate Models and two different climatic scenarios which totalled to 18 different future climate predictions representative of 2050. Based on the level of agreement among them, we created future suitability maps for the pine and for the disease independently, which were then used to assess exposure of current populations of P. pinaster to abiotic and biotic effects of climate change. Almost the entire distribution of P. pinaster in the Spanish Iberian Peninsula will be subjected to abiotic exposure likely to be driven by the predicted increase in drought events in the future. Furthermore, we detected a reduction in exposure to pitch canker that will be concentrated along the north-western edge of the study area. Setting up breeding programs is recommended in highly exposed and productive populations, while silvicultural methods and monitoring should be applied in those less productive, but still exposed, populations

  9. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help PTSD We've been there. After a traumatic event — ... you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is ...

  10. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos ...

  11. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In these videos, Veterans, family members, ...

  12. About Face

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    Full Text Available ... traumatic event — like combat, an assault, or a disaster — it's normal to feel scared, keyed up, or sad at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In ...

  13. Predicting binary, discrete and continued lncRNA-disease associations via a unified framework based on graph regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Long, Yu-Xi; Yiu, Siu-Ming

    2017-12-21

    existing approaches. Firstly, it can be used to work on lncRNAs that have no known disease association and diseases that have no known association with any lncRNAs. Secondly, instead of providing a binary answer (with or without association), GRUF works for both discrete and continued LDA, which help revealing the pathological implications between lncRNAs and diseases.

  14. Continuous hemofiltration dose calculation in a newborn patient with congenital heart disease and preoperative renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Z; Polito, A; Giorni, C; Di Chiara, L; Ronco, C; Picardo, S

    2007-03-01

    To report a case of a newborn patient with renal failure due to polycystic kidneys requiring renal replacement therapy, and total anomalous pulmonary venous return requiring major cardiosurgical intervention. Pediatric cardiosurgery operatory room and pediatric cardiologic intensive care. A 6-day-old newborn child weighing 3.1 kg. Renal function (creatinine value and urine output) was monitored during the course of the operation and intraoperative renal replacement therapy was not initiated. Serum creatinine concentration decreased from 4.4 to 3 mg/dL at cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) start and to 1.5 at the end of surgery: the creatinine decrease was provided by the dilutional effect of CPB priming and the infusion of fresh blood from transfusions together with an adequate filtration rate (800 m/L in about 120 minutes). After the operation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for ventricular dysfunction and continuous hemofiltration for anuria refractory to medical therapy were prescribed. The hemofiltration machine was set in parallel with the ECMO machine at a blood flow rate of 60 ml/min and a predilution replacement solution infusion of 600 ml/h (4.5 ml/min of creatinine clearance once adjusted on extracorporeal circuits; 3000 mL/m2 hemofiltration): after a single hemofiltration session lasting 96 hours, serum creatinine reached optimal steady state levels around 0.5 mg/dL on postoperative day 2 and 3. Administration of intraoperative continuous hemofiltration is not mandatory in the case of a 3-kg newborn patient with established renal failure needing major cardiosurgery: hemodilution secondary to CPB, transfusion of hemoderivates, and optimal UF rate appear to be effective methods for achieving solute removal. If postoperative continuous hemofiltration is started, however, a "dialytic dose" of 4.5 ml/min allows an adequate creatinine clearance, quick achievement of a steady state of serum creatinine concentration and an eventual acceptable rate of

  15. Pervasive Computing Technologies to Continuously Assess Alzheimer’s Disease Progression and Intervention Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayard E. Lyons

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, assessment of functional and cognitive status of individuals with dementia occurs in brief clinic visits during which time clinicians extract a snapshot of recent changes in individuals’ health. Conventionally, this is done using various clinical assessment tools applied at the point of care and relies on patients’ and caregivers’ ability to accurately recall daily activity and trends in personal health. These practices suffer from the infrequency and generally short durations of visits. Since 2004, researchers at the Oregon Center for Aging and Technology (ORCATECH at the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU have been working on developing technologies to transform this model. ORCATECH researchers have developed a system of continuous in-home monitoring using pervasive computing technologies that make it possible to more accurately track activities and behaviors and measure relevant intra-individual changes. We have installed a system of strategically placed sensors in over 480 homes and have been collecting data for up to 8 years. Using this continuous in-home monitoring system ORCATECH researchers have collected data on multiple behaviors such as gait and mobility, sleep and activity patterns, medication adherence and computer use. Patterns of intra-individual variation detected in each of these areas are used to predict outcomes such as low mood, loneliness, and cognitive function. These methods have the potential to improve the quality of patient health data and in turn patient care especially related to cognitive decline. Furthermore, the continuous real-world nature of the data may improve the efficiency and ecological validity of clinical intervention studies.

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep and daytime sleepiness in patients with Parkinson disease and sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neikrug, Ariel B; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A; Maglione, Jeanne E; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Sleep laboratory. Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Continuous positive airway pressure. PSG OUTCOME MEASURES: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation sleep-onset latency (MSL). There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in patients with Parkinson disease and obstructive sleep apnea. Additionally, arousal index was reduced and effects were maintained at 6 weeks. Finally, 3 weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment resulted in reduced daytime sleepiness measured by multiple sleep latency test. These results emphasize the importance of identifying and treating obstructive sleep apnea in patients with Parkinson disease.

  17. Hope in action—facing cardiac death: A qualitative study of patients with life-threatening disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Nordrehaug, Jan Erik; Malterud, Kirsti

    2011-01-01

    Coping with existential challenges is important when struck by serious disease, but apart from cancer and palliative care little is known about how patients deal with such issues and maintain hope. To explore how patients with life-threatening heart disease experience hope when coping with mortality and other existential challenges, we conducted a qualitative study with semi-structured interviews. We made a purposive sample of 11 participants (26–88 years) who had experienced life-threatening disease: eight participants with serious heart disease, two with cancer, and one with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The findings showed that hope could enhance coping and diminish existential distress when patients were confronted with mortality and other existential challenges. Hope was observed as three types of dynamic work: to shift perception of mortality from overwhelming horror toward suppression or peaceful acceptance, to foster reconciliation instead of uncertainty when adapting to the new phase of life, and to establish go-ahead spirit instead of resignation as their identity. Meaning of life could, hence, be sustained in spite of serious threats to the persons' future, everyday life, and self-conception. The work of hoping could be supported or disturbed by relationships with family, friends, and health care professionals. Hope can be regarded as an active, dynamic state of existential coping among patients with life-threatening disease. Physicians may support this coping and thereby provide personal growth and alleviation of existential distress by skillfully identifying, acknowledging, and participating in the work of hoping performed by the patient. PMID:21423599

  18. A new face of endocannabinoids in pharmacotherapy. Part II: role of endocannabinoids in inflammation-derived cardiovaascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, M; Liebold, A; Janecka, A; Zubrzycka, M

    2014-04-01

    Endocannabinoids play an important role in cardiovascular diseases caused by inflammatory disorders. Endocannabinoids are endogenous bioactive lipids that activate cannabinoid receptors and together with enzymes responsible for their synthesis and degradation constitute endocannabinoid system. The results obtained to date suggest the involvement of endocannabinoids in the pathology of many cardiovascular diseases associated with inflammation, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, chemotherapy-induced myocardial injury, diabetic and hepatic cirrhosis cardiomyopathy. Our better understanding of cannabinoid system may result in the development of new strategies for the treatment of such disorders.

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation for Patients With Coronary Artery Disease: A Practical Guide to Enhance Patient Outcomes Through Continuity of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Giuliano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a leading cause of disease burden worldwide. Referral to cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a class I recommendation for all patients with CAD based on findings that participation can reduce cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, as well as improve functional capacity and quality of life. However, programme uptake remains low, systematic progression through the traditional CR phases is often lacking, and communication between health care providers is frequently suboptimal, resulting in fragmented care. Only 30% to 50% of eligible patients are typically referred to outpatient CR and fewer still complete the programme. In contemporary models of CR, patients are no longer treated by a single practitioner, but rather by an array of health professionals, across multiples specialities and health care settings. The risk of fragmented care in CR may be great, and a concerted approach is required to achieve continuity and optimise patient outcomes. ‘Continuity of care’ has been described as the delivery of services in a coherent, logical, and timely fashion and which entails 3 specific domains: informational, management, and relational continuity. This is examined in the context of CR.

  20. Continuous lumbar hemilaminectomy for intervertebral disc disease in an Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Thomas; Böttcher, Peter; Alef, Michaele; Kiefer, Ingmar; Ludewig, Eberhard; Thielebein, Jens; Grevel, Vera

    2008-09-01

    A 13-yr-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was presented for an acute onset of paraplegia. Spinal imaging that included plain radiographs, myelography, and computed tomography performed under general anesthesia revealed lateralized spinal cord compression at the intervertebral disc space L4-5 caused by intervertebral disc extrusion. This extrusion was accompanied by an extensive epidural hemorrhage from L3 to L6. Therefore, a continuous hemilaminectomy from L3 to L6 was performed, resulting in complete decompression of the spinal cord. The tiger was ambulatory again 10 days after the surgery. This case suggests that the potential benefit of complete spinal cord decompression may outweigh the risk of causing clinically significant spinal instability after extensive decompression.

  1. Insuring continuity of care for chronic disease patients after a disaster: key preparedness elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Martha I.; Foreman, Rachel D.; Crook, Errol D.; Icenogle, Marjorie L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Care for patients with chronic diseases is a challenge after a disaster. This is particularly true for individuals from health disparate populations as they are less likely to evacuate, have less financial resources and often depend on resource-strapped institutions for their care. The specific aim of the study presented here was to elicit challenges and solutions in the provision of health care to those with chronic diseases after Hurricane Katrina in coastal Alabama and Mississippi. Methods Focusing on agencies providing care to health disparate populations, a qualitative methodology was employed using in-depth interviews with health and social service providers. Participants identified key elements essential to disaster preparedness. Results Pre-disaster issues were patient education and preparedness, evacuation, special needs shelters and health care provider preparedness. Post-disaster issues were communication, volunteer coordination and donation management. Conclusions Lessons learned from those on the ground administering healthcare during disasters should inform future disaster preparations. Furthermore, the methodological approach used in this study engendered collaboration between healthcare institutions and may enhance future inter-agency disaster preparedness. PMID:18703906

  2. Online continuing medical education as a key link for successful noncommunicable disease self-management: the CASALUD™ Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martínez, Rodrigo; Mujica-Rosales, Ricardo; Lee, Evan M; Israel, Amy; Torres-Beltran, Braulio; Quijano-González, Úrsula; Atkinson, Elena Rose; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how the benefits of online continuing medical education (CME) provided to health care professionals traveled along a patient "educational chain". In this study, the educational chain begins with the influence that CME can have on the quality of health care, with subsequent influence on patient knowledge, disease self-management, and disease biomarkers. A total of 422 patients with at least one noncommunicable disease (NCD) treated in eight different Mexican public health clinics were followed over 3 years. All clinics were participants in the CASALUD Model, an NCD care model for primary care, where all clinic staff were offered CME. Data were collected through a questionnaire on health care, patient disease knowledge, and self-management behaviors; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were collected to measure patient disease biomarkers. Between 2013 and 2015, the indexes measuring quality of health care, patient health knowledge, and diabetes self-management activities rose moderately but significantly (from 0.54 to 0.64, 0.80 to 0.84, and 0.62 to 0.67, respectively). Performing self-care activities - including owning and using a glucometer and belonging to a disease support group - saw the highest increase (from 0.65 to 0.75). A1C levels increased between 2013 and 2015 from 7.95 to 8.41% (63-68 mmol/mol) ( P Online CME can effect certain changes in the educational chain linking quality of health care, patient knowledge, and self-management behaviors. However, in order to assure adequate NCD control, the entire health care system must be improved in tandem. Online CME programs, such as CASALUD's, are feasible strategies for impacting changes in disease self-management at a clinic level throughout a country.

  3. Effects of continuous vs interval exercise training on oxygen uptake efficiency slope in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, D M L; Rocco, E A; Silva, A G; Rocco, D F; Pacheco, M T; Silva, P F; Furlan, V

    2016-02-01

    The oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) is a submaximal index incorporating cardiovascular, peripheral, and pulmonary factors that determine the ventilatory response to exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous exercise training and interval exercise training on the OUES in patients with coronary artery disease. Thirty-five patients (59.3±1.8 years old; 28 men, 7 women) with coronary artery disease were randomly divided into two groups: continuous exercise training (n=18) and interval exercise training (n=17). All patients performed graded exercise tests with respiratory gas analysis before and 3 months after the exercise-training program to determine ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT), respiratory compensation point, and peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2). The OUES was assessed based on data from the second minute of exercise until exhaustion by calculating the slope of the linear relation between oxygen uptake and the logarithm of total ventilation. After the interventions, both groups showed increased aerobic fitness (Pexercise and interval exercise training groups demonstrated an increase in OUES (Pexercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.57; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.57); 2) interval exercise training (OUES and peak VO2 r=0.80; OUES and VO2 VAT r=0.67). Continuous and interval exercise training resulted in a similar increase in OUES among patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that improvements in OUES among CAD patients after aerobic exercise training may be dependent on peripheral and central mechanisms.

  4. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on lung mechanics of babies after operation for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, J J; Hatch, D J; Kerr, A A; Taylor, B

    1975-01-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on lung mechanics was investigated in 12 babies after operation for severe congenital heart disease. At the time of study all babies were receiving or being weaned from ventilatory support and had abnormally low lung volume or compliance. During CPAP there was a fall in the pulmonary resistance which, with a slight decrease in minute ventilation, resulted in a significant decrease in the work of breathing. It is suggested that lowering the oxygen cost of breathing may contribute to the improvement in arterial oxygenation seen when CPAP is used. PMID:801862

  5. The importance of continuing surveillance of risk factors for prevention of cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Lanza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available After peaking in the 1960s’, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs have shown a consistent decline in western countries in recent decades [1].Despite this,CVDs remain the major cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialized populations, with relevant associated socio-economical issues, while their incidence is increasing in developing countries. Several factors have likely contributed to the reduced incidence of CVDs in industrialized societies, including an increase in education and attention to health issues, lifestyle changes and improvement in diagnostic facilities and therapeutic tools. Epidemiologic studies have played an outstanding role in the decline of CVDs. Indeed, they have allowed for the identification of habits and conditions which expose healthy subjects to an increased risk of development of atherosclerosis and its complications They have also led to the implementation of appropriate programs and campaigns aimed at fighting the identified risk factors by means of changes in diet and lifestyle and the use of specific drug treatments. In particular, tight control and prevention of hypertension, smoking and hypercholesterolemia has largely contributed to the reduction of CVDs, accounting for more than 50% of the reduction of mortality from the 1960s’ to the 1990s’ [2].This approach was also crucial in improving the clinical outcomes of secondary prevention for CVDs.

  6. Continuing Need for Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics After the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Karen W; Parsell, Bradley W; Leichliter, Jami S; Habel, Melissa A; Tao, Guoyu; Pearson, William S; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    We assessed the characteristics of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients, their reasons for seeking health services in STD clinics, and their access to health care in other venues. In 2013, we surveyed persons who used publicly funded STD clinics in 21 US cities with the highest STD morbidity. Of the 4364 STD clinic patients we surveyed, 58.5% were younger than 30 years, 72.5% were non-White, and 49.9% were uninsured. They visited the clinic for STD symptoms (18.9%), STD screening (33.8%), and HIV testing (13.6%). Patients chose STD clinics because of walk-in, same-day appointments (49.5%), low cost (23.9%), and expert care (8.3%). Among STD clinic patients, 60.4% had access to another type of venue for sick care, and 58.5% had access to another type of venue for preventive care. Most insured patients (51.6%) were willing to use insurance to pay for care at the STD clinic. Despite access to other health care settings, patients chose STD clinics for sexual health care because of convenient, low-cost, and expert care. Policy Implication. STD clinics play an important role in STD prevention by offering walk-in care to uninsured patients.

  7. Native root-associated bacteria rescue a plant from a sudden-wilt disease that emerged during continuous cropping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Luu, Van Thi; Weinhold, Arne; Goldberg, Jay; Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants maintain microbial associations whose functions remain largely unknown. For the past 15 y, we have planted the annual postfire tobacco Nicotiana attenuata into an experimental field plot in the plant’s native habitat, and for the last 8 y the number of plants dying from a sudden wilt disease has increased, leading to crop failure. Inadvertently we had recapitulated the common agricultural dilemma of pathogen buildup associated with continuous cropping for this native plant. Plants suffered sudden tissue collapse and black roots, symptoms similar to a Fusarium–Alternaria disease complex, recently characterized in a nearby native population and developed into an in vitro pathosystem for N. attenuata. With this in vitro disease system, different protection strategies (fungicide and inoculations with native root-associated bacterial and fungal isolates), together with a biochar soil amendment, were tested further in the field. A field trial with more than 900 plants in two field plots revealed that inoculation with a mixture of native bacterial isolates significantly reduced disease incidence and mortality in the infected field plot without influencing growth, herbivore resistance, or 32 defense and signaling metabolites known to mediate resistance against native herbivores. Tests in a subsequent year revealed that a core consortium of five bacteria was essential for disease reduction. This consortium, but not individual members of the root-associated bacteria community which this plant normally recruits during germination from native seed banks, provides enduring resistance against fungal diseases, demonstrating that native plants develop opportunistic mutualisms with prokaryotes that solve context-dependent ecological problems. PMID:26305938

  8. The Efficacy of Continued Sorafenib Treatment after Radiologic Confirmation of Progressive Disease in Patients with Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Wada

    Full Text Available Whether radiologically detected progressive disease (PD is an accurate metric for discontinuing sorafenib treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. We investigated the efficacy of sorafenib treatment after radiologic confirmation of PD in patients with advanced HCC.We retrospectively analyzed HCC patients treated with sorafenib at Kyushu Medical Center. Six of the 92 patients with radiologically confirmed PD were excluded because they were classified as Child-Pugh C or had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance status (PS ≥3; 86 patients were ultimately enrolled.Among the 86 patients, 47 continued sorafenib treatment after radiologic confirmation of PD (the continuous group, whereas 39 did not (the discontinuous group. The median survival time (MST in the continuous group after confirmation was 12.9 months compared with 4.5 months in the discontinuous group (p <0.01. The time to progression in the continuous group after confirmation was 2.6 months compared with 1.4 months in the discontinuous group (p <0.01; it was 4.2 months and 2.1 months in patients who had received sorafenib ≥4 months and <4 months, respectively, before confirmation (p = 0.03. In these subgroups, the post-PD MST was 16.7 months and 9.6 months, respectively (p < 0.01. Independent predictors of overall survival after radiologic detection of PD were (hazard ratio, confidence interval: ECOG PS <2 (0.290, 0.107-0.880, Barcelona Clinical Liver Cancer stage B (0.146, 0.047-0.457, serum α-fetoprotein level ≥400 ng/mL (2.801, 1.355-5.691, and post-PD sorafenib administration (0.279, 0.150-0.510.Continuing sorafenib treatment after radiologic confirmation of PD increased survival in patients with advanced HCC. Therefore, radiologically detected PD is not a metric for discontinuation of sorafenib treatment in such patients.

  9. Postural motor learning in Parkinson's disease: The effect of practice on continuous compensatory postural regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ooteghem, Karen; Frank, James S; Horak, Fay B

    2017-09-01

    Although balance training is considered the most effective treatment for balance impairments in Parkinson's disease (PD), few studies have examined if learning for balance control remains intact with PD. This study aimed to determine if learning for automatic postural responses is preserved in people with PD. Eleven participants with moderate PD (68±6.4years; H&Y: 2-3) on their usual medication maintained balance on a platform that oscillated forward and backward with variable amplitude and constant frequency. Participants completed 42 trials during one training session, and retention and transfer tests following a 24-h delay. Performance was measured by comparing spatial and temporal measures of whole-body centre of mass (COM) with platform displacements. Learning was compared between participants with PD and previously reported, age-matched older adults (Van Ooteghem et al., 2010). Although postural responses in participants with PD were impaired compared to control participants, a majority of PD participants improved their postural responses with practice as revealed by reduced COM displacements and improved phase relationships between COM and platform motion. Rates of improvement were comparable between groups demonstrating preserved adaptive capacity for participants with PD. Similar to control participants, the PD group moved toward anticipatory COM control as a strategy for improving stability, exhibited short-term retention of performance improvements, and demonstrated generalizability of the learned responses. Rate of improvement with practice, but not retention, was related to severity of motor impairments. Patients with moderate PD on medication demonstrate retention of improvements in automatic postural responses with practice suggesting that intrinsic postural motor learning is preserved in this group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Plus disease in retinopathy of prematurity: a continuous spectrum of vascular abnormality as basis of diagnostic variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. Peter; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Erdogmus, Deniz; Tian, Peng; Kedarisetti, Dharanish; Moleta, Chace; Reynolds, James D.; Hutcheson, Kelly; Shapiro, Michael J.; Repka, Michael X.; Ferrone, Philip; Drenser, Kimberly; Horowitz, Jason; Sonmez, Kemal; Swan, Ryan; Ostmo, Susan; Jonas, Karyn E.; Chan, R.V. Paul; Chiang, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    vascular abnormality required for presence of plus and pre-plus disease. This has important implications for research, teaching and patient care for ROP, and suggests that a continuous ROP plus disease severity score may more accurately reflect the behavior of expert ROP clinicians, and may better standardize classification in the future. PMID:27591053

  11. Transplacental transmission of Leishmania infantum as a means for continued disease incidence in North America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Mercedes Boggiatto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Dogs are the predominant domestic reservoir for human L. infantum infection. Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL is an emerging problem in some U.S. dog breeds, with an annual quantitative PCR prevalence of greater than 20% within an at-risk Foxhound population. Although classically Leishmania is transmitted by infected sand flies and phlebotomine sand flies exist in the United States, means of ongoing L. infantum transmission in U.S. dogs is currently unknown. Possibilities include vertical (transplacental/transmammary and horizontal/venereal transmission. Several reports have indicated that endemic ZVL may be transmitted vertically.Our aims for this present study were to establish whether vertical/transplacental transmission was occurring in this population of Leishmania-infected US dogs and determine the effect that this means of transmission has on immune recognition of Leishmania.A pregnant L. infantum-infected dam donated to Iowa State University gave birth in-house to 12 pups. Eight pups humanely euthanized at the time of birth and four pups and the dam humanely euthanized three months post-partum were studied via L. infantum-kinetoplast specific quantitative PCR (kqPCR, gross and histopathological assessment and CD4+ T cell proliferation assay.This novel report describes disseminated L. infantum parasites as identified by kqPCR in 8 day old pups born to a naturally-infected, seropositive U.S. dog with no travel history. This is the first report of vertical transmission of L. infantum in naturally-infected dogs in North America, emphasizing that this novel means of transmission could possibly sustain infection within populations.Evidence that vertical transmission of ZVL may be a driving force for ongoing disease in an otherwise non-endemic region has significant implications on current control strategies for ZVL, as at present parasite elimination efforts in endemic areas are largely focused on vector-borne transmission between canines

  12. Transplacental transmission of Leishmania infantum as a means for continued disease incidence in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggiatto, Paola Mercedes; Gibson-Corley, Katherine Nicole; Metz, Kyle; Gallup, Jack Michael; Hostetter, Jesse Michael; Mullin, Kathleen; Petersen, Christine Anne

    2011-04-12

    Dogs are the predominant domestic reservoir for human L. infantum infection. Zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) is an emerging problem in some U.S. dog breeds, with an annual quantitative PCR prevalence of greater than 20% within an at-risk Foxhound population. Although classically Leishmania is transmitted by infected sand flies and phlebotomine sand flies exist in the United States, means of ongoing L. infantum transmission in U.S. dogs is currently unknown. Possibilities include vertical (transplacental/transmammary) and horizontal/venereal transmission. Several reports have indicated that endemic ZVL may be transmitted vertically. Our aims for this present study were to establish whether vertical/transplacental transmission was occurring in this population of Leishmania-infected US dogs and determine the effect that this means of transmission has on immune recognition of Leishmania. A pregnant L. infantum-infected dam donated to Iowa State University gave birth in-house to 12 pups. Eight pups humanely euthanized at the time of birth and four pups and the dam humanely euthanized three months post-partum were studied via L. infantum-kinetoplast specific quantitative PCR (kqPCR), gross and histopathological assessment and CD4+ T cell proliferation assay. This novel report describes disseminated L. infantum parasites as identified by kqPCR in 8 day old pups born to a naturally-infected, seropositive U.S. dog with no travel history. This is the first report of vertical transmission of L. infantum in naturally-infected dogs in North America, emphasizing that this novel means of transmission could possibly sustain infection within populations. Evidence that vertical transmission of ZVL may be a driving force for ongoing disease in an otherwise non-endemic region has significant implications on current control strategies for ZVL, as at present parasite elimination efforts in endemic areas are largely focused on vector-borne transmission between canines and people

  13. Use of a mail-out continuing education article to teach health professionals about drug-induced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S A

    1999-11-01

    A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Georgetown University Medical Center conference was the basis for "Clinical Therapeutics and the Recognition of Drug-Induced Disease," the first MEDWATCH continuing education (CE) mail-out article. Developed as a major component of FDA MEDWATCH post-marketing surveillance outreach, the article used a clinical therapeutic approach to discuss topics including adverse drug events (ADEs) pharmacology and ADE reporting. Distributed nationwide through the MEDWATCH Partners, health professionals applied for CE credit by completing a self-assessment examination. With the overall response rate slightly more than 2%, 15,260 health professionals (55% physicians and 37% pharmacists) received CE credit. Evaluation of the initial approximately two-thirds (N = 10,021) of successfully completed exams found 99% agreement that stated learning objectives were met, and the article relevant to their clinical practice; spontaneous comments/letters were also very positive. The highest percentage responding specialists were internists (28%) and psychiatrists (17%), with notable differences found among specialties for response rate versus relative article distribution (such as relatively low response rates among surgeons and radiology/radiation physics specialists). The number of health professionals receiving CE credit, coupled with examination performance and overall response, indicates that "Clinical Therapeutics and the Recognition of Drug-Induced Disease" was well received and fulfilled learning objectives. The results provide encouragement for this continuing educational approach.

  14. Intrajejunal Infusion of Levodopa-Carbidopa Gel Can Continuously Reduce the Severity of Dropped Head in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kataoka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dropped head can occur in patients with Parkinson’s disease and make their quality of life unpleasant because they cannot obtain a frontal view. The pathophysiologic involvement of dopamine agonist or central or peripheral mechanisms has been proposed. Levodopa therapy with the withdrawal of dopamine agonists was sometimes effective, but the effect in most patients did not persist for the entire day. We describe a patient with Parkinson’s disease whose dropped head responded throughout the day to the continuous intrajejunal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG. During off-periods before treatment with LCIG, severe akinesia and freezing of gait were evident, and she could not continuously obtain a frontal view because of the dropped head. About 20 min after the intrajejunal infusion of LCIG, these features remarkably improved, and she could obtain a frontal view. The angle of dropped head was improved from 39.39 to 14.04°. This case suggests that infusion of LCIG can reduce the severity of dropped head for a longer period than oral levodopa.

  15. RRR for NNN-a rapid research response for the Neglected Tropical Disease NGDO Network: a novel framework to challenges faced by the global programs targeting neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Chelsea E; Jacobson, Julie; Wainwright, Emily C; Ottesen, Eric A; Lammie, Patrick J

    2016-03-01

    While global programs targeting the control or elimination of five of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs)-lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, schistosomiasis and trachoma-are well underway, they still face many operational challenges. Because of the urgency of 2020 program targets, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the U.S. Agency for International Development devised a novel rapid research response (RRR) framework to engage national programs, researchers, implementers and WHO in a Coalition for Operational Research on NTDs. After 2 years, this effort has succeeded as an important basis for the research response to programmatic challenges facing NTD programs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  16. Continuity of Care to Prevent Readmissions for Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fen; Xiong, Zhen-Fang; Yang, Chongming; Li, Lin; Qiao, Guiyuan; Wang, Yuncui; Zheng, Taoyun; He, Huijuan; Hu, Hui

    2017-04-01

    Readmissions of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to hospitals cast a heavy burden to health care systems. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the efficacy of continuity of care as interventions, which reduced readmission and mortality rates of such patients. PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase were searched for articles published before July 2015. A total of 31 reports with randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were finally included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that health education reduced all-cause readmission at 3 months. In addition, health education, comprehensive nursing intervention (CNI) and telemonitoring reduced all-cause readmissions over 6-12 months, and the effect of CNI was best because CNI also reduced COPD-specific readmissions. Home visits also reduced COPD-specific readmissions (the quality more than moderate), but it did not reduce the risk for all-cause readmissions (risk ratios (RRs), 0.92 [95% CI, 0.82-1.04]; moderate quality). There was no statistically significant difference in reducing mortality and quality of life (QOL) among various continued cares. In conclusion, CNI, telemonitoring, health education and home visits should receive more consideration than other interventions by caregivers seeking to implement continued care interventions for patients with COPD.

  17. Factors decreasing caregiver burden to allow patients with cerebrovascular disease to continue in long-term home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Aki; Fukuda, Michinari; Suzuki, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Habata, Toshiya; Akutsu, Tsugio; Kanda, Tadashi

    2015-02-01

    This study attempted to assess continued long-term home care by examining patients' independent activities of daily living (ADLs) and caregivers' free time. We surveyed the main caregivers of 52 patients with cerebrovascular disease with continuous home care from 1999 to 2010. Survey items were patients' ADLs, the frequency of use of care services, care requirements, and caregiver sense of burden. We compared the survey results between years. ADLs of excretory control, verbal expression, verbal comprehension, and range of activities showed significant deterioration from 1999 to 2010. Patient need for care increased significantly but use of care services did not. Main caregivers were typically spouses who aged together with the patients. Main caregivers rarely changed; occasionally, a son or daughter-in-law became the main caregiver. Patients typically required less than 3 hours of care daily, which did not change over time. Caregivers had significantly more difficulty maintaining their own health in 2010 than 1999. However, they did not identify increases in difficulties with housework or coping with work. They felt that caregiving was a burden but did not indicate that the family relationship had deteriorated. Regardless of degree of independence of patients' ADLs, caregiver burden was severe. To decrease caregiver burden, it is necessary to use care services, reduce care time, and allow caregivers free time. In addition, it is possible to continue long-term home care by maintaining their relationships. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An ontology-based approach to patient follow-up assessment for continuous and personalized chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Zhou, Tian-Shu; Lin, De-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Li, Ye; Li, Jing-Song

    2017-08-01

    Chronic diseases are complex and persistent clinical conditions that require close collaboration among patients and health care providers in the implementation of long-term and integrated care programs. However, current solutions focus partially on intensive interventions at hospitals rather than on continuous and personalized chronic disease management. This study aims to fill this gap by providing computerized clinical decision support during follow-up assessments of chronically ill patients at home. We proposed an ontology-based framework to integrate patient data, medical domain knowledge, and patient assessment criteria for chronic disease patient follow-up assessments. A clinical decision support system was developed to implement this framework for automatic selection and adaptation of standard assessment protocols to suit patient personal conditions. We evaluated our method in the case study of type 2 diabetic patient follow-up assessments. The proposed framework was instantiated using real data from 115,477 follow-up assessment records of 36,162 type 2 diabetic patients. Standard evaluation criteria were automatically selected and adapted to the particularities of each patient. Assessment results were generated as a general typing of patient overall condition and detailed scoring for each criterion, providing important indicators to the case manager about possible inappropriate judgments, in addition to raising patient awareness of their disease control outcomes. Using historical data as the gold standard, our system achieved a rate of accuracy of 99.93% and completeness of 95.00%. This study contributes to improving the accessibility, efficiency and quality of current patient follow-up services. It also provides a generic approach to knowledge sharing and reuse for patient-centered chronic disease management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making: An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease progression can often be obtained by assuming that the future state transitions do not depend only on the present state (Markov assumption) but also on the past through time since entry in the present state. Despite that these so-called semi-Markov models are still relatively straightforward to specify and implement, they are not yet routinely applied in health economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions. To facilitate a better understanding of this type of model among applied health economic analysts, the first part of this article provides a detailed discussion of what the semi-Markov model entails and how such models can be specified in an intuitive way by adopting an approach called vertical modeling. In the second part of the article, we use this approach to construct a semi-Markov model for assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of 3 disease management programs for heart failure. Compared with a standard Markov model with the same disease states, our proposed semi-Markov model fitted the observed data much better. When subsequently extrapolating beyond the clinical trial period, these relatively large differences in goodness-of-fit translated into almost a doubling in mean total cost and a 60-d decrease in mean survival time when using the Markov model instead of the semi-Markov model. For the disease process considered in our case study, the semi-Markov model thus provided a sensible balance between model parsimoniousness and computational complexity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Evolution of primary care referrals to urology. Impact of a protocol on prostate disease and continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña-Sutil, R; Tejido-Sánchez, A; Galván-Ortiz de Urbina, M; Guerrero-Ramos, F; García-Álvarez, G; Passas-Martínez, J B

    2015-06-01

    To analyze the evolution of primary care referrals to the Urology Department after the implementation of a joint protocol on prostate disease and a continuing education program in our healthcare area. In January 2011, we launched an action protocol on prostate disease, which was complemented by training sessions and an e-mail-based consultation system. We analyzed primary care referrals to the Urology Department between 2011 and 2013 and determined the reasons for the consultations and the compliance with the established criteria on prostate disease. We obtained data from the "Request for Appointment in Specialized Care" program of the Community of Madrid. We calculated the sample size with a 95% confidence level and a 50% heterogeneity. A total of 19,048 referrals were conducted. The most common reason for the referrals was lower urinary tract symptoms associated with benign prostate hyperplasia, with a 27% reduction and a compliance that went from 46% at 67%. Although prostate-specific antigen consultations increased by 40%, they improved their appropriateness (from 55% to 72%). This was the main type of consultation for suspicion of malignancy (30%). Also worth mentioning were female incontinence, which doubled in number, and a 41% reduction in erectile dysfunction, which could be due to the primary care training. The collaboration between the Department of Urology and primary care succeeded in improving the appropriateness of prostate disease referrals and modified the tendency to refer the rest of the diseases included in the project. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Emotional face recognition deficits and medication effects in pre-manifest through stage-II Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuschagne, Izelle; Jones, Rebecca; Callaghan, Jenny; Whitehead, Daisy; Dumas, Eve M; Say, Miranda J; Hart, Ellen P; Justo, Damian; Coleman, Allison; Dar Santos, Rachelle C; Frost, Chris; Craufurd, David; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Stout, Julie C

    2013-05-15

    Facial emotion recognition impairments have been reported in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the nature of the impairments across the spectrum of HD remains unclear. We report on emotion recognition data from 344 participants comprising premanifest HD (PreHD) and early HD patients, and controls. In a test of recognition of facial emotions, we examined responses to six basic emotional expressions and neutral expressions. In addition, and within the early HD sample, we tested for differences on emotion recognition performance between those 'on' vs. 'off' neuroleptic or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications. The PreHD groups showed significant (pfaces; whereas the early HD groups were significantly impaired across all emotions including neutral expressions. In early HD, neuroleptic use was associated with worse facial emotion recognition, whereas SSRI use was associated with better facial emotion recognition. The findings suggest that emotion recognition impairments exist across the HD spectrum, but are relatively more widespread in manifest HD than in the premanifest period. Commonly prescribed medications to treat HD-related symptoms also appear to affect emotion recognition. These findings have important implications for interpersonal communication and medication usage in HD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease in young patients: challenges faced by black and minority ethnic communities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Christopher; Nash, Avril; Lloyd, Michele; Brooks, Fiona; Lindsay, James O; Poullis, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing among black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Despite this rise in prevalence, there is a paucity of research relating to ethnicity and IBD outside the USA. Furthermore, the symptoms of IBD are reported to start during childhood or adolescence in 20-25% of people with the condition. It is therefore important that young people's experiences of diagnosis, treatment and living with IBD are fully understood to ensure effective services and information provision. The study reported on in this paper was commissioned by a UK charity (Crohn's and Colitis UK) with the aim of increasing understanding of the specific issues and service needs of young people with IBD from BME communities. Empirical research entailed in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 young people from BME groups accessed through gastroenterology departments at three collaborating NHS hospitals in England serving ethnically diverse populations. Interviews were carried out from June to December 2010 and sought to capture young people's views with IBD. A thematic analysis of their experiences identified many commonalities with other young people with IBD, such as the problematic route to formal diagnosis and the impact of IBD on education. The young people also experienced tensions between effective self-management strategies and cultural norms and practices relating to food. Moreover, the ability of parents to provide support was hampered for some young people by the absence of culturally competent services that were responsive to the families' communication needs. The findings highlight the need for more culturally appropriate information concerning IBD, and improved responsiveness to young people with IBD within primary care and the education system, as well as culturally competent messaging relating to the specific nature of the condition among the wider South Asian and black communities. © 2015 John Wiley

  3. Online continuing medical education as a key link for successful noncommunicable disease self-management: the CASALUD™ Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallardo-Rincón H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor Gallardo-Rincón,1 Rodrigo Saucedo-Martínez,1 Ricardo Mujica-Rosales,1 Evan M Lee,2 Amy Israel,2 Braulio Torres-Beltran,3 Úrsula Quijano-González,3 Elena Rose Atkinson,3 Pablo Kuri-Morales,4 Roberto Tapia-Conyer1 1Fundación Carlos Slim, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Lilly Global Health, Eli Lilly and Company, Vernier, Switzerland; 3C230 Consultores, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate how the benefits of online continuing medical education (CME provided to health care professionals traveled along a patient “educational chain”. In this study, the educational chain begins with the influence that CME can have on the quality of health care, with subsequent influence on patient knowledge, disease self-management, and disease biomarkers. Methods: A total of 422 patients with at least one noncommunicable disease (NCD treated in eight different Mexican public health clinics were followed over 3 years. All clinics were participants in the CASALUD Model, an NCD care model for primary care, where all clinic staff were offered CME. Data were collected through a questionnaire on health care, patient disease knowledge, and self-management behaviors; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were collected to measure patient disease biomarkers. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, the indexes measuring quality of health care, patient health knowledge, and diabetes self-management activities rose moderately but significantly (from 0.54 to 0.64, 0.80 to 0.84, and 0.62 to 0.67, respectively. Performing self-care activities – including owning and using a glucometer and belonging to a disease support group – saw the highest increase (from 0.65 to 0.75. A1C levels increased between 2013 and 2015 from 7.95 to 8.41% (63–68 mmol/mol (P<0.001, and blood pressure decreased between 2014 and 2015 from 143.7/76.8 to 137.5/74.4 (systolic/diastolic reported in mmHg (P<0

  4. SM = SM: The Interface of Systems Medicine and Sexual Medicine for Facing Non-Communicable Diseases in a Gender-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2017-07-01

