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Sample records for discontinuous irradiation defects

  1. Strongly enhanced irreversibility fields and Bose-glass behaviour in bulk YBCO with discontinuous columnar irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G; Nenkov, K; Krabbes, G; Weinstein, R; Gandini, A; Sawh, R; Mayes, B; Parks, D

    2007-01-01

    Flux pinning properties and irreversibility fields B irr (T) of melt-textured YBCO with discontinuous or multiple-in-line-damage (MILD) columnar defects produced by irradiation with high-energy U 238 ions were studied at a constant matching field of B φ = 10 T and for several energy losses between S e = 1.67 and 2.4 keV A -1 . With increasing S e and increasing length of the MILD pins, the critical current density j c (H,T) strongly increases and B irr (T) for fields along the c axis progressively shifts upwards reaching 9 T at 77 K. For S e = 2.4 keV A -1 , a pronounced kink is observed in B irr (T) at 8 T which is a strong indication of Bose-glass behaviour. The j c (H) dependence of this sample shows a peak at a low applied field B p . This peak effect is explained by the entanglement of vortices. It is argued that for MILD pins single vortices interact simultaneously with many short columnar defects in neighbouring ion trails resulting in an automatic splay in the vortex orientation. The observed decrease of B p with increasing temperature is estimated taking the increasing thermal fluctuations into account

  2. Lyophilized allogeneic bone grafts for cystic and discontinuity defects of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pill Hoon Choung; Eun Seok Kim

    1999-01-01

    Allogenic bone grafts have been used after various processing in each institute was made by lyophilized allogenic bone and used for maxillofacial reconstruction. Three types of lyophilized allogenic bone grafts as powder, chip and block form were performed to reconstruct the following defects: 1) maxillectomy, 2) mandiblectomy, 3) cystectomy, 4) cleft alveolus, 5) gap in orthognathic osteotomy, 6) peri-implant defect, 7) extraction socket, and 8) facial contouring. Above defects can be classified as cystic and discontinuity defects of the maxilia and the mandible. Because discontinuity defects have more difficult problems to reconstruct considering mechanical strength of the allogenic bone. We performed allogenic bone grafts on 50 cystic defects and 12 discontinuity defects of the jaws. Among them, 3 cases were removed due to infection, and the others had no complications. In reconstruction of cystic defects, the defects were filled with allogenic chip which were made from allogenic block bone at the surgery, which later were changed to host bone. Three cases of them showed tooth eruption through the allogenic bone grafting site, changing the eruption pathway, which was interrupted by the lesion. in reconstruction of discontinuity defects, usually allogenic bone has been used as a tray, in which PMCB or demineralized bone chips were filled. But we tried to reconstruct this discontinuity defect using allogeneic bone block without inside filling of PMCB different from tray type. We will present the results of allogenic bone grafts using cranial bone, costochondral graft, and the mandible

  3. Electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro [Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Reseach Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology

    1996-04-01

    To add information of point defects in cubic crystal SiC, polycrystal {beta}-SiC on the market was used as sample and irradiated by neutron and electron. In situ observation of neutron and electron irradiation-induced defects in {beta}-SiC were carried out by ultra high-voltage electronic microscope (UHVEM) and ordinary electronic microscope. The obtained results show that the electron irradiation-induced secondary defects are micro defects less than 20 nm at about 1273K, the density of defects is from 2x10{sup 17} to 1x10{sup 18}/cc, the secondary defects may be hole type at high temperature and the preexistant defects control nuclear formation of irradiation-induced defects, effective sink. (S.Y.)

  4. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed

  5. Effect of interaction between irradiation-induced defects and intrinsic defects in the pinning improvement of neutron irradiated YBaCuO sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur; Sozeri, Huseyin; Yavuz, Hasbi

    2004-08-01

    Interaction between the intrinsic (native) defects and the irradiation-induced defects created by neutron irradiation was examined for the YBCO sample. For this purpose, non-superconducting Y-211 phase was included to the Y-123 samples at different contents as a source of large pinning center. The critical current density enhancement with the irradiation for these samples were analysed and then the role of defects on pinning improvement was discussed.

