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Sample records for disease ckd patients

  1. Disease management programs for CKD patients: the potential and pitfalls.

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    Rocco, Michael V

    2009-03-01

    Disease management describes the use of a number of approaches to identify and treat patients with chronic health conditions, especially those that are expensive to treat. Disease management programs have grown rapidly in the United States in the past several years. These programs have been established for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but some have been discontinued because of the high cost of the program. Disease management programs for CKD face unique challenges. Identification of patients with CKD is hampered by incomplete use of the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for CKD by physicians and the less than universal use of estimated glomerular filtration rate from serum creatinine measurements to identify patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2). CKD affects multiple organ systems. Thus, a comprehensive disease management program will need to manage each of these aspects of CKD. These multiple interventions likely will make a CKD disease management program more costly than similar disease management programs designed for patients with diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, or other chronic diseases. The lack of data that can be used to develop effective disease management programs in CKD makes it difficult to determine goals for the management of each organ system affected by CKD. Finally, long periods of observation will be needed to determine whether a particular disease management program is effective in not only improving patient outcomes, but also decreasing both resource use and health care dollars. This long-term observation period is contrary to how most disease management contracts are written, which usually are based on meeting goals during a 1- to 3-year period. Until these challenges are resolved, it likely will be difficult to maintain effective disease management programs for CKD.

  2. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anees, M.; Khan, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  3. Risk factors for CKD progression in Japanese patients: findings from the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study.

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    Inaguma, Daijo; Imai, Enyu; Takeuchi, Ayano; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Hishida, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) eventually progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, risk factors associated with CKD progression have not been well characterized in Japanese patients with CKD who are less affected with coronary disease than Westerners. A large-scale, multicenter, prospective, cohort study was conducted in patients with CKD and under nephrology care, who met the eligibility criteria [Japanese; age 20-75 years; and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 10-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ]. The primary endpoint was a composite of time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline or time to the initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The secondary endpoints were the rate of decline in eGFR from baseline, time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline, time to the initiation of RRT, and time to doubling of serum creatinine (Cre) concentration. 2966 patients (female, 38.9 %; age, 60. 3 ± 11.6 years) were enrolled. The incidence of the primary endpoint increased significantly (P < 0.0001) in concert with CKD stage at baseline. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.203, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.099-1.318)] and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR ≥ 1000 mg/g Cre; HR: 4.523; 95 % CI 3.098-6.604) at baseline were significantly associated (P < 0.0001, respectively) with the primary endpoint. Elevated SBP and increased UACR were risk factors that were significantly associated with CKD progression to ESRD in Japanese patients under nephrology care. UMIN clinical trial registry number: UMIN000020038.

  4. Prevalence and risk factors of CKD in Chinese patients with periodontal disease.

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    Kejin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. METHODS: In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2, the presence of albuminuria, or hematuria. All patients with periodontal disease underwent a periodontal examination, including periodontal probing pocket depth, gingival recession, and clinical attachment level by Florida Probe. They completed a questionnaire and had blood and urine samples taken. The adjusted prevalence of indicators of kidney damage was calculated and risk factors associated with CKD were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 1392 patients with periodontal disease were invited to participate this study and 1268 completed the survey and examination. After adjusting for age and sex, the prevalence of reduced eGFR, albuminuria, and hematuria was 2.7% (95% CI 1.7-3.7, 6.7% (95% CI 5.5-8.1 and 10.9% (95% CI 9.2-12.5, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of CKD was 18.2% (95% CI 16.2-20.3. Age, male, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, and interleukin-6 levels (≥7.54 ng/L were independent risk factors for reduced eGFR. Female, diabetes, hypertension, history of CKD, hyperuricemia, high level of cholesterol, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP (≥ 1.03 mg/L and TNF-α levels (≥ 1.12 ng/L were independently associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Female, lower education (CKD were independent risk factors for hematuria. CONCLUSIONS: 18.2% of Chinese patients with periodontal disease have proteinuria, hematuria, or reduced eGFR, indicating the presence of kidney damage

  5. The modified CKD-EPI equation may be not more accurate than CKD-EPI equation in determining glomerular filtration rate in Chinese patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Xie, Peng; Huang, Jian-Min; Li, Ying; Liu, Huai-Jun; Qu, Yan

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the application of the new modified Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (mCKD-EPI) equation developed by Liu for the measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in Chinese patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to evaluate whether this modified form is more accurate than the original one in clinical practice. GFR was determined simultaneously by 3 methods: (a) 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ( 99m Tc-DTPA) dual plasma sample clearance method (mGFR), which was used as the reference standard; (b) CKD-EPI equation (eGFRckdepi); (c) modified CKD-EPI equation (eGFRmodified). Concordance correlation and Passing-Bablok regression were used to compare the validity of eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified. Bias, precision and accuracy were compared to identify which equation showed the better performance in determining GFR. A total of 170 patients were enrolled. Both eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified correlated well with mGFR (concordance correlation coefficient 0.90 and 0.74, respectively) and the Passing-Bablok regression equation of eGFRckdepi and eGFRmodified against mGFR was mGFR = 0.37 + 1.04 eGFRckdepi and -49.25 + 1.74 eGFRmodified, respectively. In terms of bias, precision and 30 % accuracy, eGFRmodified showed a worse performance compared to eGFRckdepi, in the whole cohort. The new modified CKD-EPI equation cannot replace the original CKD-EPI equation in determining GFR in Chinese patients with CKD.

  6. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

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    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Nutrition and Physical Activity in CKD patients

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    Adamasco Cupisti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD patients are at risk for protein-energy wasting, abnormal body composition and impaired physical capacity. These complications lead to increased risk of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality.In CKD patient as well as in healthy people, there is a close association between nutrition and physical activity. Namely, inadequate nutrient (energy intake impairs physical performance thus favoring a sedentary lifestyle: this further contributes to loss of muscle strength and mass, which limit the quality of life and rehabilitation of CKD patients. In CKD as well as in end-stage-renal-disease patients, regular physical activity coupled with adequate energy and protein intake counteracts protein-energy wasting and related comorbidity and mortality. In summary, exercise training can positively influence nutritional status and the perception of well-being of CKD patients and may facilitate the anabolic effects of nutritional interventions.

  8. CKD.QLD: establishment of a chronic kidney disease [CKD] registry in Queensland, Australia.

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    Venuthurupalli, Sree K; Hoy, Wendy E; Healy, Helen G; Cameron, Anne; Fassett, Robert G

    2017-06-07

    Chronic kidney disease [CKD] is recognised as a global public health problem. Until recently, the majority of information informing on CKD has been generated from renal registries reporting on patients with end-stage kidney disease [ESKD] and on renal replacement therapy [RRT]. There has been a paucity of information on pre-dialysis CKD cohorts, and many issues related to these poorly described populations are unresolved. To this end, international organizations have called for CKD surveillance systems across all countries. In Australia, we have responded by developing the Chronic Kidney Disease in Queensland [CKD.QLD] with three main platforms consisting of CKD Registry, clinical trials and development of biobank. This registry which is the core component of CKD surveillance was conceptualized specifically for the pre-dialysis population in the public health system in Queensland, Australia. Recruitment started in May 2011, and to date the Registry has evolved as one of the largest CKD cohorts in the world with recruitment close to 7000 patients. The Registry has had many outcomes, including being the nidus for Australia's first National Health and Medical Research Council [NHMRC] CKD Centre of Research Excellence [CKD.CRE]. The Registry, with its linkage to Queensland Health datasets, is reporting, and is expected to continue generating, significant information on multiple aspects of CKD, its trajectory, management and patient outcomes. Intent of the CKD.CRE is to facilitate an expanded Registry network that has representation from health services, both public and private, across Australia.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Disease in CKD and ESRD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

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    Tang, Mengyao; Batty, Jonathan A; Lin, Chiayu; Fan, Xiaohong; Chan, Kevin E; Kalim, Sahir

    2018-02-08

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and may be associated with poor outcomes. The magnitude of the association between pulmonary hypertension and mortality is uncertain due to the small size and variable findings of observational studies. Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies using subgroup analyses and metaregression. Patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD. Observational studies reporting clinical outcomes in patients with co-existing pulmonary hypertension and CKD or ESRD identified using a systematic search of PubMed and Embase. Pulmonary hypertension diagnosed by Doppler echocardiography. All-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and cardiovascular events. 16 studies, with 7,112 patients with an overall pulmonary hypertension prevalence of 23%, were included. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality among patients with CKD (relative risk [RR], 1.44; 95% CI, 1.17-1.76), with ESRD receiving maintenance dialysis (RR, 2.32; 95% CI, 1.91-2.83), and with a functioning kidney transplant (RR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.35-3.20). Pulmonary hypertension was associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events in patients with CKD (RR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.07-2.60) and ESRD receiving dialysis (RR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.76-3.08). There was an association between pulmonary hypertension and increased risk for cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD or ESRD (RR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.53-3.15). Heterogeneity of included studies, possibility of residual confounding, unavailability of individual patient-level data, and possibility of outcome reporting bias. Pulmonary hypertension is associated with a substantially increased risk for death and cardiovascular events in patients with CKD and ESRD. Risk is higher in patients with ESRD receiving dialysis compared with patients with CKD stages 1 to 5. Understanding the effect of interventions to lower

  10. COMPARISON OF BODY COMPOSITION ACCORDING TO AGE AND GENDER IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD.

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    Aleksandra Rymarz

    2012-06-01

    In hemodialysis patients no significant differences was observed in females and males in all BCMI, LTI, FTI and BMI. BCMI, LTI were significantly lower in older pts whereas BMI did not differ significantly (for all p < 0,05. In both groups BCMI and LTI decline in patients over 60 years whereas only in hemodialysis patients they do not differ in females and males. Analysis of body composition in patients with CKD is worth to be studied in large group of patients.

  11. Hematological profile of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients in Iran, in pre-dialysis stages and after initiation of hemodialysis

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    Afshar Reza

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common sequealae of chronic kidney disease (CKD, associated with significant morbidity. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 CKD patients (54 hemodia-lyzed, 46 pre-dialyzed. Data including, complete blood count, BUN, creatinine, creatinine clea-rance, underlying diseases and hemodialysis duration were collected by a questionnaire. The most frequent morphologic features were normochromic-normocytic (80%, hypochromic-microcytic (15% and macrocytic (5%. The frequency of anemia in hemodialyzed and pre-dialyzed patients (with mean Hgb level of 10.27 and 11.11 g/dL were 85% and 75%. Hemoglobin concentration was positively correlated to calculated creatinine clearance (P < 0.001. The severity of anemia among hemodialyzed patients was mild (Hgb > 10 g/dL in 5%, moderate in 70% and severe (Hgb < 7 g/dL in 25%, while in pre-dialyzed was mild in 45% and moderate in 55%. There was no correlation between the anemia and CKD causes or hemodialysis duration. In conclusion, data shows that anemia in our patients with CKD is a predominant manifestation, with high frequency but of moderate degree. The most likely cause is inadequate erythropoietin production.

  12. Impact of Vitamin D on the Cardiovascular System in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and Dialysis Patients.

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    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Olszewski, Robert; Rysz, Jacek

    2018-06-01

    In patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD), the prevalence of cardiovascular disease is much more common than in the general population. The role of vitamin D deficiency had been underestimated until a significant association was found between vitamin D therapy and survival benefit in haemodialysis patients. Vitamin D deficiency is present even in the early stages of chronic kidney disease. The results of experimental studies have revealed the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and impairment of cardiac contractile function, higher cardiac mass and increased myocardial collagen content. Experimental models propose that intermediate end points for the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and higher risk of cardiovascular disease comprise diminished left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), enhanced left ventricular diastolic function, and decreased frequency of heart failure. Multiple observational studies have demonstrated an association between the use of active vitamin D therapy in patients on dialysis and with CKD and improved survival. However, there are also many studies indicating important adverse effects of such treatment. Therefore, large randomized trials are required to analyze whether supplementation of vitamin D may affect outcomes and whether it is safe to be used in CKD patients.

  13. Erythropoietic response to oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease in the FIND-CKD trial
.

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    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Wyck, David Van; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Perrin, Amandine; Roger, Simon D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate erythropoietic response rates to oral iron over time in iron-deficient anemic patients with nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 1-year, randomized, multicenter trial of iron therapy in patients with ND-CKD, anemia, and iron deficiency, without erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy. Patients with active infection or C-reactive protein > 20 mg/L were excluded. In this post-hoc analysis, response was defined as ≥ 1 g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline, before initiation of alternative anemia therapy (i.e., ESA, transfusion, or intravenous iron). 308 patients received oral iron (200 mg elemental iron/day). Mean (SD) Hb at baseline was 10.4 (0.7) g/dL. At week 4, Hb data were available from 292 patients without alternative anemia therapy: 63/292 (21.6%) showed a response. Among the 229 nonresponders at week 4, 48.8% showed a cumulative response on ≥ 1 occasion by week 52 (11.1%, 19.9%, 25.9%, and 28.7% had a response at weeks 8, 12, 24, and 52, respectively), and 27.9% had received alternative iron therapy by week 52. Baseline levels of Hb, ferritin, and transferrin saturation were lower in responders than in nonresponders. Neither concomitant medication nor adherence (as assessed by medication count) was substantially different between early responders and nonresponders. Four weeks after starting oral iron therapy, only 21.6% of anemic patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency showed an Hb increase of at least 1 g/dL. Among early nonresponders, < 30% responded at any subsequent time point. Earlier consideration of alternative therapy could improve anemia management in this population.
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  14. Validation of Indonesian Version of FACIT Fatigue Scale Questionnaire in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD Patients with Routine Hemodialysis

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    Jhonson P. Sihombing

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD. One of anemia consequences is fatigue which can lead to decrease in quality of life. Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT Fatigue Scale is an instrument to measure patient’s score of fatigue. This questionnaire is not validated yet in Indonesia. The aim of this study is to validate Indonesian version of Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT Fatigue Scale as an instrument for patient’s quality of life. FACIT Fatigue Scale was translated into Indonesian and administrated to CKD patients with routine homodialysis in an academic hospital in Yogyakarta on May until October 2015. The validity was evaluated by Pearson correlation test and the reliability was evaluated by Cronbach’s alpha test. Validity test showed that all of the questions were valid because r count was bigger than r table=0,279 and reliable because r11=0,646>0,6. In conclusion, Indonesian version of FACIT Fatigue Scale was a brief and valid to monitor important symptom and its effect on CKD patients with routine hemodialysis.

  15. Arterial and Cellular Inflammation in Patients with CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J.; Verweij, Simone L.; van der Valk, Fleur M.; van Capelleveen, Julian C.; Kroon, Jeffrey; Versloot, Miranda; Verberne, Hein J.; Marquering, Henk A.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Vogt, Liffert; Stroes, Erik S. G.

    2017-01-01

    CKD associates with a 1.5- to 3.5-fold increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Both diseases are characterized by increased inflammation, and in patients with CKD, elevated C-reactive protein level predicts cardiovascular risk. In addition to systemic inflammation, local arterial inflammation,

  16. Longitudinal change in estimated GFR among CKD patients: A 10-year follow-up study of an integrated kidney disease care program in Taiwan.

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    Ching-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available This study examined the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD by using average annual decline in estimated GFR (eGFR and its risk factors in a 10-year follow-up CKD cohort.A prospective, observational cohort study, 4600 individuals fulfilled the definition of CKD, with or without proteinuria, were followed for 10 years. The eGFR was estimated by the MDRD equation. Linear regression was used to estimate participants' annual decline rate in eGFR. We defined subjects with annual eGFR decline rate <1 ml/min/1.73 m2 as non-progression and the decline rate over 3 ml/min/1.73 m2 as rapid progression.During the follow-up period, 2870 (62.4% individuals had annual eGFR decline rate greater than 1 ml/min/1.73 m2. The eGFR decline rate was slower in individuals with CKD diagnosed over the age of 60 years than those with onset at a younger age. Comparing to subjects with decline rate <1 ml/min/1.73 m2/year, the odds ratio (OR of developing rapid CKD progression for diabetes, proteinuria and late onset of CKD was 1.72 (95% CI: 1.48-2.00, 1.89(1.63-2.20 and 0.68 (0.56-0.81, respectively. When the model was adjusted for the latest CKD stage, comparing to those with CKD stage 1, patients with stage 4 and stage 5 have significantly higher risks for rapid progression (OR, 5.17 (2.60-10.25, 19.83 (10.05-39.10, respectively. However, such risk was not observed among patients with the latest CKD stage 2 and 3. The risk for incident ESRD was 17% higher for each 1 ml/min/1.73 m2 increasing in annual decline rate.Not everyone with CKD develops ESRD after a 10-year follow-up. Absolute annual eGFR decline rate can help clinicians to better predict the progression of CKD. Individuals with renal function decline rate over 3 ml/min/1.73 m2/year require intensive CKD care.

  17. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with CKD.

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    Liang, Chih-Chia; Wang, Su-Ming; Kuo, Huey-Liang; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Lin, Hsin-Hung; Wang, I-Kuan; Yang, Ya-Fei; Lu, Yueh-Ju; Chou, Che-Yi; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2014-08-07

    Patients with CKD receiving maintenance dialysis are at risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with early CKD who are not receiving dialysis is unknown. The hypothesis was that their risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is negatively linked to renal function. To test this hypothesis, the association between eGFR and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis was analyzed. Patients with stages 3-5 CKD in the CKD program from 2003 to 2009 were enrolled and prospectively followed until December of 2012 to monitor the development of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding was analyzed using competing-risks regression with time-varying covariates. In total, 2968 patients with stages 3-5 CKD who were not receiving dialysis were followed for a median of 1.9 years. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 100 patient-years was 3.7 (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 3.9) in patients with stage 3 CKD, 5.0 (95% confidence interval, 4.8 to 5.3) in patients with stage 4 CKD, and 13.9 (95% confidence interval, 13.1 to 14.8) in patients with stage 5 CKD. Higher eGFR was associated with a lower risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (P=0.03), with a subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 0.99) for every 5 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) higher eGFR. A history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Pupper gastrointestinal bleeding risk. In patients with CKD who are not receiving dialysis, lower renal function is associated with higher risk for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The risk is higher in patients with previous upper gastrointestinal bleeding history and low serum albumin. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. CKD in diabetes: diabetic kidney disease versus nondiabetic kidney disease.

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    Anders, Hans-Joachim; Huber, Tobias B; Isermann, Berend; Schiffer, Mario

    2018-06-01

    The increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) has prompted research efforts to tackle the growing epidemic of diabetic kidney disease (DKD; also known as diabetic nephropathy). The limited success of much of this research might in part be due to the fact that not all patients diagnosed with DKD have renal dysfunction as a consequence of their diabetes mellitus. Patients who present with CKD and diabetes mellitus (type 1 or type 2) can have true DKD (wherein CKD is a direct consequence of their diabetes status), nondiabetic kidney disease (NDKD) coincident with diabetes mellitus, or a combination of both DKD and NDKD. Preclinical studies using models that more accurately mimic these three entities might improve the ability of animal models to predict clinical trial outcomes. Moreover, improved insights into the pathomechanisms that are shared by these entities - including sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) and renin-angiotensin system-driven glomerular hyperfiltration and tubular hyper-reabsorption - as well as those that are unique to individual entities might lead to the identification of new treatment targets. Acknowledging that the clinical entity of CKD plus diabetes mellitus encompasses NDKD as well as DKD could help solve some of the urgent unmet medical needs of patients affected by these conditions.

  19. Effects of atorvastatin on renal function in patients with dyslipidemia and chronic kidney disease: assessment of clinical usefulness in CKD patients with atorvastatin (ASUCA) trial.

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    Kimura, Genjiro; Kasahara, Masato; Ueshima, Kenji; Tanaka, Sachiko; Yasuno, Shinji; Fujimoto, Akira; Sato, Toshiya; Imamoto, Miyuki; Kosugi, Shinji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2017-06-01

    Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While conventional lipid lowering therapy provides a benefit to CKD management, the effect of statins on eGFR remains unclear. A prospective, multi-center, open-labeled, randomized trial. Total of 349 CKD patients with hyperlipidemia were randomized into 2 groups, and followed for 2 years. Group A included patients who were treated with atorvastatin. Group C were treated with conventional lipid lowering drugs other than statin. Primary endpoint was changes in eGFR. Secondary endpoints included changes in urinary albumin excretion, serum LDL-C, serum triglyceride, cardio-vascular events and all-cause mortality. As the primary endpoint, eGFR decreased by 2.3 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group A and by 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m 2 in Group C, indicating that there was no difference in change of eGFR between the two groups. As secondary endpoints, atorvastatin succeeded to reduce serum LDL-C level significantly and rapidly, but conventional therapy did not. In fact, mean LDL-C level did not reach the target level of 100 mg/dl in Group C. Serum triglyceride was lowered only by atorvastatin, but not conventional drugs. The number of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality did not differ between in two groups. The ASUCA (Assessment of Clinical Usefulness in CKD Patients with Atorvastatin) trial demonstrated that atorvastatin failed to exhibit reno-protections compared to conventional therapy in Japanese patients with dyslipidemia and CKD. It would be due in part to the ability of atorvastatin to more potently reduce serum LDL and triglycerides compared to conventional therapy.

  20. Retarding chronic kidney disease (CKD progression: a practical nutritional approach for non-dialysis CKD

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    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a patient with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD in whom several nutritional issues are briefly discussed from a practical point of view. The article is accompanied by an editorial published in this Journal in relation to the 2nd International Conference of the European Renal Nutrition working group at ERA-EDTA—“Retarding CKD progression: readily available through comprehensive nutritional management?”—and focuses on several practical topics associated with the nutritional approach for the conservative treatment of non-dialysis CKD. The article is divided into 3 sections—basic nutritional assessment, nutritional targets, and nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD—linked to 3 consecutive steps of the clinical follow-up of the patient and the related nutritional concerns and intervention. First visit: Baseline nutritional assessment and basic nutritional considerations in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD • What nutritional assessment/monitoring for protein-energy wasting (PEW should be employed? • Is a body mass index (BMI of 21 kg/m2 adequate? • What phosphate target should be pursued? • What are the nutritional habits in patients with incident CKD? • What protein needs and amount of dietary protein should be pursued? • Does the quality of protein matter? • What amount of dietary salt should be employed? How should this be obtained? • How should normal serum phosphate be achieved? • What diet should be recommended? Is a vegetarian diet an option? Second visit: Major nutritional targets in non-dialysis CKD • Consequences of unintentional weight loss • What is the role of the renal dietitian in helping the patient adhere to a renal diet? Intermediate visits: Nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD • What treatment for calcium/parathyroid hormone (PTH will affect CKD progression? Final visits: • Would a dietary recall/intensive dietary education improve adherence with

  1. The FIND-CKD study--a randomized controlled trial of intravenous iron versus oral iron in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients: background and rationale.

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    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Cushway, Timothy; Roger, Simon D

    2014-04-01

    Rigorous data are sparse concerning the optimal route of administration and dosing strategy for iron therapy with or without concomitant erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy for the management of iron deficiency anaemia in patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD). FIND-CKD was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective, randomized three-arm study (NCT00994318) of 626 patients with ND-CKD and iron deficiency anaemia randomized to (i) intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) at an initial dose of 1000 mg iron with subsequent dosing as necessary to target a serum ferritin level of 400-600 µg/L (ii) IV FCM at an initial dose of 200 mg with subsequent dosing as necessary to target serum ferritin 100-200 µg/L or (iii) oral ferrous sulphate 200 mg iron/day. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA therapy, iron therapy other than study drug or blood transfusion) or a haemoglobin (Hb) trigger (two consecutive Hb values FIND-CKD was the longest randomized trial of IV iron therapy to date. Its findings will address several unanswered questions regarding iron therapy to treat iron deficiency anaemia in patients with ND-CKD. It was also the first randomized trial to utilize both a high and low serum ferritin target range to adjust IV iron dosing, and the first not to employ Hb response as its primary end point.

  2. Bisphophonates in CKD Patients with Low Bone Mineral Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chih Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD have a high risk of bone fracture because of low bone mineral density and poor bone quality. Osteoporosis also features low bone mass, disarranged microarchitecture, and skeletal fragility, and differentiating between osteoporosis and CKD-MBD in low bone mineral density is a challenge and usually achieved by bone biopsy. Bisphosphonates can be safe and beneficial for patients with a glomerular filtration rate of 30 mL/min or higher, but prescribing bisphosphonates in advanced CKD requires caution because of the increased possibility of low bone turnover disorders such as osteomalacia, mixed uremic osteodystrophy, and adynamic bone, even aggravating hyperparathyroidism. Therefore, bone biopsy in advanced CKD is an important consideration before prescribing bisphosphonates. Treatment also may induce hypocalcemia in CKD patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, but vitamin D supplementation may ameliorate this effect. Bisphosphonate treatment can improve both bone mineral density and vascular calcification, but the latter becomes more unlikely in patients with stage 3-4 CKD with vascular calcification but no decreased bone mineral density. Using bisphosphonates requires considerable caution in advanced CKD, and the lack of adequate clinical investigation necessitates more studies regarding its effects on these patients.

  3. Validation of the kidney failure risk equation in European CKD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, M.J.; Zuilen, A.D. van; Brand, A. van den; Bots, M.L.; Blankestijn, P.J.; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Vervoort, G.M.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at risk for progression to kidney failure. Using data of Canadian CKD patients, Tangri et al. recently developed models to predict the progression of CKD stages 3-5 to kidney failure within 5 years. We validated this kidney failure risk

  4. Readability of Written Materials for CKD Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morony, Suzanne; Flynn, Michaela; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Jansen, Jesse; Webster, Angela C

    2015-06-01

    The "average" patient has a literacy level of US grade 8 (age 13-14 years), but this may be lower for people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Current guidelines suggest that patient education materials should be pitched at a literacy level of around 5th grade (age 10-11 years). This study aims to evaluate the readability of written materials targeted at patients with CKD. Systematic review. Patient information materials aimed at adults with CKD and written in English. Patient education materials designed to be printed and read, sourced from practices in Australia and online at all known websites run by relevant international CKD organizations during March 2014. Quantitative analysis of readability using Lexile Analyzer and Flesch-Kincaid tools. We analyzed 80 materials. Both Lexile Analyzer and Flesch-Kincaid analyses suggested that most materials required a minimum of grade 9 (age 14-15 years) schooling to read them. Only 5% of materials were pitched at the recommended level (grade 5). Readability formulas have inherent limitations and do not account for visual information. We did not consider other media through which patients with CKD may access information. Although the study covered materials from the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia, all non-Internet materials were sourced locally, and it is possible that some international paper-based materials were missed. Generalizability may be limited due to exclusion of non-English materials. These findings suggest that patient information materials aimed at patients with CKD are pitched above the average patient's literacy level. This issue is compounded by cognitive decline in patients with CKD, who may have lower literacy than the average patient. It suggests that information providers need to consider their audience more carefully when preparing patient information materials, including user testing with a low-literacy patient population. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  5. CKD.QLD: chronic kidney disease surveillance and research in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venuthurupalli, Sree K.; Hoy, Wendy E.; Healy, Helen G.; Salisbury, Anne; Fassett, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is recognized as a major public health problem in Australia with significant mortality, morbidity and economic burden. However, there is no comprehensive surveillance programme to collect, collate and analyse data on CKD in a systematic way. Methods We describe an initiative called CKD Queensland (CKD.QLD), which was established in 2009 to address this deficiency, and outline the processes and progress made to date. The foundation is a CKD Registry of all CKD patients attending public health renal services in Queensland, and patient recruitment and data capture have started. Results We have established through early work of CKD.QLD that there are over 11 500 CKD patients attending public renal services in Queensland, and these are the target population for our registry. Progress so far includes conducting two CKD clinic site surveys, consenting over 3000 patients into the registry and initiation of baseline data analysis of the first 600 patients enrolled at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH) site. In addition, research studies in dietary intake and CKD outcomes and in models of care in CKD patient management are underway. Conclusions Through the CKD Registry, we will define the distribution of CKD patients referred to renal practices in the public system in Queensland by region, remoteness, age, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We will define the clinical characteristics of those patients, and the CKD associations, stages, co-morbidities and current management. We will follow the course and outcomes in individuals over time, as well as group trends over time. Through our activities and outcomes, we are aiming to provide a nidus for other states in Australia to join in a national CKD registry and network. PMID:23115138

  6. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette, Russell W; Carter, Randy L

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS) based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average monthly values of phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, glucose, hemoglobin, bicarbonate, albumin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, potassium, calcium, sodium, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, and white blood cells. The results of our study demonstrated that the association

  7. Modification of diet in renal disease (MDRD study and CKD epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-I Chen

    Full Text Available Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study or the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations may not be accurate for Asians; thus, we developed modified eGFR equations for Taiwanese adults.This cross-sectional study compared the Taiwanese eGFR equations, the MDRD study, and the CKD-EPI equations with inulin clearance (Cin. A total of 695 adults including 259 healthy volunteers and 436 CKD patients were recruited. Participants from the Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were used as the development set (N = 556 to develop the Taiwanese eGFR equations, whereas participants from the National Taiwan University Hospital were used as the validation set (N = 139 for external validation.The Taiwanese eGFR equations were developed by using the extended Bland-Altman plot in the development set. The Taiwanese MDRD equation was 1.309 × MDRD0.912, Taiwanese CKD-EPI was 1.262×CKD-EPI0.914 and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI was 1.205 × four-level CKD-EPI0.914. In the validation set, the Taiwanese equations had the lowest bias, the Taiwanese equations and the Japanese CKD-EPI equation had the lowest RMSE, whereas the Taiwanese and the Japanese equations had the best precision and the highest P30 among all equations. However, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had higher concordance correlation than did the Taiwanese CKD-EPI, the Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI and the Japanese equations. Moreover, only the Taiwanese equations had no proportional bias among all of the equations. Finally, the Taiwanese MDRD equation had the best diagnostic performance in terms of ordinal logistic regression among all of the equations.The Taiwanese MDRD equation is better than the MDRD, CKD-EPI, Japanese, Asian, Thai, Taiwanese CKD-EPI, and Taiwanese four-level CKD-EPI equations for Taiwanese adults.

  8. Persistent high serum bicarbonate and the risk of heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): A report from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J; Ham, L L; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Rosas, Sylvia E; Scialla, Julia J; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-04-20

    Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time-updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long-term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end-stage renal disease), and mortality. Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time-dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow-up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person-years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person-years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co-morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  9. Persistent High Serum Bicarbonate and the Risk of Heart Failure in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD): A Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Yang, Wei; Pan, Qiang; Appel, Lawrence; Bellovich, Keith; Chen, Jing; Feldman, Harold; Fischer, Michael J.; Ham, L. L.; Hostetter, Thomas; Jaar, Bernard G.; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Scialla, Julia J.; Wolf, Myles; Rahman, Mahboob

    2015-01-01

    Background Serum bicarbonate varies over time in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, and this variability may portend poor cardiovascular outcomes. The aim of this study was to conduct a time‐updated longitudinal analysis to evaluate the association of serum bicarbonate with long‐term clinical outcomes: heart failure, atherosclerotic events, renal events (halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] or end‐stage renal disease), and mortality. Methods and Results Serum bicarbonate was measured annually, in 3586 participants with CKD, enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. Marginal structural models were created to allow for integration of all available bicarbonate measurements and proper adjustment for time‐dependent confounding. During the 6 years follow‐up, 512 participants developed congestive heart failure (26/1000 person‐years) and 749 developed renal events (37/1000 person‐years). The risk of heart failure and death was significantly higher for participants who maintained serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L for the entire duration of follow‐up (hazard ratio [HR] 1.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23 to 2.23, and HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.82, respectively) compared with participants who kept their bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L, after adjusting for demographics, co‐morbidities, medications including diuretics, eGFR, and proteinuria. Participants who maintained serum bicarbonate renal disease progression (HR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.50 to 2.57) compared with participants with bicarbonate 22 to 26 mmol/L. Conclusion In this large CKD cohort, persistent serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/L was associated with increased risk of heart failure events and mortality. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal range of serum bicarbonate in CKD to prevent adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:25896890

  10. Multiple Pregnancies in CKD Patients: An Explosive Mix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Silvana; Attini, Rossella; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Biolcati, Marlisa; Pagano, Arianna; Bossotti, Carlotta; Vasario, Elena; Borgarello, Valentina; Daidola, Germana; Ferraresi, Martina; Gaglioti, Pietro; Todros, Tullia

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives CKD and multiple pregnancies bear important risks for pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the study was to define the risk for adverse pregnancy-related outcomes in multiple pregnancies in CKD patients in comparison with a control group of “low-risk” multiple pregnancies. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The study was performed in the Maternal Hospital of the University of Turin, Italy. Of 314 pregnancies referred in CKD (2000–2011), 20 were multiple (15 twin deliveries). Control groups consisted of 379 low-risk multiple pregnancies (314 twin deliveries) and 19 (15 twin deliveries) cases with hypertension-collagen diseases. Baseline data and outcomes were compared by univariate and logistic regression analyses. Results The prevalence of multiple pregnancies was relatively high in the CKD population (6.4%); all referred cases were in early CKD stages (I-II); both creatinine (0.68 to 0.79 mg/dl; P=0.010) and proteinuria (0.81 to 3.42 g/d; P=0.041) significantly increased from referral to delivery. No significant difference in demographic data at baseline was found between cases and low-risk controls. CKD was associated with higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes versus low-risk twin pregnancies. Statistical significance was reached for preterm delivery (<34 weeks: 60% vs 26.4%; P=0.005; <32 weeks: 53.3% vs 12.7%; P<0.001), small for gestational age babies (28.6% vs 8.1%; P<0.001), need for Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (60% vs 12.7%; P<0.001), weight discordance between twins (40% vs 17.8%; P=0.032), and neonatal and perinatal mortality (6.6% vs 0.8%; P=0.032). Conclusion This study suggests that maternal-fetal risks are increased in multiple pregnancies in the early CKD stages. PMID:23124785

  11. Patients' Experiences After CKD Diagnosis: A Meta-ethnographic Study and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Emma J; Leydon, Geraldine; Fraser, Simon; Roderick, Paul; Taal, Maarten W; Tonkin-Crine, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often asymptomatic at first diagnosis, and awareness of CKD is low in the general population. Thus, individuals who are unexpectedly identified as having CKD may struggle to adjust to living with this diagnosis. This study aims to synthesize qualitative research exploring patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and how they adjust to it. Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Adult patients with CKD stages 1 to 5. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Embase, and Web of Science were searched from the earliest date available to November 2015. Qualitative studies were selected that explored patients' views and experiences of a CKD diagnosis and their adjustment. Meta-ethnography was adopted to synthesize the findings. 10 studies involving 596 patients with CKD from secondary-care settings were included. 7 key themes were identified: a challenging diagnosis, diverse beliefs about causation, anticipated concerns about progression, delaying disease progression, unmet informational needs, psychosocial impact of CKD, and adjustment to life with CKD. Limited to views and experiences of participants in included studies, which were mostly conducted in high-income countries. Studies not written in English were excluded. Transferability of findings to other populations may be limited. This review highlights variation in patients' understanding of CKD, an overall lack of information on the trajectory of CKD, and a need for psychosocial support, especially in later stages, to help patients adjust to living with CKD. Future research that acknowledges CKD as a condition with diverse complicating morbidities and explores how patients' information and psychosocial needs vary according to severity and comorbid conditions would be beneficial. This will support delivery of easily understandable, timely, and targeted information about CKD, as well as practical advice about recommended lifestyle changes. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc

  12. Carbon dioxide (CO2) angiography as an option for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Chiara; Sardanelli, Francesco; Perego, Matteo; Alì, Marco; Casilli, Francesco; Inglese, Luigi; Mauri, Giovanni

    2017-11-01

    To assess feasibility, efficacy and safety of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) digital subtraction angiography (DSA) to guide endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). After Ethical Committee approval, the records of 13 patients (all male, mean age 74.6 ± 8.0 years) with CKD, who underwent EVAR to exclude an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) under CO 2 angiography guidance, were reviewed. The AAA to be excluded had a mean diameter of 52.0 ± 8.0 mm. CO 2 angiography was performed by automatic (n = 7) or hand (n = 6) injection. The endograft was correctly placed and the AAA was excluded in all cases, without any surgical conversions. Two patients (15.4%) had an endoleak: one type-Ia, detected by CO 2 -DSA and effectively treated with prosthesis dilatation; one type-III, detected by CO 2 -DSA, confirmed using 10 ml of ICM, and conservatively managed. In one patient, CO 2 angiograms were considered of too low quality for guiding the procedure and 200 ml of ICM were administered. Overall, 11 patients (84.6%) underwent a successful EVAR under the guidance of the sole CO 2 angiography. No patients suffered from major complications, including those typically CO 2 -related. Two patients suffered from abdominal pain during the procedure secondary to a transient splanchnic perfusion's reduction due to CO 2 , and one patient had a worsening of renal function probably caused by a cholesterol embolization during the procedure. In patients with CKD, EVAR under CO 2 angiography guidance is feasible, effective, and safe.

  13. Relating illness complexity to reimbursement in CKD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessette RW

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Russell W Bessette1, Randy L Carter2,3 1Department of Health Sciences, Institute for Healthcare Informatics, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Population Health Observatory, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA Background: Despite significant investments of federal and state dollars to transition patient medical records to an all-electronic system, a chasm still exists between health care quality and payment for it. A major reason for this gap is the difficulty in evaluating health care outcomes based on claims data. Since both payers and patients may not appreciate how illness complexity impacts treatment outcomes, it is difficult to determine fair provider compensation. Objectives: Chronic kidney disease (CKD typifies these problems and is often associated with comorbidities that impact cost, health, and work productivity. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate an illness complexity score (ICS based on a linear regression of select blood values that might assist in predicting average monthly reimbursements in CKD patients. A second objective was to compare the results of this ICS prediction to results obtained by prediction of average monthly reimbursement using CKD stage. A third objective was to analyze the relationship between the change in ICS, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and CKD stage over time to average monthly reimbursement. Methods: We calculated parsimonious values for select variables associated with CKD patients and compared the ICS to ordinal staging of renal disease. Data from 177 de-identified patients over 13 months was collected, which included 15 blood chemistry observations along with complete claims data for all medical expenses. To test for the relationship between average blood chemistry values, stages of CKD, age, and average monthly reimbursement, we modeled an association through a linear regression function of age, eGFR, and the Z-scores calculated from average

  14. FIND-CKD: a randomized trial of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with chronic kidney disease and iron deficiency anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdougall, Iain C; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gaillard, Carlo; Van Wyck, David; Roubert, Bernard; Nolen, Jacqueline G; Roger, Simon D

    2014-11-01

    The optimal iron therapy regimen in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unknown. Ferinject® assessment in patients with Iron deficiency anaemia and Non-Dialysis-dependent Chronic Kidney Disease (FIND-CKD) was a 56-week, open-label, multicentre, prospective and randomized study of 626 patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, anaemia and iron deficiency not receiving erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Patients were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting a higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin or oral iron therapy. The primary end point was time to initiation of other anaemia management (ESA, other iron therapy or blood transfusion) or haemoglobin (Hb) trigger of two consecutive values <10 g/dL during Weeks 8-52. The primary end point occurred in 36 patients (23.5%), 49 patients (32.2%) and 98 patients (31.8%) in the high-ferritin FCM, low-ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively [hazard ratio (HR): 0.65; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44-0.95; P = 0.026 for high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron]. The increase in Hb was greater with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (P = 0.014) and a greater proportion of patients achieved an Hb increase ≥1 g/dL with high-ferritin FCM versus oral iron (HR: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.52-2.72; P < 0.001). Rates of adverse events and serious adverse events were similar in all groups. Compared with oral iron, IV FCM targeting a ferritin of 400-600 µg/L quickly reached and maintained Hb level, and delayed and/or reduced the need for other anaemia management including ESAs. Within the limitations of this trial, no renal toxicity was observed, with no difference in cardiovascular or infectious events. NCT00994318. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease Guideline Implementation in Primary Care: A Qualitative Report from the TRANSLATE CKD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Bonnie M; York, Trevor R M; Sand, Jessica; Fox, Chester H; Kahn, Linda S

    2015-01-01

    Primary care physicians (PCPs) are optimally situated to identify and manage early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nonetheless, studies have documented suboptimal PCP understanding, awareness, and management of early CKD. The TRANSLATE CKD study is an ongoing national, mixed-methods, cluster randomized control trial that examines the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for CKD into primary care practice. As part of the mixed-methods process evaluation, semistructured interviews were conducted by phone with 27 providers participating in the study. Interviews were audio-taped and transcribed. Thematic content analysis was used to identify themes. Themes were categorized according to the 4 domains of Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Identified themes illuminated the complex work undertaken to manage CKD in primary care practices. Barriers to guideline implementation were identified in each of the 4 NPT domains, including (1) lack of knowledge and understanding around CKD (coherence), (2) difficulties engaging providers and patients in CKD management (cognitive participation), (3) limited time and competing demands (collective action), and (4) challenges obtaining and using data to monitor progress (reflexive monitoring). Addressing the barriers to implementation with concrete interventions at the levels at which they occur, informed by NPT, will ultimately improve the quality of CKD patient care. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  16. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Suk Han

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients.We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR.Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30-299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.88-2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12-3.10. In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2.The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  17. Older Patients' Perspectives on Managing Complexity in CKD Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, C Barrett; Vandenberg, Ann E; Phillips, Lawrence S; McClellan, William M; Johnson, Theodore M; Echt, Katharina V

    2017-04-03

    Patients with CKD are asked to perform self-management tasks including dietary changes, adhering to medications, avoiding nephrotoxic drugs, and self-monitoring hypertension and diabetes. Given the effect of aging on functional capacity, self-management may be especially challenging for older patients. However, little is known about the specific challenges older adults face maintaining CKD self-management regimens. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study designed to understand the relationship among factors facilitating or impeding CKD self-management in older adults. Six focus groups ( n =30) were held in August and September of 2014 with veterans≥70 years old with moderate-to-severe CKD receiving nephrology care at the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Grounded theory with a constant comparative method was used to collect, code, and analyze data. Participants had a mean age (range) of 75.1 (70.1-90.7) years, 60% were black, and 96.7% were men. The central organizing concept that emerged from these data were managing complexity. Participants typically did not have just one chronic condition, CKD, but a number of commonly co-occurring conditions. Recommendations for CKD self-management therefore occurred within a complex regimen of recommendations for managing other diseases. Participants identified overtly discordant treatment recommendations across chronic conditions ( e.g., arthritis and CKD). Prioritization emerged as one effective strategy for managing complexity ( e.g. , focusing on BP control). Some patients arrived at the conclusion that they could group concordant recommendations to simplify their regimens ( e.g. , protein restriction for both gout and CKD). Among older veterans with moderate-to-severe CKD, multimorbidity presents a major challenge for CKD self-management. Because virtually all older adults with CKD have multimorbidity, an integrated treatment approach that supports self-management across commonly occurring conditions may be

  18. Soluble Flt-1 links microvascular disease with heart failure in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Giovana S; Kentrup, Dominik; Reuter, Stefan; Mayer, Anna B; Golle, Lina; Tiemann, Klaus; Fobker, Manfred; Engelbertz, Christiane; Breithardt, Günter; Brand, Eva; Reinecke, Holger; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Brand, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of heart failure (HF). Elevated plasma concentrations of soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) have been linked to cardiovascular disease in CKD patients, but whether sFlt-1 contributes to HF in CKD is still unknown. To provide evidence that concludes a pathophysiological role of sFlt-1 in CKD-associated HF, we measured plasma sFlt-1 concentrations in 586 patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease and renal function classified according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). sFlt-1 concentrations correlated negatively with eGFR and were associated with signs of heart failure, based on New York Heart Association functional class and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and early mortality. Additionally, rats treated with recombinant sFlt-1 showed a 15 % reduction in LVEF and a 29 % reduction in cardiac output compared with control rats. High sFlt-1 concentrations were associated with a 15 % reduction in heart capillary density (number of vessels/cardiomyocyte) and a 24 % reduction in myocardial blood volume. Electron microscopy and histological analysis revealed mitochondrial damage and interstitial fibrosis in the hearts of sFlt-1-treated, but not control rats. In 5/6-nephrectomised rats, an animal model of CKD, sFlt-1 antagonism with recombinant VEGF121 preserved heart microvasculature and significantly improved heart function. Overall, these findings suggest that a component of cardiovascular risk in CKD patients could be directly attributed to sFlt-1. Assessment of patients with CKD confirmed that sFlt-1 concentrations were inversely correlated with renal function, while studies in rats suggested that sFlt-1 may link microvascular disease with HF in CKD.

  19. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular and renal events in patients with chronic kidney disease: results from first year of follow-up of the Gunma-CKD SPECT multicenter study

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    Kasama, Shu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Cardiovascular Hospital of Central Japan (Kitakanto Cardiovascular Hospital), Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Toyama, Takuji [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Gunma Prefectural Cardiovascular Center, Maebashi (Japan); Sato, Makito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Tatebayashi Kosei Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Sano, Hirokazu [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Isesaki Municipal Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Isesaki (Japan); Ueda, Tetsuya [Fujioka General Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Fujioka (Japan); Sasaki, Toyoshi [Takasaki General Medical Center, Division of Cardiology, Takasaki (Japan); Nakahara, Takehiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Medicine and Biological Science (Cardiovascular Medicine), Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardio-cerebrovascular events. We examined whether stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides reliable prognostic markers for these patients. In this multicenter, prospective cohort trial from the Gunma-CKD SPECT study protocol, patients with CKD [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 min/ml per 1.73 m{sup 2}] undergoing stress {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT for suspected or possible ischemic heart disease were initially followed for 1 year, with the following study endpoints: primary, the occurrence of cardiac deaths (CDs), and secondary, major adverse cardiac, cerebrovascular, and renal events (MACCREs). The summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) were estimated with the standard 17-segment, 5-point scoring model. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction were measured using electrocardiogram-gated SPECT. During the first year of follow-up, 69 of 299 patients experienced MACCREs (CD, n = 7; non-fatal myocardial infarction, n = 3; hospitalization for heart failure, n = 13; cerebrovascular accident, n = 1; need for revascularization, n = 38; and renal failure, i.e., hemodialysis initiation, n = 7). ESV and SSS were associated with CDs (p < 0.05), and eGFR and SDS were associated with MACCREs (p < 0.05), in multivariate logistic analysis. Patients with high ESV and high SSS had a significantly higher CD rate during the first year than the other CKD patient subgroups (p < 0.05). Patients with low eGFR and high SDS had a significantly higher MACCRE rate than the other subgroups (p < 0.05). Myocardial perfusion SPECT can provide reliable prognostic markers for patients with CKD. (orig.)

  20. Prognostic value of myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography for major adverse cardiac cerebrovascular and renal events in patients with chronic kidney disease: results from first year of follow-up of the Gunma-CKD SPECT multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Sato, Makito; Sano, Hirokazu; Ueda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Toyoshi; Nakahara, Takehiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of adverse cardio-cerebrovascular events. We examined whether stress myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides reliable prognostic markers for these patients. In this multicenter, prospective cohort trial from the Gunma-CKD SPECT study protocol, patients with CKD [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 min/ml per 1.73 m 2 ] undergoing stress 99m Tc-tetrofosmin SPECT for suspected or possible ischemic heart disease were initially followed for 1 year, with the following study endpoints: primary, the occurrence of cardiac deaths (CDs), and secondary, major adverse cardiac, cerebrovascular, and renal events (MACCREs). The summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score, and summed difference score (SDS) were estimated with the standard 17-segment, 5-point scoring model. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction were measured using electrocardiogram-gated SPECT. During the first year of follow-up, 69 of 299 patients experienced MACCREs (CD, n = 7; non-fatal myocardial infarction, n = 3; hospitalization for heart failure, n = 13; cerebrovascular accident, n = 1; need for revascularization, n = 38; and renal failure, i.e., hemodialysis initiation, n = 7). ESV and SSS were associated with CDs (p < 0.05), and eGFR and SDS were associated with MACCREs (p < 0.05), in multivariate logistic analysis. Patients with high ESV and high SSS had a significantly higher CD rate during the first year than the other CKD patient subgroups (p < 0.05). Patients with low eGFR and high SDS had a significantly higher MACCRE rate than the other subgroups (p < 0.05). Myocardial perfusion SPECT can provide reliable prognostic markers for patients with CKD. (orig.)

  1. The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2014-08-01

    While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60-90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and the performances of the

  2. Knowledge deficit of patients with stage 1-4 CKD: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Vargas, Pamela A; Tong, Allison; Phoon, Richard K S; Chadban, Steven J; Shen, Yvonne; Craig, Jonathan C

    2014-04-01

    Patients with early-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) must make lifestyle modifications and adhere to treatment regimens to prevent their progression to end-stage kidney disease. The aim of this study was to elicit the perspectives of patients with stage 1-4 CKD about their disease, with a specific focus on their information needs in managing and living with CKD and its sequelae. Patients with CKD stages 1-4 were purposively sampled from three major hospitals in Sydney, Australia to participate in focus groups. Transcripts were thematically analysed. From nine focus groups including 38 participants, six major themes were identified: medical attentiveness (shared decision-making, rapport, indifference and insensitivity); learning self-management (diet and nutrition, barriers to physical activity, medication safety); contextualizing comorbidities (prominence of CKD, contradictory treatment); prognostic uncertainty (hopelessness, fear of disease progression, disbelief regarding diagnosis); motivation and coping mechanisms (engage in research, pro-active management, optimism, feeling normal); and knowledge gaps (practical advice, access to information, comprehension of pathology results and CKD diagnosis, education for general practitioners). Patients capacity to slow the progression of CKD may be limited by their lack of knowledge about the disease, its comorbidities, psychosocial influences and their ability to interact and communicate effectively with their health-care provider. Support from a multidisciplinary care team, combined with provision of comprehensive, accessible and practical educational resources may enhance patients' ability and motivation to access and adhere to therapeutic and lifestyle interventions to retard progression of CKD. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  3. Safety of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roger, Simon D; Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H

    2017-01-01

    -label, multicenter, prospective study of patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, anemia and iron deficiency randomized (1:1:2) to IV ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin, or oral iron. A post hoc analysis of adverse event rates per 100 patient......: These results further support the conclusion that correction of iron deficiency anemia with IV FCM is safe in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD.......Background: The evidence base regarding the safety of intravenous (IV) iron therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete and largely based on small studies of relatively short duration. Methods: FIND-CKD (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00994318) was a 1-year, open...

  4. Hyperbaric area index calculated from ABPM elucidates the condition of CKD patients: the CKD-JAC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimuro, Satoshi; Imai, Enyu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Ohashi, Yasuo; Hishida, Akira

    2015-02-01

    High prevalence of masked hypertension as well as persistent hypertension was observed in the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study. We proposed a novel indicator of blood pressure (BP) load, hyperbaric area index (HBI), calculated from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) data. The characteristic of this index and its relationship with kidney function were also evaluated. The CKD-JAC study, enrolled 2,977 patients, is a prospective observational study started in September 2007. ABPM was conducted in a sub-group from September 2007 to April 2010 and baseline ABPM data of 1,075 subjects (63.4 % male, 60.7 years old) were analyzed. Mean systolic HBI of male and female patients were 242.3 and 176.5 mmHg×h, respectively. HBI sensitively reflected sex (54.7 mmHg×h higher in males than in females), seasonal effects (51.6 mmHg×h higher in winter than in summer), and advancing CKD stage [(16.5 mmHg×h higher) per -10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in eGFR]. The HBI was a significant factor to associate with reduced kidney function, after adjusting with nocturnal BP change (NBPC), sex, and other variables (p value <0.001). Our findings suggested that HBI might be a novel sensitive indicator for the reduction of kidney function, independent of patterns of NBPC.

  5. Dietary and fluid restrictions in CKD: a thematic synthesis of patient views from qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Suetonia C; Hanson, Camilla S; Craig, Jonathan C; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Ruospo, Marinella; Campbell, Katrina; Johnson, David W; Tong, Allison

    2015-04-01

    Managing the complex fluid and diet requirements of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is challenging for patients. We aimed to summarize patients' perspectives of dietary and fluid management in CKD to inform clinical practice and research. Systematic review of qualitative studies. Adults with CKD who express opinions about dietary and fluid management. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Google Scholar, reference lists, and PhD dissertations were searched to May 2013. Thematic synthesis. We included 46 studies involving 816 patients living in middle- to high-income countries. Studies involved patients treated with facility-based and home hemodialysis (33 studies; 462 patients), peritoneal dialysis (10 studies; 112 patients), either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis (3 studies; 73 patients), kidney transplant recipients (9 studies; 89 patients), and patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD stages 1 to 5 (5 studies; 80 patients). Five major themes were identified: preserving relationships (interference with roles, social limitations, and being a burden), navigating change (feeling deprived, disrupting held truths, breaking habits and norms, being overwhelmed by information, questioning efficacy, and negotiating priorities), fighting temptation (resisting impositions, experiencing mental invasion, and withstanding physiologic needs), optimizing health (accepting responsibility, valuing self-management, preventing disease progression, and preparing for and protecting a transplant), and becoming empowered (comprehending paradoxes, finding solutions, and mastering change and demands). Limited data in non-English languages and low-income settings and for adults with CKD not treated with hemodialysis. Dietary and fluid restrictions are disorienting and an intense burden for patients with CKD. Patient-prioritized education strategies, harnessing patients' motivation to stay well for a transplant or to avoid dialysis, and viewing adaptation to restrictions as a collaborative

  6. Association between Urine Creatinine Excretion and Arterial Stiffness in Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the KNOW-CKD Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Youl Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that low muscle mass is associated with arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV, in a population without chronic kidney disease (CKD. This link between low muscle mass and arterial stiffness may explain why patients with CKD have poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, the association between muscle mass and arterial stiffness in CKD patients is not well known. Methods: Between 2011 and 2013, 1,529 CKD patients were enrolled in the prospective Korean Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. We analyzed 888 participants from this cohort who underwent measurements of 24-hr urinary creatinine excretion (UCr and brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV at baseline examination. The mean of the right and left baPWV (mPWV was used as a marker of arterial stiffness. Results: The baPWV values varied according to the UCr quartile (1,630±412, 1,544±387, 1,527±282 and 1,406±246 for the 1st to 4th quartiles of UCr, respectively, PConclusion: Low muscle mass estimated by low UCr was associated high baPWV in pre-dialysis CKD patients in Korea. Further studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between UCR and baPWV, and the role of muscle mass in the development of cardiovascular disease in CKD.

  7. Telehealth Applications to Enhance CKD Knowledge and Awareness Among Patients and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Boulware, L Ebony

    2017-01-01

    CKD affects 13% of the US adult population, causes excess mortality, and is associated with significant sociodemographic disparities. Optimal CKD management slows progression of disease and reduces cardiovascular-related outcomes. Resources for patients and primary care providers, major stakeholders in preventive CKD care, are critically needed to enhance understanding of the disease and to optimize CKD health, particularly because of the asymptomatic nature of kidney disease. Telehealth is defined as the use of electronic communication and telecommunications technology to support long-distance clinical health care, patient and professional health-related education, and public health and health administration. It provides new opportunities to enhance awareness and understanding among these important stakeholders. This review will examine the role of telehealth within existing educational theories, identify telehealth applications that can enhance CKD knowledge and behavior change among patients and primary care providers, and examine the advantages and disadvantages of telehealth vs usual modalities for education. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD as a Systemic Disease: Whole Body Autoregulation and Inter-Organ Cross-Talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Zoccali

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The inter-organ cross-talk and the functional integration of organ systems is an exceedingly complex process which until now has been investigated with a reductionist approach. CKD perturbs the inter-organ cross-talk and demands central resetting of autonomic (nervous control of organ systems. Due to limitations inherent to the reductionist approach, we currently identify CKD-related pseudo-syndromes and largely fail at describing the complex systemic inter-relationships set into motion by renal damage and renal dysfunction. A mature technology for a system-analysis approach to physiology and pathophysiology of CKD now exists. System biology will allow in depth understanding of complex diseases like CKD and will set the stage for predictive, preventive and personalized medicine, a long-standing dream of doctors and patients alike.

  9. Confidence and quality in managing CKD compared with other cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus: a linked study of questionnaire and routine primary care data

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    Tahir Mohammad A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of chronic disease is managed in primary care and chronic kidney disease (CKD is a recent addition. We are conducting a cluster randomised study of quality improvement interventions in CKD (QICKD - Clinical Trials Registration: ISRCTN56023731. CKD registers have a lower than expected prevalence and an initial focus group study suggested variable levels of confidence in managing CKD. Our objective is to compare practitioner confidence and achievement of quality indicators for CKD with hypertension and diabetes. Method We validated a new questionnaire to test confidence. We compared confidence with achievement of pay-for-performance indicators (P4P and implementation of evidence-based guidance. We achieved a 74% (148/201 response rate. Results 87% (n = 128 of respondents are confident in managing hypertension (HT compared with 59% (n = 87 in managing HT in CKD (HT+CKD; and with 61% (n = 90 in HT, CKD and diabetes (CKD+HT+DM. 85.2% (P4P and 62.5% (National targets of patients with hypertension are at target; in patients with HT and CKD 65.1% and 53.3%; in patients with HT, CKD and DM 67.8% and 29.6%. Confidence in managing proteinuria in CKD is low (42%, n = 62. 87% of respondents knew BP treatment thresholds in CKD, but only 53% when proteinuria is factored in. Male GPs, younger ( 54 yrs clinicians are more confident than females and 35 to 54 year olds in managing CKD. 84% of patients with hypertension treated with angiotensin modulating drugs achieve achieved P4P targets compared to 67% of patients with CKD. Conclusions Practitioners are less likely to achieve management targets where their confidence is low.