    Complex non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disorders, are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The complexity of NCDs requires innovative, integrated, and interdisciplinary approaches for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention by adopting the new paradigm called systems medicine. A growing body of evidence suggests that sexual dysfunction in general and erectile and lubrication dysfunctions in particular are, in a sex-dependent manner, efficient predictors of overall systemic well-being. However, the relation between systems medicine and sexual medicine is not well defined. To demonstrate that in combating the major NCDs, sexual health can be used as a surrogate marker of systemic health and can facilitate the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of NCDs. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on the topic was performed through a PubMed search. Because there is a strong biological basis for the developmental origins of health and disease not only in the early phases of development but also later in life, the identification of appropriate biomarkers is essential for monitoring these timelines and trajectories for better understanding NCD processes, risk stratification for NCD intervention, and prevention. In this review, I propose a novel approach in which sexual medicine can be used as a new tool to understand and manage NCDs and as a marker of systemic health. Moreover, the multipronged application of systems medicine to pathophysiologic changes leading to sexual dysfunction might sustain the growth of a young science such as sexual medicine. This multilevel approach has the potential to suggest novel avenues for the comprehensive management of NCDs and sexual dysfunction in a sex-dependent manner. Jannini EA. SM = SM: The Interface of Systems Medicine and Sexual Medicine for Facing Non-Communicable Diseases in a Gender-Dependent Manner. Sex Med Rev 2017

  5. Continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease in Spain: Subanalysis by autonomous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-García, D; Catalán, M J; Puente, V; Valldeoriola, F; Regidor, I; Mir, P; Matías-Arbelo, J; Parra, J C; Grandas, F

    2018-01-12

    To compare the characteristics of patients undergoing treatment with continuous intestinal infusion of levodopa-carbidopa (CIILC) for advanced Parkinson's disease and the data on the effectiveness and safety of CIILC in the different autonomous communities (AC) of Spain. A retrospective, longitudinal, observational study was carried out into 177 patients from 11 CAs who underwent CIILC between January 2006 and December 2011. We analysed data on patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, variables related to effectiveness (changes in off time/on time with or without disabling dyskinesia; changes in Hoehn and Yahr scale and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores; non-motor symptoms; and Clinical Global Impression scale scores) and safety (adverse events), and the rate of CIILC discontinuation. Significant differences were observed between CAs for several baseline variables: duration of disease progression prior to CIILC onset, off time (34.9-59.7%) and on time (2.6-48.0%; with or without disabling dyskinesia), Hoehn and Yahr score during on time, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III score during both on and off time, presence of≥ 4 motor symptoms, and CIILC dose. Significant differences were observed during follow-up (> 24 months in 9 of the 11 CAs studied) for the percentage of off time and on time without disabling dyskinesia, adverse events frequency, and Clinical Global Impression scores. The rate of CIILC discontinuation was between 20-40% in 9 CAs (78 and 80% in remaining 2 CAs). This study reveals a marked variability between CAs in terms of patient selection and CIILC safety and effectiveness. These results may have been influenced by patients' baseline characteristics, the availability of multidisciplinary teams, and clinical experience. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Patients infected by tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus facing their disease, their reactions to disease diagnosis and its implication about their families and communities, in Burkina Faso: a mixed focus group and cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méda, Ziemlé Clément; Somé, Télesphore; Sombié, Issiaka; Maré, Daouda; Morisky, Donald E; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-07-29

    Patients facing tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection receive particular care. Despite efforts in the care, misconceptions about TB and HIV still heavily impact patients, their families and communities. This situation severely limits achievement of TB and HIV programs goals. This study reports current situation of TB patients and patients living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) facing their disease and its implications, by comparing results from both qualitative and quantitative study design. Cross sectional study using mixed methods was used and excluded patients co-infected by TB and HIV. Focus group included 96 patients (6 patients per group) stratified by setting, disease profile and gender; from rural (Orodara Health District) and urban (Bobo Dioulasso) areas, all from Hauts-Bassins region in Burkina Faso. Quantitative study included 862 patients (309 TB patients and 553 PLWHA) attending TB and HIV care facilities in two main regions (Hauts-Bassins and Centre) of Burkina Faso. A content analysis of reports found TB patients and PLWHA felt discriminated and stigmatized because of misconceptions with its aftermaths (rejection, emotional and financial problems), mainly among PLWHA and women patients. PLWHA go to healers when facing limited solutions in health system. There are fewer associations for TB patients, and less education and sensitization sessions to give them opportunity for sharing disease status and learning from other TB patients. TB patients and PLWHA still need to better understand their disease and its implication. Access to care (diagnosis and treatment) remains one of the key issues in health system, especially for PLWHA. Individual counseling is centered among PLWHA but not for TB patients. With research progress and experiences sharing, TB patients and PLWHA have some hope to implement their life project, and to receive psychosocial and nutritional support. Despite international aid, TB patients and PLWHA are facing

  7. Effects of long-term high continuity of care on avoidable hospitalizations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I-Po; Wu, Shiao-Chi

    2017-09-01

    To examine the effects of high continuity of care (COC) maintained for a longer time on the risk of avoidable hospitalization of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A retrospective cohort study design was adopted. We used a claim data regarding health care utilization under a universal health insurance in Taiwan. We selected 2199 subjects who were newly diagnosed with COPD. We considered COPD-related avoidable hospitalizations as outcome variables. The continuity of care index (COCI) was used to evaluate COC as short- and long-term COC. A logistic regression model was used to control for sex, age, low-income status, disease severity, and health status. Long-term COC had stronger effect on health outcomes than short-term COC did. After controlling for covariables, the logistic regression results of short-term COC showed that the medium COCI group had a higher risk of avoidable hospitalizations (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.07-3.33) than the high COCI group did. The results of long-term COC showed that both the medium (AOR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.0-3.94) and low (AOR: 2.03, 95% CI: 1.05-3.94) COCI groups had higher risks of avoidable hospitalizations than did the high COCI group. Maintaining long-term high COC effectively reduces the risk of avoidable hospitalizations. To encourage development of long-term patient-physician relationships could improve health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Langerhans cell histiocytosis in adult patients--a disease with many faces. Experience of a centre and an overview of the disease symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Z; Pour, L; Krejcí, M; Neubauer, J; Vanícek, J; Vasků, V; Hájek, R

    2008-11-01

    Over a period of 18 years, 17 patients with proven Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) were treated at the Haematological Clinic in Brno. In 13 of them, the disease was diagnosed at adult age, and 4 patients were referred to the centre with LCH diagnosed at early child age. One of these 4 patients suffered from repeated recurrences of the disease at adult age and was diagnosed with progressive neurodegenerative damage of the CNS at the age of 25 which in its terminal phase resulted in the patient's immobility, loss of sphincter control, incapacity to communicate and death at the age of 32. LCH was diagnosed at adult age in 13 patients. The form with primary bone involvement was detected in 8 out of 13 patients (62%). Only 2 of 13 patients (15%) had multiple bone lesions upon diagnosis, the remaining 6 patients (46%) had only one lesion at the time of diagnosis. Repeated recurrence of bone involvement was only recorded in 3 out of 13 patients (23%). The combination of recurrent bone involvement and the development of lung affection (dyspnoea, irritating cough, nodularities and cysts in HRCT images) were documented in 2 out of 13 patients (15%). One of the patients diagnosed with LCH at the age of37 had repeated recurrence of bone involvement, which was also treated by 2 cycles of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation. He died of bronchopneumonia due to the affection of the lungs by LCH at 48 years of age. Primary extraoseal (extamedular) involvement was diagnosed in 5 out of 13 patients (38%) (mandibular gum infiltration, single cervical node infiltration, hand skin infiltration, infiltration of the perineal region and infiltration of the hypophysial infundibular and primary lung form of LCH). In the 1st case, excision was the solution applied to the infiltration of the lingual side ofthe gums, without further recurrence. In the 2nd case, the infiltrated region of skin over the metacarpophalangeal joint was irradiated and the infiltration disappeared

  9. Change in the intrathyroidal kinetics of radioiodine under continued and discontinued antithyroid medication in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, Simone; Kuenstner, Hubertus; Nabavi, Elham; Rohde, Bettina; Groth, Peter; Schuemichen, Carl [University of Rostock, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    This study evaluated the thyroidal kinetics of radioiodine in Graves' disease under continued thiamazole medication and after discontinuation of thiamazole for 1-2 days, with a view to keeping the period of discontinuation as short as possible and to exploring the underlying mechanism of a postulated radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs. In 316 patients, diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine kinetics were followed up for 2 days by ten uptake measurements each and were defined mathematically by a two-compartment model. Without thiamazole or when thiamazole was discontinued for at least 2 days, all uptake curves could be fitted perfectly by a simple in- and output function; the mean square error (mse) was 0.38 (test) and 0.28 (therapy). Under continued thiamazole medication (11.0{+-}7.0 mg/day), the energy dose delivered to the thyroid was lowered by factor of 2.5. Uptake curves were deformed (mse: 1.06, test and 0.86, therapy) and appeared two peaked, suggesting coexistence of follicles with blocked and follicles with intact hormone synthesis and hence heterogeneous radioiodine uptake in the thyroid. In patients with maximally altered uptake curves, the success rate was as low as 31%. One day after discontinuation of thiamazole, mse was still increased (0.78, test), while 2 days afterwards it had normalised (0.36, test) and 3 days afterwards (mse: 0.24, therapy) the success rate was 87%. Efficacy of radioiodine therapy under continued thiamazole medication is reduced not only by a lower uptake and shorter half-life of radioiodine, but also by a heterogeneous energy dose distribution in the thyroid. Discontinuation of thiamazole (but probably not of propylthiouracil) for at least 2 days is required to restore the efficacy of radioiodine. (orig.)

  10. Face-to-face: Perceived personal relevance amplifies face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittig, Andre; Schupp, Harald T.; Alpers, Georg W.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The human face conveys emotional and social information, but it is not well understood how these two aspects influence face perception. In order to model a group situation, two faces displaying happy, neutral or angry expressions were presented. Importantly, faces were either facing the observer, or they were presented in profile view directed towards, or looking away from each other. In Experiment 1 (n = 64), face pairs were rated regarding perceived relevance, wish-to-interact, and displayed interactivity, as well as valence and arousal. All variables revealed main effects of facial expression (emotional > neutral), face orientation (facing observer > towards > away) and interactions showed that evaluation of emotional faces strongly varies with their orientation. Experiment 2 (n = 33) examined the temporal dynamics of perceptual-attentional processing of these face constellations with event-related potentials. Processing of emotional and neutral faces differed significantly in N170 amplitudes, early posterior negativity (EPN), and sustained positive potentials. Importantly, selective emotional face processing varied as a function of face orientation, indicating early emotion-specific (N170, EPN) and late threat-specific effects (LPP, sustained positivity). Taken together, perceived personal relevance to the observer—conveyed by facial expression and face direction—amplifies emotional face processing within triadic group situations. PMID:28158672

  11. High-Intensity Interval Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in the Prevention/Management of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed R; Macaluso, Andrea; Pearson, Stephen J

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has long been considered the most effective exercise treatment modality for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but more recently high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been viewed as a potential alternative to MICT in accruing such benefits. HIIT was initially found to induce significant improvements in numerous physiological and health-related indices, to a similar if not superior extent to MICT. Since then, many studies have attempted to explore the potential clinical utility of HIIT, relative to MICT, with respect to treating numerous cardiovascular conditions, such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and hypertension. Despite this, however, the efficacy of HIIT in reversing the specific symptoms and risk factors of these cardiovascular pathologies is not well understood. HIIT is often perceived as very strenuous, which could render it unsafe for those at risk of or afflicted with CVD, but these issues are also yet to be reviewed. Furthermore, the optimal HIIT protocol for each of the CVD cohorts has not been established. Thus, the purpose of this review article is to (1) evaluate the efficacy of HIIT relative to MICT in the prevention and management of cardiovascular conditions, and (2) explore any potential safety issues surrounding the suitability and/or tolerability of HIIT for patients with CVD, and the potential optimal prescriptive variables of HIIT for application in the clinical environment.

  12. The Effect of Continuity of Care on Emergency Room Use for Diabetic Patients Varies by Disease Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsiang Hsu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although many studies have reported that high-quality continuity of care (COC is associated with improved patient outcomes for patients with diabetes, few studies have investigated whether this positive effect of COC depends on the level of diabetes severity. Methods: A total of 3781 newly diagnosed diabetic patients selected from the 2005 National Health Insurance database were evaluated for the period 2005–2011. Generalized estimating equations combined with negative binomial estimation were used to determine the influence of COC on the overall emergency room (ER use and diabetes mellitus (DM-specific ER use. Analyses were stratified according to diabetes severity (measured using the Diabetes Complications Severity Index [DCSI], comorbidities (measured using the Charlson comorbidity score, and age. Results: COC effects varied according to diabetes severity. Stratified analysis showed that the positive effect of COC on DM-specific ER use was the highest for a DCSI of 0 (least severe, with an incidence rate ratio (IRR of 0.49 (95% CI, 0.41–0.59 in the high-COC group (reference group: low-COC group. Compared with the low-COC group, high-quality COC had a significant beneficial effect on overall ER use in younger patients (IRR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.39–0.66 for the youngest [18–40 years] group, and IRR 0.67; 95% CI, 0.59–0.76 for the oldest [>65 years] group and those with a high number of comorbidities. Conclusions: The positive effects of high-quality COC on the treatment outcomes of patient with diabetes, based on the overall and DM-specific ER use, depends on the level of disease severity. Therefore, providing health education to enhance high-quality COC when the disease severity is low may be critical for ensuring optimal positive effects during diabetes disease progression.

  13. Effect of a continuous measure of adherence with infliximab maintenance treatment on inpatient outcomes in Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter CT

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chureen T Carter,1 Heidi C Waters,1 Daniel B Smith21Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USA; 2Statistics, IMS Health, Watertown, MA, USABackground: To assess the impact of a continuous measure of adherence with infliximab maintenance treatment in Crohn's disease (CD during the first year of treatment on CD-related health care utilization, CD-related hospitalizations, inpatient costs, and length of hospital stay.Patients and methods: A retrospective claims analysis using the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims Database (September 1, 2004, to June 30, 2009 was conducted. Continuous enrollment for 12 months before and 12 months after the index date was required. Patients were required to have at least two claims with an International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis code for CD (555.xx pre-index and be aged ≥ 18 years at index. Patients with three infusions during the first 56 days post-index and at least one infusion following day 56 post-index were considered to have maintenance therapy. Adherence and nonadherence were defined as a medication possession ratio of ≥ 80% and < 80%, respectively.Results: Four hundred forty-eight patients were included in the analysis (mean age, 42.6 years; 56% female; mean ± standard deviation [SD] and median number of infliximab infusions, 7.35 ± 1.60 and 8. The number of patients who met the definition of adherence was 344 (77%. CD-related health care utilization was not significantly impacted by adherence except for ancillary services and radiology. Fewer adherent patients were hospitalized compared with nonadherent patients (9% versus 16%; P = 0.03. Adherent patients had fewer mean ± SD and median days in the hospital (5.5 ± 3.4 and 5 days compared with nonadherent patients (13.1 ± 14.2 and 8 days; P = 0.01. Mean ± SD and median hospital costs were significantly greater for nonadherent patients ($40,822 ± $49,238 and

  14. Prioritized Detection of Personally Familiar Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbini, Maria Ida; Gors, Jason D.; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Rogers, Courtney; Guntupalli, J. Swaroop; Hughes, Howard; Cipolli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether personally familiar faces are preferentially processed in conditions of reduced attentional resources and in the absence of conscious awareness. In the first experiment, we used Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) to test the susceptibility of familiar faces and faces of strangers to the attentional blink. In the second experiment, we used continuous flash interocular suppression to render stimuli invisible and measured face detection time for personally familiar faces as compared to faces of strangers. In both experiments we found an advantage for detection of personally familiar faces as compared to faces of strangers. Our data suggest that the identity of faces is processed with reduced attentional resources and even in the absence of awareness. Our results show that this facilitated processing of familiar faces cannot be attributed to detection of low-level visual features and that a learned unique configuration of facial features can influence preconscious perceptual processing. PMID:23805248

  15. [Online continuing medical education based on national disease management guidelines. The e-learning platform leitlinien-wissen.de].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, H C; Schürer-Maly, C-C; Lelgemann, M; Koneczny, N; Koch, M; Butzlaff, M

    2006-05-01

    Effective translation of relevant knowledge into clinical practice is essential for modern health care systems. National Disease Management Guidelines (NDMG) are considered relevant instruments to support this transfer. To implement NDMG Internet-based continuing medical education (CME), modules and online case-based learning objects were designed and published. To ensure high quality the contents are based on NDMG and subjected to multi-step review processes. Presentation on the web was realized through a modified content management system. To obtain a CME certificate, completing an online questionnaire using a four-point Likert scale was mandatory. Between June 2003 and April 2005, 3,105 physicians were registered and used the platform: 95% of the physicians expressed positive feedback in the evaluation questionnaire, and 35% actually used the corresponding NDMG in practice. This prompted the development of interactive medical case-based learning objects as a second learning pathway. An Internet platform for CME including case-based learning objects can be a helpful tool to assure the provision of scientific knowledge for patient care.

  16. Continuity of Business Plans for Animal Disease Outbreaks: Using a Logic Model Approach to Protect Animal Health, Public Health, and Our Food Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Allen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Foreign animal diseases can have a devastating impact on the American economy and agriculture system, while significantly disrupting the food supply chain, and affecting animal health and public health. Continuity of business during an animal disease outbreak aims to mitigate these agriculture-related losses by facilitating normal business operations through the managed movement of non-infected animals and non-contaminated animal products. During a foreign animal disease outbreak, there are competing objectives of trying to control and contain the outbreak while allowing non-infected premises to continue normal business operations to the greatest extent possible. Using a logic model approach, this article discusses the importance of continuity of business planning during an animal disease outbreak, providing a detailed and transparent theoretical framework for continuity of business planning for animal agriculture stakeholders. The logic model provides a basis for continuity of business planning, which is rapidly gaining focus and interest in the animal emergency management community. This unique logic model offers a framework for effective planning and subsequent evaluation of continuity of business plans and processes, by identifying explicit stakeholders, inputs, and activities, alongside the desired outputs and outcomes of such planning.

  17. Face feature processor on mobile service robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ho Seok; Park, Myoung Soo; Na, Jin Hee; Choi, Jin Young

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, many mobile service robots have been developed. These robots are different from industrial robots. Service robots were confronted to unexpected changes in the human environment. So many capabilities were needed to service mobile robot, for example, the capability to recognize people's face and voice, the capability to understand people's conversation, and the capability to express the robot's thinking etc. This research considered face detection, face tracking and face recognition from continuous camera image. For face detection module, it used CBCH algorithm using openCV library from Intel Corporation. For face tracking module, it used the fuzzy controller to control the pan-tilt camera movement smoothly with face detection result. A PCA-FX, which adds class information to PCA, was used for face recognition module. These three procedures were called face feature processor, which were implemented on mobile service robot OMR to verify.

  18. European cinema: face to face with Hollywood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the face of renewed competition from Hollywood since the early 1980s and the challenges posed to Europe's national cinemas by the fall of the Wall in 1989, independent filmmaking in Europe has begun to re-invent itself. European Cinema: Face to Face with Hollywood re-assesses the different

  19. Mapping Teacher-Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

  20. 'Everyone has a secret they keep close to their hearts' : Challenges faced by adolescents living with HIV infection at the Kenyan coast Infectious Disease epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar, Amina; Van De Vijver, Fons J R; Fischer, Ronald; Hassan, Amin S.; Gona, Joseph K.; Dzombo, Judith Tumaini; Bomu, Grace; Katana, Khamis; Newton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The upsurge in the uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to a significant increase in the survival of vertically acquired HIV infected children, many of whom are currently living into adolescence and early adulthood. However little if anything is known of the lived experiences and the challenges faced by HIV positive adolescents in the African context. We set out to investigate psychosocial challenges faced by HIV infected adolescents on the Kenyan coast. Methods: A total...

  1. Food-borne diseases - the challenges of 20 years ago still persist while new ones continue to emerge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newell, D.G.; Koopmans, M.; Verhoef, L.; Duizer, E.; Aidara-Kane, A.; Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; Opsteegh, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31149305X; Langelaar, M.; Threfall, J.; Scheutz, F.; van der Giessen, J.; Kruse, H.

    2010-01-01

    The burden of diseases caused by food-borne pathogens remains largely unknown. Importantly data indicating trends in food-borne infectious intestinal disease is limited to a few industrialised countries, and even fewer pathogens. It has been predicted that the importance of diarrhoeal disease,

  2. Coronaries disease: the nuclear cardiology face to the new non-invasive techniques of imaging; Maladie coronaire: la cardiologie nucleaire face aux nouvelles techniques d'imagerie non invasive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanzetto, G.; Fagret, D.; Thony, F.; Ferretti, G.; Saunier, C.; Machecourt, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-11-15

    Different techniques of imaging in nuclear cardiology are available today: SPECT, NMR, tomodensitometry, scintigraphy, echography. This article sums up the situation on the actual performances of each technique and considers what could be their respective place in the future strategies to take in charge the coronary disease. (N.C.)

  3. Bias of health estimates obtained from chronic disease and risk factor surveillance systems using telephone population surveys in Australia: results from a representative face-to-face survey in Australia from 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Grande, Eleonora; Chittleborough, Catherine R; Campostrini, Stefano; Taylor, Anne W

    2016-04-18

    Emerging communication technologies have had an impact on population-based telephone surveys worldwide. Our objective was to examine the potential biases of health estimates in South Australia, a state of Australia, obtained via current landline telephone survey methodologies and to report on the impact of mobile-only household on household surveys. Data from an annual multi-stage, systematic, clustered area, face-to-face population survey, Health Omnibus Survey (approximately 3000 interviews annually), included questions about telephone ownership to assess the population that were non-contactable by current telephone sampling methods (2006 to 2013). Univariable analyses (2010 to 2013) and trend analyses were conducted for sociodemographic and health indicator variables in relation to telephone status. Relative coverage biases (RCB) of two hypothetical telephone samples was undertaken by examining the prevalence estimates of health status and health risk behaviours (2010 to 2013): directory-listed numbers, consisting mainly of landline telephone numbers and a small proportion of mobile telephone numbers; and a random digit dialling (RDD) sample of landline telephone numbers which excludes mobile-only households. Telephone (landline and mobile) coverage in South Australia is very high (97%). Mobile telephone ownership increased slightly (7.4%), rising from 89.7% in 2006 to 96.3% in 2013; mobile-only households increased by 431% over the eight year period from 5.2% in 2006 to 27.6% in 2013. Only half of the households have either a mobile or landline number listed in the telephone directory. There were small differences in the prevalence estimates for current asthma, arthritis, diabetes and obesity between the hypothetical telephone samples and the overall sample. However, prevalence estimate for diabetes was slightly underestimated (RCB value of -0.077) in 2013. Mixed RCB results were found for having a mental health condition for both telephone samples. Current

  4. Once-Monthly Continuous Erythropoietin Receptor Activator (C.E.R.A.) in Patients with Hemodialysis-Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease: Pooled Data from Phase III Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Francesco; Choukroun, Gabriel; Truman, Matt; Wiggenhauser, Alfons; Fliser, Danilo

    2016-04-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron are commonly used in patients with chronic kidney disease with the aim of correcting anemia and maintaining stable hemoglobin levels. We analyzed pooled data from 13 studies with similar designs included in the Umbrella Continuous Erythropoietin Receptor Activator (C.E.R.A.) program to investigate the effects of continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator in clinically relevant subgroups of patients with chronic kidney disease and to determine whether the efficacy and safety outcomes demonstrated in the overall chronic kidney disease population are maintained in specific subgroups. Data from 13 Phase III trials set up with similar design were retrospectively pooled for this analysis. Patients with chronic kidney disease who had previously been receiving epoetin or darbepoetin were switched to continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator once-monthly after a 4- to 8-week screening period. Patients entered a 16-week continuous erythropoiesis receptor activator dose-titration period followed by an 8-week evaluation period. In total, 2060 patients were included in the analysis. Subgroups were defined based on: hemoglobin target range [lower (10.0-12.0 g/dL)/upper (10.5-13.0 g/dL)], gender (female/male), age (Basel, Switzerland.

  5. Preparing for Infectious Disease: Department of Education Recommendations to Ensure the Continuity of Teaching and Learning for Schools (K-12) during Extended Student Absence or School Dismissal

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education (ED) wishes to remind states, districts, schools, students, staff, families, and guardians as well as communities about the importance of: (1) addressing the prevention of infectious disease in schools, including the seasonal flu, viral meningitis, enterovirus, and Ebola; and (2) ensuring the continuity of teaching…

  6. Comparison of health-related quality of life between patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease and patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Son, Heesook

    2016-01-01

    This study compared health-related quality of life in patients with early to mid-stage chronic kidney disease. This study utilized a comparative descriptive design. Patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis were recruited from a hospital in Korea. Information from patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease was obtained from Korean national survey data. A total of 75 pairs were matched using the propensity score method. Health-related quality of life was compared using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Only 4% of patients with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease are aware of their disease. These patients have decreased mobility and ability to perform their usual activities (χ(2)  = 10.77, P = 0.001; χ(2)  = 7.22, P = 0.007, respectively). However, they have lower levels of anxiety and depression than patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (χ(2)  = 13.37, P chronic kidney disease. Educational intervention in asymptomatic patients is important to increase awareness and early detection of chronic kidney disease. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  7. A disease-specific questionnaire for measuring patient-reported outcomes and experiences in the Swedish National Diabetes Register: Development and evaluation of content validity, face validity, and test-retest reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedbo Engström, Maria; Leksell, Janeth; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina; Borg, Sixten; Palaszewski, Bo; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2018-01-01

    To describe the development and evaluation of the content and face validity and test-retest reliability of a disease-specific questionnaire that measures patient-reported outcomes and experiences for the Swedish National Diabetes Register for adult patients who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In this methodological study, a questionnaire was developed over four phases using an iterative process. Expert reviews and cognitive interviews were conducted to evaluate content and face validity, and a postal survey was administered to evaluate test-retest reliability. The expert reviews and cognitive interviews found the disease-specific questionnaire to be understandable, with relevant content and value for diabetes care. An item-level content validity index ranged from 0.6-1.0 and a scale content validity/average ranged from 0.7-1.0. The fourth version, with 33 items, two main parts and seven dimensions, was answered by 972 adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes (response rate 61%). Weighted Kappa values ranged from 0.31-0.78 for type 1 diabetes and 0.27-0.74 for type 2 diabetes. This study describes the initial development of a disease-specific questionnaire in conjunction with the NDR. Content and face validity were confirmed and test-retest reliability was satisfactory. With the development of this questionnaire, the NDR becomes a clinical tool that contributes to further understanding the perspectives of adult individuals with diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Randomized, multicenter study: on-demand versus continuous maintenance treatment with esomeprazole in patients with non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerdörffer, Ekkehard; Bigard, Marc-Andre; Weiss, Werner; Mearin, Fermín; Rodrigo, Luis; Dominguez Muñoz, Juan Enrique; Grundling, Hennie; Persson, Tore; Svedberg, Lars-Erik; Keeling, Nanna; Eklund, Stefan

    2016-04-14

    Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience symptomatic relapse after stopping acid-suppressive medication. The aim of this study was to compare willingness to continue treatment with esomeprazole on-demand versus continuous maintenance therapy for symptom control in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) after 6 months. This multicenter, open-label, randomized, parallel-group study enrolled adults with NERD who were heartburn-free after 4 weeks' treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg daily. Patients received esomeprazole 20 mg daily continuously or on-demand for 6 months. The primary variable was discontinuation due to unsatisfactory treatment. On-demand treatment was considered non-inferior if the upper limit of the one-sided 95 % confidence interval (CI) for the difference between treatments was Esomeprazole was well tolerated. In terms of willingness to continue treatment, on-demand treatment with esomeprazole 20 mg was non-inferior to continuous maintenance treatment and reduced medication usage in patients with NERD who had achieved symptom control with initial esomeprazole treatment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT02670642 ; Date of registration: December 2015.

  9. Familiar face + novel face = familiar face? Representational bias in the perception of morphed faces in chimpanzees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshi-Taka Matsuda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Highly social animals possess a well-developed ability to distinguish the faces of familiar from novel conspecifics to induce distinct behaviors for maintaining society. However, the behaviors of animals when they encounter ambiguous faces of familiar yet novel conspecifics, e.g., strangers with faces resembling known individuals, have not been well characterised. Using a morphing technique and preferential-looking paradigm, we address this question via the chimpanzee’s facial–recognition abilities. We presented eight subjects with three types of stimuli: (1 familiar faces, (2 novel faces and (3 intermediate morphed faces that were 50% familiar and 50% novel faces of conspecifics. We found that chimpanzees spent more time looking at novel faces and scanned novel faces more extensively than familiar or intermediate faces. Interestingly, chimpanzees looked at intermediate faces in a manner similar to familiar faces with regards to the fixation duration, fixation count, and saccade length for facial scanning, even though the participant was encountering the intermediate faces for the first time. We excluded the possibility that subjects merely detected and avoided traces of morphing in the intermediate faces. These findings suggest a bias for a feeling-of-familiarity that chimpanzees perceive familiarity with an intermediate face by detecting traces of a known individual, as 50% alternation is sufficient to perceive familiarity.

  10. Evaluation of a continuous indicator for syndromic surveillance through simulation. application to vector borne disease emergence detection in cattle using milk yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Madouasse

    Full Text Available Two vector borne diseases, caused by the Bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses respectively, have emerged in the European ruminant populations since 2006. Several diseases are transmitted by the same vectors and could emerge in the future. Syndromic surveillance, which consists in the routine monitoring of indicators for the detection of adverse health events, may allow an early detection. Milk yield is routinely measured in a large proportion of dairy herds and could be incorporated as an indicator in a surveillance system. However, few studies have evaluated continuous indicators for syndromic surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a framework for the quantification of both disease characteristics and model predictive abilities that are important for a continuous indicator to be sensitive, timely and specific for the detection of a vector-borne disease emergence. Emergences with a range of spread characteristics and effects on milk production were simulated. Milk yields collected monthly in 48 713 French dairy herds were used to simulate 576 disease emergence scenarios. First, the effect of disease characteristics on the sensitivity and timeliness of detection were assessed: Spatio-temporal clusters of low milk production were detected with a scan statistic using the difference between observed and simulated milk yields as input. In a second step, the system specificity was evaluated by running the scan statistic on the difference between observed and predicted milk yields, in the absence of simulated emergence. The timeliness of detection depended mostly on how easily the disease spread between and within herds. The time and location of the emergence or adding random noise to the simulated effects had a limited impact on the timeliness of detection. The main limitation of the system was the low specificity i.e. the high number of clusters detected from the difference between observed and predicted productions, in the absence of

  11. Unconscious evaluation of faces on social dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lorna H; Ajina, Sara; Getov, Spas; Bahrami, Bahador; Todorov, Alexander; Rees, Geraint

    2012-11-01

    It has been proposed that two major axes, dominance and trustworthiness, characterize the social dimensions of face evaluation. Whether evaluation of faces on these social dimensions is restricted to conscious appraisal or happens at a preconscious level is unknown. Here we provide behavioral evidence that such preconscious evaluations exist and that they are likely to be interpretations arising from interactions between the face stimuli and observer-specific traits. Monocularly viewed faces that varied independently along two social dimensions of trust and dominance were rendered invisible by continuous flash suppression (CFS) when a flashing pattern was presented to the other eye. Participants pressed a button as soon as they saw the face emerge from suppression to indicate whether the previously hidden face was located slightly to the left or right of central fixation. Dominant and untrustworthy faces took significantly longer time to emerge (T2E) compared with neutral faces. A control experiment showed these findings could not reflect delayed motor responses to conscious faces. Finally, we showed that participants' self-reported propensity to trust was strongly predictive of untrust avoidance (i.e., difference in T2E for untrustworthy vs neutral faces) as well as dominance avoidance (i.e., difference in T2E for dominant vs neutral faces). Dominance avoidance was also correlated with submissive behavior. We suggest that such prolongation of suppression for threatening faces may result from a passive fear response, leading to slowed visual perception. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. EFFECTIVENESS OF INTERVAL EXERCISE VERSUS CONTINUOUS EXERCISE TO IMPROVE EXERCISE TOLERANCE IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Swathi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: COPD is characterized by chronic airflow limitation and a range of pathological changes in the lung. Chronic inflammation causes structural changes and narrowing of the small airways and destruction of lung parenchyma, leads to the loss of alveolar attachments to the small airways and decreases lung elastic recoil; in turn these changes diminish the expiration and the work of breathing is increased. Scarcity of evidence on continuous and interval exercises is forcing researchers conduct studies on effectiveness of interval exercise with continuous exercise on exercise tolerance in subjects with COPD. Methods: 60 subjects were selected by lottery method. All the subjects were explained about the condition and mode of assessment and written informed consent were obtained from them and divided into 2 groups interval training group and continuous exercise training group and subjects were scheduled to attend exercise session 5 days a week for 4 weeks with exercise duration 20 min’s with cycle ergometer. Outcome measure: six minute walk test and heart rate. Results: On observing the means of post test parameters of experimental group A and experimental group B Independent t-test was done and the P- value is >0.05 .It shows a no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: The results had shown that both interval exercise group and continuous exercise group who received four weeks of therapy has improved significantly on pre and post test values within the groups but when compared between these groups there is no statistical significance noted. So this study concluded that there is no significant difference between interval exercise group and continuous exercise group in improving exercise tolerance among COPD subjects.

  13. A Customized Online Nutrition Guidance System Is Effective for Treating Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Supporting Continuity of Diet Therapy at Home: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Tomonori; Takada, Hidekatsu; Uchiyama, Akira; Kon, Kazuyoshi; Yamashina, Shunhei; Ikejima, Kenichi; Ban, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    Continuity is required for diet therapy, but it depends on patients. We examined the utility of a new tool, the customized online nutrition guidance system, in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Seven patients plotted their body weight (BW) and marked a customized task card on completion for 90 days on a website. The instructors encouraged them by e-mail. BW, serum transaminase levels, and system usage were evaluated. The results showed that BW and serum alanine aminotransferase levels were significantly lower than at baseline. BW and task visualization as well as encouragement by e-mails were effective in ensuring continuity. Thus, this system is effective in keeping NAFLD patients motivated to continue their diet therapy. PMID:28674352

  14. Low-dose, continual enzyme delivery ameliorates some aspects of established brain disease in a mouse model of a childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Setford, Meghan L; Hassiotis, Sofia; Trim, Paul J; Duplock, Stephen; Tucker, Justin N; Hattersley, Kathryn; Snel, Marten F; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the capacity of continual low-dose lysosomal enzyme infusion into the cerebrospinal fluid of mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA) mice to reverse established neurodegenerative disease. The rationale behind the study is that there is only limited animal model-derived evidence supporting treatment of symptomatic patients, principally because few studies have been designed to examine disease reversibility. Twelve-week old MPS IIIA mice were implanted with indwelling unilateral intra-ventricular cannulae. These were connected to subcutaneous mini-osmotic pumps infusing recombinant human sulphamidase. Pump replacement was carried out in some mice at 16-weeks of age, enabling treatment to continue for a further month. Control affected/unaffected mice received vehicle via the same method. Behavioural, neuropathological and biochemical parameters of disease were assessed. Improvement in some, but not all, behavioural parameters occurred. Sulphamidase infusion mediated a statistically significant reduction in primary (heparan sulphate) and secondary (gangliosides GM2, GM3) substrate accumulation in the brain, with small reductions in micro- but not astro-gliosis. There was no change in axonal spheroid number. All mice developed a humoural response, however the antibodies were non-neutralising and no adverse clinical effects were observed. Continual infusion of replacement enzyme partially ameliorates clinical, histological and biochemical aspects of MPS IIIA mice, when treatment begins at an early symptomatic stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Continuous drug delivery in early- and late-stage Parkinson's disease as a strategy for avoiding dyskinesia induction and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jenner, P.; McCreary, A. C.; Scheller, D. K. A.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) is dependent on the use of dopamine replacement therapy in the form of l-dopa and dopamine agonist drugs. However, the development of dyskinesia (chorea, dystonia, athetosis) can become treatment limiting. The initiation of dyskinesia

  16. Long-term quasi-continuous oxygen saturation levels obtained from sternal photoplethysmography on patients with obstructive lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chreiteh, Shadi; Saadi, Dorthe Bodholt; Belhage, Bo

    2016-01-01

    the sternum of patients admitted to the hospital with obstructive lung diseases. Due to the lack of a gold standard reference that is suitable for long-term monitoring without interfering with the patient's activity level, we extracted reliable segments based on knowledge from the basic pulse oximeter theory...

  17. Perceptions of capacity for infectious disease control and prevention to meet the challenges of dengue fever in the face of climate change: A survey among CDC staff in Guangdong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Michael Xiaoliang; Hansen, Alana; Hanson-Easey, Scott; Xiang, Jianjun; Cameron, Scott; Liu, Qiyong; Liu, Xiaobo; Sun, Yehuan; Weinstein, Philip; Han, Gil-Soo; Williams, Craig; Bi, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Dengue fever is an important climate-sensitive mosquito-borne viral disease that poses a risk to half the world's population. The disease is a major public health issue in China where in 2014 a major outbreak occurred in Guangdong Province. This study aims to gauge health professionals' perceptions about the capacity of infectious disease control and prevention to meet the challenge of dengue fever in the face of climate change in Guangdong Province, China. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was administered among staff in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) in Guangdong Province. Data analysis was undertaken using descriptive methods and logistic regression. In total, 260 questionnaires were completed. Most participants (80.7%) thought climate change would have a negative effect on population health, and 98.4% of participants reported dengue fever had emerged or re-emerged in China in recent years. Additionally, 74.9% of them indicated that the capability of the CDCs to detect infectious disease outbreak/epidemic at an early stage was excellent; 86.3% indicated laboratories could provide diagnostic support rapidly; and 83.1% believed levels of current staff would be adequate in the event of a major outbreak. Logistic regression analysis showed higher levels of CDCs were perceived to have better capacity for infectious disease control and prevention. Only 26.8% of participants thought they had a good understanding of climate change, and most (85.4%) thought they needed more information about the health impacts of climate change. Most surveyed staff suggested the following strategies to curb the public health impact of infectious diseases in relation to climate change: primary prevention measures, strengthening the monitoring of infectious diseases, the ability to actively forecast disease outbreaks by early warning systems, and more funding for public health education programs. Vigilant disease and vector surveillance, preventive practice and

  18. Comparative study of ultrasound and ERCP in the diagnosis of hepatic, biliary and pancreatic diseases: A prospective study based on a continuous series of 424 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederic, N.; D'Hondt, M.; Hermanus, A.; Potvliege, R.; Deltenre, M.; Reuck, M. de

    1983-01-01

    A prospective study of the diagnostic yield of ultrasound (US) and ERCP was made on a continuous series of 424 patients. Technical failures were slightly more frequent with US (11%) than with ERCP (8%), while US proved more accurate than ERCP in the diagnosis of focal hepatic disease -94% of correct diagnoses versus 41% (n=17). In diffuse hepatic disease (n=63) the accuracy of both methods was the same -87% of correct diagnoses with US, 83% with ERCP. US had better performances (91%), while ERCP was more accurate in the diagnosis of common duct lithiasis or tumor (98% for ERCP, 36% for US). Although ERCP has a better diagnostic yield for pancreatic diseases (92% to 100% of correct diagnoses according to the lesions) associate complications, such as pseudo-cysts, abscess formation and extravasations are better demonstrated by US (95% of correct diagnoses versus 73%). The two methods thus prove to be complementary. (orig.)