  6. Dislocation defect interaction in irradiated Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeublin, R.; Yao, Z.; Spaetig, P.; Victoria, M.

    2005-01-01

    Pure Cu single crystals irradiated at room temperature to low doses with 590 MeV protons have been deformed in situ in a transmission electron microscope in order to identify the basic mechanisms at the origin of hardening. Cu irradiated to 10 -4 dpa shows at room temperature a yield shear stress of 13.7 MPa to be compared to the 8.8 MPa of the unirradiated Cu. Irradiation induced damage consists at 90% of 2 nm stacking fault tetrahedra, the remaining being dislocation loops and unidentified defects. In-situ deformation reveals that dislocation-defect interaction can take several forms. Usually, dislocations pinned by defects bow out under the applied stress and escape without leaving any visible defect. From the escape angles obtained at 183 K, an average critical stress of 100 MPa is deduced. In some cases, the pinning of dislocations leads to debris that are about 20 nm long, which formation could be recorded during the in situ experiment

  7. Defect structure in proton-irradiated copper and nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukuda, Noboru; Ehrhart, P.; Jaeger, W.; Schilling, W.; Dworschak, F.; Gadalla, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    This single crystals of copper or nickel with a thickness of about 10 μm are irradiated with 3 MeV protons at room temperature and the structures of resultant defects are investigated based on measurements of the effects of irradiation on the electrical resistivity, length, lattice constants, x-ray diffraction line profile and electron microscopic observations. The measurements show that the electrical resistivity increases with irradiation dose, while leveling off at high dose due to overlapping of irradiation cascades. The lattice constants decreases, indicating that many vacancies still remain while most of the interstitial stoms are eliminated, absorbed or consumed for dislocation loop formation. The x-ray line profile undergoes broadening, which is the result of dislocation loops, dislocation networks and SFT's introduced by the proton irradiation. Various defects have different effects though they cannot be identified separately from the profile alone. A satellite peak appears at a low angle, which seems to arise from periodic defect structures that are found in electron microscopic observations. In both copper and nickel, such periodic defect structures are seen over a wide range from high to low dose. Defect-free and defect-rich domains (defect walls), 0.5 to several μm in size, are alingned parallel to the {001} plane at intervals of 60 nm. The defect walls, which consist of dislocations, dislocation loops and SFT's, is 20 - 40 nm thick. (Nogami, K.)

  8. On the influence of extrinsic point defects on irradiation-induced point-defect distributions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.

    1994-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model describing the influence of interfaces and stress fields on {113}-defect generation in silicon during 1-MeV electron irradiation, is further developed to take into account also the role of extrinsic point defects. It is shown that the observed distribution of {113}-defects in high-flux electron-irradiated silicon and its dependence on irradiation temperature and dopant concentration can be understood by taking into account not only the influence of the surfaces and interfaces as sinks for intrinsic point defects but also the thermal stability of the bulk sinks for intrinsic point defects. In heavily doped silicon the bulk sinks are related with pairing reactions of the dopant atoms with the generated intrinsic point defects or related with enhanced recombination of vacancies and self-interstitials at extrinsic point defects. The obtained theoretical results are correlated with published experimental data on boron-and phosphorus-doped silicon and are illustrated with observations obtained by irradiating cross-section transmission electron microscopy samples of wafer with highly doped surface layers. (orig.)