  10. Dietary fiber intake is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and cardiovascular risk, but not protein nutritional status, in adults with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Ming-Qing; Chen, De-Xiu; Wan, Heng; Wei, Lian-Bo; Xiao, Wei

    Evidence suggests that dietary fiber benefits patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, this conclusion requires further validation. In this study, we examined the effects of dietary fiber on kidney function, inflammation, indoxyl sulfate, nutritional status, and cardiovascular risk in patients with advanced CKD. We performed linear regressions to assess the association between dietary fiber intake and CKD parameters. The aforementioned parameters were compared over an 18-month follow- up period. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to investigate the association between fiber intake and Cardiac vascular disease (CVD). In total, 157 patients were included in this study. Dietary fiber and inflammatory indices were associated (interleukin [IL]-6: β=-0.024, p=0.035). The differential estimated glomerular filtration rate (ΔeGFR) as well as levels of C-reactive protein, IL-6, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol in the higher fiber intake (>=25 g/day) group were lower than those in the lower fiber intake (patients in the higher protein intake group (pintake may be a protective factor associated with CVD (hazard ratio=0.537 and 0.305- 0.947). The protein nutritional status was not different between the two groups (p>0.05). Our results suggest that increasing fiber intake can retard the decrease in the eGFR; can reduce the levels of proinflammatory factors, indoxyl sulfate, and serum cholesterol; and is negatively associated with cardiovascular risk, but does not disrupt the nutritional status of patients with CKD.

  11. Canadians Seeking Solutions and Innovations to Overcome Chronic Kidney Disease (Can-SOLVE CKD): Form and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Adeera; Adams, Evan; Barrett, Brendan J.; Beanlands, Heather; Burns, Kevin D.; Chiu, Helen Hoi-Lun; Chong, Kate; Dart, Allison; Ferera, Jack; Fernandez, Nicolas; Fowler, Elisabeth; Garg, Amit X.; Gilbert, Richard; Harris, Heather; Harvey, Rebecca; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; James, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey; Kappel, Joanne; Komenda, Paul; McCormick, Michael; McIntyre, Christopher; Mahmud, Farid; Pei, York; Pollock, Graham; Reich, Heather; Rosenblum, Norman D.; Scholey, James; Sochett, Etienne; Tang, Mila; Tangri, Navdeep; Tonelli, Marcello; Turner, Catherine; Walsh, Michael; Woods, Cathy; Manns, Braden

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review This article serves to describe the Can-SOLVE CKD network, a program of research projects and infrastructure that has excited patients and given them hope that we can truly transform the care they receive. Issue Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder that affects more than 4 million Canadians and costs the Canadian health care system more than $40 billion per year. The evidence base for guiding care in CKD is small, and even in areas where evidence exists, uptake of evidence into clinical practice has been slow. Compounding these complexities are the variations in outcomes for patients with CKD and difficulties predicting who is most likely to develop complications over time. Clearly these gaps in our knowledge and understanding of CKD need to be filled, but the current state of CKD research is not where it needs to be. A culture of clinical trials and inquiry into the disease is lacking, and much of the existing evidence base addresses the concerns of the researchers but not necessarily those of the patients. Program overview The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has launched the national Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR), a coalition of federal, provincial, and territorial partners dedicated to integrating research into care. Canadians Seeking Solutions and Innovations to Overcome Chronic Kidney Disease (Can-SOLVE CKD) is one of five pan-Canadian chronic kidney disease networks supported through the SPOR. The vision of Can-SOLVE CKD is that by 2020 every Canadian with or at high risk for CKD will receive the best recommended care, experience optimal outcomes, and have the opportunity to participate in studies with novel therapies, regardless of age, sex, gender, location, or ethnicity. Program objective The overarching objective of Can-SOLVE CKD is to accelerate the translation of knowledge about CKD into clinical research and practice. By focusing on the patient’s voice and implementing relevant findings in

  12. Beliefs and Attitudes to Bowel Cancer Screening in Patients with CKD: A Semistructured Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Laura J; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Ju, Angela; Williams, Narelle; Lim, Wai H; Cross, Nicholas; Tong, Allison

    2017-04-03

    Bowel cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death in people with CKD. Shared decision making regarding cancer screening is particularly complex in CKD and requires an understanding of patients' values and priorities, which remain largely unknown. Our study aimed to describe the beliefs and attitudes to bowel cancer screening in patients with CKD. Face to face, semistructured interviews were conducted from April of 2014 to December of 2015 with 38 participants ages 39-78 years old with CKD stages 3-5, on dialysis, or transplant recipients from four renal units in Australia and New Zealand. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the transcripts. Five themes were identified: invisibility of cancer (unspoken stigma, ambiguity of risk, and absence of symptomatic prompting); prioritizing kidney disease (preserving the chance of transplantation, over-riding attention to kidney disease, protecting graft survival, and showing loyalty to the donor); preventing the crisis of cancer (evading severe consequences and cognizant of susceptibility); cognitive resistance (reluctance to perform a repulsive procedure, intensifying disease burden threshold, anxiety of a positive test, and accepting the inevitable); and pragmatic accessibility (negligible financial effect, convenience, and protecting anonymity). Patients with CKD understand the potential health benefits of bowel cancer screening, but they are primarily committed to their kidney health. Their decisions regarding screening revolve around their present health needs, priorities, and concerns. Explicit consideration of the potential practical and psychosocial burdens that bowel cancer screening may impose on patients in addition to kidney disease and current treatment is suggested to minimize decisional conflict and improve patient satisfaction and health care outcomes in CKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Estimating glomerular filtration rate using the new CKD-EPI equation and other equations in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, Bjarne; Borresen, Malene L; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    (CKD-EPI) equation, the Cockcroft-Gault equation adjusted for body surface area and the MDRD equation with cystatin C. Performance was evaluated by mean bias, precision and accuracy. RESULTS: The MDRD equation with cystatin C had 97% of GFR estimates within 30% of measured GFR (accuracy). Both the CKD-EPI....... The CKD-EPI or the Cockcroft-Gault equations showed better performance compared to the 4-variable MDRD equation....

  14. Uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate level is associated with prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Hua Tang

    Full Text Available Total mortality and sudden cardiac death is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. In CKD patients, the protein-bound uremic retention solute indoxyl sulfate (IS is independently associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of this association have yet to be elucidated. The relationship between IS and cardiac electrocardiographic parameters was investigated in a prospective observational study among early CKD patients. IS arrhythmogenic effect was evaluated by in vitro cardiomyocyte electrophysiological study and mathematical computer simulation. In a cohort of 100 early CKD patients, patients with corrected QT (QTc prolongation had higher IS levels. Furthermore, serum IS level was independently associated with prolonged QTc interval. In vitro, the delay rectifier potassium current (IK was found to be significantly decreased after the treatment of IS in a dose-dependent manner. The modulation of IS to the IK was through the regulation of the major potassium ion channel protein Kv 2.1 phosphorylation. In a computer simulation, the decrease of IK by IS could prolong the action potential duration (APD and induce early afterdepolarization, which is known to be a trigger mechanism of lethal ventricular arrhythmias. In conclusion, serum IS level is independently associated with the prolonged QTc interval in early CKD patients. IS down-regulated IK channel protein phosphorylation and the IK current activity that in turn increased the cardiomyocyte APD and QTc interval in vitro and in the computer ORd model. These findings suggest that IS may play a role in the development of arrhythmogenesis in CKD patients.

  15. International Network of Chronic Kidney Disease cohort studies (iNET-CKD): a global network of chronic kidney disease cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienemann, Thomas; Fujii, Naohiko; Orlandi, Paula; Nessel, Lisa; Furth, Susan L; Hoy, Wendy E; Matsuo, Seiichi; Mayer, Gert; Methven, Shona; Schaefer, Franz; Schaeffner, Elke S; Solá, Laura; Stengel, Bénédicte; Wanner, Christoph; Zhang, Luxia; Levin, Adeera; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feldman, Harold I

    2016-09-02

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health burden, yet it is still underrepresented within public health agendas in many countries. Studies focusing on the natural history of CKD are challenging to design and conduct, because of the long time-course of disease progression, a wide variation in etiologies, and a large amount of clinical variability among individuals with CKD. With the difference in health-related behaviors, healthcare delivery, genetics, and environmental exposures, this variability is greater across countries than within one locale and may not be captured effectively in a single study. Studies were invited to join the network. Prerequisites for membership included: 1) observational designs with a priori hypotheses and defined study objectives, patient-level information, prospective data acquisition and collection of bio-samples, all focused on predialysis CKD patients; 2) target sample sizes of 1,000 patients for adult cohorts and 300 for pediatric cohorts; and 3) minimum follow-up of three years. Participating studies were surveyed regarding design, data, and biosample resources. Twelve prospective cohort studies and two registries covering 21 countries were included. Participants age ranges from >2 to >70 years at inclusion, CKD severity ranges from stage 2 to stage 5. Patient data and biosamples (not available in the registry studies) are measured yearly or biennially. Many studies included multiple ethnicities; cohort size ranges from 400 to more than 13,000 participants. Studies' areas of emphasis all include but are not limited to renal outcomes, such as progression to ESRD and death. iNET-CKD (International Network of CKD cohort studies) was established, to promote collaborative research, foster exchange of expertise, and create opportunities for research training. Participating studies have many commonalities that will facilitate comparative research; however, we also observed substantial differences. The diversity we observed across

  16. Clinical and Pathological Significance of Autoantibodies to Erythropoietin Receptor in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hara

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Anti-EPOR antibodies might be involved in the progression of renal lesions and in the impaired erythropoiesis in type 2 diabetic patients with CKD. Furthermore, the presence of anti-EPOR antibodies may be an additional predictor for end-stage renal disease in type 2 diabetes.

  17. Australian general practitioners’ current practice for chronic kidney disease (CKD detection and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ludlow

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Guidelines for early detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD emphasise regular testing of kidney health in high-risk individuals. However, evidence suggests that CKD is not being adequately detected or appropriately managed in primary care. Aims Assess Australian general practitioners’ (GP current practice in relation to CKD detection and management. Methods This was a cross-sectional study utilising a random sample of GPs identified by interrogation of the national online telephone directory, and stratified by geographical location. Data collection occurred between October 2014 and January 2015. Of 2,815 eligible contacts, the final response rate was 23 per cent. Results Of the 656 respondents, over 90 per cent assessed kidney health at least annually in people with diabetes or high blood pressure, and 71 per cent correctly assessed kidney health every 3–6 months in a patient with Stage 3b CKD. The tests most commonly used to assess kidney health were serum creatinine (with eGFR, blood pressure and urine albumin creatinine ratio. The most commonly reported CKD management strategies were ‘blood pressure reduction using pharmacological agents’ (81 per cent and ‘glycaemic control if diabetes present’ (64 per cent. Knowledge testing highlighted that 32 per cent of respondents were not able to correctly identify how to properly assess absolute cardiovascular risk, and this was significantly more common in more experienced GPs (p=0.003. Conclusion The results indicate that Australian GPs are mainly practising in accordance with current guidelines for detection and management of patients with CKD, but with room for improvement in some areas

  18. What do we know about chronic kidney disease in India: first report of the Indian CKD registry

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    Rajapurkar Mohan M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no national data on the magnitude and pattern of chronic kidney disease (CKD in India. The Indian CKD Registry documents the demographics, etiological spectrum, practice patterns, variations and special characteristics. Methods Data was collected for this cross-sectional study in a standardized format according to predetermined criteria. Of the 52,273 adult patients, 35.5%, 27.9%, 25.6% and 11% patients came from South, North, West and East zones respectively. Results The mean age was 50.1 ± 14.6 years, with M:F ratio of 70:30. Patients from North Zone were younger and those from the East Zone older. Diabetic nephropathy was the commonest cause (31%, followed by CKD of undetermined etiology (16%, chronic glomerulonephritis (14% and hypertensive nephrosclerosis (13%. About 48% cases presented in Stage V; they were younger than those in Stages III-IV. Diabetic nephropathy patients were older, more likely to present in earlier stages of CKD and had a higher frequency of males; whereas those with CKD of unexplained etiology were younger, had more females and more frequently presented in Stage V. Patients in lower income groups had more advanced CKD at presentation. Patients presenting to public sector hospitals were poorer, younger, and more frequently had CKD of unknown etiology. Conclusions This report confirms the emergence of diabetic nephropathy as the pre-eminent cause in India. Patients with CKD of unknown etiology are younger, poorer and more likely to present with advanced CKD. There were some geographic variations.

  19. Pragmatic Randomized, Controlled Trial of Patient Navigators and Enhanced Personal Health Records in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Jolly, Stacey E; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Nakhoul, Georges; Konig, Victoria; Hyland, Jennifer; Burrucker, Yvette K; Dann, Priscilla Davis; Tucky, Barbara H; Sharp, John; Nally, Joseph V

    2017-09-07

    Patient navigators and enhanced personal health records improve the quality of health care delivered in other disease states. We aimed to develop a navigator program for patients with CKD and an electronic health record-based enhanced personal health record to disseminate CKD stage-specific goals of care and education. We also conducted a pragmatic randomized clinical trial to compare the effect of a navigator program for patients with CKD with enhanced personal health record and compare their combination compared with usual care among patients with CKD stage 3b/4. Two hundred and nine patients from six outpatient clinics (in both primary care and nephrology settings) were randomized in a 2×2 factorial design into four-study groups: ( 1 ) enhanced personal health record only, ( 2 ) patient navigator only, ( 3 ) both, and ( 4 ) usual care (control) group. Primary outcome measure was the change in eGFR over a 2-year follow-up period. Secondary outcome measures included acquisition of appropriate CKD-related laboratory measures, specialty referrals, and hospitalization rates. Median age of the study population was 68 years old, and 75% were white. At study entry, 54% of patients were followed by nephrologists, and 88% were on renin-angiotensin system blockers. After a 2-year follow-up, rate of decline in eGFR was similar across the four groups ( P =0.19). Measurements of CKD-related laboratory parameters were not significantly different among the groups. Furthermore, referral for dialysis education and vascular access placement, emergency room visits, and hospitalization rates were not statistically significant different between the groups. We successfully developed a patient navigator program and an enhanced personal health record for the CKD population. However, there were no differences in eGFR decline and other outcomes among the study groups. Larger and long-term studies along with cost-effectiveness analyses are needed to evaluate the role of patient navigators

  20. Association of serum bicarbonate levels with mortality in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Anderson, John E.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2009-01-01

    Background. Metabolic acidosis, usually manifested by low serum bicarbonate level, is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and appears to be associated with higher mortality in dialysis patients. It is not known whether a similar association is present in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD (NDD-CKD). Methods. We used multivariable-adjusted Cox models to examine the association between baseline and time-variable serum bicarbonate (measured as total CO2) with the outcomes of all-cause mortality and the composite of pre-dialysis mortality or end-stage renal disease in 1240 male patients with moderate and advanced NDD-CKD. Results. Serum bicarbonate showed a significant U-shaped association with all-cause mortality, with the highest mortality rate observed in patients with baseline serum bicarbonate levels <22 mmol/L [multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for patients with serum bicarbonate <22 mmol/L versus ≥22 mmol/L: 1.33 (1.05–1.69), P = 0.02] and the lowest mortality observed in patients with baseline serum bicarbonate of 26–29 mmol/L. The associations between lower serum bicarbonate level and mortality were more accentuated in subgroups of patients with better nutritional status and lower inflammation. Conclusions. Both lower and higher serum bicarbonates are associated with increased all-cause mortality in patients with moderate and advanced NDD-CKD. Clinical trials are needed to determine if therapeutic interventions aimed at optimizing serum bicarbonate can result in improved outcomes in this population. PMID:19015169

  1. Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3 by CKD273, a Urinary Proteomic Biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontillo, Claudia; Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Schanstra, Joost P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CKD273 is a urinary biomarker, which in advanced chronic kidney disease predicts further deterioration. We investigated whether CKD273 can also predict a decline of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to ... threshold (P = 0.086). Discussion: In conclusion, while accounting for baseline eGFR, albuminuria, and covariables, CKD273 adds to the prediction of stage 3 chronic kidney disease, at which point intervention remains an achievable therapeutic target....

  2. Nonapnea Sleep Disorders in Patients Younger than 65 Years Are Significantly Associated with CKD: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo You-Hsien Lin

    Full Text Available Nonapnea sleep disorders (NASD and sleep-related problems are associated with poor health outcomes. However, the association between NASD and the development and prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD has not been investigated thoroughly. We explored the association between CKD and NASD in Taiwan.We conducted a population-based study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance database with1,000,000 representative data for the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2009. We investigated the incidence and risk of CKD in 7,006 newly diagnosed NASD cases compared with 21,018 people without NASD matched according to age, sex, index year, urbanization, region, and monthly income at a 1:3 ratio.The subsequent risk of CKD was 1.48-foldhigher in the NASD cohort than in the control cohort (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26-1.73, p< 0.001. Men, older age, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and gout were significant factors associated with the increased risk of CKD (p< 0.001. Among different types of NASDs, patients with insomnia had a 52% increased risk of developing CKD (95%CI = 1.23-1.84; P<0.01, whereas patients with sleep disturbance had a 49%increased risk of subsequent CKD (95% CI = 1.19-1.87; P<0.001. Younger women (aged < 65 years were at a high risk of CKD with NASD (adjusted hazard ratio, [HR] = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.35-2.40, p< 0.001.In this nationwide population-based cohort study, patients with NASD, particularly men of all ages and women aged younger than 65 years, were at high risk of CKD.

  3. Safety of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose versus oral iron in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD: an analysis of the 1-year FIND-CKD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Simon D; Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Van Wyck, David B; Cronin, Maureen; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Macdougall, Iain C

    2017-09-01

    The evidence base regarding the safety of intravenous (IV) iron therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is incomplete and largely based on small studies of relatively short duration. FIND-CKD (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00994318) was a 1-year, open-label, multicenter, prospective study of patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, anemia and iron deficiency randomized (1:1:2) to IV ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600 µg/L) or lower (100-200 µg/L) ferritin, or oral iron. A post hoc analysis of adverse event rates per 100 patient-years was performed to assess the safety of FCM versus oral iron over an extended period. The safety population included 616 patients. The incidence of one or more adverse events was 91.0, 100.0 and 105.0 per 100 patient-years in the high ferritin FCM, low ferritin FCM and oral iron groups, respectively. The incidence of adverse events with a suspected relation to study drug was 15.9, 17.8 and 36.7 per 100 patient-years in the three groups; for serious adverse events, the incidence was 28.2, 27.9 and 24.3 per 100 patient-years. The incidence of cardiac disorders and infections was similar between groups. At least one ferritin level ≥800 µg/L occurred in 26.6% of high ferritin FCM patients, with no associated increase in adverse events. No patient with ferritin ≥800 µg/L discontinued the study drug due to adverse events. Estimated glomerular filtration rate remained the stable in all groups. These results further support the conclusion that correction of iron deficiency anemia with IV FCM is safe in patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  4. Risk profile, quality of life and care of patients with moderate and advanced CKD : The French CKD-REIN Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Metzger, Marie; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Ayav, Carole; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Edouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Lange, Céline; Legrand, Karine; Speyer, Elodie; Liabeuf, Sophie; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2018-04-09

    The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study was designed to investigate the determinants of prognosis and care of patients referred to nephrologists with moderate and advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). We examined their baseline risk profile and experience. We collected bioclinical and patient-reported information from 3033 outpatients with CKD and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) of 15-60 mL/min/1.73 m2 treated at 40 nationally representative public and private facilities. The patients' median age was 69 (60-76) years, 65% were men, their mean eGFR was 33 mL/min/1.73 m2, 43% had diabetes, 24% had a history of acute kidney injury (AKI) and 57% had uncontrolled blood pressure (BP; >140/90 mmHg). Men had worse risk profiles than women and were more likely to be past or current smokers (73% versus 34%) and have cardiovascular disease (59% versus 42%), albuminuria >30 mg/mmol (or proteinuria > 50) (40% versus 30%) (all P REIN study highlights high-risk profiles of cohort members and identifies several priorities, including improving BP control and dietary counselling and increasing doctors' awareness of AKI, polypharmacy and QoL. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03381950.

  5. Phosphate attenuates the anti-proteinuric effect of very low-protein diet in CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Biagio R; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Bellasi, Antonio; Torraca, Serena; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2013-03-01

    High phosphate levels attenuate nephroprotection through angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition in patients with proteinuric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Whether this phenomenon holds true for other nephroprotective interventions like very-low-protein diet (VLPD) is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that phosphate interferes with the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD in a non-randomized, sequential study in 99 proteinuric CKD patients who sequentially underwent low-protein diet (LPD; 0.6 g/kg) and VLPD (0.3 g/kg) supplemented with keto-analogues, each for periods longer than 1 year. Serum phosphate significantly reduced during VLPD (3.2 ± 0.6 mg/dL) when compared with LPD (3.7 ± 0.6 mg/dL, P diet periods. In linear mixed models including the diagnosis of renal disease, eGFR, 24-h urine sodium and urea and other potential confounders, there was a strong interaction between serum phosphate (P = 0.04) and phosphaturia (P < 0.001) with the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD. Accordingly, 24-h proteinuria reduced modestly in patients who maintained relatively higher serum phosphate levels or relatively higher phosphaturia to be maximal in those who achieved the lowest level of serum and urine phosphate. Phosphate is an important modifier of the anti-proteinuric response to VLPD. Reducing phosphate burden may decrease proteinuria and slow the progression of renal disease in CKD patients, an issue that remains to be tested in specific clinical trials.

  6. Assessing physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Patricia; Marcus, Robin L

    2013-05-01

    Patients with CKD are characterized by low levels of physical functioning, which, along with low physical activity, predict poor outcomes in those treated with dialysis. The hallmark of clinical care in geriatric practice and geriatric research is the orientation to and assessment of physical function and functional limitations. Although there is increasing interest in physical function and physical activity in patients with CKD, the nephrology field has not focused on this aspect of care. This paper provides an in-depth review of the measurement of physical function and physical activity. It focuses on physiologic impairments and physical performance limitations (impaired mobility and functional limitations). The review is based on established frameworks of physical impairment and functional limitations that have guided research in physical function in the aging population. Definitions and measures for physiologic impairments, physical performance limitations, self-reported function, and physical activity are presented. On the basis of the information presented, recommendations for incorporating routine assessment of physical function and encouragement for physical activity in clinical care are provided.

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Anti-HBc (Total Positivity in CKD Patients before Dialysis

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    Fareha Jesmin Rabbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: CKD patients are associated with HBV infection both as a cause and complication of treatment. CKD patients before starting dialysis therapy are considered as a high risk group because of impaired immune response compared with healthy individuals and also other risk factors related with treatment and management. Only HBsAg marker does not always follow the presence or absence of HBV infection. Anti-HBc (total alone positivity indicates previous exposure to HBV infection, window period and even after reactivation of resolved HBV infection. In some cases only anti-HBc positivity is interpreted as possible chronic low dose HBV infection (chronic carriage. Predialytic CKD patients were tested with three serological markers [HBsAg, anti-HBc (total and anti-HBs] for screening HBV infection. Proper diagnosis before dialysis and knowing the infection status would help both the patient and doctor to choose proper treatment approach. Objective: This cross-sectional study was done in the CKD patients before starting dialysis therapy to find out the HBV infection and to evaluate the infection by minimal serological markers as for screening. Materials and Methods: A total of 211 patients with chronic kidney disease stage five (CKD-V before starting dialysis therapy were included as subjects of this cross-sectional study. Among the CKD patients HBsAg was tested to see the prevalence. Other serological markers, i.e., anti-HBc (total and anti-HBs were tested in combination with HBsAg in 89 randomly selected patients among the subjects. The patients were also tested for anti-HCV to assess co-infection. After collecting all the data of different test results analyses were done by SPSS version 15.0. Results: Among total study population 10 (4.7% patients were found HBsAg positive. No patient was found positive for both HBsAg and anti-HCV. Among the 89 CKD patients only 2 (2.2% patients were HBsAg positive, and only one patient (0.9% was found positive

  8. Neck Circumference as a Predictive Indicator of CKD for High Cardiovascular Risk Patients

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    Ya-Fang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neck circumference (NC is an anthropometric measure of obesity for upper subcutaneous adipose tissue distribution which is associated with cardiometabolic risk. This study investigated whether NC is associated with indicators of chronic kidney disease (CKD for high cardiometabolic risk patients. Methods. A total of 177 consecutive patients who underwent the outpatient departments of cardiology were prospectively enrolled in the study. The patients were aged >20 years with normal renal function or with stages 1–4 CKD. A linear regression was performed using the Enter method to present an unadjusted R2, standardized coefficients, and standard error, and the Durbin-Watson test was used to assess residual independence. Results. Most anthropometric measurements from patients aged ≧65 were lower than those from patients aged <65, except for women’s waist circumference (WC and waist hip ratio. Female NC obtained the highest R2 values for 24 hr CCR, uric acid, microalbuminuria, hsCRP, triglycerides, and HDL compared to BMI, WC, and hip circumference. The significances of female NC with 24 hr CCR and uric acid were improved after adjusted age and serum creatinine. Conclusions. NC is associated with indicators of CKD for high cardiometabolic risk patients and can be routinely measured as easy as WC in the future.

  9. The effect of some medications given to CKD patients on vitamin D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, Claudia; Quiroga, Borja; de Vinuesa, Soledad García; Goicoechea, Maria Angeles; Barraca, Daniel; Verdalles, Ursula; Luño, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and polypharmacy is a common problem over chronic kidney disease (CKD) population. To assess the clinical and analytical characteristics of CKD patients with 25-OH-D3 deficiency (<15 ng/mL), including the possible role of associated drugs. A single center observational review of 137 incident patients referred to our outpatient clinic with different stages of CKD and 25-OH-D3<15ng/mL (male gender 53.3%, mean age 70.8 [±16.1] years, mean GFR (MDRD-4) 43.6 [±25.5] ml/min/1.73 m²). 25-OH-D3 levels were collected in spring. Clinical and biochemical data and associated medications were recorded. Mean 25-OH-D3 levels were 8.23 [±4.03] ng/ml. Eighty-eight patients (64.7%) had 3 or more concomitant drugs. Only 7 patients (5.1%) were not receiving any medication. Patients were divided in three groups according the therapies into none (n=26), RAS inhibitors or allopurinol (n=81), and RAS inhibitors plus allopurinol (n=30); with the aim to study the influence of statin therapy. Patients under renin angiotensin (RAS) inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment presented significantly higher 25-OH-D3 levels (p=0.001 and p=0.01 respectively), however patients with Statins treatment had lower 25-OH-D3 level (p=0.039). Personal history of diabetes, cardiovascular events or other therapies did not modify 25-OH-D3 levels, adjusted by age and eGFR. CKD patients with vitamin D deficiency who received RAS inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment had higher 25-OH-D3 levels, however those with statins treatment had lower vitamin D levels. Randomized controlled trials are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  10. Risk score for first-screening of prevalent undiagnosed chronic kidney disease in Peru: the CRONICAS-CKD risk score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Miranda, J Jaime; Gilman, Robert H; Medina-Lezama, Josefina; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio A; Muñoz-Retamozo, Paola V; Smeeth, Liam; Checkley, William; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2017-11-29

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) represents a great burden for the patient and the health system, particularly if diagnosed at late stages. Consequently, tools to identify patients at high risk of having CKD are needed, particularly in limited-resources settings where laboratory facilities are scarce. This study aimed to develop a risk score for prevalent undiagnosed CKD using data from four settings in Peru: a complete risk score including all associated risk factors and another excluding laboratory-based variables. Cross-sectional study. We used two population-based studies: one for developing and internal validation (CRONICAS), and another (PREVENCION) for external validation. Risk factors included clinical- and laboratory-based variables, among others: sex, age, hypertension and obesity; and lipid profile, anemia and glucose metabolism. The outcome was undiagnosed CKD: eGFR anemia were strongly associated with undiagnosed CKD. In the external validation, at a cut-off point of 2, the complete and laboratory-free risk scores performed similarly well with a ROC area of 76.2% and 76.0%, respectively (P = 0.784). The best assessment parameter of these risk scores was their negative predictive value: 99.1% and 99.0% for the complete and laboratory-free, respectively. The developed risk scores showed a moderate performance as a screening test. People with a score of ≥ 2 points should undergo further testing to rule out CKD. Using the laboratory-free risk score is a practical approach in developing countries where laboratories are not readily available and undiagnosed CKD has significant morbidity and mortality.

  11. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mark A; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) events in HIV...

  12. Association of serum adiponectin concentration with aortic arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease: from the KNOW-CKD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Seong; Bae, Eun Hui; Ma, Seong Kwon; Park, Sue K; Lee, Ju Yeon; Chung, Wookyung; Lee, Kyubeck; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Ahn, Curie; Kim, Soo Wan

    2017-08-01

    High serum adiponectin levels predict all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and arterial stiffness in CKD is not well established. The aim of this study was to assess this relationship by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CKD patients. Serum adiponectin concentration was measured in 716 CKD patients in the prospective KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease. The study group consisted of 415 men and 301 women; mean age was 53.1 years, and baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 51 ± 29 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 . Heart to femoral PWV (hfPWV) and mean brachial to ankle PWV (baPWV) served as indicators of aortic artery stiffness and arterial stiffness, respectively. Increasing quartiles of serum adiponectin levels were associated with women, lower eGFRs and body mass indices, and higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratios. Serum adiponectin concentration also correlated with hfPWV and mean baPWV, even after adjusting for age and sex. It independently associated with hfPWV (B 0.028; 95 % confidence interval, 0.004-0.051; P = 0.020) but not mean baPWV in a multivariable linear regression analysis. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, it correlated significantly with the highest quartile of hfPWVs but not mean baPWVs. The independent and significant correlation of serum adiponectin concentration with hfPWV in CKD patients implicates adiponectin in CKD-associated aortic stiffness.

  13. Arterial aging and arterial disease : interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow-implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Zoccali, Carmine

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial

  14. The effect of lowering salt intake on ambulatory blood pressure to reduce cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (LowSALT CKD study: protocol of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMahon Emma J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite evidence implicating dietary sodium in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD in chronic kidney disease (CKD, quality intervention trials in CKD patients are lacking. This study aims to investigate the effect of reducing sodium intake on blood pressure, risk factors for progression of CKD and other cardiovascular risk factors in CKD. Methods/design The LowSALT CKD study is a six week randomized-crossover trial assessing the effect of a moderate (180 mmol/day compared with a low (60 mmol/day sodium intake on cardiovascular risk factors and risk factors for kidney function decline in mild-moderate CKD (stage III-IV. The primary outcome of interest is 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, with secondary outcomes including arterial stiffness (pulse wave velocity, proteinuria and fluid status. The randomized crossover trial (Phase 1 is supported by an ancillary trial (Phase 2 of longitudinal-observational design to assess the longer term effectiveness of sodium restriction. Phase 2 will continue measurement of outcomes as per Phase 1, with the addition of patient-centered outcomes, such as dietary adherence to sodium restriction (degree of adherence and barriers/enablers, quality of life and taste assessment. Discussion The LowSALT CKD study is an investigator-initiated study specifically designed to assess the proof-of-concept and efficacy of sodium restriction in patients with established CKD. Phase 2 will assess the longer term effectiveness of sodium restriction in the same participants, enhancing the translation of Phase 1 results into practice. This trial will provide much-needed insight into sodium restriction as a treatment option to reduce risk of CVD and CKD progression in CKD patients. Trial registration Universal Trial Number: U1111-1125-2149. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry Number: ACTRN12611001097932

  15. CKD273, a new proteomics classifier assessing CKD and its prognosis.

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    Ángel Argilés

    Full Text Available National Kidney Foundation CKD staging has allowed uniformity in studies on CKD. However, early diagnosis and predicting progression to end stage renal disease are yet to be improved. Seventy six patients with different levels of CKD, including outpatients and dialysed patients were studied for transcriptome, metabolome and proteome description. High resolution urinary proteome analysis was blindly performed in the 53 non-anuric out of the 76 CKD patients. In addition to routine clinical parameters, CKD273, a urinary proteomics-based classifier and its peptides were quantified. The baseline values were analyzed with regard to the clinical parameters and the occurrence of death or renal death during follow-up (3.6 years as the main outcome measurements. None of the patients with CKD2730.55. Unsupervised clustering analysis of the CKD273 peptides separated the patients into two main groups differing in CKD associated parameters. Among the 273 biomarkers, peptides derived from serum proteins were relatively increased in patients with lower glomerular filtration rate, while collagen-derived peptides were relatively decreased (p<0.05; Spearman. CKD273 was different in the groups with different renal function (p<0.003. The CKD273 classifier separated CKD patients according to their renal function and informed on the likelihood of experiencing adverse outcome. Recently defined in a large population, CKD273 is the first proteomic-based classifier successfully tested for prognosis of CKD progression in an independent cohort.

  16. Awareness and knowledge among internal medicine house-staff for dose adjustment of commonly used medications in patients with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surana, Sikander; Kumar, Neeru; Vasudeva, Amita; Shaikh, Gulvahid; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Shah, Hitesh; Malieckal, Deepa; Fogel, Joshua; Sidhu, Gurwinder; Rubinstein, Sofia

    2017-01-17

    Drug dosing errors result in adverse patient outcomes and are more common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). As internists treat the majority of patients with CKD, we study if Internal Medicine house-staff have awareness and knowledge about the correct dosage of commonly used medications for those with CKD. A cross-sectional survey was performed and included 341 participants. The outcomes were the awareness of whether a medication needs dose adjustment in patients with CKD and whether there was knowledge for the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) a medication needs to be adjusted. The overall pattern for all post-graduate year (PGY) groups in all medication classes was a lack of awareness and knowledge. For awareness, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and rheumatologic medication classes but not for analgesic, cardiovascular, and neuropsychotropic medication classes. For knowledge, there were statistically significant increased mean differences for PGY2 and PGY3 as compared to PGY1 for allergy, cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal, medication classes but not for analgesic, neuropsychotropic, and rheumatologic medication classes. Internal Medicine house-staff across all levels of training demonstrated poor awareness and knowledge for many medication classes in CKD patients. Internal Medicine house-staff should receive more nephrology exposure and formal didactic educational training during residency to better manage complex treatment regimens and prevent medication dosing errors.

  17. Association between cardiac biomarkers and the development of ESRD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, and CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, Akshay S; Toto, Robert; Jarolim, Petr

    2011-01-01

    In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), as in other populations, elevations in cardiac biomarker levels predict increased risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the value of troponin T (TnT) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in assessing the risk of developing e...

  18. Curcumin and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD: Major Mode of Action through Stimulating Endogenous Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase

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    Siddhartha S. Ghosh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, an active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa, has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, an inflammatory disease, can lead to end stage renal disease resulting in dialysis and transplant. Furthermore, it is frequently associated with other inflammatory disease such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. This review will focus on the clinically relevant inflammatory molecules that play a role in CKD and associated diseases. Various enzymes, transcription factors, growth factors modulate production and action of inflammatory molecules; curcumin can blunt the generation and action of these inflammatory molecules and ameliorate CKD as well as associated inflammatory disorders. Recent studies have shown that increased intestinal permeability results in the leakage of pro-inflammatory molecules (cytokines and lipopolysaccharides from gut into the circulation in diseases such as CKD, diabetes and atherosclerosis. This change in intestinal permeability is due to decreased expression of tight junction proteins and intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP. Curcumin increases the expression of IAP and tight junction proteins and corrects gut permeability. This action reduces the levels of circulatory inflammatory biomolecules. This effect of curcumin on intestine can explain why, despite poor bioavailability, curcumin has potential anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and beneficial effects on CKD.

  19. EPIC Trial: education programme impact on serum phosphorous control in CKD 5D patients on hemodialysis

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    Carmen Tzanno Branco Martins

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In stage 5D chronic kidney disease (CKD 5D patients, the encouragement of treatment adherence by health professionals is a significant clinical challenge. Objectives: This study evaluates the impact of a nutritional education programme on hyperphosphatemia, utilizing the transtheoretical model of behavior change (TMBC. Subjects and Methods: A prospective interventional study comprising 179 CKD 5D patients with hypophosphatemia. The 4-month educational programme took place during dialysis sessions. Demographic and laboratory data were evaluated, whilst the TMBC was utilized both pre- and post-intervention. Results: 132 patients showed a positive change and significant reduction in phosphate levels, whilst 47 patients showed a negative change and little reduction in phosphate levels. Positive changes were identified at different levels of literacy. 117/179 participants had ongoing treatment with sevelamer throughout the trial period. 61 patients with intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH 300 pg/ml also showed a decrease in phosphate levels. Conclusions: Nutritional education programmes can achieve excellent results when appropriately applied. An education programme may be effective across different literacy levels.

  20. Muscle atrophy in patients wirh ckd results from fgf23/klotho-mediated supression of insulin/igf-i signaling

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    Shinsuke Kido

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy is a significant consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD that increases a patient’s risk of mortality and decrease their quality of life. In CKD patients, the circulation levels of FGF23 are significantly increased, but the exact pathological significance of the increase and relationship between FGF23 and muscle atrophy are not clear. Because of Klohto, acts as a co-receptor of FGF23 is detectable in limited tissues including in kidney and brain, but not in skeletal muscles. In contrast, recently reports indicated that the extracellular domain of klohto is cleavage for some reason on the cell surface and detected in the blood in animals. In this study, we attempted to identify the causative factors responsible for the shedding of Klotho, and whether both FGF23 and Klohto induced muscle atrophy via reduction of insulin/IGF-I signaling. We first investigated by treating kidney cells with various factors related in pathological factors in CKD. As a result, we found that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs, an accumulated in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus, increases shedding of Klohto in kidney cells. It is common knowledge that insulin/IGF-I signaling is necessary for normal skeletal growth. As a result, we showed that both FGF23 and Klohto inhibited differentiation of cultured skeletal muscle cells through down-regulation of insulin/IGF-I signaling. These observations suggested a divergent role of FGF23 and soluble klohto in the regulation of skeletal muscle differentiation and thereby muscle atrophy under pathological conditioned in CKD patients. Our results further imply that FGF23/Klohto may serve a new therapeutic target for CKD-induced muscle atrophy.

  1. Influence of the Method of Definition on the Prevalence of Left-Ventricular Hypertrophy in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the Know-Ped CKD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heeyeon; Choi, Hyun Jin; Kang, Hee Gyung; Ha, Il-Soo; Cheong, Hae Il; Han, Kyung Hee; Kim, Seong Heon; Cho, Min Hyun; Shin, Jae Il; Lee, Joo Hoon; Park, Young Seo

    2017-01-01

    Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. Left-ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (LVH) is an early marker of cardiovascular disease in pediatric CKD, and the prevalence of LVH in pediatric CKD is approximately 20-30% in pre-dialysis CKD patients. However, there is no consensus on the ideal method of defining LVH in pediatric CKD patients. Previous studies have typically used the LV mass index (LVMI), which is calculated as LV mass in grams divided by height in meters to the 2.7th power ≥ 38 g/m2.7, to diagnose LVH in children with CKD. Recently, age-specific reference values for LVMI ≥ 95th percentile and LV wall-thickness z-score > 1.64 in children were addressed. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and contributing factors of LVH in pediatric CKD patients according to each measurement and evaluate the concordance between each measurement. We used the baseline data of the KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-Ped CKD), which is a nationwide, 10-year, prospective, observational cohort study of pediatric CKD. A total of 469 patients were enrolled, and 458 patients were included in the final analysis. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association of the variables with LVH. Kappa statistics were used to analyze the concordance. According to an LVH diagnosis of LVMI ≥ 38 g/m2.7, 188 patients (41.0%) were diagnosed with LVH, and the prevalence of LVH was high in younger patients ( 1.64. There is poor concordance between the diagnosis of LVH using the LV wall-thickness z-score and the LVMI method. The results of this study show that there is poor concordance between the diagnosis of LVH using the wall-thickness z-score and the LVMI2.7 criteria. Further investigation is needed to estimate the correlation between LVH and cardiac dysfunction and to find a better method for defining LVH in the pediatric CKD cohort

  2. Vegan-vegetarian low-protein supplemented diets in pregnant CKD patients: fifteen years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attini, Rossella; Leone, Filomena; Parisi, Silvia; Fassio, Federica; Capizzi, Irene; Loi, Valentina; Colla, Loredana; Rossetti, Maura; Gerbino, Martina; Maxia, Stefania; Alemanno, Maria Grazia; Minelli, Fosca; Piccoli, Ettore; Versino, Elisabetta; Biolcati, Marilisa; Avagnina, Paolo; Pani, Antonello; Cabiddu, Gianfranca; Todros, Tullia; Piccoli, Giorgina B

    2016-09-20

    Pregnancy in women with advanced CKD becoming increasingly common. However, experience with low-protein diets in CKD patients in pregnancy is still limited. Aim of this study is to review the results obtained over the last 15 years with moderately restricted low-protein diets in pregnant CKD women (combining: CKD stages 3-5, proteinuria: nephrotic at any time, or > =1 g/24 at start or referral; nephrotic in previous pregnancy). CKD patients on unrestricted diets were employed for comparison. January, 2000 to September, 2015: 36 on-diet pregnancies (31 singleton deliveries, 3 twin deliveries, 1 pregnancy termination, 1 miscarriage); 47 controls (42 singleton deliveries, 5 miscarriages). The diet is basically vegan; since occasional milk and yoghurt are allowed, we defined it vegan-vegetarian; protein intake (0.6-0.8 g/Kg/day), keto-acid supplementation, protein-unrestricted meals (1-3/week) are prescribed according to CKD stage and nutritional status. Statistical analysis was performed as implemented on SPSS. Patients and controls were similar (p: ns) at baseline with regard to age (33 vs 33.5), referral week (7 vs 9), kidney function (CKD 3-5: 48.4 % vs 64.3 %); prevalence of hypertension (51.6 % vs 40.5 %) and proteinuria >3 g/24 h (16.1 % vs 12.2 %). There were more diabetic nephropathies in on-diet patients (on diet: 31.0 % vs controls 5.3 %; p 0.007 (Fisher)) while lupus nephropathies were non-significantly higher in controls (on diet: 10.3 % vs controls 23.7 %; p 0.28 (Fisher)). The incidence of preterm delivery was similar (vegan-vegetarian supplemented diet is confirmed as a safe option in the management of pregnant CKD patients.

  3. Cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD event rates in HIV-positive persons at high predicted CVD and CKD risk: A prospective analysis of the D:A:D observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Boyd

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D study has developed predictive risk scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD, defined as confirmed estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≤ 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 events in HIV-positive people. We hypothesized that participants in D:A:D at high (>5% predicted risk for both CVD and CKD would be at even greater risk for CVD and CKD events.We included all participants with complete risk factor (covariate data, baseline eGFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m2, and a confirmed (>3 months apart eGFR 1%-5%, >5% and fitted Poisson models to assess whether CVD and CKD risk group effects were multiplicative. A total of 27,215 participants contributed 202,034 person-years of follow-up: 74% male, median (IQR age 42 (36, 49 years, median (IQR baseline year of follow-up 2005 (2004, 2008. D:A:D risk equations predicted 3,560 (13.1% participants at high CVD risk, 4,996 (18.4% participants at high CKD risk, and 1,585 (5.8% participants at both high CKD and high CVD risk. CVD and CKD event rates by predicted risk group were multiplicative. Participants at high CVD risk had a 5.63-fold (95% CI 4.47, 7.09, p < 0.001 increase in CKD events compared to those at low risk; participants at high CKD risk had a 1.31-fold (95% CI 1.09, 1.56, p = 0.005 increase in CVD events compared to those at low risk. Participants' CVD and CKD risk groups had multiplicative predictive effects, with no evidence of an interaction (p = 0.329 and p = 0.291 for CKD and CVD, respectively. The main study limitation is the difference in the ascertainment of the clinically defined CVD endpoints and the laboratory-defined CKD endpoints.We found that people at high predicted risk for both CVD and CKD have substantially greater risks for both CVD and CKD events compared with those at low predicted risk for both outcomes, and compared to those at high predicted risk for only CVD or CKD events. This suggests that CVD and

  4. Chronic kidney disease in HIV patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S.; Rasyid, H.; Kasim, H.; Katu, S.

    2018-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a health problem in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) population. Prediction of CKD in HIV patients needsto have done. This study aimis to identify the prevalence of CKD in HIV patients.Thisis a cross-sectional studyofmale and female, age 18-60 years old, diagnosedHIVat Wahidin Sudirohusodo & Hasanuddin University Hospital Makassar. Diagnosed as CKD if estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) HIV patients included in the analyses. Distribution of CKD, showed 3 (3.5%) subjects with eGFRHIV populations in Makassar is still quite low.

  5. High amylose resistant starch diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with advanced CKD exhibit profound changes in the composition and function of the gut microbiome. This is, in part, mediated by: I- heavy influx of urea in the intestinal tract leading to the dominance of urease-possessing bacteria and II- dietary restriction of potassium-rich fruits and ve...

  6. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  7. Reliability of CKD-EPI predictive equation in estimating chronic kidney disease prevalence in the Croatian endemic nephropathy area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuček, Mirjana; Dika, Živka; Karanović, Sandra; Vuković Brinar, Ivana; Premužić, Vedran; Kos, Jelena; Cvitković, Ante; Mišić, Maja; Samardžić, Josip; Rogić, Dunja; Jelaković, Bojan

    2018-02-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem and it is not possible to precisely predict its progression to terminal renal failure. According to current guidelines, CKD stages are classified based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria. Aims of this study were to determine the reliability of predictive equation in estimation of CKD prevalence in Croatian areas with endemic nephropathy (EN), compare the results with non-endemic areas, and to determine if the prevalence of CKD stages 3-5 was increased in subjects with EN. A total of 1573 inhabitants of the Croatian Posavina rural area from 6 endemic and 3 non-endemic villages were enrolled. Participants were classified according to the modified criteria of the World Health Organization for EN. Estimated GFR was calculated using Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation (CKD-EPI). The results showed a very high CKD prevalence in the Croatian rural area (19%). CKD prevalence was significantly higher in EN then in non EN villages with the lowest eGFR value in diseased subgroup. eGFR correlated significantly with the diagnosis of EN. Kidney function assessment using CKD-EPI predictive equation proved to be a good marker in differentiating the study subgroups, remained as one of the diagnostic criteria for EN.

  8. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...... study, heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation were identified using Danish nationwide registries. Risk of stroke, major haemorrhage, and death were calculated after 1 and 5 years to compare patients with and without CKD, ±dialysis [dialysis: CKD with renal replacement therapy (CKD......-RRT); no dialysis: CKD-no RRT]. A total of 43 199 heart failure patients were included, among which 0.8% had CKD-RRT and 5.9% had CKD-no RRT. When compared with heart failure patients without CKD, both CKD-RRT and CKD-no RRT were associated with a higher 5 year rate of major bleeding (CKD-RRT: adjusted hazard ratio...

  9. The QICKD study protocol: a cluster randomised trial to compare quality improvement interventions to lower systolic BP in chronic kidney disease (CKD in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    du Bois Elizabeth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a relatively newly recognised but common long-term condition affecting 5 to 10% of the population. Effective management of CKD, with emphasis on strict blood pressure (BP control, reduces cardiovascular risk and slows the progression of CKD. There is currently an unprecedented rise in referral to specialist renal services, which are often located in tertiary centres, inconvenient for patients, and wasteful of resources. National and international CKD guidelines include quality targets for primary care. However, there have been no rigorous evaluations of strategies to implement these guidelines. This study aims to test whether quality improvement interventions improve primary care management of elevated BP in CKD, reduce cardiovascular risk, and slow renal disease progression Design Cluster randomised controlled trial (CRT Methods This three-armed CRT compares two well-established quality improvement interventions with usual practice. The two interventions comprise: provision of clinical practice guidelines with prompts and audit-based education. The study population will be all individuals with CKD from general practices in eight localities across England. Randomisation will take place at the level of the general practices. The intended sample (three arms of 25 practices powers the study to detect a 3 mmHg difference in systolic BP between the different quality improvement interventions. An additional 10 practices per arm will receive a questionnaire to measure any change in confidence in managing CKD. Follow up will take place over two years. Outcomes will be measured using anonymised routinely collected data extracted from practice computer systems. Our primary outcome measure will be reduction of systolic BP in people with CKD and hypertension at two years. Secondary outcomes will include biomedical outcomes and markers of quality, including practitioner confidence in managing CKD. A small

  10. The effect of some medications given to CKD patients on vitamin D levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Yuste

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: CKD patients with vitamin D deficiency who received RAS inhibitors or Allopurinol treatment had higher 25-OH-D3 levels, however those with statins treatment had lower vitamin D levels. Randomized controlled trials are required to confirm these findings.

  11. INCREASED FAT INTAKE MAY STABILIZED CKD PROGRESSION IN LOW-FAT INTAKE PATIENTS

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    Min-Yu Chang

    2012-06-01

    Inadequate calories intake will induce excessive protein catabolism, which can cause accumulation of uremic toxins and acceleration of renal failure. Increasing fats intake is an easy way to achieve adequate calories acquirement and may stabilize the progression of CKD especially in low-fat intake patients.

  12. The significant impact of acute kidney injury on CKD in patients who survived over 10 years after myeloablative allogeneic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoi, T; Ando, M; Munakata, W; Kobayashi, T; Kakihana, K; Ohashi, K; Akiyama, H; Sakamaki, H

    2013-01-01

    There are no well-defined studies of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among long-term survivors after hematopoietic SCT. A retrospective longitudinal study was conducted to characterize CKD in 77 subjects that had undergone myeloablative allogeneic SCT, all of whom had their serum creatinine (Cr) levels followed-up during the 10-year period after SCT. Their mean (range) survival time was 14.4 (10.5-20.2) years. CKD was defined as a persistent decrease in the Cr-based estimated glomerular filtration rate to below 60 mL/min/1.73 m². Acute kidney injury (AKI) was defined as an increase in Cr within the first 100 days after SCT, and its severity was classified into three stages according to the AKIN criteria. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses evaluated the association between AKI and the incidence of CKD. The cumulative incidence of CKD increased over time and reached 34% at 10 years. After adjusting for known risks for post-SCT CKD, each AKIN stage was strongly associated with the incidence of CKD. The incidence of CKD probably increases over time among subjects who are alive at >10 years after SCT. This study places a new emphasis on AKI as an important risk factor for CKD in post-SCT subjects.

  13. Effects of the Use of Non-Calcium Phosphate Binders in the Control and Outcome of Vascular Calcifications: A Review of Clinical Trials on CKD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2011-01-01

    Vascular calcifications produce a high impact on morbidity and mortality rates in patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD). Effects are manifested from the more advanced stages of CKD (stages 3-4), particularly in patients undergoing dialysis (CKD5D). In recent years, a large number of therapeutic options have been successfully used in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT), despite eliciting less marked effects on nonbone calcifications associated with CKD-MBD. In addition to the use of Vitamin D and analogues, more recently treatment with calcimimetic drugs has also been undertaken. The present paper aims to analyze comparative and efficacy studies undertaken to assess particularly the impact on morbidity and mortality rates of non-calcium phosphate binders. Moreover, the mechanism of action underlying the depositing of calcium and phosphate along blood vessel walls, irrespective of the specific contribution provided in reducing the typical phosphate levels observed in CKD largely at more advanced stages of the disease, will be investigated. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate which phosphate binders are characterised by the above action and the mechanisms through which these are manifested.

  14. Effects of the Use of Non-Calcium Phosphate Binders in the Control and Outcome of Vascular Calcifications: A Review of Clinical Trials on CKD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piergiorgio Bolasco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcifications produce a high impact on morbidity and mortality rates in patients affected by chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD. Effects are manifested from the more advanced stages of CKD (stages 3-4, particularly in patients undergoing dialysis (CKD5D. In recent years, a large number of therapeutic options have been successfully used in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT, despite eliciting less marked effects on nonbone calcifications associated with CKD-MBD. In addition to the use of Vitamin D and analogues, more recently treatment with calcimimetic drugs has also been undertaken. The present paper aims to analyze comparative and efficacy studies undertaken to assess particularly the impact on morbidity and mortality rates of non-calcium phosphate binders. Moreover, the mechanism of action underlying the depositing of calcium and phosphate along blood vessel walls, irrespective of the specific contribution provided in reducing the typical phosphate levels observed in CKD largely at more advanced stages of the disease, will be investigated. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate which phosphate binders are characterised by the above action and the mechanisms through which these are manifested.

  15. Usability of a CKD Educational Website Targeted to Patients and Their Family Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Marni; Fink, Wanda; Hu, Peter; Yang, Shiming; Fink, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Web-based technology is critical to the future of healthcare. As part of the Safe Kidney Care cohort study evaluating patient safety in CKD, this study determined how effectively a representative sample of patients with CKD or family members could interpret and use the Safe Kidney Care website (www.safekidneycare.org), an informational website on safety in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between November of 2011 and January of 2012, persons with CKD or their family members underwent formal usability testing administered by a single interviewer with a second recording observer. Each participant was independently provided a list of 21 tasks to complete, with each task rated as either easily completed/noncritical error or critical error (user cannot complete the task without significant interviewer intervention). Results Twelve participants completed formal usability testing. Median completion time for all tasks was 17.5 minutes (range=10–44 minutes). In total, 10 participants had greater than or equal to one critical error. There were 55 critical errors in 252 tasks (22%), with the highest proportion of critical errors occurring when participants were asked to find information on treatments that may damage kidneys, find the website on the internet, increase font size, and scroll to the bottom of the webpage. Participants were generally satisfied with the content and usability of the website. Conclusions Web-based educational materials for patients with CKD should target a wide range of computer literacy levels and anticipate variability in competency in use of the computer and internet. PMID:22798537

  16. Enzymatic creatinine assays allow estimation of glomerular filtration rate in stages 1 and 2 chronic kidney disease using CKD-EPI equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Nils; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Cavalier, Etienne; Bargnoux, Anne-Sophie; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Froissart, Marc; Piéroni, Laurence; Delanaye, Pierre

    2014-01-20

    The National Kidney Disease Education Program group demonstrated that MDRD equation is sensitive to creatinine measurement error, particularly at higher glomerular filtration rates. Thus, MDRD-based eGFR above 60 mL/min/1.73 m² should not be reported numerically. However, little is known about the impact of analytical error on CKD-EPI-based estimates. This study aimed at assessing the impact of analytical characteristics (bias and imprecision) of 12 enzymatic and 4 compensated Jaffe previously characterized creatinine assays on MDRD and CKD-EPI eGFR. In a simulation study, the impact of analytical error was assessed on a hospital population of 24084 patients. Ability using each assay to correctly classify patients according to chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages was evaluated. For eGFR between 60 and 90 mL/min/1.73 m², both equations were sensitive to analytical error. Compensated Jaffe assays displayed high bias in this range and led to poorer sensitivity/specificity for classification according to CKD stages than enzymatic assays. As compared to MDRD equation, CKD-EPI equation decreases impact of analytical error in creatinine measurement above 90 mL/min/1.73 m². Compensated Jaffe creatinine assays lead to important errors in eGFR and should be avoided. Accurate enzymatic assays allow estimation of eGFR until 90 mL/min/1.73 m² with MDRD and 120 mL/min/1.73 m² with CKD-EPI equation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepcidin Response to Iron Therapy in Patients with Non-Dialysis Dependent CKD: An Analysis of the FIND-CKD Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Carlo A; Bock, Andreas H; Carrera, Fernando; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Van Wyck, David B; Bansal, Sukhvinder S; Cronin, Maureen; Meier, Yvonne; Larroque, Sylvain; Roger, Simon D; Macdougall, Iain C

    2016-01-01

    Hepcidin is the key regulator of iron homeostasis but data are limited regarding its temporal response to iron therapy, and response to intravenous versus oral iron. In the 56-week, open-label, multicenter, prospective, randomized FIND-CKD study, 626 anemic patients with non-dialysis dependent chronic kidney disease (ND-CKD) and iron deficiency not receiving an erythropoiesis stimulating agent were randomized (1:1:2) to intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), targeting higher (400-600μg/L) or lower (100-200μg/L) ferritin, or to oral iron. Serum hepcidin levels were measured centrally in a subset of 61 patients. Mean (SD) baseline hepcidin level was 4.0(3.5), 7.3(6.4) and 6.5(5.6) ng/mL in the high ferritin FCM (n = 17), low ferritin FCM (n = 16) and oral iron group (n = 28). The mean (SD) endpoint value (i.e. the last post-baseline value) was 26.0(9.1),15.7(7.7) and 16.3(11.0) ng/mL, respectively. The increase in hepcidin from baseline was significantly smaller with low ferritin FCM or oral iron vs high ferritin FCM at all time points up to week 52. Significant correlations were found between absolute hepcidin and ferritin values (r = 0.65, p<0.001) and between final post-baseline increases in both parameters (r = 0.70, p<0.001). The increase in hepcidin levels over the 12-month study generally mirrored the cumulative iron dose in each group. Hepcidin and transferrin saturation (TSAT) absolute values showed no correlation, although there was an association between final post-baseline increases (r = 0.42, p<0.001). Absolute values (r = 0.36, p = 0.004) and final post-baseline increases of hepcidin and hemoglobin (p = 0.30, p = 0.030) correlated weakly. Baseline hepcidin levels were not predictive of a hematopoietic response to iron therapy. In conclusion, hepcidin levels rose in response to either intravenous or oral iron therapy, but the speed and extent of the rise was greatest with intravenous iron targeting a higher ferritin level. However neither the

  18. Association between periodontal disease and mortality in people with CKD: a meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Hong; Sun, Min; Chen, Jianghua

    2017-08-16

    Periodontal disease occurs relatively prevalently in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but it remains indeterminate whether periodontal disease is an independent risk factor for premature death in this population. Interventions to reduce mortality in CKD population consistently yield to unsatisfactory results and new targets are necessitated. So this meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association between periodontal disease and mortality in the CKD population. Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and abstracts from recent relevant meeting were searched by two authors independently. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for overall and subgroup meta-analyses. Statistical heterogeneity was explored by chi-square test and quantified by the I 2 statistic. Eight cohort studies comprising 5477 individuals with CKD were incorporated. The overall pooled data demonstrated that periodontal disease was associated with all-cause death in CKD population (RR, 1.254; 95% CI 1.046-1.503; P = 0.005), with a moderate heterogeneity, I 2  = 52.2%. However, no evident association was observed between periodontal disease and cardiovascular mortality (RR, 1.30, 95% CI, 0.82-2.06; P = 0.259). Besides, statistical heterogeneity was substantial (I 2  = 72.5%; P = 0.012). Associations for mortality were similar between subgroups, such as the different stages of CKD, adjustment for confounding factors. Specific to all-cause death, sensitivity and cumulative analyses both suggested that our results were robust. As for cardiovascular mortality, the association with periodontal disease needs to be further strengthened. We demonstrated that periodontal disease was associated with an increased risk of all-cause death in CKD people. Yet no adequate evidence suggested periodontal disease was also at elevated risk for cardiovascular death.