  19. Comparative study of ultrasound and ERCP in the diagnosis of hepatic, biliary and pancreatic diseases: A prospective study based on a continuous series of 424 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederic, N.; D' Hondt, M.; Hermanus, A.; Potvliege, R.; Deltenre, M.; Reuck, M. de

    1983-08-01

    A prospective study of the diagnostic yield of ultrasound (US) and ERCP was made on a continuous series of 424 patients. Technical failures were slightly more frequent with US (11%) than with ERCP (8%), while US proved more accurate than ERCP in the diagnosis of focal hepatic disease -94% of correct diagnoses versus 41% (n=17). In diffuse hepatic disease (n=63) the accuracy of both methods was the same -87% of correct diagnoses with US, 83% with ERCP. US had better performances (91%), while ERCP was more accurate in the diagnosis of common duct lithiasis or tumor (98% for ERCP, 36% for US). Although ERCP has a better diagnostic yield for pancreatic diseases (92% to 100% of correct diagnoses according to the lesions) associate complications, such as pseudo-cysts, abscess formation and extravasations are better demonstrated by US (95% of correct diagnoses versus 73%). The two methods thus prove to be complementary.

  20. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or ...

  1. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    .... Specifically, the report addresses the problem of detecting faces in color images in the presence of various lighting conditions and complex backgrounds as well as recognizing faces under variations...

  2. Aerobic Interval vs. Continuous Training in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease or Heart Failure: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis with a Focus on Secondary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Nele; Beulque, Randy; Cornelissen, Véronique

    2018-03-03

    In a previous meta-analysis including nine trials comparing aerobic interval training with aerobic continuous training in patients with coronary artery disease, we found a significant difference in peak oxygen uptake favoring aerobic interval training. The objective of this study was to (1) update the original meta-analysis focussing on peak oxygen uptake and (2) evaluate the effect on secondary outcomes. We conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis by searching PubMed and SPORTDiscus databases up to March 2017. We included randomized trials comparing aerobic interval training and aerobic continuous training in patients with coronary artery disease or chronic heart failure. The primary outcome was change in peak oxygen uptake. Secondary outcomes included cardiorespiratory parameters, cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac and vascular function, and quality of life. Twenty-four papers were identified (n = 1080; mean age 60.7 ± 10.7 years). Aerobic interval training resulted in a higher increase in peak oxygen uptake compared with aerobic continuous training in all patients (1.40 mL/kg/min; p interval training in all patients. Other cardiorespiratory parameters, cardiovascular risk factors, and quality of life were equally affected. This meta-analysis adds further evidence to the clinically significant larger increase in peak oxygen uptake following aerobic interval training vs. aerobic continuous training in patients with coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure. More well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to establish the safety of aerobic interval training and the sustainability of the training response over longer periods.

  3. MHC polymorphism and disease resistance in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar); facing pathogens with single expressed major histocompatibility class I and class II loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimholt, U.; Larsen, S.; Nordmo, R.; Midtlyng, P.; Kjoeglum, S.; Storset, A.; Saebo, S.; Stet, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Few studies have yet addressed the functional aspects of MHC molecules in fish. To lay the foundation for this, we evaluated the association between disease resistance and MHC class I and class II polymorphism in Atlantic salmon. Standardized disease challenge trials were performed on a semi-wild

  4. Cognitive effects of hormone therapy continuation or discontinuation in a sample of women at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wroolie, Tonita E.; Kenna, Heather A.; Williams, Katherine E.; Rasgon, Natalie L.

    2015-01-01

    Use of estrogen-based hormone therapy (HT), as a protection from cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease, is controversial although cumulative data supports HT use when initiated close to menopause onset with estrogen formulations containing 17β-estradiol (17β-E) being preferable to conjugated equine estrogen formulations. Little is known regarding specific populations of women who may derive benefit from HT. Women with heightened risk for AD (aged 49-69), all of whom were taking HT for at ...

  5. Meta-analytic review of the development of face discrimination in infancy: Face race, face gender, infant age, and methodology moderate face discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Nicole A; Marquis, Alexandra R

    2017-11-01

    Infants show facility for discriminating between individual faces within hours of birth. Over the first year of life, infants' face discrimination shows continued improvement with familiar face types, such as own-race faces, but not with unfamiliar face types, like other-race faces. The goal of this meta-analytic review is to provide an effect size for infants' face discrimination ability overall, with own-race faces, and with other-race faces within the first year of life, how this differs with age, and how it is influenced by task methodology. Inclusion criteria were (a) infant participants aged 0 to 12 months, (b) completing a human own- or other-race face discrimination task, (c) with discrimination being determined by infant looking. Our analysis included 30 works (165 samples, 1,926 participants participated in 2,623 tasks). The effect size for infants' face discrimination was small, 6.53% greater than chance (i.e., equal looking to the novel and familiar). There was a significant difference in discrimination by race, overall (own-race, 8.18%; other-race, 3.18%) and between ages (own-race: 0- to 4.5-month-olds, 7.32%; 5- to 7.5-month-olds, 9.17%; and 8- to 12-month-olds, 7.68%; other-race: 0- to 4.5-month-olds, 6.12%; 5- to 7.5-month-olds, 3.70%; and 8- to 12-month-olds, 2.79%). Multilevel linear (mixed-effects) models were used to predict face discrimination; infants' capacity to discriminate faces is sensitive to face characteristics including race, gender, and emotion as well as the methods used, including task timing, coding method, and visual angle. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. [Exclusive enteral nutrition continues to be first line therapy for pediatric Crohn's disease in the era of biologics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-López, V M; Blasco-Alonso, J; Lacasa Maseri, S; Girón Fernández-Crehuet, F; Serrano Nieto, M J; Vicioso Recio, M I; Sierra Salinas, C

    2015-07-01

    Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) has been to be more effective than corticosteroids in achieving mucosal healing without their side effects. To determine the efficacy of EEN in terms of inducing clinical remission in newly diagnosed CD children and to study the efficacy of this therapeutic approach in improving the degree of intestinal mucosa inflammation. The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed Crohn's disease treated with EEN were reviewed retrospectively. The degree of mucosal inflammation was assessed by fecal calprotectin (FC). Remission was defined as a PCDAI<10. Forty patients (24 males) were included, the age at diagnosis was 11.6 ± 3.6 years. Of the 34 patients who completed the EEN period, 32 (94% per-protocol analysis) achieved clinical remission. This percentage fell to 80% in the intention-to-treat analysis. The compliance rate was 95%. Duration of EEN was 6.42 weeks (IQR 6.0-8.14). FC was significantly higher in patients with moderate and severe disease. Median baseline FC levels (680 μg/g) decreased significantly to 218 μg/g (P<0.0001) after EEN. We found a statistically significant correlation between FC and PCDAI (rho=0.727; P<0.0001). Early use of thiopurines (< 8 weeks) versus subsequent use was not associated with improved outcomes during the follow-up. EEN administered for 6-8 weeks is effective for inducing clinical remission and decreasing the degree of mucosal inflammation. We did not find differences in terms of maintenance of remission in patients treated early with thiopurines. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Probing the Feature Map for Faces in Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Controversy surrounds the mechanisms underlying the pop-out effect for faces in visual search. Is there a feature map for faces? If so, does it rely on the categorical distinction between faces and nonfaces, or on image-level face semblance? To probe the feature map, we compared search efficiency for faces, and nonface stimuli with high, low, and no face semblance. First, subjects performed a visual search task with objects as distractors. Only faces popped-out. Moreover, search efficiency for nonfaces correlated with image-level face semblance of the target. In a second experiment, faces were used as distractors but nonfaces did not pop-out. Interestingly, search efficiency for nonfaces was not modulated by face semblance, although searching for a face among faces was particularly difficult, reflecting a categorical boundary between nonfaces and faces. Finally, inversion and contrast negation significantly interacted with the effect of face semblance, ruling out the possibility that search efficiency solely depends on low-level features. Our study supports a parallel search for faces that is perhaps preattentive. Like other features (color, orientation etc., there appears to be a continuous face feature map for visual search. Our results also suggest that this map may include both image-level face semblance and face categoricity.

  8. Congenital asymmetric crying face: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Kara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital asymmetric crying face is an anomalia caused by unilateral absence or weakness of depressor anguli oris muscle The major finding of the disease is the absence or weakness in the outer and lower movement of the commissure during crying. The other expression muscles are normal and the face is symmetric at rest. The asymmetry in congenital asymmetric crying face is most evident during infancy but decreases by age. Congenital asymmetric crying face can be associated with cervicofacial, musclebone, respiratory, genitourinary and central nervous system anomalia. It is diagnosed by physical examination. This paper presents a six days old infant with Congenital asymmetric crying face and discusses the case in terms of diagnosis and disease features.

  9. International employees' concerns during serious disease outbreaks and the potential impact on business continuity: Lessons identified from the 2014-15 West African Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jennifer; Watkins, Chris

    This paper presents the findings of research carried out into the information-seeking behaviour, and information requirements of a small sample of international workers stationed in West Africa during the Zaire Ebola virus outbreak of 2014-15. The research study under which these results were obtained was part of exploratory research for a PhD focused on the use, and potential uses, of social media platforms during serious disease outbreaks that might be used to inform policy planning for public health and emergency response interventions. Thus, the findings from this study may provide valuable insights to business continuity managers and emergency planners in making future decisions about information exchange and crisis decision-making during future serious disease outbreaks.

  10. Procedural-Based Category Learning in Patients with Parkinson's Disease: Impact of Category Number and Category Continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vincent eFiloteo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we found that Parkinson's disease (PD patients are impaired in procedural-based category learning when category membership is defined by a nonlinear relationship between stimulus dimensions, but these same patients are normal when the rule is defined by a linear relationship (Filoteo et al., 2005; Maddox & Filoteo, 2001. We suggested that PD patients' impairment was due to a deficit in recruiting ‘striatal units' to represent complex nonlinear rules. In the present study, we further examined the nature of PD patients' procedural-based deficit in two experiments designed to examine the impact of (1 the number of categories, and (2 category discontinuity on learning. Results indicated that PD patients were impaired only under discontinuous category conditions but were normal when the number of categories was increased from two to four. The lack of impairment in the four-category condition suggests normal integrity of striatal medium spiny cells involved in procedural-based category learning. In contrast, and consistent with our previous observation of a nonlinear deficit, the finding that PD patients were impaired in the discontinuous condition suggests that these patients are impaired when they have to associate perceptually distinct exemplars with the same category. Theoretically, this deficit might be related to dysfunctional communication among medium spiny neurons within the striatum, particularly given that these are cholinergic neurons and a cholinergic deficiency could underlie some of PD patients’ cognitive impairment.

  11. Continuous auditing & continuous monitoring : Continuous value?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillo, Rutger; Weigand, Hans; Espana, S; Ralyte, J; Souveyet, C

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in information technology, new laws and regulations and rapidly changing business conditions have led to a need for more timely and ongoing assurance with effectively working controls. Continuous Auditing (CA) and Continuous Monitoring (CM) technologies have made this possible by

  12. Prevalence of gluten-free diet adherence among individuals without celiac disease in the USA: results from the Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiacomo, Daniel V; Tennyson, Christina A; Green, Peter H; Demmer, Ryan T

    2013-08-01

    Clinical inference suggests the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is substantially higher than that of celiac disease in the USA. Unfortunately, there are currently no data supporting these claims. The authors analyzed nationally representative data to estimate the prevalence of adherence to a gluten-free diet among participants without celiac disease and also to characterize the demographics and general health status of these participants. The Continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 enrolled 7762 individuals representing the civilian, non-institutionalized, US population free of celiac disease. Participants responded to interviewer administered questionnaires regarding current adherence to a gluten-free diet. Prevalence estimates were computed using SAS survey procedures. There were 49 individuals who reported current adherence to a gluten-free diet reflecting a weighted prevalence of 0.548% (95% CI 0.206-0.889). The prevalence of a gluten-free diet was higher in females (0.58%) than males (0.37%), although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.34). Participants reporting a gluten-free diet were older (46.6 vs. 40.5 years, p = 0.005), had higher high-density lipoprotein, lower iron and lower body mass index. The estimated national prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is 0.548%, approximately half that of celiac disease. Future studies are merited in order to better understand the population burden of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

  13. Multidisciplinary analysis of invasive meningococcal disease as a framework for continuous quality and safety improvement in regional Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn A; Durrheim, David N; Merritt, Tony; Massey, Peter; Ferguson, John; Ryan, Nick; Hullick, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    System factors in a regional Australian health district contributed to avoidable care deviations from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) management guidelines. Traditional root cause analysis (RCA) is not well-suited to IMD, focusing on individual cases rather than system improvements. As IMD requires complex care across healthcare silos, it presents an opportunity to explore and address system-based patient safety issues. Baseline assessment of IMD cases (2005-2006) identified inadequate triage, lack of senior clinician review, inconsistent vital sign recording and laboratory delays as common issues, resulting in antibiotic administration delays and inappropriate or premature discharge. Clinical governance, in partnership with clinical and public health services, established a multidisciplinary Meningococcal Reference Group (MRG) to routinely review management of all IMD cases. The MRG comprised representatives from primary care, acute care, public health, laboratory medicine and clinical governance. Baseline data were compared with two subsequent evaluation points (2011-2012 and 2013-2015). Phase I involved multidisciplinary process mapping and development of a standardised audit tool from national IMD management guidelines. Phase II involved formalisation of group processes and advocacy for operational change. Phase III focused on dissemination of findings to clinicians and managers. Greatest care improvements were observed in the final evaluation. Median antibiotic delay decreased from 72 to 42 min and proportion of cases triaged appropriately improved from 38% to 75% between 2013 and 2015. Increasing fatal outcomes were attributed to the emergence of more virulent meningococcal serotypes. The MRG was a key mechanism for identifying system gaps, advocating for change and enhancing communication and coordination across services. Employing IMD case review as a focus for district-level process reflection presents an innovative patient safety approach

  14. Multidisciplinary analysis of invasive meningococcal disease as a framework for continuous quality and safety improvement in regional Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kathryn A; Durrheim, David N; Merritt, Tony; Massey, Peter; Ferguson, John; Ryan, Nick; Hullick, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Background System factors in a regional Australian health district contributed to avoidable care deviations from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) management guidelines. Traditional root cause analysis (RCA) is not well-suited to IMD, focusing on individual cases rather than system improvements. As IMD requires complex care across healthcare silos, it presents an opportunity to explore and address system-based patient safety issues. Context Baseline assessment of IMD cases (2005–2006) identified inadequate triage, lack of senior clinician review, inconsistent vital sign recording and laboratory delays as common issues, resulting in antibiotic administration delays and inappropriate or premature discharge. Methods Clinical governance, in partnership with clinical and public health services, established a multidisciplinary Meningococcal Reference Group (MRG) to routinely review management of all IMD cases. The MRG comprised representatives from primary care, acute care, public health, laboratory medicine and clinical governance. Baseline data were compared with two subsequent evaluation points (2011–2012 and 2013–2015). Interventions Phase I involved multidisciplinary process mapping and development of a standardised audit tool from national IMD management guidelines. Phase II involved formalisation of group processes and advocacy for operational change. Phase III focused on dissemination of findings to clinicians and managers. Results Greatest care improvements were observed in the final evaluation. Median antibiotic delay decreased from 72 to 42 min and proportion of cases triaged appropriately improved from 38% to 75% between 2013 and 2015. Increasing fatal outcomes were attributed to the emergence of more virulent meningococcal serotypes. Conclusions The MRG was a key mechanism for identifying system gaps, advocating for change and enhancing communication and coordination across services. Employing IMD case review as a focus for district-level process

  15. Association of global and disease-specific health status with outcomes following continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Kelsey M; Spertus, John A; Tang, Fengming; Jones, Philip; Fendler, Timothy J; Allen, Larry A

    2017-03-14

    The prognostic value of heart failure specific and global health status before and after left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation in the usual care setting is not well studied. We included 3,836 continuous-flow LVAD patients in the INTERMACS registry. Health status was measured pre-operatively and 3 months post-LVAD using the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) and EuroQol visual analog scale (VAS). Primary outcomes were mortality/rehospitalization. Inverse propensity weighting was used to minimize bias from missing data. Pre-operative global and heart failure-specific health status were very poor: KCCQ median 34.6 (IQR 21.4-50.5); VAS median 43 (interquartile range (IQR) 25-65). Health status measures improved 3 months after LVAD placement: KCCQ median 69.3 (IQR 54.2-82.3); VAS median 75 (IQR 60-85). Pre-operative health status was not associated with death (unadjusted HR for lowest vs. highest score quartiles: 1.09 (0.85-1.41) KCCQ; 1.12 (0.85-1.49) VAS) or rehospitalization (unadjusted HR 0.83 (0.72-0.96) KCCQ; 0.99 (0.85-1.16) VAS). Three-month KCCQ was associated with mortality (unadjusted HR 2.17 (1.47-3.21); VAS was not (1.43 (0.94-2.17). Three-month KCCQ added incremental discriminatory value to the HeartMate II Risk Score for death (c-stat 0.60 to 0.66); VAS did not (c-stat 0.59 to 0.60). Three-month health status was associated with rehospitalization (unadjusted HR 1.31 (1.15-1.57) KCCQ; 1.24 (1.05-1.46) VAS), but did not add incremental discriminatory value (c-stat 0.52 to 0.55 and 0.54, respectively). These real-world data suggest that pre-operative health status has limited association with outcomes after LVAD. However, persistently low health status after surgery may independently signal higher risk for subsequent death. Further study is needed to determine the clinical utility of routinely collected health status data after LVAD implantation.

  16. Biodiversity conservation in the face of dramatic forest disease: an integrated conservation strategy for tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) threatened by sudden oak death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard C. Cobb; David M. Rizzo; Katherine J. Hayden; Matteo Garbelotto; A.N. Filipe João; Christopher A. Gilligan; Whalen W. Dillon; Ross K. Meentemeyer; Yana S. Vlachovic; Ellen Goheen; Tedmund J. Swiecki; Everett M. Hansen; Susan J. Frankel

    2013-01-01

    Non-native diseases of dominant tree species have diminished North American forest biodiversity, structure, and ecosystem function over the last 150 years. Since the mid-1990s, coastal California forests have suffered extensive decline of the endemic overstory tree tanoak, Notholithocarpus densiflorus (Hook. & Arn.) Manos, Cannon & S. H. Oh...

  17. Oracle ADF Faces cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gawish, Amr

    2014-01-01

    This is a cookbook that covers more than 80 different recipes to teach you about different aspects of Oracle ADF Faces. It follows a practical approach and covers how to build your components for reuse in different applications. This book will also help you in tuning the performance of your ADF Faces application. If you are an ADF developer who wants to harness the power of Oracle ADF Faces to create exceptional user interfaces and reactive applications, this book will provide you with the recipes needed to do just that. You will not need to be familiar with Oracle ADF Faces, but you should be

  18. Face inversion increases attractiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Goller, Juergen; Forster, Michael; Schlageter, Lena; Paul, Matthew A

    2017-07-01

    Assessing facial attractiveness is a ubiquitous, inherent, and hard-wired phenomenon in everyday interactions. As such, it has highly adapted to the default way that faces are typically processed: viewing faces in upright orientation. By inverting faces, we can disrupt this default mode, and study how facial attractiveness is assessed. Faces, rotated at 90 (tilting to either side) and 180°, were rated on attractiveness and distinctiveness scales. For both orientations, we found that faces were rated more attractive and less distinctive than upright faces. Importantly, these effects were more pronounced for faces rated low in upright orientation, and smaller for highly attractive faces. In other words, the less attractive a face was, the more it gained in attractiveness by inversion or rotation. Based on these findings, we argue that facial attractiveness assessments might not rely on the presence of attractive facial characteristics, but on the absence of distinctive, unattractive characteristics. These unattractive characteristics are potentially weighed against an individual, attractive prototype in assessing facial attractiveness. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning discriminant face descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhen; Pietikäinen, Matti; Li, Stan Z

    2014-02-01

    Local feature descriptor is an important module for face recognition and those like Gabor and local binary patterns (LBP) have proven effective face descriptors. Traditionally, the form of such local descriptors is predefined in a handcrafted way. In this paper, we propose a method to learn a discriminant face descriptor (DFD) in a data-driven way. The idea is to learn the most discriminant local features that minimize the difference of the features between images of the same person and maximize that between images from different people. In particular, we propose to enhance the discriminative ability of face representation in three aspects. First, the discriminant image filters are learned. Second, the optimal neighborhood sampling strategy is soft determined. Third, the dominant patterns are statistically constructed. Discriminative learning is incorporated to extract effective and robust features. We further apply the proposed method to the heterogeneous (cross-modality) face recognition problem and learn DFD in a coupled way (coupled DFD or C-DFD) to reduce the gap between features of heterogeneous face images to improve the performance of this challenging problem. Extensive experiments on FERET, CAS-PEAL-R1, LFW, and HFB face databases validate the effectiveness of the proposed DFD learning on both homogeneous and heterogeneous face recognition problems. The DFD improves POEM and LQP by about 4.5 percent on LFW database and the C-DFD enhances the heterogeneous face recognition performance of LBP by over 25 percent.

  20. Reforms and emerging noncommunicable disease: some challenges facing a conflict-ridden country--the case of the Syrian Arab Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kasturi; Al-Faisal, Waleed

    2013-01-01

    The past year witnessed considerable turbulence in the Arab world-in this case, Syria, a lower middle-income country with a record of a strong public health infrastructure. This paper explores the current challenges facing its health system from reforms, civil strife and international sanctions all of which we argue have serious implications for population health. The health sector in Syria was little known, and until recently, it was well integrated to provide preventive and specialized care when needed. Regionally, it was one of the few countries ready and capable of addressing the challenges of demographic and epidemiologic transition with a long-standing emphasis on primary care and prevention, unlike most countries of the region. This context has changed dramatically through the recent implementation of reforms and the current civil war. Changes to financing, management and the delivery of health service placed access to services in jeopardy, but now, these are compounded by the destruction from an intractable and violent conflict and international sanctions. This paper explores some of the combined effects of reforms, conflict and sanctions on population health. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Morphing morphing faces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, R.J. van

    2009-01-01

    We have made cyclic morphing animations using two different faces. The morphing animations gradually evolved from one face to the other, and vice versa. When free viewing, the perceived changes were not very large, but the changes could easily be observed. Observers were asked to fixate on a dot

  2. Perceptions of the family facing the diagnosis and information about chronic disease in childhood - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i2.13691

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Medeiros da Nóbrega

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the perceptions of the family to the diagnosis of chronic disease in childhood; and to assess, from the perspective of the families, the information provided by health professionals. This is a qualitative, descriptive-exploratory study based on the testimonials of families living in João Pessoa, State of Paraíba, whose children had been admitted to a public hospital. The empirical data was produced between November 2008 and January 2009 through participant observation and open interviews. In the analysis, the data were grouped into the following categories: perceptions and feelings of the families on the diagnosis of chronic disease in childhood; and information as a tool for the families deal with the adversities. The results revealed that, despite the long wait, the moment of the final diagnosis is hard and the families need support to overcome the situation and create coping strategies to play their new roles. The family needs to feel safe and confident in its ability to care for the child, which requires information. Shortcomings were verified in the communication between health professionals and family members, especially during hospitalization. The feelings that emerge in the course of chronic illness should not be ignored, but worked together with the family.

  3. Phosphate is a potential biomarker of disease severity and predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Young Jung

    Full Text Available Hyperphosphatemia is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, and is common in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI; however, its clinical implication in these patients is unknown. We conducted an observational study in 1144 patients (mean age, 63.2 years; male, 705 [61.6%] with AKI who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT between January 2009 and September 2016. Phosphate levels were measured before (0 h and 24 h after CRRT initiation. We assessed disease severity using various clinical parameters. Phosphate at 0 h positively correlated with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; P < 0.001 and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA; P < 0.001 scores, and inversely with mean arterial pressure (MAP; P = 0.02 and urine output (UO; P = 0.01. In a fully adjusted linear regression analysis for age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI, MAP, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, higher 0 h phosphate level was significantly associated with high APACHE II (P < 0.001 and SOFA (P = 0.04 scores, suggesting that phosphate represents disease severity. A multivariable Cox model also showed that hyperphosphatemia was significantly associated with increased 28-day (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P = 0.001 and 90-day (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P = 0.001 mortality. Furthermore, patients with increased phosphate level during 24 h were at higher risk of death than those with stable or decreased phosphate levels. Finally, c-statistics significantly increased when phosphate was added to a model that included age, sex, CCI, body mass index, eGFR, MAP, hemoglobin, serum albumin, C-reactive protein, and APACHE II score. This study shows that phosphate is a potential biomarker that can reflect disease severity and predict mortality in critically ill patients receiving CRRT.

  4. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    CASON, JANA

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology ?face-to-face? (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other?s faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face...

  5. Evaluating the Efficacy of Nocturnal Continuous Subcutaneous Apomorphine Infusion in Sleep Disorders in Advanced Parkinson's Disease: The APO-NIGHT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pajarín, Gustavo; Sesar, Ángel; Ares, Begoña; Castro, Alfonso

    2016-10-19

    There are not many data about the beneficial effect of nocturnal continuous subcutaneous apomorphine infusion (NCSAI) over sleep disturbances in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Evaluate the effect of the NCSAI in sleeping problems and insomnia due to nocturnal hypokinesia inadvanced PD. We assessed 17 advanced PD patients with several sleep disturbances measured by SCOPA-SLEEP and PDSS scales. All the patients were on apomorphine infusion during daytime. This therapy was extended to nighttime. We evaluated the patients before the onset and after six weeks with NCSAI. NCSAI allowed highly significant improvements in SCOPA-SLEEP and PDSS scales (psleep disturbances related to advanced PD. We provide an easy protocol to start this therapy.

  6. Sitting ducks face chronic disease: an analysis of newspaper coverage of sedentary behaviour as a health issue in Australia 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Josephine Y; Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Zhong, Amy; Pedisic, Zeljko; Daley, Michelle; McGill, Bronwyn; Bauman, Adrian

    2017-08-01

    Issue addressed This study examines how sedentary behaviour (too much sitting) was covered as a health issue by Australian newspapers and how physical activity was framed within this newspaper coverage. Methods Articles featuring sedentary behaviour published in Australian newspapers between 2000 and 2012 were analysed for content and framing. Main outcome measures were volume, number and content of newspaper articles; framing and types of sedentary behaviour; responsibility for the problem of and solutions to high levels of sedentary behaviour; and physical activity mentions and how it was framed within sedentary behaviour coverage. Results Out of 48 articles, prolonged sitting was framed as bad for health (52%) and specifically as health compromising for office workers (25%). Adults who sat a lot were framed as 'easy targets' for ill health (21% of headlines led with 'sitting ducks' or 'sitting targets'). Prolonged sitting was framed as an issue of individual responsibility (>90%) with less mention of environmental and sociocultural contributors. Thirty-six of 48 articles mentioned physical activity; 39% stated that being physically active does not matter if a person sits for prolonged periods of time or that the benefits of physical activity are undone by too much sitting. Conclusions News coverage should reflect the full socio-ecological model of sedentary behaviour and continually reinforce the independent and well-established benefits of health-enhancing physical activity alongside the need to limit prolonged sitting. So what? It is important that the entire 'move more, sit less, every day!' message is communicated by news media.

  7. Multimedia Mapping using Continuous State Space Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Schiøler, Tue

    2004-01-01

    In this paper a system that transforms speech waveforms to animated faces are proposed. The system relies on continuous state space models to perform the mapping, this makes it possible to ensure video with no sudden jumps and allows continuous control of the parameters in 'face space'. Simulatio...

  8. Conscious awareness is required for holistic face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Vadim; Rees, Geraint

    2014-07-01

    Investigating the limits of unconscious processing is essential to understand the function of consciousness. Here, we explored whether holistic face processing, a mechanism believed to be important for face processing in general, can be accomplished unconsciously. Using a novel "eyes-face" stimulus we tested whether discrimination of pairs of eyes was influenced by the surrounding face context. While the eyes were fully visible, the faces that provided context could be rendered invisible through continuous flash suppression. Two experiments with three different sets of face stimuli and a subliminal learning procedure converged to show that invisible faces did not influence perception of visible eyes. In contrast, surrounding faces, when they were clearly visible, strongly influenced perception of the eyes. Thus, we conclude that conscious awareness might be a prerequisite for holistic face processing. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Face-Lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several weeks. Keeping your head elevated and applying cold compresses can help. Plan to have your surgery at least 6 weeks before any important social events. Changes in skin sensation. During a face-lift, the repositioning of your ...

  10. Face the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Skip Navigation Department of Health and Human Services Your Browser does not support javascript, so the search function on this page is disabled 1-800-677-1116 Home > Resources > Factsheets > Face ...

  11. Face Detection and Recognition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jain, Anil K

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research efforts towards developing algorithms for a robust face recognition system to overcome many of the limitations found in existing two-dimensional facial recognition systems...

  12. Effects of high intensity interval versus moderate continuous training on markers of ventilatory and cardiac efficiency in coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Gustavo G; Oliveira, Ricardo B; Farinatti, Paulo T V

    2015-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that high intensity interval training (HIIT) would be more effective than moderate intensity continuous training (MIT) to improve newly emerged markers of cardiorespiratory fitness in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients, as the relationship between ventilation and carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2 slope), oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), and oxygen pulse (O2P). Seventy-one patients with optimized treatment were randomly assigned into HIIT (n = 23, age = 56 ± 12 years), MIT (n = 24, age = 62 ± 12 years), or nonexercise control group (CG) (n = 24, age = 64 ± 12 years). MIT performed 30 min of continuous aerobic exercise at 70-75% of maximal heart rate (HRmax), and HIIT performed 30 min sessions split in 2 min alternate bouts at 60%/90% HRmax (3 times/week for 16 weeks). No differences among groups (before versus after) were found for VE/VCO2 slope or OUES (P > 0.05). After training the O2P slope increased in HIIT (22%, P 0.05), while decreased in CG (-20%, P < 0.05) becoming lower versus HIIT (P = 0.03). HIIT was more effective than MIT for improving O2P slope in CHD patients, while VE/VCO2 slope and OUES were similarly improved by aerobic training regimens versus controls.

  13. Cognitive decline in normal aging and early Alzheimer’s disease: A continuous or discontinuous transition? A historical review and future research proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E.J. Spaan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding debate in dementia research has been whether normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are extremes that lie along the same continuum (continuity view, or whether AD is categorically different from normal aging (discontinuity view. In other words, do only quantitative differences in neuropsychological test performance exist between normal aging and AD, or are there also qualitative differences? This question has been dominating dementia research for a century now and is characterized by inconsistent results and differences in methodological approach. In this review, I discuss studies that draw conclusions in terms of a continuous transition from normal aging to AD, followed by a discussion of studies that draw conclusions in terms of a discontinuous transition. In addition, several methodological issues are discussed that may explain the contrasting findings. This led to a proposal for investigating this topic in further research. I argue that only a latent variable (structural equation modeling approach testing for measurement equivalence may or may not reveal structural (i.e. qualitative differences in neuropsychological test performance between normal aging and AD. This outcome has important implications for the selection of optimal procedures of early AD assessment, particularly at very old age.

  14. Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease: the SAINTEX-CAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conraads, Viviane M; Pattyn, Nele; De Maeyer, Catherine; Beckers, Paul J; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; Cornelissen, Véronique A; Denollet, Johan; Frederix, Geert; Goetschalckx, Kaatje; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Possemiers, Nadine; Schepers, Dirk; Shivalkar, Bharati; Voigt, Jens-Uwe; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Vanhees, Luc

    2015-01-20

    Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO₂), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO₂ in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. Proof of concept papers comparing Aerobic Interval Training (AIT) and Moderate Continuous Training (MCT) were conducted in small sample sizes and findings were inconsistent and heterogeneous. Therefore, we aimed to compare the effects of AIT and Aerobic Continuous Training (ACT) on peak VO₂, peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety, in a large multicentre study. Two-hundred CAD patients (LVEF >40%, 90% men, mean age 58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to a supervised 12-week cardiac rehabilitation programme of three weekly sessions of either AIT (90-95% of peak heart rate (HR)) or ACT (70-75% of peak HR) on a bicycle. Primary outcome was peak VO₂; secondary outcomes were peripheral endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life and safety. Peak VO₂ (ml/kg/min) increased significantly in both groups (AIT 22.7 ± 17.6% versus ACT 20.3 ± 15.3%; p-timeexercise capacity and peripheral endothelial function following AIT and ACT in a large population of CAD patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Use of a vectored vaccine against infectious bursal disease of chickens in the face of high-titred maternally derived antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublot, M; Pritchard, N; Le Gros, F-X; Goutebroze, S

    2007-07-01

    Interference by maternally derived antibody (MDA) is a major problem for the vaccination of young chickens against infectious bursal disease (IBD). The choice of the timing of vaccination and of the type (degree of attenuation) of modified-live vaccine (MLV) to use is often difficult. An IBD vectored vaccine (vHVT13), in which turkey herpesvirus (HVT) is used as the vector, was recently developed. This vaccine is administered once at the hatchery, either in ovo or by the subcutaneous route, to 1-day-old chicks at a time when MDA is maximal. In terms of safety, the vHVT13 vaccine had negligible impact on the bursa of Fabricius when compared with classical IBD MLV. Vaccination and challenge studies demonstrated that this vaccine is able to protect chickens against various IBD virus (IBDV) challenge strains including very virulent, classical, and USA variant IBDV, despite the presence of high-titred IBD MDA at the time of vaccination. These data show that the vector vaccine combines a safety and efficacy profile that cannot be achieved with classical IBD vaccines.

  16. Face recognition in simulated prosthetic vision: face detection-based image processing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Xiaobei; Lu, Yanyu; Wu, Hao; Kan, Han; Chai, Xinyu

    2014-08-01

    Given the limited visual percepts elicited by current prosthetic devices, it is essential to optimize image content in order to assist implant wearers to achieve better performance of visual tasks. This study focuses on recognition of familiar faces using simulated prosthetic vision. Combined with region-of-interest (ROI) magnification, three face extraction strategies based on a face detection technique were used: the Viola-Jones face region, the statistical face region (SFR) and the matting face region. These strategies significantly enhanced recognition performance compared to directly lowering resolution (DLR) with Gaussian dots. The inclusion of certain external features, such as hairstyle, was beneficial for face recognition. Given the high recognition accuracy achieved and applicable processing speed, SFR-ROI was the preferred strategy. DLR processing resulted in significant face gender recognition differences (i.e. females were more easily recognized than males), but these differences were not apparent with other strategies. Face detection-based image processing strategies improved visual perception by highlighting useful information. Their use is advisable for face recognition when using low-resolution prosthetic vision. These results provide information for the continued design of image processing modules for use in visual prosthetics, thus maximizing the benefits for future prosthesis wearers.

  17. Perceptions of Academic Honesty in Online vs. Face-to-Face Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As online instruction continues to evolve, instructors continue to struggle with the perceived growing problem of academic dishonesty. This study will expand the literature regarding academic integrity, particularly in the online learning environment by examining student perceptions of academic integrity related to both online and face-to-face…

  18. Genetics and genomics of cholesterol and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in relation to coronary heart disease risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu Yingchang (Kevin), Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background face="">Coronary heart disease (CHD) continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide. Deregulated lipid metabolism (dyslipidemia) that manifests as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density-lipoprotein (HDL)

  19. Vertical vector face lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoano, Brian; Chan, Joanna; Morganroth, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Facial rejuvenation using local anesthesia has evolved in the past decade as a safer option for patients seeking fewer complications and minimal downtime. Mini- and short-scar face lifts using more conservative incision lengths and extent of undermining can be effective in the younger patient with lower face laxity and minimal loose, elastotic neck skin. By incorporating both an anterior and posterior approach and using an incision length between the mini and more traditional face lift, the Vertical Vector Face Lift can achieve longer-lasting and natural results with lesser cost and risk. Submentoplasty and liposuction of the neck and jawline, fundamental components of the vertical vector face lift, act synergistically with superficial musculoaponeurotic system plication to reestablish a more youthful, sculpted cervicomental angle, even in patients with prominent jowls. Dramatic results can be achieved in the right patient by combining with other procedures such as injectable fillers, chin implants, laser resurfacing, or upper and lower blepharoplasties. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. How Well Do Computer-Generated Faces Tap Face Expertise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Crookes

    Full Text Available The use of computer-generated (CG stimuli in face processing research is proliferating due to the ease with which faces can be generated, standardised and manipulated. However there has been surprisingly little research into whether CG faces are processed in the same way as photographs of real faces. The present study assessed how well CG faces tap face identity expertise by investigating whether two indicators of face expertise are reduced for CG faces when compared to face photographs. These indicators were accuracy for identification of own-race faces and the other-race effect (ORE-the well-established finding that own-race faces are recognised more accurately than other-race faces. In Experiment 1 Caucasian and Asian participants completed a recognition memory task for own- and other-race real and CG faces. Overall accuracy for own-race faces was dramatically reduced for CG compared to real faces and the ORE was significantly and substantially attenuated for CG faces. Experiment 2 investigated perceptual discrimination for own- and other-race real and CG faces with Caucasian and Asian participants. Here again, accuracy for own-race faces was significantly reduced for CG compared to real faces. However the ORE was not affected by format. Together these results signal that CG faces of the type tested here do not fully tap face expertise. Technological advancement may, in the future, produce CG faces that are equivalent to real photographs. Until then caution is advised when interpreting results obtained using CG faces.