  9. Behavior of high Tc-superconductors and irradiated defects under reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well known that the lattice defects of various types are introduced in ceramics without exception, and exert large effect to the function of these materials. Among oxides, the electronic materials positively using oxygen defect control have been already put in practical use. Also in the oxide high temperature superconductors which are Perovskite type composite oxides, the superconductive characteristics are affected largely by the concentration of the oxygen composing them. This is regarded as an important factor for causing superconductivity, related with the oxygen cavities arising at this time and the carriers bearing superconductivity. In this study, the irradiation effect with relatively low dose, the measurement under irradiation, the effect of irradiation temperature, and the effect of radiation quality were evaluated by the irradiation of YBCO, EBCO and LBCO. The experimental method, and the irradiation effect at low temperature and normal temperature, the effect of Co-60 gamma ray irradiation instead of reactor irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  10. Defect studies in electron-irradiated ZnO and GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Look, D.C.; Farlow, G.C.

    2007-01-01

    We present experimental results obtained with positron annihilation spectroscopy in room-temperature electron-irradiated n-type ZnO and GaN. The cation vacancies act as important compensating centers in 2 MeV electron-irradiated samples, even though their introduction rates are different by 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, negatively charged non-open volume defects that also compensate the n-type conductivity are produced together with the cation vacancies at similar introduction rates. The low introduction rates of compensating defects in ZnO demonstrate the radiation hardness of the material. Isochronal thermal annealings were performed to study the dynamics of the irradiation-induced defects. In 2 MeV electron-irradiated ZnO, all the defects introduced in the irradiation disappear already at 600 K, while 1100 K is needed in GaN. Several separate annealing stages of the defects are observed in both materials, the first at 400 K

  11. Defect studies in electron-irradiated ZnO and GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, F. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, 02015 TKK Espoo (Finland)], E-mail: filip.tuomisto@tkk.fi; Look, D.C. [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States); Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433 (United States); Farlow, G.C. [Physics Department, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    We present experimental results obtained with positron annihilation spectroscopy in room-temperature electron-irradiated n-type ZnO and GaN. The cation vacancies act as important compensating centers in 2 MeV electron-irradiated samples, even though their introduction rates are different by 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, negatively charged non-open volume defects that also compensate the n-type conductivity are produced together with the cation vacancies at similar introduction rates. The low introduction rates of compensating defects in ZnO demonstrate the radiation hardness of the material. Isochronal thermal annealings were performed to study the dynamics of the irradiation-induced defects. In 2 MeV electron-irradiated ZnO, all the defects introduced in the irradiation disappear already at 600 K, while 1100 K is needed in GaN. Several separate annealing stages of the defects are observed in both materials, the first at 400 K.

  12. Influence of irradiation defects on anelastic properties of magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, C.; Haneczok, G.; Lauzier, J.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation defects in magnesium and their interactions with dislocations are studied by internal friction and elastic modulus. Long distance migration of different defects are determined. Relaxation peaks at very low temperature are analyzed. In the interaction peak between defects and dislocations it is shown that defects are interstitials and that dislocations are responsible for the peak B 1 and the interaction mechanism is probably associated to a side motion of defects along the lines. Defects brought by irradiation on dislocations are used for testing Bordoni relaxation theory and variation of parameters of peak B 1 and B 2 are analyzed [fr

  13. NMR studies of defects created by irradiation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, M.; Minier, C.

    1983-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance has been rarely used to study point defects created by irradiation in metals. Information obtained in this field using N.M.R. are shown. Some results are also described: characterization of migrating defects in electron irradiated copper; mobility of the complex interstitial-impurity in Al with 150 ppm of chromium; interstitial structure in irradiated aluminum and autodiffusion in metals [fr

  14. Production behavior of irradiation defects in solid breeder materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Hirotake; Moritani, Kimikazu [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    The irradiation effects in solid breeder materials are important for the performance assessment of fusion reactor blanket systems. For a clearer understanding of such effects, we have studied the production behavior of irradiation defects in some lithium ceramics by an in-situ luminescence measurement technique under ion beam irradiation. The luminescence spectra were measured at different temperatures, and the temperature-transient behaviors of luminescence intensity were also measured. The production mechanisms of irradiation defects were discussed on the basis of the observations. (author)

  15. Defect-impurity interactions in irradiated germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, J.W.; James, F.J.; Westbrook, R.D.