  19. OUTCOME OF ZINC SUPPLEMENTATION ON NUTRITIONAL INTAKE OF CKD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sahni

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Zn supplementation alone failed to improve dietary intake as it seemed patients were scared to eat more/wrong/kidney unfriendly food in absence of clear dietary guidelines, but favorable results were observed when Zn supplementation was coupled with parametric, individualized dietary counseling which shows that role of diet counseling in removing food misconceptions & lack of knowledge is important to make any therapy effective. So there is a critical need for implementation of effective nutritional management strategies.

  20. Smoking and Adverse Outcomes in Patients With CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staplin, Natalie; Haynes, Richard; Herrington, William G

    2016-01-01

    enrolled in SHARP. PREDICTOR: Baseline smoking status (current, former, and never). OUTCOMES: Vascular events, site-specific cancer, ESRD, rate of change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and cause-specific mortality. RESULTS: At baseline, 1,243 (13%) participants were current smokers (median....... For 6,245 patients not receiving dialysis at baseline, ESRD incidence did not differ significantly between current and never smokers (2,141 events; RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.89-1.17), nor did estimated rate of change in eGFR (current smokers, -1.77±0.14 [SE]; never smokers, -1.70±0.07mL/min/1.73m(2) per year...

  1. [The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study: To better understand chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Édouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-04-01

    Preserving kidney function and improving the transition from chronic kidney disease to end stage is a research and healthcare challenge. The national Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort was established to identify the determinants, biomarkers and practice patterns associated with chronic kidney disease outcomes. The study will include more than 3000 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease from a representative sample of 40 nephrology clinics with respect to regions and legal status, public or private. Patients are recruited during a routine visit and followed for 5 years, before and after starting renal replacement therapy. Patient-level clinical, biological, and lifestyle data are collected annually, as well as provider-level data on clinical practices, coordinated with the International Chronic Kidney Disease Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Blood and urine samples are stored in a biobank. Major studied outcomes include survival, patient-reported outcomes, disease progression and hospitalizations. More than 13,000 eligible patients with chronic kidney disease were identified, 60% with stage 3 and 40% with stage 4. Their median age is 72 years [interquartile range, 62-80 years], 60% are men and 38% have diabetes. By the end of December 2015, 2885 patients were included. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of chronic kidney disease and provide evidence to improve patient survival and quality of life as well as health care system performances. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. All rights reserved.

  2. Differences between office and 24-hour blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with CKD: A 5,693-patient cross-sectional analysis from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostidi, Manuel; Sarafidis, Pantelis A; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Segura, Julian; de la Cruz, Juan J; Banegas, Jose R; Ruilope, Luis M

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have examined control rates of office blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, recent evidence suggests major discrepancies between office and 24-hour BP values in hypertensive populations. This study examined concordance/discordance between office- and ambulatory-based BP control in a large cohort of patients with CKD. Cross-sectional. 5,693 hypertensive individuals with CKD stages 1-5 from the Spanish ABPM (ambulatory BP monitoring) Registry. Thresholds of 140/90 and 130/80 mm Hg for office BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP, respectively. Age, sex, body mass index, waist circumference, hypertension duration, kidney measures, diabetes, dyslipidemia, target-organ damage, and cardiovascular comorbid conditions. Misclassification of BP control as "white-coat" hypertension (office BP ≥140/90 mm Hg, 24-hour BP <130/80 mm Hg) or masked hypertension (office BP <140/90 mm Hg, 24-hour BP ≥130/80 mm Hg). Standardized office-based BP and 24-hour ABPM. Mean age was 61.0 ± 13.9 (SD) years and 52.6% were men. The proportion with white-coat hypertension was 28.8% (36.8% of patients with office BP ≥140/90 mm Hg) and that of masked hypertension was 7.0% (but 32.1% of patients with office BP <140/90 mm Hg). Female sex, aging, obesity, and target-organ damage were associated with white-coat hypertension; aging and obesity were associated with masked hypertension. Only 21.7% and 8.1% of the CKD population had office BP <140/90 and <130/80 mm Hg, respectively. In contrast, 43.5% of individuals had average 24-hour BP <130/80 mm Hg. Cross-sectional design, longitudinal associations cannot be established. Misclassification of BP control at the office was observed in 1 of 3 hypertensive patients with CKD. Ambulatory-based control rates were far better than office-based rates. Nevertheless, the burden of uncontrolled ambulatory BP and misclassification of BP control at the office constitutes a call for wider use of ABPM to evaluate the success of

  3. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    management of the complications of CKD, e.g. renal anaemia, ... ARTICLE. Management of patients with chronic kidney disease. T Gerntholtz,1 FCP (SA); G Paget,2 ..... Telmisartan, ramipril, or both in patients at high risk for vascular events.

  4. The use of vitamin D analogs is independently associated with the favorable renal prognosis in chronic kidney disease stages 4-5: the CKD-ROUTE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yohei; Kanda, Eiichiro; Iimori, Soichiro; Naito, Shotaro; Noda, Yumi; Kawasaki, Tomoki; Sato, Hidehiko; Ando, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Sei; Sohara, Eisei; Okado, Tomokazu; Rai, Tatemitsu; Uchida, Shinichi

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D analogs have generally been recommended for treatment of mineral bone disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the association between this treatment and CKD progression has not yet been established. We designed a post hoc propensity score-matched cohort analysis derived from 3-year follow-up data of a prospective cohort. Adult participants with pre-dialysis CKD stages 4-5 who had newly been prescribed active vitamin D analogs during the observation period were eligible as matched cases. Then, matched controls were extracted from participants who had never been prescribed active vitamin D analogs. The primary outcome was a composite of end-stage renal disease or a 50 % reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A Cox proportional hazards model evaluated the association between the use of vitamin D analogs and the primary outcome. We enrolled 240 patients (males, 65 %). The number of matched cases and controls was 30 and 210, respectively. The primary outcome was observed in 94 patients, whereas 25 patients died. The mean ± standard deviation age and eGFR were 69 ± 12 years and 17 ± 5.7 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , respectively. In a Cox proportional hazard model, the use of vitamin D analogs was independently associated with a lower risk of the primary outcome (crude hazard ratio 0.41; 95 % confidence interval 0.19, 0.89; adjusted hazard ratio 0.38; 95 % confidence interval 0.17, 0.88). The use of vitamin D analogs is independently associated with the preservation of renal function in patients with pre-dialysis CKD stages 4-5.

  5. New perspectives on CKD-induced dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-López, Marcelino; Arroyo, David; Betriu, Àngels; Masana, Luis; Fernández, Elvira; Valdivielso, Jose M

    2017-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a world-wide health concern associated with a significantly higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One of the principal cardiovascular risk factors is the lipid profile. CKD patients have a more frequent and progressive atheromatous disease that cannot be explained by the classical lipid parameters used in the daily clinical practice. Areas covered: The current review summarizes prevailing knowledge on the role of lipids in atheromathosis in CKD patients, including an overview of lipoprotein metabolism highlighting the CKD-induced alterations. Moreover, to obtain information beyond traditional lipid parameters, new state-of-the-art technologies such as lipoprotein subfraction profiling and lipidomics are also reviewed. Finally, we analyse the potential of new lipoprotein subclasses as therapeutic targets in CKD. Expert opinion: The CKD-induced lipid profile has specific features distinct from the general population. Besides quantitative alterations, renal patients have a plethora of qualitative lipid alterations that cannot be detected by routine determinations and are responsible for the excess of cardiovascular risk. New parameters, such as lipoprotein particle number and size, together with new biomarkers obtained by lipidomics will personalize the management of these patients. Therefore, nephrologists need to be aware of new insights into lipoprotein metabolism to improve cardiovascular risk assessment.

  6. Management of Gout and Hyperuricemia in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Santos, Ana Beatriz; Neogi, Tuhina

    2017-09-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout, the clinical manifestation of monosodium urate crystal deposition, are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although the presence of CKD poses additional challenges in gout management, effective urate lowering is possible for most patients with CKD. Initial doses of urate-lowering therapy are lower than in the non-CKD population, whereas incremental dose escalation is guided by regular monitoring of serum urate levels to reach the target level of gout flares with presently available agents can be more challenging due to potential nephrotoxicity and/or contraindications in the setting of other common comorbid conditions. At present, asymptomatic hyperuricemia is not an indication for urate-lowering therapy, though emerging data may support a potential renoprotective effect. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Benefit of Valvular Surgery in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Au, Wing-Kuk; Chan, Daniel; Sit, Ko-Yung; Zhen, Zhe; Ho, Kar-Lai; Wong, Debbie; Ho, Lai-Ming; Yap, Desmond; Lam, Yui-Ming; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat; Chan, Tak-Mao; Yiu, Kai-Hang

    2018-06-20

    Concomitant chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in patients with significant valvular heart disease (VHD). This study sought to evaluate the clinical benefit of valvular surgery in patients with concomitant CKD.We evaluated 349 patients with significant VHD who were referred for surgery. Patients were divided into those with CKD stage ≥ 3 (CKD patients; n = 88) and those with CKD stage 1 or 2 (no CKD patients; n = 261). 63 patients did not receive surgery, of which 20 patients had CKD and 43 had no CKD. Mortality and change in eGFR were assessed after a median follow-up of 21 months.In the whole study population, 25% of the patients had CKD and these patients had higher mortality than those with no CKD. The annual mortality rates of patients with CKD who did and did not undergo surgery were 7.9% and 28.0%, respectively. In patients with no CKD, the annual mortality rates of those who did and did not undergo surgery were 1.8% and 2.3%, respectively. Importantly, surgery was associated with significant survival benefit in patients with CKD (log-rank test, P < 0.01), but was neutral in patients with no CKD. Multivariable analysis confirmed the survival benefit of valvular surgery in all patients, which was most significant in patients with CKD. Furthermore, eGFR was preserved in patients who underwent valvular surgery but declined significantly in those who did not.CKD is common in patients with significant VHD and, if left untreated surgically, these patients exhibit a high mortality.

  8. Impact of sex and glucose-lowering treatments on hypoglycaemic symptoms in people with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. The French Chronic Kidney Disease - Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkau, B; Metzger, M; Andreelli, F; Frimat, L; Speyer, E; Combe, C; Laville, M; Jacquelinet, C; Briançon, S; Ayav, C; Massy, Z; Pisoni, R L; Stengel, B; Fouque, D

    2018-04-06

    To describe current practices of glucose-lowering treatments in people with diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the associated glucose control and hypoglycaemic symptoms, with an emphasis on sex differences. Among the 3033 patients with CKD stages 3-5 recruited into the French CKD-REIN study, 645 men and 288 women had type 2 diabetes and were treated by glucose-lowering drugs. Overall, 31% were treated only with insulin, 28% with combinations of insulin and another drug, 42% with non-insulin glucose-lowering drugs. In CKD stage 3, 40% of patients used metformin, 12% at stages 4&5, similar for men and women; in CKD stage 3, 53% used insulin, similar for men and women, but at stages 4&5, 59% of men and 77% of women used insulin. Patients were reasonably well controlled, with a median HbA1c of 7.1% (54mmol/mol) in men, 7.4% (57mmol/mol) in women (P=0.0003). Hypoglycaemic symptoms were reported by 40% of men and 59% of women; they were not associated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate, nor with albuminuria or with HbA1c in multivariable analyses, but they were more frequent in people treated with insulin, particularly with fast-acting and pre-mixed insulins. Glucose-lowering treatment, HbA1c and hypoglycaemic symptoms were sex dependent. Metformin use was similar in men and women, but unexpectedly low in CKD stage 3; its use could be encouraged rather than resorting to insulin. Hypoglycaemic symptoms were frequent and need to be more closely monitored, with appropriate patient-education, especially in women. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. iConnect CKD - Virtual Medical Consulting: a web-based Chronic Kidney Disease, Hypertension and Diabetes Integrated Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ivor J; Pirabhahar, Saiyini; Williamson, Paula; Raghunath, Vishwas; Brennan, Frank; O'Sullivan, Anthony; Youssef, George; Lane, Cathie; Jacobson, Gary; Feldman, Peter; Kelly, John

    2017-05-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients overwhelm specialist services and can potentially be managed in the primary care (PC). Opportunistic screening of high risk (HR) patients and follow-up in PC is the most sustainable model of care. A 'virtual consultation' (VC) model instead of traditional face to face (F2F) consultations was used, aiming to assess efficacy and safety of the model. Seventy patients were recruited from PC sites and hospital clinics, and followed for one year. The HR patients (eGFR 30 mg/mmol/L) were randomised to either VC or F2F. Patients were monitored 6 monthly by a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS). The specialist team provided virtual or clinical support and included a Nephrologist, Endocrinologist, Cardiologist and Renal 'Palliative' Supportive Care. Sixty one (87%) patients were virtually tracked or consulted with 14 (23%) being HR. At 12 months there was no difference in outcomes between VC and F2F patients. All patients were successfully monitored. GPs reported high level of satisfaction and supported the model, but found software integration challenging. Patients found the system attractive and felt well managed. Specialist consults occurred within a week and if a second specialist opinion was required it took another two weeks. The program demonstrated safe, expedited and efficient follow up with a clinical and web based program. Support from the GPs and patients was encouraging, despite logistical issues. Ongoing evaluation of VC services will continue and feasibility to larger networks and more chronic diseases remains the long term goal. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein Nutrition and Malnutrition in CKD and ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yan; Qian, Qi

    2017-02-27

    Elevated protein catabolism and protein malnutrition are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The underlying etiology includes, but is not limited to, metabolic acidosis intestinal dysbiosis; systemic inflammation with activation of complements, endothelin-1 and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis; anabolic hormone resistance; energy expenditure elevation; and uremic toxin accumulation. All of these derangements can further worsen kidney function, leading to poor patient outcomes. Many of these CKD-related derangements can be prevented and substantially reversed, representing an area of great potential to improve CKD and ESRD care. This review integrates known information and recent advances in the area of protein nutrition and malnutrition in CKD and ESRD. Management recommendations are summarized. Thorough understanding the pathogenesis and etiology of protein malnutrition in CKD and ESRD patients will undoubtedly facilitate the design and development of more effective strategies to optimize protein nutrition and improve outcomes.

  11. What drives quality improvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care: process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihat, Akin; de Lusignan, Simon; Thomas, Nicola; Tahir, Mohammad Aumran; Gallagher, Hugh

    2016-04-06

    This study is a process evaluation of the Quality Improvement in Chronic Kidney Disease (QICKD) study, comparing audit-based education (ABE) and sending clinical guidelines and prompts (G&P) with usual practice, in improving systolic blood pressure control in primary care. This evaluation aimed to explore how far clinical staff in participating practices were aware of the intervention, and why change in practice might have taken place. 4 primary care practices in England: 2 received ABE, and 2 G&P. We purposively selected 1 northern/southern/city and rural practice from each study arm (from a larger pool of 132 practices as part of the QICKD trial). The 4 study practices were purposively sampled, and focus groups conducted with staff from each. All staff members were invited to attend. Focus groups in each of 4 practices, at the mid-study point and at the end. 4 additional trial practices not originally selected for in-depth process evaluation took part in end of trial focus groups, to a total of 12 focus groups. These were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework approach. 5 themes emerged: (1) involvement in the study made participants more positive about the CKD register; (2) clinicians did not always explain to patients that they had CKD; (3) while practitioners improved their monitoring of CKD, many were sceptical that it improved care and were more motivated by pay-for-performance measures; (4) the impact of study interventions on practice was generally positive, particularly the interaction with specialists, included in ABE; (5) the study stimulated ideas for future clinical practice. Improving quality in CKD is complex. Lack of awareness of clinical guidelines and scepticism about their validity are barriers to change. While pay-for-performance incentives are the main driver for change, quality improvement interventions can have a complementary influence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  12. The Prevalence of Fabry Disease in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Turkey: The TURKFAB Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kultigin Turkmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fabry disease is a treatable cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD characterized by a genetic deficiency of α-galactosidase A. European Renal Best Practice (ERBP recommends screening for Fabry disease in CKD patients. However, this is based on expert opinion and there are no reports of the prevalence of Fabry disease in stage 1-5 CKD. Hence, we investigated the prevalence of Fabry disease in CKD patients not receiving renal replacement therapy. Methods: This prospective study assessed α-galactosidase activity in dried blood spots in 313 stage 1-5 CKD patients, 167 males, between ages of 18-70 years whose etiology of CKD was unknown and were not receiving renal replacement therapy. The diagnosis was confirmed by GLA gene mutation analysis. Results: Three (all males of 313 CKD patients (0.95% were diagnosed of Fabry disease, for a prevalence in males of 1.80%. Family screening identified 8 aditional Fabry patients with CKD. Of a total of 11 Fabry patients, 7 were male and started enzyme replacement therapy and 4 were female. The most frequent manifestations in male patients were fatigue (100%, tinnitus, vertigo, acroparesthesia, hypohidrosis, cornea verticillata and angiokeratoma (all 85%, heat intolerance (71%, and abdominal pain (57%. The most frequent manifestations in female patients were fatigue and cornea verticillata (50%, and tinnitus, vertigo and angiokeratoma (25%. Three patients had severe episodic abdominal pain attacks and proteinuria, and were misdiagnosed as familial Mediterranean fever. Conclusions: The prevalence of Fabry disease in selected CKD patients is in the range found among renal replacement therapy patients, but the disease is diagnosed at an earlier, treatable stage. These data support the ERBP recommendation to screen for Fabry disease in patients with CKD of unknown origin.

  13. Left ventricular hypertrophy among chronic kidney disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is associated with worsening cardiovascular outcomes. There is a dearth of data on LVH in Ghanaian CKD patients. Methods: This was a cross sectional study carried out at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital ...

  14. A resistant starch fiber diet ameliorates oxidative stress, inflammation, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation is a constant feature and a major mediator of CKD progression. It is, in part, driven by altered gut microbiome and disruption of intestinal epithelial barrier, events which are primarily caused by: 1- urea influx in the intestine resulting in dominance of urease-possessing bacteria; 2-...

  15. Comparison of the usefulness of selected formulas for GFR estimation in patients with diagnosed chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Wróbel

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: CKD-EPI and abbreviated MDRD formulas have a similar usefulness in GFR value estimation in patients with diagnosed chronic kidney disease. Lower eGFR values achieved using abbreviated MDRD formula and CKD-EPI equation in comparison with Bjornsson’s formula may result in an increased number of patients diagnosed with CKD.

  16. Should patients with CKD stage 5D and biochemical evidence of secondary hyperparathyroidism be prescribed calcimimetic therapy? An ERA-EDTA position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldsmith, David; Covic, Adrian; Vervloet, Marc; Cozzolino, Mario; Nistor, Ionut; Vervloet, Mark; Brandenburg, Vincent; Bover, Jordi; Evenepoel, Pieter; Massy, Ziad; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Urena-Torres, Pablo; Abramowicz, D.; Bolignano, D.; Cannata Andia, G.; Cochat, P.; Covic, A.; Delvecchio, L.; Drechsler, C.; Eckardt, K. U.; Fouque, D.; Fox, J.; Haller, M.; Heimburger, O.; Jager, K. J.; Lindley, E.; Marti Monros, A. M.; Nagler, E.; Oberbauer, R.; Spasovski, G.; Tattersall, J.; van Biesen, W.; Vander Veer, S.; Vanholder, R.; Wanner, C.; Wheeler, D.; Whithers, W.; Wiecek, A.; Zoccali, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects the position of the CKD-MBD workgroup, an official working group of ERA-EDTA and of the ERBP advisory board, the official guideline-producing body of ERA-EDTA, on the topic of the use of calcimimetics in patients with CKD stage 5D, as based on two recent meta-analysis

  17. Circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in patients with chronic kidney disease without previous history of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguiano, Lidia; Riera, Marta; Pascual, Julio; Valdivielso, José Manuel; Barrios, Clara; Betriu, Angels; Mojal, Sergi; Fernández, Elvira; Soler, María José

    2015-07-01

    Patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease have an increased circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) activity, but there is little information about changes in ACE2 in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients without history of CV disease. We examined circulating ACE2 activity in CKD patients at stages 3-5 (CKD3-5) and in dialysis (CKD5D) without any history of CV disease. Circulating ACE2 activity was measured in human ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA)-plasma samples from the NEFRONA study (n = 2572): control group (CONT) (n = 568), CKD3-5 (n = 1458) and CKD5D (n = 546). Different clinical and analytical variables such as gender; age; history of diabetes mellitus (DM), dyslipidemia and hypertension; glycaemic, renal, lipid and anaemia profiles; vitamin D analogues treatment and antihypertensive treatments (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and angiotensin receptor blockade) were analysed. Circulating ACE2 and ACE activities were measured using modified fluorimetric assay for EDTA-plasma samples, where zinc chloride was added to recover enzymatic activity. In CKD3-5 and CKD5D, significant decrease in circulating ACE2 activity was observed when compared with CONT, but no differences were found between CKD3-5 and CKD5 when performing paired case-control studies. By multivariate linear regression analysis, male gender and advanced age were identified as independent predictors of ACE2 activity in all groups. Diabetes was identified as independent predictor of ACE2 activity in CKD3-5. Significant increase in the activity of circulating ACE was found in CKD3-5 and CKD5D when compared with CONT and in CKD5D when compared with CKD3-5. By multiple regression analysis, female gender and younger age were identified as independent predictors of ACE activity in CONT and CKD3-5. Diabetes was also identified as an independent predictor of ACE activity in CKD3-5 patients. Circulating ACE2 and ACE activities can be measured in human EDTA-plasma samples with zinc

  18. Current status of bicarbonate in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobre, Mirela; Rahman, Mahboob; Hostetter, Thomas H

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis was one of the earliest complications to be recognized and explained pathologically in patients with CKD. Despite the accumulated evidence of deleterious effects of acidosis, treatment of acidosis has been tested very little, especially with respect to standard clinical outcomes. On the basis of fundamental research and small alkali supplementation trials, correcting metabolic acidosis has a strikingly broad array of potential benefits. This review summarizes the published evidence on the association between serum bicarbonate and clinical outcomes. We discuss the role of alkali supplementation in CKD as it relates to retarding kidney disease progression, improving metabolic and musculoskeletal complications. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Evaluation of arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodanapu Mastanvalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem worldwide. Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that structural and functional changes that occur in major arteries are a major contributing factor to the high mortality in uremic patients. Recent studies have shown a stepwise increase of the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV from CKD Stage 1 to Stage 5. We evaluated the cfPWV and augmentation index (AIx, as indirect markers of arterial stiffness in patients with nondiabetic CKD and compared the values with normal population; we also evaluated the relationship between various stages of CKD and arterial stiffness markers. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Nephrology for a duration of two years from January 15, 2012, to January 14, 2014. Fifty patients with nondiabetic CKD were studied along with 50 healthy volunteers who did not have CKD, who served as controls. Assessment of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, PWV, heart rate, aortic augmentation pressure, and AIx was performed using the PeriScope device. PWV positively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean aortic arterial pressure, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Arterial stiffness increased as CKD stage increased and was higher in nondiabetic CKD group than in the general population. Arterial stiffness progressed gradually from CKD Stage 2 to 5, and then abruptly, in dialysis patients. Measures to decrease the arterial stiffness and its influence on decreasing cardiovascular events need further evaluation.

  20. ECG abnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, S.; Saleem, M.; Anjum, R.; Abdullah, W.; Shafi, T.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are common in CKD patients. However, there is variation in literature regarding frequency of ECG abnormalities in CKD patients and limited information in local population. Methods: The study design was cross-sectional in nature. All patients between ages of 20-80 years with CKD not previously on renal replacement therapy who were admitted to nephrology ward at a tertiary care facility over a 6-month period were included. All patients underwent 12 lead electrocardiograms (ECG). ECG abnormalities were defined based on accepted standard criteria. Results: Total number of patients included in the study was 124. Mean age of all patients was 49.9+-13.8 years, 106 (84.8%) had hypertension, 84 (70%) had diabetes mellitus, and 35 (29.9%) had known cardiovascular disease. Mean serum creatinine was 7.2+-3.4 mg/dl, mean eGFR was 10.6+-9.2 ml/min/1.73 m/sup 2/. Overall 78.4% of all CKD patients have one or more ECG abnormality. Left ventricular hypertrophy (40%), Q waves (27.2%), ST segment elevation or depression (23.4%), prolonged QRS duration (19.2%), tachycardia (17.6%) and left and right atrial enlargement (17.6%) were the most common abnormalities. Conclusion: ECG abnormalities are common in hospitalized CKD patients in local population. All hospitalized CKD patients should undergo ECG to screen for cardiovascular disease. (author)

  1. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD : A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W.; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J. M.; Bos, Willem Jan W.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van Dijk, Sandra

    Background: To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Study Design: Open randomized controlled trial. Setting & Participants: Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands.

  2. CKD Self-management: Phenotypes and Associations With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauben, Sarah J; Hsu, Jesse Y; Rosas, Sylvia E; Jaar, Bernard G; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deo, Rajat; Saab, Georges; Chen, Jing; Lederer, Swati; Kanthety, Radhika; Hamm, L Lee; Ricardo, Ana C; Lash, James P; Feldman, Harold I; Anderson, Amanda H

    2018-03-24

    To slow chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and its complications, patients need to engage in self-management behaviors. The objective of this study was to classify CKD self-management behaviors into phenotypes and assess the association of these phenotypes with clinical outcomes. Prospective cohort study. Adults with mild to moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. 3,939 participants in the CRIC Study recruited between 2003 and 2008 served as the derivation cohort and 1,560 participants recruited between 2013 and 2015 served as the validation cohort. CKD self-management behavior phenotypes. CKD progression, atherosclerotic events, heart failure events, death from any cause. Latent class analysis stratified by diabetes was used to identify CKD self-management phenotypes based on measures of body mass index, diet, physical activity, blood pressure, smoking status, and hemoglobin A 1c concentration (if diabetic); Cox proportional hazards models. 3 identified phenotypes varied according to the extent of implementation of recommended CKD self-management behaviors: phenotype I characterized study participants with the most recommended behaviors; phenotype II, participants with a mixture of recommended and not recommended behaviors; and phenotype III, participants with minimal recommended behaviors. In multivariable-adjusted models for those with and without diabetes, phenotype III was strongly associated with CKD progression (HRs of 1.82 and 1.49), death (HRs of 1.95 and 4.14), and atherosclerotic events (HRs of 2.54 and 1.90; each P diabetes. No consensus definition of CKD self-management; limited to baseline behavior data. There are potentially 3 CKD self-management behavior phenotypes that distinguish risk for clinical outcomes. These phenotypes may inform the development of studies and guidelines regarding optimal self-management. Copyright © 2018 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Impact of surgical parathyroidectomy on chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugurel Apetrii

    Full Text Available For more than 6 decades, many patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD have undergone surgical parathyroidectomy (sPTX for severe secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT mainly based historical clinical practice patterns, but not on evidence of outcome.We aimed in this meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of sPTX in patients with SHPT. We searched MEDLINE (inception to October 2016, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (through Issue 10 of 12, October 2016 and website clinicaltrials.gov (October 2016 without language restriction. Eligible studies evaluated patients reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR, below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (CKD 3-5 stages with hyperparathyroidism who underwent sPTX. Reviewers working independently and in duplicate extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. The final analysis included 15 cohort studies, comprising 24,048 participants. Compared with standard treatment, sPTX significantly decreased all-cause mortality (RR 0.74 [95% CI, 0.66 to 0.83] in End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD patients with biochemical and / or clinical evidence of SHPT. sPTX was also associated with decreased cardiovascular mortality (RR 0.59 [95% CI, 0.46 to 0.76] in 6 observational studies that included almost 10,000 patients. The available evidence, mostly observational, is at moderate risk of bias, and limited by indirect comparisons and inconsistency in reporting for some outcomes (eg. short term adverse events, including documented voice change or episodes of severe hypocalcaemia needing admission or long-term adverse events, including undetectable PTH levels, risk of fractures etc.. Taken together, the results of this meta-analysis would suggest a clinically significant beneficial effect of sPTX on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients with SHPT. However, given the observational nature of the included studies, the case for a properly conducted, independent randomised controlled trial comparing surgery with medical

  4. [Vitamins and microelements in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małgorzewicz, Sylwia; Jankowska, Magdalena; Kaczkan, Małgorzata; Czajka, Beata; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2014-01-01

    The supply of vitamins and microelements in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is very important and requires special attention. CKD patients presented deficiency of these substances in the diet and in organism, but also excess of fat-soluble vitamins or trace elements is observed. Studies indicate that deficiency of vitamins and antioxidants in diet and also enhanced oxidative stress are cause of many complications for example: accelerated process of arteriosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  5. Self-reported Medication Adherence and CKD Progression

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    Esteban A. Cedillo-Couvert

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the general population, medication nonadherence contributes to poorer outcomes. However, little is known about medication adherence among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We evaluated the association of self-reported medication adherence with CKD progression and all-cause death in patients with CKD. Methods: In this prospective observational study of 3305 adults with mild-to-moderate CKD enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC Study, the baseline self-reported medication adherence was assessed by responses to 3 questions and categorized as high, medium, and low. CKD progression (50% decline in eGFR or incident end-stage renal disease and all-cause death were measured using multivariable Cox proportional hazards. Results: Of the patients, 68% were categorized as high adherence, 17% medium adherence, and 15% low adherence. Over a median follow-up of 6 years, there were 969 CKD progression events and 675 deaths. Compared with the high-adherence group, the low-adherence group experienced increased risk for CKD progression (hazard ratio = 1.27, 95% confidence interval = 1.05, 1.54 after adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical factors, cardiovascular medications, number of medication types, and depressive symptoms. A similar association existed between low adherence and all-cause death, but did not reach standard statistical significance (hazard ratio = 1.14 95% confidence interval = 0.88, 1.47. Conclusion: Baseline self-reported low medication adherence was associated with an increased risk for CKD progression. Future work is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying this association and to develop interventions to improve adherence. Keywords: CKD, death, medication adherence, progression

  6. Plant Protein Intake Is Associated with Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 and Serum Bicarbonate in Patients with CKD: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialla, Julia J.; Appel, Lawrence J; Wolf, Myles; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Sozio, Stephen M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Bazzano, Lydia A.; Cuevas, Magdalena; Glenn, Melanie J.; Lustigova, Eva; Kallem, Radhakrishna R.; Porter, Anna C.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Weir, Matthew R.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein from plant, as opposed to animal, sources may be preferred in chronic kidney disease (CKD), due to lower bioavailability of phosphate and lower nonvolatile acid load. Study Design Observational cross-sectional study. Setting & Participants 2938 participants with chronic kidney disease and information on dietary intake at the baseline visit in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Predictors Percentage of total protein from plant sources (% plant protein) was determined by scoring individual food items from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ). Outcomes Metabolic parameters, including serum phosphate, bicarbonate (HCO3), potassium, and albumin, plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), and parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hemoglobin. Measurements We modeled the association between % plant protein and metabolic parameters using linear regression. Models were adjusted for age, sex, race, diabetes, body mass index, eGFR, income, smoking, total energy intake, total protein intake, 24 hour urinary sodium, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and use of diuretics. Results Higher % plant protein was associated with lower FGF23 (p=0.05) and higher HCO3 (p=0.01), but not with serum phosphate or PTH (p=0.9 and 0.5, respectively). Higher % plant protein was not associated with higher serum potassium (p=0.2), lower serum albumin (p=0.2) or lower hemoglobin (p=0.3). The associations of % plant protein with FGF23 and HCO3 did not differ by diabetes status, sex, race, CKD stage (2/3 vs. 4/5) or total protein intake (≤ 0.8 g/kg/d vs. >0.8 g/kg/d) (p-interaction > 0.10 for each). Limitations Cross-sectional study; Determination of % plant protein using the DHQ has not been validated. Conclusions Consumption of a higher percentage of protein from plant sources may lower FGF23 and raise HCO3 in patients with CKD. PMID:22480598

  7. Hemoglobin stability in patients with anemia, CKD, and type 2 diabetes: an analysis of the TREAT (Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy) placebo arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skali, Hicham; Lin, Julie; Pfeffer, Marc A; Chen, Chao-Yin; Cooper, Mark E; McMurray, John J V; Nissenson, Allen R; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Rossert, Jerome; Parfrey, Patrick S; Scott-Douglas, Nairne W; Singh, Ajay K; Toto, Robert; Uno, Hajime; Ivanovich, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Sparse data are available about the natural history of hemoglobin (Hb) level trends in contemporary patients with anemia, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We intended to describe Hb level trends over time with no or minimal administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Prospective clinical trial cohort. 2,019 individuals with type 2 diabetes, moderate anemia, and CKD from the placebo arm of the Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events With Aranesp Therapy (TREAT) followed up for 2.3 years with an average of 32 monthly Hb level determinations per patient. Darbepoetin alfa was administered only if Hb level decreased to protocol-directed doses of darbepoetin alfa received due to an Hb level decrease to protocol-directed darbepoetin alfa. The other patients received 1 (16%), 2-4 (16%), or 5 or more (13%) doses of darbepoetin alfa. Those who received no darbepoetin alfa doses had higher baseline Hb levels, higher estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs), less proteinuria, and lower ferritin and transferrin saturation values. On average, Hb levels were stable or increased in all groups. Compared with individuals who received no darbepoetin alfa, those who received 5 or more doses were more likely to receive intravenous iron therapy and blood transfusions and progress to renal replacement therapy, but were not at higher risk of death. The strongest predictors of requiring 5 or more doses of darbepoetin alfa were lower baseline Hb level, lower eGFR, and higher proteinuria level. Post hoc analysis of a clinical trial of a specific population with diabetes, anemia, and non-dialysis-dependent CKD. In the TREAT placebo arm, Hb levels were stable with no or minimal protocol-directed darbepoetin alfa during 2.3 years of follow-up. Most patients with moderate anemia, non-dialysis-dependent CKD, and type 2 diabetes are able to maintain a stable Hb level without implementing long-term erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy. Copyright © 2013

  8. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Contemporary Management of Coronary Artery Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Chou; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have emerged as a worldwide public health problem. Due to the remarkably higher incidence and prevalence of this chronic disease in Taiwan than in other countries, CKD/ESRD has contributed to a significant health burden in Taiwan. Patients with CKD/ESRD have an increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) compared to the normal population. Patients with ACS alone can present differently than patients with ACS and CKD/ESRD. Also, due to the lower prevalence of chest pain and ST-segment elevation, CKD/ESRD patients were more difficult to diagnose than other patients. Furthermore, whether advances in ACS management with medical therapy and an early invasive approach could improve patient outcomes with CKD/ESRD is not known. The use of antiplatelets such as aspirin and other antithrombotic agents might reduce the incidence of ACS or stroke in CKD patients. However, such use could also increase bleeding risk and even increase the likelihood of mortality, especially in dialysis patients. While recent clinical data suggest the potential benefit of aggressive management with coronary intervention for CAD and ACS in this category of patients, further clinical studies are still indicated for the proper medical strategy and revascularization therapy to improve the outcomes of CAD and ACS in CKD/ESRD patients, both in Taiwan and worldwide. PMID:27122697

  10. The effect of magnesium supplementation on vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease-a randomised clinical trial (MAGiCAL-CKD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Hansen, Ditte; Schou, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, which is thought to be caused by increased propensity towards vascular calcification (VC). Magnesium (Mg) inhibits phosphate-induced VC in vitro and in animal models and serum Mg...... the progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC) in subjects with predialysis CKD. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will randomise 250 subjects with estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 45 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 12 months treatment with either slow-release Mg hydroxide 30 mmol/day or matching placebo in a 1...

  11. The Role of Physical Activity in the CKD Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Aucella

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sedentary lifestyle contributes to the development of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes and probably cancer in the general population; this cluster of disease may be defined the diseasome of physical inactivity. Also in CKD/ESRD patients physical activity is strikingly low. As a result of growing evidence suggestive of cardiovascular benefit among the CKD population with exercise, the National Kidney Foundation recommended counseling by nephrologists to increase patients' levels of physical activity in their guideline about management of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, to maintain the well-being and functional capacity of renal patients attention should be directed toward maintaining strength and aerobic fitness as well as focusing on renal function and anemia or other comorbidities. All CKD/ESRD patients should be counseled and regularly encouraged by nephrology and dialysis staff to increase their level of physical activity.

  12. Spectrum of bone marrow changes in patients of chronic kidney disease (stage iii, iv and v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, R.K.; Khan, S.A.; Ahmad, S.Q.; Arshad, U.

    2017-01-01

    To see the various hematological changes in the bone marrow of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III, IV and V. Study Design: Cross sectional observational study.Place and Duration of Study: Study was conducted in the department of haematology (Pathology), Army Medical College, Rawalpindi and duration was one year, from Mar 2015 to Feb 2016. Material and Methods: Patients of both sexes and all age groups with CKD stage III, IV and V were included in this study. Patients' histories were recorded. Complete blood counts, bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy were done and evaluated microscopically. Mean blood counts of the patients in three groups of CKD were compared. Frequencies of various bone marrow (BM) findings in patients of CKD were calculated. Results: Out of 57 patients, 41 (71.9%) were males while 16 (28%) were females. Mean age was 60 years. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean hemoglobin, mean white cell count and mean platelets count of the patients in three groups of CKD. Reactive changes due to underlying CKD and inflammation were the most frequent findings in the BM of the patients. Conclusion: Anaemia of mild to moderate severity and reactive changes in the BM are the most frequent haematological findings encountered in patients suffering from advanced stage CKD. Since CKD is predominantly a disease of the elderly so it is not rare to find the co-morbidities including plasmacytosis, malignancies and their effects on the BM in patients of CKD. (author)

  13. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Heleniak, Zbigniew; Cieplińska, Magdalena; Szychliński, Tomasz; Rychter, Dymitr; Jagodzińska, Kalina; Kłos, Alicja; Kuźmiuk, Izabela; Tylicka, Marzena Jakimowicz; Tylicki, Leszek; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Aims Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of pain management. There are no detailed data on NSAIDs use in Poland, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, circumstances, and causes of NSAIDs use as well as knowledge of their side-effects in patients with CKD. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted in 972 individuals with CKD, enrolled in a written survey originally developed by the auth...

  14. Humoral immunity to memory antigens and pathogens is maintained in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Nadezhda A; Dominguez-Medina, C Coral; Faustini, Sian E; Cook, Charlotte N; McClean, Andrew; Jesky, Mark D; Perez-Toledo, Marisol; Morgan, Matthew D; Richter, Alexandra G; Ferro, Charles J; Cockwell, Paul; Moss, Paul A; Henderson, Ian R; Harper, Lorraine; Cunningham, Adam F

    2018-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of infection and poorer responses to vaccination. This suggests that CKD patients have an impaired responsiveness to all antigens, even those first encountered before CKD onset. To examine this we evaluated antibody responses against two childhood vaccine antigens, tetanus (TT) and diphtheria toxoids (DT) and two common pathogens, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (SEn) in two independent cohorts consisting of age-matched individuals with and without CKD. Sera were evaluated for antigen-specific IgG titres and the functionality of antibody to SEn was assessed in a serum bactericidal assay. Surprisingly, patients with CKD and control subjects had comparable levels of IgG against TT and DT, suggesting preserved humoral memory responses to antigens encountered early in life. Lipopolysaccharide-specific IgG titres and serum bactericidal activity in patients with CKD were also not inferior to controls. CMV-specific IgG titres in seropositive CKD patients were similar or even increased compared to controls. Therefore, whilst responses to new vaccines in CKD are typically lower than expected, antibody responses to antigens commonly encountered prior to CKD onset are not. The immunodeficiency of CKD is likely characterised by failure to respond to new antigenic challenges and efforts to improve patient outcomes should be focussed here.

  15. CKD in disadvantaged populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, Guillermo; Jha, Vivekanand

    2015-02-01

    The increased burden of CKD in disadvantaged populations is due to both global factors and population-specific issues. Low socioeconomic status and poor access to care contribute to health-care disparities and exacerbate the negative effects of genetic or biologic predisposition. Provision of appropriate renal care to these populations requires a two-pronged approach: expansion of the reach of dialysis through development of low-cost alternatives that can be practiced in remote locations, and implementation and evaluation of cost-effective prevention strategies. Kidney transplantation should be promoted by expansion of deceased-donor transplant programs and use of inexpensive, generic immunosuppressive drugs. The message of WKD 2015 is that a concerted attack against the diseases that lead to ESRD, by increased community outreach, better education, improved economic opportunity, and access to preventive medicine for those at highest risk, could end the unacceptable relationship between CKD and disadvantage in these communities.

  16. [DIET CHARACTERISTICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić-Marković, N; Šutić, I; Popović, B; Marković, R; Vučak, J

    2016-12-01

    Because of the increasing number of patients, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant public health problem. As kidney function decreases, it is necessary to introduce certain dietary modifications. The aim was to investigate what is the appropriate approach to diet of CKD patients, which could contribute to slowing down progression of the disease. Dietary recommendations are individual for each patient, but also vary in the same patient depending on the stage of disease progression because special attention must be paid to appropriate intake of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fats), micronutrients (sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium, various vitamins), and water. In newly diagnosed patients, it is necessary to assess their nutritional status and energy requirements. It has been shown that protein-energy malnutrition, muscle loss and cachexia are strong predictors of mortality in CKD. Comparing different dietary approaches in everyday life of patients suffering from CKD, it was found that the most effective diet is Mediterranean food style. Studies confirm that Mediterranean diet has a preventive effect on renal function and reduces progression of the disease. Preventive measures, correct identification and early intervention can increase survival of patients and improve their quality of life. Mediterranean diet tailored to individual stages of CKD has been confirmed as the best choice in CKD patients.

  17. Discrepancies in Clinic and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Korean Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) control is considered the most important treatment for preventing chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and associated cardiovascular complications. However, clinic BP is insufficient to diagnose hypertension (HT) and to monitor overall BP control because it does not correlate well with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We enrolled 387 hypertensive CKD patients (stages G1–G4, 58.4% male with median age 61 years) from 3 hospitals in Korea. HT of clinic BP and ABPM was classified as ≥ 140/90 and ≥ 130/80 mmHg, respectively. Clinic BP control rate was 60.2%. The median 24-hour systolic blood pressures (SBPs) of CKD G3b and CKD G4 were significantly higher than those of CKD G1–2 and CKD G3a. However, the median 24-hour SBPs were not different between CKD G1–2 and CKD G3a or between CKD G3b and CKD G4. Of all patients, 5.7%, 38.0%. 42.3%, and 14.0% were extreme-dippers, dippers, non-dippers, and reverse-dippers, respectively. Non-/reverse-dippers independently correlated with higher Ca × P product, higher intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and lower albumin. Normal BP was 33.3%, and sustained, masked, and white-coat HT were 29.7%, 26.9%, and 10.1%, respectively. White-coat HT independently correlated with age ≥ 61 years and masked HT independently correlated with CKD G3b/G4. In conclusion, ABPM revealed a high prevalence of non-/reverse-dippers and sustained/masked HT in Korean CKD patients. Clinicians should try to obtain a CKD patient's ABPM, especially among those who are older or who have advanced CKD as well as those with abnormal Ca × P product, iPTH, and albumin. PMID:28378550

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Incretin-Based Therapies in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and CKD: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Patricia M; Chibrikova, Lyudmila N; Twells, Laurie K; Barrett, Brendan J; Gamble, John-Michael

    2016-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antidiabetic therapies for patients with type 2 diabetes are often altered in the context of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Systematic review and meta-analysis. Patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD. 2 reviewers independently screened studies identified through bibliographic databases (Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts), clinical trial registries, and references from pertinent articles and clinical practice guidelines. Eligible studies included randomized controlled trials evaluating incretin-based therapy in adults with type 2 diabetes and estimated glomerular filtration rates 1.73m 2 . Incretin-based therapies (dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists) compared to placebo or active antidiabetic therapies. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), hypoglycemia, mortality, change in fasting plasma glucose, cardiovascular events, and end-stage renal disease. Of 1,619 nonduplicate records screened, 13 studies were included. Compared to placebo, incretin-based therapies significantly reduced HbA 1c levels (n = 9; weighted mean difference, -0.64; 95% CI, -0.79 to -0.48; I 2  = 43%); however, compared with active comparators, they did not (n = 4; weighted mean difference, -0.07; 95% CI, -0.25 to 0.12; I 2  = 38%). Incretin-based therapies significantly increased the risk for hypoglycemia compared to placebo (n = 7; relative risk [RR], 1.38; 95% CI, 1.01-1.89; I 2  = 0%) but no effect was observed versus active comparators (n = 4; RR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.03-1.94; I 2  = 52%). Limited evidence exists for all-cause mortality (placebo: n = 7 [RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.64-2.29; I 2  = 0%]; active comparators: n = 3 [RR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.32-1.54; I 2  = 0%]). Variation among interventions, small number of studies, heterogeneity between studies, and high risk for attrition bias in 7 of the selected studies. In patients with moderate or severe CKD

  19. Central arterial characteristics of gout patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Gulperi; Yilmaz, Sema; Kebapcilar, Levent; Gundogdu, Ali

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between central blood pressure, arterial stiffness parameters and renal function parameters in gout patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and without CKD. The study enrolled 48 gout patients and 32 control subjects. Central blood pressure, arterial stiffness parameters and renal function parameters in gout patients were investigated. The vascular measurements were performed with an arteriograph. Of the gout patients, 40.1% had CKD. The 24-h pulse pressure (PP) (P < 0.001), central systolic blood pressure (SBP) (P < 0.001), central diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (P < 0.001), cardiac output (CO) (P < 0.001) and peripheral resistance (P = 0.004) were significantly higher in the all patients with gout compared to healthy control subjects. Moreover, when the gout patients with and without CKD were compared, the gout patients with CKD had higher 24-h PP (P = 0.009), 24-h augmentation index standardized to a heart rate of 75 beats per min (AIx@75) (P < 0.023), daytime PP (P = 0.001), daytime AIx@75 (P = 0.027), and nighttime PP (P = 0.035) than the gout patients without CKD. In our study, gout patients with CKD had worse and more emphasized evidence of arterial stiffness than gout patients without CKD. Further investigations with large sample sizes are needed to evaluate the effect of CKD on the arterial stiffness of gout patients. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Circulating osteoprotegerin is associated with chronic kidney disease in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stella; Toffoli, Barbara; Bossi, Fleur; Candido, Riccardo; Stenner, Elisabetta; Carretta, Renzo; Barbone, Fabio; Fabris, Bruno

    2017-07-06

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a glycoprotein that plays an important regulatory role in the skeletal, vascular, and immune system. It has been shown that OPG predicts chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetic patients. We hypothesized that OPG could be a risk marker of CKD development also in non-diabetic hypertensive patients. A case-control study was carried out to measure circulating OPG levels in 42 hypertensive patients with CKD and in 141 hypertensive patients without CKD. A potential relationship between OPG and the presence of CKD was investigated and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was designed thereafter to identify a cut-off value of OPG that best explained the presence of CKD. Secondly, to evaluate whether OPG increase could affect the kidney, 18 C57BL/6J mice were randomized to be treated with saline or recombinant OPG every 3 weeks for 12 weeks. Circulating OPG levels were significantly higher in hypertensive patients with CKD, and there was a significant inverse association between OPG and renal function, that was independent from other variables. ROC analysis showed that OPG levels had a high statistically predictive value on CKD in hypertensive patients, which was greater than that of hypertension. The OPG best cut-off value associated with CKD was 1109.19 ng/L. In the experimental study, OPG delivery significantly increased the gene expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic mediators, as well as the glomerular nitrosylation of proteins. This study shows that OPG is associated with CKD in hypertensive patients, where it might have a higher predictive value than that of hypertension for CKD development. Secondly, we found that OPG delivery significantly increased the expression of molecular pathways involved in kidney damage. Further longitudinal studies are needed not only to evaluate whether OPG predicts CKD development but also to clarify whether OPG should be considered a risk factor for CKD.

  1. Comparative performance of the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equations for estimating GFR levels above 60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lesley A; Schmid, Christopher H; Greene, Tom; Zhang, Yaping Lucy; Beck, Gerald J; Froissart, Marc; Hamm, Lee L; Lewis, Julia B; Mauer, Michael; Navis, Gerjan J; Steffes, Michael W; Eggers, Paul W; Coresh, Josef; Levey, Andrew S

    2010-09-01

    The Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) Study equation underestimates measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at levels>60 mL/min/1.73 m2, with variable accuracy among subgroups; consequently, estimated GFR (eGFR)>or=60 mL/min/1.73 m2 is not reported by clinical laboratories. Here, performance of a more accurate GFR-estimating equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation, is reported by level of GFR and clinical characteristics. Test of diagnostic accuracy. Pooled data set of 3,896 people from 16 studies with measured GFR (not used for the development of either equation). Subgroups were defined by eGFR, age, sex, race, diabetes, prior solid-organ transplant, and body mass index. eGFR from the CKD-EPI and MDRD Study equations and standardized serum creatinine. Measured GFR using urinary or plasma clearance of exogenous filtration markers. Mean measured GFR was 68+/-36 (SD) mL/min/1.73 m2. For eGFR73 m2, both equations have similar bias (median difference compared with measured GFR). For eGFR of 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 4.9 to 2.1 mL/min/1.73 m2 (57% improvement). For eGFR of 60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 11.9 to 4.2 mL/min/1.73 m2 (61% improvement). For eGFR of 90-119 mL/min/1.73 m2, bias was decreased from 10.0 to 1.9 mL/min/1.73 m2 (75% improvement). Similar or improved performance was noted for most subgroups with eGFR73 m2, other than body mass indexor=90 mL/min/1.73 m2. Limited number of elderly people and racial and ethnic minorities with measured GFR. The CKD-EPI equation is more accurate than the MDRD Study equation overall and across most subgroups. In contrast to the MDRD Study equation, eGFR>or=60 mL/min/1.73 m2 can be reported using the CKD-EPI equation. Copyright (c) 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of chronic kidney disease as a predictor of major cardiac events in patients with no evidence of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Moroi, Masao; Joki, Nobuhiko; Hase, Hiroki; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion images (MPI) generally show good prognosis for cardiovascular events. However, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the important risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD), and the interpretation of normal stress MPI has not been well established in CKD patients with no evidence of CAD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term prognostic value of stress MPI in CKD patients with no evidence of myocardial ischemia or infarction. Patients who had no history but were suspected of CAD and had normal stress MPI (n=307, male=208, age=67 years, CKD/non-CKD=46/261) were followed-up for 4.5 years. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration ratio of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and unstable angina requiring hospitalization were defined as major cardiac events. Major cardiac events were observed in 3 of 261 (1.1%) non-CKD patients and 6 of 46 (13%) CKD patients (p<0.001, with log-rank test). CKD was an independent risk factor for major cardiac events (hazard ratio=13.1, p<0.001, multivariate Cox regression analysis). Normal stress MPI does not always promise a good prognosis for major cardiac events. Even in patients with no evidence of CAD from stress MPI, CKD can be an independent and significant risk factor for major cardiac events. (author)

  3. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Artese,Hilana Paula Carillo; Sousa,Celso Oliveira de; Torres,Maria Cynésia Medeiros de Barros; Silva-Boghossian,Carina Maciel; Colombo,Ana Paula Vieira

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the composition of subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sixteen CKD pre-dialysis individuals (CKD) and 14 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (C) presenting chronic periodontitis were treated by scaling and root planing. Subgingival samples were collected from each patient and analyzed for their composition by checkerboard at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Signif...

  4. Annual all-cause mortality rate for patients with diabetic kidney disease in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Gary Ang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Our study estimated the annual all-cause mortality rate for Singaporean patients with diabetic kidney disease by CKD stages and identified predictors of all-cause mortality. This study has affirmed the poor prognosis of these patients and an urgency to intervene early so as to retard the progression to later stages of CKD.

  5. Treatment choices for the glycaemic management of patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease: Analysis of the SAIL patient linked dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Thinzar; Davies, Gareth I; Rice, Sam; Chess, James; Stephens, Jeffrey W

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common in type 2 diabetes and limits the treatment choices for glycaemic control. Our aim was to examine real-world prescribing for managing hyperglycaemia in the presence of CKD. The SAIL (Secure Anonymised Information Linkage) databank was used to examine prescribing during the period from the 1st of January to 30th December 2014. CKD was defined as:- none or mild CKD, eGFR ≥60mL/min/1.73m 2 ; moderate CKD eGFR <60mL/min/1.73m 2 ; and severe CKD eGFR <30mL/min/1.73m 2 or requiring dialysis. We identified 9585 subjects who received any form of glucose lowering therapy (8363 had no/mild CKD; 1137 moderate CKD; 85 severe CKD). There was a linear association between insulin use and CKD severity with approximately 54% of those with severe CKD receiving insulin. Sulphonylureas use did not differ among the CKD groups and was approximately 40%. Metformin showed a linear decrease across the groups, however approximately 21% in the severe CKD group received metformin. The use of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) was approximately 20% and did not differ among groups. The DPP-4 inhibitor choice was:- 1% vildagliptin, 9% saxagliptin, 58% sitagliptin, and 32% linaglitpin. With respect to sitagliptin and saxagliptin, 72% and 62% received an inappropriately high dose in the setting of CKD. We observed that a considerable proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes and CKD were receiving metformin and non dose-adjusted DPP-4 inhibitors. Careful consideration of medication use and dosaging is required in the setting of CKD and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physical function was related to mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease and dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Shinichiro; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Shirai, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that exercise improves aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and health-related quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis. Recently, additional studies have shown that higher physical activity contributes to survival and decreased mortality as well as physical function and QOL in patients with CKD and dialysis. Herein, we review the evidence that physical function and physical activity play an important role in mortality for patients with CKD and dialysis. During November 2016, Medline and Web of Science databases were searched for published English medical reports (without a time limit) using the terms "CKD" or "dialysis" and "mortality" in conjunction with "exercise capacity," "muscle strength," "activities of daily living (ADL)," "physical activity," and "exercise." Numerous studies suggest that higher exercise capacity, muscle strength, ADL, and physical activity contribute to lower mortality in patients with CKD and dialysis. Physical function is associated with mortality in patients with CKD and dialysis. Increasing physical function may decrease the mortality rate of patients with CKD and dialysis. Physicians and medical staff should recognize the importance of physical function in CKD and dialysis. In addition, exercise is associated with reduced mortality among patients with CKD and dialysis. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  7. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  8. Vitamin B(12) Immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010: Effects of High Excess Concentration of Serum Vitamin B(12) in CKD Patients on Parenteral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Surupa; Chaudhuri, Subimal

    2011-10-01

    Vitamin B(12) being water soluble is excreted in the urine when administered in excess. The probability of finding an abnormally excess serum concentration would be almost surreal. We report a peculiar clinical situation that may impact the vitamin B(12) immunoassay on the Roche Elecsys 2010 due to excess analyte concentration. In separate episodes (Feb and June 2010), the Biochemistry laboratory of a tertiary-care hospital, Kolkata, India, encountered two critically ill patients with background chronic kidney disease (CKD), low urine output, and on cyanocoabalamin supplementation, who had serum vitamin B(12) concentrations far exceeding expected values; even post dialysis. The B(12) assays (pmol/l) were performed using electrochemiluminiscence immunoassay on Roche Elecsys 2010, the assay validity confirmed by concomitant quality control runs. The immunoassays failed to deliver results, flagged with "signal level below limit". Biotin therapy was ruled out as a possible interferent. In the first episode, re-assay of a repeat draw yielded same outcome; outsourcing on Immulite provided concentration of >738 pmol/l. Serial dilution gave result of >29520 pmol/l on Elecsys 2010. In the second, we gained from past experience. Vitamin B(12) concentration >59040 pmol/l was conveyed to the treating nephrologist the very day. The B(12) immunoassay on the Elecsys 2010 employs sequential incubation steps for competitive binding that is compromised in the event of abnormally excess B(12) concentration in patient sera akin to the prozone effect. This knowledge may be beneficial while assaying sera of CKD patients to avoid financial loss due unnecessary repeats and delay in turnaround time.