  1. Business continuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunhoelder, Gert

    2002-01-01

    This presentation deals with the following keypoints: Information Technology (IT) Business Continuity and Recovery essential for any business; lessons learned after Sept. 11 event; Detailed planning, redundancy and testing being the key elements for probability estimation of disasters

  2. A temporary face support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, V.I.; Bakhtin, V.N.; Tolkachev, N.I.

    1980-03-30

    A temporary face support is proposed. It includes a beam supported by hydraulic jacks on the housing of the cutter-loader with a working tool and rotary pressure regulator. It differs in that to decrease the volume of unsecured roofing in the face space between the leading edge of the beam and the cutting tool of the cutter-loader, the beam is hinged onto the housing of the rotary pressure regulator by a fastened connecting rod, and the hydraulic jacks are provided with additional powered elements with a mechanism that regulates the length of the cut-off plate of the hydraulic pump when the seam pressure changes.

  3. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  4. California Workforce: California Faces a Skills Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Policy Institute of California, 2011

    2011-01-01

    California's education system is not keeping up with the changing demands of the state's economy--soon, California will face a shortage of skilled workers. Projections to 2025 suggest that the economy will continue to need more and more highly educated workers, but that the state will not be able to meet that demand. If current trends persist,…

  5. Brain structure, function, and genetics revealed by studies of the eye and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodiya, Sanjay

    2008-08-01

    Understanding the structure and function of the human brain is intrinsically interesting and fundamental to improved diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human neurological diseases, which constitute an increasing global burden. The intimate connections between brain and face, and brain and eye, have been utilized to access brain structure and function. Concepts and recent progress are reviewed here. Continued work on biological links between brain and eye or face has uncovered further genetic abnormalities causing facial or eye anomalies, which in either case may clearly indicate changes in the underlying brain. Cause and effect can be difficult to disentangle, but the use of conditional animal models can help establish whether brain changes are the result of face or eye changes or the result of a parallel influence on brain and eye or face. The application of newer methods and technologies such as parameterization of facial characteristics and comparative genomic hybridization has led to new discoveries and insights. Further interdisciplinary studies into brain structure and function through the windows of the face and the eye, with the application of genome-wide studies in larger cohorts, will potentially enable more discovery and critically may reveal unsuspected therapeutic targets in human disease.

  6. Short- and long-term effects of intensive training and motivational programme for continued physical activity in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattukat, K; Rennert, D; Brandes, I; Ehlebracht-König, I; Kluge, K; Mau, W

    2014-08-01

    Despite the positive health effects of (intensive) exercise in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, they are very often inactive. Motivational exercise interventions in other patient samples have shown good effects in promoting exercise behaviours. To evaluate the short- and long-term effects of an intensive exercise training programme in rheumatic patients with additional motivation for continued physical activity. Controlled prospective intervention study with repeated measures over 12 months. Rheumatologic inpatient rehabilitation in two centres in Germany. Three-hundred-and-seven patients with chronic polyarthritis or spondyloarthritis. The patients were assigned to a control group (CG, standard therapy, N.=156) or an intervention group (IG, motivation and intensive training, N.=151). Socio-demographic (age, gender, social background, employment) and health parameters (SF-36, HFAQ, HADS, pain, disease activity), exercise motivation, physical activity and costs of illness were assessed by questionnaires at baseline (t1), discharge (t2), and 12-months-follow-up (t5). Participants evaluated the rehabilitation programme at t2. At t2, IG-patients rated their rehabilitation better than CG-patients and reported higher exercise motivation. All patients had a better health status at t2 compared to t1. At t5, IG-patients reported more physical activity in everyday life. An unexpected lower physical component score (SF-36) of the IG compared to the CG lacked clinical relevance. No other variable showed significant group differences. Both CG- and IG-patients showed improvements in their health-related quality of life, pain, psychological well-being, sports activities, and exercise self-efficacy. The rehabilitation programme that included intensive training was perceived to be better than the conventional programme and the patients benefited more from the motivation intervention. Long-term improvements in all participants may be indicators of the positive effects

  7. PrimeFaces blueprints

    CERN Document Server

    Jonna, Sudheer

    2014-01-01

    If you are a Java developer with experience of frontend UI development, and want to take the plunge to develop stunning UI applications with the most popular JSF framework, PrimeFaces, then this book is for you. For those with entrepreneurial aspirations, this book will provide valuable insights into how to utilize successful business models.

  8. Face the voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønstrup, Ansa

    2014-01-01

    Belle, Neumark). Finally, the article will discuss the specific artistic combination and our auditory experience of mediated human voices and sculpturally projected faces in an art museum context under the general conditions of the societal panophonia of disembodied and mediated voices, as promoted by Steven...

  9. Problems facing developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Financing, above all political and technical considerations, remains the major obstacle faced by developing countries who wish to embark on a nuclear power programme. According to the IAEA, the support of the official lending agencies of the suppliers is essential. (author)

  10. Two Faces of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Conger, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the inconsistency between Japanese exploitation of world natural resources and gestures to provide leadership in ecologically innovative technology. Explores Japanese culture, power structure, population trends, environmental ethics, industrialism, and international business practices as they relate to the philosophical face of…

  11. The transparent face mask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, E A; Strate, R G; Solem, L D

    1979-02-01

    Fabrication of an accurate transparent mask for total contact pressure to the healed burned face proved helpful in controlling scarring. Wearing the mask for 20 hours daily, secured by elastic straps giving 35-mmHG pressure to the scar, can prevent the original facial contours from being distorted by contracting scar tissue.

  12. Robust Statistical Face Frontalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagonas, Christos; Panagakis, Yannis; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that excellent results can be achieved in both facial landmark localization and pose-invariant face recognition. These breakthroughs are attributed to the efforts of the community to manually annotate facial images in many different poses and to collect 3D facial data. In

  13. Neural synchronization during face-to-face communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Dai, Bohan; Peng, Danling; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Li; Lu, Chunming

    2012-11-07

    Although the human brain may have evolutionarily adapted to face-to-face communication, other modes of communication, e.g., telephone and e-mail, increasingly dominate our modern daily life. This study examined the neural difference between face-to-face communication and other types of communication by simultaneously measuring two brains using a hyperscanning approach. The results showed a significant increase in the neural synchronization in the left inferior frontal cortex during a face-to-face dialog between partners but none during a back-to-back dialog, a face-to-face monologue, or a back-to-back monologue. Moreover, the neural synchronization between partners during the face-to-face dialog resulted primarily from the direct interactions between the partners, including multimodal sensory information integration and turn-taking behavior. The communicating behavior during the face-to-face dialog could be predicted accurately based on the neural synchronization level. These results suggest that face-to-face communication, particularly dialog, has special neural features that other types of communication do not have and that the neural synchronization between partners may underlie successful face-to-face communication.

  14. Voicing on Virtual and Face to Face Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamat, Hamidah

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses findings of a study conducted on pre-service teachers' experiences in virtual and face to face discussions. Technology has brought learning nowadays beyond the classroom context or time zone. The learning context and process no longer rely solely on face to face communications in the presence of a teacher.…

  15. Faceness-Net: Face Detection through Deep Facial Part Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Luo, Ping; Loy, Chen Change; Tang, Xiaoou

    2017-08-11

    We propose a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) for face detection leveraging on facial attributes based supervision. We observe a phenomenon that part detectors emerge within CNN trained to classify attributes from uncropped face images, without any explicit part supervision. The observation motivates a new method for finding faces through scoring facial parts responses by their spatial structure and arrangement. The scoring mechanism is data-driven, and carefully formulated considering challenging cases where faces are only partially visible. This consideration allows our network to detect faces under severe occlusion and unconstrained pose variations. Our method achieves promising performance on popular benchmarks including FDDB, PASCAL Faces, AFW, and WIDER FACE.

  16. Real Time Face Quality Assessment for Face Log Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Nasrollahi; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Summarizing a long surveillance video to just a few best quality face images of each subject, a face-log, is of great importance in surveillance systems. Face quality assessment is the back-bone for face log generation and improving the quality assessment makes the face logs more reliable....... Developing a real time face quality assessment system using the most important facial features and employing it for face logs generation are the concerns of this paper. Extensive tests using four databases are carried out to validate the usability of the system....

  17. Flashed face distortion effect: grotesque faces from relative spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangen, Jason M; Murphy, Sean C; Thompson, Matthew B

    2011-01-01

    We describe a novel face distortion effect resulting from the fast-paced presentation of eye-aligned faces. When cycling through the faces on a computer screen, each face seems to become a caricature of itself and some faces appear highly deformed, even grotesque. The degree of distortion is greatest for faces that deviate from the others in the set on a particular dimension (eg if a person has a large forehead, it looks particularly large). This new method of image presentation, based on alignment and speed, could provide a useful tool for investigating contrastive distortion effects and face adaptation.

  18. Human faces are slower than chimpanzee faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Burrows

    Full Text Available While humans (like other primates communicate with facial expressions, the evolution of speech added a new function to the facial muscles (facial expression muscles. The evolution of speech required the development of a coordinated action between visual (movement of the lips and auditory signals in a rhythmic fashion to produce "visemes" (visual movements of the lips that correspond to specific sounds. Visemes depend upon facial muscles to regulate shape of the lips, which themselves act as speech articulators. This movement necessitates a more controlled, sustained muscle contraction than that produced during spontaneous facial expressions which occur rapidly and last only a short period of time. Recently, it was found that human tongue musculature contains a higher proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers than in rhesus macaques, which is related to the slower, more controlled movements of the human tongue in the production of speech. Are there similar unique, evolutionary physiologic biases found in human facial musculature related to the evolution of speech?Using myosin immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that human facial musculature has a higher percentage of slow-twitch myosin fibers relative to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We sampled the orbicularis oris and zygomaticus major muscles from three cadavers of each species and compared proportions of fiber-types. Results confirmed our hypothesis: humans had the highest proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers while chimpanzees had the highest proportion of fast-twitch fibers.These findings demonstrate that the human face is slower than that of rhesus macaques and our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. They also support the assertion that human facial musculature and speech co-evolved. Further, these results suggest a unique set of evolutionary selective pressures on human facial musculature to slow down while the function of this muscle

  19. Face-to-Face Activities in Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette

    While blended learning combines online and face-to-face teaching, research on blended learning has primarily focused on the role of technology and the opportunities it creates for engaging students. Less focus has been put on face-to-face activities in blended learning. This paper argues...... that it is not only the online activities in blended learning that provide new opportunities for rethinking pedagogy in higher education, it is also imperative to reconsider the face-to-face activities when part of the learning is provided online. Based on a review of blended learning in business and management...... education, we identify what forms of teaching and learning are suggested to take place face-to-face when other activities are moved online. We draw from the Community of Inquiry framework to analyze how face-to-face activities contribute to a blended learning pedagogy and discuss the implications...

  20. Face recognition system and method using face pattern words and face pattern bytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    2014-12-23

    The present invention provides a novel system and method for identifying individuals and for face recognition utilizing facial features for face identification. The system and method of the invention comprise creating facial features or face patterns called face pattern words and face pattern bytes for face identification. The invention also provides for pattern recognitions for identification other than face recognition. The invention further provides a means for identifying individuals based on visible and/or thermal images of those individuals by utilizing computer software implemented by instructions on a computer or computer system and a computer readable medium containing instructions on a computer system for face recognition and identification.

  1. The Caledonian face test: A new test of face discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Andrew J; Wilkinson, Frances; Wilson, Hugh R; Gordon, Gael E; Loffler, Gunter

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a clinical test of face perception which is applicable to a wide range of patients and can capture normal variability. The Caledonian face test utilises synthetic faces which combine simplicity with sufficient realism to permit individual identification. Face discrimination thresholds (i.e. minimum difference between faces required for accurate discrimination) were determined in an "odd-one-out" task. The difference between faces was controlled by an adaptive QUEST procedure. A broad range of face discrimination sensitivity was determined from a group (N=52) of young adults (mean 5.75%; SD 1.18; range 3.33-8.84%). The test is fast (3-4 min), repeatable (test-re-test r(2)=0.795) and demonstrates a significant inversion effect. The potential to identify impairments of face discrimination was evaluated by testing LM who reported a lifelong difficulty with face perception. While LM's impairment for two established face tests was close to the criterion for significance (Z-scores of -2.20 and -2.27) for the Caledonian face test, her Z-score was -7.26, implying a more than threefold higher sensitivity. The new face test provides a quantifiable and repeatable assessment of face discrimination ability. The enhanced sensitivity suggests that the Caledonian face test may be capable of detecting more subtle impairments of face perception than available tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Comparison of Face to Face and Video-Based Self Care Education on Quality of Life of Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati Maslakpak, Masumeh; Shams, Shadi

    2015-07-01

    End stage renal disease negatively affects the patients' quality of life. There are different educational methods to help these patients. This study was performed to compare the effectiveness of self-care education in two methods, face to face and video educational, on the quality of life in patients under treatment by hemodialysis in education-medical centers in Urmia. In this quasi-experimental study, 120 hemodialysis patients were selected randomly; they were then randomly allocated to three groups: the control, face to face education and video education. For face to face group, education was given individually in two sessions of 35 to 45 minutes. For video educational group, CD was shown. Kidney Disease Quality Of Life- Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire was filled out before and two months after the intervention. Data analysis was performed in SPSS software by using one-way ANOVA. ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference in the quality of life scores among the three groups after the intervention (P=0.024). After the intervention, Tukey's post-hoc test showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups of video and face to face education regarding the quality of life (P>0.05). Implementation of the face to face and video education methods improves the quality of life in hemodialysis patients. So, it is suggested that video educational should be used along with face to face education.

  3. Foil Face Seal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, John

    2009-01-01

    In the seal literature you can find many attempts by various researchers to adapt film riding seals to the gas turbine engine. None have been successful, potential distortion of the sealing faces is the primary reason. There is a film riding device that does accommodate distortion and is in service in aircraft applications, namely the foil bearing. More specifically a foil thrust bearing. These are not intended to be seals, and they do not accommodate large axial movement between shaft & static structure. By combining the 2 a unique type of face seal has been created. It functions like a normal face seal. The foil thrust bearing replaces the normal primary sealing surface. The compliance of the foil bearing allows the foils to track distortion of the mating seal ring. The foil seal has several perceived advantages over existing hydrodynamic designs, enumerated in the chart. Materials and design methodology needed for this application already exist. Also the load capacity requirements for the foil bearing are low since it only needs to support itself and overcome friction forces at the antirotation keys.

  4. Telehealth is Face-to-Face Service Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The Commentary contests the increasingly outdated and narrow use of the terminology 'face-to-face' (often abbreviated as F2F) to connote clinical interactions in which both the client and the practitioner are physically present in the same room or space. An expanded definition is necessary because when delivered synchronously via videoconferencing, telehealth also provides face-to-face services (i.e., the practitioner and the client view each other's faces). Terminology that uses face-to-face to connote only in-person care is limiting and perpetuates language that is out of line with progressive US regulatory language and broad interpretation within existing regulatory language. It is this author's hope that this commentary will raise awareness of the important policy implications associated with this seemingly minor distinction in terminology and impact the lingering misapplication of the term, face-to-face.

  5. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease at a tertiary children's hospital through the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era: a case for continuous surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Chris, Stockmann; Hersh, Adam L; Bender, Jeffrey M; Blaschke, Anne J; Weng, Hsin Yi Cindy; Korgenski, Kent E; Daly, Judy; Mason, Edward O; Byington, Carrie L

    2012-03-01

    In 2000, a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was licensed for use among US children. Many sites have since reported changes in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). We recognized an opportunity to describe the changes in epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution during a 14-year period including 4 years before vaccine introduction and spanning the entire PCV7 era. Cases were defined as children <18 years of age who were cared for at Primary Children's Medical Center for culture-confirmed IPD. We defined the prevaccine period as the time frame spanning from 1997 to 2000 and the postvaccine period from 2001 to 2010. Demographics, clinical data, and outcomes were collected through electronic query and chart review. Streptococcus pneumoniae serotyping was performed using the capsular swelling method. The median age of children with IPD increased from 19 months during the prevaccine period to 27 months during postvaccine period (P = 0.02), with a larger proportion of IPD among children older than 5 years. The proportion of IPD associated with pneumonia increased substantially from 29% to 50% (P < 0.001). This increase was primarily attributable to an increase in complicated pneumonia (17% to 33%, P < 0.001). Nonvaccine serotypes 7F, 19A, 22F, and 3 emerged as the dominant serotypes in the postvaccine period. In children with IPD who were younger than 5 years, for whom vaccine is recommended, 67% of the cases were caused by serotypes in 13-valent PCV during 2005 to 2010. After PCV7 was introduced, significant changes in IPD were noted. One-third of IPD occurred in children older than 5 years, who were outside the age-group for which PCV is recommended. Continued surveillance is warranted to identify further evolution of the epidemiology, clinical syndromes, and serotype distribution of S. pneumoniae after 13-valent PCV licensure.

  6. Experience of Percutaneous Versus Surgically Placed Catheter for Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease Stage-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroz, S; Ferdaus, T; Khondokar, S A; Khan, M H; Hanif, M

    2016-10-01

    The lifespan and outcome of end stage renal disease (ESRD) children have dramatically improved since the development of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), it offers several advantages over hemodialysis. Percutaneous placement of CAPD catheters in children is minimally invasive, reliable, safe and cost-effective method. Percutaneous method of CAPD catheter insertion can be used in children to avoid the complications of general anesthesia and surgery. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of CAPD in children, to find out the complication profile of CAPD & to compare the advantages of surgical versus percutaneously placed CAPD catheters in children. This prospective longitudinal comparative study was carried out in the department of Pediatric Nephrology, Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), Bangladesh from July 2011 to June 2014. A total of 8 children with ESRD were included (Age 5-14 year, M: F=1: 1). All underwent CAPD, Group I = surgically placed CAPD catheter (N=5), Group II = percutaneously placed CAPD catheter (N=3). Average duration of CAPD in Group I and Group II were 31.6 vs. 9 (months) with a total of 158 vs. 27 patient months of CAPD respectively. The rate of complications of the 2 groups and their outcome were compared. Common complications being observed were peritonitis 1 episode per 12.1 vs. 1.8 patient months (pchildren (pchildren, but percutaneous method of catheter insertion is associated with higher rate of complications. Placement of catheter by surgical method with elective omentectomy will reduce catheter related complications. Early detection of peritonitis and prompt therapy is essential for a favourable outcome.

  7. Double bag or Y-set versus standard transfer systems for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in end-stage kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Conal; Cody, June D; Khan, Izhar; Rabindranath, Kannaiyan S; Vale, Luke; Wallace, Sheila A

    2014-08-13

    Peritonitis is the most frequent serious complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). It has a major influence on the number of patients switching from CAPD to haemodialysis and has probably restricted the wider acceptance and uptake of CAPD as an alternative mode of dialysis.This is an update of a review first published in 2000. This systematic review sought to determine if modifications of the transfer set (Y-set or double bag systems) used in CAPD exchanges are associated with a reduction in peritonitis and an improvement in other relevant outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group's Specialised Register through contact with the Trials Search Co-ordinator. Studies contained in the Specialised Register are identified through search strategies specifically designed for CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE. Date of last search: 22 October 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing double bag, Y-set and standard peritoneal dialysis (PD) exchange systems in patients with end-stage kidney disease. Data were abstracted by a single investigator onto a standard form and analysed by Review Manager. Analysis was by a random effects model and results were expressed as risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Twelve eligible trials with a total of 991 randomised patients were identified. Despite the large total number of patients, few trials covered the same interventions, small numbers of patients were enrolled in each trial and the methodological quality was suboptimal. Y-set and twin-bag systems were superior to conventional spike systems (7 trials, 485 patients, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.77) in preventing peritonitis in PD. Disconnect systems should be the preferred exchange systems in CAPD.

  8. Continuation calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Geron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Programs with control are usually modeled using lambda calculus extended with control operators. Instead of modifying lambda calculus, we consider a different model of computation. We introduce continuation calculus, or CC, a deterministic model of computation that is evaluated using only head reduction, and argue that it is suitable for modeling programs with control. It is demonstrated how to define programs, specify them, and prove them correct. This is shown in detail by presenting in CC a list multiplication program that prematurely returns when it encounters a zero. The correctness proof includes termination of the program. In continuation calculus we can model both call-by-name and call-by-value. In addition, call-by-name functions can be applied to call-by-value results, and conversely.

  9. Decoding of faces and face components in face-sensitive human visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F Nichols

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A great challenge to the field of visual neuroscience is to understand how faces are encoded and represented within the human brain. Here we show evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI for spatially distributed processing of the whole face and its components in face-sensitive human visual cortex. We used multi-class linear pattern classifiers constructed with a leave-one-scan-out verification procedure to discriminate brain activation patterns elicited by whole faces, the internal features alone, and the external head outline alone. Furthermore, our results suggest that whole faces are represented disproportionately in the fusiform cortex (FFA whereas the building blocks of faces are represented disproportionately in occipitotemporal cortex (OFA. Faces and face components may therefore be organized with functional clustering within both the FFA and OFA, but with specialization for face components in the OFA and the whole face in the FFA.

  10. Performance and accountability : challenges facing the Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-14

    For surface transportation safety, DOT continues to face challenges in improving the safety of highways and pipelines. While the Department of Transportation appears to be making progress on some initiatives to reduce the number of large truck crashe...

  11. City face to face with nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabowo, Hendro; Dewi, Mahargyantari P.

    2017-11-01

    Within the perspective of environmental psychology, there are some forms of earth destruction such as global warming, deforestation, pollution, and species extinction. These have been caused by the massive growth of population that inevitably means more housingis needed while at the same time, agricultural land for food production has been shrinking. Nisbet, Zelenski, and Murphy (2009) proposed that personal relationships with nature may provide some insight into the way people treat the environment. In other words, disconnection from the natural world may be contributing to our planet's destruction. In addition, Koger and Winter (2011) proposed green urban planning and green buildings as solution not only for overcoming the destruction, but also they are useful to reduce stress. Wilson (1984) pioneered the term "biophilia" to refer to a fundamental hypothesized, genetically based human need and propensity to affiliate with "life and lifelike processes." Studies have shown, for example, that even minimal connection with nature—such as looking at it through a window—can promote the healing of hospitalized patients; can increase health in the workplace; and can reduce the frequency of illness in prisons. In hundreds of other studies, interaction with pets has shown a wide range of benefits forclinical patients—from adults with Alzheimer's disease to children with autism—as well as for people within the general population (Kahn, Severson, & Ruckert, 2009). This paper is an attempt to collect data regarding the efforts of cities today in adapting to nature, such as Barcelona which tried to control the bird population with contraception;Austin city coexists with bats; dozens of cities in the US which conform with bees and honey, and Masdar city that is designed along with its nature.

  12. Faced with a dilemma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Christiansen, Anne Hjøllund; Petersson, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    's legal right to choose TOP and considerations about the foetus' right to live were suppressed. Midwives experienced a dilemma when faced with aborted foetuses that looked like newborns and when aborted foetuses showed signs of life after a termination. Furthermore, they were critical of how physicians...... counsel women/couples after prenatal diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: The midwives' practice in relation to late TOP was characterised by an acknowledgement of the growing ethical status of the foetus and the emotional reactions of the women/couples going through late TOP. Other professions as well as structural...

  13. Assessing Students Perceptions on Intensive Face to Face in Open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study assessed students‟ perception on Intensive Face to Face sessions. The study specifically aimed at identifying students‟ perception on quality of interaction between tutors and students and between students on the other hand. It also explored the nature of challenges students meet in attending face to ...

  14. Face reconstruction from image sequences for forensic face comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, C.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2016-01-01

    The authors explore the possibilities of a dense model-free three-dimensional (3D) face reconstruction method, based on image sequences from a single camera, to improve the current state of forensic face comparison. They propose a new model-free 3D reconstruction method for faces, based on the

  15. Facing scalability: Naming faces in an online social network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppe, Ronald Walter

    Automatically naming faces in online social networks enables us to search for photos and build user face models. We consider two common weakly supervised settings where: (1) users are linked to photos, not to faces and (2) photos are not labeled but part of a user's album. The focus is on algorithms

  16. Face-to-Face Interference in Typical and Atypical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riby, Deborah M.; Doherty-Sneddon, Gwyneth; Whittle, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Visual communication cues facilitate interpersonal communication. It is important that we look at faces to retrieve and subsequently process such cues. It is also important that we sometimes look away from faces as they increase cognitive load that may interfere with online processing. Indeed, when typically developing individuals hold face gaze…

  17. Thermal to visible face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Hu, Shuowen; Young, S. Susan; Davis, Larry S.

    2012-06-01

    In low light conditions, visible light face identification is infeasible due to the lack of illumination. For nighttime surveillance, thermal imaging is commonly used because of the intrinsic emissivity of thermal radiation from the human body. However, matching thermal images of faces acquired at nighttime to the predominantly visible light face imagery in existing government databases and watch lists is a challenging task. The difficulty arises from the significant difference between the face's thermal signature and its visible signature (i.e. the modality gap). To match the thermal face to the visible face acquired by the two different modalities, we applied face recognition algorithms that reduce the modality gap in each step of face identification, from low-level analysis to machine learning techniques. Specifically, partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based approaches were used to correlate the thermal face signatures to the visible face signatures, yielding a thermal-to-visible face identification rate of 49.9%. While this work makes progress for thermal-to-visible face recognition, more efforts need to be devoted to solving this difficult task. Successful development of a thermal-to-visible face recognition system would significantly enhance the Nation's nighttime surveillance capabilities.

  18. Improvement in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease management and prevention using a health centre-based continuous quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Anna P; Fittock, Marea; Schultz, Rosalie; Thompson, Dale; Dowden, Michelle; Clemens, Tom; Parnaby, Matthew G; Clark, Michele; McDonald, Malcolm I; Edwards, Keith N; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Bailie, Ross S

    2013-12-18

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) remains a major health concern for Aboriginal Australians. A key component of RHD control is prevention of recurrent acute rheumatic fever (ARF) using long-term secondary prophylaxis with intramuscular benzathine penicillin (BPG). This is the most important and cost-effective step in RHD control. However, there are significant challenges to effective implementation of secondary prophylaxis programs. This project aimed to increase understanding and improve quality of RHD care through development and implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy. We used a CQI strategy to promote implementation of national best-practice ARF/RHD management guidelines at primary health care level in Indigenous communities of the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, 2008-2010. Participatory action research methods were employed to identify system barriers to delivery of high quality care. This entailed facilitated discussion with primary care staff aided by a system assessment tool (SAT). Participants were encouraged to develop and implement strategies to overcome identified barriers, including better record-keeping, triage systems and strategies for patient follow-up. To assess performance, clinical records were audited at baseline, then annually for two years. Key performance indicators included proportion of people receiving adequate secondary prophylaxis (≥80% of scheduled 4-weekly penicillin injections) and quality of documentation. Six health centres participated, servicing approximately 154 people with ARF/RHD. Improvements occurred in indicators of service delivery including proportion of people receiving ≥40% of their scheduled BPG (increasing from 81/116 [70%] at baseline to 84/103 [82%] in year three, p = 0.04), proportion of people reviewed by a doctor within the past two years (112/154 [73%] and 134/156 [86%], p = 0.003), and proportion of people who received influenza vaccination (57/154 [37%] to 86/156 [55%], p

  19. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on anxiety, depression, and major cardiac and cerebro-vascular events in obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Chung; Shen, Yu-Chih; Wang, Ji-Hung; Li, Yu-Ying; Li, Tzu-Hsien; Chang, En-Ting; Wang, Hsiu-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with bad cardiovascular outcomes and a high prevalence of anxiety and depression. This study investigated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the severity of anxiety and depression in OSA patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD) and on the rate of cardio- and cerebro-vascular events in those with OSA and CAD. This prospective study included patients with moderate-to-severe OSA, with or without a recent diagnosis of CAD; all were started on CPAP therapy. Patients completed the Chinese versions of the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) at baseline and after 6-month follow-up. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) was assessed every 3 months up to 1 year. BAI scores decreased from 8.5 ± 8.4 at baseline to 5.4 ± 6.9 at 6 months in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD ( P < 0.05). BAI scores also decreased from 20.7 ± 14.9 to 16.1 ± 14.5 in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD. BDI-II scores decreased in CPAP-compliant OSA patients without CAD (from 11.1 ± 10.7 at baseline to 6.6 ± 9.5 at 6 months) and in CPAP-compliant OSA patients with CAD (from 20.4 ± 14.3 to 15.9 ± 7.3). In addition, there was a large effect size (ES) of BAI and BDI in 6-month CPAP treatment of OSA patients with CAD and a large ES in those with OSA under CPAP treatment. In OSA patients with CAD, the occurrence of MACCE was significantly lower in CPAP-compliant patients than that in CPAP noncompliant patients (11% in CPAP compliant and 50% in noncompliant; P < 0.05). CPAP improved anxiety and depression in OSA patients regardless of CAD. In OSA patients with CAD, CPAP-compliant patients had a lower 1-year rate of MACCE than CPAP-noncompliant patients.

  20. ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, T.; Vieider, G.; Akiba, M.

    1991-01-01

    This document summarizes results of the Conceptual Design Activities (1988-1990) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, namely those that pertain to the plasma facing components of the reactor vessel, of which the main components are the first wall and the divertor plates. After an introduction and an executive summary, the principal functions of the plasma-facing components are delineated, i.e., (i) define the low-impurity region within which the plasma is produced, (ii) absorb the electromagnetic radiation and charged-particle flux from the plasma, and (iii) protect the blanket/shield components from the plasma. A list of critical design issues for the divertor plates and the first wall is given, followed by discussions of the divertor plate design (including the issues of material selection, erosion lifetime, design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, operating limits and overall lifetime, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, and advanced divertor concepts) and the first wall design (armor material and design, erosion lifetime, overall design concepts, thermal and mechanical analysis, lifetime and operating limits, tritium inventory, baking and conditioning, safety analysis, manufacture and testing, an alternative first wall design, and the limiters used instead of the divertor plates during start-up). Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Face-to-face versus remote and web 2.0 interventions for promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Justin; Thorogood, Margaret; Hillsdon, Melvyn; Foster, Charles

    2013-09-30

    Face-to-face interventions for promoting physical activity (PA) are continuing to be popular as remote and web 2.0 approaches rapidly emerge, but we are unsure which approach is more effective at achieving long term sustained change. To compare the effectiveness of face-to-face versus remote and web 2.0 interventions for PA promotion in community dwelling adults (aged 16 years and above). We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and some other databases (from earliest dates available to October 2012). Reference lists of relevant articles were checked. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised trials that compared face-to-face versus remote and web 2.0 PA interventions for community dwelling adults. We included studies if they compared an intervention that was principally delivered face-to-face to an intervention that had principally remote and web 2.0 methods. To assess behavioural change over time, the included studies had a minimum of 12 months follow-up from the start of the intervention to the final results. We excluded studies that had more than a 20% loss to follow-up if they did not apply an intention-to-treat analysis. At least two review authors independently assessed the quality of each study and extracted the data. Non-English language papers were reviewed with the assistance of an interpreter who was an epidemiologist. Study authors were contacted for additional information where necessary. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for continuous measures of cardio-respiratory fitness. One study recruiting 225 apparently healthy adults met the inclusion criteria. This study took place in a high-income country. From 27,299 hits, the full texts of 193 papers were retrieved for examination against the inclusion criteria. However, there was only one paper that met the inclusion criteria. This study reported the effect of a PA intervention on cardio-respiratory fitness. There were no reported data

  2. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy: From Face to Face Interaction to a Broader Contextual Understanding of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, A.; Dagnan, D.; Kroese, B. Stenfert; Pert, C.; Trower, P.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is increasingly used to address the emotional and interpersonal problems of people with ID. There is a limited but promising evidence base supporting this activity. However, these individuals face real and continuing challenges in their lives that have implications for their self and interpersonal perceptions.…

  3. Differences between Caucasian and Asian attractive faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, S C

    2018-02-01

    There are discrepancies between the public's current beauty desires and conventional theories and historical rules regarding facial beauty. This photogrammetric study aims to describe in detail mathematical differences in facial configuration between attractive Caucasian and attractive Asian faces. To analyse the structural differences between attractive Caucasian and attractive Asian faces, frontal face and lateral face views for each race were morphed; facial landmarks were defined, and the relative photographic pixel distances and angles were measured. Absolute values were acquired by arithmetic conversion for comparison. The data indicate that some conventional beliefs of facial attractiveness can be applied but others are no longer valid in explaining perspectives of beauty between Caucasians and Asians. Racial differences in the perceptions of attractive faces were evident. Common features as a phenomenon of global fusion in the perspectives on facial beauty were revealed. Beauty standards differ with race and ethnicity, and some conventional rules for ideal facial attractiveness were found to be inappropriate. We must reexamine old principles of facial beauty and continue to fundamentally question it according to its racial, cultural, and neuropsychological aspects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Matching score based face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.; Beumer, G.M.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate face registration is of vital importance to the performance of a face recognition algorithm. We propose a new method: matching score based face registration, which searches for optimal alignment by maximizing the matching score output of a classifier as a function of the different

  5. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Quaglia, Adamo; Epifano, Calogera M.

    2012-01-01

    The improvements of automatic face recognition during the last 2 decades have disclosed new applications like border control and camera surveillance. A new application field is forensic face recognition. Traditionally, face recognition by human experts has been used in forensics, but now there is a

  6. Enabling dynamics in face analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibeklioğlu, H.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the approaches in automatic face analysis rely solely on static appearance. However, temporal analysis of expressions reveals interesting patterns. For a better understanding of the human face, this thesis focuses on temporal changes in the face, and dynamic patterns of expressions. In

  7. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2010-01-01

    Side-view face recognition is a challenging problem with many applications. Especially in real-life scenarios where the environment is uncontrolled, coping with pose variations up to side-view positions is an important task for face recognition. In this paper we discuss the use of side view face

  8. Facing evil: theological reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Brand

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests some possible responses, drawn from the Judeo-Christian-
    Islamic tradition, to Theo de Wit’s analysis of evil, narrativity and reconciliation. It
    is argued, first, that the problem of evil is rightly seen, not as a question relating
    incidentally to faith, but as an existential challenge arising from the human condition,
    to which the Judeo-Christian-Islamic tradition has sought, from its inception, to
    provide answers. Secondly, that the theme of not downplaying evil, but facing it in its
    full reality, is central to this tradition, inter alia in the longing for, and expectation of,
    the resurrection of the dead as a way of approaching the unresolved problem of past
    evil. Some related theological concepts and questions are also brought to bear on the
    questions raised by De Wit.

  9. Facing the Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Kai

    2014-01-01

    China's rise signifies a gradual transformation of the international system from unipolarity to a non-unipolar world. ,4s an organization of small and middle powers, ASEAN faces strategic uncertainties brought about by the power transition in the system. Deepening economic interdependence between...... ASEAN and China has amplified the economic cost for the ASEAN states to use traditional military means to deal with China s rise. Applying institutional balancing theory, this paper examines how ASEAN has adopted various institutional instruments, such as the ASEAN Regional Forum (ARF), the East Asia...... Summit (EAS), the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), and the ASEAN Community, to constrain and shape China's behaviour in the region in the post-Cold War era. It argues that due to globalization and economic interdependence, the power transition in the 21st century is different from...

  10. The many faces of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagam, Janet Yagoda

    2009-01-01

    Dementia is a progressive and incurable condition that in one way or another affects nearly everyone. Examples of specific types of dementia include Alzheimer disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies. Age is the primary risk factor for dementia and the long-term social and economic effects of dementia are immense. Functional medical imaging is an important research tool that eventually may become a practical screening tool for early-stage dementia, to confirm a clinical diagnosis and to help clinicians manage patient care. Functional medical imaging also may play a role in research regarding the development of new medications to prevent or delay the progression of Alzheimer disease and other dementias. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store.

  11. Face Attention Network: An Effective Face Detector for the Occluded Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jianfeng; Yuan, Ye; Yu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The performance of face detection has been largely improved with the development of convolutional neural network. However, the occlusion issue due to mask and sunglasses, is still a challenging problem. The improvement on the recall of these occluded cases usually brings the risk of high false positives. In this paper, we present a novel face detector called Face Attention Network (FAN), which can significantly improve the recall of the face detection problem in the occluded case without comp...

  12. Time-tradeoff values and standard-gamble utilities assessed during telephone interviews versus face-to-face interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijck, Esther; Bosch, JL; Hunink, Maria

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare time-tradeoff values and standard-gamble utilities obtained during telephone interviews with those obtained through face-to-face interviews. Sixty-five patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease completed both interviews. One week prior to the

  13. Energy conservation using face detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deotale, Nilesh T.; Kalbande, Dhananjay R.; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-10-01

    Computerized Face Detection, is concerned with the difficult task of converting a video signal of a person to written text. It has several applications like face recognition, simultaneous multiple face processing, biometrics, security, video surveillance, human computer interface, image database management, digital cameras use face detection for autofocus, selecting regions of interest in photo slideshows that use a pan-and-scale and The Present Paper deals with energy conservation using face detection. Automating the process to a computer requires the use of various image processing techniques. There are various methods that can be used for Face Detection such as Contour tracking methods, Template matching, Controlled background, Model based, Motion based and color based. Basically, the video of the subject are converted into images are further selected manually for processing. However, several factors like poor illumination, movement of face, viewpoint-dependent Physical appearance, Acquisition geometry, Imaging conditions, Compression artifacts makes Face detection difficult. This paper reports an algorithm for conservation of energy using face detection for various devices. The present paper suggests Energy Conservation can be done by Detecting the Face and reducing the brightness of complete image and then adjusting the brightness of the particular area of an image where the face is located using histogram equalization.

  14. Robust continuous clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sohil Atul; Koltun, Vladlen

    2017-09-12

    Clustering is a fundamental procedure in the analysis of scientific data. It is used ubiquitously across the sciences. Despite decades of research, existing clustering algorithms have limited effectiveness in high dimensions and often require tuning parameters for different domains and datasets. We present a clustering algorithm that achieves high accuracy across multiple domains and scales efficiently to high dimensions and large datasets. The presented algorithm optimizes a smooth continuous objective, which is based on robust statistics and allows heavily mixed clusters to be untangled. The continuous nature of the objective also allows clustering to be integrated as a module in end-to-end feature learning pipelines. We demonstrate this by extending the algorithm to perform joint clustering and dimensionality reduction by efficiently optimizing a continuous global objective. The presented approach is evaluated on large datasets of faces, hand-written digits, objects, newswire articles, sensor readings from the Space Shuttle, and protein expression levels. Our method achieves high accuracy across all datasets, outperforming the best prior algorithm by a factor of 3 in average rank.