    1975-07-01

    Results of experiments are used to formulate a better model for the structures of lattice defects and defect-impurity complexes in irradiated n-type Ge. Single crystals were grown by the Czochralski process from P, As, or Sb-doped melts, and less than or equal to 10 15 to greater than or equal to 10 17 oxygen cm -3 was added to the furnace chamber after approximately 1 / 3 of the crystal had been solidified. Hall coefficient and resistivity measurements (at 77 0 K) were used to determine the initial donor concentration due to the dopant and clustered oxygen, and infrared absorption measurements (at 11.7 μ) were used to determine the dissociated oxygen concentration. Certain impurity and defect-impurity interactions were then investigated that occurred as a consequence of selected annealing, quenching, Li diffusion, and irradiation experiments at approximately 300 0 K with 60 Co photons, 1.5 to 2.0 MeV electrons, or thermal energy neutrons. Particular attention was given to determining the electrical role of the irradiation produced interstitial and vacancy, and to look for any evidence from electrical and optical measurements of vacancy--oxygen, lithium--oxygen, and lithium--vacancy interactions. (U.S.)

  16. Production of freely-migrating defects during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    During irradiation at elevated temperatures, vacancy and interstitial defects that escape can produce several different types of microstructural changes. Hence the production rate of freely-migrating defects must be known as a function of irradiating particle species and energy before quantitative correlations can be made between microstructural changes. Our fundamental knowledge of freely-migrating defect production has increased substantially in recent years. Critical experimental findings that led to the improved understanding are reviewed in this paper. A strong similarity is found for the dependence of freely-migrating defect production on primary recoil energy as measured in a variety of metals and alloys by different authors. The efficiency for producing freely-migrating defects decreases much more strongly with increasing primary recoil energy than does the efficiency for creating stable defects at liquid helium temperatures. The stronger decrease can be understood in terms of additional intracascade recombination that results from the nonrandom distribution of defects existing in the primary damage state for high primary recoil energies. Although the existing data base is limited to fcc materials, the strong similarity in the reported investigations suggests that the same dependence of freely-migrating defect production on primary recoil energy may be characteristic of a wide variety of other alloy systems as well. 52 refs., 4 figs

  17. Study of the irradiation defects in 3C-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, J.

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the study of the irradiation defects in the cubic polytype 3C of the n type silicon carbide. Low temperature photoluminescence and electron spin resonance techniques have been used. In situ photoluminescence measurements after irradiation at 10 K by electrons have shown that the nature of the defects induced is identical to those observed after irradiation at ambient temperature with electrons, protons or carbon ions. No regeneration of these defects has been revealed after in situ annealings until 300 K. The electrons Van de Graff accelerator of the Irradiated Solid Laboratory has allowed to irradiate sample of 3C in a range of energies between 190 keV and 1 MeV. It has then been possible to estimate the appearance threshold of the irradiation defects but especially to be able to determine the displacement threshold energy of silicon in this SiC polytype. The found value of 25 eV is in good agreement with the first experimental result proposed by X. Kerbiriou with the use of the ESR. Annealings in the range of high temperatures have been carried out. The evolution of the irradiation defects has been followed in photoluminescence and in ESR. The results show that, in one part, the vacancy of the silicon negatively charged is essentially the only compensating defect in 3C-SiC of n type and that, in another part, the majority of the defects are annealed below 1200 C. Only the D1 defect remains after annealings until 1600 C. The D1 center is in fact a native defect in SiC; indeed, it has been identified alone in non irradiated samples. A systematic study of these last samples show the absence of D1 in samples strongly compensated. The compared results of photoluminescence and of positons annihilation are in good agreement for the possible attribution of D1 to the bi-vacancy V C -V Si . One of the most interesting result of this last work has been obtained using the ESR technique under excitation with a neodymium laser. The measurements, carried

  18. Microstructural defects in EUROFER 97 after different neutron irradiation conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dethloff