  9. The association between changes in lifestyle behaviors and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older?men

    OpenAIRE

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate whether changes in lifestyle behaviors are correlated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: The subjects consisted of 316 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or renal dysfunction or dialysis treatment. The following lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire: habitual moderate exercise, daily physical activity, walking speed, eating speed, late-night din...

  10. Predictors of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, John J V; Uno, Hajime; Jarolim, Petr

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine predictors of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Individuals with the triad of diabetes, CKD, and anemia represent a significant proportion of patients with cardiovascular disease and are at particularly high risk...

  11. The systemic nature of CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoccali, Carmine; Vanholder, Raymond; Massy, Ziad A.; Ortiz, Alberto; Sarafidis, Pantelis; Dekker, Friedo W.; Fliser, Danilo; Fouque, Denis; Heine, Gunnar H.; Jager, Kitty J.; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Parati, Gianfranco; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; London, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    The accurate definition and staging of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the major achievements of modern nephrology. Intensive research is now being undertaken to unravel the risk factors and pathophysiologic underpinnings of this disease. In particular, the relationships between the kidney

  12. Hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with chronic kidney disease and its relationship with the functional status of the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    K. P. Postovitenko; I. A. Iliuk; S. V. Shevchuk; G. V. Bezsmertna; І. O. Bezsmertnyi; I. V. Kurylenko

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important medical, social and economic problem nowadays. Patients with CKD are known to have an increased risk of development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. However, the causes and pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications are not well understood. One of the recently recognized “non-traditional” risk factors for the increased development of cardiovascular pathology in severe stages of CKD is hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC). The article presents th...

  13. Urinary endotrophin predicts disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring; Fenton, Anthony; Jesky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the central pathogenic process in progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Collagen type VI (COL VI) is upregulated in renal fibrosis. Endotrophin is released from COL VI and promotes pleiotropic pro-fibrotic effects. Kidney disease severity varies considerably and accurate...... information regarding CKD progression may improve clinical decisions. We tested the hypothesis that urinary endotrophin derived during COL VI deposition in fibrotic human kidneys is a marker for progression of CKD in the Renal Impairment in Secondary Care (RIISC) cohort, a prospective observational study...... of 499 CKD patients. Endotrophin localised to areas of increased COL VI deposition in fibrotic kidneys but was not present in histologically normal kidneys. The third and fourth quartiles of urinary endotrophin:creatinine ratio (ECR) were independently associated with one-year disease progression after...

  14. Left Ventricular Structure during Antihypertensive Treatment in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batir T. Daminov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate the left ventricular (LV echocardiographic parameters and estimate the antiremodeling efficacy of eprosartan and lercanidipine in patients with CKD, depending on the presence or absence of diabetic nephropathy (DN. Materials and Methods: The study included 121 patients (mean age 52.4±5.7 years with CKD stage 3 (KDOQI, 2002. Patients were distributed in two groups according to the etiology of CKD. Group 1 consisted of 67 patients with non-diabetic CKD. Group 2 consisted of 54 CKD patients with DN. All patients had arterial hypertension grade 1 or 2 (ESH/ESC, 2013. All patients underwent clinical examination, echocardiography; GFR was estimated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula. Stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD were determined according to the KDOQI 2002 classification. Eprosartan and lercanidipine were prescribed to patients after one week of lavage from previous antihypertensive therapy. This 6-month follow-up study compared the effectiveness of two courses of treatment. Results: LVH was observed in all CKD patients regardless of the presence or absence of DN. Eprosartan and lercanidipine showed the high antihypertensive efficacy expressing a reliable decrease in absolute values of SBP and DBP. In CKD patients with DN, on the background of a comparable antihypertensive effect, eprosartan, in comparison with lercanidipine, showed a more pronounced effect on the LV echocardiographic parameters associated with LVH regression.

  15. [Sodium Glucose Co-transporter Type 2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors in CKD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insalaco, Monica; Zanoli, Luca; Rastelli, Stefania; Lentini, Paolo; Rapisarda, Francesco; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Castellino, Pietro; Granata, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Among the new drugs used for the treatment of Diabetes Mellitus type 2, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent a promising therapeutic option. Since their ability to lower glucose is proportional to GFR, their effect is reduced in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The antidiabetic mechanism of these drugs is insulin-independent and, therefore, complimentary to that of others antihyperglicaemic agents. Moreover, SGLT2 inhibitors are able to reduce glomerular hyperfiltration, systemic and intraglomerular pressure and uric acid levels, with consequent beneficial effects on the progression of kidney disease in non diabetic patients as well. Only few studies have been performed to evaluate the effects of SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with CKD. Therefore, safety and efficacy of SGLT2 inhibitors should be better clarified in the setting of CKD. In this paper, we will review the use of SGLT2 inhibitors in diabetic patients, including those with CKD.

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant—Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a complex medical condition that is associated with several comorbidities and requires comprehensive medical management. Given the chronic nature of the condition, its frequent association with psychosocial distress, and its very significant symptom burden, the subjective patient experience is key toward understanding the true impact of CKD on the patients’ life. Patient-reported outcome measures are important tools that can be used to support patient-centered care and patient engagement during the complex management of patients with CKD. The routine collection and use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs in clinical practice may improve quality of care and outcomes, and may provide useful data to understand the disease from both an individual and a population perspective. Many tools used to measure PROs focus on assessing health-related quality of life, which is significantly impaired among patients with CKD. Health-related quality of life, in addition to being an important outcome itself, is associated with clinical outcomes such as health care use and mortality. In Part 1 of this review, we provide an overview of PROs and implications of their use in the context of CKD. In Part 2, we will review the selection of appropriate measures and the relevant domains of interest for patients with CKD.

  17. What is the role of nephrologists and nurses of the dialysis department in providing fertility care to CKD patients? : A questionnaire study among care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ek, Gaby F.; Krouwel, Esmée M.; Nicolai, Melianthe P. J.; den Oudsten, B.L.; Den Ouden, Marjolein E. M.; Dieben, Sandra W. M.; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated current fertility care for CKD patients by assessing the perspectives of nephrologists and nurses in the dialysis department. Methods Two different surveys were distributed for this cross-sectional study among Dutch nephrologists (N = 312) and dialysis nurses (N = 1211).

  18. Utilizing a disease management approach to improve ESRD patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shaan; Nissenson, Allen R

    2002-01-01

    In this era of processes and systems to improve quality, disease management is one methodology to improve care delivery and outcomes for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In most disease management systems a senior renal nurse coordinates all aspects of the patient's care and ensures that the prescribed and necessary care is delivered for both CKD-related and comorbid conditions. The nurse also continually monitors outcomes on quality indicators and key performance measures. These outcome data are then aggregated and analyzed, are compared with local and national benchmarks, and drive the continuous quality improvement (CQI) process. Such a system attempts to centralize the currently fragmented care delivery system, continually improve patient outcomes, and conserve scarce economic resources. Early data suggest a disease management approach may improve both the morbidity and mortality of CKD patients.

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient......, with its associated increased fracture risk, vascular calcification, and accelerated mortality fracture risk. Peritoneal dialysis, however, bears a lower risk than hemodialysis (HD). The approach to CKD-MBD prophylaxis and treatment in the elderly PD patient is similar to other CKD patients, with some...

  20. Stirring the Pot: Can Dietary Modification Alleviate the Burden of CKD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Snelson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Diet is one of the largest modifiable risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD-related death and disability. CKD is largely a progressive disease; however, it is increasingly appreciated that hallmarks of chronic kidney disease such as albuminuria can regress over time. The factors driving albuminuria resolution remain elusive. Since albuminuria is a strong risk factor for GFR loss, modifiable lifestyle factors that lead to an improvement in albuminuria would likely reduce the burden of CKD in high-risk individuals, such as patients with diabetes. Dietary therapy such as protein and sodium restriction has historically been used in the management of CKD. Evidence is emerging to indicate that other nutrients may influence kidney health, either through metabolic or haemodynamic pathways or via the modification of gut homeostasis. This review focuses on the role of diet in the pathogenesis and progression of CKD and discusses the latest findings related to the mechanisms of diet-induced kidney disease. It is possible that optimizing diet quality or restricting dietary intake could be harnessed as an adjunct therapy for CKD prevention or progression in susceptible individuals, thereby reducing the burden of CKD.

  1. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sojib Bin Zaman; Naznin Hossain; Ahmed E. Rahman; Sheikh M.S. Islam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were tre...

  2. The Association Between Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors and the Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in Middle-Aged and Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2016-07-05

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the association between unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older men. The subjects included 445 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or dialysis treatment, who were not taking medications. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire and were defined as follows: 1) lack of habitual moderate exercise, 2) lack of daily physical activity, 3) slow walking speed, 4) fast eating speed, 5) late-night dinner, 6) bedtime snacking, and 7) skipping breakfast. The participants were divided into four categories, which were classified into quartile distributions based on the number of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (0-1, 2, 3, and ≥4 unhealthy behaviors). According to a multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR) for CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, especially those related to lack of habitual moderate exercise and presence of late-night dinner and bedtime snacking may be associated with the prevalence of CKD.

  3. The joint impact of habitual exercise and glycemic control on the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-11-06

    This retrospective study evaluated the influence of the joint impact of habitual exercise and glycemic control on the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) during a 6-year follow-up period in middle-aged and older males. The study population included 303 males without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, renal dysfunction, or dialysis treatment. Their lifestyle behaviors regarding exercise and physical activity were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. The participants were divided into four categories according to the performance or non-performance of habitual exercise and the presence or absence of hyperglycemia. After 6 years, 32 subjects (10.6%) developed CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate exercise and hyperglycemic subjects (log-rank test: p exercise (HR = 2.82, 95% confidence of interval (CI) = 1.07-7.36, p = 0.034) and that in hyperglycemic subjects who did not perform habitual exercise (HR = 5.89, 95% CI = 1.87-16.63, p = 0.003) were significantly higher in comparison to the subjects with a NGT who performed habitual exercise. These results suggest that the habitual exercise and good glycemic control and their combination were associated with the incidence of CKD.

  4. The Association Between Unhealthy Lifestyle Behaviors and the Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD in Middle-Aged and Older Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoma Michishita

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This cross-sectional study evaluated the association between unhealthy lifestyle behaviors and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD in middle-aged and older men. Methods: The subjects included 445 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or dialysis treatment, who were not taking medications. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized selfadministered questionnaire and were defined as follows: 1 lack of habitual moderate exercise, 2 lack of daily physical activity, 3 slow walking speed, 4 fast eating speed, 5 late-night dinner, 6 bedtime snacking, and 7 skipping breakfast. The participants were divided into four categories, which were classified into quartile distributions based on the number of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors (0–1, 2, 3, and ≥4 unhealthy behaviors. Results: According to a multivariate analysis, the odds ratio (OR for CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 and/or proteinuria was found to be significantly higher in the ≥4 group than in the 0–1 group (OR 4.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51–14.40. Moreover, subjects’ lack of habitual moderate exercise (OR 3.06; 95% CI, 1.13–8.32 and presence of late-night dinner (OR 2.84; 95% CI, 1.40–5.75 and bedtime snacking behaviors (OR 2.87; 95% CI, 1.27–6.45 were found to be significantly associated with the prevalence of CKD. Conclusions: These results suggest that an accumulation of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, especially those related to lack of habitual moderate exercise and presence of late-night dinner and bedtime snacking may be associated with the prevalence of CKD.

  5. The association between changes in lifestyle behaviors and the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in middle-aged and older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michishita, Ryoma; Matsuda, Takuro; Kawakami, Shotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Morito, Natsumi; Higaki, Yasuki

    2017-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether changes in lifestyle behaviors are correlated with the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The subjects consisted of 316 men without a history of cardiovascular disease, stroke, or renal dysfunction or dialysis treatment. The following lifestyle behaviors were evaluated using a standardized self-administered questionnaire: habitual moderate exercise, daily physical activity, walking speed, eating speed, late-night dinner, bedtime snacking, skipping breakfast, and drinking and smoking habits. The subjects were divided into four categories according to the change in each lifestyle behavior from baseline to the end of follow-up (healthy-healthy, unhealthy-healthy, healthy-unhealthy and unhealthy-unhealthy). A multivariate analysis showed that, with respect to habitual moderate exercise and late-night dinner, maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for the incidence of CKD than maintaining a lifestyle (OR 8.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-15.40 for habitual moderate exercise and OR 4.00; 95% CI, 1.38-11.57 for late-night dinner). In addition, with respect to bedtime snacking, the change from a healthy to an unhealthy lifestyle and maintaining an unhealthy lifestyle resulted in significantly higher OR for incidence of CKD than maintaining a healthy lifestyle (OR 4.44; 95% CI, 1.05-13.93 for healthy-unhealthy group and OR 11.02; 95% CI, 2.83-26.69 for unhealthy-unhealthy group). The results of the present study suggest that the lack of habitual moderate exercise, late-night dinner, and bedtime snacking may increase the risk of CKD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Effects of Exercise Education Intervention on the Exercise Behaviour, Depression, and Fatigue Status of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Yi-Ching; Chen, Pei-Ying; Wang, Kuo-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of an exercise education intervention on exercise behavior, depression and fatigue status of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Design/methodology/approach: This was a pilot study using an exercise education program as an intervention for CKD patients. The authors used the…

  7. Pharmacist Web-Based Training Program on Medication Use in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Impact on Knowledge, Skills, and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legris, Marie-eve; Seguin, Noemie Charbonneau; Desforges, Katherine; Sauve, Patricia; Lord, Anne; Bell, Robert; Berbiche, Djamal; Desrochers, Jean-Francois; Lemieux, Jean-Philippe; Morin-Belanger, Claudia; Paradis, Francois Ste-Marie; Lalonde, Lyne

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are multimorbid elderly at high risk of drug-related problems. A Web-based training program was developed based on a list of significant drug-related problems in CKD patients requiring a pharmaceutical intervention. The objectives were to evaluate the impact of the program on community…

  8. Ergocalciferol treatment and aspects of mineral homeostasis in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 4-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, Eva; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Lewin, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Focus on non-classical effects and possible less side effects of treatment with nutritional vitamin D, raises the expectation of possible benefits from treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with ergocalciferol (vitamin D2). Treatment with 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D (calcitriol) induces elevated...... of treatment with high doses of ergocalciferol on parameters of mineral homeostasis in predialysis CKD patients....

  9. Circadian blood pressure patterns and blood pressure control in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Daniele, Nicola; Fegatelli, Danilo Alunni; Rovella, Valentina; Castagnola, Veronica; Gabriele, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD), and CKD progression is associated with suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control. Here we evaluate the impact of CKD on the attainment of BP control and the circadian BP profile in older subjects. In this observational study, we studied 547 patients referred to the hypertension clinic, of whom 224 (40.9%) had CKD. Blood pressure (BP) control and circadian BP patterns were evaluated by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Circadian BP variability was measured as the within-subject SD of BP, the percentage of measurements exceeding normal values, hypotension, and dipping status. The attainment of adequate BP control was similar in subjects with or without CKD (around 31%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that CKD was not a determinant of adequate BP control (OR 1.004; 95% CI 0.989-1.019; p = 0.58). Patients with CKD presented as twice as higher prevalence of reverse dipper (night-time peak) for systolic BP and episodes of hypotension during daytime, independently of BP control. Knowledge of the circadian pattern of BP in hypertensive subjects with CKD could inform better than attainment of BP target about risky condition for CKD progression and cognitive decline and allow a more personalized antihypertensive treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparison of Treating Metabolic Acidosis in CKD Stage 4 Hypertensive Kidney Disease with Fruits and Vegetables or Sodium Bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Current guidelines recommend Na+-based alkali for CKD with metabolic acidosis and plasma total CO2 (PTCO2) fruits and vegetables with oral NaHCO3 (HCO3) regarding the primary outcome of follow-up estimated GFR (eGFR) and secondary outcomes of improved metabolic acidosis and reduced urine indices of kidney injury. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Individuals with stage 4 (eGFR, 15–29 ml/min per 1.73 m2) CKD due to hypertensive nephropathy, had a PTCO2 level fruits and vegetables dosed to reduce dietary acid by half (n=36). Results Plasma cystatin C–calculated eGFR did not differ at baseline and 1 year between groups. One-year PTCO2 was higher than baseline in the HCO3 group (21.2±1.3 versus 19.5±1.5 mM; Pfruits and vegetables group (19.9±1.7 versus 19.3±1.9 mM; Pfruits and vegetable group (Pfruits and vegetables or NaHCO3 in individuals with stage 4 CKD yielded eGFR that was not different, was associated with higher-than-baseline PTCO2, and was associated with lower-than-baseline urine indices of kidney injury. The data indicate that fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis and reduce kidney injury in stage 4 CKD without producing hyperkalemia. PMID:23393104

  11. Circulating levels of sclerostin but not DKK1 associate with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert J Behets

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence indicates that a disturbed Wnt-β-catenin signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone and mineral disorder (CKD-MBD. Data on the impact of CKD on circulating levels of the Wnt antagonists sclerostin and Dickkopf related protein 1 (DKK1 and the relationship with laboratory parameters of CKD-MBD are incomplete.We analyzed serum sclerostin and DKK1 in 308 patients across the stages of chronic kidney disease (kDOQI stage 1-2 n = 41; CKD stage 3 n = 54; CKD stage 4-5 n = 54; hemodialysis n = 100; peritoneal dialysis n = 59 as well as in 49 healthy controls. We investigated associations with demographics, renal function, parameters of mineral metabolism including 25(OH vitamin D, 1,25(OH2 vitamin D, biointact fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, and parathyroid hormone (PTH, and bone turnover markers.Serum sclerostin, but not DKK1, increases in more advanced stages of CKD and associates with PTH, phosphate, and 1,25(OH2 vitamin D concentrations. Bone turnover markers are highest in hemodialysis patients presenting the combination of high PTH with low sclerostin level. Serum DKK1 levels are lower in CKD patients than in controls and are not associated with laboratory parameters of mineral metabolism. Interestingly, a direct association between DKK1 and platelet count was observed.In CKD, serum levels of the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and sclerostin are unrelated, indicating different sites of origin and/ or different regulatory mechanisms. Sclerostin, as opposed to DKK1, may qualify as a biomarker of CKD-MBD, particularly in dialysis patients. DKK1 serum levels, remarkably, correlate almost uniquely with blood platelet counts.

  12. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL.

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors Diabetes High blood pressure Family history Obesity Race/ethnicity Full list of causes and risk factors ... give Give monthly Memorials and tributes Donate a car Donate gently used items Stock donation Workplace giving ...

  14. Predictors of Cognitive Dysfunction among Patients with Moderate to Severe Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak Effiong Williams

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction including dementia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD that has just been recently appreciated. It has negative outcomes in the management of patients with CKD. This study explored the possible biochemical and clinical features of patients with CKD that can predict the occurrence of cognitive impairment in patients with moderate to severe CKD. We evaluate patients with stages 3-5 CKD for the occurrence and predictors of cognitive impairment. Multiple areas of cognitive function were tested in this single-center study using Community Screening Interview for Dementia (CSID and Trial-Making Test A (TMTA/Trial-Making Test B (TMTB. Cognitive impairment was correlated with patients’ routine biochemical, hematological, and selected clinical parameters. We observed a negative correlation between cognitive impairment and patient’s serum calcium (r = 0.240; p = 0.033 and estimated Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR (r = 0.379; p = 0.0006. Therefore, eGFR is an accurate predictor of cognitive dysfunction in patients with moderate to severe CKD. Early evaluation of cognitive function in CKD is indeed advised for optimal outcome in the management of patients with CKD.

  15. CMV seropositivity determines epoetin dose and hemoglobin levels in patients with CKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); W. Weimar (Willem); N.H.R. Litjens (Nicolle)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive patients with ESRD may have more CD4+T cells lacking the co-stimulatory molecule CD28 (CD4+CD28null) than CMV-seronegative patients. Increased numbers of CD28null T cells associates with epoetin nonresponsiveness in patients with ESRD, but whether

  16. Sodium Restriction in Patients With CKD: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-management Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W; Navis, Gerjan; Vogt, Liffert; van der Boog, Paul J M; Bos, Willem Jan W; van Montfrans, Gert A; van Dijk, Sandra

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of self-managed sodium restriction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Open randomized controlled trial. Patients with moderately decreased kidney function from 4 hospitals in the Netherlands. Regular care was compared with regular care plus an intervention comprising education, motivational interviewing, coaching, and self-monitoring of blood pressure (BP) and sodium. Primary outcomes were sodium excretion and BP after the 3-month intervention and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were protein excretion, kidney function, antihypertensive medication, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). At baseline, mean sodium excretion rate was 163.6±64.9 (SD) mmol/24 h; mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 49.7±25.6mL/min/1.73m 2 ; median protein excretion rate was 0.8 (IQR, 0.4-1.7) g/24 h; and mean 24-hour ambulatory systolic and diastolic BPs were 129±15 and 76±9mmHg, respectively. Compared to regular care only (n=71), at 3 months, the intervention group (n=67) showed reduced sodium excretion rate (mean change, -30.3 [95% CI, -54.7 to -5.9] mmol/24 h), daytime ambulatory diastolic BP (mean change, -3.4 [95% CI, -6.3 to -0.6] mmHg), diastolic office BP (mean change, -5.2 [95% CI, -8.4 to -2.1] mmHg), protein excretion (mean change, -0.4 [95% CI, -0.7 to -0.1] g/24h), and improved self-efficacy (mean change, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.9]). At 6 months, differences in sodium excretion rates and ambulatory BPs between the groups were not significant, but differences were detected in systolic and diastolic office BPs (mean changes of -7.3 [95% CI, -12.7 to -1.9] and -3.8 [95% CI, -6.9 to -0.6] mmHg, respectively), protein excretion (mean changes, -0.3 [95% CI, -0.6 to -0.1] g/24h), and self-efficacy (mean change, 0.5 [95% CI, 0.0 to 0.9]). No differences in kidney function, medication, and HRQoL were observed. Nonblinding, relatively low response rate, and missing data

  17. Chronic kidney disease in congenital heart disease patients: a narrative review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catherine; Al-Aklabi, Mohammed; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease have a number of risk factors for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is well known that CKD has a large negative impact on health outcomes. It is important therefore to consider that patients with congenital heart disease represent a population in whom long-term primary and secondary prevention strategies to reduce CKD occurrence and progression could be instituted and significantly change outcomes. There are currently no clear guidelines for clinicians in terms of renal assessment in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Consolidation of knowledge is critical for generating such guidelines, and hence is the purpose of this view. This review will summarize current knowledge related to CKD in patients with congenital heart disease, to highlight important work that has been done to date and set the stage for further investigation, development of prevention strategies, and re-evaluation of appropriate renal follow-up in patients with congenital heart disease. The literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Current epidemiological evidence suggests that CKD occurs in patients with congenital heart disease at a higher frequency than the general population and is detectable early in follow-up (i.e. during childhood). Best evidence suggests that approximately 30 to 50 % of adult patients with congenital heart disease have significantly impaired renal function. The risk of CKD is higher with cyanotic congenital heart disease but it is also present with non-cyanotic congenital heart disease. Although significant knowledge gaps exist, the sum of the data suggests that patients with congenital heart disease should be followed from an early age for the development of CKD. There is an opportunity to mitigate CKD progression and negative renal outcomes by instituting interventions such as stringent blood pressure control and reduction of proteinuria. There is a need to

  18. Albuminuria Is an Appropriate Therapeutic Target in Patients with CKD : The Pro View

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    The presence of elevated levels of albuminuria is associated with an increased risk of progressive renal function loss over time. This association is found in various pathophysiological conditions, including diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and various primary renal diseases, but

  19. Contribution of inflammation to vascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, Mohamed E.; Stenvinkel, P.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, much of which results from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic low-grade inflammation, as evidenced by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), is a common feature of CKD and may cause atherosclerotic CVD through various pathogenetic mechanisms. Evidence suggests that persistent inflammation may also be a risk factor for progression of CKD, which may result in a vicious inflammation-driven circle. The causes of inflammation in CKD are multifactorial. The influence of various comorbidities may contribute to inflammation in the setting of progressive loss of renal function. Available data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines also play a central role in the genesis of the metabolic syndrome. There is a lack of epidemiological data on the prevalence and consequences of inflammation in relation to protein-energy wasting (PEW) and CVD in CKD patients from developing countries. The westernization of nutritional intakes and changes of life style besides the high prevalence of chronic infections in developing countries are possible additive contributors to a high prevalence of inflammation, PEW and CVD among CKD patients. Also, genetic differences may affect inflammatory responses and nutritional status and thus the susceptibility to CVD in different regions. (author)

  20. Diabetic Nephropathy and CKD?Analysis of Individual Patient Serum Creatinine Trajectories: A Forgotten Diagnostic Methodology for Diabetic CKD Prognostication and Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Onuigbo, Macaulay Amechi Chukwukadibia; Agbasi, Nneoma

    2015-01-01

    Creatinine is produced in muscle metabolism as the end-product of creatine phosphate and is subsequently excreted principally by way of the kidneys, predominantly by glomerular filtration. Blood creatinine assays constitute the most common clinically relevant measure of renal function. The use of individual patient-level real-time serum creatinine trajectories provides a very attractive and tantalizing methodology in nephrology practice. Topics covered in this review include acute kidney inju...

  1. Value of electrocardiogram in predialytic chronic kidney disease patient without known coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta PK, Das S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Kidney disease (CKD is a pressing public health burden occurring in about 10% of the population. The majority of them die before reaching End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD due to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Hypertension (HTN and anaemia are two reversible factors for progression of CKD. Besides asymptomatic coronary artery disease, the electrolyte abnormalities such as hyperkalaemia and hypocalcaemia also subject these patients to sudden cardiac death. This study is aimed at to see the changes in electrocardiogram (ECG in hospitalized predialytic CKD patients due to these abnormalities. Methods: This is a 6 months cross-sectional study carried out at Chittagong Medical College Hospital in Chittagong, Bangladesh. 50 patients with stages 3, 4 and 5 CKD were recruited from the Nephrology and Medicine wards. Patients with prior history of coronary artery disease, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease and dialysis were excluded. All had their standard 12–lead electrocardiogram (ECG recorded and various findings were critically studied and interpreted independently by two consultant physicians including a cardiologist. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 19. Results: LVH (left ventricular hypertrophy (66%, LAE (left atrial enlargement (30% and unrecognized myocardial infarction (28% were very common ECG abnormalities in our predialytic CKD patients. HTN, anaemia, late presentation, and male gender appear to be associated with ECG abnormalities. Though 28 patients (56% were hyperkalaemic only 9 patients (38% of them had tall tented T wave in ECG. Conclusion: Detection of HTN and anaemia in male predialytic CKD patients will arouse suspicion which will help in early detection of cardiac outcome by ECG abnormality which will help in taking treatment strategy in resource limited country.

  2. Seroprevalence of Anti-HCV Antibody in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease before Starting Dialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareha Jesmin Rabbi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and chronic kidney disease are common and potentially serious medical problems throughout the world. In recent years, it has become clear that these two conditions are linked in several important ways. Indeed, some forms of renal diseases are precipitated by HCV infection and patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD are at increased risk for acquiring HCV infection. Patients with chronic kidney disease typically show an impaired immune response compared with healthy individuals and also other risk factors related with treatment and management. CKD patients ultimately undergo end stage renal therapy like dialysis for their treatment and survival. Risk factors for the infections are more in dialysis period than in predialytic stages. Like other developing countries CKD patients with HCV infection are very common in our country. For this reason the CKD patients should be properly diagnosed knowing the infection status before dialysis which would help both the patient and doctor to choose their proper treatment approach. Objective: This cross-sectional study was done to know the prevalence of HCV infection in the CKD patients before starting dialysis therapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 197 patients with chronic kidney disease stage five (CKD-V before starting dialysis therapy were included as subjects of this study. Among the CKD patients anti-HCV was detected to see prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection. The patients were also tested for HBsAg to assess co-infection. After collecting all the data of different test results analyses were done by SPSS version 15.0. Results: In this study 195 (99% patients were anti-HCV negative and only two patients (1% were found positive. Conclusion: HCV infection in CKD patients before dialysis should be taken into account so that HCV negative CKD patients would not get the infection during dialysis and standard screening procedures should be taken to

  3. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  4. Phosphate Metabolism in CKD Stages 3–5: Dietary and Pharmacological Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ketteler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared to the available information for patients on dialysis (CKD stage 5D, data on the epidemiology and appropriate treatment of calcium and phosphate metabolism in the predialysis stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD are quite limited. Perceptible derangements of calcium and phosphate levels start to become apparent when GFR falls below 30 mL/min in some, but not all, patients. However, hyperphosphatemia may be a significant morbidity and mortality risk predictor in predialysis CKD stages. The RIND study, evaluating progression of coronary artery calcification in incident hemodialysis patients, indirectly demonstrated that vascular calcification processes start to manifest in CKD patients prior to the dialysis stage, which may be closely linked to early and invisible derangements in calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of calcium and phosphate handling such as the discovery of FGF23 and other phosphatonins suggest that a more complex assessment of phosphate balance is warranted, possibly including measurements of fractional phosphate excretion and phosphatonin levels in order to appropriately evaluate disordered metabolism in earlier stages of kidney disease. As a consequence, early and preventive treatment approaches may have to be developed for patients in CKD stages 3-5 to halt progression of CKD-MBD.

  5. Prevalence of CKD-MBD in pre-dialysis patients using biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dialysis patients were sim- ilarly studied, it was found that blacks had significantly lower levels of 25(OH) D but higher levels of calcium, phosphorus and PTH. This high secondary hyperpar- athyroidism (SHPT) and 25(OH) D deficiency occurs.

  6. One-Year Mortality of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease After Spinal Cord Injury: A 14-Year Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shou-Chun; Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Yu, Zong-Xing; Ho, Chung-Han; Wu, Chia-Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chu, Chin-Chen; Lim, Sher-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health burden because of its increasing incidence, high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and poor prognosis. We aimed to investigate the 1-year mortality of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) with CKD and ESRD, and compare it with that of patients with SCI without CKD by reviewing a large Taiwanese population data set. In this 14-year retrospective cohort study, the study group (SCI with CKD group, n = 3315) and comparison group (SCI without CKD group, n = 6630) were matched at a 1:2 ratio with propensity score matching by age, sex, comorbidities, length of intensive care unit stay, and length of stay. The 1-year mortality and the relative risks of mortality were calculated. Mortality stratified by age, sex, and comorbidities was also analyzed. The SCI with CKD group had a significantly shorter survival period (10.13 vs. 10.97 months), higher 1-year mortality (17.65% vs. 8.54%), and higher risk of mortality than did the comparison group (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.25). Furthermore, patients with CKD with ESRD had a 7.71-fold higher risk of mortality than did patients with SCI without CKD for ages <50 years. The presence of comorbidities was a risk factor for mortality among patients with SCI CKD or ESRD in contrast to patients with SCI without CKD. Patients with SCI with CKD, especially those with ESRD, have a higher risk of mortality than do patients who do not have CKD. Therefore, patients with CKD should have carefully monitoring for the development of 1-year mortality after SCI, especially for ESRD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hydro-epidemiology of Chronic Kidney Disease(CKD) in Sri Lanka and Its Similarities to the CKD Epidemic in Meso-America.Sarath Gunatilake M.D, Dr. P.H, Professor, California State University, Long Beach California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekera, T.; Gunatilake, S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 2000 years ago Sri Lanka was known as the granary of the east. This distinction was achieved with a massive rice production aided by an efficient irrigation system. The basic structural unit of this irrigation system -with thousands of man-made lakes- was a large reservoir collecting rain water from tributaries and redistributing it to a cascade of rice paddy farms. The rice cultivation used organic fertilizer and natural pesticides made from ancient Ayurvedic recipes. The sociopolitical changes initiated in the county in 1977 resulted in a modernized agricultural economy with the renovation of the old irrigation system. Heavy use of pesticides, mostly Glyphosate (brand name "Round Up") with government subsidized cheap synthetic fertilizer (mostly triple phosphate) contaminated with heavy metals, including Arsenic and Cadmium, became a common practice. As a result, the shallow aquifers in the lowest lying areas, recharged by the irrigation water, was contaminated with Calcium, Magnesium phosphates, and the heavy metals, rendering the drinking water from shallow wells in these areas, extremely hard and unpalatable. The practice of drinking water from the shallow wells in low lying areas, most of which are abandoned now, and the use and spraying of pesticides particularly Glyphosate (often without proper personal protective equipment) have been identified in a case control study, as the main risk factors responsible for a massive epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) affecting 450,000 young farmers, resulting in 23,000 deaths. It is hypothesized that the Glyphosate chelates heavy metals delivering it to the kidney, with contaminated drinking water and food, causing progressive kidney damage. The same irrigation system that contributed to past prosperity has now become a scourge within the realm of a modernized agriculture. Climatic variations, global warming and severe dehydration also have been identified as contributory factors. Similar CKD epidemic killing

  8. The Effect of Renal Transplantation on Respiratory Muscle Strength in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tavana, Sasan; Mirzaei, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of musculoskeletal and respiratory involvement in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). This is attributed to protein calorie imbalance that is caused by the disease process, and hemodialysis and is generally referred to as uremic myopathy. This results in calcification of respiratory muscles such as diaphragm and intercostal muscles. There are limited data about respiratory muscle strength in patients with CKD. We intended to evaluate the effect of kidney ...

  9. Hospital-based prevalence of chronic kidney disease among the newly registered patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is proved to be a major public health issue worldwide and an important contributor to the overall non-communicable disease burden. It increases risk of mortality, end-stage renal disease and accelerated cardiovascular disease (CVD. Diabetes is the biggest contributor to CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. In Bangladesh, very few data on CKD is available. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients at BIRDEM (Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, a referral center for diabetes in Bangladesh. Methods: The study included all diabetic patients aged 18 - 80 years and were registered in the year 2012. Socio-demographic (age, sex, residence, income, literacy, clinical (obesity, blood pressure and biochemical (blood glucose, lipids, eGFR information were collected from the BIRDEM registry. CKD was defined according to the K/ DOQI guidelines. Results: A total of 1317 type 2 diabetic patients of age 18 to 80 years were studied. Of them, men and women were 54.7% and 45.3%, respectively. The overall prevalence of CKD (eGFR ≤60 (ml/min/m2 was 13.9%. The prevalence was significantly higher in women than men (21.3 v. 7.8%, p50y, higher sBP (≥140mmHg and taking oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA were significant. Conclusions: Thus, the study concludes that the prevalence of CKD among the newly registered diabetic patients is quite high in Bangladesh. The female diabetic patients with older age and with higher SBP bear the brunt of CKD. Considering high prevalence of CKD with severe lifelong complications it is of utmost importance for early detection and intervention at the primary health care (PHC level.

  10. Assessment of printed patient-educational materials for chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Davis, Elizabeth; Velasquez, Alexandra; Banerjee, Tanushree; Powe, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is suboptimal among patients with CKD, perhaps due to poor readability of patient education materials (PEMs). We reviewed the suitability and readability of common PEMs that focused on 5 content areas: basics of CKD, risk factors for CKD development, risk factors for CKD progression, complications of CKD and self-management strategies to improve kidney health. Three reviewers (nephrologist, primary care physician, patient) used the Suitability Assessment of Materials to rate PEMs on message content/stimulation of learning, typography, visuals and layout and determined literacy level. Mean ratings were calculated for each PEM by content area and overall (superior = 70-100; adequate = 40-69; inadequate = 6th grade) was associated with an 11.7 point higher mean rating. Most PEMs for kidney disease were adequate. Outstanding PEMs shared characteristics of patient centeredness, a low literacy level, and patient interaction. Providers should be aware of strengths and limitations of PEMs when educating their patients about CKD. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The probability of resistant hypertension during dental treatment of chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, R.

    2017-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation in medically compromised patients like chronic kidney disease (CKD) needs special dental care. Many papers have been published on dental considerations for such individuals. However, literature citing oral care for patients with risk factors of CKD are scarce. Resistant hypertension, one such risk factor, is closely related to CKD. Furthermore, the associated increased prevalence and adverse renal/cardiac outcomes motivated the author to report its unexplored association/impact during dental care. The importance of assessing glomerular filtration rate is highlighted to better understand patients' medical conditions. (author)

  12. Prevalence of anemia in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAM Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence of anemia in a large cohort that comprises patients in different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, we conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study of a cohort of CKD patients who have not started dialysis. The study patients were recruited from the nephrology clinics in 11 different medical centers distributed all over the regions of the KSA. For the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR, we used the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equation. There were 250 study patients who fulfilled the criteria for the study. The patients were stratified according to their GFR as follows: stage 1: 19 patients, stage 2: 35 patients, stage 3: 67 patients, stage 4: 68 patients, and stage 5: 61 patients. The composite of proteinuria and abnormal imaging in stages 1 and 2 was satisfied in 100% of the cases. The prevalence of anemia was elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dL (the level at which the evaluation of anemia in CKD should be initiated in the different stages of CKD, that is, 42%, 33%, 48%, 71%, and 82% in the stages from 1 to 5, respectively. The prevalence was also elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL (the minimum hemoglobin level at which therapy should be initiated with erythropoietin, that is, 21%, 17%, 31%, 49%, and 72%, respectively for stages from 1 to 5. In conclusion, we found a large prevalence of anemia among the CKD population in Saudi Arabia, and the burden of patients who require treatment with erythropoietin is considerably large. However, the response to therapy will not require large doses according to the availability of long-acting erythropoiesis stimulating agents, which will render the therapy more convenient and less expensive.

  13. ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE IN PATIENTS OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE ON MAINTENANCE HEMODIALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Aijaz Ahmed, Dr. Muhammad Nadeem Ahsan, Dr. Pooran Mal*, Dr. Hamid Nawaz Ali Memon, Dr. Samreen and Dr. Sajjad Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of ischemic heart disease in patients of chronic kidney disease on maintenance hemodialysis Patients and Methods: A total of 160 patients with diagnosis of CKD in department of Nephrology, Liaquat National Hospital Karachi were recruited in this six months cross sectional study. Demographic information was recorded. Then patients were underwent ECG. Reports were assessed and ischemic heart disease was labeled while all the data was collected using the pro...

  14. The Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale can be applied to patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Marcus G; Wallston, Kenneth A; Green, Jamie A; Beach, Lauren B; Umeukeje, Ebele; Wright Nunes, Julie A; Ikizler, T Alp; Steed, Julia; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2017-10-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major burden on patients and the health care system. Treatment of CKD requires dedicated involvement from both caretakers and patients. Self-efficacy, also known as perceived competence, contributes to successful maintenance of patient's CKD self-management behaviors such as medication adherence and dietary regulations. Despite a clear association between self-efficacy and improved CKD outcomes, there remains a lack of validated self-report measures of CKD self-efficacy. To address this gap, the Perceived Kidney/Dialysis Self-Management Scale (PKDSMS) was adapted from the previously validated Perceived Medical Condition Self-Management Scale. We then sought to validate this using data from two separate cohorts: a cross-sectional investigation of 146 patients with end-stage renal disease receiving maintenance hemodialysis and a longitudinal study of 237 patients with CKD not receiving dialysis. The PKDSMS was found to be positively and significantly correlated with self-management behaviors and medication adherence in both patient cohorts. The PKDSMS had acceptable reliability, was internally consistent, and exhibited predictive validity between baseline PKDSMS scores and self-management behaviors across multiple time points. Thus, the PKDSMS is a valid and reliable measure of CKD patient self-efficacy and supports the development of interventions enhancing perceived competence to improve CKD self-management. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA is associated with the kidney survival time in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinsheng; Guo, Zhanjun; Bai, Yaling; Zhang, Junxia; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran; Zhang, Shenglei; Ai, Xiaolu

    2015-02-01

    The mitochondrial displacement loop (D-loop) is known to accumulate mutations and SNPs at a higher frequency than other regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We had identified chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk-associated SNPs in the D-loop of CKD patients previously. In this study, we investigated the association of SNPs in the D-loop of mtDNA with the kidney survival of CKD. The D-loop region of mtDNA was sequenced for 119 CKD patients from the inpatient of the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to identify disease outcome-associated SNPs in the D-loop of CKD patients. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify risk factors for the kidney survival of CKD. In the present study, we identified 20 SNPs with a frequency higher than 5% and assessed the relationship of these SNPs with kidney survival time in CKD patients, a SNP of 146 was identified by log-rank test for statistically significant prediction of the kidney survival time. In an overall multivariate analysis, allele 146 was identified as an independent predictor of kidney survival time in CKD patients. The survival time of kidney in the CKD patients with 146C was significantly shorter than that of kidney in CKD patients with 146T (relative risk, 2.336; 95% CI, 1.319-3.923; p = 0.001). SNPs in the D-loop can predict the kidney survival of CKD patients. Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in the mitochondrial D-loop can help to identify CKD patient subgroup at high risk of a poor disease outcome.

  16. Correlation of chronic kidney disease, diabetes and peripheral artery disease with cardiovascular events in patients using stress myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru; Moroi, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Normal stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) studies generally suggest an excellent prognosis for cardiovascular events. Chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes and peripheral artery disease (PAD) have been established as the risk factors for cardiovascular events. However, whether these risk factors significantly predict cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of these risk factors in patients with normal stress MPI. Patients with normal stress MPI (n=372, male=215 and female=157, age=69 years, CKD without hemodialysis=95, diabetes=99, PAD=19, previous coronary artery disease=116) were followed up for 14 months. Normal stress MPI was defined as a summed stress score of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiovascular events included cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 20 of 372 patients (5.4%). In univariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, insulin use, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, CKD, left ventricular ejection fraction and pharmacological stress tests were significant predictors of cardiovascular events. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, PAD, diabetes and CKD were independent and significant predictors for cardiovascular events, and their number was the strongest predictor for cardiovascular events (hazard ratio=21.7, P<0.001). PAD, diabetes and CKD are coexisting, independent and significant risk factors for cardiovascular events, CKD being the strongest predictor. The number of coexisting risk factors is important in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with normal stress MPI. (author)

  17. Osteoporosis, bone mineral density and CKD-MBD complex (I): Diagnostic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Torregrosa, Josep-Vicent; Rodríguez-García, Minerva; Castro-Alonso, Cristina; Górriz, José Luis; Laiz Alonso, Ana María; Cigarrán, Secundino; Benito, Silvia; López-Báez, Víctor; Lloret Cora, María Jesús; daSilva, Iara; Cannata-Andía, Jorge

    2018-04-24

    Osteoporosis (OP) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) independently influence bone and cardiovascular health. A considerable number of patients with CKD, especially those with stages 3a to 5D, have a significantly reduced bone mineral density leading to a high risk of fracture and a significant increase in associated morbidity and mortality. Independently of classic OP related to age and/or gender, the mechanical properties of bone are also affected by inherent risk factors for CKD ("uraemic OP"). In the first part of this review, we will analyse the general concepts regarding bone mineral density, OP and fractures, which have been largely undervalued until now by nephrologists due to the lack of evidence and diagnostic difficulties in the context of CKD. It has now been proven that a reduced bone mineral density is highly predictive of fracture risk in CKD patients, although it does not allow a distinction to be made between the causes which generate it (hyperparathyroidism, adynamic bone disease and/or senile osteoporosis, etc.). Therefore, in the second part, we will analyse the therapeutic indications in different CKD stages. In any case, the individual assessment of factors which represent a higher or lower risk of fracture, the quantification of this risk (i.e. using tools such as FRAX ® ) and the potential indications for densitometry in patients with CKD could represent an important first step pending new clinical guidelines based on randomised studies which do not exclude CKD patients, all the while avoiding therapeutic nihilism in an area of growing importance. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Procalcitonin Levels in Patients with Complete and Incomplete Kawasaki Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Jin Cho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Incomplete Kawasaki disease (iKD is considered to be a less complete form of Kawasaki disease (cKD, and several differences in the laboratory presentations of iKD and cKD have been noted. We investigated serum procalcitonin levels in patients with iKD, cKD, and other febrile diseases (a control group. Seventy-seven patients with cKD, 24 with iKD, and 41 controls admitted to our hospital from November 2009 to November 2011 were enrolled in the present study. We obtained four measurements of serum procalcitonin levels and those of other inflammatory markers from each patient. Samples were taken for analysis on the day of diagnosis (thus before treatment commenced; D0 and 2 (D2, 14 (D14, and 56 days (D56 after intravenous immunoglobulin infusion. We obtained control group data at D0. The mean D0 serum procalcitonin levels of cKD patients (0.71±1.36 ng/mL and controls (0.67±1.06 ng/mL were significantly higher than those of iKD patients (0.26±0.26 ng/mL (P=0.014 and P=0.041, resp.. No significant difference in mean procalcitonin level was evident among groups at any subsequent time. In conclusion, the serum procalcitonin level of patients with acute-stage cKD was significantly higher than that of iKD patients.

  19. A comparison of treating metabolic acidosis in CKD stage 4 hypertensive kidney disease with fruits and vegetables or sodium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Simoni, Jan; Jo, Chan-Hee; Wesson, Donald E

    2013-03-01

    Current guidelines recommend Na(+)-based alkali for CKD with metabolic acidosis and plasma total CO2 (PTCO2) < 22 mM. Because diets in industrialized societies are typically acid-producing, we compared base-producing fruits and vegetables with oral NaHCO3 (HCO3) regarding the primary outcome of follow-up estimated GFR (eGFR) and secondary outcomes of improved metabolic acidosis and reduced urine indices of kidney injury. Individuals with stage 4 (eGFR, 15-29 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) CKD due to hypertensive nephropathy, had a PTCO2 level < 22 mM, and were receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition were randomly assigned to 1 year of daily oral NaHCO3 at 1.0 mEq/kg per day (n=35) or fruits and vegetables dosed to reduce dietary acid by half (n=36). Plasma cystatin C-calculated eGFR did not differ at baseline and 1 year between groups. One-year PTCO2 was higher than baseline in the HCO3 group (21.2±1.3 versus 19.5±1.5 mM; P<0.01) and the fruits and vegetables group (19.9±1.7 versus 19.3±1.9 mM; P<0.01), consistent with improved metabolic acidosis, and was higher in the HCO3 than the fruits and vegetable group (P<0.001). One-year urine indices of kidney injury were lower than baseline in both groups. Plasma [K(+)] did not increase in either group. One year of fruits and vegetables or NaHCO3 in individuals with stage 4 CKD yielded eGFR that was not different, was associated with higher-than-baseline PTCO2, and was associated with lower-than-baseline urine indices of kidney injury. The data indicate that fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis and reduce kidney injury in stage 4 CKD without producing hyperkalemia.

  20. Conservative care as a treatment option for patients aged 75 years and older with CKD stage V: a National survey in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Christopher; Kooman, J; Courtens, A M; Konings, C J A M

    2018-01-01

    Conservative care for patients aged 75 years and older with CKD stage 5 as a treatment option besides dialysis was proposed officially in the Netherlands in October 2016. This national survey showed the current implementation of this option in Netherlands nephrology departments. A web-based survey was sent to medical managers of 60 nephrology departments in the Netherlands in August 2016. Twenty-one medical managers (35%) completed the survey. The term "conservative care" is frequently used and well known. The estimated number of patients in whom the decision for maximal conservative care was made in 2015 was 310 of 2249 patients with CKD stage 5 age 75 years and older (range 5-50 patients per department). 164 patients became symptomatic and received no dialysis. There is no official registration for this treatment option and patient category. The practice patterns vary widely. Only one of 21 respondents reported a conservative care outpatient clinic. Formal training or education regarding conservative care is not available in most of departments. 95% of respondents discussed this treatment option with their patients. General practitioners are always being informed about their patient's decision. Their main role is providing or organizing palliative care support at the end of life and discussing advance care planning. Most respondents (86%) considered to include their patients in a prospective multicentre observational study, conservative care versus dialysis. Conservative care as a treatment option for patients with CKD stage 5 aged 75 years and older is well established. The practice patterns are varied in the Netherlands. Follow-up studies are needed to see whether the new multidisciplinary guideline facilitates harmonization of practice pattern. Funding is needed to optimize the implementation of conservative care.

  1. The assessment of cognitive function in older adult patients with chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mary; Steffen, Alana; Quinn, Lauretta; Collins, Eileen G; Phillips, Shane A; Bronas, Ulf G

    2018-05-25

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common chronic condition in older adults that is associated with cognitive decline. However, the exact prevalence of cognitive impairment in older adults with CKD is unclear likely due to the variety of methods utilized to assess cognitive function. The purpose of this integrative review is to determine how cognitive function is most frequently assessed in older adult patients with CKD. Five electronic databases were searched to explore relevant literature related to cognitive function assessment in older adult patients with CKD. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created to focus the search to the assessment of cognitive function with standardized cognitive tests in older adults with CKD, not on renal replacement therapy. Through the search methods, 36 articles were found that fulfilled the purpose of the review. There were 36 different types of cognitive tests utilized in the included articles, with each study utilizing between one and 12 tests. The most commonly utilized cognitive test was the Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE), followed by tests of digit symbol substitution and verbal fluency. The most commonly assessed aspect of cognitive function was global cognition. The assessment of cognitive function in older adults with CKD with standardized tests is completed in various ways. Unfortunately, the common methods of assessment of cognitive function may not be fully examining the domains of impairment commonly found in older adults with CKD. Further research is needed to identify the ideal cognitive test to best assess older adults with CKD for cognitive impairment.

  2. disease patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Mamishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase complex. This disorder results in recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections. Aspergillus species are the most common fungal infections in these patients. Case Report: Herein, we present a case of fungal infection in a girl with CGD. We confirmed aspergillosis through the positive microscopic and macroscopic examinations, as well as radiology results. Invasive aspergillosis in this patient with pneumonia, lung abscess, and osteomyelitis of the ribs was not initially treated with amphotericin B (Am B and recombinant interferon-gamma. Conclusion: Among infectious diseases, fungal infections, in particular aspergillosis, remain a serious problem in CGD patients. Considering poor clinical response and deficient immune system, rapid diagnosis of fungal infection and optimizing the treatment of these patients are recommended.

  3. Hypocalcemia post denosumab in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 4-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Vatsa; Chiang, Cherie Y; Booth, Jane; Mount, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Denosumab, a RANK-ligand inhibitor, is an effective treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and men. Unlike the bisphosphonates, it is not excreted by the kidney. Little is known, however, about its efficacy and safety in patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). A retrospective study was performed in CKD 4-5D patients from a tertiary referral hospital who were treated with denosumab between 1st January 2011 and 31st March 2014. Data collected included information about the following: CKD stage, fracture history, bone mineral density, serum calcium levels pre and post denosumab treatment, episodes of hypocalcemia, relevant medications and adverse events. Eight patients with CKD-5 and 6 patients with CKD-4 were identified (all female, mean age 77.1 ± 9.9). The mean pre-denosumab calcium value was 2.42 ± 0.12 mmol/l, PTH 20.2 ± 14.7 pmol/l and 25-OH vitamin D 69.1 ± 30.1 nmol/l. After denosumab treatment, 6/8 patients with CKD-5/5D, and 2/5 patients with CKD-4 developed severe hypocalcemia. Two patients developed direct adverse complications of hypocalcemia (seizure, laryngospasm, prolonged QTc). Among the patients who developed hypocalcemia, the median time to serum calcium nadir was 21 days and the median time to correction of hypocalcemia was 71 days. Treatment of hypocalcemia required large doses of oral calcium and calcitriol, and increases in dialysate calcium concentration. A high rate of severe hypocalcemia was observed in patients with advanced CKD treated with denosumab. If denosumab is used in patients with severe CKD, close monitoring and aggressive replacement of calcium and calcitriol is required to avoid the development of hypocalcemia.

  4. Improving CKD Diagnosis and Blood Pressure Control in Primary Care: A Tailored Multifaceted Quality Improvement Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Humphreys

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health issue. From 2009 to 2014, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care Greater Manchester (NIHR CLAHRC GM in England ran 4 phased, 12-month quality improvement (QI projects with 49 primary care practices in GM. Two measureable aims were set – halve undiagnosed CKD in participating practices using modelled estimates of prevalence; and optimise blood pressure (BP control (<140/90 mm Hg in CKD patients without proteinuria; <130/80 mm Hg in CKD patients with proteinuria for 75% of recorded cases of CKD. The 4 projects ran as follows: P1 = Project 1 with 19 practices (September 2009 to September 2010, P2 = Project 2 with 11 practices (March 2011 to March 2012, P3 = Project 3 with 12 practices (September 2012 to October 2013, and P4 = Project 4 with 7 practices (April 2013 to March 2014. Methods: Multifaceted intervention approaches were tailored based on a contextual analysis of practice support needs. Data were collected from practices by facilitators at baseline and again at project close, with self-reported data regularly requested from practices throughout the projects. Results: Halving undiagnosed CKD as per aim was exceeded in 3 of the 4 projects. The optimising BP aim was met in 2 projects. Total CKD cases after the programme increased by 2,347 (27% from baseline to 10,968 in a total adult population (aged ≥18 years of 231,568. The percentage of patients who managed to appropriate BP targets increased from 34 to 74% (P1, from 60 to 83% (P2, from 68 to 71% (P3, and from 63 to 76% (P4. In nonproteinuric CKD patients, 88, 90, 89, and 91%, respectively, achieved a target BP of <140/90 mm Hg. In proteinuric CKD patients, 69, 46, 48, and 45%, respectively, achieved a tighter target of <130/80 mm Hg. Analysis of national data over similar timeframes indicated that practices participating in the programme achieved

  5. The effects of different physical activities on atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuchi, M?rcio Galindo; Chen, Shaojie; Hoye, Neil Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is highly common, and is most frequently observed in individuals with hypertension and structural cardiac disease. Sympathetic hyperactivity plays a fundamental role in the progression, maintenance and aggravation of arrhythmia. Endurance exercise training clearly lowers sympathetic activity in sympathoexcitatory disease states, and is well-tolerated by patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: We assessed 50 CKD patients with hypertension. Each...

  6. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  7. The impact of kidney foundations in alleviating the burden of CKD in India - an example, Tamilnad Kidney Research Foundation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Georgi; Vijayan, Madhusudan; Ravi, Rajalakshmi; Kumaraswami, Latha; Venkatesan, Malathy

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem in India. The CKD registry of India has been formed to understand the epidemiology of CKD in India. Due to health economics in India, the majority of CKD-affected patients cannot afford renal replacement therapy (RRT) services. There is an unmet need to improve the awareness of kidney disease in India, and the focus should be on prevention and early detection of CKD by screening high risk populations. The Tamilnad Kidney Research (TANKER) Foundation is a charitable trust established in 1993 with the aim to improve awareness and provide quality affordable treatment to underprivileged patients. TANKER is supported by contributions from well-wishers. It has three arms: i) treatment arm, ii) research arm, and iii) awareness and screening arm. TANKER Foundation offers free and subsidized dialysis twice weekly to 227 underprivileged patients. TANKER dialysis has been supported by state government funding schemes. TANKER actively supports and conducts research in nephrology. More than 100,000 people have benefitted from TANKER's kidney awareness programs. The screening programs have provided for early detection of CKD in both urban and rural areas. TANKER award functions are held annually to recognize research and exemplary service to society. The TANKER Foundation can be used as a model for developing countries to address the unmet needs in CKD management.

  8. Diagnostic approach to chronic kidney disease | Naiker | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be considered to be present if a patient has a glomerular filtration rate 3 months. These include proteinuria, haematuria and radiological abnormalities. Regardless of the stage of CKD, the approach is mainly similar.

  9. The Frequency of Prediabetes and Contributing Factors in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razeghi, Effat; Heydarian, Peimaneh; Heydari, Mahshid

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Uremia is a prediabetic state, but abnormal glucose metabolism and relative risk factors in non-diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are not studied extensively. This study aimed to evaluate prediabetes and contributing factors in patients with CKD. METHODS: We studied the frequency of prediabetes (defined as fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dl and 2-h plasma glucose 140-199 mg/dl) and contributing risk factors in 91 (34 women and 57 men) non-diabetic CKD (GFR prediabetic state. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients (41.8%), 28 male and 10 female, with mean age of 57.4 ± 17.1 yr, had prediabetes. Among these, 18.7% had impaired fasting glucose, 7.7% impaired glucose tolerance, and 15.4% combined impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance. CKD patients with impaired glucose tolerance had more frequently hypertriglyceridemia (85.7% vs. 42.0%, p = 0.001), hypertension (66.6% vs. 31.4%, p = 0.004), and metabolic syndrome according to National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (52.3% vs. 25.7%, p = 0.02). Also, mean systolic blood pressure (134.2 ± 13.9 vs. 124.5 ± 20.0, p = 0.004) was higher in CKD patients with impaired glucose tolerance compared to CKD patients with normal glucose. CONCLUSIONS: Prediabetes is a frequent condition in CKD patients. Also, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension are more prevalent in prediabetic CKD patients than in non-diabetic CKD patients. PMID:22189551

  10. Nutritional and taste characteristics of low-potassium lettuce developed for patients with chronic kidney diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Takuya; Sakuma, Kozue; Kumagai, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Dietary potassium restriction is recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with hyperkalemia. Boiling or soaking vegetables in water is known to decrease their potassium content. However, these methods can also reduce the quantity of other nutrients. Recently, low-potassium (LK) lettuce has been developed for CKD patients with hyperkalemia. This study compared the potassium content, other nutritional values, and taste characteristics of LK lettuce with those of normal lettuce. The...