  15. High-intensity interval training versus moderate-intensity continuous training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with coronary artery disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Durães, André R; Reis, Helena F Correia Dos; Neves, Victor R; Martinez, Bruno P; Carvalho, Vitor O

    2017-11-01

    Background Exercise is an effective strategy for reducing total and cardiovascular mortality in patients with coronary artery disease. However, it is not clear which modality is best. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effects of high-intensity interval versus moderate-intensity continuous training of coronary artery disease patients. Methods We searched MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, SciELO and the Cochrane Library (from the earliest date available to November 2016) for controlled trials that evaluated the effects of high-intensity interval versus moderate-intensity continuous training for coronary artery disease patients. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 test. Results Twelve studies met the study criteria, including 609 patients. High-intensity interval training resulted in improvement in peak oxygen uptake weighted mean difference (1.3 ml/kg/min, 95% confidence interval: 0.6-1.9, n = 594) compared with moderate-intensity continuous training. No significant difference in physical, emotional, and social domain of quality of life was found for participants for participants in the high-intensity interval training group compared with the moderate-intensity continuous training group. Sub-analysis of three studies with isocaloric exercise training showed no significant difference in peak oxygen uptake weighted mean difference (0.4 ml/kg/min, 95% confidence interval: -0.1-0.9, n = 137) for participants in the high-intensity interval training group compared with moderate-intensity continuous training group. Conclusions High-intensity interval training may improve peak oxygen uptake and should be considered as a component of care of coronary artery disease patients. However, this superiority disappeared when isocaloric protocol is compared.

  16. Face classification using electronic synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Wu, Huaqiang; Gao, Bin; Eryilmaz, Sukru Burc; Huang, Xueyao; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Qingtian; Deng, Ning; Shi, Luping; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Qian, He

    2017-05-01

    Conventional hardware platforms consume huge amount of energy for cognitive learning due to the data movement between the processor and the off-chip memory. Brain-inspired device technologies using analogue weight storage allow to complete cognitive tasks more efficiently. Here we present an analogue non-volatile resistive memory (an electronic synapse) with foundry friendly materials. The device shows bidirectional continuous weight modulation behaviour. Grey-scale face classification is experimentally demonstrated using an integrated 1024-cell array with parallel online training. The energy consumption within the analogue synapses for each iteration is 1,000 × (20 ×) lower compared to an implementation using Intel Xeon Phi processor with off-chip memory (with hypothetical on-chip digital resistive random access memory). The accuracy on test sets is close to the result using a central processing unit. These experimental results consolidate the feasibility of analogue synaptic array and pave the way toward building an energy efficient and large-scale neuromorphic system.

  17. The construction FACE database - Codifying the NIOSH FACE reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Largay, Julie A; Wang, Xuanwen; Cain, Chris Trahan; Romano, Nancy

    2017-09-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has published reports detailing the results of investigations on selected work-related fatalities through the Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program since 1982. Information from construction-related FACE reports was coded into the Construction FACE Database (CFD). Use of the CFD was illustrated by analyzing major CFD variables. A total of 768 construction fatalities were included in the CFD. Information on decedents, safety training, use of PPE, and FACE recommendations were coded. Analysis shows that one in five decedents in the CFD died within the first two months on the job; 75% and 43% of reports recommended having safety training or installing protection equipment, respectively. Comprehensive research using FACE reports may improve understanding of work-related fatalities and provide much-needed information on injury prevention. The CFD allows researchers to analyze the FACE reports quantitatively and efficiently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  18. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  19. Many Faces of Migrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Antić Gaber

    2013-12-01

    We believe that in the present thematic issue we have succeeded in capturing an important part of the modern European research dynamic in the field of migration. In addition to well-known scholars in this field several young authors at the beginning their research careers have been shortlisted for the publication. We are glad of their success as it bodes a vibrancy of this research area in the future. At the same time, we were pleased to receive responses to the invitation from representatives of so many disciplines, and that the number of papers received significantly exceeded the maximum volume of the journal. Recognising and understanding of the many faces of migration are important steps towards the comprehensive knowledge needed to successfully meet the challenges of migration issues today and even more so in the future. It is therefore of utmost importance that researchers find ways of transferring their academic knowledge into practice – to all levels of education, the media, the wider public and, of course, the decision makers in local, national and international institutions. The call also applies to all authors in this issue of the journal.

  20. NET plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veieder, G.; Harrison, M.; Moons, F.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in the design and development of the first wall (FW) and divertor plates (DP) for the Next European Torus (NET) are summarized, highlighting the assumed main operating conditions, material choices, design options and their analysis as well as associated manufacturing studies and the ongoing testing programme. As plasma facing armor on both FW and DP, carbon based materials will be used at least during the initial physics phase due to their good performance in current tokamaks in respect to impurity control and disruption resistance. For the FW structure in water cooled austenitic steel, with radiation cooled armor adequate thermo-mechanical performance is predicted allowing peak heat fluxes of up to 0.8 MW/m 2 at 2 x 10 4 long duration burn pulses. For divertor concepts with the armor attached by brazing to a water cooled heatsink, the peak heat flux is about 10 MW/m 2 . However, the main critical issue for the DP is the lifetime which is critically limited by erosion. The demonstration of the basic feasibility of FW and DP design is in progress via manufacture and thermo-mechanical testing of prototypical mock-ups. (author). 26 refs.; 13 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. NET plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieider, G.; Harrison, M.; Moons, F.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in the design and development of the first wall (FW) and divertor plates (DP) for the Next European Torus (NET) are summarized, highlighting the assumed main operating conditions, material choices, design options and their analysis as well as associated manufacturing studies and the ongoing testing programme. As plasma facing armor on both FW and DP, carbon based materials will be used at least during the initial physics phase due to their good performance in current tokamaks in respect to impurity control and disruption resistance. For the FW structure in water cooled austenitic steel, with radiation cooled armor adequate thermo-mechanical performance is predicted allowing peak heat fluxes of up to 0.8 MW/m 2 at 2x10 4 long duration burn pulses. For divertor concepts with the armor attached by brazing to a water cooled heatsink, the peak heat flux is about 10 MW/m 2 . However, the main critical issue for the DP is the lifetime which is critically limited by erosion. The demonstation of the basic feasibility of FW and DP design is in progress via manufacture and thermo-mechanical testing of prototypical mock-ups. (orig.)

  2. The impact of lifestyle diseases on the health care system in Sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Sub Saharan Africa(SSA) is facing a rapidly growing number of people with chronic non-communicable diseases while at the same time experiencing continual high death rates from infectious diseases e.g. HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria. Although this region comprises just over 10% of the world's population, ...

  3. Glued to Which Face? Attentional Priority Effect of Female Babyface and Male Mature Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwen; Luo, Ting; Hu, Chuan-Peng; Peng, Kaiping

    2018-01-01

    A more babyfaced individual is perceived as more child-like and this impression from babyface, as known as babyface effect, has an impact on social life among various age groups. In this study, the influence of babyfaces on visual selective attention was tested by cognitive task, demonstrating that the female babyface and male mature face would draw participants' attention so that they take their eyes off more slowly. In Experiment 1, a detection task was applied to test the influence of babyfaces on visual selective attention. In this experiment, a babyface and a mature face with the same gender were presented simultaneously with a letter on one of them. The reaction time was shorter when the target letter was overlaid with a female babyface or male mature face, suggesting an attention capture effect. To explore how this competition influenced by attentional resources, we conducted Experiment 2 with a spatial cueing paradigm and controlled the attentional resources by cueing validity and inter-stimulus interval. In this task, the female babyface and male mature face prolonged responses to the spatially separated targets under the condition of an invalid and long interval pre-cue. This observation replicated the result of Experiment 1. This indicates that the female babyface and male mature face glued visual selective attention once attentional resources were directed to them. To further investigate the subliminal influence from a babyface, we used continuous flash suppression paradigm in Experiment 3. The results, again, showed the advantage of the female babyfaces and male mature faces: they broke the suppression faster than other faces. Our results provide primary evidence that the female babyfaces and male mature faces can reliably glue the visual selective attention, both supra- and sub-liminally.

  4. A comparison of technologically mediated and face-to-face help-seeking sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Philip M; Sperling, Rayne A

    2015-12-01

    Current post-secondary school students have access to multiple help-seeking sources. As help-seeking behaviour relates to academic achievement, the provision of preferred help sources would be beneficial to students, instructors, and course designers. This study examines whether students prefer and intend to utilize technologically mediated or face-to-face help-seeking sources. Participants (n = 226) were recruited from two sections of an on campus, introductory, educational psychology class. An online survey was distributed containing measures of help-seeking threat, adaptive help-seeking tendencies, avoidant help-seeking tendencies, and the intention to seek help from six sources. Correlations and an ANOVA were calculated to determine whether source preferences differed by self-reported course grade. Help-seeking threat was only negatively associated with sources of help that required face-to-face interaction. Despite the threat, students intended to use face-to-face help-seeking sources more than technologically mediated sources. Students intended to seek help the most before or after class, via email, or during class. Students intended to seek help the least through the discussion board and during online office hours. Higher performing students preferred face-to-face sources, particularly before or after class and during class, more than lower performing students. Lower performing students intended to use mediated sources especially the discussion board and online office hours more than the higher performing students. The results provide new insights into the help-seeking process and suggestions for instructors when allocating time and classroom resources. Additionally, the study illustrates the need for continual refinement of a help-seeking source classification system. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Learning to Discriminate Face Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Fang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although visual feature leaning has been well studied, we still know little about the mechanisms of perceptual learning of complex object. Here, human perceptual learning in discrimination of in-depth orientation of face view was studied using psychophysics, EEG and fMRI. We trained subjects to discriminate face orientations around a face view (i.e. 30° over eight daily sessions, which resulted in a significant improvement in sensitivity to the face view orientation. This improved sensitivity was highly specific to the trained orientation and persisted up to six months. Different from perceptual learning of simple visual features, this orientation-specific learning effect could completely transfer across changes in face size, visual field and face identity. A complete transfer also occurred between two partial face images that were mutually exclusive but constituted a complete face. However, the transfer of the learning effect between upright and inverted faces and between a face and a paperclip object was very weak. Before and after training, we measured EEG and fMRI BOLD signals responding to both the trained and the untrained face views. Analyses of ERPs and induced gamma activity showed that face view discrimination training led to a larger reduction of N170 latency at the left occipital-temporal area and a concurrent larger decrease of induced gamma activity at the left frontal area with the trained face view, compared with the untrained ones. BOLD signal amplitude and MVPA analyses showed that, in face-selective cortical areas, training did not lead to a significant amplitude change, but induced a more reliable spatial pattern of neural activity in the left FFA. These results suggest that the visual system had learned how to compute face orientation from face configural information more accurately and that a large amount of plastic changes took place at a level of higher visual processing where size-, location-, and identity

  6. Face adaptation improves gender discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Shen, Jianhong; Chen, Juan; Fang, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation to a visual pattern can alter the sensitivities of neuronal populations encoding the pattern. However, the functional roles of adaptation, especially in high-level vision, are still equivocal. In the present study, we performed three experiments to investigate if face gender adaptation could affect gender discrimination. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed that adapting to a male/female face could selectively enhance discrimination for male/female faces. Experiment 3 showed that the discrimination enhancement induced by face adaptation could transfer across a substantial change in three-dimensional face viewpoint. These results provide further evidence suggesting that, similar to low-level vision, adaptation in high-level vision could calibrate the visual system to current inputs of complex shapes (i.e. face) and improve discrimination at the adapted characteristic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neonates' responses to repeated exposure to a still face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Emese; Pilling, Karen; Watt, Rachel; Pal, Attila; Orvos, Hajnalka

    2017-01-01

    The main aims of the study were to examine whether human neonates' responses to communication disturbance modelled by the still-face paradigm were stable and whether their responses were affected by their previous experience with the still-face paradigm. The still face procedure, as a laboratory model of interpersonal stress, was administered repeatedly, twice, to 84 neonates (0 to 4 day olds), with a delay of an average of 1.25 day. Frame-by-frame analysis of the frequency and duration of gaze, distressed face, crying, sleeping and sucking behaviours showed that the procedure was stressful to them both times, that is, the still face effect was stable after repeated administration and newborns consistently responded to such nonverbal violation of communication. They averted their gaze, showed distress and cried more during the still-face phase in both the first and the second administration. They also showed a carry-over effect in that they continued to avert their gaze and displayed increased distress and crying in the first reunion period, but their gaze behaviour changed with experience, in the second administration. While in the first administration the babies continued averting their gaze even after the stressful still-face phase was over, this carry-over effect disappeared in the second administration, and the babies significantly increased their gaze following the still-face phase. After excluding explanations of fatigue, habituation and random effects, a self-other regulatory model is discussed as a possible explanation for this pattern.

  8. Emotion Words: Adding Face Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugate, Jennifer M B; Gendron, Maria; Nakashima, Satoshi F; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2017-06-12

    Despite a growing number of studies suggesting that emotion words affect perceptual judgments of emotional stimuli, little is known about how emotion words affect perceptual memory for emotional faces. In Experiments 1 and 2 we tested how emotion words (compared with control words) affected participants' abilities to select a target emotional face from among distractor faces. Participants were generally more likely to false alarm to distractor emotional faces when primed with an emotion word congruent with the face (compared with a control word). Moreover, participants showed both decreased sensitivity (d') to discriminate between target and distractor faces, as well as altered response biases (c; more likely to answer "yes") when primed with an emotion word (compared with a control word). In Experiment 3 we showed that emotion words had more of an effect on perceptual memory judgments when the structural information in the target face was limited, as well as when participants were only able to categorize the face with a partially congruent emotion word. The overall results are consistent with the idea that emotion words affect the encoding of emotional faces in perceptual memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The Kent Face Matching Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysh, Matthew C; Bindemann, Markus

    2018-05-01

    This study presents the Kent Face Matching Test (KFMT), which comprises 200 same-identity and 20 different-identity pairs of unfamiliar faces. Each face pair consists of a photograph from a student ID card and a high-quality portrait that was taken at least three months later. The test is designed to complement existing resources for face-matching research, by providing a more ecologically valid stimulus set that captures the natural variability that can arise in a person's appearance over time. Two experiments are presented to demonstrate that the KFMT provides a challenging measure of face matching but correlates with established tests. Experiment 1 compares a short version of this test with the optimized Glasgow Face Matching Test (GFMT). In Experiment 2, a longer version of the KFMT, with infrequent identity mismatches, is correlated with performance on the Cambridge Face Memory Test (CFMT) and the Cambridge Face Perception Test (CFPT). The KFMT is freely available for use in face-matching research. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Coordinating face-to-face meetings in mobile network societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas; Urry, John; Axhausen, Kay

    2008-01-01

    and conduct face-to-face meetings. We show striking changes in technologies and cultures of coordination - a shift from punctuality effected through clock time to a flexible and perpetual coordination effected through email and mobiles. This empirical research addresses specifically located embodied practices...

  11. Attention to internal face features in unfamiliar face matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Kingsley I; Butavicius, Marcus A; Lee, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    Accurate matching of unfamiliar faces is vital in security and forensic applications, yet previous research has suggested that humans often perform poorly when matching unfamiliar faces. Hairstyle and facial hair can strongly influence unfamiliar face matching but are potentially unreliable cues. This study investigated whether increased attention to the more stable internal face features of eyes, nose, and mouth was associated with more accurate face-matching performance. Forty-three first-year psychology students decided whether two simultaneously presented faces were of the same person or not. The faces were displayed for either 2 or 6 seconds, and had either similar or dissimilar hairstyles. The level of attention to internal features was measured by the proportion of fixation time spent on the internal face features and the sensitivity of discrimination to changes in external feature similarity. Increased attention to internal features was associated with increased discrimination in the 2-second display-time condition, but no significant relationship was found in the 6-second condition. Individual differences in eye-movements were highly stable across the experimental conditions.

  12. Finding Hope in the Face-to-Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgoose, Jennifer Y C; Edgoose, Julian M

    2017-05-01

    What does it mean to look into the face of a patient who looks back? Face-to-face encounters are at the heart of the patient-clinician relationship but their singular significance is often lost amid the demands of today's high-tech, metric-driven health care systems. Using the framework provided by the philosopher and Holocaust survivor Emmanuel Levinas, the authors explore the unique responsibility and potential for hope found only in face-to-face encounters. Revisiting this most fundamental attribute of medicine is likely our greatest chance to reclaim who we are as clinicians and why we do what we do. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  13. Préface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Duvillard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Le moment est opportun, la question foncière est de retour, légitimée par presque une décennie (2001-2008 d’augmentation continue des prix de l’immobilier. De « sommets » , en articles de presse, la montagne et les Alpes en particulier font l’objet, dans ce domaine, d’une attention toute particulière. Le contexte est ici délicat. Les sociétés alpines sont partagées entre désir de préservation d’une forte identité montagnarde et crainte d’une « déprise » économique (agricole, touristique et/...

  14. Aerobic interval training and continuous training equally improve aerobic exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease : The SAINTEX-CAD study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conraads, V.; Pattyn, N.; de Maeyer, C.; Beckers, P.; Coeckelberghs, E.; Cornelissen, V.A.; Denollet, J.; Frederix, G.; Goetschalckx, K.; Hoymans, V.Y.; Possemiers, N.; Schepers, D.; Shivalkar, B.; Voigt, J.U.; van Craenenbroeck, E.M.; Vanhees, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation increases peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), which is an important predictor of mortality in cardiac patients. However, it remains unclear which exercise characteristics are most effective for improving peak VO2 in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients.

  15. Development and evaluation of a sensor-based system for remote monitoring and treatment of chronic diseases - the continuous care & coaching platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Harm; Tabak, Monique; Marin Perianu, Mihai; Huis in 't Veld, M.H.A.; Jones, Valerie M.; Hofs, D.H.W.; Tönis, Thijs; van Schooten, B.W.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    The steep increase in the number of people with chronic diseases in the Western world is a long recognised problem which forces us to look for less labour intensive and more cost effective methods to deliver health-care. Wider use of telemedicine services seems to be a solution that can contribute

  16. Effects of high-intensity interval versus continuous exercise training on post-exercise heart rate recovery in coronary heart-disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelabeitia-Jaureguizar, Koldobika; Vicente-Campos, Davinia; Senen, Alejandro Berenguel; Jiménez, Verónica Hernández; Garrido-Lestache, María Elvira Barrios; Chicharro, Jose López

    2017-10-01

    Heart rate recovery (HRR) has been considered a prognostic and mortality indicator in both healthy and coronary patients. Physical exercise prescription has shown improvements in VO 2 peak and HRR, but most of the studies have been carried out applying continuous training at a moderate intensity, being very limited the use of protocols of high intensity interval training in coronary patients. We aimed to compare the effects of a moderate continuous training (MCT) versus a high intensity interval training (HIIT) programme on VO 2 peak and HRR. Seventy three coronary patients were assigned to either HIIT or MCT groups for 8weeks. Incremental exercise tests in a cycloergometer were performed to obtain VO 2 peak data and heart rate was monitored during and after the exercise test to obtain heart rate recovery data. Both exercise programmes significantly increase VO 2 peak with a higher increase in the HIIT group (HIIT: 4.5±4.46ml/kg/min vs MCT: 2.46±3.57ml/kg/min; p=0.039). High intensity interval training resulted in a significantly increase in HRR at the first and second minute of the recovery phase (15,44±7,04 vs 21,22±6,62, pdisease of low risk resulted in an improvement in VO 2 peak, and also improvements in post-exercise heart-rate recovery, compared with continuous training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Own-race and own-age biases facilitate visual awareness of faces under interocular suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Timo; End, Albert; Sterzer, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The detection of a face in a visual scene is the first stage in the face processing hierarchy. Although all subsequent, more elaborate face processing depends on the initial detection of a face, surprisingly little is known about the perceptual mechanisms underlying face detection. Recent evidence suggests that relatively hard-wired face detection mechanisms are broadly tuned to all face-like visual patterns as long as they respect the typical spatial configuration of the eyes above the mouth. Here, we qualify this notion by showing that face detection mechanisms are also sensitive to face shape and facial surface reflectance properties. We used continuous flash suppression (CFS) to render faces invisible at the beginning of a trial and measured the time upright and inverted faces needed to break into awareness. Young Caucasian adult observers were presented with faces from their own race or from another race (race experiment) and with faces from their own age group or from another age group (age experiment). Faces matching the observers’ own race and age group were detected more quickly. Moreover, the advantage of upright over inverted faces in overcoming CFS, i.e., the face inversion effect (FIE), was larger for own-race and own-age faces. These results demonstrate that differences in face shape and surface reflectance influence access to awareness and configural face processing at the initial detection stage. Although we did not collect data from observers of another race or age group, these findings are a first indication that face detection mechanisms are shaped by visual experience with faces from one’s own social group. Such experience-based fine-tuning of face detection mechanisms may equip in-group faces with a competitive advantage for access to conscious awareness. PMID:25136308

  18. Own-race and own-age biases facilitate visual awareness of faces under interocular suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo eStein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The detection of a face in a visual scene is the first stage in the face processing hierarchy. Although all subsequent, more elaborate face processing depends on the initial detection of a face, surprisingly little is known about the perceptual mechanisms underlying face detection. Recent evidence suggests that relatively hard-wired face detection mechanisms are broadly tuned to all face-like visual patterns as long as they respect the typical spatial configuration of the eyes above the mouth. Here, we qualify this notion by showing that face detection mechanisms are also sensitive to face shape and facial surface reflectance properties. We used continuous flash suppression (CFS to render faces invisible at the beginning of a trial and measured the time upright and inverted faces needed to break into awareness. Young Caucasian adult observers were presented with faces from their own race or from another race (race experiment and with faces from their own age group or from another age group (age experiment. Faces matching the observers’ own race and age group were detected more quickly. Moreover, the advantage of upright over inverted faces in overcoming CFS, i.e. the face inversion effect, was larger for own-race and own-age faces. These results demonstrate that differences in face shape and surface reflectance influence access to awareness and configural face processing at the initial detection stage. Although we did not collect data from observers of another race or age group, these findings are a first indication that face detection mechanisms are shaped by visual experience with faces from one’s own social group. Such experience-based fine-tuning of face detection mechanisms may equip in-group faces with a competitive advantage for access to conscious awareness.

  19. Facing My Fears (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available I’m scared. I’m nervous. In a few short weeks the contractors and electricians will take over my library for several months. They will drill huge gouges in the concrete floor, hammer, saw, scrape,move, wire, etc. No doubt they may have to be asked to keep their voices down once or twice. Half of the print journal collection will be relocated to accommodate a new teaching lab that will also double as an information commons. The planning has been going on for many months. We have consulted with other libraries, reviewed the literature, identified the needs of our various user groups, measured space,tested technical possibilities, and met with architects and engineers. Up until now the new lab was an organic idea on paper, discussed over coffee and in meetings. That’s fairly easy to deal with. But just around the corner it becomes a reality and I’m a bag of nerves. Have we made the right decisions? Will it address all our needs? Is there anything I forgot to consider? What if our users don’t like it? What if it is a complete failure?!Theoretically, it should be ok. I’ve followed the right steps and worked with a creative, talented and dedicated team. This is different from trying out a new instructional technique or reorganizing the information desk. This is big. I talk the evidence based talk regularly, but now I am walking the walk in a bigger way than I had ever imagined. Change can be frightening. Moving out of comfort zones is not easy. Having said that, the challenge can be invigorating and the change, refreshing. I find myself welcoming the change as much as I dread it. I’ll face my fears and see it through to the implementation and evaluations and beyond. And hey, no matter what the outcome, it should make for a good paper. If anyone else out there is going through a similar process, I’d be interested in comparing notes. I invite you to try something new this year in your work environment or in your professional activities

  20. Plasma facing device of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Hideo; Ioki, Kimihiro.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention improves integrity of thermal structures of a plasma facing device. That is, in the plasma facing device, an armour block portion from a metal cooling pipe to a carbon material comprises a mixed material of the metal as the constituent material of the cooling pipe and ceramics. Then, the mixing ratio of the composition is changed continuously or stepwise to suppress peakings of remaining stresses upon production and thermal stresses upon exertion of thermal loads. Accordingly, thermal integrity of the structural materials can further be improved. In this case, a satisfactory characteristic can be obtained also by using ceramics instead of carbon for the mixed material, and the characteristic such as heat expansion coefficient is similar to that of the armour tile. (I.S.)

  1. DISEASES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi

    2015-01-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition...... of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should...... not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases...

  2. PrimeFaces beginner's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, K Siva Prasad

    2013-01-01

    A guide for beginner's with step-by-step instructions and an easy-to-follow approach.PrimeFaces Beginners Guide is a simple and effective guide for beginners, wanting to learn and implement PrimeFaces in their JSF-based applications. Some basic JSF and jQuery skills are required before you start working through the book.

  3. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction in face ...

  4. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial Intelligence 17(1): 41–62. Hu M K 1962 Visual pattern recognition by moment invariants. IRE Trans. on Information Theory, IT-8,. 179–187. Huang F T, Zhou Z, Zhang H-J and Chen T 2000 Pose invariant face recognition, Proc. Fourth IEEE. International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition, ...

  5. Side-View Face Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santemiz, P.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; van den Biggelaar, Olivier

    As a widely used biometrics, face recognition has many advantages such as being non-intrusive, natural and passive. On the other hand, in real-life scenarios with uncontrolled environment, pose variation up to side-view positions makes face recognition a challenging work. In this paper we discuss

  6. Forensic Face Recognition: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan

    2010-01-01

    Beside a few papers which focus on the forensic aspects of automatic face recognition, there is not much published about it in contrast to the literature on developing new techniques and methodologies for biometric face recognition. In this report, we review forensic facial identification which is

  7. Newborns' Mooney-Face Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Irene; Simion, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether newborns detect a face on the basis of a Gestalt representation based on first-order relational information (i.e., the basic arrangement of face features) by using Mooney stimuli. The incomplete 2-tone Mooney stimuli were used because they preclude focusing both on the local features (i.e., the fine…

  8. Genetic, antigenic and pathogenic characterization of four infectious bursal disease virus isolates from China suggests continued evolution of very virulent viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Courtillon, Céline; Guionie, Olivier; Allée, Chantal; Amelot, Michel; Qi, Xiaole; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei; Eterradossi, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes an economically significant disease of young chickens worldwide. The emergence of very virulent IBDV (vvIBDV) strains has brought more challenges for effective prevention and control of this disease. The aim of the present study was to characterize four IBDV isolates from various regions of China between late 1990s and recent years and to compare them with previously isolated European IBDV strains. In this study, one Chinese vvIBDV strain isolated in 1999 and three strains isolated between 2005 and 2011 were analyzed at the genetic, antigenic and pathogenic levels. Strain SH99 was closely related and clustered in the same genetic lineage as the typical vvIBDV based on the genomic sequences of segments A and B. However, the three more recent Chinese vvIBDV (HLJ0504, HeB10 and HuN11) showed several genetic changes in both segments and clustered in a distinct lineage from the typical vvIBDV and the previously known Chinese vvIBDV. Based on the binding to a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, all Chinese vvIBDVs exhibited similar antigenicity with the European typical vvIBDV strains. Nonetheless, the pathogenicity caused by the recent Chinese vvIBDV was higher than that induced by the European typical vvIBDV. This study calls for a sustained surveillance of IBD situation in China in order to support a better prevention and control of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effective indexing for face recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochenkov, I.; Sochenkova, A.; Vokhmintsev, A.; Makovetskii, A.; Melnikov, A.

    2016-09-01

    Face recognition is one of the most important tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. Face recognition is useful for security systems to provide safety. In some situations it is necessary to identify the person among many others. In this case this work presents new approach in data indexing, which provides fast retrieval in big image collections. Data indexing in this research consists of five steps. First, we detect the area containing face, second we align face, and then we detect areas containing eyes and eyebrows, nose, mouth. After that we find key points of each area using different descriptors and finally index these descriptors with help of quantization procedure. The experimental analysis of this method is performed. This paper shows that performing method has results at the level of state-of-the-art face recognition methods, but it is also gives results fast that is important for the systems that provide safety.

  10. Face-Lift Satisfaction Using the FACE-Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Sammy; Schwitzer, Jonathan; Anzai, Lavinia; Thorne, Charles H

    2015-08-01

    Face lifting is one of the most common operative procedures for facial aging and perhaps the procedure most synonymous with plastic surgery in the minds of the lay public, but no verifiable documentation of patient satisfaction exists in the literature. This study is the first to examine face-lift outcomes and patient satisfaction using a validated questionnaire. One hundred five patients undergoing a face lift performed by the senior author (C.H.T.) using a high, extended-superficial musculoaponeurotic system with submental platysma approximation technique were asked to complete anonymously the FACE-Q by e-mail. FACE-Q scores were assessed for each domain (range, 0 to 100), with higher scores indicating greater satisfaction with appearance or superior quality of life. Fifty-three patients completed the FACE-Q (50.5 percent response rate). Patients demonstrated high satisfaction with facial appearance (mean ± SD, 80.7 ± 22.3), and quality of life, including social confidence (90.4 ± 16.6), psychological well-being (92.8 ± 14.3), and early life impact (92.2 ± 16.4). Patients also reported extremely high satisfaction with their decision to undergo face lifting (90.5 ± 15.9). On average, patients felt they appeared 6.9 years younger than their actual age. Patients were most satisfied with the appearance of their nasolabial folds (86.2 ± 18.5), cheeks (86.1 ± 25.4), and lower face/jawline (86.0 ± 20.6), compared with their necks (78.1 ± 25.6) and area under the chin (67.9 ± 32.3). Patients who responded in this study were extremely satisfied with their decision to undergo face lifting and the outcomes and quality of life following the procedure.

  11. The pharmacotherapy of the HeartMate II, a continuous flow left ventricular assist device, in patients with advanced heart failure: integration of disease, device, and drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Douglas L; Chambers, Rachel M; Schillig, Jessica M

    2010-10-01

    Advanced heart failure continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Patients with advanced heart failure have a poor prognosis without cardiac transplantation. The use of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) as destination therapy for these patients is therefore expected to increase in the coming years as technology advances. The HeartMate II, a continuous flow implantable device, is currently the only LVAD that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for destination therapy in patients with advanced heart failure. The pharmacotherapy associated with this device is very complex and, therefore, the need for expertly trained clinical pharmacists to care for this expanding patient population will also likely increase. Unfortunately, most pharmacists are unfamiliar with the effect of LVADs on the physiology and pharmacotherapy of a patient's heart failure. The purpose of this article is to give clinical pharmacists an introduction to the most common pharmacotherapeutic issues for patients with LVADs and present practical solutions for managing common drug therapy problems.

  12. Continuous evidence of fast HIV disease progression related to class-wide resistance to antiretroviral drugs: a 6 year follow-up analysis of a large observational database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Zaccarelli; Federica, Forbici; Patrizia, Lorenzini; Francesca, Ceccherini-Silberstein; Valerio, Tozzi; Paola, Trotta Maria; Patrizia, Marconi; Pasquale, Narciso; Federico, Perno Carlo; Andrea, Antinori

    2007-08-20

    Class-wide resistance (CWR) was increasingly associated with a higher risk of HIV progression after 72 months of follow-up among 1392 patients genotypic-tested after failure (AIDS risk 13% for no CWR to 34% for three CWR; AIDS/death risk 21-54%). At multivariate analysis, the detection of two and three CWR was significantly associated with a two and threefold increased risk, respectively, of death and AIDS/death, suggesting that extended resistance is a marker of disease progression in long-term observation.

  13. Demonstration of continuously seropositive population against Borna disease virus in Misaki feral horses, a Japanese strain: a four-year follow-up study from 1998 to 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoichi; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Sawada, Takashi; Rivero, Juan C; Horii, Yoichiro

    2002-05-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV)-specific antibodies were monitored in Misaki feral horses annually for 4 years using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA). Among 130 horses examined, 35 (26.9%) with an ECLIA count above 1000 once or more were judged as BDV seropositive. Throughout the study period, p24 antibodies were more frequent than p40 antibodies in almost all positive animals. Among the 35 seropositive horses, the ECLIA count was consistently high in 12 cases. Eleven horses seroconverted from negative to positive and 7 underwent reversal. The count in the remaining 95 horses (73.1%) remained low for 4 years and these animals were judged as seronegative.

  14. Business continuity 2014: From traditional to integrated Business Continuity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ee, Henry

    As global change continues to generate new challenges and potential threats to businesses, traditional business continuity management (BCM) slowly reveals its limitations and weak points to ensuring 'business resiliency' today. Consequently, BCM professionals also face the challenge of re-evaluating traditional concepts and introducing new strategies and industry best practices. This paper points to why traditional BCM is no longer sufficient in terms of enabling businesses to survive in today's high-risk environment. It also looks into some of the misconceptions about BCM and other stumbling blocks to establishing effective BCM today. Most importantly, however, this paper provides tips based on the Business Continuity Institute's (BCI) Good Practices Guideline (GPG) and the latest international BCM standard ISO 22301 on how to overcome the issues and challenges presented.

  15. A randomised phase II study of continuous versus stop-and-go S-1 plus oxaliplatin following disease stabilisation in first-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sook Ryun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Kong, Sun-Young; Park, Young-Iee

    2017-09-01

    We compared continuous versus stop-and-go chemotherapy after disease stabilisation with induction chemotherapy in the first-line treatment of metastatic gastric cancer (MGC). MGC patients who achieved disease control after 6 cycles of S-1/oxaliplatin (SOX) were randomised to receive either continuous SOX until progression (continuous arm) or to have a chemotherapy-free interval followed by SOX reintroduction at progression (stop-and-go arm). The primary end-point was overall survival (OS). Of the 250 patients enrolled, 247 participated in the induction phase. Of these, 121 patients were randomised to the continuous arm (n = 59) or the stop-and-go arm (n = 62). Progression-free survival (PFS) was significantly longer in the continuous arm than in the stop-and-go arm (10.5 versus 7.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 0.55, 95% CI, 0.37-0.81; P = 0.002). Duration of disease control (DDC) and OS, however, were comparable between the two arms: median DDC, 10.5 versus 11.3 months, HR 0.92 (95% CI, 0.62-1.36; P = 0.674); median OS, 22.6 versus 22.7 months, HR 0.78 (95% CI, 0.50-1.23; P = 0.284). Adverse events including grade ≥3 fatigue (28.8% versus 8.1%; P = 0.003) and sensory neuropathy (25.4% versus 9.7%; P = 0.022) occurred more frequently in the continuous arm than in the stop-and-go arm. Quality of life (QOL) including global health status, physical/role functioning and other symptom scores significantly favoured the stop-and-go arm. Compared with the stop-and-go strategy, maintenance chemotherapy improved PFS but not DDC and OS and had a negative impact on QOL, suggesting the stop-and-go strategy may be an appropriate option in MGC patients following induction chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of longwall face-to-face transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, C.; Topuz, E.

    1992-01-01

    A non-producing longwall costs the mine owner from $45 to over $100 per minute in lost production time. Face-to-face equipment transfers, which involve disassembling longwall equipment in a panel, transporting, and then reassembling it in a new longwall panel, are second only to system availability as a source of longwall non-productive time. This, in addition to a move cost of over $100,000, makes reduction and control of face transfer times essential. This paper will report a segment of on-going VPI research to analyze and model longwall transfers through the use of operations research techniques. The purpose is to reduce overall transfer time and the variation of transfer times among U.S. longwall operations. This research is expected to contribute to the longwall mining industry by offering an objective approach that can be used in the prediction, planning, preparation, and implementation of longwall face equipment transfers

  17. Multithread Face Recognition in Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dakshina Ranjan Kisku

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Faces are highly challenging and dynamic objects that are employed as biometrics evidence in identity verification. Recently, biometrics systems have proven to be an essential security tools, in which bulk matching of enrolled people and watch lists is performed every day. To facilitate this process, organizations with large computing facilities need to maintain these facilities. To minimize the burden of maintaining these costly facilities for enrollment and recognition, multinational companies can transfer this responsibility to third-party vendors who can maintain cloud computing infrastructures for recognition. In this paper, we showcase cloud computing-enabled face recognition, which utilizes PCA-characterized face instances and reduces the number of invariant SIFT points that are extracted from each face. To achieve high interclass and low intraclass variances, a set of six PCA-characterized face instances is computed on columns of each face image by varying the number of principal components. Extracted SIFT keypoints are fused using sum and max fusion rules. A novel cohort selection technique is applied to increase the total performance. The proposed protomodel is tested on BioID and FEI face databases, and the efficacy of the system is proven based on the obtained results. We also compare the proposed method with other well-known methods.

  18. Continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1 improves myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with ischemic heart disease assessed by positron emission tomography: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Lun; Wu, Yen-Wen; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Tseng, Chuen-Den; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Hsu, Kwan-Lih; Lee, Chii-Ming; Tzen, Kai-Yuan

    2011-08-01

    Recent investigation has demonstrated that prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) therapy increased capillary density in explanted hearts. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) is reliable for non-invasive measurement of myocardial blood flow and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PGE(1) therapy during 4 weeks on reduction of myocardial perfusion abnormalities and increase of MPR in the patients with ischemic heart disease. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 11 patients who had symptomatic heart failure and documented myocardial ischemia to 4 weeks intravenous infusion of PGE(1) (2.5 ng/kg/min; 8 patients, age 60 ± 13 years) or saline (3 patients, age 57 ± 13 years). Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET scans at rest and during adenosine stress were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment completion. Quantitative size/severity of perfusion defects and MPR change from baseline to follow-up PET were determined using a 17-segment model. Compared with the control group, baseline MPR in the PGE(1) group was significantly lower (1.96 ± 0.78 vs. 2.71 ± 0.73; P ischemic heart disease. This may be an attractive therapeutic approach for no-option patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy.

  19. Continuous intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E1 improves myocardial perfusion reserve in patients with ischemic heart disease assessed by positron emission tomography. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Chilun; Wu Yenwen; Wang Shoeishen; Tseng Chuenden; Chiang Futien; Lee Chiiming; Tzen Kaiyuan; Hsu Kwanlih

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigation has demonstrated that prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) therapy increased capillary density in explanted hearts. Dynamic 13 N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) is reliable for non-invasive measurement of myocardial blood flow and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PGE 1 therapy during 4 weeks on reduction of myocardial perfusion abnormalities and increase of MPR in the patients with ischemic heart disease. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 11 patients who had symptomatic heart failure and documented myocardial ischemia to 4 weeks intravenous infusion of PGE 1 (2.5 ng/kg/min; 8 patients, age 60±13 years) or saline (3 patients, age 57±13 years). Dynamic 13 N-ammonia PET scans at rest and during adenosine stress were obtained at baseline and 12 weeks after treatment completion. Quantitative size/severity of perfusion defects and MPR change from baseline to follow-up PET were determined using a 17-segment model. Compared with the control group, baseline MPR in the PGE 1 group was significantly lower (1.96±0.78 vs. 2.71±0.73; P 1 infusion (1.96±0.78 to 2.16±0.77; P 1 infusion sustained MPR improvement in patients with ischemic heart disease. This may be an attractive therapeutic approach for no-option patients with severe ischemic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  20. Does distance e-learning work? A comparison between distance and face-to-face learners using e-learning materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara de Freitas

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compares continual assessment data, intake numbers, retention numbers and final examination grades of a mixed cohort of face-to-face and distance learners against similar data from previous years where e-learning materials were not used in order to test whether e-learning materials can support the same quality and quantity of teaching and learning for both face-to-face and distance learners. The results for this cohort of learners demonstrate that: (i distance e-learners score as well and sometimes better than face-to-face learners; (ii face-to-face student numbers have increased; (iii overall, student retention and student attendance have been maintained; (iv final examination results have been maintained or in some cases improved; (v lecturer workload was high, but not unmanageable, and it is clear how manageability can be improved.