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of irradiation induced microstructural evolution is essential for assessing the applicability of structural steels like the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel EUROFER 97 in upcoming fusion reactors. In this work Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM is used to determine the defect microstructure after different neutron irradiation conditions. In particular dislocation loops, voids and precipitates are analyzed concerning defect nature, density and size distribution after irradiation to 15 dpa at 300 °C in the mixed spectrum High Flux Reactor (HFR. New results are combined with previously obtained data from irradiation in the fast spectrum BOR-60 reactor (15 and 32 dpa, 330 °C, which allows for assessment of dose and dose rate effects on the aforementioned irradiation induced defects and microstructural characteristics.

  19. Defects in low temperature electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suski, J.; Bourgoin, J.

    1984-01-01

    n and p-InP has been irradiated at 25K with 1MeV electrons and the created defects were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) in the range 25K-400K. In n-InP, four traps are directly observed, with low introduction rates except for one. They anneal in three stages, and four new centers of still lower concentration appear after 70 0 C heat treatment. In p-InP, two dominant traps stable up to approx.= 400K with introduction rates close to the theoretical ones, which might be primary defects are found, while another one is clearly a secondary defect likely associated to Zn dopant. At least two of the low concentration irradiation induced electron traps, created between 25K and 100K are also secondary defects, which implies a mobility of some primary defects down to 100K at least. (author)

  20. Point defects and magnetic properties of neutron irradiated MgO single crystal

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    Mengxiong Cao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available (100-oriented MgO single crystals were irradiated to introduce point defects with different neutron doses ranging from 1.0×1016 to 1.0×1020 cm-2. The point defect configurations were studied with X-ray diffuse scattering and UV-Vis absorption spectra. The isointensity profiles of X-ray diffuse scattering caused by the cubic and double-force point defects in MgO were theoretically calculated based on the Huang scattering theory. The magnetic properties at different temperature were measured with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID. The reciprocal space mappings (RSMs of irradiated MgO revealed notable diffuse scattering. The UV-Vis spectra indicated the presence of O Frenkel defects in irradiated MgO. Neutron-irradiated MgO was diamagnetic at room temperature and became ferromagnetic at low temperature due to O Frenkel defects induced by neutron-irradiation.

  1. Defects investigation in neutron irradiated reactor steels by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slugen, V.

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) based on positron lifetime measurements using the Pulsed Low Energy Positron System (PLEPS) was applied to the investigation of defects of irradiated and thermally treated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. PLEPS results showed that the changes in microstructure of the RPV-steel properties caused by neutron irradiation and post-irradiation heat treatment can be well detected. From the lifetime measurements in the near-surface region (20-550 nm) the defect density in Russian types of RPV-steels was calculated using the diffusion trapping model. The post-irradiation heat treatment studies performed on non-irradiated specimens are also presented. (author)

  2. Defect characterization in high-purity silicon after γ- and hadron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, J.

    2004-07-01

    The challenge for silicon particle detectors in future high energy physics experiments caused by extreme radiation fields can only be met by an appropriate defect engineering of the starting material. Appreciable improvements had already been obtained by enriching high resistivity float zone silicon with oxygen as demonstrated by the CERN RD48 collaboration. This thesis will focus on the difference observed after irradiation between standard and oxygenated float zone and detector grade Czochralski silicon. Results obtained with diodes manufactured on epitaxial layers are also included, envisioning effects arising from the possible migration of impurities during the crystal growth from the oxygen rich Czochralski substrate. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurements have been performed for defect characterization after γ- and hadron irradiation. Also a new high resolution DLTS technique has been used for the first time to separate defect levels with similar parameters. During the microscopic studies additionally to the well known defects like VO i , V 2 , C i O i or VP, four new radiation induced defects have been discovered and characterized. Two of these defects are closely correlated with the detector performance: A deep acceptor labeled as I-defect, and a bistable donor (BD). The formation of the I-defect is strongly suppressed in oxygen rich materials, while the formation of the BD is suppressed in oxygen lean material. With their properties the I- and the BD-defect are able to explain the different macroscopic behavior of standard and oxygen enriched float zone silicon after γ-irradiation. Furthermore, the BD defect is most probably responsible for the observation that in Cz and Epi diodes space charge sign inversion does not occur even after high fluences of proton irradiation. Additionally the γ-irradiated diodes were annealed at temperatures between 100 C and 350 C. During these studies some new reaction