  11. LDL cholesterol in CKD-to treat or not to treat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massy, Ziad A.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    In the majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) the total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol are usually normal, with the exception of patients with nephrotic-range proteinuria and in peritoneal dialysis patients. Moreover, epidemiological evidence shows that the link

  12. Comparison of Three Diet Quality Indices for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Mortazavi Najafabadi, Mojgan; Moeinzadeh, Firouzeh; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat; Azadbakht, Leila

    2017-08-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have specific dietary needs due to recommended dietary restrictions. However, there is no specific index for evaluating the quality of diet in patients with CKD.   OBJECTIVE: To define and compare three specific diet quality indices in patients with CKD. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with CKD were selected for this cross-sectional study. The patients' Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. Total protein intake per body weight (TP/BW), animal protein intake per body weight (AP/BW) and animal protein to vegetable protein ratio (AP/VP) were defined as diet quality indices. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Cr). Patients in the highest tertile of TP/BW and tertile of AP/BW consumed more amounts of nutrients which should be limited in CKD (i.e., sodium, potassium and phosphorus). Subjects in the last tertile of AP/BW had higher BUN and Cr. A marginally significant increased risk of higher stage of CKD across the tertiles of AP/BW was observed after adjusting for potential confounders (OR = 2.20, 95% CI: 1.06, 4.56; P = 0.08). The results showed that AP/BW is a good diet quality index and is marginally associated with being in higher stages of CKD.

  13. Direct costs associated with chronic kidney disease among type 2 diabetic patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Satyavani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the direct costs of medical care among hospitalized type 2 diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. A total of 209 (M:F, 133:76 patients were divided into groups based on the severity of kidney disease. Group 1 subjects had undergone renal transplantation (n = 12, group 2 was CKD patients on hemodialysis (n = 45, group 3 was patients with CKD, prior to end-stage renal disease (ESRD (n = 66, and group 4 (n = 86 consisted of subjects without any complications. Details about expenditure per hospitalization, length of stay during admission, direct medical and nonmedical cost, expenditure for the previous two years, and source of bearing the expenditure were recorded in a questionnaire. Diabetic patients with CKD prior to ESRD spend more per hospitalization than patients without any complications. [Median ₹ 12,664 vs. 3,214]. The total median cost of CKD patients on hemodialysis was significantly higher than other CKD patients (INR 61,170 vs. 12,664. The median cost involved in kidney transplantation was ₹ 392,920. The total expenditure for hospital admissions in two years was significantly higher for dialysis than transplantation. Patients on hemodialysis or kidney transplantation tend to stay longer as inpatient admissions. The source of funds for the expenditure was mainly personal savings (46%. The expenditure on hospital admissions for CKD was considerably higher, and so, there is a need to develop a protocol on a cost-effective strategy for the treatment of CKD.

  14. Rethinking CKD Evaluation: Should We Be Quantifying Basal or Stimulated GFR to Maximize Precision and Sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitoris, Bruce A.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains an increasing clinical problem. Although clinical risk factors and biomarkers for development and progression of CKD have been identified, there is no commercial surveillance technology to definitively diagnose and quantify the severity and progressive loss of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in CKD. This has limited the study of potential therapies to late stages of CKD when FDA-registerable events are more likely. Since patient outcomes, including the rate of CKD progression, correlate with disease severity, and effective therapy may require early intervention, being able to diagnose and stratify patients by their level of decreased kidney function early on is key for translational progress. In addition, renal reserve, defined as the increase in GFR following stimulation, may improve the quantification of GFR based solely on basal levels. Various groups are developing and characterizing optical measurement techniques utilizing new minimally invasive or non-invasive approaches for quantifying basal and stimulated kidney function. This development has the potential to allow widespread individualization of therapy at an earlier disease stage. Therefore, the purposes of this review are to suggest why quantifying stimulated GFR, by activating renal reserve, may be advantageous in patients and review fluorescent technologies to deliver patient-specific GFR. PMID:28223001

  15. Elevated potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W; Nicolaisen, Sia K; Hasvold, Pål

    2018-01-01

    Background: Data on the true burden of hyperkalemia (HK) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a real-world setting are scarce. Methods: The incidence rate of HK [first blood test with an elevated blood potassium level level >5.0 mmol/L] in primary or hospital care was assessed...

  16. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Noha A; Hassanein, Safaa M; Leil, Marwa M; NasrAllah, Mohamed M

    2015-11-01

    To explore and compare complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practice among subsets of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal allograft recipients. Cross-sectional survey questionnaire. Three outpatient nephrology clinics and dialysis centers in Egypt. A total of 1005 subjects were included in the study (560 predialyis patients with CKD 3-4, 245 patients on hemodialysis, and 200 transplant recipients). Face to face interview with CKD patients. The survey inquired about epidemiological data, types, sources, and patterns of CAM used as well as the effect of CAM use on the patients' interaction with modern medicine and clinical caregivers. (1) Prevalence and types of CAM used by CKD patients; (2) Associations and correlates of CAM use including epidemiological features, impact of CAM use on adherence to conventional treatment and interaction of the users with modern medical systems; (3) Differences in CAM practice between subsets of CKD patients viz. hemodialysis patients, CKD 3-4, and transplant recipients. Overall, 522 patients (52%) were using CAM (64% of predialyis patients, 33% of dialysis patients, and 40.5% of transplant recipients, P transplant recipients were more likely to report P Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Effect of Diet on the Survival of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna

    2017-05-13

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and it is gradually increasing. Individuals with CKD should introduce appropriate measures to hamper the progression of kidney function deterioration as well as prevent the development or progression of CKD-related diseases. A kidney-friendly diet may help to protect kidneys from further damage. Patients with kidney damage should limit the intake of certain foods to reduce the accumulation of unexcreted metabolic products and also to protect against hypertension, proteinuria and other heart and bone health problems. Despite the fact that the influence of certain types of nutrients has been widely studied in relation to kidney function and overall health in CKD patients, there are few studies on the impact of a specific diet on their survival. Animal studies demonstrated prolonged survival of rats with CKD fed with protein-restricted diets. In humans, the results of studies are conflicting. Some of them indicate slowing down of the progression of kidney disease and reduction in proteinuria, but other underline significant worsening of patients' nutritional state, which can be dangerous. A recent systemic study revealed that a healthy diet comprising many fruits and vegetables, fish, legumes, whole grains, and fibers and also the cutting down on red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake was associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results of studies concerning the impact of diet on the survival of CKD patients.

  18. Approximation of Corrected Calcium Concentrations in Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease Patients with or without Dialysis Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Kaku

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The following calcium (Ca correction formula (Payne is conventionally used for serum Ca estimation: corrected total Ca (TCa (mg/dl = TCa (mg/dl + [4 - albumin (g/dl]; however, it is inapplicable to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Methods: 1,922 samples in CKD G4 + G5 patients and 341 samples in CKD G5D patients were collected. Levels of TCa (mg/day, ionized Ca2+ (iCa2+ (mmol/l and other clinical parameters were measured. We assumed the corrected TCa to be equal to eight times the iCa2+ value (measured corrected TCa. We subsequently performed stepwise multiple linear regression analysis using the clinical parameters. Results: The following formula was devised from multiple linear regression analysis. For CKD G4 + G5 patients: approximated corrected TCa (mg/dl = TCa + 0.25 × (4 - albumin + 4 × (7.4 - pH + 0.1 × (6 - P + 0.22. For CKD G5D patients: approximated corrected TCa (mg/dl = TCa + 0.25 × (4 - albumin + 0.1 × (6 - P + 0.05 × (24 - HCO3- + 0.35. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed the high values of the area under the curve of approximated corrected TCa for the detection of measured corrected TCa ≥8.4 mg/dl and ≤10.4 mg/dl for each CKD sample. Both intraclass correlation coefficients for each CKD sample demonstrated superior agreement using the new formula compared to the previously reported formulas. Conclusion: Compared to other formulas, the approximated corrected TCa values calculated from the new formula for patients with CKD G4 + G5 and CKD G5D demonstrates superior agreement with the measured corrected TCa.

  19. The Effect of Diet on the Survival of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and it is gradually increasing. Individuals with CKD should introduce appropriate measures to hamper the progression of kidney function deterioration as well as prevent the development or progression of CKD-related diseases. A kidney-friendly diet may help to protect kidneys from further damage. Patients with kidney damage should limit the intake of certain foods to reduce the accumulation of unexcreted metabolic products and also to protect against hypertension, proteinuria and other heart and bone health problems. Despite the fact that the influence of certain types of nutrients has been widely studied in relation to kidney function and overall health in CKD patients, there are few studies on the impact of a specific diet on their survival. Animal studies demonstrated prolonged survival of rats with CKD fed with protein-restricted diets. In humans, the results of studies are conflicting. Some of them indicate slowing down of the progression of kidney disease and reduction in proteinuria, but other underline significant worsening of patients’ nutritional state, which can be dangerous. A recent systemic study revealed that a healthy diet comprising many fruits and vegetables, fish, legumes, whole grains, and fibers and also the cutting down on red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake was associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results of studies concerning the impact of diet on the survival of CKD patients. PMID:28505087

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  1. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin

    2010-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm 2 ). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  2. Heart failure in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease: the GCKD study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a risk factor for development and progression of heart failure (HF. CKD and HF share common risk factors, but few data exist on the prevalence, signs and symptoms as well as correlates of HF in populations with CKD of moderate severity. We therefore aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of HF in the German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD study, a large observational prospective study.We analyzed data from 5,015 GCKD patients aged 18-74 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 500 mg/d. We evaluated a definition of HF based on the Gothenburg score, a clinical HF score used in epidemiological studies (Gothenburg HF, and self-reported HF. Factors associated with HF were identified using multivariable adjusted logistic regression. The prevalence of Gothenburg HF was 43% (ranging from 24% in those with eGFR >90 to 59% in those with eGFR<30 ml/min/1.73m2. The corresponding estimate for self-reported HF was 18% (range 5%-24%. Lower eGFR was significantly and independently associated with the Gothenburg definition of HF (p-trend <0.001. Additional significantly associated correlates included older age, female gender, higher BMI, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, anemia, sleep apnea, and lower educational status.The burden of self-reported and Gothenburg HF among patients with CKD is high. The proportion of patients who meet the criteria for Gothenburg HF in a European cohort of patients with moderate CKD is more than twice as high as the prevalence of self-reported HF. However, because of the shared signs, symptoms and medications of HF and CKD, the Gothenburg score cannot be used to reliably define HF in CKD patients. Our results emphasize the need for early screening for HF in patients with CKD.

  3. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ching Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD group had lower resilience than either high-risk or early CKD groups. Factors affecting pre-ESRD resilience were gender, occupational status, diabetes and health-promoting behaviors. Factors affecting resilience of the high-risk group included level of education and health-promoting behaviors while factors affecting resilience in the early CKD group involved whether they are employed and health promoting behaviors. A significant positive correlation was found between health promoting behavior and resilience in all study subjects. Multiple regression analysis found that factors which could effectively predict resilience in patients at high-risk for CKD were gender, whether the patient had a job, nutrition, self-actualization, and stress level, accounting for 69.7% of the variance. Therefore, nursing education should focus on health promotion advocacy throughout the life of not only patients but also their families.

  4. MDRD vs. CKD-EPI in comparison to 51Chromium EDTA: a cross sectional study of Malaysian CKD cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalalonmuhali, Maisarah; Lim, Soo Kun; Md Shah, Mohammad Nazri; Ng, Kok Peng

    2017-12-13

    Accurate measurement of renal function is important: however, radiolabelled gold standard measurement of GFR is highly expensive and can only be used on a very limited scale. We aim to compare the performance of Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) and Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equations in the multi-ethnic population attending University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC). This is a cross-sectional study recruiting patients, who attend UMMC Nephrology clinics on voluntary basis. 51-Chromium EDTA ( 51 Cr-EDTA) plasma level was used to measure the reference GFR. The serum creatinine was determined by IDMS reference modified Jaffe kinetic assay (Cr Jaffe ). The predictive capabilities of MDRD and CKD-EPI based equations were calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20 and correlation, bias, precision and accuracy were determined. A total of 113 subjects with mean age of 58.12 ± 14.76 years and BMI of 25.99 ± 4.29 kg/m 2 were recruited. The mean reference GFR was 66.98 ± 40.65 ml/min/1.73m 2 , while the estimated GFR based on MDRD and CKD-EPI formula were 62.17 ± 40.40, and 60.44 ± 34.59, respectively. Both MDRD and CKD-EPI were well-correlated with reference GFR (0.806 and 0.867 respectively) and statistically significant with p < 0.001. In the overall cohort, although MDRD had smaller bias than CKD-EPI (4.81 vs. 6.54), CKD-EPI was more precise (25.22 vs. 20.29) with higher accuracy within 30% of measured GFR (79.65 vs. 86.73%). The CKD-EPI equation appeared to be more precise and accurate than the MDRD equation in estimating GFR in our cohort of multi-ethnic populations in Malaysia.

  5. Analysis of elements in human blood of patients with chronic kidney disease using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metairon, S.; Zamboni, C.B.; Kovacs, L.; Genezini, F.A.; Santos, N.F.; Vilela, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used to determine Br, Ca, Cl, K, Mg and Na concentrations in whole blood of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) as well as in whole blood of normal individuals (control group). The dependence of the elements concentration in function of sex, age, time and type of treatment were investigated. The similarities and differences between healthy individuals and CKD are discussed. (author)

  6. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    level in the body. Most patients with CKD have elevated levels of inflammation due to CKD and the presence of other medical issues (e.g., diabetes ...Blood, 37 (1971), 725–732. [11] Chung-Che Chang, Yayan Chen, Kapil Modi , Omar Awar, Clarence P. Alfrey, and Lawrence Rice, Changes of red blood cell...National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD, 2008. [43] M. M. Udden, T. B. Driscoll, M

  7. Habitual dietary phosphorus intake and urinary excretion in chronic kidney disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Louise Havkrog; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Møller, Grith

    2017-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with vascular calcification, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to estimate the daily dietary phosphorus intake compared with recommendations in CKD patients and to evaluate the reproducibility of the 2...... to estimate the individual phosphorus excretion.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 14 December 2016; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.247....

  8. Hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease: complexities within the commonplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Michael M; McMahon, Lawrence P; Smith, Edward R; Williams, David S; Holt, Stephen G

    2012-08-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and usually caused by associated metabolic abnormalities, in particular, hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphataemia. Nevertheless, other causes of hyperparathyroidism can exist concurrently with CKD, challenging diagnostic interpretation and therapeutic intervention. We present four cases of hyperparathyroidism in patients with CKD that highlight some of these dilemmas.

  9. Dietary Protein Intake in a Multi-ethnic Asian Population of Healthy Participants and Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon Wee; Toh, Qi Chun; Xu, Hui; Yang, Adonsia Y T; Lin, Tingxuan; Li, Jialiang; Lee, Evan J C

    2015-04-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend different levels of dietary protein intake in predialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. It is unknown how effectively these recommendations perform in a multi-ethnic Asian population, with varied cultural beliefs and diets. We assess the profi le of protein intake in a multi-ethnic Asian population, comparing healthy participants and CKD patients. We analysed the 24-hour urine collections of the Asian Kidney Disease Study (AKDS) and the Singapore Kidney Function Study (SKFS) to estimate total protein intake (TPI; g/day). We calculated ideal body weight (IDW; kg): 22.99 × height2 (m). Standard statistical tests were applied where appropriate, and linear regression was used to assess associations of continuous variables with protein intake. There were 232 CKD patients and 103 healthy participants with 35.5% diabetics. The mean TPI in healthy participants was 58.89 ± 18.42 and the mean TPI in CKD patients was 53.64 ± 19.39. By US National Kidney Foundation (NKF) guidelines, 29/232 (12.5%) of CKD patients with measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR) patients had TPI-IDW >0.75g/kg/ day. By American Dietetic Association (ADA) guidelines, 34.7% (44/127) of CKD patients with GFR patients with GFR protein intake of between 0.3 to 0.5 g/kg/day. A total of 21.9% (25/114) of diabetic CKD patients had protein intake between 0.8 to 0.9 g/kg/day. On average, the protein intake of most CKD patients exceeds the recommendations of guidelines. Diabetic CKD patients should aim to have higher protein intakes.

  10. Fasting Ramadan in chronic kidney disease patients: Clinical and biochemical effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernieh Bassam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting of the month of Ramadan is a pillar of Islam. Muslim patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD usually fast this month. To determine the effects of fasting on renal function in CKD patients, we prospectively studied 31 (19 males and mean age 54 ±14.2 years CKD patients during the month of Ramadan 1426 Hijra (4 th October - 4 th November 2005; 14 patients were in stage III CKD, 12 had stage IV and 5 had stage V. The mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (e-GFR was 29 ± 16.3 mL/min. Diabetes was the main cause of CKD (19 (61% patients, and hypertension was present in 22 (71% patients. Clinical assessment and renal function tests were performed one month prior to fasting then during and a month later. Medications were taken in two divided doses at sunset (time of breaking the fast and pre dawn (before starting the fast. All patients fasted the whole month of Ramadan with a good tolerance, tendency to weight reduction, and lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. eGFR showed a significant improvement during the fast and the month after. The blood sugar was high during fasting with an increment in the Hb A1c. There was better lipid profile, reduction of the pro-teinuria and urinary sodium. We conclude that this study demonstrates a good tolerance and safety of fasting Ramadan in CKD patients.

  11. Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on the Presence and Severity of Aortic Stenosis in Patients at High Risk for Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Chiaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective We evaluated the impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD on the presence and severity of aortic stenosis (AS in patients at high risk for coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods One hundred and twenty consecutive patients who underwent invasive coronary angiography were enrolled. Aortic valve area (AVA was calculated by the continuity equation using transthoracic echocardiography, and was normalized by body surface area (AVA index. Results Among all 120 patients, 78% had CAD, 55% had CKD (stage 3: 81%; stage 4: 19%, and 34% had AS (AVA 2. Patients with AS were older, more often female, and had a higher frequency of CKD than those without AS, but the prevalence of CAD and most other coexisting conventional risk factors was similar between patients with and without AS. Multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that only CKD and CAD were independent determinants of AVA index with standardized coefficients of -0.37 and -0.28, respectively. When patients were divided into 3 groups (group 1: absence of CKD and CAD, n = 16; group 2: presence of either CKD or CAD, n = 51; and group 3: presence of both CKD and CAD, n = 53, group 3 had the smallest AVA index (1.19 ± 0.30*# cm2/m2, *p 2/m2, and #p 2/m2 and the highest peak velocity across the aortic valve (1.53 ± 0.41*# m/sec; *p Conclusion CKD, even pre-stage 5 CKD, has a more powerful impact on the presence and severity of AS than other conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis in patients at high risk for CAD.

  12. Ketoanalogues supplementation decreases dialysis and mortality risk in patients with anemic advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsiung Wu

    Full Text Available The benefit of alpha-Ketoanalogues (KA supplementation for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients that followed low-protein diet (LPD remains undetermined.We extracted longitudinal data for all CKD patients in the Taiwan National Health Insurance from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2010. A total of 1483 patients with anemic advanced CKD treated with LPD, who started KA supplementation, were enrolled in this study. We analyzed the risks of end stage renal disease and all-cause mortality using Cox proportional hazard models with influential drugs as time-dependent variables.A total of 1113 events of initiating long-term dialysis and 1228 events of the composite outcome of long-term dialysis or death occurred in patients with advanced CKD after a mean follow-up of 1.57 years. Data analysis suggests KA supplementation is associated with a lower risk for long-term dialysis and the composite outcome when daily dosage is more than 5.5 tablets. The beneficial effect was consistent in subgroup analysis, independent of age, sex, and comorbidities.Among advanced CKD patients that followed LPD, KA supplementation at an appropriate dosage may substantially reduce the risk of initiating long-term dialysis or of developing the composite outcome. KA supplementation represents an additional therapeutic strategy to slow the progression of CKD.

  13. Detection of Chronic Kidney Disease by Using Different Equations of Glomerular Filtration Rate in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Sojib Bin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global threat due to its high mortality. It is essential to know the actual magnitude of diabetic CKD to design a specific management program. However, there is limited knowledge regarding the most suitable equation to measure CKD in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This paper aimed to analyze estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) based on different equations to detect the CKD among T2DM.? Methods A hospital-based cross-sectio...

  14. Accuracy and precision of the CKD-EPI and MDRD predictive equations compared with glomerular filtration rate measured by inulin clearance in a Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wakeel, Jamal Saleh

    2016-01-01

    Predictive equations for estimating glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in different clinical conditions should be validated by comparing with the measurement of GFR using inulin clearance, a highly accurate measure of GFR. Our aim was to validate the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations by comparing it to the GFR measured using inulin clearance in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Cross-sectional study performed in adult Saudi patients with CKD. King Saud University Affiliated Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in 2014. We compared GFR measured by inulin clearance with the estimated GFR calculated using CKD-EPI and MDRD predictive formulas. Correlation, bias, precision and accuracy between the estimated GFR and inulin clearance. Comparisons were made in 31 participants (23 CKD and 8 transplanted), including 19 males (mean age 42.2 [15] years and weight 68.7 [18] kg). GFR using inulin was 51.54 (33.8) mL/min/1.73 m2 in comparison to inulin clearance, the GFR by the predictive equations was: CKD-EPI creatinine 52.6 (34.4) mL/ min/1.73 m2 (P=.490), CKD-EPI cystatin C 41.39 (30.30) mL/min/1.73 m2 (P=.002), CKD creatinine-cystatin C 45.03 (30.9) mL/min/1.73 m2 (P=.004) and MDRD GFR 48.35 (31.5) mL/min/1.73 m2 (P=.028) (statistical comparisons vs inulin). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated that GFR estimated by the CKD-EPI creatinine was the most accurate compared with inulin clearance, having a mean difference (estimated bias) and limits of agreement of -1.1 (15.6,-17.7). By comparison the mean differences for predictive equations were: CKD-EPI cystatin C 10.2 (43.7,-23.4), CKD creatinine-cystatin C 6.5 (29.3,-16.3) and MDRD 3.2 (18.3,-11.9). except for CKD-EPI creatinine, all of the equations underestimated GFR in comparison with inulin clearance. When compared with inulin clearance, the CKD-EPI creatinine equation is the most accurate, precise and least biased equation for estimation of GFR

  15. Mobile Health to Maintain Continuity of Patient-Centered Care for Chronic Kidney Disease: Content Analysis of Apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ying-Li; Cui, Yan-Yan; Tu, Ming-Hsiang; Chen, Yu-Chi; Chang, Polun

    2018-04-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health problem with a high economic burden, which is particularly prevalent in Taiwan. Mobile health apps have been widely used to maintain continuity of patient care for various chronic diseases. To slow the progression of CKD, continuity of care is vital for patients' self-management and cooperation with health care professionals. However, the literature provides a limited understanding of the use of mobile health apps to maintain continuity of patient-centered care for CKD. This study identified apps related to the continuity of patient-centered care for CKD on the App Store, Google Play, and 360 Mobile Assistant, and explored the information and frequency of changes in these apps available to the public on different platforms. App functionalities, like patient self-management and patient management support for health care professionals, were also examined. We used the CKD-related keywords "kidney," "renal," "nephro," "chronic kidney disease," "CKD," and "kidney disease" in traditional Chinese, simplified Chinese, and English to search 3 app platforms: App Store, Google Play, and 360 Mobile Assistant. A total of 2 reviewers reached consensus on coding guidelines and coded the contents and functionalities of the apps through content analysis. After coding, Microsoft Office Excel 2016 was used to calculate Cohen kappa coefficients and analyze the contents and functionalities of the apps. A total of 177 apps related to patient-centered care for CKD in any language were included. On the basis of their functionality and content, 67 apps were recommended for patients. Among them, the most common functionalities were CKD information and CKD self-management (38/67, 57%), e-consultation (17/67, 25%), CKD nutrition education (16/67, 24%), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) calculators (13/67, 19%). In addition, 67 apps were recommended for health care professionals. The most common functionalities of these apps were

  16. Association of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE gene polymorphisms in Malaysian patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foo Nian Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a condition associated with progressive loss of kidney function and kidney damage. The two common causes of CKD are diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Other causes of CKD also include polycystic kidney disease, obstructive uropathy and primary glomerulonephritis. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE is a multi-ligand cell surface receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily and it has been associated with kidney disease in both non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Presently, data on the association between RAGE polymorphisms and CKD in the Malaysian population is limited, while numerous studies have reported associations of RAGE polymorphisms with diabetic complications in other populations. The present study aims to explore the possibility of using RAGE polymorphisms as candidate markers of CKD in Malaysian population by using association analysis. Methods: A total of 102 non-diabetic CKD patients, 204 diabetic CKD patients and 345 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. DNA isolated from blood samples were subjected to genotyping of RAGE G82S, −374T/A, −429T/C, 1704G/T and 2184A/G polymorphisms using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The 63-bp deletion, a polymorphism in the RAGE gene promoter, was genotyped using conventional PCR method and visualized using agarose gel electrophoresis. The collective frequencies of genotypes with at least one copy of the minor alleles of the four polymorphisms were compared between the non-diabetic CKD patients, diabetic CKD patients and healthy controls. Results: After adjustment of age, gender and ethnic groups in binary logistic regression analysis, the G82S CT + TT genotypes were associated with non-diabetic CKD patients when compared with diabetic CKD patients (p = 0.015, OR = 1.896, 95% CI = 1.132–3.176. After further adjustment of CKD comorbidities, the G82S CT + TT genotypes were still associated with non-diabetic CKD

  17. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were treated in a district hospital in the Northeast of Thailand. CKD was defined according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements of the patient were taken by review of medical records. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the likelihood of the association between HbA1c and CKD.Results: Among 4,050 participants, 1,027 (25.3% developed diabetic CKD. Older age (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 4.88, 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.71–6.42, p<0.05, female (AOR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.05–1.73, p<0.05, and hypertension (AOR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.21–1.91, p<0.05 were found as the risk factors of diabetic CKD. However, patients with high HbA1c (>6.5% were negatively associated with diabetic CKD (AOR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51–0.86, p<0.05.Conclusion: This study found patients with higher HbA1c level were not associated with diabetic CKD. Therefore, using the conventional cut-off values of HbA1c in diabetic CKD patients may be problematic in the clinical settings. Enhanced detection of glycemic status in patients with diabetic CKD is warranted to improve the outcome.

  18. WHO antiretroviral therapy guidelines 2010 and impact of tenofovir on chronic kidney disease in Vietnamese HIV-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Mizushima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The 2010 WHO antiretroviral therapy (ART guidelines have resulted in increased tenofovir use. Little is known about tenofovir-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD in HIV-infected Vietnamese with mean body weight of 55 kg. We evaluated the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in this country. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study was performed. METHODS: Clinical data on HIV-infected Vietnamese cohort were collected twice a year. To evaluate the prevalence of CKD, serum creatinine was measured in 771 patients in October 2011 and April 2012. CKD was defined as creatinine clearance less than 60 ml/min at both time points. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with CKD. RESULTS: Tenofovir use increased in Vietnam from 11.9% in April 2011 to 40.3% in April 2012. CKD was diagnosed in 7.3%, of which 7% was considered moderate and 0.3% was severe. Multivariate analysis of October-2011 data identified age per year-increase (OR: 1.229, 95%CI, 1.170-1.291, body weight per 1 kg-decrement (1.286, 1.193-1.386, and tenofovir use (2.715, 1.028-7.168 as risk factors for CKD. CONCLUSIONS: Older age, low body weight and tenofovir use were independent risk factors for CKD in Vietnam. Further longitudinal study is required to evaluate the impact of TDF on renal function in Vietnam and other countries with small-body weight patients.

  19. The ability of NT-proBNP to detect chronic heart failure and predict all-cause mortality is higher in elderly Chinese coronary artery disease patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Shihui Fu, Leiming Luo, Ping Ye, Shuangyan Yi, Yuan Liu, Bing Zhu, Liang Wang, Tiehui Xiao, Yongyi Bai Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China Objective: To analyze the relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and renal function, and compare the ability and cut-off thresholds of NT-proBNP to detect chronic heart failure (CHF and predict mortality in elderly Chinese coronary artery disease (CAD patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD. Methods: The study included 999 CAD patients older than 60 years. The endpoint was all-cause mortality over a mean follow-up period of 417 days. Results: The median age was 86 years (range: 60–104 years, and the median NT-proBNP level was 409.8 pg/mL. CKD was present in 358 patients. Three hundred and six patients were positive for CHF. One hundred and ten CKD patients and 105 non-CKD patients died. Not only CKD, but also estimated glomerular filtration rate independently affected NT-proBNP. NT-proBNP detected CHF with a cut-off value of 298.4 pg/mL in non-CKD patients and a cut-off value of 435.7 pg/mL in CKD patients. NT-proBNP predicted death with a cut-off value of 369.5 pg/mL in non-CKD patients and a cut-off value of 2584.1 pg/mL in CKD patients. The NT-proBNP level was significantly related to the prevalence of CHF and all-cause mortality in CAD patients with and without CKD; this effect persisted after adjustment. The crude and multiple adjusted hazard ratios of NT-proBNP to detect CHF and predict mortality were significantly higher in patients with CKD compared with the remainder of the population. The addition of NT-proBNP to the three-variable and six-variable models generated a significant increase in the C-statistic. Conclusion: Amongst elderly Chinese CAD patients, there was an independently inverse association between NT-proBNP and renal function. With the higher cutoff points, NT

  20. Eplerenone attenuates pulse wave reflection in chronic kidney disease stage 3-4--a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesby, Lene; Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Strandgaard, Svend

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity associated with increased arterial stiffness. Plasma aldosterone levels are increased in CKD, and aldosterone has been found to increase vascular inflammation and fibrosis. It was hypothesized...

  1. Clinical global assessment of nutritional status as predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Mukai, Hideyuki; Lindholm, Bengt; Heimbürger, Olof; Barany, Peter; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2017-01-01

    The value of subjective global assessment (SGA) as nutritional assessor of protein-energy wasting (PEWSGA) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients depends on its mortality predictive capacity. We investigated associations of PEWSGA with markers of nutritional status and all-cause mortality in CKD patients. In 1031 (732 CKD1-5 non-dialysis and 299 dialysis) patients, SGA and body (BMI), lean (LBMI) and fat (FBMI) body mass indices, % handgrip strength (% HGS), serum albumin, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were examined at baseline. The five-year all-cause mortality predictive strength of baseline PEWSGA and during follow-up were investigated. PEWSGA was present in 2% of CKD1-2, 16% of CKD3-4, 31% of CKD5 non-dialysis and 44% of dialysis patients. Patients with PEWSGA (n = 320; 31%) had higher hsCRP and lower BMI, LBMI, FBMI, %HGS and serum albumin. But, using receiver operating characteristics-derived cutoffs, these markers could not classify (by kappa statistic) or explain variations of (by multinomial logistic regression analysis) presence of PEWSGA. In generalized linear models, SGA independently predicted mortality after adjustments of multiple confounders (RR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.23). Among 323 CKD5 patients who were re-assessed after median 12.6 months, 222 (69%) remained well-nourished, 37 (11%) developed PEWSGA de novo, 40 (12%) improved while 24 (8%) remained with PEWSGA. The latter independently predicted mortality (RR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.13-1.46). SGA, a valid assessor of nutritional status, is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality both in CKD non-dialysis and dialysis patients that outperforms non-composite nutritional markers as prognosticator.

  2. The Kidney Awareness Registry and Education (KARE) study: protocol of a randomized controlled trial to enhance provider and patient engagement with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuot, Delphine S; Velasquez, Alexandra; McCulloch, Charles E; Banerjee, Tanushree; Zhu, Yunnuo; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Handley, Margaret; Schillinger, Dean; Powe, Neil R

    2015-10-22

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and is associated with excess mortality and morbidity. Better management could slow progression of disease, prevent metabolic complications, and reduce cardiovascular outcomes. Low patient awareness of CKD and ineffective patient-provider communication can impede such efforts. We developed provider and patient-directed interventions that harness health information technology to enhance provider recognition of CKD and delivery of guideline concordant care and augment patient understanding and engagement in CKD care. We report the design and protocol of the Kidney Awareness Registry and Education (KARE) Study, a 2x2 factorial randomized controlled trial that examines the impact of a multi-level intervention on health outcomes among low-income English, Spanish and Cantonese-speaking patients with CKD in a safety net system. The intervention includes: (1) implementation of a primary care electronic CKD registry that notifies practice teams of patients' CKD status and employs a patient profile and quarterly feedback to encourage provision of guideline-concordant care at point-of-care and via outreach; and (2) a language-concordant, culturally-sensitive self-management support program that consists of automated telephone modules, provision of low-literacy written patient-educational materials and telephone health coaching. The primary outcomes of the trial are changes in systolic blood pressure (BP) and the proportion of patients with BP control (≤ 140/90 mmHg) after one year. Secondary outcomes include patient understanding of CKD, participation in healthy behaviors, and practice team delivery of guideline-concordant CKD care. Results from the KARE study will provide data on the feasibility, effectiveness, and acceptability of technology-based interventions that support primary care efforts at improving health outcomes among vulnerable patients with CKD. ClinicalTrials.gov, number: NCT01530958.

  3. Analysis of survival for patients with chronic kidney disease primarily related to renal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jitao; Suk-Ouichai, Chalairat; Dong, Wen; Antonio, Elvis Caraballo; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Lane, Brian R; Demirjian, Sevag; Li, Jianbo; Campbell, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate predictors of long-term survival for patients with chronic kidney disease primarily due to surgery (CKD-S). Patients with CKD-S have generally good survival that approximates patients who do not have CKD even after renal cancer surgery (RCS), yet there may be heterogeneity within this cohort. From 1997 to 2008, 4 246 patients underwent RCS at our centre. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up was 9.4 (7.3-11.0) years. New baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was defined as highest GFR between nadir and 6 weeks after RCS. We retrospectively evaluated three cohorts: no-CKD (new baseline GFR of ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ); CKD-S (new baseline GFR of cancer-related survival (NRCRS) for the CKD-S cohort. Kaplan-Meier analysis assessed the longitudinal impact of new baseline GFR (45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 vs <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and Cox regression evaluated relative impact of preoperative GFR, new baseline GFR, and relevant demographics/comorbidities. Of the 4 246 patients who underwent RCS, 931 had CKD-S and 1 113 had CKD-M/S, whilst 2 202 had no-CKD even after RCS. Partial/radical nephrectomy (PN/RN) was performed in 54%/46% of the patients, respectively. For CKD-S, 641 patients had a new baseline GFR of 45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and 290 had a new baseline GFR of <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly reduced NRCRS for patients with CKD-S with a GFR of <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 compared to those with no-CKD or CKD-S with a GFR of 45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (both P ≤ 0.004), and competing risk analysis confirmed this (P < 0.001). Age, gender, heart disease, and new baseline GFR were all associated independently with NRCRS for patients with CKD-S (all P ≤ 0.02). Our data suggest that CKD-S is heterogeneous, and patients with a reduced new baseline GFR have compromised survival, particularly if <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Our findings may have implications regarding choice of PN/RN in patients at risk of developing

  4. Attitudes in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease Toward Prenatal Diagnosis and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Oscar; Vilar, Enric; Rahman, Belinda; Side, Lucy; Gale, Daniel P

    2016-12-01

    No recommendations currently exist regarding implementation of both prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). This study evaluated attitudes in ADPKD patients with either chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages I-IV or end-stage renal failure (ESRF) toward prenatal diagnosis and PGD. Ninety-six ADPKD patients were recruited from an outpatient clinic, wards, and dialysis units. Thirty-eight patients had ESRF and 58 had CKD stages I-IV. Participants were given an information sheet on prenatal diagnosis and PGD and subsequently completed a questionnaire. The median age of participants was 51.5 years. Seventeen percent of ADPKD patients with CKD and 18% of ADPKD patients with ESRF would consider prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy for ADPKD. Fifty percent with CKD would have opted for PGD (or might consider it in the future) were it available and funded by the UK National Health Service, compared to 63% in the ESRF group (p = 0.33). Sixty-nine percent in the CKD group and 68% in the ESRF group believed that PGD should be offered to other patients. There was a spectrum of attitudes among this cohort. A proportion of patients believe that PGD should be made available to prospective parents with this disease. The discrepancy between the low proportion (17% CKD, 18% ESRF) who would consider prenatal diagnosis and termination of pregnancy and the higher number who hypothetically express an intention or wish to access PGD (50% CKD and 63% ESRF) indicates far greater acceptability for diagnostic methods that occur before embryo implantation. It is not known how the development of methods to identify patients whose renal function is likely to decline rapidly and treatments altering the natural history of ADPKD will affect these attitudes.

  5. Dietary antioxidents and oxidative stress in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L Gupta, Krishan; Sahni, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Dietary antioxidants are important in protecting against human diseases. Oxidative stress, a non- traditional risk factors of cardio-vascular disease is far more prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients than in normal subjects. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. Oxidative stress could be a consequence of an increase in reactive oxygen species as well as a decrease in antioxidant defenses. Among the important factors that can be involved in triggering oxidative stress is insufficient dietary intake of antioxidants. Malnourished CKD patients are reported to have more oxidative stress than well nourished ones. Moving beyond the importance of assessment of dietary protein and energy in pre dialysis CKD patients to the assessment of dietary antioxidants is of utmost importance to help combat enhanced oxidative stress levels in such patients.

  6. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038......, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients....

  7. The Analysis of Asymetric Dimethylarginine and Homocysteine in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetty Hendrawati

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA is a competitive inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. ADMA reduces NO synthesis when its concentration elevates. ADMA is a novel risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Plasma ADMA accumulates in patients with endstage renal disease, due to reduced renal clearance. Hyperhomocysteinemia is often found in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Homocysteine may cause ADMA to accumulate; however, the mechanism by which ADMA level elevates in hyperhomocysteinemia is still unclear. Objective of this study was to analyze the concentrations of homocysteine and ADMA and to assess the correlation between homocysteine and ADMA concentrations with the severity of chronic kidney disease. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study on 75 patients with CKD, comprising men and women aged 40-70 years. Assessments were done on the concentrations of creatinine, homocysteine, ADMA, fasting blood glucose, cholesterol HDL and triglyceride. RESULTS: In later stage of CKD there was significantly higher tHcy concentration as compared with the earlier stage of CKD (p=0.0000. In CKD stage 2 to 4 there was a tendency for ADMA concentration to increase to a significant average (p=0.210, but ADMA concentration was lower at stage 5. There was increased ADMA along with increased tHcy concentration of around 20μ mol/L, and this then decreased. The inverse correlation between tHcy and ADMA concentrations started to appear in CKD stage 4, but this correlation was statistically insignificant (r2=0.19; p=0.499. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed there was a correlation between homocysteine and ADMA concentrations in patients with CKD stage 2 to 5, although statistically not significant. KEYWORDS: asymmetric dimethylarginine, homocysteine, chronic kidney disease.

  8. High serum bicarbonate level within the normal range prevents the progression of chronic kidney disease in elderly chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanda Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic acidosis leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. The guidelines recommend a lower limit of serum bicarbonate level, but no upper limit. For serum bicarbonate level to be clinically useful as a therapeutic target marker, it is necessary to investigate the target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range to prevent CKD progression. Methods One hundred and thirteen elderly CKD patients, whose serum bicarbonate level was controlled within the normal range, were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study in Ibaraki, Japan. Outcome was defined as a decrease of 25% or more in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR or starting dialysis. We used Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for patients’ characteristics to examine the association between serum bicarbonate level and the outcome. Results Female patients were 36.3%: average age (SD, 70.4 (6.6 years; eGFR, 25.7 (13.6 ml/min/1.73 m2; serum bicarbonate level, 27.4 (3.2 mEq/l. Patients with the lowest quartile of serum bicarbonate levels [23.4 (1.8 mEq/l] showed a high risk of CKD progression compared with patients with high serum bicarbonate levels [28.8 (2.3 mEq/l]: adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 3.511 (95% CI, 1.342-9.186. A 1 mEq/l increase in serum bicarbonate level was associated with a low risk of CKD progression: adjusted HR, 0.791 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.684-0.914]. Conclusions In elderly CKD patients, our findings suggest that serum bicarbonate level is independently associated with CKD progression, and that a high serum bicarbonate level is associated with a low risk of CKD progression. A high target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range may be effective for preventing CKD progression.

  9. Self-rated appetite as a predictor of mortality in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama-Axelsson, Thiane; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the level of anorexia and its correlation with mortality in chronic kidney disease stage 5 patients not yet on dialysis (CKD5-ND) and in those with stage 5 chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis (CKD5-D). In an observational study, self-rated appetite (as part of a subjective global assessment of nutritional status), along with anthropometrics and biochemical markers of nutritional status, was analyzed in relation to survival. In a subgroup of patients, appetite change after start of dialysis was studied prospectively. Two hundred eighty CKD5-ND (40% female; age 54 ± 12 years; glomerular filtration rate 7 ± 2 mL/minute) and 243 CKD5-D patients (116 hemodialysis and 127 peritoneal dialysis [PD]; 44% female; age 54 ± 12 years; dialysis vintage time 12 ± 2 months) who had been on dialysis for about 1 year were studied. CKD5-ND patients with poor appetite (50%) had a higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease, lower body weight and serum creatinine level, and higher C-reactive protein. CKD5-D patients with poor appetite (33%) had impaired subjective global assessment of nutritional status and lower body weight, fat body mass, handgrip strength, hemoglobin, and serum albumin level. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, appetite was not associated with survival difference, whereas in the Cox proportional hazards model with competing risk analysis, poor appetite increased mortality risk in PD patients but not in hemodialysis and CKD5-ND patients. In CKD5-ND patients, self-rated appetite was not an independent predictor of 48-months survival, whereas there was a significant increase in mortality risk in PD patients with poor appetite. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Profile of chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in newly diagnosed advanced predialysis diabetic kidney disease patients: A hospital based cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, S; Beatrice, A M; Ghosh, A; Pramanik, S; Bhattacharjee, R; Ghosh, S; Raychaudhury, A; Mukhopadhyay, S; Chowdhury, S

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD population. There are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in diabetic CKD patients. Therefore, a study was conducted to find out the profile of mineral bone disorders in T2DM patients with pre-dialysis CKD. In this cross-sectional design, diabetic patients with newly-diagnosed stage 4 and 5 CKD were evaluated. Serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), 25 hydroxy vitamin D and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in all patients. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). A total of 72 eligible patients participated (44 males, 28 females; age 54.2±11.7). Patients with CKD Stage 5 had a lower level of corrected serum calcium and significantly higher level of inorganic phosphorus, total ALP and iPTH as compared to stage 4 patients. Overall, 38.5% were hypocalcemic, 31.43% were hyperphosphatemic. 24.2% of CKD subjects were vitamin D deficient (110pg/ml) was detected in nearly 43% of patients. In stage 5, only 32% patients was found to have hyperparathyroidism (iPTH>300pg/ml). There was a good correlation between iPTH and total ALP (r=0.5, p=0.0001) in this cohort. 25 (OH) vitamin D was inversely correlated with ALP (r=-0.39, P=0.001) and showed negative correlation with urine ACR (r=-0.37, P=0.002). As a group, the osteoporotic CKD subjects exhibited higher iPTH (220.1±153.8 vs. 119±108pg/ml, p<0.05) as compared to those who were osteopenic or had normal bone density. There was significant correlation between BMD and iPTH (adjusted r=-0.436; P=0.001). In the multivariate regression model, we found intact PTH to predict BMD even after adjustment of all the confounders. The current study showed that adynamic bone disease is prevalent even in pre-dialysis CKD population. High bone turnover disease may not be the most prevalent type in diabetic CKD. However, it

  11. ESRD After Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, or Stroke in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With CKD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charytan, David M; Solomon, Scott D; Ivanovich, Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: How cardiovascular (CV) events affect progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD), particularly in the setting of type 2 diabetes, remains uncertain. STUDY DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: 4,022 patients with type 2 diabetes, anemia, and chronic kidney disease from......, are strongly associated with risk for ESRD. These findings underscore the need for kidney-specific therapies in addition to treatment of CV risk factors to lower ESRD incidence in diabetes....... and during overall follow-up after an intercurrent CV event. LIMITATIONS: Population limited to clinical trial participants with diabetes and anemia. RESULTS: 155 of 652 (23.8%) ESRD cases occurred after an intercurrent CV event; 110 (16.9%) cases followed heart failure, 28 (4.3%) followed myocardial...

  12. Association between medication adherence and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkiatkumjai, Mayuree; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat; Boardman, Helen

    2017-06-01

    There is limited evidence of medication adherence related to progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine associations between medication adherence and the progression of CKD in outpatients with CKD. This cohort study recruited 339 Thai patients with stages 3-5 CKD. Patients with a glomerular disease or receiving renal replacement therapy before recruitment were excluded. 295 were followed up regarding their serum creatinine, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol over 12 months. Medication adherence was measured at baseline using the Thai version of the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale ® . The primary outcome was the progression of CKD. The progression of CKD was defined as either a decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 3 ml/min/1.73 m 2 /year or initiation of renal replacement therapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using Chi-squared tests and multiple logistic regressions. Twenty-one percent had poor adherence. Younger patients were more likely to have poor adherence (adjusted OR 2.81, 95 % CI 1.45-5.43). Anti-hypertensive agents were the most frequently reported as not being taken (52 %). Patients with poor adherence were associated with the progression of CKD (adjusted OR 1.96, 95 % CI 1.02-3.76). Those with poor adherence were less likely to control their blood pressure, than moderate-to-high adherence group (p < 0.01). The findings suggest that CKD patients with poor medication adherence are more likely to have progression of CKD. Health care providers should acknowledge these findings and provide effective strategies to deal with this issue.

  13. How does CKD affect HbA1c?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Zachary; Handelsman, Yehuda

    2018-04-01

    HOW DOES CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AFFECT HBA1C?: A number of factors determine HbA1c other than the level of glucose exposure alone. In an subset analysis of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study of 941 diabetic people with varying degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as 724 who did not have CKD, and mean age in the eighth decade, Jung et al. ask whether HbA1c is reliable as an indicator of glycemia in people with kidney disease (CKD) to the same degree as in those not having kidney disease, and, if not, whether measures of glycated serum proteins may be more useful. The only available measure of glycemia for comparison was a single fasting glucose level, and the authors acknowledge that this gives an incomplete measure, particularly in people with relatively mild diabetes, whose mean HbA1c was 6.4%, with most having levels of 7.5% or lower. In patients of this sort, postprandial glucose levels may better explain variations in mean HbA1c. Recognizing that the dataset may be limited, Jung et al. nevertheless give an intriguingly negative answer to the first question, of the reliability of HbA1c with kidney disease. Using Deming regression analysis, Jung et al. showed that the correlation between HbA1c and fasting glucose weakens as renal function worsens, and, moreover, that this appears particularly to be the case in people with anemia (hemoglobin men and women, respectively), confirming earlier observations. Among those diabetic people with neither anemia nor CKD, the correlation coefficient between HbA1c and fasting glucose was r = 0.70, compared with r = 0.35 among those with both anemia and very severe CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] perform SMBG to more adequately interpret HbA1c results. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Validity and reproducibility of a short food frequency questionnaire among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affret, Aurélie; Wagner, Sandra; El Fatouhi, Douae; Dow, Courtney; Correia, Emmanuelle; Niravong, Maryvonne; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; De Chefdebien, Julie; Fouque, Denis; Stengel, Bénédicte; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy

    2017-09-15

    A balanced diet is essential to slowing the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and managing the symptoms. Currently, no tool is available to easily and quickly assess energy and macronutrient intake in patients with non end-stage CKD. We aimed to develop and evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a new short 49-item food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) adapted to patients with CKD. The CKD-REIN study is a prospective cohort that enrolled 3033 patients with moderate or advanced CKD from a national sample of nephrology clinics. A sub-sample of 201 patients completed the SFFQ twice, at a one-year interval and were included in the reproducibility study. During this interval, 127 patients also completed six 24-h recalls and were included in the validity study. Main nutrient and dietary intakes were computed. Validity was evaluated by calculating crude, energy-adjusted and de-attenuated correlation coefficients (CC) between FFQ and the mean of the 24-h recall results. Bland-Altman plots were performed and cross-classification into quintiles of consumption of each nutrient and food group was computed. Reproducibility between the two SFFQs was evaluated by intraclass CC (ICC). Regarding validity, CC ranged from 0.05 to 0.79 (unadjusted CC, median: 0.40) and 0.10 to 0.59 (de-attenuated CC, median: 0.35) for food group and nutrient intakes, respectively. Five of the most important nutrients of interest in CKD, i.e. protein, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium had de-attenuated CC of 0.46, 0.43, 0.39, 0.32, and 0.12, respectively. The median of classification into the same or adjacent quintiles was 68% and 65% for food and nutrient intakes, respectively, and ranged from 63% to 69% for the five nutrients mentioned before. Bland-Altman plots showed good agreement across the range of intakes. ICC ranged from 0.18 to 0.66 (median: 0.46). The CKD-REIN SFFQ showed acceptable validity and reproducibility in a sample of patients with CKD, notably for CKD

  15. Dietary protein intake in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukkipati, Ramanath; Noori, Nazanin; Feroze, Usama; Kopple, Joel D

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly those with stage 5 CKD, have protein wasting. The degree to which increased morbidity and mortality seen in these patients is due to protein depletion rather than to the often accompanying comorbidity is not clear. High protein diets lead to the accumulation of metabolites of protein that are potentially toxic. The MDRD Study, which investigated the effects of three levels of dietary protein and phosphorus intakes and two blood pressure goals on the progression of CKD, has several limitations. Several meta-analyses have examined the effects of low protein diets (LPD) on the progression of CKD. It is possible that the lower SUN levels or lesser degree of uremic symptoms may have contributed to the positive findings of LPD in the meta-analyses of Fouque and Pedrini et al., when compared with the study of Kasiske et al. A number of published reports indicate that LPD provide adequate protein for almost all clinically stable CKD patients and do not adversely affect body composition. In general, there are no large differences in the protein intake recommended by different expert groups for a given stage of CKD.

  16. Aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanasambandan Ramanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common heritable kidney disease and is characterized by bilateral renal cysts. Hypertension is a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD and mortality in patients with ADPKD. The aldosterone synthase gene polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The present study is aimed to investigate the potential modifier effect of CYP11B2 gene on the progression of CKD in ADPKD. One hundred and two ADPKD patients and 106 healthy controls were recruited based on Ravine inclusion and exclusion criteria. The three tag-SNPs within CYP11B2 gene (rs3802230, rs4543, and rs4544 were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to assess the potential associations between these polymorphisms and CKD stages. Mantel- Haenszel stratified analysis was used to explore confounding and interaction effects of these polymorphisms. Of the three tag-SNPs genotyped, rs4544 polymorphism was monomorphic and rs3802230 deviated Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The CYP11B2 tag-SNPs did not show significant association with ADPKD or CKD. Further, these polymorphisms did not exhibit confounding effect on the relationship between CKD progression and hypertension. Our results suggest that aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of CKD in South Indian ADPKD patients.

  17. The link between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Sarmad; Hernandez, German T

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a strong risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the excess risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with CKD is only partially explained by the presence of traditional risk factors, such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed, EBSCO and Web of Science has been searched. Chronic kidney disease even in its early stages can cause hypertension and potentiate the risk for cardiovascular disease. However, the practice of intensive blood pressure lowering was criticized in recent systematic reviews. Available evidence is inconclusive but does not prove that a blood pressure target of less than 130/80 mmHg as recommended in the guidelines improves clinical outcomes more than a target of less than 140/90 mmHg in adults with CKD. The association between CKD and CVD has been extensively documented in the literature. Both CKD and CVD share common traditional risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia. However, cardiovascular disease remains often underdiagnosed und undertreated in patients with CKD. It is imperative that as clinicians, we recognize that patients with CKD are a group at high risk for developing CVD and cardiovascular events. Additional studies devoted to further understand the risk factors for CVD in patients with CKD are necessary to develop and institute preventative and treatment strategies to reduce the high morbidity and mortality in patients with CKD.

  18. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and progression of disease over time among patients enrolled in the Houston West Nile virus cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S Nolan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In experimental models of West Nile virus (WNV infection, animals develop chronic kidney infection with histopathological changes in the kidney up to 8-months post-infection. However, the long term pathologic effects of acute infection in humans are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess renal outcomes following WNV infection, specifically the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: In a cohort of 139 study participants with a previous diagnosis of WNV infection, we investigated the prevalence of CKD using the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI criteria based on the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula and urinary abnormalities, and assessed various risk factors and biomarkers. RESULTS: Study participants were primarily male (60% and non-Hispanic white (86% with a mean age of 57 years. Most (83% were four to nine years post-infection at the time of this study. Based on the KDOQI definition, 40% of participants had evidence of CKD, with 10% having Stage III or greater and 30% having Stage I-II. By urinary dipstick testing, 26% of patients had proteinuria and 23% had hematuria. Plasma NGAL levels were elevated in 14% of participants while MCP-1 levels were increased in 12%. Over 1.5 years, the average change in eGFR was -3.71 mL/min/1.73 m(2. Only a history of Neuroinvasive WNV disease was independently associated with CKD following multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION: We found a high prevalence of CKD after long term follow-up in a cohort of participants previously infected with WNV. The majority of those with CKD are in Stage I-II indicating early stages of renal disease. Traditional risk factors were not associated with the presence of CKD in this population. Therefore, clinicians should regularly evaluate all patients with a history of WNV for evidence of CKD.

  19. Community-based study on CKD subjects and the associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Weiming; Huang, Yanping; Shen, Pingyan; Pei, Daoling; Yu, Haijin; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Qianying; Xu, Jing; Lv, Yilun; Fan, Qishi

    2009-07-01

    The study was performed to investigate the prevalence, awareness and the risk factors of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the community population in Shanghai, China. A total of 2596 residents were randomly recruited from the community population in Shanghai, China. All were screened for albuminuria, haematuria, morning spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and renal function. Serum creatinine, uric acid, cholesterol, triglyceride and haemoglobin were assessed. A simplified MDRD equation was used to estimate the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). All studied subjects were screened by kidney ultrasound. Haematuria, if present in the morning spot urine dipstick test, was confirmed by microscopy. The associations among the demographic characteristics, health characteristics and indicators of kidney damage were examined. Two thousand five hundred and fifty-four residents (n = 2554), after giving informed consent and with complete data, were entered into this study. Albuminuria and haematuria were detected in 6.3% and 1.2% of all the studied subjects, respectively, whereas decreased kidney function was found in 5.8% of all studied subjects. Approximately 11.8% of subjects had at least one indicator of kidney damage. The rate of awareness of CKD was 8.2%. The logistic regression model showed that age, central obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anaemia, hyperuricaemia and nephrolithiasis each contributed to the development of CKD. This is the first Shanghai community-based epidemiological study data on Chinese CKD patients. The prevalence of CKD in the community population in Shanghai is 11.8%, and the rate of awareness of CKD is 8.2%. All the factors including age, central obesity, hypertension, diabetes, anaemia, hyperuricaemia and nephrolithiasis are positively correlated with the development of CKD in our studied subjects.

  20. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Resistant starch alters gut microbiota and reduces uremic retention solutes in rats with adenine-induced chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by the reduced ability to void urine, leading to accumulation of waste products in the body. Recently, it has been observed that patients with CKD have an altered gut microbiome. This may in part be due to reduced fiber intake. Patients with CKD are ofte...

  2. Association between Low Dietary Protein Intake and Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Single-Center Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aki Kiuchi; Yasushi Ohashi; Reibin Tai; Toshiyuki Aoki; Sonoo Mizuiri; Toyoko Ogura; Atsushi Aikawa; Ken Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary protein intake in malnourished patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with adverse clinical outcomes, which may mask any efficacy of a low-protein diet. The study included 126 patients with CKD who attended a dedicated dietary counseling clinic in 2005–2009 and were systematically followed until January 2015. Of these patients, 20 (15.9%) had moderate or severe nutrition-related risk of geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) < 92; these patients were ...

  3. Oral health in patients with chronic kidney disease - emphasis on periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Karita

    2017-01-01

    ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE - EMPHASIS ON PERIODONTITIS Background: Periodontitis is a common bacteria-induced chronic inflammatory disease with mild symptoms. It leads to destruction of the periodontium and finally to tooth loss in a susceptible patient. Periodontitis is associated with many systemic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) through low-grade systemic inflammation. However, no causality c...

  4. Patient's perceptions of chronic kidney disease and their association with psychosocial and clinical outcomes: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Amy L; Yates, Thomas; Smith, Alice C; Chilcot, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) form organized beliefs regarding their illness and treatment. These perceptions influence the coping strategies employed by an individual to manage his/her illness and may act as a predictor for his/her willingness to engage in self-management behaviours. While illness perceptions have been identified as predictors of non-adherence, depression and mortality in dialysis patients, there is a paucity of research in CKD patients not requiring renal replacement therapy. This narrative review synthesizes the existing literature regarding the role of illness perceptions and associated clinical and psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Studies were identified following database searches of AMED, BNI, CINAHL, EMBASE, Health Business Elite, HMIC, Medline, PsycINFO and Google Scholar in January 2016. Despite the small evidence base, existing studies indicate that negative illness perceptions are associated with disease progression and a number of psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Evidence from other clinical populations suggests that illness perceptions are modifiable through psychological intervention, which may be most effective if delivered early before beliefs have the chance to become more established. Therefore, targeting illness perceptions in the earlier stages of CKD may be optimal. Further studies are now required to ascertain the mechanisms through which illness perceptions predict psychosocial and clinical outcomes in CKD patients and to ultimately test the efficacy of illness perception-based interventions.