  1. Préface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Alain

    2004-11-01

    industriels... Il serait dommage de ne pas continuer car les articles de RX 2003 qui suivent montrent bien l'intérêt d'une telle manifestation.

  2. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información ... Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información ...

  3. A Neural Model of Face Recognition: a Comprehensive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stara, Vera; Montesanto, Anna; Puliti, Paolo; Tascini, Guido; Sechi, Cristina

    Visual recognition of faces is an essential behavior of humans: we have optimal performance in everyday life and just such a performance makes us able to establish the continuity of actors in our social life and to quickly identify and categorize people. This remarkable ability justifies the general interest in face recognition of researchers belonging to different fields and specially of designers of biometrical identification systems able to recognize the features of person's faces in a background. Due to interdisciplinary nature of this topic in this contribute we deal with face recognition through a comprehensive approach with the purpose to reproduce some features of human performance, as evidenced by studies in psychophysics and neuroscience, relevant to face recognition. This approach views face recognition as an emergent phenomenon resulting from the nonlinear interaction of a number of different features. For this reason our model of face recognition has been based on a computational system implemented through an artificial neural network. This synergy between neuroscience and engineering efforts allowed us to implement a model that had a biological plausibility, performed the same tasks as human subjects, and gave a possible account of human face perception and recognition. In this regard the paper reports on an experimental study of performance of a SOM-based neural network in a face recognition task, with reference both to the ability to learn to discriminate different faces, and to the ability to recognize a face already encountered in training phase, when presented in a pose or with an expression differing from the one present in the training context.

  4. Aging changes in the face

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Aging changes in the face URL of this page: // ...

  5. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  6. Face Recognition using Approximate Arithmetic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marso, Karol

    Face recognition is image processing technique which aims to identify human faces and found its use in various different fields for example in security. Throughout the years this field evolved and there are many approaches and many different algorithms which aim to make the face recognition as effective...... as possible. The use of different approaches such as neural networks and machine learning can lead to fast and efficient solutions however, these solutions are expensive in terms of hardware resources and power consumption. A possible solution to this problem can be use of approximate arithmetic. In many image...... processing applications the results do not need to be completely precise and use of the approximate arithmetic can lead to reduction in terms of delay, space and power consumption. In this paper we examine possible use of approximate arithmetic in face recognition using Eigenfaces algorithm....

  7. Bracing Zonohedra With Special Faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Gyula

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of simpler preliminary design gives useful input for more complicated three-dimensional building frame structure. A zonohedron, as a preliminary structure of design, is a convex polyhedron for which each face possesses central symmetry. We considered zonohedron as a special framework with the special assumption that the polygonal faces can be deformed in such a way that faces remain planar and centrally symmetric, moreover the length of all edges remains unchanged. Introducing some diagonal braces we got a new mechanism. This paper deals with the flexibility of this kind of mechanisms, and investigates the rigidity of the braced framework. The flexibility of the framework can be characterized by some vectors, which represent equivalence classes of the edges. A necessary and sufficient condition for the rigidity of the braced rhombic face zonohedra is posed. A real mechanical construction, based on two simple elements, provides a CAD prototype of these new mechanisms.

  8. Familiarity facilitates feature-based face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Kelsey G.; Cipolli, Carlo; Gobbini, M. Ida

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of personally familiar faces is remarkably efficient, effortless and robust. We asked if feature-based face processing facilitates detection of familiar faces by testing the effect of face inversion on a visual search task for familiar and unfamiliar faces. Because face inversion disrupts configural and holistic face processing, we hypothesized that inversion would diminish the familiarity advantage to the extent that it is mediated by such processing. Subjects detected personally familiar and stranger target faces in arrays of two, four, or six face images. Subjects showed significant facilitation of personally familiar face detection for both upright and inverted faces. The effect of familiarity on target absent trials, which involved only rejection of unfamiliar face distractors, suggests that familiarity facilitates rejection of unfamiliar distractors as well as detection of familiar targets. The preserved familiarity effect for inverted faces suggests that facilitation of face detection afforded by familiarity reflects mostly feature-based processes. PMID:28582439

  9. Sleep disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis: comparison between hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and automated peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losso, Ricardo L M; Minhoto, Gisele R; Riella, Miguel C

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disorders for patients on dialysis are significant causes of a poorer quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality. No study has evaluated patients undergoing automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assess their sleep disorders compared to hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A total of 166 clinically stable patients who had been on dialysis for at least 3 months were randomly selected for the study and divided into HD, CAPD or APD. Socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters and self-administered questionnaires were collected for the investigation of insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), bruxism, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), sleepwalking, sleep hygiene, depression and anxiety. Insomnia was detected in more than 80 % of patients on the three modalities. OSAS was lower for patients on HD (36 %) than on CAPD (65 %) (p dialysis modalities studied had a high prevalence of sleep disorders. Patients on HD had a lower proportion of OSAS than those on CAPD and APD, which is most likely attributed to their lower body mass indices. The possible causes of higher RLS rates in APD patients have not been established.

  10. 3D Face Appearance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Åström, Kalle

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}......We build a 3d face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical jacobian of its resulting 2d rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations.}...

  11. 3D Face Apperance Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Brian; Larsen, Rasmus; Astrom, K

    2006-01-01

    We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations......We build a 3D face shape model, including inter- and intra-shape variations, derive the analytical Jacobian of its resulting 2D rendered image, and show example of its fitting performance with light, pose, id, expression and texture variations...

  12. Continued Benefit to Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Across Multiple Definitions of High-Risk Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Sandler, Howard M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prognostic factors in patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and androgen deprivation (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2008 at University of Michigan Medical Center, 718 men were consecutively treated with EBRT to at least 75 Gy. Seven definitions of high-risk prostate cancer, applying to 11–33% of patients, were evaluated. Biochemical failure (BF), salvage ADT use, metastatic progression, and prostate cancer–specific mortality (PCSM) were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Each high-risk definition was associated with increased BF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.8–3.9, p < 0.0001), salvage ADT use (HR 3.9–6.3, p < 0.0001), metastasis (HR 3.7–6.6, p < 0.0001), and PCSM (HR 3.7–16.2, p < 0.0001). Furthermore, an increasing number of high-risk features predicted worse outcome. Adjuvant ADT yielded significant reductions in both metastases (HR 0.19–0.38, p < 0.001) and PCSM (HR 0.38–0.50, p < 0.05) for all high-risk definitions (with the exception of clinical Stage T3–4 disease) but improved BF only for those with elevated Gleason scores (p < 0.03, HR 0.25–0.48). When treated with ADT and dose-escalated EBRT, patients with Gleason scores 8 to 10, without other high-risk features, had 8-year freedom from BF of 74%, freedom from distant metastases of 93%, and cause-specific survival of 92%, with salvage ADT used in 16% of patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant ADT results in a significant improvement in clinical progression and PCSM across multiple definitions of high-risk disease even with dose-escalated EBRT. There is a subset of patients, characterized by multiple high-risk features or the presence of Gleason Pattern 5, who remain at significant risk for metastasis and PCSM despite current treatment.

  13. Mapping the emotional face. How individual face parts contribute to successful emotion recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wegrzyn

    Full Text Available Which facial features allow human observers to successfully recognize expressions of emotion? While the eyes and mouth have been frequently shown to be of high importance, research on facial action units has made more precise predictions about the areas involved in displaying each emotion. The present research investigated on a fine-grained level, which physical features are most relied on when decoding facial expressions. In the experiment, individual faces expressing the basic emotions according to Ekman were hidden behind a mask of 48 tiles, which was sequentially uncovered. Participants were instructed to stop the sequence as soon as they recognized the facial expression and assign it the correct label. For each part of the face, its contribution to successful recognition was computed, allowing to visualize the importance of different face areas for each expression. Overall, observers were mostly relying on the eye and mouth regions when successfully recognizing an emotion. Furthermore, the difference in the importance of eyes and mouth allowed to group the expressions in a continuous space, ranging from sadness and fear (reliance on the eyes to disgust and happiness (mouth. The face parts with highest diagnostic value for expression identification were typically located in areas corresponding to action units from the facial action coding system. A similarity analysis of the usefulness of different face parts for expression recognition demonstrated that faces cluster according to the emotion they express, rather than by low-level physical features. Also, expressions relying more on the eyes or mouth region were in close proximity in the constructed similarity space. These analyses help to better understand how human observers process expressions of emotion, by delineating the mapping from facial features to psychological representation.

  14. Treatment of a patient with Kawasaki disease associated with selective IgA deficiency by continuous infusion of cyclosporine A without intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Tatsuya; Minami, Takaomi; Sato, Tomoyuki; Furui, Sadahiro; Yamagata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is standard for Kawasaki disease (KD) treatment; however, anaphylactic reactions to immunoglobulins are a risk in KD patients with selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD). The therapy for KD associated with sIgAD has not been established. The IgA immune response is believed to play an important role in KD vasculitis. We report the case of a 5-year-old boy with KD and sIgAD treated with intravenous cyclosporine A (CsA, 3.0 mg/kg/day) instead of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The fever and inflammation immediately resolved without a coronary artery lesion. In KD patients with sIgAD, we believe that an IgA immune response is lacking, which is the reason for milder KD symptoms than in those without sIgAD. This case report aids in clarifying the role of IgA antibodies in KD and provides evidence that CsA is a potential candidate for first-line therapy for patients with KD with contraindications to IVIG.

  15. Préface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouerdane, Youcef; Laporte, Pierre

    2005-06-01

    ère sur onduleurs et 22 sur aimants de courbure. Les premiers “utilisateurs” sont prévus au printemps 2006 avec couverture de l'IR jusqu'aux X durs pour des études variées notamment dans le domaine de la matière condensée. - La LIL (ligne d'intégration laser) du LMJ fonctionne avec 4 faisceaux (de 30 kJ à 351 nm) et un ensemble de diagnostics plasma est en cours de validation (énergie, imagerie X, spectrométrie X). Un souci d'ouverture collaborative (France et étranger) est affiché. - LASERIX (LIXAM, LOA) a pour but de doter les scientifiques français d'un laser émettant en “quasi-routine” de l'émission laser X à 6 tirs/mn basée sur différents schémas collisionnels et donc différentes longueurs d'ondes, et mettant en oeuvre un laser saphir-titane ultra bref de 40 J pour la génération plasma. - Le projet Arc en Ciel (CEA, LOA) se penche sur la possibilité de mise en oeuvre d'une source de “4^ogénération”. Ces sources se veulent à la fois brillantes, cohérentes, dans la gamme des 100 femtosecondes, ce qui conduit à tourner le dos aux anneaux de stockage pour se focaliser sur la combinaison accélérateur linéaire/onduleur, complétée par un laser saphir-titane (génération d'harmoniques UV/X dans des gaz). - Une avancée particulièrement intéressante a été récemment réalisée, notamment au LOA, par injection d'un laser X (plasma) par un faisceau X de bonne qualité (polarisation, divergence, temps, contraste...) issu de la génération d'harmoniques élevées par une chaîne saphir-titane femto. - On notera aussi les avancées réalisées dans le domaine des sources incohérentes de forte intensité dans le domaine des X par interaction optimisée de l'interaction laser de puissance-agrégats (GPS-Paris 6 et 7, CEA Saclay), ainsi que par techniques X-pinch à fils à foyer de 10 microns (LPTP-École Polytechnique). - La génération d'harmoniques d'ordres élevés à partir de chaînes laser amplifiées a continué à faire l

  16. Exploring the challenges faced by polytechnic students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matore, Mohd Effendi @ Ewan Mohd; Khairani, Ahmad Zamri

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to identify other challenges besides those already faced by students, in seven polytechnics in Malaysia as a continuation to the previous research that had identified 52 main challenges faced by students using the Rasch Model. The explorative study focuses on the challenges that are not included in the Mooney Problem Checklist (MPCL). A total of 121 polytechnic students submitted 183 written responses through the open questions provided. Two hundred fifty two students had responded from a students' perspective on the dichotomous questions regarding their view on the challenges faced. The data was analysed qualitatively using the NVivo 8.0. The findings showed that students from Politeknik Seberang Perai (PSP) gave the highest response, which was 56 (30.6%) and Politeknik Metro Kuala Lumpur (PMKL) had the lowest response of 2 (1.09%). Five dominant challenges were identified, which were the English language (32, 17.5%), learning (14, 7.7%), vehicles (13, 7.1%), information technology and communication (ICT) (13, 7.1%), and peers (11, 6.0%). This article, however, focus on three apparent challenges, namely, English language, vehicles, as well as computer and ICT, as the challenges of learning and peers had been analysed in the previous MPCL. The challenge of English language that had been raised was regarding the weakness in commanding the aspects of speech and fluency. The computer and ICT challenge covered the weakness in mastering ICT and computers, as well as computer breakdowns and low-performance computers. The challenge of vehicles emphasized the unavailability of vehicles to attend lectures and go elsewhere, lack of transportation service in the polytechnic and not having a valid driving license. These challenges are very relevant and need to be discussed in an effort to prepare polytechnics in facing the transformational process of polytechnics.

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF CORONARY ARTERY CALCIFICATION AND DIAGNOSIS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE BY ABDOMINAL CT; A RESIDENT EDUCATION CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Michael; Hobbs, Stephen; Charnigo, Richard; Embertson, Ryan; Daugherty, Michael; Hall, Michael; Brooks, Michael; Leung, Steve; Sorrell, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is an excellent imaging tool for subclinical atherosclerosis detection and risk stratification. We hypothesize that although CAC has been underreported in the past on computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen, specialized resident educational intervention can improve on this underreporting. Materials and Methods Beginning July 2009, a dedicated radiology resident cardiac imaging rotation and curriculum was initiated. A retrospective review of the first 500 abdominal CT reports from January 2009, 2011 and 2013 was performed including studies originally interpreted by a resident as well as primary attending physician interpretations. Each scan was re-evaluated for presence or absence of CAC and coronary artery disease (CAD) by a cardiovascular CT expert reader. These data were then correlated to determine if the presence of CAC had been properly reported initially. The results of the three time periods were compared to assess for improved rates of CAC and CAD reporting after initiation of a resident cardiac imaging curriculum. Results Statistically significant improvements in the reporting of CAC and CAD on CT scans of the abdomen occurred following the initiation of formal resident cardiac imaging training which included two rotations (4 weeks each) of dedicated cardiac CT and cardiac MRI interpretation during the resident's 2nd, 3rd, or 4th radiology training years. The improvement was persistent and increased over time, improving from 1% to 72% after two years and to 90% after four years. Conclusion This single center retrospective analysis shows association between implementation of formal cardiac imaging training into radiology resident education and improved CAC detection and CAD reporting on abdominal CT scans. PMID:25579636

  18. Efficacy of self-monitoring of blood glucose versus retrospective continuous glucose monitoring in improving glycaemic control in diabetic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, Ester; Lim, Boon Khim; Fun, Sharon; Tong, Julia; Yeoh, Lee Ying; Sum, Chee Fang; Subramaniam, Tavintharan; Lim, Su Chi

    2018-03-01

    Patients with diabetic kidney disease (DKD) on anti-diabetic agents, are at greater risk of glycemic variations, both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We aimed to compare glycemic control (using HbA1c) and hypoglycemia incidence in patients with Stage 3 DKD (eGFR 30-60 mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ), receiving retrospective CGM-guided anti-diabetic therapy versus self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) over 3 months. Thirty patients with HbA1c >8% were randomized to 6-day retrospective CGM or SMBG. In the CGM group, CGM was worn at the beginning and 6 weeks. HbA1c, assessment of hypoglycaemia events (self-reported and BG 10 years and on insulin therapy (90%). HbA1c improved significantly from baseline 9.9 ± 1.2 to 9.0 ± 1.5% (P  10 mmol/L) reduced from baseline 65.4 ± 22.4% to 54.6 ± 23.6% (P = 0.033) at 6 weeks, with a non-significant rise in percentage duration in hypoglycaemia from 1.2 ± 2.2% to 4.0 ± 7.0% (P = 0.176). There was no difference in self-reported and documented hypoglycaemia events. In a pilot study of DKD patients, short-term episodic use of CGM reduced time spent in hyperglycaemia range without significantly increasing time-exposure to hypoglycaemia. However, both CGM and SMBG were equally effective in improving glycaemic control. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  19. Face adaptation: Changing stable representations of familiar faces within minutes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus-Christian Carbon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Three experiments are reported showing that the perception and the assessment of veridicality of familiar faces are highly adaptive to new visual information. Subjects were asked to discriminate between real photographs and altered versions of celebrities. Exposing participants to extremely deviated versions changed the usually stable representations of the famous faces within a very short time. In Experiment 1, exposure to an extreme face version resulted in identity decisions shifted towards the exposed one. Experiment 2 revealed that the effects are not short lasting. In Experiment 3, we showed that the effect also generalizes to different pictures of the same famous person. Together the experiments seem to indicate that the brain permanently adapts to new perceptual information and integrates new data within already elaborated representations in a fast way.

  20. The Use of Technology for Phone and Face-to-Face Communication After Total Laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childes, Jana M; Palmer, Andrew D; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Graville, Donna J

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the characteristics and experiences of individuals who use technology to support telephone or face-to-face communication after total laryngectomy. An online questionnaire was used to identify potential participants. Seventeen individuals met inclusion criteria and participated in an in-depth survey. They were compared with a reference group matched for age, gender, and time postsurgery who did not use these technologies. Open-ended responses were summarized. Compared with the matched reference group, individuals who used technology to support verbal communication had undergone more aggressive cancer treatment and used more communication methods. They were less likely to use an alaryngeal speech method, had greater difficulty over the telephone, and used more repair strategies in face-to-face communication. The 2 groups did not differ significantly in the frequency or success of their communication, however. Open-ended responses revealed great variety with regard to their reasons, purposes, and timing of technology use. There is a subset of individuals using technology to support verbal communication very successfully after laryngectomy. Usage was not limited to those who were unable to communicate verbally and often continued long after the initial postoperative period in many settings, for various purposes, and in combination with other methods of communication.

  1. Developmental changes in analytic and holistic processes in face perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Elizabeth Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although infants demonstrate sensitivity to some kinds of perceptual information in faces, many face capacities continue to develop throughout childhood. One debate is the degree to which children perceive faces analytically versus holistically and how these processes undergo developmental change. In the present study, school-aged children and adults performed a perceptual matching task with upright and inverted face and house pairs that varied in similarity of featural or 2nd order configural information. Holistic processing was operationalized as the degree of serial processing when discriminating faces and houses (i.e., increased reaction time, RT, as more features or spacing relations were shared between stimuli. Analytical processing was operationalized as the degree of parallel processing (or no change in reaction time as a function of greater similarity of features or spatial relations. Adults showed the most evidence for holistic processing (most strongly for 2nd order faces and holistic processing was weaker for inverted faces and houses. Younger children (6-8 years, in contrast, showed analytical processing across all experimental manipulations. Older children (9-11 years showed an intermediate pattern with a trend toward holistic processing of 2nd order faces like adults, but parallel processing in other experimental conditions like younger children. These findings indicate that holistic face representations emerge around 10 years of age. In adults both 2nd order and featural information are incorporated into holistic representations, whereas older children only incorporate 2nd order information. Holistic processing was not evident in younger children. Hence, the development of holistic face representations relies on 2nd order processing initially then incorporates featural information by adulthood.

  2. Ethnicity identification from face images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Jain, Anil K.

    2004-08-01

    Human facial images provide the demographic information, such as ethnicity and gender. Conversely, ethnicity and gender also play an important role in face-related applications. Image-based ethnicity identification problem is addressed in a machine learning framework. The Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) based scheme is presented for the two-class (Asian vs. non-Asian) ethnicity classification task. Multiscale analysis is applied to the input facial images. An ensemble framework, which integrates the LDA analysis for the input face images at different scales, is proposed to further improve the classification performance. The product rule is used as the combination strategy in the ensemble. Experimental results based on a face database containing 263 subjects (2,630 face images, with equal balance between the two classes) are promising, indicating that LDA and the proposed ensemble framework have sufficient discriminative power for the ethnicity classification problem. The normalized ethnicity classification scores can be helpful in the facial identity recognition. Useful as a "soft" biometric, face matching scores can be updated based on the output of ethnicity classification module. In other words, ethnicity classifier does not have to be perfect to be useful in practice.

  3. The Functional Architecture for Face-processing Expertise: FMRI Evidence of the Developmental Trajectory of the Core and the Extended Face Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Haist, Frank; Adamo, Maha; Han, Jarnet; Lee, Kang; Stiles, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Expertise in processing faces is a cornerstone of human social interaction. However, the developmental course of many key brain regions supporting face preferential processing in the human brain remains undefined. Here, we present findings from an FMRI study using a simple viewing paradigm of faces and objects in a continuous age sample covering the age range from 6 years through adulthood. These findings are the first to use such a sample paired with whole-brain FMRI analyses to investigate ...

  4. Attractiveness judgments and discrimination of mommies and grandmas: perceptual tuning for young adult faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Lindsey A; Mondloch, Catherine J; Hackland, Anne T

    2015-01-01

    Adults are more accurate in detecting deviations from normality in young adult faces than in older adult faces despite exhibiting comparable accuracy in discriminating both face ages. This deficit in judging the normality of older faces may be due to reliance on a face space optimized for the dimensions of young adult faces, perhaps because of early and continuous experience with young adult faces. Here we examined the emergence of this young adult face bias by testing 3- and 7-year-old children on a child-friendly version of the task used to test adults. In an attractiveness judgment task, children viewed young and older adult face pairs; each pair consisted of an unaltered face and a distorted face of the same identity. Children pointed to the prettiest face, which served as a measure of their sensitivity to the dimensions on which faces vary relative to a norm. To examine whether biases in the attractiveness task were specific to deficits in referencing a norm or extended to impaired discrimination, we tested children on a simultaneous match-to-sample task with the same stimuli. Both age groups were more accurate in judging the attractiveness of young faces relative to older faces; however, unlike adults, the young adult face bias extended to the match-to-sample task. These results suggest that by 3 years of age, children's perceptual system is more finely tuned for young adult faces than for older adult faces, which may support past findings of superior recognition for young adult faces. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Treatment goals in FACE philosophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Domingo; Maté, Amaia; Zabalegui, Paula; Valenzuela, Jaime

    2017-03-01

    The FACE philosophy is characterized by clearly defined treatment goals: facial esthetics, dental esthetics, periodontal health, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The purpose is to establish ideal occlusion with good facial esthetics and an orthopedic stable joint position. The authors present all the concepts of FACE philosophy and illustrate them through one case report. Taking into account all the FACE philosophy concepts increases diagnostic ability and improves the quality and stability of treatment outcomes. The goal of this philosophy is to harmonize the facial profile, tooth alignment, periodontium, functional occlusion, neuromuscular mechanism and joint function. The evaluation and treatment approach to vertical problems are unique to the philosophy. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  6. Eye-tracking analysis of face observing and face recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Iskra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Images are one of the key elements of the content of the World Wide Web. One group of web images are also photos of people. When various institutions (universities, research organizations, companies, associations, etc. present their staff, they should include photos of people for the purpose of more informative presentation. The fact is, that there are many specifies how people see face images and how do they remember them. Several methods to investigate person’s behavior during use of web content can be performed and one of the most reliable method among them is eye tracking. It is very common technique, particularly when it comes to observing web images. Our research focused on behavior of observing face images in process of memorizing them. Test participants were presented with face images shown at different time scale. We focused on three main face elements: eyes, mouth and nose. The results of our analysis can help not only in web presentation, which are, in principle, not limited by time observation, but especially in public presentations (conferences, symposia, and meetings.

  7. Embedded Face Detection and Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göksel Günlü

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The need to increase security in open or public spaces has in turn given rise to the requirement to monitor these spaces and analyse those images on-site and on-time. At this point, the use of smart cameras – of which the popularity has been increasing – is one step ahead. With sensors and Digital Signal Processors (DSPs, smart cameras generate ad hoc results by analysing the numeric images transmitted from the sensor by means of a variety of image-processing algorithms. Since the images are not transmitted to a distance processing unit but rather are processed inside the camera, it does not necessitate high-bandwidth networks or high processor powered systems; it can instantaneously decide on the required access. Nonetheless, on account of restricted memory, processing power and overall power, image processing algorithms need to be developed and optimized for embedded processors. Among these algorithms, one of the most important is for face detection and recognition. A number of face detection and recognition methods have been proposed recently and many of these methods have been tested on general-purpose processors. In smart cameras – which are real-life applications of such methods – the widest use is on DSPs. In the present study, the Viola-Jones face detection method – which was reported to run faster on PCs – was optimized for DSPs; the face recognition method was combined with the developed sub-region and mask-based DCT (Discrete Cosine Transform. As the employed DSP is a fixed-point processor, the processes were performed with integers insofar as it was possible. To enable face recognition, the image was divided into sub-regions and from each sub-region the robust coefficients against disruptive elements – like face expression, illumination, etc. – were selected as the features. The discrimination of the selected features was enhanced via LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis and then employed for recognition. Thanks to its

  8. Instant PrimeFaces starter

    CERN Document Server

    Hlavats, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. Instant Primefaces Starter is a fast-paced, introductory guide designed to give you all the information you need to start using Primfaces, instantly.Instant PrimeFaces Starter is great for developers looking to get started quickly with PrimeFaces. It's assumed that you have some JSF experience already, as well as familiarity with other Java technologies such as CDI and JPA and an understanding of MVC principles, object-relational mapping (ORM),

  9. Neonates’ responses to repeated exposure to a still face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Karen; Watt, Rachel; Pal, Attila; Orvos, Hajnalka

    2017-01-01

    Aim The main aims of the study were to examine whether human neonates’ responses to communication disturbance modelled by the still-face paradigm were stable and whether their responses were affected by their previous experience with the still-face paradigm. Methods The still face procedure, as a laboratory model of interpersonal stress, was administered repeatedly, twice, to 84 neonates (0 to 4 day olds), with a delay of an average of 1.25 day. Results Frame-by-frame analysis of the frequency and duration of gaze, distressed face, crying, sleeping and sucking behaviours showed that the procedure was stressful to them both times, that is, the still face effect was stable after repeated administration and newborns consistently responded to such nonverbal violation of communication. They averted their gaze, showed distress and cried more during the still-face phase in both the first and the second administration. They also showed a carry-over effect in that they continued to avert their gaze and displayed increased distress and crying in the first reunion period, but their gaze behaviour changed with experience, in the second administration. While in the first administration the babies continued averting their gaze even after the stressful still-face phase was over, this carry-over effect disappeared in the second administration, and the babies significantly increased their gaze following the still-face phase. Conclusion After excluding explanations of fatigue, habituation and random effects, a self-other regulatory model is discussed as a possible explanation for this pattern. PMID:28771555

  10. Strategies being followed in India to face challenge of drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Strategies being followed in India to face challenge of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Increasing the coverage with DOTS. Operational research to monitor the trends in drug resistance. Research in methods for rapid detection of drug resistance. Improving methods/ ...

  11. The challenges facing the effective teaching and learning of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the challenges facing the effective teaching and learning of religious education in contemporary secondary schools in Anambra State with reference to Onitsha urban. It is believed that generally education in Nigeria has lost its salt. The standard seems to have fallen and continues to fall.

  12. Challenges Faced by Adult Learners Enrolled in Blended Distance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research attempted to provide an insight into major barriers facing adult learners pursuing a diploma in adult and continuing education programme through Blended Distance Learning. Participants included the adult learners, staff from the Department of Open and Distance Learning who are also the facilitators of the ...

  13. Encouraging Participation in Face-to-Face Lectures: The Index Card Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daws, Laura Beth

    2018-01-01

    Courses: This activity will work in any face-to-face communication lecture course. Objectives: By the end of the semester in a face-to-face lecture class, every student will have engaged in verbal discussion.

  14. Conscious awareness is necessary for processing race and gender information from faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amihai, Ido; Deouell, Leon; Bentin, Shlomo

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that emotions can be correctly interpreted from facial expressions in the absence of conscious awareness of the face. Our goal was to explore whether subordinate information about a face's gender and race could also become available without awareness of the face. Participants classified the race or the gender of unfamiliar faces that were ambiguous with regard to these dimensions. The ambiguous faces were preceded by face-images that unequivocally represented gender and race, rendered consciously invisible by simultaneous continuous-flash-suppression. The classification of ambiguous faces was biased away from the category of the adaptor only when it was consciously visible. The duration of subjective visibility correlated with the aftereffect strength. Moreover, face identity was consequential only if consciously perceived. These results suggest that while conscious awareness is not needed for basic level categorization, it is needed for subordinate categorization. Emotional information might be unique in this respect. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Topical anti-inflammatory agents for seborrheic dermatitis of the face or scalp: summary of a Cochrane Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastarinen, Helena; Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H

    2015-02-01

    Are there differences in effectiveness between topical anti-inflammatory treatments (steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, or lithium salts) and placebo or azoles in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adults? The topical anti-inflammatory treatments were more effective in achieving total clearance of symptoms than placebo by 1.4-fold to 8.5-fold, but there are no considerable differences in the anti-inflammatory topical treatments or in comparison with azoles for short-term treatment. There is no evidence of treatment effects in long-term, continuous, or intermittent use of these compounds despite the chronic nature of the disease.

  16. Continuous Improvement in State Funded Preschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    State funded preschool programs were constantly faced with the need to change in order to address internal and external demands. As programs engaged in efforts towards change, minimal research was available on how to support continuous improvement efforts within the context unique to state funded preschool programs. Guidance available had…

  17. Continuous Flattening of a Regular Tetrahedron with Explicit Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ichi Itoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We proved in [10] that each Platonic polyhedron P can be folded into a flat multilayered face of P by a continuous folding process of polyhedra. In this paper, we give explicit formulas of continuous functions for such a continuous flattening process in R³ for a regular tetrahedron.The article is published in the author’s wording.

  18. Coping with Continual Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Betha

    2010-01-01

    In the face of seismic shifts in technology and social organization, librarians and library staff face changing roles. A focus on competencies--the skills, knowledge, behaviors, and attitudes that are involved in a job--can help the library profession keep its footing as well as help librarians stick to values. When well done, they can define a…

  19. Misuse of topical corticosteroids over face: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajal Manchanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical corticosteroids (TCS have been widely used in various dermatological diseases. However, because of inadvertent use, TCS misuse has become a common problem faced by dermatologists in various parts of the world. Prolonged use over the face can cause various side effects such as steroid rosacea, acneiform eruptions, and hypertrichosis. Aim: To study the effects of TCS misuse and analyze various factors promoting its use on face. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients presenting with various facial dermatoses following the misuse of TCS on the face were studied. Detailed history was noted and the various side effects were recorded. Results: Majority of the patients (70% were females with maximum number of patients belonging to the age group of 11–20 years. Eighty-five percent of the patients were applying TCS for medical conditions, with acne being the most common indication, and the rest were applying as a general face cream. Pruritus and acneiform eruptions were the most common side effects observed and the other reported were erythema, photosensitivity, steroid dependent face, and telangiectasia. Conclusion: TCS misuse especially over the face can lead to a multitude of side effects. It is high time to create awareness among the patients as well as doctors regarding the proper usage of this wonder drug.

  20. Saving Face and Group Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Mao, Lei; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    2015-01-01

    their self- but also other group members' image. This behavior is frequent even in the absence of group identity. When group identity is more salient, individuals help regardless of whether the least performer is an in-group or an out-group. This suggests that saving others' face is a strong social norm....

  1. Markerless 3D Face Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walder, Christian; Breidt, Martin; Bulthoff, Heinrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for the markerless tracking of deforming surfaces such as faces. We acquire a sequence of 3D scans along with color images at 40Hz. The data is then represented by implicit surface and color functions, using a novel partition-of-unity type method of efficiently combin...

  2. Face recognition, a landmarks tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Face recognition is a technology that appeals to the imagination of many people. This is particularly reflected in the popularity of science-fiction films and forensic detective series such as CSI, CSI New York, CSI Miami, Bones and NCIS. Although these series tend to be set in the present, their

  3. Managers facing the climatic risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This colloquium aimed to analyze the relations between the climatic changes and extreme meteorological events and on the associated risks. It provides information and knowledge on the state of the art concerning the today scientific knowledge, the prevention measures and the adaptation facing the risks and the difficult estimation of the climatic damages costs. (A.L.B.)

  4. Face recognition using Krawtchouk moment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Feature extraction is one of the important tasks in face recognition. Moments are widely used feature extractor due to their superior discriminatory power and geometrical invariance. Moments generally capture the global features of the image. This paper proposes Krawtchouk moment for feature extraction ...

  5. Interpretative challenges in face analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Oliveira, Sandi Michele; Hernández-Flores, Nieves

    2015-01-01

    In current research on face analysis questions of who and what should be interpreted, as well as how, are of central interest. In English language research, this question has led to a debate on the concepts of P1 (laypersons, representing the “emic” perspective) and P2 (researchers, representing ...

  6. Towards automatic forensic face recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Tauseef; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology and experimental results for evidence evaluation in the context of forensic face recognition. In forensic applications, the matching score (hereafter referred to as similarity score) from a biometric system must be represented as a Likelihood Ratio (LR). In our

  7. Face Liveness Detection Using Defocus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyeon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop security systems for identity authentication, face recognition (FR technology has been applied. One of the main problems of applying FR technology is that the systems are especially vulnerable to attacks with spoofing faces (e.g., 2D pictures. To defend from these attacks and to enhance the reliability of FR systems, many anti-spoofing approaches have been recently developed. In this paper, we propose a method for face liveness detection using the effect of defocus. From two images sequentially taken at different focuses, three features, focus, power histogram and gradient location and orientation histogram (GLOH, are extracted. Afterwards, we detect forged faces through the feature-level fusion approach. For reliable performance verification, we develop two databases with a handheld digital camera and a webcam. The proposed method achieves a 3.29% half total error rate (HTER at a given depth of field (DoF and can be extended to camera-equipped devices, like smartphones.

  8. Digital Storytelling: Conveying the Essence of a Face-to-Face Lecture in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baim, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    As the percentage of university-level courses delivered online continues to increase, instructors who rely on storytelling approaches to convey key concepts in lecture-based coursework will likely face the need to translate their oral storytelling modules into one or more formats that are suitable for use in an online learning environment. While…

  9. Developmental Changes in Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Communication: Birth to 3 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelli, Manuela; Fogel, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Investigated development of face-to-face communication in infants between 1 and 14 weeks old and their mothers. Found a curvilinear development of early face-to-face communication, with increases occurring between weeks 4 and 9. When placed on a sofa, infants' face-to-face communication was longer than when they were held. Girls spent a longer…

  10. Social cognition in autism: Face tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Marina A; Guerreschi, Michele; Tagliavento, Lucia; Gitti, Filippo; Sokolov, Alexander N; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Fazzi, Elisa

    2017-05-26

    Faces convey valuable information for social cognition, effective interpersonal interaction, and non-verbal communication. Face perception is believed to be atypical in autism, but the origin of this deficit is controversial. Dominant featural face encoding is suggested to be responsible for face tuning scarcity. Here we used a recently developed Face-n-Food paradigm for studying face tuning in individuals with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). The key benefit of these images is that single components do not explicitly trigger face processing. In a spontaneous recognition task, adolescents with autism and typically developing matched controls were presented with a set of Face-n-Food images in different degree resembling a face (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). The set of images was shown in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Thresholds for recognition of the Face-n-Food images as a face in ASD individuals were substantially higher than in typically developing controls: they did not report seeing a face on the images, which controls easily recognized as a face, and gave overall fewer face responses. This outcome not only lends support to atypical face tuning, but provides novel insights into the origin of face encoding deficits in autism.

  11. Midwifery continuity: The use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Rose; Choucri, Lesley; Ormandy, Paula; Brettle, Alison

    2017-09-01

    Continuity models of midwifery care improve women's experiences of care and clinical outcomes, but organisationally driven working practices do not facilitate a continuity model and the midwifery care received by most women is fragmented (Sandall et al., 2016, NHS England, 2016). Little is known about the potential for continuity of midwifery care to be achieved using an electronic platform. This paper examines the experiences of women accessing known midwives through a social media platform and their experiences and perception of continuity of care. The study forms part of a larger research project aiming to increase understanding about online social learning within professionally moderated social media based communities. This paper reports specifically the concept of midwifery continuity within the online communities. Two secret Facebook groups consisting of 31 mothers and 4 midwife moderators were created (17 mothers & 2 midwives / 14 mothers & 2 midwives). Primary data included 8 online and face to face focus groups, conducted at approximately 10 week intervals, and 28 individual one to one interviews with members of the online community within six weeks of giving birth. A thematic analysis using a priori themes was undertaken. This involved coding data which evidenced relational, informational and management continuity across the entire dataset (28 interviews and 8 focus groups). The analysis was undertaken broadly following the six stages described by Braun and Clarke (2006). Relational and informational continuity were identified across the data. Relational continuity was evident for both the participants and the midwife moderators; informational continuity was described by the participants. Management continuity was not identified. Continuity through social media use was valued by both the mothers and the midwives. Information and relational continuity needs of women can be met using professionally moderated, social media based groups. They may

  12. Face to Face : The Perception of Automotive Designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, Sonja; Slice, Dennis E; Schaefer, Katrin; Oberzaucher, Elisabeth; Thorstensen, Truls; Grammer, Karl

    2008-12-01

    Over evolutionary time, humans have developed a selective sensitivity to features in the human face that convey information on sex, age, emotions, and intentions. This ability might not only be applied to our conspecifics nowadays, but also to other living objects (i.e., animals) and even to artificial structures, such as cars. To investigate this possibility, we asked people to report the characteristics, emotions, personality traits, and attitudes they attribute to car fronts, and we used geometric morphometrics (GM) and multivariate statistical methods to determine and visualize the corresponding shape information. Automotive features and proportions are found to covary with trait perception in a manner similar to that found with human faces. Emerging analogies are discussed. This study should have implications for both our understanding of our prehistoric psyche and its interrelation with the modern world.