  5. Epidemiology of hypertensive kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Suneel; Lazich, Ivana; Bakris, George L

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributable to hypertension continues to rise worldwide. Identifying the precise prevalence of CKD attributable to hypertension is difficult owing to the absence of uniform criteria to establish a diagnosis of hypertensive nephropathy. Despite the increasing prevalence of CKD-associated hypertension, awareness of hypertension among individuals with CKD remains suboptimal and rates of blood-pressure control remain poor. Targeted subgroups involved in studies of CKD seem to reach better rates of blood-pressure control, suggesting that this therapeutic goal can be achieved in patients with CKD. Elevated blood-pressure levels are associated with CKD progression. However, the optimal blood-pressure level and pharmacological agent remains unclear. Physicians treating patients with CKD must recognize the importance of maintaining optimal salt and volume balance to achieve blood-pressure goals. Furthermore, agents that modify the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis can be an important adjunct to therapy and physicians must monitor expected changes in serum creatinine and electrolyte levels after their administration. Hypertension remains a common factor complicating CKD. Future investigations identifying early signs of hypertension-related CKD, increasing awareness of the effects of hypertension in CKD and determining optimal therapeutic interventions might help reduce the incidence of hypertensive nephropathy.

  6. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Beto, Judith A.; Schury,Katherine; Bansal,Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coor...

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Pharmacy Education on Infection Management Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in an Indonesian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Azizah; Sulaiman, SA. Syed; Shafie, A.A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the clinical and economic impacts of clinical pharmacy education (CPE) on infection management among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Indonesia. Methods A quasi-experimental economic evaluation comparing CPE impact on 6-month CKD mortality was conducted on the basis of payer perspective. The experimental group (n = 63) received care by health care providers who were given CPE on drug-related probl...

  8. Knowledge regarding the prevention of chronic kidney disease in hypertensive and diabetic patients: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Elaine Cristina Santa Cruz de; Barbosa, Jefferson Belarmino Nunes; Marinho, Patrícia Érika de Melo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Hypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) lead to functional and structural changes in target organs such as the kidneys, characterizing the need for preventive actions to avoid Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Objective: To verify cardiologists’ and endocrinologists’ knowledge, indications and practices regarding prevention of CKD in patients with HT and DM. Methods: A cross-sectional study with 14 cardiologists and 5 endocrinologists applying a questionnaire about ...

  9. Protein-restricted diets plus keto/amino acids--a valid therapeutic approach for chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Michel; Bellizzi, Vincenzo; Chauveau, Philippe; Cupisti, Adamasco; Ecder, Tevfik; Fouque, Denis; Garneata, Liliana; Lin, Shanyan; Mitch, William E; Teplan, Vladimír; Zakar, Gábor; Yu, Xueqing

    2012-03-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly common, and there is an increasing awareness that every strategy should be used to avoid complications of CKD. Restriction of dietary protein intake has been a relevant part of the management of CKD for more than 100 years, but even today, the principal goal of protein-restricted regimens is to decrease the accumulation of nitrogen waste products, hydrogen ions, phosphates, and inorganic ions while maintaining an adequate nutritional status to avoid secondary problems such as metabolic acidosis, bone disease, and insulin resistance, as well as proteinuria and deterioration of renal function. This supplement focuses on recent experimental and clinical findings related to an optimized dietary management of predialysis, dialysis, and transplanted patients as an important aspect of patient care. Nutritional treatment strategies are linked toward ameliorating metabolic and endocrine disturbances, improving/maintaining nutritional status, as well as delaying the renal replacement initiation and improving outcomes in CKD patients. A final consensus states that dietary manipulations should be considered as one of the main approaches in the management program of CKD patients and that a reasonable number of patients with moderate or severe CKD benefit from dietary protein/phosphorus restriction. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate in people older than 85: Comparisons between CKD-EPI, MDRD-IDMS and BIS1 equations

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    Fernando Bustos-Guadaño

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: The GFR estimations obtained with BS1 equation are not interchangeable with MDRD-IDMS or CKD-EPI equations. BIS1 estimates lower GFR values than MDRD-IDMS and CKD-EPI and tends to classify the patients in a more advanced chronic kidney disease stage, especially for estimated GFR higher than 29 mL/min/1.73 m2.

  11. Prevalence and predictors of chronic kidney disease in newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus patients in Owerri, Nigeria

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    E N Anyabolu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is a common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study aims at identifying the prevalence and predictors of CKD in newly diagnosed HIV patients in Owerri, South East Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study consisting of 393 newly diagnosed HIV-seropositive subjects and 136 age- and sex-matched seronegative subjects as controls. CKD was defined as 24-hour urine protein (24-HUP ≥0.3 g and/or glomerular filtration rate (GFR < 60 ml/min. Subjects were recruited from the HIV clinic and the Medical Outpatient Department of Federal Medical Centre, Owerri. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected. Relevant investigations were performed, including HIV screening and relevant urine and blood investigations. The mean age of the HIV subjects was 38.84 ± 10.65 years. CKD was present in 86 (22.9% HIV subjects and 11 (8.l % controls. Low waist circumference (WC, high serum creatinine, high spot urine protein/creatinine ratio (SUPCR, high 24-HUP/creatinine Ratio (24-HUPCR, high 24-HUP/osmolality Ratio (24-HUPOR predicted CKD in HIV subjects. CKD prevalence is high (22.9% among newly diagnosed HIV patients in South East Nigeria. The predictors of CKD included WC, serum creatinine, SUPCR, 24-HUPCR, and 24-HUPOR.

  12. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in newly diagnosed patients with Human immunodeficiency virus in Ilorin, Nigeria.

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    Ayokunle, Dada Samuel; Olusegun, Olanrewaju Timothy; Ademola, Aderibigbe; Adindu, Chijioke; Olaitan, Rafiu Mojeed; Oladimeji, Ajayi Akande

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) the causative agent of Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an important cause of renal diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. There is paucity of studies on the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with HIV/AIDS in the North-Central zone of Nigeria. This is a cross-sectional study of 227 newly-diagnosed, antiretroviral naïve patients with HIV/AIDS seen at the HIV clinic of the Medical Out-patient Department (MOPD) of University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH). They were matched with 108 control group. Laboratory investigations were performed for the participants. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 30 mg/g. There were 100 (44%) males among the patients and 47 (43.5%) among the control group. The mean ages of the patients and controls were 40.3 ± 10.3 years and 41.8 ± 9.5 years respectively. CKD was observed in 108 (47.6%) among the patients and 18 (16.7%) of the controls (p = 0.01). The median CD4 T-cell count was significantly lower in patients with CKD. Ninety-three (41.0%) of the patients had dipstick proteinuria of > 2 +. The median albumin creatinine ratio (ACR) was significantly higher among the HIV-positive patients (272.3 mg/g) compared with the HIV-negative controls (27.22 mg/g) p = 0.01. The CD4 T-cell count correlates positively with eGFR (r = 0.463, p = 0.001) and negatively with ACR (r = -0.806, p = 0.001). CKD is very common among patients with HIV/AIDS in Ilorin. Screening and early intervention for CKD should be part of the protocols in the management of these patients.

  13. Evaluation of Renal Blood Flow and Oxygenation in CKD Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

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    Khatir, Dinah S; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Animal studies suggest that progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is related to renal hypoxia. With renal blood supply determining oxygen delivery and sodium absorption being the main contributor to oxygen consumption, we describe the relationship between renal oxygenation, renal artery blood flow, and sodium absorption in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Cross-sectional study. 62 stable patients with CKD stages 3 to 4 (mean age, 61±13 [SD] years) and 24 age- and sex-matched controls. CKD versus control status. Renal artery blood flow, tissue oxygenation (relative changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration of the renal medulla [MR2*] and cortex [CR2*]), and sodium absorption. Renal artery blood flow was determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); MR2* and CR2* were determined by blood oxygen level-dependent MRI. Ultrafiltered and reabsorbed sodium were determined from measured glomerular filtration rate (mGFR) and 24-hour urine collections. mGFR in patients was 37% that of controls (36±15 vs 97±23 mL/min/1.73 m(2); P renal artery blood flow was 72% that of controls (319 vs 443 mL/min; P renal artery blood flow or sodium absorption. Increasing arterial blood oxygen tension by breathing 100% oxygen had very small effects on CR2*, but reduced MR2* in both groups. Only renal artery blood flow was determined and thus regional perfusion could not be related to CR2* or MR2*. In CKD, reductions of mGFR and reabsorbed sodium are more than double that of renal artery blood flow, whereas cortical and medullary oxygenation are within the range of healthy persons. Reduction in glomerular filtration fraction may prevent renal hypoxia in CKD. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heart Failure in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Integrative Review

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    Liviu Segall

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Heart failure (HF is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD and is strongly associated with mortality in these patients. However, the treatment of HF in this population is largely unclear. Study Design. We conducted a systematic integrative review of the literature to assess the current evidence of HF treatment in CKD patients, searching electronic databases in April 2014. Synthesis used narrative methods. Setting and Population. We focused on adults with a primary diagnosis of CKD and HF. Selection Criteria for Studies. We included studies of any design, quantitative or qualitative. Interventions. HF treatment was defined as any formal means taken to improve the symptoms of HF and/or the heart structure and function abnormalities. Outcomes. Measures of all kinds were considered of interest. Results. Of 1,439 results returned by database searches, 79 articles met inclusion criteria. A further 23 relevant articles were identified by hand searching. Conclusions. Control of fluid overload, the use of beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, and optimization of dialysis appear to be the most important methods to treat HF in CKD and ESRD patients. Aldosterone antagonists and digitalis glycosides may additionally be considered; however, their use is associated with significant risks. The role of anemia correction, control of CKD-mineral and bone disorder, and cardiac resynchronization therapy are also discussed.

  15. Correlations of dietary energy and protein intakes with renal function impairment in chronic kidney disease patients with or without diabetes.

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    Chen, Mei-En; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun; Hung, Chi-Chih; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Liu, Shao-Chun; Wu, Tsai-Jiin; Huang, Meng-Chuan

    2017-05-01

    Dietary energy and protein intake can affect progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD complicated with diabetes is often associated with a decline in renal function. We investigated the relative importance of dietary energy intake (DEI) and dietary protein intake (DPI) to renal function indicators in nondiabetic and diabetic CKD patients. A total of 539 Stage 3-5 CKD patients [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)Disease equation] with or without diabetes were recruited from outpatient clinics of Nephrology and Nutrition in a medical center in Taiwan. Appropriateness of DEI and DPI was used to subcategorize CKD patients into four groups:(1) kidney diet (KD) A (KD-A), the most appropriate diet, was characterized by low DPI and adequate DEI; (2) KD-B, low DPI and inadequate DEI; (3) KD-C, excess DPI and adequate DEI; and (4) KD-D, the least appropriate diet, excess DPI and inadequate DEI. Inadequate DEI was defined as a ratio of actual intake/recommended intake less than 90% and adequate DEI as over 90%. Low DPI was defined as less than 110% of recommended intake and excessive when over 110%. Outcome measured was eGFR. In both groups of CKD patients, DEI was significantly lower (ppatients were KD-C and KD-D significantly correlated with reduced eGFR compared with KD-A at increments of -5.63 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p = 0.029) and -7.72 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (p=0.015). In conclusion, inadequate energy and excessive protein intakes appear to correlate with poorer renal function in nondiabetic CKD patients. Patients with advanced CKD are in need of counseling by dietitians to improve adherence to diets. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  16. Spot Urine-guided Salt Reduction in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

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    Uchiyama, Kiyotaka; Yanai, Akane; Ishibashi, Yoshitaka

    2017-09-01

    Dietary salt restriction is important in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) to reduce hypertension, cardiovascular events, progression of CKD, and mortality. However, recommending salt reduction for patients is difficult without knowing their actual sodium intake. This study evaluated the effectiveness of spot urine-guided salt reduction in CKD outpatients. A prospective cohort study was used. This study included a total of 127 adult outpatients (aged 60 ± 18 years, 80 males) with CKD. Their baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate was 51.4 ± 25.1 (mL/minute/1.73 m 2 ), and 64 (50%) of them were with CKD stage 3a or 3b (both 32 [25%]). We informed the patients of their individual spot urine-estimated salt intake every time they visited the outpatient clinic. Based on the data, the nephrologist encouraged the patients to achieve their salt restriction goal. The primary outcome was the estimated salt excretion, and the secondary outcome was the urinary protein-to-Cr ratio (UPCR). Multiple regression analyses were performed to clarify the contributing factors of changes in both outcomes. Over a follow-up of 12 months, the median number of patients' visits was 7 (5-8). The estimated salt intake was significantly reduced from 7.98 ± 2.49 g/day to 6.77 ± 1.77 g/day (P intake, with borderline significance (P = .08). Providing spot urine-estimated salt intake feedback effectively motivated CKD patients to reduce their salt intake. Spot urine-guided salt reduction may slow CKD progression through decreased urinary protein excretion. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of metabolic syndrome on resting energy expenditure in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Carolina Q D; Santos, Jacqueline A P; Quinto, Beata M R; Marrocos, Mauro S M; Teixeira, Andrei A; Rodrigues, Cássio J O; Batista, Marcelo C

    2016-10-01

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) changes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may contribute to mortality increase. The obesity and inflammation is associated with high REE and when not compensated by adequate intake, may determine an unfavorable clinical outcome in this population. We aimed to evaluate the influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on REE in CKD patients. One hundred eighty-three patients were stratified according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and divided in groups: without CKD (GFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) and CKD (GFR Patients without MetS, REE correlated with estimated GFR and the protein equivalent (r = 0.33, P patients, these correlations were not observed. The presence of CKD is independently associated with reduced REE. The observed decrease in REE is reversed in patients with MetS independent of renal function. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peptic Ulcer Disease Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Ten-Year Incidence, Ulcer Location, and Ulcerogenic Effect of Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Chia; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Wang, I-Kuan; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Chou, Che-Yi; Liu, Jiung-Hsiun; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Chung, Chi-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed at determining peptic ulcer disease (PUD) incidence among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients during 1998–2008, compared to patients without CKD, and at examining associations between CKD and PUD. Methods Data for 1998–2008 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. The annual PUD incidence (cases per thousand persons per year) was calculated separately for patients with and without CKD. Characteristics of patients with newly diagnosed PUD (n = 16322) were compared to those of a control group without PUD (n = 32644). The 2 groups were matched for age, sex, and index year. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Results Over the 10-year period, the PUD incidence was ∼10–12 times higher in CKD patients than in those without CKD. Its incidence in elderly CKD patients increased rapidly over time. For CKD patients, most PUD events (>95%) were managed during hospitalization. Peptic ulcer risk, adjusted for all potential confounders, was much higher in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis (adjusted OR, 9.74; 95% CI, 7.11–13.31). Maintenance hemodialysis patients were 2 times more likely to have gastric ulcers than duodenal ulcers, while CKD patients not on dialysis had similar risks for both. There were no significant interactions between medications and CKD status on the peptic ulcer risk. Unlike CKD patients on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and clopidogrel, those on aspirin did not have a higher peptic ulcer risk (adjusted OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.44–1.77). Conclusions CKD patients have a substantially increased PUD risk, and the majority of CKD patients with PUD require hospital management. Further, peptic ulcer risk is affected by hemodialysis therapy, patient status (inpatient vs. outpatient), and ulcerogenic medications. PMID:24498412

  19. Parental perspectives on the financial impact of caring for a child with CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medway, Meredith; Tong, Allison; Craig, Jonathan C; Kim, Siah; Mackie, Fiona; McTaggart, Steven; Walker, Amanda; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    The economic consequences of chronic kidney disease (CKD) are severe for adult patients and their households, but the out-of-pocket expenses and economic burden of CKD and how this affects the caregivers of children with kidney disease are unclear. This study aims to describe parental perspectives on the financial impact of caring for a child with CKD. Face-to-face semistructured interviews. Parents of children with CKD from 3 pediatric nephrology centers in Australia. Transcripts were analyzed thematically. 27 parents of 26 children participated. We identified 5 themes: loss of freedom and control (prioritizing care, limiting occupational opportunities, and appreciating socioeconomic advantage), burden of sole responsibility (inability to rely on others, lack of respite, increased separation of family roles, and self-reliance), adapting for survival (vigilant budgeting, redefining normality and expectations, rechanneling resources to basic needs, and negotiating work flexibility), instability of circumstances (depleted capacity to work, unpredictability of child's health, burden of travel-related costs, imposition of debt, and domestic upheaval), and struggle in seeking support ("falling through the cracks" and unmet information needs). Few participants were fathers (n=5), and results may not be transferable to non-English-speaking caregivers because these participants were excluded. Parents focused their resources and attention on meeting the complex needs of their child. Inability to sustain employment due to focus on their child's care and both medical and nonmedical expenses were major contributors to the financial impact, with financial stress compounded by difficulties accessing government support. As a result, parents experienced profound financial and social instability and physical and psychological fatigue and exercised extreme financial vigilance. Increased access to respite and domestic support and financial and psychosocial interventions are suggested

  20. Beliefs influencing community pharmacists' interventions with chronic kidney disease patients: A theory-based qualitative study.

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    Quintana-Bárcena, Patricia; Lalonde, Lyne; Lauzier, Sophie

    2018-04-06

    Drug-related problems (DRPs) are highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Community pharmacists are ideally positioned to manage these DRPs. However, little is known about the factors influencing their interventions with CKD patients. Using the theory of planned behavior (TPB), this qualitative study sought to: (1) explore the behavioral beliefs (perceived advantages and disadvantages), normative beliefs (perceived expectations of significant others) and control beliefs (perceived barriers and facilitators) influencing community pharmacists' interventions related to identifying and managing DRPs in CKD; and (2) compare these beliefs among three DRPs prevalent in CKD patients. Community pharmacists in Quebec, Canada participated in face-to-face individual semi-structured interviews. The topic guide was based on the TPB. Three vignettes were presented to stimulate community pharmacists' thoughts about their interventions regarding: (1) the use of an inappropriate over-the-counter laxative; (2) prescriptions of anti-inflammatory medications; and (3) non-adherence to antihypertensive medication. Integral transcripts of audio recordings were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings on each of the three DRPs were systematically compared. Fifteen community pharmacists participated in the study. All expressed a positive attitude toward DRP management, mentioning advantages such as gaining the patient's loyalty as a client and avoiding CKD complications. Participants mentioned that patients and physicians generally approve their interventions, but the dynamics of these relationships may vary depending on the DRP. Common barriers in the management of the three DRPs were the pharmacists' limited time and heavy workloads. The pharmacists felt that the main disadvantage is that these interventions interrupt the workflow in the pharmacy. Community pharmacists hold positive views of their interventions in CKD. However, enhancing community pharmacists

  1. Health literacy and patient outcomes in chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dominic M; Fraser, Simon; Dudley, Chris; Oniscu, Gabriel C; Tomson, Charles; Ravanan, Rommel; Roderick, Paul

    2017-11-20

    Limited health literacy affects 25% of people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and may reduce self-management skills resulting in poorer clinical outcomes. By disproportionately affecting people with low socio-economic status and non-white ethnicity, limited health literacy may promote health inequity. We performed a systematic review of quantitative studies of health literacy and clinical outcomes among adults with CKD. A total of 29 studies (13 articles; 16 conference abstracts) were included. One included non-USA patients. Of the 29 studies, 5 were cohort studies and 24 were cross-sectional. In all, 18 300 patients were studied: 4367 non-dialysis CKD; 13 202 dialysis; 390 transplant; 341 unspecified. Median study size was 127 [interquartile range (IQR) 92-238)], but 480 (IQR 260-2392) for cohort studies. Median proportion of non-white participants was 48% (IQR 17-70%). Six health literacy measures were used. Outcomes included patient attributes, care processes, clinical/laboratory parameters and 'hard' clinical outcomes. Limited health literacy was significantly, independently associated with hospitalizations, emergency department use, missed dialysis sessions, cardiovascular events and mortality (in cohort studies). Study quality was high (1 study), moderate (3 studies) and poor (25 studies), limited by sampling methods, variable adjustment for confounders and reduced methodological detail given in conference abstracts. There is limited robust evidence of the causal effects of health literacy on patient outcomes in CKD. Available evidence suggests associations with adverse clinical events, increased healthcare use and mortality. Prospective studies are required to determine the causal effects of health literacy on outcomes in CKD patients, and examine the relationships between socio-economic status, comorbidity, health literacy and CKD outcomes. Intervention development and evaluation will determine whether health literacy is a modifiable determinant of

  2. Optimal Antibiotic Dosage for Chronic Kidney Disease Patient: A Pharmacological Manual for Oral Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Ramasamy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, (CKD) a gradual and inevitable deterioration in renal function, is the disease with the most associations in dentistry. Dosage adjustment is one amongst the vital elements to be familiar with during their oral care. CKD patients take extended duration to filter out medications, therefore dosage must always be tailored under the supervision of nephrologist. The relished benefits from antibiotic could transform as anti-microbial resistance on their abuse and nephrotoxic when contraindicated drugs are encouraged. New patented drug belonging to oxazoliodine group has driven the researchers to handle the emerging AMR. The present communication discusses the pharmacological factors influencing in prescribing the antibiotics for CKD patient from the dentist's point of view. The formulas destined for calculating the optimal dosage of antibiotics have been documented to aid oral physicians.

  3. Masked Uncontrolled Hypertension in CKD.

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    Agarwal, Rajiv; Pappas, Maria K; Sinha, Arjun D

    2016-03-01

    Masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) is diagnosed in patients treated for hypertension who are normotensive in the clinic but hypertensive outside. In this study of 333 veterans with CKD, we prospectively evaluated the prevalence of MUCH as determined by ambulatory BP monitoring using three definitions of hypertension (daytime hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg; either nighttime hypertension ≥120/70 mmHg or daytime hypertension; and 24-hour hypertension ≥130/80 mmHg) or by home BP monitoring (hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg). The prevalence of MUCH was 26.7% by daytime ambulatory BP, 32.8% by 24-hour ambulatory BP, 56.1% by daytime or night-time ambulatory BP, and 50.8% by home BP. To assess the reproducibility of the diagnosis, we repeated these measurements after 4 weeks. Agreement in MUCH diagnosis by ambulatory BP was 75-78% (κ coefficient for agreement, 0.44-0.51), depending on the definition used. In contrast, home BP showed an agreement of only 63% and a κ coefficient of 0.25. Prevalence of MUCH increased with increasing clinic systolic BP: 2% in the 90-110 mmHg group, 17% in the 110-119 mmHg group, 34% in the 120-129 mmHg group, and 66% in the 130-139 mmHg group. Clinic BP was a good determinant of MUCH (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.87). In diagnosing MUCH, home BP was not different from clinic BP. In conclusion, among people with CKD, MUCH is common and reproducible, and should be suspected when clinic BP is in the prehypertensive range. Confirmation of MUCH diagnosis should rely on ambulatory BP monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. [Effects of a resistance training program in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarroa, Igor; Barriga, Rodrigo; Michéas, Camila; Zapata-Lamana, Rafael; Soto, Claudio; Manukian, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    Exercise may be a therapeutic tool for improving the functional capacity in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who are on hemodialysis (HD). To determine the effects on muscle strength (MS), functional capacity (FC) and quality of life related to health (QOLRH) of a resistance training program in patients with CKD on HD. Thirteen CKD patients aged 38.8 ± 3 years, (7 men) on HD for more than one year participated in an exercise program twice a week during 8 weeks. At the beginning and at the end of the program, MS using a knee extension isometric strength test, FC using the six minutes walking test (6MWT) and QOLRH using the KDQOL CV-36 questionnaire were evaluated. Heart and respiratory rates, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and modified Borg scale were measured as control variables. After training, there were significant improvements in MS in both legs; in the distance travelled during 6MWT and in the physical component summary score of the KDQOL-36. Furthermore, a significant decline in diastolic blood pressure was observed. All other control variables did not change significantly. Exercise training during eight weeks in CKD patients in HD resulted in significant improvements in muscle strength, walking capacity and in the physical component of a quality of life score for patients with CKD.

  5. Baseline Characteristics and Prescription Patterns of Standard Drugs in Patients with Angiographically Determined Coronary Artery Disease and Renal Failure (CAD-REF Registry.

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    Holger Reinecke

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is strongly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD. We established a prospective observational nationwide multicenter registry to evaluate current treatment and outcomes in patients with both CKD and angiographically documented CAD.In 32 cardiological centers 3,352 CAD patients with ≥50% stenosis in at least one coronary artery were enrolled and classified according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria into one of five stages of CKD or as a control group.2,723 (81.2% consecutively enrolled patients suffered from CKD. Compared to controls, CKD patients had a higher prevalence of diabetes, hypertension, peripheral artery diseases, heart failure, and valvular heart disease (each p<0.001. Myocardial infarctions (p = 0.02, coronary bypass grafting, valve replacements and pacemaker implantations had been recorded more frequently (each p<0.001. With advanced CKD, the number of diseased coronary vessels and the proportion of patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF increased significantly (both p<0.001. Percutaneous coronary interventions were performed less frequently (p<0.001 while coronary bypass grafting was recommended more often (p = 0.04 with advanced CKD. With regard to standard drugs in CAD treatment, prescriptions were higher in our registry than in previous reports, but beta-blockers (p = 0.008, and angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin-receptor blockers (p<0.001 were given less often in higher CKD stages. In contrast, in the subgroup of patients with moderately to severely reduced LVEF the prescription rates did not differ between CKD stages. In-hospital mortality increased stepwise with each CKD stage (p = 0.02.In line with other studies comprising CKD cohorts, patients' morbidity and in-hospital mortality increased with the degree of renal impairment. Although cardiologists' drug prescription rates in CAD-REF were higher than in

  6. Age- and sex-tailored serum phosphate thresholds do not improve cardiovascular risk estimation in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Pietro Manuel; Bonello, Monica; Gambaro, Alessia; Sturniolo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Disordered metabolism of phosphorus is one of the hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting in increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Age and sex may affect the metabolism of phosphorus and subsequently its serum level. We evaluated if age- and sex-specific cutoffs for hyperphosphatemia may define cardiovascular risk better than the current guideline cutoffs. We used data from 16,834 subjects participating in the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); the prevalence of self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality rates were analyzed in CKD patients for both the classic definitions (CH; i.e., NKF-KDOQI and K-DIGO) and a tailored definition (TH) of hyperphosphatemia by means of regression models adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, smoking status and body mass index. The cutoffs for TH were represented by the 95th percentile of an age- and sex-matched non-CKD population. Serum phosphorus levels showed an inverse correlation with age (r = -0.12; pdefinition and CVD was marginally better compared with the CH definition (odds ratio [OR] = 1.49, 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04-2.13; p=0.030 vs. OR=1.55, 95% CI, 0.98-2.44; p = 0.059), the TH model was not superior in predicting CVD or mortality. Our data suggest that a tailored, age- and sex-specific definition of hyperphosphatemia is not superior to conventional definitions in predicting cardiovascular events in patients with CKD.

  7. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

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    Sanjay Vikrant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD, were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%, hypercalcemia (5.4%, hypophosphatemia (2.8%, hyperphosphatemia (55.4%, raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%, secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%, and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%. 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5% patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016, a higher iPTH (P = 0.001 a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09, and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004. The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001, creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001, and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001 and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001, age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002, and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  8. The impact of renal insufficiency and anaemia on survival in patients with cardiovascular disease: a cohort study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anderson, Jocelyn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The simultaneous occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), kidney disease, and anaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. In the community setting, little data exists about the risk associated with milder levels of anaemia when it is present concurrently with CVD and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of CKD and anaemia in patients with CVD in the community and to examine whether the presence of anaemia was associated with increased morbidity and mortality. METHODS: This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study and involved a random sample of 35 general practices in the West of Ireland. A practice-based sample of 1,609 patients with established cardiovascular disease was generated in 2000\\/2001 and followed for five years. The primary endpoint was death from any cause. Statistical analysis involved using one-way ANOVA and Chi-squared tests for baseline data and Cox proportional-hazards models for mortality data. RESULTS: Of the study sample of 617 patients with blood results, 33% (n = 203) had CKD while 6% (n = 37) had CKD and anaemia. The estimated risk of death from any cause, when compared to patients with cardiovascular disease only, was almost double (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 0.99 to 3.98) for patients with both CVD and CKD and was over 4 times greater (HR = 4.33, 95% CI 1.76 to 10.68) for patients with CVD, CKD and anaemia. CONCLUSION: In patients with cardiovascular disease in the community, chronic kidney disease and anaemia occur commonly. The presence of chronic kidney disease carries an increased mortality risk which increases in an additive way with the addition of anaemia. These results suggest that early primary care diagnosis and management of this high risk group may be worthwhile.

  9. Does community-wide chronic kidney disease management improve patient outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Hugh C; Baharani, Jyoti; Dasgupta, Indranil; Suresh, Vijayan; Temple, Robert M; Thomas, Mark E; Smith, Steve A

    2014-03-01

    The number of patients starting renal replacement therapy (RRT) is increasing in England, as it is worldwide. Improvements in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) across communities to alter this trend are a public health priority. We have prospectively studied changes in the incidence and modality of treatment for end-stage renal disease following the introduction of a CKD management programme in the West Midlands region of England. Nephrology service to approximately 700 000 adult population of mixed ethnicity in urban and suburban areas, many with social deprivation. The programme was introduced in stages between 2003 and 2006 and comprised primary care education and financial incentives, personal clinical reports written directly to patients following every consultation, routine laboratory estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) reporting, eGFR graph surveillance to identify and monitor patients at risk, multidisciplinary pre-RRT care and conservative care. Prevalent patients: 10 552 with CKD and 8509 without CKD with diabetes. access to nephrology care, trends in RRT incidence and starting modality, place of death without RRT. Incident count was adjusted for changes in the local adult population recorded in national censuses. Ninety-one per cent of patients aged ≥75 years with incident CKD stage 5 were known to a nephrologist. The population-adjusted incident RRT rate peaked in 2005 and then declined; the proportion starting with transplant, peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis by arterio-venous fistula increased to 63% by 2012 (P = 0.001 versus 2005). Fifty-two per cent of patients receiving planned conservative care without dialysis died out of hospital. Following the introduction of a community-wide systematic CKD management programme, the population-adjusted incidence of RRT reduced, modality of initiation of RRT improved and a majority of patients receiving planned conservative care without dialysis died out of hospital.

  10. Optimal medication dosing in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Lori

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Canada. As rates of diabetes rise, so does the prevalence of CKD. Diabetes and CKD are chronic diseases that require multiple medications for their management. Many of the anticipated effects of these medications are altered by the physiologic changes that occur in CKD. Failure to individualize drug dosing in this population may lead to toxicity or decreased therapeutic response, leading to treatment failure. At times this can be challenging for a multitude of reasons, including the limitations of available calculations for estimating renal function, inconsistent dosing recommendations and the lack of dosing recommendations for some medications. Clinicians caring for these patients need to consider an approach of individualized drug therapy that will ensure optimal outcomes. The better understanding that clinicians have of these challenges, the more effective they will be at using the available information as a guide together with their own professional judgement to make appropriate dosing changes. This article discusses the following: 1) physiologic changes that occur in CKD and its impact on drug dosing; 2) advantages and disadvantages of various calculations used for estimating renal function; 3) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of some commonly used medications in diabetes, and finally, 4) an approach to individualized drug dosing for this patient population. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA damage in hemodialysis patients with chronic kidney disease; a test of the role of diabetes mellitus; a comet assay investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamur, Sevcan; Unal, Fatma; Altok, Kadriye; Deger, Serpil Muge; Yuzbasioglu, Deniz

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing rapidly. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most important cause of CKD. We studied the possible role of DM in CKD patients with respect to DNA damage, as assessed by the comet assay in 60 CKD patients (with or without DM) undergoing hemodialysis and in 26 controls. Effects of other factors, such as age, sex, hypertension, duration of hemodialysis, body mass index (BMI), and levels of hemoglobin (HB), intact parathormone (iPTH), and ferritin (FER), were also examined. Primary DNA damage measured by the comet assay was significantly higher in CKD patients than in controls. Among CKD patients, the following correlations were observed. (1) There was no difference in comet tail length or tail intensity between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. (2) Age, sex, hemoglobin, hypertension, duration of hemodialysis, and ferritin levels affected neither tail length nor intensity. (3) BMI values above 25kg/m(2) and iPTH levels above 300pg/ml were associated with significantly greater comet tail length. Our results indicate that primary DNA damage is increased in CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis, compared to controls; however, DM had no additional effect. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Strategies to promote adherence to nutritional advice in patients with chronic kidney disease: a narrative review and commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beto JA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Judith A Beto, Katherine A Schury, Vinod K Bansal Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Loyola University Healthcare System, Loyola University of Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD requires extensive changes to food and lifestyle. Poor adherence to diet, medications, and treatments has been estimated to vary between 20% and 70%, which in turn can contribute to increased mortality and morbidity. Delivering effective nutritional advice in patients with CKD coordinates multiple diet components including calories, protein, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, and fluid. Dietary intake studies have shown difficulty in adhering to the scope and complexity of the CKD diet parameters. No single educational or clinical strategy has been shown to be consistently effective across CKD populations. Highest adherence has been observed when both diet and education efforts are individualized to each patient and adapted over time to changing lifestyle and CKD variables. This narrative review and commentary summarizes nutrition education literature and published strategies for providing nutritional advice in CKD. A cohort of practical and effective strategies for increasing dietary adherence to nutritional advice are provided that include communicating with "talking control" principles, integrating patient-owned technology, acknowledging the typical food pattern may be snacking rather than formal meals, focusing on a single goal rather than multiple goals, creating active learning and coping strategies (frozen sandwiches, visual hands-on activities, planting herb gardens, and involving the total patient food environment. Keywords: talking control, technology-enhanced learning, hemodialysis, nutrition education, education strategies

  13. Oral conditions, periodontal status and periodontal treatment need of chronic kidney disease patients

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    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Majority of the CKD patients reviewed had poor periodontal status with code 2 TN. We, therefore, recommend nonsurgical periodontal treatment for all CKD patients to improve their oral health and forestall the systemic effects of periodontal pathology.

  14. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilana Paula Carillo Artese

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on the composition of subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Sixteen CKD pre-dialysis individuals (CKD and 14 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (C presenting chronic periodontitis were treated by scaling and root planing. Subgingival samples were collected from each patient and analyzed for their composition by checkerboard at baseline and 3 months post-therapy. Significant differences between groups at baseline were sought by the Mann-Whitney and χ² tests. Changes over time were examined by the Wilcoxon test. At baseline, the CKD group had significantly lower counts of E. faecalis compared to the C group (p < 0.05. After treatment, the levels of a greater number of species were reduced in the C group. Higher levels of A. israelii, C. rectus, F. periodonticum, P. micra, P. nigrescens, T. forsythia, N. mucosa, and S. anginosus (p < 0.05 were found in the CKD group compared to the C group. Also, non-responsive sites in CKD individuals harbored significantly higher levels of pathogenic species (T. forsythia, P. gingivalis, T. denticola, Fusobacterium spp., D. pneumosintes, E. faecalis and S. aureus; p < 0.05 than sites that responded to therapy, as well as non-responsive sites in the C group. The periodontitis-associated subgingival microbiota of CKD and systemically healthy individuals was similar in composition. However, high levels of pathogenic species persisted in the subgingival microbiota of patients with CKD after treatment.

  15. Cinacalcet in patients with chronic kidney disease: a cumulative meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Suetonia C Palmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calcimimetic agents lower serum parathyroid hormone levels in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but treatment effects on patient-relevant outcomes are uncertain. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the benefits and harms of calcimimetic therapy in adults with CKD and used cumulative meta-analysis to identify how evidence for calcimimetic treatment has developed in this clinical setting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cochrane and Embase databases (through February 7, 2013 were electronically searched to identify randomized trials evaluating effects of calcimimetic therapy on mortality and adverse events in adults with CKD. Two independent reviewers identified trials, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Eighteen trials comprising 7,446 participants compared cinacalcet plus conventional therapy with placebo or no treatment plus conventional therapy in adults with CKD. In moderate- to high-quality evidence (based on Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria in adults with CKD stage 5D (dialysis, cinacalcet had little or no effect on all-cause mortality (relative risk, 0.97 [95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.05], had imprecise effect on cardiovascular mortality (0.67 [0.16-2.87], and prevented parathyroidectomy (0.49 [0.40-0.59] and hypercalcemia (0.23 [0.05-0.97], but increased hypocalcemia (6.98 [5.10-9.53], nausea (2.02 [1.45-2.81], and vomiting (1.97 [1.73-2.24]. Data for clinical outcomes were sparse in adults with CKD stages 3-5. On average, treating 1,000 people with CKD stage 5D for 1 y had no effect on survival and prevented about three patients from experiencing parathyroidectomy, whilst 60 experienced hypocalcemia and 150 experienced nausea. Analyses were limited by insufficient data in CKD stages 3-5 and kidney transplant recipients. CONCLUSIONS: Cinacalcet reduces the need for parathyroidectomy in patients with CKD stage 5D, but does not appear to improve all

  16. Prevalence and correlates of gout in a large cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease: the German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jiaojiao; Kielstein, Jan T; Schultheiss, Ulla T; Sitter, Thomas; Titze, Stephanie I; Schaeffner, Elke S; McAdams-DeMarco, Mara; Kronenberg, Florian; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Köttgen, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Reduced kidney function is a risk factor for hyperuricaemia and gout, but limited information on the burden of gout is available from studies of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We therefore examined the prevalence and correlates of gout in the large prospective observational German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study. Data from 5085 CKD patients aged 18-74 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-patients on urate lowering therapy, 47.2% still showed hyperuricaemia. Factors associated with gout were serum urate, lower eGFR, advanced age, male sex, higher body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio, higher triglyceride and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, alcohol intake and diuretics use. While lower eGFR categories showed significant associations with gout in multivariable-adjusted models (prevalence ratio 1.46 for eGFR patients with CKD and lower GFR is strongly associated with gout. Pharmacological management of gout in patients with CKD is suboptimal. Prospective follow-up will show whether gout and hyperuricaemia increase the risk of CKD progression and cardiovascular events in the GCKD study. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  17. Timely Referral to Outpatient Nephrology Care Slows Progression and Reduces Treatment Costs of Chronic Kidney Diseases

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    Gerhard Lonnemann

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Timely referral to outpatient nephrology care is associated with slowed disease progression, less hospital admissions, reduced total treatment costs, and improved survival in patients with CKD.

  18. Management of Hypertension in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qi-Fang; Hoshide, Satoshi; Cheng, Hao-Min; Park, Sungha; Park, Chang-Gyu; Chen, Chen-Huan; Kario, Kazuomi; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is both a cause and consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). According to the Chinese national survey in 2007-2010, the prevalence of CKD was much higher in hypertensive patients (18.9%, n=16,691) than in the overall population sample (10.8%, n=47,204). CKD in hypertension confers risks to the kidneys as well as other organs. Probably because of high dietary salt intake, Asian hypertensive patients with CKD show high prevalence of non-dipping and reversed dipping blood pressure pattern, and may have even higher risks of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, out-of-office blood pressure evaluation and comprehensive cardiovascular evaluations are required. Most of current hypertension guidelines recommend intensive antihypertensive treatment in hypertensive patients with CKD. This is probably of particular relevance for cardiovascular prevention in Asia, because stroke, as a major complication of hypertension in Asia, is more closely related to blood pressure than coronary events. Intensive blood pressure control to 130/80 mmHg is often required to prevent CKD progression and cardiovascular complications. The inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are recommended as the first line antihypertensive medications in patients with a glomerular filtration rate higher than 30 ml/min/1.73 m², which may more efficaciously prevent end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. Nonetheless, combination therapy of RAS inhibitors with other classes of antihypertensive drugs, such as calcium-channel blockers, diuretics, etc, is required to control blood pressure to the target. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. How are patients with type 2 diabetes and renal disease monitored and managed? Insights from the observational OREDIA study

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    Penfornis A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alfred Penfornis,1 Jean Frédéric Blicklé,2 Béatrice Fiquet,3 Stéphane Quéré,4 Sylvie Dejager3 1Department of Endocrinology-Metabolism and Diabetology-Nutrition, Jean Minjoz Hospital, University of Franche-Comté, Besançon, France; 2Department of Internal Medicine and Diabetology, Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France; 3Clinical Affairs, Novartis Pharma SAS, Rueil-Malmaison, France; 4BioStatistics, Novartis Pharma SAS, Rueil-Malmaison, France Background and aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is frequent in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and therapeutic management of diabetes is more challenging in patients with renal impairment (RI. The place of metformin is of particular interest since most scientific societies now recommend using half the dosage in moderate RI and abstaining from use in severe RI, while the classic contraindication with RI has not been removed from the label. This study aimed to assess the therapeutic management, in particular the use of metformin, of T2DM patients with CKD in real life. Methods: This was a French cross-sectional observational study: 3,704 patients with T2DM diagnosed for over 1 year and pharmacologically treated were recruited in two cohorts (two-thirds were considered to have renal disease [CKD patients] and one-third were not [non-CKD patients] by 968 physicians (81% general practitioners in 2012. Results: CKD versus non-CKD patients were significantly older with longer diabetes history, more diabetic complications, and less strict glycemic control (mean glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] 7.5% versus 7.1%; 25% of CKD patients had HbA1c ≥8% versus 15% of non-CKD patients. Fifteen percent of CKD patients had severe RI, and 66% moderate RI. Therapeutic management of T2DM was clearly distinct in CKD, with less use of metformin (62% versus 86% but at similar mean daily doses (~2 g/d. Of patients with severe RI, 33% were still treated with metformin, at similar doses. For other oral anti

  20. A comparative study of renal dysfunction in patients with inflammatory arthropathies: strong association with cardiovascular diseases and not with anti-rheumatic therapies, inflammatory markers or duration of arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among comparable patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and to explore any predictive factors for renal impairment. METHODS: Consecutive patients with peripheral joint disease (oligo and polyarthritis) were recruited from our inflammatory arthritis clinics. We divided patients in two groups: RA group and seronegative inflammatory arthritis group. The cohort consisted of 183 patients (RA = 107, seronegative arthritis = 76 [psoriatic arthritis = 69, undifferentiated oligoarthritis = 7]). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the established Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Demographic details, disease-specific characteristics, anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of cardiovascular diseases were recorded. RESULTS: In total, 17.48% (n = 32) of the cohort had CKD. There was no statistically significant variation between the two groups as regards baseline demographics, disease characteristics, use of anti-rheumatic drugs and the presence of individual cardiovascular diseases. We found that eGFR and the presence of CKD were similar among these groups. Among patients with CKD, 72% had undiagnosed CKD. No association of statistical significance was noted between CKD and the use of corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and anti-tumor necrosis factor agents. The association of cardiovascular diseases with CKD remained significant after adjusting for confounders (age, gender, duration of arthritis, high C-reactive protein, use of anti-rheumatic drugs). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis are more prone to have CKD. This could have serious implications, as the majority of rheumatology patients use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and different immunosuppressives, such as methotrexate. No association of kidney dysfunction was noted with inflammatory disease

  1. Cerebral metabolic alterations and cognitive dysfunction in children with chronic kidney disease using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Wechsler intelligence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Mohamed, Ahmed Hosny; Kamel Attia, Wafaa Mahmoud; Mohammad, Faten Fawzy; El Fatah, Nelly Rafaat Abd; Elshal, Amal Saeed

    2017-06-16

    Many studies described Impaired intelligence, attention, memory and executive function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) dialyzed and non-dialyzed, but there is still lacking the early and sensitive method of detection of these deficits. The purpose of this study is to investigate relation between the brain metabolic alteration [measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)] and cognitive dysfunction in CKD children (detected by psychometric analysis). One hundred and forty patients with CKD were included [ 40 patients with stage 5 CKD on dialysis, 30 patients with stage 4 to 5 CKD without dialysis, and 70 patients with stage 1 to 3 CKD]. All patients with previous neurological disorders were excluded. Conventional MRI, MRS and psychometric assessment by using Wechsler intelligence scale for children third edition was done in all subjects. We found a significant negative correlation between MRS abnormalities and Wechsler IQ Test scores. But there was a significantly positive correlation between the CKD stages and MRS abnormalities in patients with CKD and negative significant correlation between CKD stages and Wechsler IQ test scores in patients with CKD. There were correlations between "the electrolyte disturbance, blood hemoglobin and hypertension" and "the CKD staging, cognitive functions IQ scores and MRS parameter changes". We concluded that both MRS and psychometric tests are sensitive methods for detection of cognitive function affection in CKD children, particularly in dialyzed group and these findings appears before the clinical diagnosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. The spectrum of bone disease in Jordanian hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younes, Nidal A.; Al-Mansour, M.; Sroujieh, Ahmad S.; Wahbeh, A.; Ailabouni, W.; Hamzah, Y.; Mahafzah, W.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of mineral abnormalities and bone disease (BD) in hemodialysis patients at Jordan University Hospital (JUH), Amman, Jordan. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 63 patients (38 males and 25 females), mean age 44.19 years (range 17-76 years), with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on regular hemodialysis at JUH between November 2004 and April 2005. All patients have undergone complete blood count, chemistry profile, alkaline phosphatase, serum albumin, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) and plain x-rays. Bone disorders were identified in 45 patients on x-rays (70%). Osteopenia was found in 43 patients (68.3%), subperiosteal resorption in 24 patients (38.3%) and metastatic calcification in 22 patients (35%). Hypocalcemia was found in 28.6% and hypercalcemia in 7.9%. All patients were taking calcium carbonate, and 55.5% of patients were on vitamin D supplements. The calcium levels in 63.5% and the phosphorus levels in 50.8% of patients were within the recommended guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Serum i-PTH level was above 300 pg/ml high turnover bone disease in 24.6% of patients, 21.3% had iPTH of 150-300 pg/ml target, and 44.3% had i-PTH levels below 100 pg/mL suggesting a dynamic bone disease. Patients with severe bone disease had a statistically significant higher iPTH levels (p<0.005). Bone disease and mineral abnormalities are common in hemodialysis patients at JUH. Earlier detection of bone disease and better overall management strategy may reduce the frequency and severity of bone disease in CKD patients in Jordan. (author)

  3. Risk of stroke and bleeding in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melgaard, Line; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Skjøth, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in relation to ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage, major bleeding, and all-cause death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this observational cohort...

  4. Net Clinical Benefit of Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, A. N.; Lip, G. Y. H.; Kamper, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    (Congestive heart failure; Hypertension; Age >= 75 years; Diabetes mellitus; previous Stroke, transient ischemic attack, or thromboembolism; Vascular disease; Age 65 to 74 years; Sex category) strata and the net clinical benefit of warfarin in patients with AF and CKD in a nationwide cohort. METHODS...

  5. Development and initial validation of prescribing quality indicators for patients with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Kirsten P J; Sidorenkov, Grigory; Bilo, Henk J G; Bouma, Margriet; van Ittersum, Frans J; Voorham, Jaco; Navis, Gerjan; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality assessment is a key element for improving the quality of care. Currently, a comprehensive indicator set for measuring the quality of medication treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is lacking. Our aim was to develop and validate a set of prescribing quality

  6. How do primary care doctors in England and Wales code and manage people with chronic kidney disease? Results from the National Chronic Kidney Disease Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Lois G; Cleary, Faye; Wheeler, David C; Caplin, Ben; Nitsch, Dorothea; Hull, Sally A

    2017-10-16

    In the UK, primary care records are electronic and require doctors to ascribe disease codes to direct care plans and facilitate safe prescribing. We investigated factors associated with coding of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with reduced kidney function and the impact this has on patient management. We identified patients meeting biochemical criteria for CKD (two estimated glomerular filtration rates 90 days apart) from 1039 general practitioner (GP) practices in a UK audit. Clustered logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with coding for CKD and improvement in coding as a result of the audit process. We investigated the relationship between coding and five interventions recommended for CKD: achieving blood pressure targets, proteinuria testing, statin prescription and flu and pneumococcal vaccination. Of 256 000 patients with biochemical CKD, 30% did not have a GP CKD code. Males, older patients, those with more severe CKD, diabetes or hypertension or those prescribed statins were more likely to have a CKD code. Among those with continued biochemical CKD following audit, these same characteristics increased the odds of improved coding. Patients without any kidney diagnosis were less likely to receive optimal care than those coded for CKD [e.g. odds ratio for meeting blood pressure target 0.78 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.79)]. Older age, male sex, diabetes and hypertension are associated with coding for those with biochemical CKD. CKD coding is associated with receiving key primary care interventions recommended for CKD. Increased efforts to incentivize CKD coding may improve outcomes for CKD patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA.

  7. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilana Paula Carillo Artese

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a debilitating systemic condition. Our working hypothesis is that CKD predialysis patients with periodontitis would respond poorly to periodontal treatment owing to immunologic compromise. Twenty-one predialysis patients (group 1 and 19 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (group 2 with chronic periodontitis were subjected to non-surgical periodontal treatment with no antibiotics. Clinical periodontal and systemic parameters were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after treatment. Both groups showed significant and similar post-treatment improvements in all periodontal parameters examined. Most interestingly, periodontal treatment had a statistically significant positive effect on the glomerular filtration rate of each individual (group 1, p = 0.04; group 2, p = 0.002. Our results indicate that chronic periodontitis in predialysis kidney disease patients improved similarly in patients with chronic periodontitis and no history of CKD after receiving non-surgical periodontal therapy. This study demonstrates that CKD predialysis patients show a good response to non-surgical periodontal treatment.

  8. Association of TSH Elevation with All-Cause Mortality in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hsing Chuang

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a widespread condition in the global population and is more common in the elderly. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level increases with aging, and hypothyroidism is highly prevalent in CKD patients. However, the relationship between low thyroid function and mortality in CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine the relationship between TSH elevation and all-cause mortality in elderly patients with CKD. This retrospective cohort study included individuals ≥65 years old with CKD (n = 23,786 in Taipei City. Health examination data from 2005 to 2010 were provided by the Taipei Databank for Public Health Analysis. Subjects were categorized according to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level as follows: low normal (0.34CKD stage, serum albumin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, uric acid, hemoglobin, body mass index, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, smoking, alcohol consumption, and history of cardiovascular disease (coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, cerebral vascular disease, history of cancer, and history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Our results showed that compared to the reference group (middle normal TSH, the risk of all-cause mortality was increased in the elevated I group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.45 and elevated II group (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00-1.69. We found a significant association between TSH elevation and all-cause mortality in this cohort of elderly persons with CKD. However, determining the benefit of treatment for moderately elevated TSH level (5.2-10 mIU/L in elderly patients with CKD will require a

  9. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease with Cognitive Impairment in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitaka Umemura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent years, the relationship between chronic kidney disease (CKD and cognitive impairment has been attracting attention. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD is also associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment. However, it is still unknown whether CKD markers are associated with cognitive impairment independently of SVD in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: Seventy-nine type 2 diabetic patients (mean age, 76.0 years were enrolled in the present study. CKD was defined as the presence of albuminuria and/or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 2. SVD was evaluated by the presence and severity of silent brain infarcts (SBIs and white matter lesions (WMLs on brain magnetic resonance imaging. Neuropsychological tests were assessed using four validated cognitive instruments. Results: In multiple linear regression analyses, albuminuria was associated with worse modified Stroop Color Word scores (β = 0.284, p = 0.017 and low eGFR was associated with reduced Digit Symbol Substitution scores (β = -0.224, p = 0.026 after adjustment for age, sex, education years, diabetes duration, hypertension, multiple SBIs, and advanced WMLs. In contrast, there were no significant associations between CKD markers and Mini-Mental State Examination or Word Recall scores. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that albuminuria and low eGFR are associated with frontal lobe dysfunction independently of SVD in elderly type 2 diabetic patients.

  10. Relation of Aortic Valve and Coronary Artery Calcium in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease to the Stage and Etiology of the Renal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Touw, Hugo R. W.; Gansevoort, Ron; Franssen, Casper F. M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Zijlstra, Felix; Tio, Rene A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure have increased cardiac calcium loads. Previous studies have investigated the prevalence and quantitative extent of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of

  11. Limited knowledge of chronic kidney disease among primary care patients – a cross-sectional survey

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    Chow Wai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in Singapore. While preventive effects have focused on early detection and education, little is known about the knowledge level of chronic kidney disease (CKD locally. We seek to evaluate the knowledge of CKD among primary care patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 1520 patients from 3 primary care centers. Those with existing CKD or on dialysis were excluded. Knowledge was assessed based on 7 questions on CKD in the self-administered questionnaire. One point was given for each correct answer with a maximum of 7 points. Results 1435 completed all 7 questions on CKD. Mean age was 48.9 ±15.0 (SD years. 50.9% were male. 62.3% had a secondary and below education and 52.4% had a monthly household income of ≤ $2000. 43.7% had chronic diseases. Mean score was 3.44 ± 1.53 (out of a maximum of 7. Median score was 4. In multivariate logistic regression, being older {>60 years [Odds Ratio (OR 0.50, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 0.32-0.79]; 40–60 years (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.43,0.89}, less educated [up to primary education (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.22-0.49], having a lower monthly household income [ Conclusion This suggests that CKD education should be targeted at older patients with lower education and lower socioeconomic status.

  12. Challenges and opportunities for stem cell therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, LaTonya J; Eirin, Alfonso; Lerman, Lilach O

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global health care burden affecting billions of individuals worldwide. The kidney has limited regenerative capacity from chronic insults, and for the most common causes of CKD, no effective treatment exists to prevent progression to end-stage kidney failure. Therefore, novel interventions, such as regenerative cell-based therapies, need to be developed for CKD. Given the risk of allosensitization, autologous transplantation of cells to boost regenerative potential is preferred. Therefore, verification of cell function and vitality in CKD patients is imperative. Two cell types have been most commonly applied in regenerative medicine. Endothelial progenitor cells contribute to neovasculogenesis primarily through paracrine angiogenic activity and partly by differentiation into mature endothelial cells in situ. Mesenchymal stem cells also exert paracrine effects, including proangiogenic, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic activity. However, in CKD, multiple factors may contribute to reduced cell function, including older age, coexisting cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic inflammatory states, and uremia, which may limit the effectiveness of an autologous cell-based therapy approach. This Review highlights current knowledge on stem and progenitor cell function and vitality, aspects of the uremic milieu that may serve as a barrier to therapy, and novel methods to improve stem cell function for potential transplantation. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of prevalence of chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients in countries of the European Union up to 2025.

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    Kainz, Alexander; Hronsky, Milan; Stel, Vianda S; Jager, Kitty J; Geroldinger, Angelika; Dunkler, Daniela; Heinze, Georg; Tripepi, Giovanni; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are a growing burden for health-care systems. The prevalence of diabetes has increased constantly during the last decade, although a slight flattening of end-stage renal disease as a result of diabetes has been observed recently in some European countries. In this study, we project the prevalence of CKD in patients with diabetes in European countries up to the year 2025. We analysed the population with diabetes and development of nephropathy in 12 European countries, which we computed from models published previously and on data from the annual reports of the European Renal Association (1998-2011). The prevalence of CKD stage 5 in patients with diabetes up to the year 2025 was projected by the Lee-Carter algorithm. Those for stage 3 and 4 were then estimated by applying the same ratios of CKD prevalences as estimated in the Austrian population with diabetic nephropathy. The estimated prevalence of CKD in patients with diabetes is expected to increase in all 12 countries up to the year 2025. For CKD stage 3, we estimate for Austria in 2025 a prevalence of 215 000 per million diabetic population (p.m.p.) (95% confidence interval 169 000, 275 000), for CKD4 18 600 p.m.p. (14 500, 23 700) and for CKD5 6900 p.m.p. (5400, 8900). The median prevalence in the considered countries is 132 900 p.m.p. (IQR: 118 500, 195 800), 11 500 (10 200, 16 900) and 4300 (3800, 6300) for CKD stages 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Altogether, these data predict in the years 2012-25 an annual increase of 3.2% in the prevalence of diabetic CKD stage 5. Due to the increase in prevalence of diabetes and CKD5, the costs of renal therapy are expected to rise. We believe that these data may help health-care policy makers to make informed decisions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing inappropriate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prescription in primary care patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Keohane, David M; Dennehy, Thomas; Keohane, Kenneth P; Shanahan, Eamonn

    2017-08-14

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to reduce inappropriate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prescribing in primary care patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Once diagnosed, CKD management involves delaying progression to end stage renal failure and preventing complications. It is well established that non-steroidal anti-inflammatories have a negative effect on kidney function and consequently, all nephrology consensus groups suggest avoiding this drug class in CKD. Design/methodology/approach The sampling criteria included all practice patients with a known CKD risk factor. This group was refined to include those with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 ml/min per 1.73m2 (stage 3 CKD or greater). Phase one analysed how many prescriptions had occurred in this group over the preceding three months. The intervention involved creating an automated alert on at risk patient records if non-steroidal anti-inflammatories were prescribed and discussing the rationale with practice staff. The re-audit phase occurred three months' post intervention. Findings The study revealed 728/7,500 (9.7 per cent) patients at risk from CKD and 158 (2.1 per cent) who were subsequently found to have an eGFR<60 ml/min, indicating=stage 3 CKD. In phase one, 10.2 per cent of at risk patients had received a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prescription in the preceding three months. Additionally, 6.2 per cent had received non-steroidal anti-inflammatories on repeat prescription. Phase two post intervention revealed a significant 75 per cent reduction in the total non-steroidal anti-inflammatories prescribed and a 90 per cent reduction in repeat non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prescriptions in those with CKD. Originality/value The study significantly reduced non-steroidal anti-inflammatory prescription in those with CKD in primary care settings. It also created a CKD register within the practice and an enduring medication alert system for individuals that risk nephrotoxic

  15. The Effect of High-Flux Hemodialysis on Hemoglobin Concentrations in Patients with CKD: Results of the MINOXIS Study

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    Schneider, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; Krane, Vera; Krieter, Detlef H.; Scharnagl, Hubert; Schneider, Markus P.; Wanner, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hemodialysis treatment induces markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which could affect hemoglobin levels and the response to erythropoietin use. This study sought to determine whether high-flux dialysis would help improve markers of renal anemia, inflammation, and oxidative stress compared with low-flux dialysis. Design, settings, participants, & measurements In a prospective, controlled study, 221 patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and receiving darbepoetin-alfa treatment (mean age, 66 years; 55% male) from 19 centers were screened in a 20-week run-in period of low-flux hemodialysis with a synthetic dialysis membrane. Thereafter, 166 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive a synthetic high-flux membrane or to continue on low-flux dialysis for 52 weeks. Data on myeloperoxidase, oxidized LDL, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the Malnutrition Inflammation Score were collected at baseline and after 52 weeks; routine laboratory data, such as hemoglobin, ferritin, and albumin, and the use of darbepoetin-alfa, were also measured in the run-in period. Results After 52 weeks, the low-flux and the high-flux groups did not differ with respect to hemoglobin (mean ± SD, 11.7±0.9 g/dl versus 11.7±1.1 g/dl; P=0.62) or use of darbepoetin-alfa (mean dosage ± SD, 29.8±24.8 μg/wk versus 26.0±31.1 μg/wk; P=0.85). Markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, or nutritional status also did not differ between groups. Conclusion Over 1 year, high-flux dialysis had no superior effects on hemoglobin levels or markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and nutritional status. These data do not support the hypothesis that enhanced convective toxin removal would improve patient outcome. PMID:22096040

  16. Dyslipidemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: etiology and management

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    Mikolasevic I

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ivana Mikolasevic,1,2 Marta Žutelija,3 Vojko Mavrinac,1 Lidija Orlic 2 1Department of Gastroenterology, 2Department of Nephrology, Dialysis and Kidney Transplantation, UHC Rijeka, 3School of Medicine, Rijeka, Croatia Abstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, including those with end-stage renal disease, treated with dialysis, or renal transplant recipients have an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD morbidity and mortality. Dyslipidemia, often present in this patient population, is an important risk factor for CVD development. Specific quantitative and qualitative changes are seen at different stages of renal impairment and are associated with the degree of glomerular filtration rate declining. Patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD have low high-density lipoproteins (HDL, normal or low total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, increased triglycerides as well as increased apolipoprotein B (apoB, lipoprotein(a (Lp (a, intermediate- and very-low-density lipoprotein (IDL, VLDL; “remnant particles”, and small dense LDL particles. In patients with nephrotic syndrome lipid profile is more atherogenic with increased TC, LDL, and triglycerides. Lipid profile in hemodialysis (HD patients is usually similar to that in non-dialysis-dependent CKD patients. Patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD have more altered dyslipidemia compared to HD patients, which is more atherogenic in nature. These differences may be attributed to PD per se but may also be associated with the selection of dialytic modality. In renal transplant recipients, TC, LDL, VLDL, and triglycerides are elevated, whereas HDL is significantly reduced. Many factors can influence post-transplant dyslipidemia including immunosuppressive agents. This patient population is obviously at high risk; hence, prompt diagnosis and management are required to improve their clinical outcomes. Various studies have shown statins to be effective in the

  17. Skin autofluorescence is associated with renal function and cardiovascular diseases in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Tanaka, Kenichi; Tani, Yoshihiro; Asai, Jun; Nemoto, Fumihiko; Kusano, Yuki; Suzuki, Hodaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Katoh, Tetsuo; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Tissue accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) is thought to be a contributing factor to the progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Skin autofluorescence, a non-invasive measure of AGE accumulation using autofluorescence of the skin under ultraviolet light, has shown associations with CVD in haemodialysis patients. The present study aimed to evaluate relationships of skin autofluorescence to renal function as well as CVD in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects in this cross-sectional analysis comprised 304 pre-dialysis CKD patients [median age, 62.0 years; median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 54.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2); diabetes, n = 81 (26.6%)]. AGE accumulation in skin was assessed by skin autofluorescence using an autofluorescence reader. Relationships between skin autofluorescence, eGFR, CVD history and other parameters were evaluated. Skin autofluorescence correlated negatively with eGFR (r = -0.42, P skin autofluorescence with age, presence of diabetes, eGFR and CVD history in CKD patients (R(2) = 30%). Age, male gender, smoking history, skin autofluorescence and eGFR were significantly correlated with CVD history, and multiple logistic regression analysis identified age [odds ratio (OR), 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.15; P skin autofluorescence (OR, 3.74; 95%CI, 1.54-9.24; P skin autofluorescence increased as GFR decreased and was related to CVD history in CKD patients. Non-invasive autofluorescence readers may provide potential markers for clinical risk assessment in pre-dialysis CKD patients.

  18. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in patients on hemodialysis in southwest Guatemala

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    Timothy S. Laux

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To document the prevalence of patients on hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala who have chronic kidney disease (CKD of non-traditional causes (CKDnt. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study interviewed patients on hemodialysis at the Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social on their health and occupational history. Laboratory serum, urine and vital sign data at the initiation of hemodialysis were obtained from chart reviews. Patients were classified according to whether they had hypertension or obesity or neither. The proportion of patients with and without these traditional CKD risk factors was recorded and the association between demographic and occupational factors and a lack of traditional CKD risk factors analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results Of 242 total patients (including 171 non-diabetics enrolled in hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala, 45 (18.6% of total patients and 26.3% of non-diabetics lacked traditional CKD risk factors. While agricultural work history was common, only travel time greater than 30 minutes and age less than 50 years old were significantly associated with CKD in the absence of traditional risk factors. Individuals without such risk factors lived throughout southwestern Guatemala’s five departments. Conclusions The prevalence of CKDnT appears to be much lower in this sample of patients receiving hemodialysis in Southwestern Guatemala than in hospitalized patients in El Salvador. It has yet to be determined whether the prevalence is higher in the general population and in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  19. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease of non-traditional causes in patients on hemodialysis in southwest Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Timothy S; Barnoya, Joaquin; Cipriano, Ever; Herrera, Erick; Lopez, Noemi; Polo, Vicente Sanchez; Rothstein, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Objective To document the prevalence of patients on hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) of non-traditional causes (CKDnt). Methods This cross-sectional descriptive study interviewed patients on hemodialysis at the Instituto Guatemalteco de Seguridad Social on their health and occupational history. Laboratory serum, urine and vital sign data at the initiation of hemodialysis were obtained from chart reviews. Patients were classified according to whether they had hypertension or obesity or neither. The proportion of patients with and without these traditional CKD risk factors was recorded and the association between demographic and occupational factors and a lack of traditional CKD risk factors analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. Results Of 242 total patients (including 171 non-diabetics) enrolled in hemodialysis in southwestern Guatemala, 45 (18.6% of total patients and 26.3% of non-diabetics) lacked traditional CKD risk factors. While agricultural work history was common, only travel time greater than 30 minutes and age less than 50 years old were significantly associated with CKD in the absence of traditional risk factors. Individuals without such risk factors lived throughout southwestern Guatemala's five departments. Conclusions The prevalence of CKDnT appears to be much lower in this sample of patients receiving hemodialysis in Southwestern Guatemala than in hospitalized patients in El Salvador. It has yet to be determined whether the prevalence is higher in the general population and in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  20. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Baseline characteristics of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 3 and stage 4 in spain: the MERENA observational cohort study

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    Montes Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To obtain information on cardiovascular morbidity, hypertension control, anemia and mineral metabolism based on the analysis of the baseline characteristics of a large cohort of Spanish patients enrolled in an ongoing prospective, observational, multicenter study of patients with stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney diseases (CKD. Methods Multicenter study from Spanish government hospital-based Nephrology outpatient clinics involving 1129 patients with CKD stages 3 (n = 434 and 4 (n = 695 defined by GFR calculated by the MDRD formula. Additional analysis was performed with GFR calculated using the CKD-EPI and Cockcroft-Gault formula. Results In the cohort as a whole, median age 70.9 years, morbidity from all cardiovascular disease (CVD was very high (39.1%. In CKD stage 4, CVD prevalence was higher than in stage 3 (42.2 vs 35.6% p 300 mg/day was present in more than 60% of patients and there was no significant differences between stages 3 and 4 CKD (1.2 ± 1.8 and 1.3 ± 1.8 g/day, respectively. A majority of the patients had hemoglobin levels greater than 11 g/dL (91.1 and 85.5% in stages 3 and 4 CKD respectively p Conclusion This study provides an overview of key clinical parameters in patients with CKD Stages 3 and 4 where delivery or care was largely by nephrologists working in a network of hospital-based clinics of the Spanish National Healthcare System.

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Secondary to Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship to Inflammatory Markers

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    Subrata Debnath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is the primary case of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Inflammation is associated with metabolic dysregulation in patients with T2D and CKD. Tryptophan (TRP metabolism may have relevance to the CKD outcomes and associated symptoms. We investigated the relationships of TRP metabolism with inflammatory markers in patients with T2D and CKD. Methods: Data were collected from a well-characterized cohort of type 2 diabetic individuals with all stages of CKD, including patients on hemodialysis. Key TRP metabolites (kynurenine [KYN], kynurenic acid [KYNA], and quinolinic acid [QA], proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α] and interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein were measured in plasma. The KYN/TRP ratio was utilized as a surrogate marker for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 enzyme activity. Results: There was a significant inverse association between circulating TRP level and stages of CKD ( P  < 0.0001. Downstream bioactive TRP metabolites KYN, KYNA, and QA were positively and robustly correlated with the severity of kidney disease ( P  < 0.0001. In multiple linear regression, neither TNF-α nor IL-6 was independently related to KYN/TRP ratio after adjusting for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Only TNF-α was independently related to KYN after taking into account the effect of eGFR. Conclusions: Chronic kidney disease secondary to T2D may be associated with accumulation of toxic TRP metabolites due to both inflammation and impaired kidney function. Future longitudinal studies to determine whether the accumulation of KYN directly contributes to CKD progression and associated symptoms in patients with T2D are warranted.

  3. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway in monocytes derived from chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Heevy Abdulkareem Musa Al-Chaqmaqchi

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD have significantly increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infections and cardiovascular diseases. Since monocytes play an essential role in host immunity, this study was directed to explore the gene expression profile in order to identify differences in activated pathways in monocytes relevant to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and increased susceptibility to infections. Monocytes from CKD patients (stages 4 and 5, estimated GFR <20 ml/min/1.73 m(2 and healthy donors were collected from peripheral blood. Microarray gene expression profile was performed and data were interpreted by GeneSpring software and by PANTHER tool. Western blot was done to validate the pathway members. The results demonstrated that 600 and 272 genes were differentially up- and down regulated respectively in the patient group. Pathways involved in the inflammatory response were highly expressed and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was the most significant pathway expressed in the patient group. Since this pathway has been attributed to a variety of inflammatory manifestations, the current findings may contribute to dysfunctional monocytes in CKD patients. Strategies to interfere with this pathway may improve host immunity and prevent cardiovascular complications in CKD patients.

  4. Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Pathway in Monocytes Derived from Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Chaqmaqchi, Heevy Abdulkareem Musa; Moshfegh, Ali; Dadfar, Elham; Paulsson, Josefin; Hassan, Moustapha; Jacobson, Stefan H.; Lundahl, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have significantly increased morbidity and mortality resulting from infections and cardiovascular diseases. Since monocytes play an essential role in host immunity, this study was directed to explore the gene expression profile in order to identify differences in activated pathways in monocytes relevant to the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and increased susceptibility to infections. Monocytes from CKD patients (stages 4 and 5, estimated GFR <20 ml/min/1.73 m2) and healthy donors were collected from peripheral blood. Microarray gene expression profile was performed and data were interpreted by GeneSpring software and by PANTHER tool. Western blot was done to validate the pathway members. The results demonstrated that 600 and 272 genes were differentially up- and down regulated respectively in the patient group. Pathways involved in the inflammatory response were highly expressed and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway was the most significant pathway expressed in the patient group. Since this pathway has been attributed to a variety of inflammatory manifestations, the current findings may contribute to dysfunctional monocytes in CKD patients. Strategies to interfere with this pathway may improve host immunity and prevent cardiovascular complications in CKD patients. PMID:23935909

  5. Modeling a Mobile Health Management Business Model for Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Lee, Ying-Li; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    In these decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a global public health problem. Information technology (IT) tools have been used widely to empower the patients with chronic disease (e.g., diabetes and hypertension). It is also a potential application to advance the CKD care. In this project, we analyzed the requirements of a mobile health management system for healthcare workers, patients and their families to design a health management business model for CKD patients.

  6. Novel Equations for Estimating Lean Body Mass in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Tian, Xue; Chen, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Qu, Zhen; Dong, Jie

    2018-05-01

    Simplified methods to estimate lean body mass (LBM), an important nutritional measure representing muscle mass and somatic protein, are lacking in nondialyzed patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We developed and tested 2 reliable equations for estimation of LBM in daily clinical practice. The development and validation groups both included 150 nondialyzed patients with CKD Stages 3 to 5. Two equations for estimating LBM based on mid-arm muscle circumference (MAMC) or handgrip strength (HGS) were developed and validated in CKD patients with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry as referenced gold method. We developed and validated 2 equations for estimating LBM based on HGS and MAMC. These equations, which also incorporated sex, height, and weight, were developed and validated in CKD patients. The new equations were found to exhibit only small biases when compared with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, with median differences of 0.94 and 0.46 kg observed in the HGS and MAMC equations, respectively. Good precision and accuracy were achieved for both equations, as reflected by small interquartile ranges in the differences and in the percentages of estimates that were 20% of measured LBM. The bias, precision, and accuracy of each equation were found to be similar when it was applied to groups of patients divided by the median measured LBM, the median ratio of extracellular to total body water, and the stages of CKD. LBM estimated from MAMC or HGS were found to provide accurate estimates of LBM in nondialyzed patients with CKD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of subgingival periodontal pathogens and association with the severity of periodontitis in patients with chronic kidney diseases: a cross-sectional study.

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    Ismail, Fidan Bahtiar; Ismail, Gener; Dumitriu, Anca Silvia; Baston, Catalin; Berbecar, Vlad; Jurubita, Roxana; Andronesi, Andreea; Dumitriu, Horia Traian; Sinescu, Ioanel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the subgingival profile of 9 periodontal pathogens, by means of real-time PCR, in a group of predialysis chronic kidney disease patients with and without periodontal disease and to identify the risk factors associated with periodontal disease in these patients. This is a single centre cross-sectional cohort study performed on 70 CKD patients. Patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination and the following parameters were assessed: periodontal pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and plaque index; subgingival biofilm samples were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket of each quadrant and were pooled in one transporting unit. Clinical data were drawn from the medical file of the patients. T. denticola (P = 0.001), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), and P. micros (P = 0.003) are significantly associated with periodontal disease in CKD subjects but in a multivariate model only age and T. forsythia remain independent risk factors for periodontal disease in patients with CKD. In our cohort, age and T. forsythia are independently associated with periodontitis in CKD patients. Within the limits of this study, CKD was not significantly associated with a particular subgingival periodontal pathogens profile in periodontitis patients.

  8. Identification of Subgingival Periodontal Pathogens and Association with the Severity of Periodontitis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Diseases: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Fidan Bahtiar Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of our study was to assess the subgingival profile of 9 periodontal pathogens, by means of real-time PCR, in a group of predialysis chronic kidney disease patients with and without periodontal disease and to identify the risk factors associated with periodontal disease in these patients. Material and Methods. This is a single centre cross-sectional cohort study performed on 70 CKD patients. Patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination and the following parameters were assessed: periodontal pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and plaque index; subgingival biofilm samples were collected from the deepest periodontal pocket of each quadrant and were pooled in one transporting unit. Clinical data were drawn from the medical file of the patients. Results. T. denticola (P=0.001, T. forsythia (P<0.001, and P. micros (P=0.003 are significantly associated with periodontal disease in CKD subjects but in a multivariate model only age and T. forsythia remain independent risk factors for periodontal disease in patients with CKD. Conclusions. In our cohort, age and T. forsythia are independently associated with periodontitis in CKD patients. Within the limits of this study, CKD was not significantly associated with a particular subgingival periodontal pathogens profile in periodontitis patients.

  9. Comparison of Intact PTH and Bio-Intact PTH Assays Among Non-Dialysis Dependent Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

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    Einbinder, Yael; Benchetrit, Sydney; Golan, Eliezer; Zitman-Gal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    The third-generation bio-intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1-84) assay was designed to overcome problems associated with the detection of C-terminal fragments by the second-generation intact PTH assay. The two assays have been compared primarily among dialysis populations. The present study evaluated the correlations and differences between these two PTH assays among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5 not yet on dialysis. Blood samples were collected from 98 patients with CKD stages 3 to 5. PTH concentrations were measured simultaneously by using the second-generation - PTH intact-STAT and third-generation bio-intact 1-84 PTH assays. Other serum biomarkers of bone mineral disorders were also assessed. CKD stage was calculated by using the CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration (EPI) formula. Serum bio-intact PTH concentrations were strongly correlated but significantly lower than the intact PTH concentrations (r=0.963, Pbio-intact PTH) positively correlated with urea (r=0.523, r=0.504; P=0.002, respectively), phosphorus (r=0.532, r=0.521; Pbio-intact PTH assay detected significantly lower PTH concentrations compared with intact PTH assay. Additional studies that correlate the diagnosis and management of CKD mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometric findings are needed to determine whether bio-intact PTH assay results are better surrogate markers in these early stages of CKD. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  10. Calcium as a cardiovascular toxin in CKD-MBD.

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    Moe, Sharon M

    2017-07-01

    Disordered calcium balance and homeostasis are common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Such alterations are commonly associated with abnormal bone remodeling, directly and indirectly. Similarly, positive calcium balance may also be a factor in the pathogenesis of extra skeletal soft tissue and arterial calcification. Calcium may directly affect cardiac structure and function through direct effects to alter cell signaling due to abnormal intracellular calcium homeostasis 2) extra-skeletal deposition of calcium and phosphate in the myocardium and small cardiac arterioles, 3) inducing cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through calcium and hormone activation of NFAT signaling mechanisms, and 4) increased aorta calcification resulting in chronic increased afterload leading to hypertrophy. Similarly, calcium may alter vascular smooth muscle cell function and affect cell signaling which may predispose to a proliferative phenotype important in arteriosclerosis and arterial calcification. Thus, disorders of calcium balance and homeostasis due to CKD-MBD may play a role in the high cardiovascular burden observed in patients with CKD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Research Article. Comparative Analysis of Hepcidin-25 and Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease with and without Anemia

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    Căldăraru Carmen Denise

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hepcidin is a regulatory protein in iron metabolism; we do not know the role in chronic kidney disease anemia. Methods: 22 patients with CKD anemia and 15 patients with CKD without anemia were investigated. CKD anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, hemoglobin ≤12 g/dl for women and ≤13 g/dl for men, no treatment for anemia 6 months before enrollment, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and stable creatinine three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: infection, bleeding, malignancy, systemic or liver disease, immunosuppression, renal replacement therapy. CKD without anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, no anemia or treatment for anemia, CKD with stable creatinine values three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: medical conditions known to have a role in the development of polycythemia. Hepcidin-25 and ferritin were measured by ELISA method. Erythropoietin (EPO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-6 were evaluated using chemiluminescent enzyme immunometric assays. Unpaired T test, Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: Hemoglobin values were significantly lower in anemia group. There were no differences in terms of eGFR, age, body mass index, serum hepcidin, erythropoietin, fibrinogen, IL-6, and TNF-α between CKD patients with and without anemia. Serum hepcidin correlated positively with ferritin (r=0.45 p<0.05, TNF-α (r=0.54, p<0.05 and negatively with erythropoietin (r=-0.51, p<0.05. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that TNF-α is an independent predictor of serum hepcidin in our patients (p=0.003, R=0.71. Conclusion: We found no differences in serum hepcidin, erythropoietin and inflammatory markers in non-dialysis CKD patients with and without anemia.

  12. The effect of ONCE Renal on minerals and electrolytes in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Satirapoj, Bancha; Prapakorn, Janjira; Punpanich, Dollapas; Pongsuparbchon, Chantima; Supasyndh, Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is one common adverse consequence in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and most patients have a lower-than-normal dietary energy intake. The present study was undertaken to examine whether orally administered ONCE Renal formula (ORF) supplement would improve energy intake without minerals and electrolytes disturbances in predialysis patients with CKD. All eligible nondiabetic patients with CKD received ORF supplement for 1 week. Nutrition markers, renal function, and minerals and electrolytes were evaluated before and after supplementing. All patients kept a 3-day food record and were interviewed by a registered dietitian. A total of 29 patients with mean age 64.9±13.3 years were included. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 37.7±12.1 mL/min/1.73 m(2). A significant increase was observed in amount of energy, fat, fiber, calcium, and magnesium intake after 1 week of ORF supplement. Moreover, in comparison with baseline values, the patients displayed decreased dietary protein intake and blood urea nitrogen and increased serum magnesium. However, no significant change was found in renal function, nutritional markers (body weight, prealbumin, albumin, and protein equivalence of total nitrogen appearance), serum calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate. In patients with CKD, ingestion of ORF was well tolerated and had a positive effect with an increase in dietary energy, fat, and fiber intake, as well as a decreased dietary protein intake. No mineral or electrolyte abnormalities were observed during the study.

  13. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE- A HOSPITALBASED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Ponmudy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease affects every organ system including the eye. The aim of the study is to conduct a thorough ocular examination and to study the occurrence of various ocular manifestations exhibited by patients with chronic kidney disease and to analyse the findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients from Department of Nephrology, Stanley Medical College diagnosed with chronic kidney disease were examined for ocular manifestations at the Department of Ophthalmology, Stanley Medical College. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive, non-interventional, hospital-based study. The period of study was from August 2010 to October 2011. RESULTS The commonest cause of CKD was hypertension in 47 pts. (52.2% followed by both diabetes and hypertension in 30 patients. Patients with only diabetes were 6 patients (6.7% and with other causes were 7 patients (7.8%.10% of patients were legally blind with visual acuity <6/60. In this study, 65 patients belonged to less than 50 years. 49.3% of the presenile patients had cataract. A reduced Schirmer’s value was noted in 54 eyes of the 200 eyes. The incidence of ocular surface disease in the study was 27%. 92 eyes out of 200 eyes studied showed hypertensive retinopathy. Higher grades of hypertensive retinopathy was more in advanced stages of CKD, i.e. 24 eyes in stage IV and 23 eyes in stage V. 51 eyes out of 40 diabetics showed diabetic retinopathy changes of which a majority of 25 eyes belonged to stage V disease. Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in CKD patients is significantly more when compared to diabetic patients without CKD. CONCLUSION Study demonstrates that routine ocular evaluation is necessary in all patients with chronic kidney disease irrespective of the presence of ocular symptoms. It also highlights the occurrence of a variety of treatable ocular manifestations, which can become vision threatening if not taken care of at the earliest.

  14. Survival advantage in black versus white men with CKD: effect of estimated GFR and case mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Quarles, L Darryl; Lott, Evan H; Lu, Jun Ling; Ma, Jennie Z; Molnar, Miklos Z; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2013-08-01

    Black dialysis patients have significantly lower mortality compared with white patients, in contradistinction to the higher mortality seen in blacks in the general population. It is unclear whether a similar paradox exists in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (CKD), and if it does, what its underlying reasons are. Historical cohort. 518,406 white and 52,402 black male US veterans with non-dialysis-dependent CKD stages 3-5. Black race. We examined overall and CKD stage-specific all-cause mortality using parametric survival models. The effect of sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid conditions, and laboratory characteristics on the observed differences was explored in multivariable models. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years, 172,093 patients died (mortality rate, 71.0 [95% CI, 70.6-71.3] per 1,000 patient-years). Black race was associated with significantly lower crude mortality (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.94-0.97; P case-mix and laboratory characteristics occurring during the course of kidney disease. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

  15. Type of dyslipidemia and achievement of the LDL-cholesterol goal in chronic kidney disease patients at the University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsawang, Tamon; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been defined as a coronary artery disease risk equivalent. Therefore, the current guideline has been recommended for CKD patients to reach and maintain a low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) goal of less than 100 mg/dL. However, the data regarding the achievement of LDL-C goal in these patients is lacking. This study was conducted to evaluate the types of dyslipidemia affecting patients with CKD stages 3 and 4 and to determine whether these patients achieved LDL-C goal. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with CKD stage 3 or 4 and dyslipidemia who were followed-up at Siriraj Hospital between October 2011 and September 2012. In total, 150 patients with CKD stage 3 or 4 and dyslipidemia were recruited. The mean age was 72±10 years, and the body mass index was 25.6±4 kg/m(2); 60% had CKD stage 3 with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 34±12 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and 54% had type 2 diabetes. The percentage of patients with hypercholesterolemia was 78%, hypertriglyceridemia 54%, and low high-density lipoprotein-C 36%. Of these, 52% had mixed hyperlipidemia. Statin treatment was prescribed to 87% of the patients, of which only 31.3% achieved the LDL-C goal according to the National Cholesterol Education Program and the European Society of Cardiology/European Atherosclerosis Society recommendations. Patients who did not achieve the LDL-C goal had a higher cholesterol level at diagnosis and higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes and stroke than those who achieved it. Two-thirds of CKD patients with hyperlipidemia had mixed hyperlipidemia. Despite the high frequency of statin treatment, only one-third of patients with CKD achieved the LDL-C goal. Thus, a developmental plan for the management of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD should be implemented to increase their achievement of the LDL-C goal.

  16. The impact of non-dipper circadian rhythm of blood pressure on left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xiajing; Mou, Shan; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Minfang; Gu, Leyi; Yan, Yucheng; Ying, Hua; Hu, Chunhua; Qian, Jiaqi; Ni, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between non-dipper circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods and results All 257 patients with stage 1 to 5 CKD were enrolled in the study and classified into a CKD1-3 group and a CKD4-5 group according to renal function. The parameters and circadian rhythm of BP were measured by a GE Marquette Tonoport V Eng dynamic sphygmomanometer, and cardiac structure was examined by echocardiography. The incidence of abnormal circadian BP rhythm (non-dipper rhythm) was quite high (75.4% in all enrolled patients and 71.3% in the patients with normal BP levels) in CKD patients and increased with the deterioration of renal function. Changes of cardiac structure such as LVH in patients with non-dipper BP were more distinct than in patients with dipper BP. The development of left ventricular mass index (LVMI) correlated positively with the incidence of non-dipper BP rhythm. Multiple regression analysis showed that 24-h systolic BP (β = 0.417, P circadian rhythm of blood pressure was quite high in CKD patients and increased with the deterioration of renal function. Non-dipper circadian rhythm of BP is closely related with LVMI.

  17. Definition, identification and treatment of resistant hypertension in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Yelena R; Bomback, Andrew S

    2014-07-01

    Resistant hypertension, the inability to achieve goal blood pressure despite the use of three or more appropriately dosed antihypertensive drugs (including a diuretic), remains a common clinical problem, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). While the exact prevalence and prognosis of resistant hypertension in CKD patients remain unknown, resistant hypertension likely contributes significantly to increased cardiovascular risk and progression of kidney disease in this population. We review the identification and evaluation of patients with resistant hypertension, including the importance of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the identification of 'white-coat', 'masked' and 'non-dipper' hypertension, the latter of which has particular clinical and therapeutic importance in patients with resistant hypertension and CKD. We then discuss treatment strategies for resistant hypertension that target the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying resistance to treatment, including persistent volume excess, incomplete renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and inadequate nocturnal blood pressure control. Finally, we propose a treatment algorithm for evaluation and treatment of resistant hypertension in patients with CKD. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors Associated with Decreased Lean Tissue Index in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Yi-Wen Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting is common and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, factors associated with decreased muscle mass in CKD patients are seldom reported. We performed a cross-sectional study of 326 patients (age 65.8 ± 13.3 years with stage 3–5 CKD who were not yet on dialysis. Muscle mass was determined using the Body Composition Monitor (BCM, a multifrequency bioimpedance spectroscopy device, and was expressed as the lean tissue index (LTI, lean tissue mass/height2. An LTI of less than 10% of the normal value (low LTI indicates muscle wasting. Patients with low LTI (n = 40 tended to be diabetic, had significantly higher fat tissue index, urine protein creatinine ratio, and interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α levels, but had significantly lower serum albumin and hemoglobin levels compared with those with normal LTI. In multivariate linear regression analysis, age, sex, cardiovascular disease, and interleukin-6 were independently associated with LTI. Additionally, diabetes mellitus remained an independent predictor of muscle wasting according to low LTI by multivariate logistic regression analysis. We conclude that LTI has important clinical correlations. Determination of LTI may aid in clinical assessment by helping to identify muscle wasting among patients with stage 3–5 CKD.

  19. Patient satisfaction with nurse-led chronic kidney disease clinics: A multicentre evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Sonya; Havas, Kathryn; Ersham, Susanne; Stone, Cassandra; Taylor, Berndatte; Graham, Anne; Bublitz, Lorraine; Purtell, Louise; Bonner, Ann

    2017-03-01

    There is growing international evidence that nurse-led chronic kidney disease (CKD) clinics provide a comprehensive approach to achieving clinical targets effective in slowing the progression of CKD. Across Queensland, Australia, these clinics have been established in many renal outpatient departments although patient satisfaction with these clinics is unknown. To measure patient satisfaction levels with CKD nurse-led clinics. This was a cross-sectional study undertaken at five clinics located in metropolitan, regional and remote hospitals in Queensland. Participants were >18 years of age (no upper age limit) with CKD (non-dialysis) who attended CKD nurse-led clinics over a six month period (N = 873). They completed the Nurse Practitioner Patient Satisfaction questionnaire which was modified for CKD. The response rate was 64.3 % (n = 561); half of the respondents were male (55.5 %), there was a median age range of 71-80 years (43.5 %) and most respondents were pensioners or retired (84.2 %). While the majority reported that they were highly satisfied with the quality of care provided by the nurse (83.8 %), we detected differences in some aspects of satisfaction between genders, age groups and familiarity with the nurse. Overall, patients' comments were highly positive with a few improvements to the service being suggested; these related to car-parking, providing more practical support, and having accessible locations. In an era of person-centred care, it is important to measure patient satisfaction using appropriate and standardised questionnaires. Our results highlight that, to improve services, communication strategies should be optimised in nurse-led clinics. © 2017 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  20. Hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with chronic kidney disease and its relationship with the functional status of the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Postovitenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is an important medical, social and economic problem nowadays. Patients with CKD are known to have an increased risk of development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. However, the causes and pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications are not well understood. One of the recently recognized “non-traditional” risk factors for the increased development of cardiovascular pathology in severe stages of CKD is hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC. The article presents the results of study of HHC frequency in patients with different stages of CKD as well as the relationship between HHC and endothelial dysfunction and structural-functional status of the heart. The study involved 148 persons with different stages of CKD who underwent immunoenzyme determination of total plasma homocysteine (HC, echocardiography, carotid ultrasonograghy, endothelial function was assessed as well. It was found that among the patients with CKD, 26 (21.1% had normal and 34 (27.7% had subnormal HC levels, mild HHC was observed in 30 (24.4% and moderate HHC – in 33 (26.8% cases, i.e. the total number of patients with elevated HC level was 88.9%. It should be noted that no patients with normal HC level were found among those with stage four CKD as well as in dialysis patients. The increase of blood plasma HC level was actually proportional to the severity of renal failure, which in its turn led to the shift in the number of cases towards higher rank indices of HHC level. In particular, while there were no patients with HHC among those with CKD-I, more than 50% of such patients were found in the group with CKD-V. Reduced myocardial contractility and echocardiographic markers of left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with CKD were found to be closely associated with HC concentrations in blood plasma. The data presented clearly demonstrate strong inverse correlation between endothelial dysfunction indices and HC level. So, the endothelium

  1. Preliminary Study on the Kidney Elasticity Quantification in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Using Virtual Touch Tissue Quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xiao Zhi; Yang, Bin; Fu, Ning Hua

    2015-01-01

    Virtual touch tissue quantification (VTTQ) provides numerical measurements (shear wave velocity (SWV) values) of tissue stiffness. The purpose of this study was to describe the SWV values of the kidney by VTTQ and to examine the clinical usefulness of this procedure in the evaluation of elasticity changes in the kidneys of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Sixty-five patients with CKD and seventy healthy participants were included in this study. A total of 270 kidneys were examined by VTTQ. The kidney elasticity was expressed as shear wave velocity. The SWV values, blood serum creatinine (Scr)/BUN and pathological findings were analyzed and compared between patients with CKD and healthy participants. In patients with CKD and healthy participants, the SWV values both gradually decreased from the renal cortex to the medulla and renal sinus The SWV value of the renal cortex in patients with CKD was less than that of healthy participants (P < 0.05), and the SWV value of the renal cortex in patients with renal insufficiency was significantly less than in those with normal renal function (2.46 ± 0.15 vs. 3.45 ± 0.26 m/s, P < 0.05). The best cutoff value for predicting renal insufficiency (Scr > 1.24 mg/dL or/and BUN > 21 mg/DL) was a SWV value of the renal cortex of less than 1.92 m/s with a sensitivity of 84.4% (95% CI: 67.2-94.7%) and a specificity of 96.8% (95% CI: 83.3-99.9%) (P < 0.001). VTTQ can sensitively detect the elasticity changes in patients with CKD, and it can effectively predict renal insufficiency. This technology provides a valuable tool for the assessment of CKD

  2. Marijuana and Cannabinoids in ESRD and Earlier Stages of CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Joshua L; Wyatt, Christina M

    2018-02-01

    Marijuana is the most commonly used recreational drug in the United States, and legal recreational and medicinal use has gained public acceptance during the last decade. Twenty-nine US states have established medical marijuana programs, 8 of which have also legalized recreational marijuana, and Canada is expected to legalize recreational marijuana in 2018. Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are chronic conditions with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Patients experience substantial symptom burden that is frequently undertreated due to adverse medication side effects. This article reviews the available evidence for the use of medical marijuana to manage chronic pain, nausea/vomiting, anorexia/cachexia, and pruritus, all of which are frequently reported by patients with advanced CKD or ESRD. Potential adverse health effects of medical and recreational marijuana use are also discussed. Regardless of personal, social, and political beliefs, marijuana use is becoming mainstream, and nephrologists should be aware of the potential impact on our patient population. Further research is warranted to investigate the renal endocannabinoid system, the impact of marijuana use on kidney disease outcomes, and the risks and benefits of medical marijuana use on symptoms of advanced CKD and ESRD. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid disorders in patients with renal failure: Role in cardiovascular events and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Visconti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of lipid disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD is usually characterized by high triglycerides and reduced high dense lipoprotein (HDL, associated with normal or slightly reduced low dense lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Keys for the cardiovascular risk reduction in these patients are lowering the number and modifying the composition of the cholesterol-carrying atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Statins have an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in non-hemodialyzed CKD patients. The benefits in terms of progression of renal failure are contradictory. Patient education regarding dietary regimen should be part of the CKD clinical management.

  4. The efficacy of tolvaptan in the perioperative management of chronic kidney disease patients undergoing open-heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mitsutomo; Nishi, Hiroyuki; Sekiya, Naosumi; Horikawa, Kohei; Takahashi, Toshiki; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    The perioperative management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients undergoing open-heart surgery is challenging. In this study, we evaluated the effects of tolvaptan in CKD patients after open-heart surgery. Between 2010 to 2015, 731 patients underwent open-heart surgery in our hospital. We consecutively selected 71 patients with stage IIIa-IV CKD and divided them into two groups. Those who received tolvaptan postoperatively were defined as the "Tolvaptan group" (n = 25) and those who did not were defined as the "Non-tolvaptan group" (n = 46). We compared the urine volume of postoperative days (POD) 1 and 2, the number of days to return to preoperative body weight (BW), and the change in the postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In the tolvaptan group, the urine volume was significantly larger (P = .04) and the duration to preoperative BW tended to be shorter. Overall, the postoperative change in the eGFR tended to be better in the tolvaptan group (P = .008). In particular, we found a significantly better trend in CKD stage IV (P = .04) patients and in the patients, whose cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time was longer than 120 min (P = .03). Tolvaptan can safely be used for CKD patients undergoing open-heart surgery and can provide a feasible urine volume without leading to a deterioration of their renal function.

  5. Refusal of hemodialysis by hospitalized chronic kidney disease patients in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Salman Tahir; Saleem, Mohammad; Anjum, Roshina; Abdullah, Wajid; Shafi, Tahir

    2018-01-01

    In Pakistan, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are commonly diagnosed at a late stage. There is little information about the refusal of hemodialysis by hospitalized CKD patients who need hemodialysis (HD) and reasons for acceptance and refusal among these patients. All patients with Stage V CKD who had medical indications to undergo HD and were hospitalized at a tertiary care facility over a six-month period were invited to participate in this study. Patients were surveyed regarding acceptance or refusing of HD and reasons for their decisions. Demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical characteristics of patients were compared between patients who accepted or refused HD. A total of 125 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 47.9 ±12.1 years. The mean duration of diagnosis of CKD was 2.5 ± 0.6 months. Of all patients, 72 (57.6%) agreed to do HD and 53 (42.4%) refused HD. Patients with arteriovenous fistula in place (27.1 vs. 9.1%, P 0.02) and those in the middle- or higher-income group (64.4% vs. 38.6%, p = 0.03) were more willing to undergo HD. Trust in doctor's advice (86.1%) was the most common reason for acceptance of HD. Frequency of HD per week (52.8%), lifelong and permanent nature of HD (50.9%), advice by family members or friends (37.7%), perception of poor quality of life on HD (35.8%), and fear of HD needles and complications during HD (33.9%) were the most common reasons for refusal. Refusal of HD is common among hospitalized CKD patients with medical indications to undergo HD, especially in lower income group.

  6. Blood pressure and antihypertensive medication profile in a multiethnic Asian population of stable chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon Wee; Chua, Horng Ruey; Wong, Weng Kin; Haroon, Sabrina; Subramanian, Srinivas; Loh, Ping Tyug; Sethi, Sunil; Lau, Titus

    2016-05-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend different blood pressure (BP) goals for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Usage of antihypertensive medication and attainment of BP targets in Asian CKD patients remain unclear. This study describes the profile of antihypertensive agents used and BP components in a multiethnic Asian population with stable CKD. Stable CKD outpatients with variability of serum creatinine levels 3 months apart, were recruited. Mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using automated manometers, according to practice guidelines. Serum creatinine was assayed and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated using the CKD Epidemiology Collaboration equation. BP and antihypertensive medication profile was examined using univariate analyses. 613 patients (55.1% male; 74.7% Chinese, 6.4% Indian, 11.4% Malay; 35.7% diabetes mellitus) with a mean age of 57.8 ± 14.5 years were recruited. Mean SBP was 139 ± 20 mmHg, DBP was 74 ± 11 mmHg, serum creatinine was 166 ± 115 µmol/L and GFR was 53 ± 32 mL/min/1.73 m(2). At a lower GFR, SBP increased (p < 0.001), whereas DBP decreased (p = 0.0052). Mean SBP increased in tandem with the number of antihypertensive agents used (p < 0.001), while mean DBP decreased when ≥ 3 antihypertensive agents were used (p = 0.0020). Different targets are recommended for each BP component in CKD patients. A majority of patients cannot attain SBP targets and/or exceed DBP targets. Research into monitoring and treatment methods is required to better define BP targets in CKD patients. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  7. Prevalence of symptoms of depression among patients with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Depression is the most common psychiatric illness in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Depression has been shown to affect mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. The objective of this study was to determine prevalence of depressive symptoms among CKD patients. Materials and Methods: A ...

  8. Evaluation of Urinary Indices for Albuminuria and Proteinuria in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Dennis Sung Chul Hong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Either protein-to-creatinine ratio (PCR or albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR can be adopted for estimation of proteinuria in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Estimated protein excretion rate (ePER and estimated albumin excretion rate (eAER may be superior to ACR and PCR. Reports show that urine albumin-to-protein ratio (APR may be useful in detecting tubular proteinuria, but should be compared with urine protein electrophoresis (PEP. Methods: Both 24-h urine and spot urine were collected from 77 stable CKD patients for measurement of albumin, protein, and creatinine, and PEP. Based on MDRD and CKD-EPI equations, ePERMDRD, ePERCKD-EPI, eAERMDRD and eAERCKD-EPI were calculated to estimate daily proteinuria and albuminuria. Glomerular CKD was defined by clinical and/or pathological evidence. Results: ACR correlated significantly with PCR. However, microalbuminuria was present in patients without pathologic proteinuria. Twenty-four-hour urine albumin correlated better with eAERMDRD and eAERCKD-EPI than ACR, and 24-h urine protein correlated better with ePERMDRD and ePERCKD-EPI than PCR. APR significantly but not well correlated with the albumin fraction in urine PEP. The albumin fraction obtained from urine PEP was significantly higher in patients with glomerulopathy than those with non-glomerular CKD, whereas there were no differences in APR between groups. In contrast with APR, the albumin fraction in urine PEP was independently associated with glomerular CKD. Conclusions: Both PCR and ACR are useful in evaluation of proteinuria. In quantifying daily proteinuria and albuminuria, ePER and eAER are superior to PCR and ACR, respectively. Compared with APR, urine PEP is more useful in diagnosing glomerular proteinuria.

  9. Evaluation of quality of life, physical, and mental aspects in longevous patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Adriana; Ammirati, Adriano; Garcia, Carlos; Andrade, Carolina; Portela, Odete; Cendoroglo, Maysa S; Sesso, Ricardo

    2018-04-01

    The diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in elderly individuals has been increasing. The objective of this study was to evaluate physical, mental and social aspects in longevous elderly patients with CKD. Eighty patients with CKD (stage 4 and 5, not on dialysis) and 60 longevous elderly (≥ 80 years) paired by gender and age living in the community were evaluated. Physical, cognitive, social and quality of life aspects were analyzed according to the following scales: Charlson comorbidity index, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item (SF-36), Medical Outcomes Study, Boston Naming Test, verbal fluency test (animal naming), sit-to-stand test, gait speed, and the Mini-Mental state examination. Compared to the control group, the CKD group had a higher mean in the comorbidities index (3.5 ± 1.2 vs. 1.0 ± 1, respectively, p < 0.001). In the multivariate analysis, the CKD group presented worse performance in the SF-36 dimensions: 'physical functioning,' 'general health,' 'emotional functioning,' 'vitality,' and physical component summary. On the other hand, they presented better results for the 'mental health' dimension, in addition to lower  social support, worse verbal fluency and worse results on the sit-to-stand test. Longevous patients with stage 4 or 5 CKD presented worse evaluation in several domains of physical and emotional functioning, lower social support and evidence of worse cognitive performance. These aspects should be taken into account in order to improve the care provided to these patients, improve their quality of life and prevent their morbidity.

  10. Barriers to effective communication between veterans with chronic kidney disease and their healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Swati; Fischer, Michael J; Gordon, Howard S; Wadhwa, Anuradha; Popli, Subhash; Gordon, Elisa J

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have insufficient knowledge about CKD, which is associated with poorer health outcomes. Effective patient-provider communication can improve CKD patients' knowledge, thereby augmenting their participation in self-care practices. However, barriers to addressing CKD patients' information needs have not been previously characterized. Adults with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of communication dynamics. Thirty-two patients participated. The mean age of participants was 63 years; most were male (94%) and non-Hispanic white (53%). CKD severity groups represented included CKD-3 (eGFR 30-59 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 34%), CKD-4 (eGFR 15-29 mL/min/1.73 m(2); 25%), CKD-5 (eGFR barriers to patient-provider communication based on patients' reported care at both VA and non-VA facilities, including patients perceived their role as a 'listener', reported limited CKD knowledge, did not understand physicians' explanations and were dissatisfied with the patient-provider relationship. Several barriers to patient-provider communication prevent patients from meeting their information needs and perpetuate patient passivity. Future research should evaluate whether interventions that empower CKD patients to actively participate in their care increase knowledge and improve health outcomes.

  11. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarek, Dariusz; Głąbska, Dominika; Rojek-Trębicka, Jadwiga

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29-79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7 ml/min/1.73 m2). Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake--too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  12. Utilization Patterns of IV Iron and Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents in Anemic Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: A Multihospital Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avani D. Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravenous (IV iron and Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESAs are recommended for anemia management in chronic kidney disease (CKD. This retrospective cohort study analyzed utilization patterns of IV iron and ESA in patients over 18 years of age admitted to University Health System Hospitals with a primary or secondary diagnosis of CKD between January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. A clustered binomial logistic regression using the GEE methodology was used to identify predictors of IV iron utilization. Only 8% (n = 6678 of CKD patients on ESA therapy received IV iron supplementation in university hospitals. Those receiving iron used significantly less amounts of ESAs. Patient demographics (age, race, primary payer, patient clinical conditions (admission status, severity of illness, dialysis status, and physician specialty were identified as predictors of IV iron use in CKD patients. Use of IV iron with ESAs was low despite recommendations from consensus guidelines. The low treatment rate of IV iron represents a gap in treatment practices and signals an opportunity for healthcare improvement in CKD anemic patients.

  13. Awareness and beliefs towards organ donation in chronic kidney disease patients in western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwani, Manish R; Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu; Shah, Pankaj R; Goswami, Jitendra; Ghule, Pravin; Shah, Maulin; Gattani, Vipul; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is a wide discrepancy between demand for and availability of donor organs for organ transplantation. There is no study on awareness about organ donation in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in India. Objectives: To study the awareness and beliefs towards organ donation in CKD patients on hemodialysis in western India. Patients and Methods: Authors conducted a cross sectional study among 85 CKD patients to evaluate knowledge about and attitude towards organ donation at a tertiary hospital. Results: Age of respondents ranged from 15 to 75 years. All were aware of term organ donation and cadaver donation. About 47% of people heard about organ donation through hospital or from doctor. Strikingly, radio was not the source of information to any of the respondents, despite radio being one of the most common medium of mass communication. Almost one third of patients were unaware about any legislation regarding organ donation. All respondents felt that organs should go to the needy irrespective of their religion. About 70% feel that medical colleges should make decisions about organ donation in case of unclaimed dead bodies. About 31.76% believe that there is a danger that donated organs could be misused, abused or misappropriated. Conclusion: Our study shows about 31.76% of our participants believe that there is a danger that donated organs could be misused, abused or misappropriated. There seems to be paucity of information and awareness regarding organ donation among CKD patients. Mass media, religious and political leaders may be involved to maximize awareness about organ donation.

  14. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  15. High sodium intake is associated with important risk factors in a large cohort of chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Nerbass, F B; Pecoits-Filho, R; McIntyre, N J; McIntyre, C W; Taal, M W

    2015-07-01

    An increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is observed in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) even in early stages. Dietary sodium intake has been associated with important CVD and CKD progression risk factors such as hypertension and proteinuria in this population. We aimed to investigate the relationship between sodium intake and CVD or CKD progression risk factors in a large cohort of patients with CKD stage 3 recruited from primary care. A total of 1733 patients with previous estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-59 ml/min/1.73m(2), with a mean age 72.9±9.0 years, were recruited from 32 general practices in primary care in England. Medical history was obtained and participants underwent clinical assessment, urine and serum biochemistry testing. Sodium intake was estimated from three early-morning urine specimens using an equation validated for this study population. Sixty percent of participants who had estimated sodium intake above recommendation (>100 mmol/day or 6 g salt/day) also had higher diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure (MAP), urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, high-sensitive C-reactive protein and uric acid and used a greater number of anti-hypertensive drugs. In multivariable regression analysis, excessive sodium intake was an independent predictor of MAP (B=1.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.41-2.72; P=0.008) and albuminuria (B=1.35, 95% CI 1.02-1.79; P=0.03). High sodium intake was associated with CVD and CKD progression risk factors in patients with predominantly early stages of CKD followed up in primary care. This suggests that dietary sodium intake could afffect CVD risk even in early or mild CKD. Intervention studies are warranted to investigate the potential benefit of dietary advice to reduce sodium intake in this population.

  16. PTH levels and not serum phosphorus levels are a predictor of the progression of kidney disease in elderly patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

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    Toapanta Gaibor, Néstor Gabriel; Nava Pérez, Nathasha Carolina; Martínez Echevers, Yeleine; Montes Delgado, Rafael; Guerrero Riscos, María Ángeles

    At present, there is a high incidence of elderly patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and it is important to know the long term progression and the factors that influence it. To analyse the progression of advanced CKD in elderly patients and the influence of bone-mineral metabolism. Retrospective study of 125 patients ≥70years of age with CKD stages 4-5 who started follow-up from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, showing the progression of CKD (measured by the slope of the regression line of the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] by MDRD-4) over 5years. Progression in the entire group (median and 25th and 75th percentiles): -1.15 (-2.8/0.17) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year, CKD-4: -1.3 (-2.8/0.03) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year, CKD-5: -1.03 (-3.0/0.8) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year; the slope of the regression line was positive in 35 patients (28%: CKD does not progress) and negative in 90 patients (72%: CKD progresses). Negative correlation (Spearman) (slower progression): PTH, albumin/Cr ratio and daily Na excretion (all baseline measurements). No correlation with eGFR, serum P, urinary P excretion, protein intake and intake of P (all baseline measurements). In the linear regression analysis (dependent variable: slope of progression): albuminuria and PTH (both at baseline measurements) influenced this variable independently. Logistic regression (progresses vs. does not progress): PTH, albuminuria and eGFR (all at baseline measurements) influenced significantly. In our group of elderly patients, impairment of renal function is slow, particularly in CKD-5 patients. Albuminuria and PTH at baseline levels are prognostic factors in the evolution of renal function. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral health in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Lingam Amara Swapna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study is to assess the subjective and objective oral manifestations and salivary pH in diabetic and nondiabetic uremic patients at a nephrology clinic. A total of 194 diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, who were divided into four groups, Group A, B, C, D, and who were attending a nephrology clinic were included in the study. Predialytic unstimulated whole salivary pH was recorded using pH- measuring strips. Subjective and objective findings were evaluated and recorded in the specially designed pro forma. Dental health assessment consisted of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index and community periodontal index (CPI. Dysgeusia was found to be significantly more prevalent in nondiabetic patients on dialysis. Uremic odor showed high significance (P <0.05 with 75% patients being positive in diabetic dialysis. There was no significant difference in the incidence of tongue coating between the four groups. A statistically high significance was observed with the objective oral manifestation of mucosal petechiae, with P = 0.01. There was an increased periodontal pocket depth among diabetic CKD patients as compared to that in nondiabetic patients. A moderate significance was found, with a CPI score showing P <0.05. Increased prevalence of caries was noticed among the diabetic CKD patients (Groups A, B. Recorded salivary pH showed no significant difference among diabetic and nondiabetic CKD patients. Findings suggest that these patients are at risk of developing complications, related to systemic health causing morbidity and mortality. Hence, these patients are to be motivated for comprehensive professional oral care and self oral hygiene instructions. Additional research is necessary to elucidate and correlate the combined influence of diabetes, CKD, and dialysis on oral health.

  18. Prevalence and impact of high platelet reactivity in chronic kidney disease: results from the Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy with Drug-Eluting Stents registry.

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    Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Kirtane, Ajay J; Gurbel, Paul A; Christodoulidis, Georgios; Maehara, Akiko; Witzenbichler, Bernhard; Weisz, Giora; Rinaldi, Michael J; Metzger, D Christopher; Henry, Timothy D; Cox, David A; Duffy, Peter L; Mazzaferri, Ernest L; Xu, Ke; Parise, Helen; Brodie, Bruce R; Stuckey, Thomas D; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased rates of adverse events after percutaneous coronary intervention. We sought to determine the impact of CKD on platelet reactivity in clopidogrel-treated patients and whether high platelet reactivity (HPR) confers a similar or differential risk for adverse events among patients with CKD and non-CKD. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents (ADAPT-DES) registry, which included 8582 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stents and platelet function testing using the VerifyNow assay. We compared HPR and its impact on ischemic and bleeding events >2 years among patients with CKD and non-CKD. Patients with CKD (n=1367) were older, more often female, diabetic, and had lower ejection fraction compared with their non-CKD counterparts (n=7043). Although HPR prevalence increased with worsening renal function in unadjusted analyses, these associations were no longer present after adjustment. Major adverse cardiac event rates at 2 years among those without CKD or HPR, HPR alone, CKD alone, and both CKD and HPR were 9.0%, 11.2%, 13.3%, and 17.5%, respectively (Pimpact of HPR on ischemic and bleeding events is similar irrespective of CKD status. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00638794. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. CKD hotspots around the world: where, why and what the lessons are. A CKJ review series.

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    Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one of the three causes of death that has had the highest increase in the last 20 years. The increasing CKD burden occurs in the context of lack of access of most of the world population to adequate healthcare and an incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. However, CKD is not homogeneously distributed. CKD hotspots are defined as countries, region, communities or ethnicities with higher than average incidence of CKD. Analysis of CKD hotspots has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of kidney disease and to improve the life expectancy of the affected communities. Examples include ethnicities such as African Americans in the USA or Aboriginals in Australia, regions such as certain Balkan valleys or Central America and even groups of people sharing common activities or interests such as young women trying to lose weight in Belgium. The study of these CKD hotspots has identified underlying genetic factors, such as ApoL1 gene variants, environmental toxins, such as aristolochic acid and socioeconomic factors leading to nutritional deprivation and inflammation/infection. The CKD hotspots series of CKJ reviews will explore the epidemiology and causes in CKD hotspots, beginning with Australian Aboriginals in this issue. An online map of CKD hotspots around the world will feature the reviewed hotspots, highlighting known or suspected causes as well as ongoing projects to unravel the cause and providing a directory of public health officials, physicians and basic scientists involved in these efforts. Since the high prevalence of CKD in a particular region or population may only be known to local physicians, we encourage readers to propose further CKD hotspots to be reviewed.

  20. Effect of Different Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease and Renal Replacement Therapies on Oxidant-Antioxidant Balance in Uremic Patients

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    Hadja Fatima Tbahriti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress seems to be involved in the path physiology of cardiovascular complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. In this study, we determined the effect of different stages of CKD and substitutive therapies on oxidative stress. One hundred sixty-seven patients (age: 44±06 years; male/female: 76/91 with CKD were divided into 6 groups according to the National Kidney Foundation classification. Prooxidant status was assessed by assaying thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides, and protein carbonyls. Antioxidant defence was performed by analysis of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, vitamin E, Iron, and bilirubin. TBARS and LPO were higher in HD patients compared to other groups (P<0.001, while protein carbonyls were more increased in PD patients. The antioxidant enzymes were declined already at severe stage of CKD and they were declined notably in HD patients (P<0.001. Similar observation was found for vitamin E, Fe, and bilirubin where we observed a significant decrease in the majority of study groups, especially in HD patients (P<0.001. The evolution of CKD was associated with elevated OS. HD accentuates lipid, while PD aggravates protein oxidation. However, the activity of antioxidant enzymes was altered by impaired renal function and by both dialysis treatments.

  1. Vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kristin M; Adams, Michael A; Holden, Rachel M

    2013-11-07

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  2. Clinical pharmacy activities in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease patients: a systematic literature review

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    Stemer Gunar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD represent worldwide health problems with an epidemic extent. Therefore, attention must be given to the optimisation of patient care, as gaps in the care of CKD and ESRD patients are well documented. As part of a multidisciplinary patient care strategy, clinical pharmacy services have led to improvements in patient care. The purpose of this study was to summarise the available evidence regarding the role and impact of clinical pharmacy services for these patient populations. Methods A literature search was conducted using the Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases to identify relevant studies on the impact of clinical pharmacists on CKD and ESRD patients, regarding disease-oriented and patient-oriented outcomes, and clinical pharmacist interventions on drug-related problems. Results Among a total of 21 studies, only four (19% were controlled trials. The majority of studies were descriptive (67% and before-after studies (14%. Interventions comprised general clinical pharmacy services with a focus on detecting, resolving and preventing drug-related problems, clinical pharmacy services with a focus on disease management, or clinical pharmacy services with a focus on patient education in order to increase medication knowledge. Anaemia was the most common comorbidity managed by clinical pharmacists, and their involvement led to significant improvement in investigated disease-oriented outcomes, for example, haemoglobin levels. Only four of the studies (including three controlled trials presented data on patient-oriented outcomes, for example, quality of life and length of hospitalisation. Studies investigating the number and type of clinical pharmacist interventions and physician acceptance rates reported a mean acceptance rate of 79%. The most common reported drug-related problems were incorrect dosing, the need for additional

  3. Correlations of dietary energy and protein intakes with renal function impairment in chronic kidney disease patients with or without diabetes

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    Mei-En Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary energy and protein intake can affect progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD complicated with diabetes is often associated with a decline in renal function. We investigated the relative importance of dietary energy intake (DEI and dietary protein intake (DPI to renal function indicators in nondiabetic and diabetic CKD patients. A total of 539 Stage 3–5 CKD patients [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation] with or without diabetes were recruited from outpatient clinics of Nephrology and Nutrition in a medical center in Taiwan. Appropriateness of DEI and DPI was used to subcategorize CKD patients into four groups:(1 kidney diet (KD A (KD-A, the most appropriate diet, was characterized by low DPI and adequate DEI; (2 KD-B, low DPI and inadequate DEI; (3 KD-C, excess DPI and adequate DEI; and (4 KD-D, the least appropriate diet, excess DPI and inadequate DEI. Inadequate DEI was defined as a ratio of actual intake/recommended intake less than 90% and adequate DEI as over 90%. Low DPI was defined as less than 110% of recommended intake and excessive when over 110%. Outcome measured was eGFR. In both groups of CKD patients, DEI was significantly lower (p<0.001 and DPI higher (p=0.002 than recommended levels. However, only in the nondiabetic CKD patients were KD-C and KD-D significantly correlated with reduced eGFR compared with KD-A at increments of −5.63 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.029 and −7.72 mL/min/1.73 m2 (p=0.015. In conclusion, inadequate energy and excessive protein intakes appear to correlate with poorer renal function in nondiabetic CKD patients. Patients with advanced CKD are in need of counseling by dietitians to improve adherence to diets.