  13. Face Detection and Face Recognition in Android Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian DOSPINESCU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the smartphone’s camera enables us to capture high quality pictures at a high resolution, so we can perform different types of recognition on these images. Face detection is one of these types of recognition that is very common in our society. We use it every day on Facebook to tag friends in our pictures. It is also used in video games alongside Kinect concept, or in security to allow the access to private places only to authorized persons. These are just some examples of using facial recognition, because in modern society, detection and facial recognition tend to surround us everywhere. The aim of this article is to create an appli-cation for smartphones that can recognize human faces. The main goal of this application is to grant access to certain areas or rooms only to certain authorized persons. For example, we can speak here of hospitals or educational institutions where there are rooms where only certain employees can enter. Of course, this type of application can cover a wide range of uses, such as helping people suffering from Alzheimer's to recognize the people they loved, to fill gaps persons who can’t remember the names of their relatives or for example to automatically capture the face of our own children when they smile.

  14. The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura A; Malloy, Daniel M; Cone, John M; Hendrickson, David L

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker's face in four locations as the talker communicates with the participant. In addition to the primary task of comprehending speeches, participants make a secondary task light detection response. In the present experiment, the talker gave non-emotionally-expressive speeches that were used in past research with videotaped stimuli. Signal detection analysis was employed to determine which areas of the face received the greatest focus of attention. Results replicate previous findings using videotaped methods.

  15. Fabricating 3D figurines with personalized faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, J Rafael; Mahler, Moshe; Beeler, Thabo; Grosse, Max; Hengchin Yeh; Matthews, Iain

    2013-01-01

    We present a semi-automated system for fabricating figurines with faces that are personalised to the individual likeness of the customer. The efficacy of the system has been demonstrated by commercial deployments at Walt Disney World Resort and Star Wars Celebration VI in Orlando Florida. Although the system is semi automated, human intervention is limited to a few simple tasks to maintain the high throughput and consistent quality required for commercial application. In contrast to existing systems that fabricate custom heads that are assembled to pre-fabricated plastic bodies, our system seamlessly integrates 3D facial data with a predefined figurine body into a unique and continuous object that is fabricated as a single piece. The combination of state-of-the-art 3D capture, modelling, and printing that are the core of our system provide the flexibility to fabricate figurines whose complexity is only limited by the creativity of the designer.

  16. Continuous Markovian Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Cardelli, Luca; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2012-01-01

    Continuous Markovian Logic (CML) is a multimodal logic that expresses quantitative and qualitative properties of continuous-time labelled Markov processes with arbitrary (analytic) state-spaces, henceforth called continuous Markov processes (CMPs). The modalities of CML evaluate the rates...

  17. Business continuity management in international organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamou, Christel

    2014-01-01

    In the area of business continuity management, a preliminary review of the literature reveals extensive knowledge, expertise and experience concerning organisations in the private and public sectors. It is interesting to note, however, that there is little literature about business continuity management in international organisations, although these entities are complex and particularly prone to threats. This apparent absence of literature suggests that business continuity management has not yet hit the agenda of international organisations. In recent years, member states have encouraged senior management to design and implement business continuity strategies to minimise the mishandling of an internal crisis and build organisational resilience, but very few of them have actually been able to design and implement comprehensive business continuity programmes. Based on actual experience working in international organisations, this paper outlines some of the challenges faced by international organisations in developing and implementing business continuity activities and attempts to make suggestions for further improvement.

  18. The Experience of Care-Giving for a Person with Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Connie Lynn

    2010-01-01

    As the population continues to become more aged and at risk for chronic illness, there will be a growing need for caregivers. Caregivers to persons with Parkinson's disease (PD) face the challenge of providing care over many years due to the chronic progressive nature of this neurological disorder. The purpose of this study was to understand and…

  19. Face and Mask: A Double History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saramifar, Y.

    2017-01-01

    How often have you read an article and then Googled the author to see him or her? How often have you swiped right or left just looking at the faces without reading the profile on Tinder? Seeking faces and trying to put faces to names happens every day but Hans Belting has brought together Face and

  20. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approximate identity for B, bounded in A. In addition, a necessary condition for the weak complete continuity of A is ... continuous elements of a Banach algebra A and symmetric abstract Segal algebras B with respect to A, in the case ..... [13] Hewitt E and Ross K A, Abstract harmonic analysis, 2nd edn. I, II (1970) (New York,.

  1. Kernel learning algorithms for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-Bao; Pan, Jeng-Shyang

    2013-01-01

    Kernel Learning Algorithms for Face Recognition covers the framework of kernel based face recognition. This book discusses the advanced kernel learning algorithms and its application on face recognition. This book also focuses on the theoretical deviation, the system framework and experiments involving kernel based face recognition. Included within are algorithms of kernel based face recognition, and also the feasibility of the kernel based face recognition method. This book provides researchers in pattern recognition and machine learning area with advanced face recognition methods and its new

  2. Child's recognition of emotions in robot's face and body

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, I.; Looije, R.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Social robots can comfort and support children who have to cope with chronic diseases. In previous studies, a "facial robot", the iCat, proved to show well-recognized emotional expressions that are important in social interactions. The question is if a mobile robot without a face, the Nao, can

  3. Imaging the retina by en face optical coherence tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, Mirjam E. J.; Verbraak, Frank D.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.; Rosen, Richard B.; Podoleanu, Adrian G. H.; de Smet, Marc D.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To present the possibilities of a new system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal ophthalmoscopy, producing en face OCT images in patients with retinal diseases. METHODS: A prototype OCT Ophthalmoscope (OTI, Toronto, Canada) was used to scan patients with retinal

  4. Mimetic modulation for problem creases of the face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mühlbauer, W.; Fairley, J.; van Wingerden, J.

    1995-01-01

    Problem creases of the face such as frontal lines and frown lines, crow's feet, deep nasolabial and perioral folds, and cervical bands may be caused by the aging process, excessive exposure to the sun, disease, or genetic disposition. The condition may become aggravated by habitual hyperkinesia of

  5. Isolated cutaneous leishmaniasis over face – A diagnostic dilemma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated cutaneous leishmaniasis over face – A diagnostic dilemma. Santosh K. Swain, Ishwar C. Behera, Mahesh C. Sahu, Maitreyee Panda. Abstract. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) is a disease caused by an intracellular protozoa belong to the genus Leishmania, transmitted by the bite of a sandfly. It has diverse clinical ...

  6. The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Amy; Lawler, Kathy; Olson, Ingrid R; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2008-01-01

    The Philadelphia Face Perception Battery (PFPB) tests four aspects of face perception: discrimination of facial similarity, attractiveness, gender, and age. Calibration with 116 neurologically intact subjects yielded average performance of ~90%. Across subjects, there was a low correlation (perception. There were modest effects of subject demographic factors upon performance, and test-retest reliability scores (between 0.37 and 0.75) were comparable to other neuropsychological batteries. Modification of the stimuli to obscure internal facial features lowered performance on the age, gender, and attractiveness discrimination tests between 2 and 4 standard deviations. The clinical sensitivity of the battery was demonstrated by testing a patient with acquired prosopagnosia. She showed performance impairments of between 2 and 4 standard deviations on all sub-tests. The PFPB is freely available for non-commercial use. PMID:18082362

  7. The IMM Frontal Face Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagertun, Jens; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille

    2005-01-01

    This note describes a data set consisting of 120 annotated monocular images of 12 different frontal human faces. Points of correspondence are placed on each image so the data set can be readily used for building statistical models of shape. Format specifications and terms of use are also given in...... in this note. The data set is available in two versions: i) low resolution, given in the zip-file electronic version, ii) high, given in the publication link....

  8. Critical Routes: Women Facing Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel; Sandra Regina Martini Vial

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the Critical Routes International Seminar – Women Facing Violence , which took place in Porto Alegre in 2008. The seminar was promoted by the Graduate Program on Collective Health at Unisinos and by the Public Health School/RS and was supported by outstanding researchers working in the fields of collective health, and social and human sciences. Initially, we discuss some conceptual aspects about gender violence, its dimensions and its consequences for the health and ...

  9. Circumplex Model VII: validation studies and FACES III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D H

    1986-09-01

    This paper reviews some of the recent empirical studies validating the Circumplex Model and describes the newly developed self-report measure, FACES III. Studies testing hypotheses derived from the Circumplex Model regarding the three dimensions of cohesion, change, and communication are reviewed. Case illustrations using FACES III and the Clinical Rating Scale are presented. These two assessment tools can be used for making a diagnosis of family functioning and for assessing changes over the course of treatment. This paper reflects the continuing attempt to develop further the Circumplex Model and to bridge more adequately research, theory, and practice.

  10. Continuity of pharmaceutical care for psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah-Koolmees, Heshu

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric diseases are common. The effective treatment of a psychiatric disease, its (somatic) side effects and any concurrent somatic diseases is important for the patient’s overall health and wellbeing. The studies conducted in psychiatric patients generally focus on the continuation of

  11. Remote versus face-to-face check-ups for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Cates, Christopher J

    2016-04-18

    Asthma remains a significant cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Regular check-ups with a healthcare professional are essential to monitor symptoms and adjust medication.Health services worldwide are considering telephone and internet technologies as a way to manage the rising number of people with asthma and other long-term health conditions. This may serve to improve health and reduce the burden on emergency and inpatient services. Remote check-ups may represent an unobtrusive and efficient way of maintaining contact with patients, but it is uncertain whether conducting check-ups in this way is effective or whether it may have unexpected negative consequences. To assess the safety and efficacy of conducting asthma check-ups remotely versus usual face-to-face consultations. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Specialised Register (CAGR) up to 24 November 2015. We also searched www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal, reference lists of other reviews and contacted trial authors for additional information. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults or children with asthma that compared remote check-ups conducted using any form of technology versus standard face-to-face consultations. We excluded studies that used automated telehealth interventions that did not include personalised contact with a health professional. We included studies reported as full-text articles, as abstracts only and unpublished data. Two review authors screened the literature search results and independently extracted risk of bias and numerical data. We resolved any disagreements by consensus, and we contacted study authors for missing information.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios (ORs) using study participants as the unit of analysis, and continuous data as mean differences using the random-effects models. We rated all outcomes using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and

  12. Series 'Facing Radiation'. 2 Facing radiation is facing residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanzawa, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The series is to report how general people, who are not at all radiological experts, have faced and understood the problems and tasks of radiation given by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident (Mar. 2011). The section 2 is reported by an officer of Date City, which localizes at 60 km northern west of the Plant, borders on Iitate Village of Fukushima prefecture, and is indicated as the important area of contamination search (IACS), which the reporter has been conducted for as responsible personnel. In July 2011, the ambient dose was as high as 3.0-3.5 mc-Sv/h and the tentative storage place of contaminated materials was decided by own initiative of residents of a small community, from which the real decontamination started in the City. The target dose after decontamination was defined to be 1.0 mc-Sv/h: however, 28/32 IACS municipalities in the prefecture had not defined the target although they had worked for 2 years after the Accident for their areas exceeding the standard 0.23 mc-Sv/h. At the moment of decontamination of the reporter's own house, he noticed that resident's concerns had directed toward its work itself, not toward the target dose, and wondered if these figures had obstructed to correctly face the radiation. At present that about 2.5 years have passed since the Accident, all of Date citizens have personal accumulated glass dosimeters for seeing the effective external dose and it seems that their dose will not exceed 1 mSv/y if the ambient dose estimated is 0.3-5 mc-Sv/h. Media run to popularity not to face radiation, experts tend to hesitate to face media and residents, and radiation dose will be hardly reduced to zero, despite that correct understanding of radiation is a shorter way for residents' own ease: facing radiation is facing residents. (T.T.)

  13. [Diagnostic value of echocardiography with dipyridamole in coronary disease and evaluation of its prognostic potentiality face to ergometry, plane dipyridamole Tc99m-MIBI myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and coronary cineangiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, S E; Bueno, M S; Pedras, I V; de Freitas, E V; de la Nuez, S B; Luna, R L

    1995-08-01

    To assess in a consecutive series of patients, the diagnostic accuracy of dipyridamole echocardiography and to compare its prognostic power with that from other tests. Seventy eight patients prospectively were underwent to dipyridamole echocardiography (DET) and coronary arteriography for diagnostic and post-infarction investigation. The majority was underwent to treadmill stress test and Tc99MIBI-dipyridamole planar myocardial scintigraphy. Eleven variables with possible prognostic importance were analyzed in a stepwise model to identify independent predictors of events. Sensitivity and specificity for the presence of coronary artery disease (in non-M patients) and multivessel disease (in post-MI patients) were, respectively, 44%, 91%, 53% and 88%. Mean follow-up was 21 +/- 9 months, during which there were four deaths, four unstable angina episodes, four nonfatal myocardial infarctions and eight revascularization procedures. By multivariate analysis, the only independent predictor of events was the change in wall motion score index from rest to peak stress. DET is a valuable alternative to exercise stress test and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. Semiquantitative estimation of ischemic area during pharmacological stress is an important prognostic marker.

  14. Providing Continuous Assurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, Jonne; Hulstijn, Joris

    2017-01-01

    It has been claimed that continuous assurance can be attained by combining continuous monitoring by management, with continuous auditing of data streams and the effectiveness of internal controls by an external auditor. However, we find that in existing literature the final step to continuous

  15. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  16. Face-to-face or not-to-face: A technology preference for communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Noor Ismawati; Darmawan, Bobby; Mohamed Ariffin, Mohd Yahya

    2014-11-01

    This study employed the Model of Technology Preference (MTP) to explain the relationship of the variables as the antecedents of behavioral intention to adopt a social networking site (SNS) for communication. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to SNS account users using paper-based and web-based surveys that led to 514 valid responses. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The results show that two out of three attributes of the attribute-based preference (ATRP) affect attitude-based preference (ATTP). The data support the hypotheses that perceived enjoyment and social presence are predictors of ATTP. In this study, the findings further indicated that ATTP has no relationship with the behavioral intention of using SNS, but it has a relationship with the attitude of using SNS. SNS development should provide features that ensure enjoyment and social presence for users to communicate instead of using the traditional face-to-face method of communication.

  17. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    Just as technology is transforming the delivery of education, the Internet and advanced telecommunication applications are changing the "face" of CE and the connotation of "lifelong learning." As late as the mid-1980s, a discussion of computer applications in nursing CE focused on the "timely" transition to microcomputers as tools for the enhancement of managerial tasks for increased productivity. Even as recently as 1990, there seemed to be "time" for those providers who were "slower to adopt innovation" to "catch up." Now, the CE provider who does not integrate the microcomputer and advanced telecommunications as an integral component of their delivery modalities may be outsourced rapidly by an educational or commercial competitive unit that is able to utilize the communication medium, mergers and partnerships, enterprise, and individual lifestyle and learning patterns that will epitomize the CE unit of the 21st century. As with the "re-engineering" of nursing education, the "re-engineered" delivery modalities of evolving CE entity might now best be conceptualized on a continuum from the traditional mode that time and place dependent to a mode of synchronous and asynchronous data and advanced telecommunication. Delivery methods will need to be selected according to the target populations, content, and situation. The health-care educational provider may discover, as in other industries, that a combination of distance and residential offerings will be the most successful medium for the delivery of CE to the progressively more "information and technologically savvy" lifelong learner of the 21st century. In addressing the dramatic effects of the information technology era on the refocused multimedia/interactive delivery method for student education, educators amply quoted Bob Dylan's phrase of the 1960s, "The times, they are a-changing." And so, we see that the times are also changing at an astronomical rate for the health-care educational provider as well as the

  18. Crossing the “Uncanny Valley”: adaptation to cartoon faces can influence perception of human faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwen; Russell, Richard; Nakayama, Ken; Livingstone, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation can shift what individuals identify to be a prototypical or attractive face. Past work suggests that low-level shape adaptation can affect high-level face processing but is position dependent. Adaptation to distorted images of faces can also affect face processing but only within sub-categories of faces, such as gender, age, and race/ethnicity. This study assesses whether there is a representation of face that is specific to faces (as opposed to all shapes) but general to all kinds of faces (as opposed to subcategories) by testing whether adaptation to one type of face can affect perception of another. Participants were shown cartoon videos containing faces with abnormally large eyes. Using animated videos allowed us to simulate naturalistic exposure and avoid positional shape adaptation. Results suggest that adaptation to cartoon faces with large eyes shifts preferences for human faces toward larger eyes, supporting the existence of general face representations. PMID:20465173

  19. Familiar Face Detection in 180ms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti di Oleggio Castello, Matteo; Gobbini, M. Ida

    2015-01-01

    The visual system is tuned for rapid detection of faces, with the fastest choice saccade to a face at 100ms. Familiar faces have a more robust representation than do unfamiliar faces, and are detected faster in the absence of awareness and with reduced attentional resources. Faces of family and close friends become familiar over a protracted period involving learning the unique visual appearance, including a view-invariant representation, as well as person knowledge. We investigated the effect of personal familiarity on the earliest stages of face processing by using a saccadic-choice task to measure how fast familiar face detection can happen. Subjects made correct and reliable saccades to familiar faces when unfamiliar faces were distractors at 180ms—very rapid saccades that are 30 to 70ms earlier than the earliest evoked potential modulated by familiarity. By contrast, accuracy of saccades to unfamiliar faces with familiar faces as distractors did not exceed chance. Saccades to faces with object distractors were even faster (110 to 120 ms) and equivalent for familiar and unfamiliar faces, indicating that familiarity does not affect ultra-rapid saccades. We propose that detectors of diagnostic facial features for familiar faces develop in visual cortices through learning and allow rapid detection that precedes explicit recognition of identity. PMID:26305788

  20. Online or Face to Face? A Comparison of Two Methods of Training Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Kristin; Dworkin, Jodi; Gengler, Colleen; Olson, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Online courses offer benefits over face-to-face courses such as accessibility, affordability, and flexibility. Literature assessing the effectiveness of face-to-face and online courses is growing, but findings remain inconclusive. This study compared evaluations completed by professionals who had taken a research update short course either face to…

  1. High-resolution measurements of face-to-face contact patterns in a primary school.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Stehlé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little quantitative information is available on the mixing patterns of children in school environments. Describing and understanding contacts between children at school would help quantify the transmission opportunities of respiratory infections and identify situations within schools where the risk of transmission is higher. We report on measurements carried out in a French school (6-12 years children, where we collected data on the time-resolved face-to-face proximity of children and teachers using a proximity-sensing infrastructure based on radio frequency identification devices. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Data on face-to-face interactions were collected on Thursday, October 1(st and Friday, October 2(nd 2009. We recorded 77,602 contact events between 242 individuals (232 children and 10 teachers. In this setting, each child has on average 323 contacts per day with 47 other children, leading to an average daily interaction time of 176 minutes. Most contacts are brief, but long contacts are also observed. Contacts occur mostly within each class, and each child spends on average three times more time in contact with classmates than with children of other classes. We describe the temporal evolution of the contact network and the trajectories followed by the children in the school, which constrain the contact patterns. We determine an exposure matrix aimed at informing mathematical models. This matrix exhibits a class and age structure which is very different from the homogeneous mixing hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS: We report on important properties of the contact patterns between school children that are relevant for modeling the propagation of diseases and for evaluating control measures. We discuss public health implications related to the management of schools in case of epidemics and pandemics. Our results can help define a prioritization of control measures based on preventive measures, case isolation, classes and school closures, that

  2. CHALLENGES FACING THE ESP PRACTITIONER

    OpenAIRE

    SIMION MINODORA OTILIA

    2015-01-01

    The ESP teacher has to face certain challenges in his profession: One of the biggest challenges of the ESP teacher is the fact that he/she lacks the necessary knowledge of the subject to teach Business English, for instance, some researchers believing that such courses should be taught by subject teachers. The task of teaching ESP by ESL teachers is not an easy one. Dudley- Evans and St. John pointed out its complexity, identifying five key roles of the ESP practitioner: teacher, cou...

  3. The many faces of QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the workshop is to bring together experts on QCD in order to face a variety of subjects, including: The QCD spectrum of hadrons, mesons, glueballs QCD Green's functions: Lattice studies, Schwinger-Dyson approach, Gribov copies and quantization of Yang-Mills theories QCD at finite temperature, local CP-violation in quark gluon plasma, influence of strong magnetic fields Holographic descriptions of QCD and quark-gluon plasma Topological aspects of QCD (De)confinement and/or chiral symmetry breaking Vacuum condensates, sum rules

  4. Face Recognition using Gabor Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad MOHSIN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An Elastic Bunch Graph Map (EBGM algorithm is being proposed in this research paper that successfully implements face recognition using Gabor filters. The proposed system applies 40 different Gabor filters on an image. As aresult of which 40 images with different angles and orientation are received. Next, maximum intensity points in each filtered image are calculated and mark them as Fiducial points. The system reduces these points in accordance to distance between them. The next step is calculating the distances between the reduced points using distance formula. At last, the distances are compared with database. If match occurs, it means that the image is recognized.

  5. Grand Challenges facing Storage Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will discuss the future of storage systems. In particular, we will focus on several big challenges which we are facing in storage, such as being able to build, manage and backup really massive storage systems, being able to find information of interest, being able to do long-term archival of data, and so on. We also present ideas and research being done to address these challenges, and provide a perspective on how we expect these challenges to be resolved as we go forward.

  6. The 100 faces of poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Vépy-Schlemmer, Éva

    2010-01-01

    Information about our world and society cannot be obtained through numbers only, even so because a significant segment of our current knowledge is conveyed through pictures and other visual signs. These are to complement our verbal codes and are capable of showing the human face of social reality, such as poverty, hidden beyond the maze of various charts and diagrams. The concept of “The poorest 100” was inspired by the top list of the 100 richest persons published every year; this unique...

  7. A enfermagem na ressignificação da vida diante da enfermidade El oficio de enfermero en la resignificación de la vida delante de la enfermedad Nursing in life resignification on face of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilda Selli

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available O texto trata do papel educativo do trabalhador da saúde. As idéias expostas são frutos da reflexão que se deu a partir de uma pesquisa sobre a ressignificação da vida de indivíduos acometidos por doenças que sugerem mudanças no seu modo de viver. O trabalhador da saúde tem um papel fundamental nesse processo, influenciando o paciente positiva ou negativamente. A reflexão aborda o processo subjetivo de ressignificação da vida na situação saúde/doença e o papel educacional do profissional de enfermagem no desempenho de suas competências. O ensino/aprendizagem influencia na configuração do imaginário do indivíduo, desse modo, constituindo um importante ingrediente no saber/fazer educação no exercício profissional.El texto trata del papel educativo del trabajador de la salud. Las ideas mostradas son frutos de la reflexión, resultantes de una investigación sobre la resignificación de la vida de los individuos que poseen enfermedades que requieren cambios en su forma de vivir. El trabajador de la salud posee un papel fundamental en ese proceso, haciendo influjo en el paciente positiva o negativamente. La reflexión discute el proceso subjetivo de la resignificación de la vida en la situación salud/enfermedad y el papel educacional del profesional del oficio de enfermero en el desempeñode sus competencias. El enseño/aprendisaje influye en la configuración del imaginario del individuo, de esa manera, constituyendo un importante ingrediente en el saber/hacer educación en el ejercicio profesional.The paper deals with the educational role played by the health care provider. The ideas exposed stem from a reflection made from a research on the resignification of life of individuals affected by diseases that entail changes to their lifestyle. The health care provider has a key role in this process, influencing the patient positively or negatively. The reflection approaches the subjective process of life resignification in

  8. An Approach: Modality Reduction and Face-Sketch Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Pramanik, Sourav; Bhattacharjee, Dr. Debotosh

    2013-01-01

    To recognize face sketch through face photo database is a challenging task for todays researchers. Because face photo images in training set and face sketch images in testing set have different modality. Difference between two face photos of difference person is smaller than the difference between same person in a face photo and face sketched. In this paper, for reduction of the modality between face photo and face sketch we first bring face photo and face sketch images in a new dimension usi...

  9. Normal composite face effects in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotti, Federica; Wu, Esther; Yang, Hua; Jiahui, Guo; Duchaine, Bradley; Cook, Richard

    2017-10-01

    Upright face perception is thought to involve holistic processing, whereby local features are integrated into a unified whole. Consistent with this view, the top half of one face appears to fuse perceptually with the bottom half of another, when aligned spatially and presented upright. This 'composite face effect' reveals a tendency to integrate information from disparate regions when faces are presented canonically. In recent years, the relationship between susceptibility to the composite effect and face recognition ability has received extensive attention both in participants with normal face recognition and participants with developmental prosopagnosia. Previous results suggest that individuals with developmental prosopagnosia may show reduced susceptibility to the effect suggestive of diminished holistic face processing. Here we describe two studies that examine whether developmental prosopagnosia is associated with reduced composite face effects. Despite using independent samples of developmental prosopagnosics and different composite procedures, we find no evidence for reduced composite face effects. The experiments yielded similar results; highly significant composite effects in both prosopagnosic groups that were similar in magnitude to the effects found in participants with normal face processing. The composite face effects exhibited by both samples and the controls were greatly diminished when stimulus arrangements were inverted. Our finding that the whole-face binding process indexed by the composite effect is intact in developmental prosopagnosia indicates that other factors are responsible for developmental prosopagnosia. These results are also inconsistent with suggestions that susceptibility to the composite face effect and face recognition ability are tightly linked. While the holistic process revealed by the composite face effect may be necessary for typical face perception, it is not sufficient; individual differences in face recognition ability

  10. Automatic Door Access System Using Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hteik Htar Lwin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Most doors are controlled by persons with the use of keys security cards password or pattern to open the door. Theaim of this paper is to help users forimprovement of the door security of sensitive locations by using face detection and recognition. Face is a complex multidimensional structure and needs good computing techniques for detection and recognition. This paper is comprised mainly of three subsystems namely face detection face recognition and automatic door access control. Face detection is the process of detecting the region of face in an image. The face is detected by using the viola jones method and face recognition is implemented by using the Principal Component Analysis PCA. Face Recognition based on PCA is generally referred to as the use of Eigenfaces.If a face is recognized it is known else it is unknown. The door will open automatically for the known person due to the command of the microcontroller. On the other hand alarm will ring for the unknown person. Since PCA reduces the dimensions of face images without losing important features facial images for many persons can be stored in the database. Although many training images are used computational efficiency cannot be decreased significantly. Therefore face recognition using PCA can be more useful for door security system than other face recognition schemes.

  11. Critical Routes: Women Facing Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Critical Routes International Seminar – Women Facing Violence , which took place in Porto Alegre in 2008. The seminar was promoted by the Graduate Program on Collective Health at Unisinos and by the Public Health School/RS and was supported by outstanding researchers working in the fields of collective health, and social and human sciences. Initially, we discuss some conceptual aspects about gender violence, its dimensions and its consequences for the health and the life quality of the affected women. Our understanding is that violence is one of the most effective methods of controlling women in societies scarred with gender hierarchies. The structure of the seminar focused on three main discussion themes: breaking up with the violence, mechanisms for working with gender and hearing the services. These themes were chosen aiming at looking for ways to help the women and to explore efficient mechanisms to combat, reduce and, if possible, eliminate the violence perpetrated against women. At the end of the seminar, we reiterate the political commitment on the accomplishment of the public policies to face violence and the fight against all inequality, discrimination and violence forms based on gender.

  12. Arterial Transit Time Mapping Obtained by Pulsed Continuous 3D ASL Imaging with Multiple Post-Label Delay Acquisitions: Comparative Study with PET-CBF in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Isozaki, Makoto; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT) is most crucial for measuring absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL), a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion assessment technique, in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We validated ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT maps calculated by pulsed continuous ASL (pCASL) with multiple post-label delay acquisitions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Fifteen patients underwent MR scans, including pCASL, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans with 15O-water to obtain PET-CBF. MR acquisitions with different post-label delays (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 sec) were also obtained for ATT correction. The theoretical framework of 2-compartmental model (2CM) was also used for the delay compensation. ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT were calculated based on the proposed 2CM, and the effect on the CBF values and the ATT correction characteristics were discussed. Linear regression analyses were performed both on pixel-by-pixel and region-of-interest bases in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. There were significant correlations between ASL-CBF and PET-CBF both for voxel values (r = 0.74 ± 0.08, slope: 0.87 ± 0.22, intercept: 6.1 ± 4.9) and for the MCA territorial comparison in both affected (R2 = 0.67, y = 0.83x + 6.3) and contralateral sides (R2 = 0.66, y = 0.74x + 6.3). ASL-ATTs in the affected side were significantly longer than those in the contralateral side (1.51 ± 0.41 sec and 1.12 ± 0.30 sec, respectively, p <0.0005). CBF measurement using pCASL with delay compensation was feasible and fairly accurate even in altered hemodynamic states.

  13. Neonatal face-to-face interactions promote later social behaviour in infant rhesus monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Dettmer, Amanda M.; Kaburu, Stefano S. K.; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Paukner, Annika; Sclafani, Valentina; Byers, Kristen L.; Murphy, Ashley M.; Miller, Michelle; Marquez, Neal; Miller, Grace M.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Ferrari, Pier F.

    2016-01-01

    In primates, including humans, mothers engage in face-to-face interactions with their infants, with frequencies varying both within and across species. However, the impact of this variation in face-to-face interactions on infant social development is unclear. Here we report that infant monkeys (Macaca mulatta) who engaged in more neonatal face-to-face interactions with mothers have increased social interactions at 2 and 5 months. In a controlled experiment, we show that this effect is not due...

  14. Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Facing Diabetes: What You Need to Know Past Issues / Fall ... your loved ones. Photos: AP The Faces of Diabetes Diabetes strikes millions of Americans, young and old, ...

  15. Attractive faces temporally modulate visual attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koyo eNakamura

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial attractiveness is an important biological and social signal on social interaction. Recent research has demonstrated that an attractive face captures greater spatial attention than an unattractive face does. Little is known, however, about the temporal characteristics of visual attention for facial attractiveness. In this study, we investigated the temporal modulation of visual attention induced by facial attractiveness by using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP. Fourteen male faces and two female faces were successively presented for 160 ms respectively, and participants were asked to identify two female faces embedded among a series of multiple male distractor faces. Identification of a second female target (T2 was impaired when a first target (T1 was attractive compared to neutral or unattractive faces, at 320 ms SOA; identification was improved when T1 was attractive compared to unattractive faces at 640 ms SOA. These findings suggest that the spontaneous appraisal of facial attractiveness modulates temporal attention.

  16. Organocatalysis in continuous flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow chemistry is an enabling technique in organic chemistry. Advantages include extremely fast mixing and heat transfer capabilities as well as rapid screening of reaction conditions. Combining continuous flow chemistry with solid-supported organocatalysis presents challenges that have

  17. Intracranial markers of conscious face perception in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Fabiano; van Kempen, Jochem; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Kovach, Christopher K; Oya, Hiroyuki; Howard, Matthew A; Adolphs, Ralph; Tsuchiya, Naotsugu

    2017-11-15

    Investigations of the neural basis of consciousness have greatly benefited from protocols that involve the presentation of stimuli at perceptual threshold, enabling the assessment of the patterns of brain activity that correlate with conscious perception, independently of any changes in sensory input. However, the comparison between perceived and unperceived trials would be expected to reveal not only the core neural substrate of a particular conscious perception, but also aspects of brain activity that facilitate, hinder or tend to follow conscious perception. We take a step towards the resolution of these confounds by combining an analysis of neural responses observed during the presentation of faces partially masked by Continuous Flash Suppression, and those responses observed during the unmasked presentation of faces and other images in the same subjects. We employed multidimensional classifiers to decode physical properties of stimuli or perceptual states from spectrotemporal representations of electrocorticographic signals (1071 channels in 5 subjects). Neural activity in certain face responsive areas located in both the fusiform gyrus and in the lateral-temporal/inferior-parietal cortex discriminated seen vs. unseen faces in the masked paradigm and upright faces vs. other categories in the unmasked paradigm. However, only the former discriminated upright vs. inverted faces in the unmasked paradigm. Our results suggest a prominent role for the fusiform gyrus in the configural perception of faces, and possibly other objects that are holistically processed. More generally, we advocate comparative analysis of neural recordings obtained during different, but related, experimental protocols as a promising direction towards elucidating the functional specificities of the patterns of neural activation that accompany our conscious experiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A global attentional scope setting prioritizes faces for conscious detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sol Z; Cant, Jonathan S; Ferber, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The scope of visual attention is known to affect conscious object perception, with recent studies showing that a global attentional scope boosts holistic face processing, relative to a local scope. Here we show that attentional scope settings can also modulate the availability of information for conscious visual awareness. In an initial experiment, we show that adopting a global attentional scope accelerates conscious detection of initially invisible faces, presented under continuous flash suppression (CFS). Furthermore, face detection time was not modulated by attentional scope in a nonrivalrous control condition, which emulated the experience of CFS without inducing binocular rivalry. In a follow-up experiment, we report an exact replication of the original effect, as well as data suggesting that this effect is specific to upright faces, and is abolished when using both inverted faces and images of houses in an otherwise identical task. Thus, attentional scope settings can modulate the availability of information to conscious awareness, fundamentally altering the contents of our subjective visual experience.

  19. Face, content, and construct validation of the Bristol TURP trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewin, James; Ahmed, Kamran; Khan, Muhammed S; Jaye, Peter; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2014-01-01

    Validation studies are an important part of simulator evaluation and are considered necessary to establish the effectiveness of simulation-based training. The widely used Bristol transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) simulator has not been formally validated. Evaluation of the face, content, and construct validities of the Bristol TURP simulator as an endourology training tool. Using established validation methodology, face, content, and construct validities were evaluated. Face and content validities were assessed using a structured quantitative survey. Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of experts and novices using a validated performance scale and resection efficiency. Overall, 8 novice urologists and 8 expert urologists participated in the study. The study was conducted in a dedicated surgical simulation training facility. All 16 participants felt the model was a good training tool and should be used as an essential part of urology training (face validity). Content validity evaluation showed that most aspects of the simulator were adequately realistic (mean Likert scores 3.38-3.57/5); however, the model does not simulate bleeding. Experts significantly outperformed novices (p Bristol TURP simulator shows face, content, and construct validities, although some aspects of the simulator were not very realistic (e.g., bleeding). This study provides evidence for the continuing use of this simulator in endourology training. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Anatomy of the Aging Face: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotofana, Sebastian; Fratila, Alina A M; Schenck, Thilo L; Redka-Swoboda, Wolfgang; Zilinsky, Isaac; Pavicic, Tatjana

    2016-06-01

    Rejuvenative procedures of the face are increasing in numbers, and a plethora of different therapeutic options are available today. Every procedure should aim for the patient's safety first and then for natural and long-lasting results. The face is one of the most complex regions in the human body and research continuously reveals new insights into the complex interplay of the different participating structures. Bone, ligaments, muscles, fat, and skin are the key players in the layered arrangement of the face.Aging occurs in all involved facial structures but the onset and the speed of age-related changes differ between each specific structure, between each individual, and between different ethnic groups. Therefore, knowledge of age-related anatomy is crucial for a physician's work when trying to restore a youthful face.This review focuses on the current understanding of the anatomy of the human face and tries to elucidate the morphological changes during aging of bone, ligaments, muscles, and fat, and their role in rejuvenative procedures. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Discretization of continuous frame

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 122; Issue 2 ... In this paper we consider the notion of continuous frame of subspaces and define a new concept of continuous frame, entitled continuous atomic resolution of identity, for arbitrary Hilbert space H which has a countable reconstruction formula.

  2. Automatic face morphing for transferring facial animation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.; Bui, T.D.; Poel, Mannes; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Hamza, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method of automatically finding the training set of RBF networks for morphing a prototype face to represent a new face. This is done by automatically specifying and adjusting corresponding feature points on a target face. The RBF networks are then used to transfer

  3. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face

  4. Psychophysical thresholds of face visibility during infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelskov, Sofie; Kouider, Sid

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and focus on faces is a fundamental prerequisite for developing social skills. But how well can infants detect faces? Here, we address this question by studying the minimum duration at which faces must appear to trigger a behavioral response in infants. We used a preferentia...

  5. Implicit face prototype learning from geometric information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Charles C-F; Wilson, Hugh R

    2013-04-19

    There is evidence that humans implicitly learn an average or prototype of previously studied faces, as the unseen face prototype is falsely recognized as having been learned (Solso & McCarthy, 1981). Here we investigated the extent and nature of face prototype formation where observers' memory was tested after they studied synthetic faces defined purely in geometric terms in a multidimensional face space. We found a strong prototype effect: The basic results showed that the unseen prototype averaged from the studied faces was falsely identified as learned at a rate of 86.3%, whereas individual studied faces were identified correctly 66.3% of the time and the distractors were incorrectly identified as having been learned only 32.4% of the time. This prototype learning lasted at least 1 week. Face prototype learning occurred even when the studied faces were further from the unseen prototype than the median variation in the population. Prototype memory formation was evident in addition to memory formation of studied face exemplars as demonstrated in our models. Additional studies showed that the prototype effect can be generalized across viewpoints, and head shape and internal features separately contribute to prototype formation. Thus, implicit face prototype extraction in a multidimensional space is a very general aspect of geometric face learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Face Verification for Mobile Personal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we presented a detailed study of the face verification problem on the mobile device, covering every component of the system. The study includes face detection, registration, normalization, and verification. Furthermore, the information fusion problem is studied to verify face

  7. [Sports injuries of the face].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrzavzez, G; Chrzavzez, J P; D'Erceville, T; Kharrat, N; Barbillon, C; Pilz, F

    1984-01-01

    Of 249 patients with facial injuries admitted to the Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hôpital Bel Air, Thionville, France, between 1981 and 1982, 45 (18%) were cases of injury from sporting activities. The particular characteristics of the latter lesions were their predominance in males, their increased seasonal frequency in spring and early summer, the high incidence of damage to the nasal pyramid and maxillomalar complex, and the fact that the most implicated sport was football (71% of cases). Whereas most accidents resulted in relatively minor lesions, three cases--including two from riding--involved severe, complex injuries comparable to those seen in certain car accidents. Findings in this series confirm the natural "bumper" property of the face. Emphasis is placed on the importance of well-conducted training, and the need to eliminate consideration of sport as a means for expressing aggressiveness that is not always possible in daily life.

  8. kernenergie.de changes face

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geisler, Maja

    2009-01-01

    The portals of the Deutsches Atomforum e.V. (DAtF) and of the Informationskreis KernEnergie (IK) changed face effective June 24, 2009. On-line appearance was in need of modernization after the last relaunches and the additional new industry dialog portal, ''Zeit fuer Energieverantwortung.'' The starting page of the industry portal, which receives a high level of attention as indicated by 130,000 monthly hits, was streamlined in its structure. The design was modernized and made clearer. Depending on the depth of information wanted, users are guided by the new structure to the required level of detailed technical information. Up to 200,000 monthly hits are confirming the popularity and importance of this information portal. The main pages can be found under these Web addresses: www.kernenergie.de, www.kernfragen.de, www.kernenergie.de/energieverantwortung. (orig.)