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Among Individuals with Clinical Markers of Kidney Dysfunction

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    Plantinga, Laura C.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Jordan, Regina; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Yee, Jerry; Saran, Rajiv; Powe, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among providers and patients is low. Whether clinical cues prompt recognition of CKD is unknown. We examined whether markers of kidney disease that should trigger CKD recognition among providers are associated with higher individual CKD awareness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements CKD awareness was assessed in 1852 adults with an estimated GFR kidneys?” Participants were grouped by distribution of the following abnormal markers of CKD: hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, albuminuria, and uncontrolled hypertension. Odds of CKD awareness associated with each abnormal marker and groupings of markers were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Among individuals with kidney disease, only those with albuminuria had greater odds of CKD awareness (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0, P disease. Conclusions Although individuals who manifest many markers of kidney dysfunction are more likely to be aware of their CKD, their CKD awareness remains low. A better understanding of mechanisms of awareness is required to facilitate earlier detection of CKD and implement therapy to minimize associated complications. PMID:21784832

  5. Clinical Predictors and Outcomes of Patients with Pericardial Effusion in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Venkatesh; Iskander, Fady; Saini, Abhimanyu; Brecklin, Carolyn; Doukky, Rami

    2018-03-13

    Pericardial effusion is common in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to identify predictors of pericardial effusion in CKD patients and to evaluate the impact of pericardial effusion on their mortality and morbidity. In a retrospective nested case control study design, we analyzed hospitalized adult patients with CKD stage 4, 5, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) diagnosed with pericardial effusion. Randomly selected patients with CKD stage 4, 5, and ESRD without pericardial effusion were used as controls. We analyzed 84 cases and 61 controls, of whom 44% and 34% were on dialysis, respectively. The mean blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were 70±27 mg/dL and 8.4±6.0 mg/dL among cases, 54±26 mg/dL and 6.0±3.4 mg/dL among controls, respectively. Effusion was moderate to large in 46% of cases. Predictors of any pericardial effusion were serum potassium (OR, 1.95 per 1 mEq/L increment in level; CI, 1.21-3.13; p=0.006), serum corrected calcium (OR, 1.33 per 1mg/dl decrement in level; CI, 1.11-1.67; p=0.015) and admission heart rate (OR, 1.29 per 10 beats/minute increment in heart rate; CI, 1.03-1.62; p=0.027). Corrected calcium level was an independent predictor of moderate to large pericardial effusion, (OR, 1.38 per 1 mg/dL decrement in level; CI, 1.04-1.82, p=0.023). Corrected calcium effusion. Patients with effusion had no significant difference in mortality or cardiovascular re-hospitalization (log-rank p=0.408). In hospitalized CKD patients, hypocalcemia may be useful in identifying those with moderate to large pericardial effusion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein as Useful Surrogate Markers for Evaluating CKD Risk in Adults

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    Chung-Hsun Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Results: Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Conclusion: Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

  7. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein as useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Yi-Yen; Sheu, Bor-Fuh; Hsiao, Cheng-Ting; Loke, Song-Seng; Chen, Jih-Chang; Li, Wen-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP) as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

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    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  9. CKD screening and management in the Veterans Health Administration: the impact of system organization and an innovative electronic record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Thakor G; Pogach, Leonard M; Barth, Robert H

    2009-03-01

    At the beginning of this decade, Healthy People 2010 issued a series of objectives to "reduce the incidence, morbidity, mortality and health care costs of chronic kidney disease." A necessary feature of any program to reduce the burden of kidney disease in the US population must include mechanisms to screen populations at risk and institute early the aspects of management, such as control of blood pressure, management of diabetes, and, in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), preparation for dialysis therapy and proper vascular access management, that can retard CKD progression and improve long-term outcome. The Department of Veterans Affairs and the Veterans Health Administration is a broad-based national health care system that is almost uniquely situated to address these issues and has developed a number of effective approaches using evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, performance measures, innovative use of a robust electronic medical record system, and system oversight during the past decade. In this report, we describe the application of this systems approach to the prevention of CKD in veterans through the treatment of risk factors, identification of CKD in veterans, and oversight of predialysis and dialysis care. The lessons learned and applicability to the private sector are discussed.

  10. The impact of body weight management in chronic kidney disease patients with obesity.

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    Wang, Ya-Ling; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Fang; Yang, Wen-Ching; Wu, Ming-Ju; Lin, Tzu-Mei; Chen, Cheng-Hsu

    2013-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity are important public health concerns. Because obesity may initiate and/or accelerate kidney damage, weight control may benefit CKD patients. We examined the influence of dietary management and physical exercise in 38 obese CKD patients with or without target reduction of body weight 3% or more from baseline. After a 2-month lifestyle intervention program, those with target body weight control had significant improvement of blood pressure control, as well as reduced lipid profiles, serum creatinine level (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.8 ± 0.3; P management and exercise were associated with improvements in health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure and lipid control), and renal profiles in obese CKD patients. Supportive individualized programs for lifestyle change could exert beneficial effects, but long-term research with a larger patient population is needed to elucidate the optimal effective combination of dietary management and exercise. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerobic exercise in obese diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease: a randomized and controlled pilot study

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    Cooper Cheryl

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with obesity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD are generally physically inactive, have a high mortality rate, and may benefit from an exercise program. Methods We performed a 24-week randomized controlled feasibility study comparing aerobic exercise plus optimal medical management to medical management alone in patients with type 2 diabetes, obesity (body mass index [BMI] > 30 kg/m2, and stage 2-4 CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 15-90 mL/min/1.73 m2 with persistent proteinuria. Subjects randomized to exercise underwent thrice weekly aerobic training for 6 followed by 18 weeks of supervised home exercise. The primary outcome variable was change in proteinuria. Results Seven subjects randomized to exercise and 4 control subjects completed the study. Exercise training resulted in an increase in exercise duration during treadmill testing, which was accompanied by slight but insignificant decreases in resting systolic blood pressure and 24-hour proteinuria. Exercise did not alter GFR, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, serum lipids, or C-reactive protein (CRP. Caloric intake and body weight and composition also did not change with exercise training. Conclusion Exercise training in obese diabetic patients with CKD is feasible and may have clinical benefits. A large-scale randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of exercise on renal functions, cardiovascular fitness, inflammation, and oxidative stress in diabetic patients with CKD is planned.

  12. The Relationship between Burden and Depression in Spouses of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

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    Athina Paschou; Dimitrios Damigos; Petros Skapinakis; Kostas Siamopoulos

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the burden and depression in spouses of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The interrelation between burden and depression in family caregivers has been pointed out by previous researches in several chronic diseases and researchers agree that they clearly go together and one cannot talk about one without considering the other. More particularly, in the present study, the caregiver burden, the depression, anxiety, and also health-rel...

  13. Chronic kidney disease in Nigeria: an evaluation of the spatial accessibility to healthcare for diagnosed cases in Edo State

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    Osaretin Oviasu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem in Nigeria, presenting challenges to the nation’s health and economy. This study evaluates the accessibility to healthcare in Edo State of CKD patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2009. Using cost analysis techniques within a geographical information system, an estimated travel time to the hospital was used to examine the spatial accessibility of diagnosed patients to available CKD healthcare in the state. The results from the study indicated that although there was an annual rise in the number of diagnosed cases, there were no significant changes in the proportion of patients that were diagnosed at the last stage of CKD. However, there were indications that the travel time to the hospital for CKD treatment might be a contributing factor to the number of diagnosed CKD cases. This implies that the current structure for CKD management within the state might not be adequate.

  14. Closing the loop in person-centered care: patient experiences of a chronic kidney disease self-management intervention

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    Havas K

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Havas,1,2 Clint Douglas,1 Ann Bonner1–3 1School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, 2NHMRC Chronic Kidney Disease Centre for Research Excellence, University of Queensland, 3Kidney Health Service, Metro North Hospital and Health Service, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Purpose: The provision of self-management support (SMS for people with earlier stages (1–4 of chronic kidney disease (CKD can improve patient outcomes and extend time to dialysis. However, attempts to deliver such support have often not taken patient preferences into account. After the development, implementation, and quantitative evaluation of the person-centered CKD-SMS intervention, the aim of this study was to investigate participant experiences and perceptions of the program, as well as to seek suggestions to improve future SMS attempts.Patients and methods: Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were conducted with almost all (63/66 participants in the CKD-SMS. Deductive categories were derived from previous research into self-management from the CKD patient’s perspective, and this was supplemented by categories that emerged inductively during multiple readings of interview transcripts. Content analysis was used to analyze interview data.Results: Participants recognized self-management of CKD as complex and multifaceted. They felt that the CKD-SMS helped them develop skills to engage in necessary self-management tasks, as well as their knowledge about their condition and confidence to take an active role in their healthcare. These participants experience a healthcare environment that is characterized by complexity and inconsistency, and participation in the intervention helped them to navigate it. The benefit of participating in this research to contribute to the scientific literature was also recognized by participants. Overall, participants found the CKD-SMS useful in its current format, and made some suggestions for future interventions

  15. The association between individual counselling and health behaviour change: the See Kidney Disease (SeeKD) targeted screening programme for chronic kidney disease

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    Galbraith, Lauren; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Manns, Braden; Samuel, Susan; Kappel, Joanne; Valk, Nadine; Ronksley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Health behaviour change is an important component of management for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, the optimal method to promote health behaviour change for self-management of CKD is unknown. The See Kidney Disease (SeeKD) targeted screening programme screened Canadians at risk for CKD and promoted health behaviour change through individual counselling and goal setting. Objectives The objectives of this study are to determine the effectiveness of individual co...

  16. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration is a predictor of chronic kidney disease in patients with cardiovascular risk factors - Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Kurajoh

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been shown to have protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and death through neural and non-neural pathways via tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling. However, it is not known whether plasma BDNF concentration is a predictor of chronic kidney disease (CKD.This study was conducted as a prospective cohort study as part of the Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis.We measured plasma BDNF concentration in 324 patients without CKD, defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR less than 60 ml/min/1.73m2, and with cardiovascular risk factors. As potential confounders, sleep condition, nocturnal hypertension, and autonomic function were quantitatively examined. The patients were followed for a median 37 months (range 2-59 months and occurrence of CKD was noted.Plasma BDNF concentration was significantly and independently associated with CKD development, which occurred in 38 patients (11.7%. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with reduced plasma BDNF concentration exhibited a significantly (p = 0.029 greater number of CKD events as compared to those with a higher concentration. Moreover, comparisons of key subgroups showed that the risk of CKD in association with low plasma BDNF concentration was more prominent in patients with a greater reduction of nocturnal systolic blood pressure, better movement index, higher standard deviations of the NN(RR interval or average NN(RR interval for each 5-minute period, and without past cardiovascular disease events, smoking habit, or albuminuria.Plasma BDNF concentration is an independent predictor for development of CKD in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

  17. Hepcidin in chronic kidney disease : not an anaemia management tool, but promising as a cardiovascular biomarker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weerd, N. C.; Grooteman, M. P. C.; Nube, M. J.; ter Wee, P. M.; Swinkels, D. W.; Gaillard, C. A. J. M.

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis and plays a role in the pathogenesis of anaemia of chronic disease. Its levels are increased in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to diminished renal clearance and an inflammatory state. Increased hepcidin levels in CKD patients are

  18. Cognitive Performance Is Highly Stable over a 2-Year-Follow-Up in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients in a Dedicated Medical Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronewold, Janine; Todica, Olga; Seidel, Ulla K; Volsek, Michaela; Kribben, Andreas; Bruck, Heike; Hermann, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    As kidney and brain functions decline with aging, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dementia are becoming increasing health burdens worldwide. Among the risk factors for cognitive impairment, CKD is increasingly recognized. The precise impact of CKD on the development of cognitive impairment is poorly understood. In the New Tools for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease (NTCVD) cohort, which was recruited in a dedicated nephrology department, we examined the 2-year course of cognitive performance in 120 patients (73 patients with CKD stages 3-5D, 47 control patients without CKD with similar vascular risk profile) using a comprehensive battery of 10 neuropsychological tests. Kidney function, vascular risk factors and cognitive performance were highly stable both in CKD and control patients. The summary score of cognitive performance in CKD patients was very similar at baseline (z = -0.63±0.76) and follow-up (z = -0.54±0.79, p = 0.113), as was cognitive performance in control patients (z = -0.01±0.59 and 0.01±0.70, p = 0.862, at baseline and follow-up, respectively). Total serum cholesterol (199.6±36.0 and 186.0±32.9, p = 0.005 in controls; 194.4±46.1 and 181.2±41.2, p = 0.008 in CKD) and common carotid intima-media thickness (0.87±0.18 and 0.84±0.17, p = 0.351 in controls; 0.88±0.21 and 0.82±0.16, p = 0.002 in CKD) moderately but significantly decreased during the follow-up. In multivariable regression analyses, high age (β = -0.28, 95%CI = -0.48 to 0.08, p = 0.007) predicted decrease in cognitive performance. In this well-defined cohort receiving state-of-the-art therapy, cognitive performance did not decrease over 2 years. Our data emphasize the aspect of risk factor control, suggesting that dedicated medical care might prevent cognitive decline in CKD patients.

  19. Comparison of the MDRD Study and CKD-EPI Equations for the Estimation of the Glomerular Filtration Rate in the Korean General Population: The Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V-1, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Dong Jeong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We compared the accuracy of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD study and Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equations in Korean patients and evaluated the difference in CKD prevalence determined using the two equations in the Korean general population. Methods: The accuracy of the two equations was evaluated in 607 patients who underwent a chromium-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid GFR measurement. Additionally, we compared the difference in CKD prevalence determined by the two equations among 5,822 participants in the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010. Results: Among the 607 subjects, the median bias of the CKD-EPI equation was significantly lower than that of the MDRD study equation (0.9 vs. 2.2, p=0.020. The accuracy of the two equations was not significantly different in patients with mGFR 2; however, the accuracy of the CKD-EPI equation was significantly higher than that of the MDRD study equation in patients with GFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73m2. The prevalences of the CKD stages 1, 2 and 3 in the Korean general population were 47.56, 49.23, and 3.07%, respectively, for the MDRD study equation; and were 68.48, 28.89, and 2.49%, respectively, for the CKD-EPI equation. Conclusions: These data suggest that the CKD-EPI equation might be more useful in clinical practice than the MDRD study equation in Koreans.

  20. A Randomized Trial of Vitamin D Supplementation on Vascular Function in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Kumar, Vinod; Singhal, Manphool; Billot, Laurent; Gupta, Krishan Lal; Banerjee, Debasish; Jha, Vivekanand

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency associates with mortality in patients with CKD, and vitamin D supplementation might mitigate cardiovascular disease risk in CKD. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we investigated the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on vascular function in 120 patients of either sex, aged 18-70 years, with nondiabetic CKD stage 3-4 and vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤20 ng/ml). We randomized patients using a 1:1 ratio to receive either two directly observed oral doses of cholecalciferol (300,000 IU) or matching placebo at baseline and 8 weeks. The primary outcome was change in endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included changes in pulse wave velocity and circulating biomarkers. Cholecalciferol supplementation significantly increased endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilation at 16 weeks, whereas placebo did not (between-group difference in mean change: 5.49%; 95% confidence interval, 4.34% to 6.64%; P vitamin D deficiency, vitamin D supplementation may improve vascular function. This study is registered with the Clinical Trials Registry of India (no.: CTRI/2013/05/003648). Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. The effect of ONCE Renal on minerals and electrolytes in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Satirapoj, Bancha; Prapakorn,Janjira; Punpanich,Dollapas; Pongsuparbchon,Chantima; Supasyndh,Ouppatham

    2016-01-01

    Bancha Satirapoj,1 Janjira Prapakorn,2 Dollapas Punpanich,2 Chantima Pongsuparbchon,3 Ouppatham Supasyndh11Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, 2Research Unit, Department of Medicine, 3Clinical Research Center, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok, ThailandBackground: Malnutrition is one common adverse consequence in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD), and most patients have a lower-than-normal dietary energy intake. The present st...

  2. A contemporary evaluation of carotid endarterectomy outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit R; Dombrovskiy, Viktor Y; Vogel, Todd R

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been identified as a significant risk factor for poor post-surgical outcomes. This study was designed to provide a contemporary analysis of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) outcomes in patients with CKD, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and normal renal function (NF). Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample data 2006-2012 was queried to select patients aging 40 years old and above who underwent CEA during two days after admission and had a diagnosis of ESRD on long-term hemodialysis, patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD, or NF. Patients with acute renal failure were excluded. We subsequently compared procedure outcomes and hospital resource utilization in these patients. Results Totally 573,723 CEA procedures were estimated: 4801 (ESRD)' 32,988 (CKD)' and 535,934 (NF). Mean age was 71.0 years, 57.7% were males, and 73.7% were white. Overall hospital mortality was 0.20%: 0.69% (ESRD), 0.35% (CKD), and 0.19% (NF), p < 0.0005 between groups. The overall stroke rate was 1.6%: 1.8% (ESRD), 2.0% (CKD), and 1.6% (NF). Comparing NF to CKD there was a significant difference: p < 0.0001. For CKD patients, compared to NF patients, there was an increased risk in cardiac complications (odds ratio = 1.2; 95% CI 1.15-1.32), respiratory complications (odds ratio = 1.2; 95% CI 1.15-1.32), and stroke (odds ratio = 1.1; 95% CI 1.04-1.23). For ESRD patients compared to NF patients there was an increased risk in respiratory complications (odds ratio = 1.3; 95% CI 1.08-1.47) and sepsis (odds ratio = 4.4; 95% CI 3.23-5.94). Mean length of stay and cost were: 2.8 d and $13,903 (ESRD), 2.2 d and $12,057 (CKD), and 1.8 d and $10,130 (NF), all p < 0.0001. Conclusions Patients with ESRD undergoing CEA had an increased risk of respiratory and septic complications, but not a higher risk of stroke compared to patients with normal renal function. The greatest risks of postoperative stroke, respiratory, and cardiac

  3. Poverty, race, and CKD in a racially and socioeconomically diverse urban population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Deidra C; Charles, Raquel F; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B; Powe, Neil R

    2010-06-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) and African American race are both independently associated with end-stage renal disease and progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, despite their frequent co-occurrence, the effect of low SES independent of race has not been well studied in CKD. Cross-sectional study. 2,375 community-dwelling adults aged 30-64 years residing within 12 neighborhoods selected for both socioeconomic and racial diversity in Baltimore City, MD. Low SES (self-reported household income or =125% of guideline); white and African American race. CKD defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate poverty and CKD, stratified by race. Of 2,375 participants, 955 were white (347 low SES and 608 higher SES) and 1,420 were African American (713 low SES and 707 higher SES). 146 (6.2%) participants had CKD. Overall, race was not associated with CKD (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.57-1.96); however, African Americans had a much greater odds of advanced CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate urban populations. Low SES has a profound relationship with CKD in African Americans, but not whites, in an urban population of adults, and its role in the racial disparities seen in CKD is worthy of further investigation. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of statin therapy on cerebrovascular and renal outcomes in patients with predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease and dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chang-Min; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Hsu, Jen-Te; Hsiao, Ju-Feng; Chang, Shih-Tai; Pan, Kuo-Li; Lin, Chun-Liang; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    Treatment with statin may be beneficial for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the debate over the clinical importance of statin in patients with predialysis advanced CKD remains unresolved. The objective of the article was to evaluate the effect of statin on mortality, cerebrovascular, and renal outcomes in patients with predialysis advanced CKD and dyslipidemia. Data on predialysis advanced CKD patients were retrieved from the National Health Insurance Research Database based on the guidelines for prescribing regular erythropoietin-stimulating agent in CKD patients. Patients with dyslipidemia were further selected and divided into 2 groups by their statin use after the prescribed erythropoietin-stimulating agent. All-cause mortality and cerebrovascular and renal outcomes were analyzed after propensity score matching. There were 2016 and 14,412 patients in the statin and nonstatin groups. Their average follow-up periods were 3.7 and 3.0 years, respectively. After 1:2 propensity score matching, the annual all-cause mortality rate was higher in the nonstatin than in the statin group (143.99 vs 109.50 per 1000 person-years; P statin group (1269.45 vs 1095.00 per 1000 person-years; P = .002). Adverse events were not significant between the 2 groups. Statins may reduce the all-cause mortality and reduced the risk of dialysis in patients with predialysis advanced CKD and dyslipidemia. However, statins have no impact on ischemic-hemorrhage stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of personalized dietary intervention on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, S; Molfino, A; Coppola, B; De Leo, S; Tommasi, V; Galani, A; Migliaccio, S; Greco, E A; Gnerre Musto, T; Muscaritoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) present a markedly increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality since the early stages of the disease and a high prevalence of malnutrition, inflammation, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Personalized nutritional intervention, with of a low-protein diet (LPD), since the early stages of CKD should be able to achieve significant metabolic improvements. In our study we have verified the effects of a personalized dietary intervention in patients in the CKD stages 3/4 KDOQI on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices. We have evaluated renal function, lipid profile, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and acid-base balance of 16 patients with CKD (stages 3/4 KDOQI). Assessment of nutritional status, body composition, bone mineral density and muscle mass, using body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed. Vascular indices and endothelial dysfunction such as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (baFMD) were also analyzed. After dietary interventions, we observed a significant increase in plasma bicarbonate (p = 0.004) and vitamin D levels (p = 0.03) and a concomitant significant reduction of phosphorus concentration (p = 0.001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.01). Nutritional intervention potentially plays a major role in reducing the progression of CKD and systemic complications of predialysis patients. A low-protein diet (LPD) ensuring vegetable protein intake and a reduced amount of specific micronutrients should be recommended to stage 3/4 CKD patients in order to ameliorate metabolic profile, renal outcome, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  6. Urinary excretion of uric acid is negatively associated with albuminuria in patients with chronic kidney disease: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengqin; Guo, Hui; Zou, Jianan; Chen, Weijun; Lu, Yijun; Zhang, Xiaoli; Fu, Chensheng; Xiao, Jing; Ye, Zhibin

    2018-04-24

    Increasing evidence has shown that albuminuria is related to serum uric acid. Little is known about whether this association may be interrelated via renal handling of uric acid. Therefore, we aim to study urinary uric acid excretion and its association with albuminuria in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). A cross-sectional study of 200 Chinese CKD patients recruited from department of nephrology of Huadong hospital was conducted. Levels of 24 h urinary excretion of uric acid (24-h Uur), fractional excretion of uric acid (FEur) and uric acid clearance rate (Cur) according to gender, CKD stages, hypertension and albuminuria status were compared by a multivariate analysis. Pearson and Spearman correlation and multiple regression analyses were used to study the correlation of 24-h Uur, FEur and Cur with urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). The multivariate analysis showed that 24-h Uur and Cur were lower and FEur was higher in the hypertension group, stage 3-5 CKD and macro-albuminuria group (UACR> 30 mg/mmol) than those in the normotensive group, stage 1 CKD group and the normo-albuminuria group (UACRuric acid is negatively associated with albuminuria in patients with CKD. This phenomenon may help to explain the association between albuminuria and serum uric acid.

  7. Increased rho kinase activity in mononuclear cells of dialysis and stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: Cardiovascular risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Lorenzo A; Vertolli, Ugo; Pagnin, Elisa; Ravarotto, Verdiana; Davis, Paul A; Lupia, Mario; Naso, Elena; Maiolino, Giuseppe; Naso, Agostino

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of excess mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and dialysis patients (DP) who have higher prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), the strongest predictor of CV events. Rho kinase (ROCK) activation is linked in hypertensive patients to cardiac remodeling while ROCK inhibition suppresses cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and, in a human clinical condition opposite to hypertension, its downregulation associates with lack of CV remodeling. Information on ROCK activation-LVH link in CKD and DP is lacking. Mononuclear cells (PBMCs) MYPT-1 phosphorylation, a marker of ROCK activity, and the effect of fasudil, a ROCK inhibitor, on MYPT-1 phosphorylation were assessed in 23 DPs, 13 stage 3-4 CKD and 36 healthy subjects (HS) by Western blot. LV mass was assessed by M-mode echocardiography. DP and CKD had higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation compared to HS (p<0.001 and p=0.003). Fasudil (500 and 1000μM) dose dependently reduced MYPT-1 phosphorylation in DP (p<0.01). DP had higher LV mass than CKD (p<0.001). MYPT-1 phosphorylation was higher in patients with LVH (p=0.009) and correlated with LV mass both in DP and CKD with LVH (p<0.001 and p=0.006). In DP and CKD, ROCK activity tracks with LVH. This ROCK activation-LVH link provided in these CVD high-risk patients along with similar findings in hypertensive patients and added to opposite findings in a human model opposite to hypertension and in type 2 diabetic patients, identify ROCK activation as a potential LVH marker and provide further rationale for ROCK activation inhibition as target of therapy in CVD high-risk patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Final Year Nursing Students in Nigeria; How Knowledgeable and Prepared are They to Offer Medical Care to Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwuonu, Chimezie Godswill; Kanu, Hannah Sylvanus; Odigie, Ojeh-Oziegbe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nurses play an important role in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of care. In other to perform their functions, it is pertinent that they have a good understanding of kidney functions and CKD. We do not know if the current educational curriculum prepares them adequately for this role. Aim: To assess the knowledge level of kidney functions and diseases among final year nursing students in Abia State Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study involving final year diploma and Bachelor of nursing (B. Nursing) students who were randomly chosen. Structured, self-administered questionnaire containing 18 items was the tool for data collection. A score of one was given for each correctly answered question on functions of the kidney, symptoms, signs, causes, and complications of CKD. A score of 50% and above was regarded as good knowledge. Results: Two hundred questionnaires were distributed, but 186 were returned (response rate of 93%). Male:female ratio was 1:14.5. One hundred and seventeen (62.9%) knew the correct definition of CKD, but only 69 (37.1%) knew the normal range of glomerular filtration rate. Eighty-one percent had good knowledge of kidney functions while 39 (21%) had good knowledge of CKD. Overall, 42 (22.6%) had good knowledge of kidney functions and CKD. Students who rotated through the dialysis unit during their clinical posting had higher mean knowledge score than others (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in the mean knowledge scores of the diploma and B. Nursing students (P = 0.76). Conclusion: The majority of the final year students had poor knowledge of CKD. There is need to expand the current teaching curriculum so as to increase the knowledge of these future nurses on the basic concepts of CKD to improve outcomes of patient management. PMID:28300046

  9. [Executive summary of the recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorriz, José L; Gutiérrez, Félix; Trullàs, Joan C; Arazo, Piedad; Arribas, Jose R; Barril, Guillermina; Cervero, Miguel; Cofán, Frederic; Domingo, Pere; Estrada, Vicente; Fulladosa, Xavier; Galindo, María J; Gràcia, Sílvia; Iribarren, José A; Knobel, Hernando; López-Aldeguer, José; Lozano, Fernando; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Martínez, Esteban; Mazuecos, Maria A; Miralles, Celia; Montañés, Rosario; Negredo, Eugenia; Palacios, Rosario; Pérez-Elías, María J; Portilla, Joaquín; Praga, Manuel; Quereda, Carlos; Rivero, Antonio; Santamaría, Juan M; Sanz, José; Sanz, Jesús; Miró, José M

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this article is to update the 2010 recommendations on the evaluation and management of renal disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Renal function should be monitored in all HIV-infected patients. The basic renal work-up should include measurements of serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate by CKD-EPI, urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, and urinary sediment. Tubular function tests should include determination of serum phosphate levels and urine dipstick for glycosuria. In the absence of abnormal values, renal screening should be performed annually. In patients treated with tenofovir, or with risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD), more frequent renal screening is recommended. In order to prevent disease progression, potentially nephrotoxic antiretroviral drugs are not recommended in patients with CKD or risk factors for CKD. The document provides indications for renal biopsy and advises on the optimal time for referral of a patient to the nephrologist. The indications for and evaluation and management of dialysis and renal transplantation are also addressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Loop diuretics are associated with greater risk of sarcopenia in patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Seiko; Naito, Shotaro; Iimori, Soichiro; Takahashi, Daiei; Zeniya, Moko; Sato, Hidehiko; Nomura, Naohiro; Sohara, Eisei; Okado, Tomokazu; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2018-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, frequently accompanies chronic kidney disease. The aim of this study was to clarify the prevalence and the risk factors for sarcopenia among patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD), focusing on the use of drugs. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis on a cohort of 260 patients with NDD-CKD in a university hospital, recruited between June 2016 and March 2017. We extracted data on patient gender, age, cause of chronic kidney disease, use of drugs, and comorbidities that could potentially affect the prevalence of sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was diagnosed using the criteria of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the association of each factor on the prevalence of sarcopenia. 25.0% of our study subjects had sarcopenia. Multivariable analysis revealed that an increased risk of sarcopenia was significantly associated with age, male gender, body mass index, diabetes mellitus, and loop diuretic use (odds ratio, 4.59: 95% confidence interval, 1.81-11.61: P-value 0.001). In our cohort, the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with NDD-CKD was high, and diuretics use, particularly loop diuretic use, was suggested to be a risk factor of sarcopenia. Although loop diuretics are commonly used in patients with CKD, careful consideration of the risk of sarcopenia may be necessary.

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    Vitamin D deficiency is present in the vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and correcting a poor vitamin D status is recommended as a treatment of CKD-mineral and bone disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular and clinical data on the role of vitamin D status for

  12. Predialytic treatment of chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... in high turnover bone disease. Note the poor outline of the femurs. Fig. 4. Severe calciphylaxis in a patient with CKD. Note the extensive skin and subcutaneous infarc- tion with underlying muscle clearly visible. Predialytic treatment of CKD. 392. CME August 2007 Vol.25 No.8 pg389-394.indd 392. 8/16/07 ...

  13. Paediatric chronic kidney disease | van Biljon | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctors use various guidelines on paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) for managing their patients according to the availability of resources. As with adolescent and adult patients, CKD in children can also progress to end-stage renal failure – the time course being influenced by several modifiable factors. Decline in ...

  14. Clinical Course of Acute Pancreatitis in Chronic Kidney Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the clinical course, etiology and complications of acute pancreatitis among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in a tertiary care renal center in Karachi. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the clinical course of CKD patients who presented to our emergency room with ...

  15. of chronic kidney disease advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Szeliga-Król

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Chronic kidney disease (CKD is at present a worldwide health problem. According to the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI, chronic kidney disease has five stages of advancement based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. The formulas that are most frequently used in determining eGFR are the Cockroft–Gault (CG formula, the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula, and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI Collaboration formula, which is considered the most accurate formula. Objectives . The aim of our study was to compare the CG, simplified MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas for determining eGFR and thus CKD advancement. Material and methods. The study was conducted on a group of 202 patients with previously diagnosed CKD. To calculate the eGFR, the CG, simplified MDRD, and CKD-EPI formulas were used. Patients were assigned a disease stage (from 1 to 5 according to the NKF KDOQI guidelines. Results . The calculated eGFR values varied depending on the formula, which resulted different assignations of patients to CKD stages. The largest difference regarded the qualification of the patients to the first and the fifth stage. A similar number of patients were classed as stage three by all formulas. Differences were also seen in how the formulas classified patients to the second and fourth stages. Conclusions . GFR estimation remains a problematic clinical concern. The CKD stage assigned to patients varies depending on the formula used, a fact which may be particularly significant for general practitioners. Laboratories should apply the CKD-EPI formula for eGFR calculation, as it gives the least false results.

  16. Chronic kidney disease: information on southern brazilian patients with kidney disease - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.16048 Chronic kidney disease: information on southern brazilian patients with kidney disease - 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v34ispec.16048

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dalva de Barros Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The profile of patients undergoing haemodialysis in the dialysis unit of Hospital Santa Casa de Maringá, Maringá PR Brazil, is provided. A questionnaire on social and economic data and underlying diseases prior to the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD identified the patients’ profile. The project was approved by the Ethics Committee of the institution. Eighty-three patients, with 54.21% males, were interviewed. Age bracket ranged between 20 and 59 years in 65.06% of patients. Only 27.71% maintained jobs after the diagnosis and the start of treatment; 63.86% had an average personal income between 1 and 3 minimum wages; 63.85% did not practice any physical activity. Moreover, 53.01% belonged to the European-Brazilian white group; 20.48% to the Afro-Brazilian brown group; 19.28% to the Afro-Brazilian Negro group; 6.02% to other ethnic groups. Further, 85.54% patients reported having an underlying disease prior to the CKD, namely, 61.45% were hypertensive; 31.33% were diabetics and 20.48% had other diseases. Results show the need of a greater attention to these patients’ health care to reduce the negative impacts related to the chronic disease focused.The profile of patients undergoing haemodialysis in the dialysis unit of Hospital Santa Casa de Maringá, Maringá PR Brazil, is provided. A questionnaire on social and economic data and underlying diseases prior to the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD identified the patients’ profile. The project was approved by the Ethics Committee of the institution. Eighty-three patients, with 54.21% males, were interviewed. Age bracket ranged between 20 and 59 years in 65.06% of patients. Only 27.71% maintained jobs after the diagnosis and the start of treatment; 63.86% had an average personal income between 1 and 3 minimum wages; 63.85% did not practice any physical activity. Moreover, 53.01% belonged to the European-Brazilian white group; 20.48% to the Afro-Brazilian brown group; 19.28% to the Afro-Brazilian Negro

  17. Prescribed Renoprotective Chinese Herbal Medicines Were Associated with a Lower Risk of All-Cause and Disease-Specific Mortality among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Follow-Up Study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Fa Hsieh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs containing aristolochic acid (AA are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but some prescribed CHMs have been shown to possess renoprotective effects. We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study to delineate the role of prescribed CHMs on the CKD progression. Renoprotective CHM (RPCHM was defined if a CHM contained dong chong xia cao (Cordyceps sinensis (Berk. Sacc., da huang (Rheum palmatum L, huang qi (Astragalus membranaceus, dan shen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bge., and dong quai (Angelica sinensis (Oliv. Diels or belonged to specific mixture herbal formulations (Yishen capsule, Saireito, or Wen Pi Tang. Subjects who had ever used AA-containing CHMs, had cancer or HIV prior to CKD diagnosis, or died within the first month of CKD diagnosis were excluded. A total of 11,625 patients were eligible subjects. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR for all-cause mortality was 0.6 (p < 0.001 and 0.6 (p = 0.013 among subjects receiving RPCHMs containing Angelica sinensis and those receiving other RPCHMs, respectively. For CKD-related mortality, the aHR among subjects receiving RPCHMs containing Angelica sinensis was 0.6 (p = 0.025. The use of specific RPCHMs, especially those that contained Angelica sinensis, was associated with a lower risk of mortality among CKD patients.

  18. The Interaction Between Thyroid and Kidney Disease: An Overview of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Connie M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Hypothyroidism is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, including those receiving dialysis. This review examines potential mechanistic links between thyroid and kidney disease; current evidence for hypothyroidism as a risk factor for de novo CKD and CKD progression; and studies of thyroid functional disorders, cardiovascular disease, and death in the CKD population. Recent Findings Epidemiologic data have demonstrated an incrementally higher prevalence of hypothyroidism with increasing severity of kidney dysfunction. Various thyroid functional test abnormalities are also commonly observed in CKD, due to alterations in thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism, and regulation. While the mechanistic link between thyroid and kidney disease remains unclear, observational studies suggest hypothyroidism is associated with abnormal kidney structure and function. Previously thought to be a physiologic adaptation, recent studies show that hypothyroidism is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD. Summary A growing body of evidence suggests that hypothyroidism is a risk factor for incident CKD, CKD progression, and higher death risk in kidney disease patients. Rigorous studies are needed to determine impact of thyroid hormone replacement upon kidney disease progression, cardiovascular disease, and mortality, which may shed light into the causal implications of hypothyroidism in CKD. PMID:27428519

  19. Syndrome of rapid onset end stage renal disease in incident Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis patient

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    M. A. C. Onuigbo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, a full understanding of chronic kidney disease (CKD-end stage renal disease (ESRD progression remains elusive. The common consensus is a predictable, linear, progressive and time-dependent decline of CKD to ESRD. Acute kidney injury (AKI on CKD is usually assumed to be transient, with recovery as the expected outcome. AKI-ESRD association in current nephrology literature is blamed on the so-called "residual confounding." We had previously described a relationship between AKI events and rapid onset yet irreversible ESRD happening in a continuum in a high-risk CKD cohort. However, the contribution of the syndrome of rapid onset-ESRD (SORO-ESRD to incident United States ESRD population remained conjectural. In this retrospective analysis, we analyzed serum creatinine trajectories of the last 100 consecutive ESRD patients in 4 Mayo Clinic chronic hemodialysis units to determine the incidence of SORO-ESRD. Excluding 9 patients, 31 (34% patients, including two renal transplant recipients, had SORO-ESRD: 18 males and 13 females age 72 (range 50-92 years. Precipitating AKI followed pneumonia (8, acutely decompensated heart failure (7, pyelonephritis (4, post-operative (5, sepsis (3, contrast-induced nephropathy (2, and others (2. Time to dialysis was shortest following surgical procedures. Concurrent renin angiotensin aldosterone system blockade was higher with SORO-ESRD - 23% versus 5%, P = 0.0113. In conclusion, SORO-ESRD is not uncommon among the incident general US ESRD population. The implications for ESRD care planning, AV-fistula-first programs, general CKD care and any associations with renal ageing/senescence warrant further study.

  20. Gastrointestinal symptoms, inflammation and hypoalbuminemia in chronic kidney disease patients: a cross-sectional study.

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    Zhang, Xuehan; Bansal, Nisha; Go, Alan S; Hsu, Chi-Yuan

    2015-12-11

    Few studies have focused on investigating hypoalbuminemia in patients during earlier stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In particular, little is known about the role of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Our goal in this paper is to study how GI symptoms relate to serum albumin levels in CKD, especially in the context of and compared with inflammation. We performed a cross-sectional study of 3599 patients with chronic kidney disease enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study. All subjects were asked to complete the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study patient symptom form. Our main predictor is GI symptom score. Serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured as well. Main outcome measures are serum albumin levels and prevalence of hypoalbuminemia. Of the participants assessed, mean serum albumin was 3.95 ± 0.46 g/dL; 12.7 % had hypoalbuminemia. Patients with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were likely to have more GI symptoms (apparent at an eGFR Patients with worse GI symptoms had lower dietary protein intake. GI symptoms, like inflammation, were risk factors for lower serum albumin levels. However, adding GI symptom score or CRP into the multivariable regression analysis, did not attenuate the association between lower eGFR and lower albumin or hypoalbuminemia. Increased prevalence of GI symptoms become apparent among CKD patients at relatively high eGFR levels (45 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), long before ESRD. Patients with more severe GI symptoms scores are more likely to have hypoalbuminemia. But our data do not support GI symptoms/decreased protein intake or inflammation as being the main determinants of serum albumin level in CKD patients.

  1. Does the Spiritual Well-Being of Chronic Hemodialysis Patients Differ from that of Pre-dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease Patients?

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    Areewan Cheawchanwattana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual well-being is viewed as an essential component of health-related quality of life (HRQOL in the modernized biopsychosocial-spiritual model of health. Understanding spiritual well-being should lead to better treatment plans from the patients’ point of view, and improved patient adherence. There are numerous studies of traditional HRQOL, physical, mental, and social well-being; however, studies of spiritual well-being in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients are limited. Thus, this study compared spiritual well-being of chronic hemodialysis patients and pre-dialysis CKD patients. A total of 31 chronic hemodialysis and 63 pre-dialysis CKD patients were asked for consent and then interviewed for spiritual well-being using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp. Analysis of covariance was applied to compare FACIT-Sp scores between pre-dialysis CKD and chronic hemodialysis groups that were adjusted by patient characteristics. The FACIT-Sp scores of pre-dialysis CKD patients were non-significantly greater than those of chronic hemodialysis patients after adjustment for gender, age, and marital status. However, all FACIT-Sp scores of males were significantly lower than those of females [FACIT Meaning −1.59 (p = 0.024, FACIT Peace −2.37 (p = 0.004, FACIT Faith −2.87 (p = 0.001, FACIT Total Score −6.83 (p = 0.001]. The spiritual well-being did not significantly differ by stages of chronic kidney disease; however, patient gender was associated with spiritual well-being instead. To improve spiritual well-being, researchers should consider patient gender as a significant factor.

  2. Impact of chronic kidney disease and stress myocardial perfusion imaging as a predictor of cardiovascular events

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    Furuhashi, Tatsuhiko; Joki, Nobuhiko; Hase, Hiroki; Masai, Hirofumi; Kunimasa, Taeko; Nakazato, Ryo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Sugi, Kaoru; Moroi, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an established means of predicting cardiovascular events and is suitable in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of CKD parameters and an abnormal stress MPI for cardiovascular events. A total of 495 patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) or history of CAD including 130 CKD patients not undergoing hemodialysis, underwent stress MPI (313 males, mean age 70 years) and were followed up for 14 months (mean period). CKD was defined as an estimated GFR of 2 and/or persistent proteinuria. Cardiovascular events were defined as sudden cardiac death, acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure requiring hospitalization. Cardiovascular events occurred in 41 (8.3%) patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that CKD [hazard ratio (HR) =3.76, p<0.001] and a stress MPI summed difference score (SDS) of ≥2 (HR=3.78, p<0.001) were independent predictors of cardiovascular events; CKD plus abnormal stress MPI was also a strong predictor of cardiovascular events (non-CKD and SDS <2 vs. CKD and SDS ≥2, HR=15.9, p<0.001). Both CKD and myocardial ischemia detected by stress MPI are independent predictors for cardiovascular events. Coexistence of CKD and myocardial ischemia detected by stress MPI is more useful for short-term risk stratification of cardiovascular events. (author)

  3. Rationale and trial design of Bardoxolone Methyl Evaluation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

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    de Zeeuw, Dick; Akizawa, Tadao; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus constitutes a global epidemic complicated by considerable renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, despite the provision of inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Bardoxolone methyl, a synthetic...... triterpenoid that reduces oxidative stress and inflammation through Nrf2 activation and inhibition of NF-κB was previously shown to increase estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with CKD associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, no antioxidant or anti-inflammatory therapy has proved...

  4. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

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    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  5. Glycaemic changes in patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    De'Marziani, Guillermo; Soler Pujol, Gervasio; Obregón, Liliana Miriam; Morales, Elisa Mabel; Gonzalez, Claudio Daniel; Gonzalez Paganti, Luciana; Cacciagiú, Leonardo; Lopez, Graciela; Schreier, Laura; Elbert, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    In Argentina, there have been no studies aimed at establishing the prevalence of dysglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose [IFG], impaired glucose tolerance [IGT] and diabetes mellitus [DM]) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Our group decided to conduct an observational study to evaluate the frequency with oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in CKD patients with no previous data for dysglycaemia in their medical records. OGTT was performed in 254 patients (60.62% male) with stage 3, 4 and 5 CKD under conservative treatment, haemodialysis or transplantation. Results for DM were found in 10 patients according to fasting glucose alone (3.94%; 95% CI: 1.35-6.53%), 11 patients with exclusively the second hour criterion (4.33%; 95% CI: 1.63-7.03%), 15 with both criteria (5.91%; 95% CI: 2.81-9.00%) and 36 patients with at least one criteria (14.17%; 95% CI: 9.69-18.66%). In a multivariate analysis, DM was associated with waist circumference (OR=1.033 per cm; 95% CI, 1.005 to 1.062; P=.019) and with conservative treatment vs. replacement therapy (OR=0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.92; P=.028). IGT was evident in 24.6% and 20.3 on conservative vs. replacement therapy, with no statistically significant difference. IFG (ADA criteria) was 19.75 vs. 9.24% in conservative vs. replacement therapy, with a statistically significant difference. OGTT is suggested for all CKD patients since it is able to detect the full range of unknown dysglycaemias, which avoids underdiagnoses and favours performing treatments to prevent progression in DM risk groups (IFG and/or IGT). It also aids in the selection of the most appropriate medication for transplantation or treatment initiation in new cases of undiagnosed DM to decrease morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic kidney disease (stages 3-5) in comparison with age- and sex-matched controls: A study from Kashmir Valley Tertiary Care Center.

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    Najar, M Saleem; Mir, Mohamad Muzzafer; Muzamil, Mudasir

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a range of metabolic bone diseases. Fracture rates are higher in CKD patients than age-matched controls throughout all the five stages of CKD. Dialysis patients have 4 times as many hip fractures as expected for their age. CKD forms an independent risk factor for osteoporosis, even in the absence of traditional risk factors. This study was carried out at the nephrology unit in a tertiary care center of Kashmir to know the prevalence of osteoporosis in CKD patients having glomerular filtration rate (GFR) stages 3-5). Among the 151 cases studied, the average estimated GFR was 16.78 ± 10.714 mL/min. There were 98 males (64.9%) and 53 females (35.1%). Their mean age was 51.01 ± 14.138 years. Osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score was seen in 31 patients (31.6%) while 43 patients (28.5%) had osteoporosis at L1, L2 lumbar vertebrae. The prevalence of osteoporosis based on femoral neck T-Score as well as osteopenia was highest in stage-5 CKD. In our study, the body mass index (BMI) had a positive correlation with osteoporosis; low BMI patients were at higher risk for osteoporosis (P = 0.014). In the Kashmir valley, the prevalence of osteoporosis was 31.8% in CKD patients against 22% in controls. Thus, CKD forms an important risk factor for osteoporosis even in the absence of traditional risk factors. We recommend early screening, detection, and management of osteoporosis to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality in this subset of patients.

  7. Circulating levels and dietary intake of the advanced glycation end-product marker carboxymethyl lysine in chronic kidney disease patients on conservative predialysis therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroddi, Marta; Palazzetti, Ingrid; Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Pilolli, Francesca; Montaldi, Massimiliano; Valentina, Viola; Libetta, Carmelo; Galli, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are proposed to influence inflammatory pathways and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dietary AGEs are believed to sustain circulating levels and toxicity in this condition. We investigated this aspect in a cross-sectional pilot study measuring levels of the AGE marker carboxymethyl lysine (CML) and fluorescent AGEs in the blood of pre-dialysis patients with CKD and hemodialysis (HD) patients (n = 10 each), and in a group of matched healthy controls (Ctr). Plasma CML was measured by immuno-dot blot and fluorescent AGEs were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis measuring the fluorescence of the cross-link pentosidine. The dietary intake of CML was assessed by dietary recall to trace total AGE intake in patients with CKD and the Ctr group. All the subjects included in the study were assessed for dietary intake while maintaining their usual diet. Main exclusion criteria for patients with CKD and HD were severe protein-caloric malnutrition and inflammation (measured by high sensitivity C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels). Plasma CML, as well as free and protein-bound fluorescent AGEs, significantly increased in CKD and even more in HD patients than that of the Ctr group. In patients with CKD, the average dietary intake of CML was less than half than that of the Ctr group (6 vs. 13 MU/day) and the lowered protein intake adopted spontaneously by these patients appear to explain this finding. The results show that the intake of CML does not affect circulating levels of this as well as of other AGEs, in well nourished predialysis CKD patients. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease is associated with acute kidney injury and the risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Nicolas L; Goldstein, Stuart L; Frøslev, Trine; Christiansen, Christian F; Olsen, Morten

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac surgery associated-acute kidney injury (CS-AKI) occurs in 30-50% of patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Here we determine if CS-AKI is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in patients with congenital heart disease. Using Danish regional population-based registries, our cohort study included patients with congenital heart disease born between 1990-2010 with first cardiac surgery between 2005 and 2010 (under 15 years of age). Utilizing in- and out-patient laboratory serum creatinine data, we identified individuals fulfilling KDIGO stages of AKI within 5 days of cardiac surgery. A unique personal identifier enabled unambiguous data linkage and virtually complete follow-up. The cumulative incidences of CKD stages 2-5 according to presence of CS-AKI were computed utilizing serum creatinine values and Pottel's formula. Using Cox regression, the corresponding hazard ratios were computed, adjusting for sex, age at first cardiac surgery, calendar period of surgery, and congenital heart disease severity. Of 382 patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery, 127 experienced CS-AKI within 5 days of surgery. Median follow-up was 4.9 years. The five-year cumulative incidence of CKD for patients with CS-AKI was 12% (95% confidence interval 7%-20%), significantly higher than the 3% (1%-5%) for those without CS-AKI with a significant adjusted hazard ratio of 3.8 (1.4-10.4). Thus, CS-AKI in patients with congenital heart disease is common and is associated with an increased risk for CKD. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between symptom clusters and quality of life in patients at stages 2 to 4 chronic kidney disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Jeon, JaeHee

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to identify the relationship between symptom clusters and quality of life (QOL) in patients with stages 2 to 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Korea. Using self-reported questionnaires, data were collected from 143 patients who underwent treatment for CKD at one hospital in Korea. The 17-item Patient Outcome Scale was used to measure symptoms, and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey Instrument Version 2 (SF-36v2) was used to measure the QOL. Data were analyzed using factor analysis to draw symptom clusters. Among five symptom clusters, the energy insufficiency and pain cluster was found to have the highest prevalence and greatest severity. The severity of symptom clusters showed negative correlations with both physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS) scores. Elderly patients scored low on PCS, whereas younger patients in their 30s and 40s scored low on MCS. Negative correlations were found between symptom clusters and PCS as well as MCS. The severity of symptoms and QOL had stronger relationships with subjective perception of symptoms and psychological factors than with objective clinical indicators. As the effects of physical and psychological symptoms on the QOL in patients with stages 2 to 4 CKD were identified in this study, nurses should develop strategic nursing plans focused on symptom clusters and patients' subjective perception of symptoms rather than objective clinical indicators in order to improve the QOL in patients with CKD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Skin blood flow in patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Binh; Rongey, Christine; Hiscox, Bryan; Rendell, Marc; Woodley, David; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw

    2010-09-01

    We have shown previously that skin perfusion is reduced in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients with diabetes and with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 were having advanced microangiopathy. In this cross-sectional study, we measured skin blood flow in DM and non-DM patients on dialysis to assess whether any differences exist in skin perfusion in those 2 groups of patients. A total of 25 patients with DM (aged 59.9 +/- 2.2 years) and 24 patients with non-DM CKD stage 5 (44.6 +/- 2.9 years) on hemodialysis (HD) were studied. Ten healthy subjects (37 +/- 4.3 years) were used as a control group. Skin blood flow (SBF) was measured using Vasamedic Model 403B laser Doppler device (Vasamedics Inc., St. Paul, MN) in a standardized way at the plantar and dorsal surface of the finger and toe and at the pretibial surface of the leg at 2 different local skin temperatures of 35 degrees C and 44 degrees C. Laboratory biochemical data were collected at the time of SBF study. The SBF measured at 35 degrees C was lower in the patients with DM on dialysis as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM dialysis patients. The SBF response to the increase in temperature of the probe to 44 degrees C was 70% to 80% lower in DM patients as compared with healthy subjects and non-DM patients. However, non-DM subjects who displayed SBF similar to control subjects at 35 degrees C, had impaired response in SBF at 44 degrees C as well. Patients with lower serum albumin exhibited lower SBF even after adjustment for age. SBF is impaired in patients with stage 5 CKD on HD, particularly in those with DM as a cause of CKD. SBF negatively correlated with age and albumin (nutritional status) in DM and non-DM patients with stage 5 CKD on HD. Measurement of SBF can be useful in the evaluation of vasculopathy in CKD population and can potentially be used for assessment of vascular response during specific clinical intervention. Copyright 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by

  11. A practical approach to the nutritional management of chronic kidney disease patients in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameh, Oluwatoyin I; Cilliers, Lynette; Okpechi, Ikechi G

    2016-07-08

    The multi-racial and multi-ethnic population of South Africa has significant variation in their nutritional habits with many black South Africans undergoing a nutritional transition to Western type diets. In this review, we describe our practical approaches to the dietary and nutritional management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients in Cape Town, South Africa. Due to poverty and socio-economic constraints, significant challenges still exist with regard to achieving the nutritional needs and adequate dietary counselling of many CKD patients (pre-dialysis and dialysis) in South Africa. Inadequate workforce to meet the educational and counselling needs of patients, inability of many patients to effectively come to terms with changing body and metabolic needs due to ongoing kidney disease, issues of adherence to fluid and food restrictions as well as adherence to medications and in some cases the inability to obtain adequate daily food supplies make up some of these challenges. A multi-disciplinary approach (dietitians, nurses and nephrologists) of regularly reminding and educating patients on dietary (especially low protein diets) and nutritional needs is practiced. The South African Renal exchange list consisting of groups of food items with the same nutritional content has been developed as a practical tool to be used by dietitians to convert individualized nutritional prescriptions into meal plan to meet the nutritional needs of patients in South Africa. The list is currently utilized in counselling CKD patients and provides varied options for food items within the same group (exchangeable) as well as offering ease for the description of suitable meal portions (sizes) to our patients. Regular and continuous education of CKD patients by a multi-disciplinary team in South Africa enables our patients to meet their nutritional goals and retard CKD progression. The South African renal exchange list has proved to be a very useful tool in meeting this need.

  12. Pharmacist-perceived barriers to pharmaceutical care of chronic and end-stage kidney disease patients in Saudi Arabia

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    Amal K Suleiman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The contribution of pharmacists in CKD and ESRD will continue to grow as their clinical knowledge improves. Saudi pharmacists believe that the pharmaceutical care is an essential component of managing CKD and ESRD patients.

  13. Association of quality of sleep with cognitive decline among the patients of chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubair, U.B.; Butt, B.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association between the subjective quality of sleep and cognitive decline among the patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing haemodialysis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 106 patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing haemodialysis at a tertiary care hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan were included in the final analysis. Cognitive decline was measured by British Columbia Cognitive Complaints Inventory (BC-CCI). Sleep quality was measured by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Relationship of age, gender, marital status, education, occupation, BMI, duration of dialysis, dialysis count per week, family income, tobacco smoking and use of naswar was assessed with the cognitive decline. Results: Out of 106 patients screened through BC-CCI and PSQI, 13.1% had no cognitive decline while 86.9% had significant cognitive decline. Relationship between quality of sleep and cognitive decline was significant on binary logistic regression. Conclusion: This study showed significant relationship between the sleep quality and cognitive decline among the patients of CKD undergoing haemodialysis. The findings of our study also call for a greater degree of understanding of the physical and psychological state of patients of CKD undergoing haemodialysis. (author)

  14. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics and Clinical Use of SGLT2 Inhibitors in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. SGLT2 cotransporters are responsible for reabsorption of 90 % of the glucose filtered by the kidney. The glucuretic effect resulting from SGLT2 inhibition contributes to reduce hyperglycaemia and also assists weight loss and blood pressure reduction. Several SGLT2 inhibitors are already available in many countries (dapagliflozin, canagliflozin, empagliflozin) and in Japan (ipragliflozin, tofogliflozin). These SGLT2 inhibitors share similar pharmacokinetic characteristics with a rapid oral absorption, a long elimination half-life allowing once-daily administration, an extensive hepatic metabolism mainly via glucuronidation to inactive metabolites and a low renal elimination as a parent drug. Pharmacokinetic parameters are slightly altered in the case of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While no dose adjustment is required in the case of mild CKD, SGLT2 inhibitors may not be used or only at a lower daily dose in patients with moderate CKD. Furthermore, the pharmacodynamic response to SGLT2 inhibitors as assessed by urinary glucose excretion declines with increasing severity of renal impairment as assessed by a reduction in the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Nevertheless, the glucose-lowering efficacy and safety of SGLT2 inhibitors are almost comparable in patients with mild CKD as in patients with normal kidney function. In patients with moderate CKD, the efficacy tends to be dampened and safety concerns may occur. In patients with severe CKD, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors is contraindicated. Thus, prescribing information should be consulted regarding dosage adjustments or restrictions in the case of renal dysfunction for each SGLT2 inhibitor. The clinical impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on renal function and their potential to influence the course of diabetic nephropathy deserve attention because of preliminary favourable results

  15. Cardiovascular risk prediction in chronic kidney disease patients

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    Santiago Cedeño Mora

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: The cardiovascular risk scores (FRS-CVD and ASCVD [AHA/ACC 2013] can estimate the probability of atherosclerotic cardiovascular events in patients with CKD regardless of renal function, albuminuria and previous cardiovascular events.

  16. Clinical relevance of sarcopenia in chronic kidney