  9. New Faces of Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Michael B.; Fisher, Julia Freeland

    2017-01-01

    The Clayton Christiansen Institute maintains a database of more than 400 schools across the United States that have implemented some form of blended learning, which combines online learning with brick-and-mortar classrooms. Data the Institute has collected over the past six months suggests three trends as this model continues to evolve and mature.…

  10. Faces of the Welfare State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Mette-Louise

    2012-01-01

    the welfare State and other realms of life, such as their family and neighborhood, threatening to take away their children (to crime, to prison, to foster families or to the divorced partner, etc). The paper conceptualizes immobility and confinement as embedded in the contrary; a continuous spatial placement...

  11. The shape of the face template: geometric distortions of faces and their detection in natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongakkasira, Kaewmart; Bindemann, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Human face detection might be driven by skin-coloured face-shaped templates. To explore this idea, this study compared the detection of faces for which the natural height-to-width ratios were preserved with distorted faces that were stretched vertically or horizontally. The impact of stretching on detection performance was not obvious when faces were equated to their unstretched counterparts in terms of their height or width dimension (Experiment 1). However, stretching impaired detection when the original and distorted faces were matched for their surface area (Experiment 2), and this was found with both vertically and horizontally stretched faces (Experiment 3). This effect was evident in accuracy, response times, and also observers' eye movements to faces. These findings demonstrate that height-to-width ratios are an important component of the cognitive template for face detection. The results also highlight important differences between face detection and face recognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. What’s in a face? How face gender and current affect influence perceived emotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Harris

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Faces drive our social interactions. A vast literature suggests an interaction between gender and emotional face perception, with studies using different methodologies demonstrating that the gender of a face can affect how emotions are processed. However, how different is our perception of affective male and female faces? Furthermore, how does our current affective state when viewing faces influence our perceptual biases? We presented participants with a series of faces morphed along an emotional continuum from happy to angry. Participants judged each face morph as either happy or angry. We determined each participant’s unique emotional ‘neutral’ point, defined as the face morph judged to be perceived equally happy and angry, separately for male and female faces. We also assessed how current state affect influenced these perceptual neutral points. Our results indicate that, for both male and female participants, the emotional neutral point for male faces is perceptually biased to be happier than for female faces. This bias suggests that more happiness is required to perceive a male face as emotionally neutral, i.e., we are biased to perceive a male face as more negative. Interestingly, we also find that perceptual biases in perceiving female faces are correlated with current mood, such that positive state affect correlates with perceiving female faces as happier, while we find no significant correlation between negative state affect and the perception of facial emotion. Furthermore, we find reaction time biases, with slower responses for angry male faces compared to angry female faces.

  13. Looking at My Own Face: Visual Processing Strategies in Self–Other Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya Chakraborty

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We live in an age of ‘selfies.’ Yet, how we look at our own faces has seldom been systematically investigated. In this study we test if the visual processing of the highly familiar self-face is different from other faces, using psychophysics and eye-tracking. This paradigm also enabled us to test the association between the psychophysical properties of self-face representation and visual processing strategies involved in self-face recognition. Thirty-three adults performed a self-face recognition task from a series of self-other face morphs with simultaneous eye-tracking. Participants were found to look longer at the lower part of the face for self-face compared to other-face. Participants with a more distinct self-face representation, as indexed by a steeper slope of the psychometric response curve for self-face recognition, were found to look longer at upper part of the faces identified as ‘self’ vs. those identified as ‘other’. This result indicates that self-face representation can influence where we look when we process our own vs. others’ faces. We also investigated the association of autism-related traits with self-face processing metrics since autism has previously been associated with atypical self-processing. The study did not find any self-face specific association with autistic traits, suggesting that autism-related features may be related to self-processing in a domain specific manner.

  14. Guiding Simulations and Experiments using Continuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    When applying continuation of periodic solutions to high-dimensional finite element models one might face a dilemma. The mesh resolution and thus the dimension N of the model are typically chosen such that a given computer system can store the information necessary to perform one integration step...... for dimension N, but not for larger dimensions. In other words, a model is usually implemented as a carefully derived implicit integration scheme tailored for numerically stable simulations with the highest spacial resolution admitted by the computational power available. On the other hand, stable numerical...... developed method of control based continuation allows the continuation of periodic solutions without a reduction of the model resolution, and even directly in physical experiments. Moreover, both a simulation as well as an experiment can run asynchronously from the actual continuation method, which...

  15. Prosopagnosia when all faces look the same

    CERN Document Server

    Rivolta, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This book provides readers with a simplified and comprehensive account of the cognitive and neural bases of face perception in humans. Faces are ubiquitous in our environment and we rely on them during social interactions. The human face processing system allows us to extract information about the identity, gender, age, mood, race, attractiveness and approachability of other people in about a fraction of a second, just by glancing at their faces.  By introducing readers to the most relevant research on face recognition, this book seeks to answer the questions: “Why are humans so fast at recognizing faces?”, “Why are humans so efficient at recognizing faces?”, “Do faces represent a particular category for the human visual system?”, What makes face perception in humans so special?, “Can our face recognition system fail”?  This book presents the author’s findings on face perception during his research studies on both normal subjects and subjects with prosopagnosia, a neurological disorder cha...

  16. Very low resolution face recognition problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wilman W W; Yuen, Pong C

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the very low resolution (VLR) problem in face recognition in which the resolution of the face image to be recognized is lower than 16 × 16. With the increasing demand of surveillance camera-based applications, the VLR problem happens in many face application systems. Existing face recognition algorithms are not able to give satisfactory performance on the VLR face image. While face super-resolution (SR) methods can be employed to enhance the resolution of the images, the existing learning-based face SR methods do not perform well on such a VLR face image. To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel approach to learn the relationship between the high-resolution image space and the VLR image space for face SR. Based on this new approach, two constraints, namely, new data and discriminative constraints, are designed for good visuality and face recognition applications under the VLR problem, respectively. Experimental results show that the proposed SR algorithm based on relationship learning outperforms the existing algorithms in public face databases.

  17. Processing of emotional faces in social phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kristjansen Rosenberg

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has found that individuals with social phobia differ from controls in their processing of emotional faces. For instance, people with social phobia show increased attention to briefly presented threatening faces. However, when exposure times are increased, the direction of this attentional bias is more unclear. Studies investigating eye movements have found both increased as well as decreased attention to threatening faces in socially anxious participants. The current study investigated eye movements to emotional faces in eight patients with social phobia and 34 controls. Three different tasks with different exposure durations were used, which allowed for an investigation of the time course of attention. At the early time interval, patients showed a complex pattern of both vigilance and avoidance of threatening faces. At the longest time interval, patients avoided the eyes of sad, disgust, and neutral faces more than controls, whereas there were no group differences for angry faces.

  18. Editorial Continuing Medical Education (CME) Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    System Administrator

    developments in the field of medicine. CME has evolved in the last ten years necessitated by the realization that the practice of medicine is constantly changing. New diseases are emerging; diagnostic techniques are being updated and new drugs and therapeutic methods being introduced into the market. Added to this is ...

  19. Revisiting an old foe: The face of psychosis in neurosyphilis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease caused by Treponema pal lidum, continues to be a considerable health burden worldwide. It affects over 30 million people, the majority of whom are from Africa and South-East Asia.[1]. This disease, which is also known as the 'great imitator', has three stages. Primary syphilis ...

  20. Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice-Relevance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghab, Roxanne Ward; Maldonado, Carlos; Whitehead, Dongsook; Bartlett, Felicia; de Bittner, Magaly Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face-to-face programs. Practice-oriented online educational methods and e-learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational…

  1. Nurse managers' experiences in continuous quality improvement in resource-poor healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakyo, Tracy Alexis; Xiao, Lily Dongxia

    2017-06-01

    Ensuring safe and quality care for patients in hospitals is an important part of a nurse manager's role. Continuous quality improvement has been identified as one approach that leads to the delivery of quality care services to patients and is widely used by nurse managers to improve patient care. Nurse managers' experiences in initiating continuous quality improvement activities in resource-poor healthcare settings remain largely unknown. Research evidence is highly demanded in these settings to address disease burden and evidence-based practice. This interpretive qualitative study was conducted to gain an understanding of nurse managers' Continuous Quality Improvement experiences in rural hospitals in Uganda. Nurse managers in rural healthcare settings used their role to prioritize quality improvement activities, monitor the Continuous Quality Improvement process, and utilize in-service education to support continuous quality improvement. The nurse managers in our sample encountered a number of barriers during the implementation of Continuous Quality Improvement, including: limited patient participation, lack of materials, and limited human resources. Efforts to address the challenges faced through good governance and leadership development require more attention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Do Young Infants Prefer an Infant-Directed Face or a Happy Face?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin I.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2013-01-01

    Infants' visual preference for infant-directed (ID) faces over adult-directed (AD) faces was examined in two experiments that introduced controls for emotion. Infants' eye movements were recorded as they viewed a series of side-by-side dynamic faces. When emotion was held constant, 6-month-old infants showed no preference for ID faces over AD…

  3. An Investigation of Online and Face-to-Face Communication in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Gabriela; Green, Kellie; Rahman, Aliyah; Epp, Erik

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated an online office hour and a face-to-face recitation for similarities and differences. The online office hour and face-to-face recitation were a part of general chemistry courses taught at different universities. The courses covered the same material at the same level. The results of the investigation revealed…

  4. Face to Face or E-Learning in Turkish EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Ekrem; Cakir, Recep

    2014-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to understand e-learners and face to face learners' views towards learning English through e-learning in vocational higher school context and to determine the role of academic achievement and gender in e-learning and face to face learning. This study was conducted at a state-run university in 2012-2013 academic year…

  5. The complex duration perception of emotional faces: effects of face direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegl, Katrin M; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Dürr, Lea; Traue, Harald C; Huckauf, Anke

    2015-01-01

    The perceived duration of emotional face stimuli strongly depends on the expressed emotion. But, emotional faces also differ regarding a number of other features like gaze, face direction, or sex. Usually, these features have been controlled by only using pictures of female models with straight gaze and face direction. Doi and Shinohara (2009) reported that an overestimation of angry faces could only be found when the model's gaze was oriented toward the observer. We aimed at replicating this effect for face direction. Moreover, we explored the effect of face direction on the duration perception sad faces. Controlling for the sex of the face model and the participant, female and male participants rated the duration of neutral, angry, and sad face stimuli of both sexes photographed from different perspectives in a bisection task. In line with current findings, we report a significant overestimation of angry compared to neutral face stimuli that was modulated by face direction. Moreover, the perceived duration of sad face stimuli did not differ from that of neutral faces and was not influenced by face direction. Furthermore, we found that faces of the opposite sex appeared to last longer than those of the same sex. This outcome is discussed with regards to stimulus parameters like the induced arousal, social relevance, and an evolutionary context.

  6. The complex duration perception of emotional faces: Effects of face direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Martina Kliegl

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The perceived duration of emotional face stimuli strongly depends on the expressed emotion. But, emotional faces also differ regarding a number of other features like gaze, face direction, or sex. Usually, these features have been controlled by only using pictures of female models with straight gaze and face direction. Doi and Shinohara (2009 reported that an overestimation of angry faces could only be found when the model’s gaze was oriented towards the observer. We aimed at replicating this effect for face direction. Moreover, we explored the effect of face direction on the duration perception sad faces. Controlling for the sex of the face model and the participant, female and male participants rated the duration of neutral, angry and sad face stimuli of both sexes photographed from different perspectives in a bisection task. In line with current findings, we report a significant overestimation of angry compared to neutral face stimuli that was modulated by face direction. Moreover, the perceived duration of sad face stimuli did not differ from that of neutral faces and was not influenced by face direction. Furthermore, we found that faces of the opposite sex appeared to last longer than those of the same sex. This outcome is discussed with regards to stimulus parameters like the induced arousal, social relevance and an evolutionary context.

  7. The changing face of tuberculomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthi, B; Ramamurthi, R; Vasudevan, M C; Sridhar, K

    1993-11-01

    Tuberculomas of the brain continue to be prevalent in all the developing countries of Asia, Africa, South American and Europe and seem to be making a comeback in the richer nations of the West. They pose a challenge to the neurosurgeon, in spite of the advances that have been made in the diagnosis of these lesions and in the available therapeutic regimes. During the last decade, computed tomographic (CT) scan has facilitated early diagnosis of tuberculomas at a stage when the lesions are small and antituberculous therapy (ATT) has been found beneficial in the majority of patients. Those lesions that do not respond need change in the ATT regimen and addition of steroids. Some lesions tend to disappear by themselves after a few weeks and probably are not tuberculous in nature. Some continue to grow in spite of ATT, probably due to drug resistance and require surgery, and some turn out to be gliomas. As it is not possible to differentiate between glioma or tuberculoma from CT morphology alone, and as stereotactic biopsy can be expensive, it is worth a trial with ATT, reserving surgery only to those which continue to grow inspite of ATT.

  8. Lost in Translation: Adapting a Face-to-Face Course Into an Online Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzig, Melissa J

    2015-09-01

    Online education has grown dramatically over the past decade. Instructors who teach face-to-face courses are being called on to adapt their courses to the online environment. Many instructors do not have sufficient training to be able to effectively move courses to an online format. This commentary discusses the growth of online learning, common challenges faced by instructors adapting courses from face-to-face to online, and best practices for translating face-to-face courses into online learning opportunities. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Facebook and MySpace: complement or substitute for face-to-face interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujath, Carlyne L

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have claimed that social-networking sites are used as a substitute for face-to-face interaction, resulting in deteriorating relationship quality and decreased intimacy among its users. The present study hypothesized that this type of communication is not a substitute for face-to-face interaction; rather, that it is an extension of communication with face-to-face partners. A survey was administered to examine the use of Facebook and MySpace in this regard among 183 college students. The study confirmed that Facebook and MySpace do act as an extension of face-to-face interaction, but that some users do tend to rely on Facebook and MySpace for interpersonal communication more than face-to-face interaction.

  10. Digital 'faces' of synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Kathrin

    2013-06-01

    In silicio design plays a fundamental role in the endeavour to synthesise biological systems. In particular, computer-aided design software enables users to manage the complexity of biological entities that is connected to their construction and reconfiguration. The software's graphical user interface bridges the gap between the machine-readable data on the algorithmic subface of the computer and its human-amenable surface represented by standardised diagrammatic elements. Notations like the Systems Biology Graphical Notation (SBGN), together with interactive operations such as drag & drop, allow the user to visually design and simulate synthetic systems as 'bio-algorithmic signs'. Finally, the digital programming process should be extended to the wet lab to manufacture the designed synthetic biological systems. By exploring the different 'faces' of synthetic biology, I argue that in particular computer-aided design (CAD) is pushing the idea to automatically produce de novo objects. Multifaceted software processes serve mutually aesthetic, epistemic and performative purposes by simultaneously black-boxing and bridging different data sources, experimental operations and community-wide standards. So far, synthetic biology is mainly a product of digital media technologies that structurally mimic the epistemological challenge to take both qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of biological systems into account in order to understand and produce new and functional entities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The many faces of autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, H T

    2001-01-01

    The challenge in maintaining patient autonomy regarding medical decision-making and confidentiality lies not only in control over information transferred to and regarding patients, but in the ambiguity of autonomy itself. Post-modernity is characterized by the recognition of not just numerous accounts of autonomy, but by the inability in a principled fashion to select one as canonical. Autonomy is understood as a good, a right-making condition, and an element of human flourishing. In each case, it can have a different content, depending in part on whether it is given a nomological or a volitional construal. Different accounts of autonomy can lead to strikingly different understandings of appropriate behavior, including the argument that one ought on behalf of autonomy to liberate individuals from the sense of autonomy they themselves affirm. In the face of competing accounts of moral probity, autonomy in a secular morality and bioethics must by default be understood in terms of the permission of patients, which makes space for numerous moral accounts and different communal construals of free choice, which in turn will legitimate different practices of informing patients and maintaining confidentiality.

  12. Three Faces of Fragile X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb-Lundell, Cornelia C E

    2016-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the first of 3 syndromes identified as a health condition related to fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene dysfunction. The other 2 syndromes are fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency syndrome (FXPOI) and fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which together are referred to as fragile X-associated disorders (FXDs). Collectively, this group comprises the 3 faces of fragile X. Even though the 3 conditions share a common genetic defect, each one is a separate health condition that results in a variety of body function impairments such as motor delay, musculoskeletal issues related to low muscle tone, coordination limitations, ataxia, tremor, undefined muscle aches and pains, and, for FXTAS, a late-onset neurodegeneration. Although each FXD condition may benefit from physical therapy intervention, available evidence as to the efficacy of intervention appropriate to FXDs is lacking. This perspective article will discuss the genetic basis of FMR1 gene dysfunction and describe health conditions related to this mutation, which have a range of expressions within a family. Physical therapy concerns and possible assessment and intervention strategies will be introduced. Understanding the intergenerational effect of the FMR1 mutation with potential life-span expression is a key component to identifying and treating the health conditions related to this specific genetic condition. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  13. Face-to-face or face-to-screen? Undergraduates' opinions and test performance in classroom vs. online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Nenagh; Grieve, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    As electronic communication becomes increasingly common, and as students juggle study, work, and family life, many universities are offering their students more flexible learning opportunities. Classes once delivered face-to-face are often replaced by online activities and discussions. However, there is little research comparing students' experience and learning in these two modalities. The aim of this study was to compare undergraduates' preference for, and academic performance on, class material and assessment presented online vs. in traditional classrooms. Psychology students (N = 67) at an Australian university completed written exercises, a class discussion, and a written test on two academic topics. The activities for one topic were conducted face-to-face, and the other online, with topics counterbalanced across two groups. The results showed that students preferred to complete activities face-to-face rather than online, but there was no significant difference in their test performance in the two modalities. In their written responses, students expressed a strong preference for class discussions to be conducted face-to-face, reporting that they felt more engaged, and received more immediate feedback, than in online discussion. A follow-up study with a separate group (N = 37) confirmed that although students appreciated the convenience of completing written activities online in their own time, they also strongly preferred to discuss course content with peers in the classroom rather than online. It is concluded that online and face-to-face activities can lead to similar levels of academic performance, but that students would rather do written activities online but engage in discussion in person. Course developers could aim to structure classes so that students can benefit from both the flexibility of online learning, and the greater engagement experienced in face-to-face discussion.

  14. Electrical stimulation of human fusiform face-selective regions distorts face perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Josef; Jacques, Corentin; Foster, Brett L.; Withoft, Nathan; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Weiner, Kevin S.; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2012-01-01

    Face-selective neural responses in the human fusiform gyrus have been widely examined. However, their causal role in human face perception is largely unknown. Here, we used a multimodal approach of electrocorticography (ECoG), high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and electrical brain stimulation (EBS) to directly investigate the causal role of face-selective neural responses of the fusiform gyrus (FG) in face perception in a patient implanted with subdural electrodes in the right inferior temporal lobe. High-resolution fMRI identified two distinct FG face-selective regions (mFus-faces and pFus-faces). ECoG revealed a striking anatomical and functional correspondence with fMRI data where a pair of face-selective electrodes, positioned one centimeter apart, overlapped mFus-faces and pFus-faces, respectively. Moreover, electrical charge delivered to this pair of electrodes induced a profound face-specific perceptual distortion during viewing of real faces. Specifically, the subject reported a “metamorphosed” appearance of faces of people in the room. Several controls illustrate the specificity of the effect to the perception of faces. EBS of mFus-faces and pFus-faces neither produced a significant deficit in naming pictures of famous faces on the computer, nor did it affect the appearance of nonface objects. Further, the appearance of faces remained unaffected during both sham stimulation and stimulation of a pair of nearby electrodes that were not face-selective. Overall, our findings reveal a striking convergence of fMRI, ECoG, and EBS, which together offer a rare causal link between functional subsets of the human FG network and face perception. PMID:23100414

  15. Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... within weeks of getting symptoms. Further problems are rare. Early treatment reduces the risk of serious problems. Researchers continue to look for the cause of Kawasaki disease and better ways to diagnose and treat it. They also hope to learn ...

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, R; Wung, J T

    1998-01-01

    Progress in neonatal intensive care is closely linked to improvements in the management of respiratory failure in small infants. This applies to the care of the preterm infants with immature lungs, and also to treatment of the preterm or full term infants with specific diseases that are associated with respiratory failure. Respiratory distress of the newborn continues to account for significant morbidity in the intensive care unit. The spectrum of disease ranges from mild distress to severe respiratory failure requiring varying degrees of support. The current modalities of ventilatory assistance range from the more benign continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to conventional mechanical ventilation, and on to high frequency ventilation. It is a reasonable supposition that the type of ventilatory assistance provided to these infants should be graded according to the severity of the disease. However, the principal objective in selecting the mode of respiratory support should be to use a modality which results in minimal volo- or barotrauma to the infant. The following detailed description on CPAP explains its physiological effects, delivery system, indications for use, application, maintenance, and associated complications. The equipment described is simple to use, has a greater cost benefit, and has a more universal application, which is of help to smaller units including those in the developing parts of the world. We have also included our institutional clinical experience of CPAP usage in very low birth weight infants from the periods before and after commercial availability of surfactant in the United States.

  17. Dissociation between face perception and face memory in adults, but not children, with developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Kirsten A; Garrido, Lúcia; Duchaine, Brad

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive models propose that face recognition is accomplished through a series of discrete stages, including perceptual representation of facial structure, and encoding and retrieval of facial information. This implies that impaired face recognition can result from failures of face perception, face memory, or both. Studies of acquired prosopagnosia, autism spectrum disorders, and the development of normal face recognition support the idea that face perception and face memory are distinct processes, yet this distinction has received little attention in developmental prosopagnosia (DP). To address this issue, we tested the face perception and face memory of children and adults with DP. By definition, face memory is impaired in DP, so memory deficits were present in all participants. However, we found that all children, but only half of the adults had impaired face perception. Thus, results from adults indicate that face perception and face memory are dissociable, while the results from children provide no evidence for this division. Importantly, our findings raise the possibility that DP is qualitatively different in childhood versus adulthood. We discuss theoretical explanations for this developmental pattern and conclude that longitudinal studies are necessary to better understand the developmental trajectory of face perception and face memory deficits in DP. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Dissociation between face perception and face memory in adults, but not children, with developmental prosopagnosia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten A. Dalrymple

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive models propose that face recognition is accomplished through a series of discrete stages, including perceptual representation of facial structure, and encoding and retrieval of facial information. This implies that impaired face recognition can result from failures of face perception, face memory, or both. Studies of acquired prosopagnosia, autism spectrum disorders, and the development of normal face recognition support the idea that face perception and face memory are distinct processes, yet this distinction has received little attention in developmental prosopagnosia (DP. To address this issue, we tested the face perception and face memory of children and adults with DP. By definition, face memory is impaired in DP, so memory deficits were present in all participants. However, we found that all children, but only half of the adults had impaired face perception. Thus, results from adults indicate that face perception and face memory are dissociable, while the results from children provide no evidence for this division. Importantly, our findings raise the possibility that DP is qualitatively different in childhood versus adulthood. We discuss theoretical explanations for this developmental pattern and conclude that longitudinal studies are necessary to better understand the developmental trajectory of face perception and face memory deficits in DP.

  19. Continuities and Discontinuities in Family Members' Relationships with Alzheimer's Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesla, Catherine; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Asked 30 families who cared for family member with Alzheimer's disease to provide narratives of daily care over 18 months. Found that different family members experienced their relationship with Alzheimer's disease patient to be continuous, continuous but transformed, or radically discontinuous with their relationship prior to the disease.…

  20. Discretization of continuous frame

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other known continuous frames. Finally, we state and prove the assertions of the stability of perturbation in this concept. Keywords. Bounded operator; Hilbert space; continuous frame; atomic resolution of identity. 1. Introduction and preliminaries. As we know frames are more flexible tools to convey information than bases, ...

  1. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 88 ...

  2. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 88 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 51 - 88 of 88 ...

  3. Cutting Out Continuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Hutton, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In the field of program transformation, one often transforms programs into continuation-passing style to make their flow of control explicit, and then immediately removes the resulting continuations using defunctionalisation to make the programs first-order. In this article, we show how these two...

  4. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  5. Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and treatment plan. It is important to avoid "internet overload" by sticking to reputable websites. See the additional resources at the end of this article. Making changes to safeguard their child's health: Infants and children with CHD have weaker ...

  6. [Facing new ethical challenges and dilemmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belicza, B

    1997-01-01

    Considering the present health policy, health service and health care systems, health condition and health demands of the people, proclaimed priorities in biomedical scientific research in the Republic of Croatia, and expected health and disease status in the first decades of the 21st century, the author raises the question of sensitization of the Croatian physicians and the public to new ethical challenges. These questions are arousing attention in the world and Europe as one of the peculiarities mankind is facing in the midst of new scientific, technical and informatic possibilities, at the same time in the context of global impoverishment and restricted public funds, with existing or expected changes in the demographic structure and the life philosophy system of values. In democratic, pluralistic societies, the dimension of human rights is getting increasingly pronounced. This is reflected in the postulation of international, national or professional bioethical standards related to biomedical research, in the emphasis on the indisputable public right to actively make decisions by consensus mechanisms about goals, priorities and limits of individual and collective health care programmes, forms and levels of medical care in the national health service and obligatory health insurance system, as well as about ethical aspects of the relation doctor-patient, at the boundary of the interactions of doctor-patient-profession-individual-community-society relationships.

  7. Four Challenges That Global Health Networks Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Shiffman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Global health networks, webs of individuals and organizations with a shared concern for a particular condition, have proliferated over the past quarter century. They differ in their effectiveness, a factor that may help explain why resource allocations vary across health conditions and do not correspond closely with disease burden. Drawing on findings from recently concluded studies of eight global health networks—addressing alcohol harm, early childhood development (ECD, maternal mortality, neonatal mortality, pneumonia, surgically-treatable conditions, tobacco use, and tuberculosis—I identify four challenges that networks face in generating attention and resources for the conditions that concern them. The first is problem definition: generating consensus on what the problem is and how it should be addressed. The second is positioning: portraying the issue in ways that inspire external audiences to act. The third is coalition-building: forging alliances with these external actors, particularly ones outside the health sector. The fourth is governance: establishing institutions to facilitate collective action. Research indicates that global health networks that effectively tackle these challenges are more likely to garner support to address the conditions that concern them. In addition to the effectiveness of networks, I also consider their legitimacy, identifying reasons both to affirm and to question their right to exert power.

  8. Configural face encoding and spatial frequency information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutet, Isabelle; Collin, Charles; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2003-10-01

    Configural relations and a critical band of spatial frequencies (SFs) in the middle range are particularly important for face recognition. We report the results of four experiments in which the relationship between these two types of information was examined. In Experiments 1, 2A, and 2B, the face inversion effect (FIE) was used to probe configural face encoding. Recognition of upright and inverted faces and nonface objects was measured in four conditions: a no-filter condition and three SF conditions (low, medium, and high frequency). We found significant FIEs of comparable magnitudes for all frequency conditions. In Experiment 3, discrimination of faces on the basis of either configural or featural modifications was measured under the same four conditions. Although the ability to discriminate configural modifications was superior in the medium-frequency condition, so was the ability to discriminate featural modifications. We conclude that the band of SF that is critical for face recognition does not contribute preferentially to configural encoding.

  9. Assessment of Continuity of Care among Patients with Multiple Chronic Conditions in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Napolitano

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to evaluate the extent of continuity of care and to investigate its association with several factors among a sample of outpatients with chronic diseases in Italy. The survey was conducted, using face to face interview, from March to December 2014 in a random sample of 633 outpatients with chronic conditions who were going in cardiology, metabolic disorders, and respiratory ambulatory center of four hospitals. A multivariate ordered logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with the outpatients continuity of care. The mean of the Bice-Boxerman continuity of care (COC index related to the entire sample was 0.44, and 27.9%, 58.4%, 13.7% had a low, intermediate, and high value of the index based on the tertiles of the distribution. The results of the ordered logistic regression analysis showed that female patients, those older, those who had a lower score of Katz Index of independence in activities of daily living, those who had a lower Charlson et al. comorbidity score, and those who had no hospitalization in the last year, were significantly more likely to have a higher value of the COC index. Patients who had completed a secondary school education had significantly lower odds of having a high value of COC index in comparison to patients with a college degree educational level. Policy makers and clinicians involved in the care of patients should implement comprehensively and efficiently efforts in order to improve the continuity of care in patients with chronic diseases.

  10. Face mask ventilation--the dos and don'ts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fiona E; Morley, Colin J

    2013-12-01

    Face mask ventilation provides respiratory support to newly born or sick infants. It is a challenging technique and difficult to ensure that an appropriate tidal volume is delivered because large and variable leaks occur between the mask and face; airway obstruction may also occur. Technique is more important than the mask shape although the size must appropriately fit the face. The essence of the technique is to roll the mask on to the face from the chin while avoiding the eyes, with a finger and thumb apply a strong even downward pressure to the top of the mask, away from the stem and sloped sides or skirt of the mask, place the other fingers under the jaw and apply a similar upward pressure. Preterm infants require continuous end-expiratory pressure to facilitate lung aeration and maintain lung volume. This is best done with a T-piece device, not a self-inflating or flow-inflating bag. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Disease: H00145 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed metabolite levels in urine. The main symptoms of aspartylglucosaminuria are progressive mental retardation, coarce faces, behavior...al, and hepatosplenomegaly. Inherited metabolic disease; Lysosomal storage disease

  12. Continuous user authentication using temporal information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinuma, Koichiro; Jain, Anil K.

    2010-04-01

    Conventional computer systems authenticate users only at the initial log-in session, which can be the cause of a critical security flaw. To resolve this problem, systems need continuous user authentication methods that continuously monitor and authenticate users based on some biometric trait(s). We propose a new method for continuous user authentication based on a Webcam that monitors a logged in user's face and color of clothing. Our method can authenticate users regardless of their posture in front of the workstation (laptop or PC). Previous methods for continuous user authentication cannot authenticate users without biometric observation. To alleviate this requirement, our method uses color information of users' clothing as an enrollment template in addition to their face information. The system cannot pre-register the clothing color information because this information is not permanent. To deal with the problem, our system automatically registers this information every time the user logs in and then fuses it with the conventional (password) identification system. We report preliminary authentication results and future enhancements to the proposed system.

  13. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Maria Felisberti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174. An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2. Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3. Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4. CONCLUSION: The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  14. Contextual modulation of biases in face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisberti, Fatima Maria; Pavey, Louisa

    2010-09-23

    The ability to recognize the faces of potential cooperators and cheaters is fundamental to social exchanges, given that cooperation for mutual benefit is expected. Studies addressing biases in face recognition have so far proved inconclusive, with reports of biases towards faces of cheaters, biases towards faces of cooperators, or no biases at all. This study attempts to uncover possible causes underlying such discrepancies. Four experiments were designed to investigate biases in face recognition during social exchanges when behavioral descriptors (prosocial, antisocial or neutral) embedded in different scenarios were tagged to faces during memorization. Face recognition, measured as accuracy and response latency, was tested with modified yes-no, forced-choice and recall tasks (N = 174). An enhanced recognition of faces tagged with prosocial descriptors was observed when the encoding scenario involved financial transactions and the rules of the social contract were not explicit (experiments 1 and 2). Such bias was eliminated or attenuated by making participants explicitly aware of "cooperative", "cheating" and "neutral/indifferent" behaviors via a pre-test questionnaire and then adding such tags to behavioral descriptors (experiment 3). Further, in a social judgment scenario with descriptors of salient moral behaviors, recognition of antisocial and prosocial faces was similar, but significantly better than neutral faces (experiment 4). The results highlight the relevance of descriptors and scenarios of social exchange in face recognition, when the frequency of prosocial and antisocial individuals in a group is similar. Recognition biases towards prosocial faces emerged when descriptors did not state the rules of a social contract or the moral status of a behavior, and they point to the existence of broad and flexible cognitive abilities finely tuned to minor changes in social context.

  15. 3D face modeling, analysis and recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Daoudi, Mohamed; Veltkamp, Remco

    2013-01-01

    3D Face Modeling, Analysis and Recognition presents methodologies for analyzing shapes of facial surfaces, develops computational tools for analyzing 3D face data, and illustrates them using state-of-the-art applications. The methodologies chosen are based on efficient representations, metrics, comparisons, and classifications of features that are especially relevant in the context of 3D measurements of human faces. These frameworks have a long-term utility in face analysis, taking into account the anticipated improvements in data collection, data storage, processing speeds, and application s

  16. Face hallucination using orthogonal canonical correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huiling; Lam, Kin-Man

    2016-05-01

    A two-step face-hallucination framework is proposed to reconstruct a high-resolution (HR) version of a face from an input low-resolution (LR) face, based on learning from LR-HR example face pairs using orthogonal canonical correlation analysis (orthogonal CCA) and linear mapping. In the proposed algorithm, face images are first represented using principal component analysis (PCA). Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) with the orthogonality property is then employed, to maximize the correlation between the PCA coefficients of the LR and the HR face pairs to improve the hallucination performance. The original CCA does not own the orthogonality property, which is crucial for information reconstruction. We propose using orthogonal CCA, which is proven by experiments to achieve a better performance in terms of global face reconstruction. In addition, in the residual-compensation process, a linear-mapping method is proposed to include both the inter- and intrainformation about manifolds of different resolutions. Compared with other state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed framework can achieve a comparable, or even better, performance in terms of global face reconstruction and the visual quality of face hallucination. Experiments on images with various parameter settings and blurring distortions show that the proposed approach is robust and has great potential for real-world applications.

  17. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder scan own-race faces differently from other-race faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Quinn, Paul C; Fan, Yuebo; Huang, Dan; Feng, Cong; Joseph, Lisa; Li, Jiao; Lee, Kang

    2016-01-01

    It has been well documented that people recognize and scan other-race faces differently from faces of their own race. The current study examined whether this cross-racial difference in face processing found in the typical population also exists in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Participants included 5- to 10-year-old children with ASD (n=29), typically developing (TD) children matched on chronological age (n=29), and TD children matched on nonverbal IQ (n=29). Children completed a face recognition task in which they were asked to memorize and recognize both own- and other-race faces while their eye movements were tracked. We found no recognition advantage for own-race faces relative to other-race faces in any of the three groups. However, eye-tracking results indicated that, similar to TD children, children with ASD exhibited a cross-racial face-scanning pattern: they looked at the eyes of other-race faces longer than at those of own-race faces, whereas they looked at the mouth of own-race faces longer than at that of other-race faces. The findings suggest that although children with ASD have difficulty with processing some aspects of faces, their ability to process face race information is relatively spared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Many faces of cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bari Arfan Ul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is known for its clinical diversity and increasing numbers of new and rare variants of the disease are being reported these days. Aim: The aim of this descriptive study was to look for and report the atypical presentations of this common disease occurring in Pakistan. Methods: The study was carried out in three hospitals (MH, Rawalpindi; PAF Hospital, Sargodha; and CMH, Muzaffarabad from 2002 to 2006. Military and civilian patients of all ages, both males and females, belonging to central and north Punjab province and Kashmir were included in the study. Clinical as well as parasitological features of cutaneous leishmaniasis were studied. The unusual lesions were photographed and categorized accordingly using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 718 patients of cutaneous leishmaniasis, 41 (5.7% had unusual presentations. The commonest among unusual morphologies was lupoid leishmaniasis 14 (34.1%, followed by sporotrichoid 5 (12.1%, paronychial 3 (7.3%, lid leishmaniasis 2 (4.9%, psoriasiform 2 (4.9%, mycetoma-like 2 (4.9%, erysipeloid 2 (4.9%, chancriform 2 (4.9%, whitlow 1 (2.4%, scar leishmaniasis 1 (2.4%, DLE-like 1 (2.4%, ′squamous cell carcinoma′-like 1 (2.4%, zosteriform 1 (2.4%, eczematous 1 (2.4%, verrucous 1 (2.4%, palmar/plantar 1 (2.4% and mucocutaneous 1 (2.4%. Conclusion: In Pakistan, an endemic country for CL, the possibility of CL should be kept in mind while diagnosing common dermatological diseases like erysipelas, chronic eczema, herpes zoster, paronychia; and uncommon disorders like lupus vulgaris, squamous cell carcinoma, sporotrichosis, mycetoma and other deep mycoses.

  19. A multidisciplinary protocol for face transplantation at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, E M; Diaz-Siso, J R; Pomahac, B

    2011-12-01

    Face transplantation introduces an unprecedented potential to restore form and function in patients with severe facial disfigurement. A successful face transplantation programme requires a sound research protocol, a solid infrastructure, expert personnel and adequate funding. There are only a few active face transplant programmes in the world and interest in the development of new such programmes continues to grow. After 2 years of working on the development of the face transplant programme, in 2009 the team at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) performed the 2nd face transplant in the United States. Since then, the team has continued to evaluate several possible face transplant candidates and performed three additional facial transplants. These experiences have helped refine a highly effective multidisciplinary protocol that carries a patient through recruitment, informed consent, screening, preoperative planning, face transplantation surgery and postoperative long-term follow-up. The members of the BWH face transplantation team responsible for carrying out this protocol include a team leader, a programme manager/coordinator, clinical and rehabilitation specialists, social workers, bioethicists, nurses and administrative staff. The roles of each team member during the various stages of the face transplant process are presented here. Additional insight into the interaction between the face transplant team, the Institutional Review Board and the regional Organ Procurement Organization is given. The BWH team's experience has shown that true collaboration, creativity and a unique approach to each candidate translate into the optimal care of the face transplant patient both before and after surgery. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Interpersonal Similarity between Body Movements in Face-To-Face Communication in Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Naoki; Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Minemura, Juichi; Xu, Bujie; Nozawa, Takayuki; Ogata, Taiki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Individuals are embedded in social networks in which they communicate with others in their daily lives. Because smooth face-to-face communication is the key to maintaining these networks, measuring the smoothness of such communication is an important issue. One indicator of smoothness is the similarity of the body movements of the two individuals concerned. A typical example noted in experimental environments is the interpersonal synchronization of body movements such as nods and gestures during smooth face-to-face communication. It should therefore be possible to estimate quantitatively the smoothness of face-to-face communication in social networks through measurement of the synchronization of body movements. However, this is difficult because social networks, which differ from disciplined experimental environments, are open environments for the face-to-face communication between two individuals. In such open environments, their body movements become complicated by various external factors and may follow unstable and nonuniform patterns. Nevertheless, we consider there to be some interaction during face-to-face communication that leads to the interpersonal synchronization of body movements, which can be seen through the interpersonal similarity of body movements. The present study aims to clarify such interaction in terms of body movements during daily face-to-face communication in real organizations of more than 100 people. We analyzed data on the frequency of body movement for each individual during face-to-face communication, as measured by a wearable sensor, and evaluated the degree of interpersonal similarity of body movements between two individuals as their frequency difference. Furthermore, we generated uncorrelated data by resampling the data gathered and compared these two data sets statistically to distinguish the effects of actual face-to-face communication from those of the activities accompanying the communication. Our results confirm an