  3. Defects in electron irradiated vitreous SiO2 probed by positron annihiliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Kawano, Takao; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    1994-01-01

    Defects in 3 MeV electron irradiated vitreous SiO 2 (v-SiO 2 ) were probed by the positron annihilation technique. For unirradiated v-SiO 2 specimens, almost all positrons were found to annihilate from positronium (Ps) states. This high formation probability of Ps was attributed to the trapping of positrons by open-space defects. The formation probability of Ps was decreased by the electron irradiation. The observed inhibition of the Ps formation was attributed to the trapping of positrons by point defects introduced and/or activated by the irradiation. From measurements of the lifetime distribution of Ps, it was found that, by the electron irradiation, the mean size of open-space defects was decreased and the size distribution of such defects was broadened. (Author)

  4. Helium bubbles aggravated defects production in self-irradiated copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, FengChao; Zhu, YinBo; Wu, Qiang; Li, XinZhu; Wang, Pei; Wu, HengAn

    2017-12-01

    Under the environment of high radiation, materials used in fission and fusion reactors will internally accumulate numerous lattice defects and bubbles. With extensive studies focused on bubble resolution under irradiation, the mutually effects between helium bubbles and displacement cascades in irradiated materials remain unaddressed. Therefore, the defects production and microstructure evolution under self-irradiation events in vicinity of helium bubbles are investigated by preforming large scale molecular dynamics simulations in single-crystal copper. When subjected to displacement cascades, distinguished bubble resolution categories dependent on bubble size are observed. With the existence of bubbles, radiation damage is aggravated with the increasing bubble size, represented as the promotion of point defects and dislocations. The atomic mechanisms of heterogeneous dislocation structures are attributed to different helium-vacancy cluster modes, transforming from the resolved gas trapped with vacancies to the biased absorption of vacancies by the over-pressured bubble. In both cases, helium impedes the recombination of point defects, leading to the accelerated formation of interstitial loops. The results and insight obtained here might contribute to understand the underlying mechanism of transmutant solute on the long-term evolution of irradiated materials.

  5. Auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density in impure crystals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selishchev, P.A.; Sugakov, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    Appearance of auto-oscillations in temperature and defect density of impurity crystals under irradiation is studied. It is shown that at certain critical parameters stationary distribution of temperature and defect density of the sample irradiated becomes unstable as regards the formation of temporal dissipative structures: auto-oscillations of temperature and defect density. Critical parameters are determined (the rate of defect formation, temperature of crystal environment, etc.) and the frequency of appearing auto-oscillations, its dependence on irradiation conditions and crystal properties are found

  6. Radiation defects in electron-irradiated InP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Megela, I.G.; Tartachnik, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    The results are presented of formation and annealing of defects in InP crystals at 1 to 50 MeV electron irradiation. The recovery of electrical properties in the range of 77 to 970 K during annealing processes is studied. Five low temperature annealing states in n-InP and the reverse annealing in p-InP are observed at 77 to 300 K. Four annealing stages at temperatures higher than 300 K are present. When the electron energy is increased more complicated thermostable defects are formed, and at 50 MeV electron energy besides of the point defect clusters are formed, which anneal at temperatures of 800 to 970 K. It is shown that the peculiarities of the Hall mobility at irradiation and annealing are caused by the scattering centres E/sub c/ - 0.2 eV. The 'limiting' position of the Fermi level in electron irradiated InP crystals is discussed. (author)

  7. Radiation defects in electron-irradiated InP crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Megela, I.G.; Tartachnik, V.P. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij)

    1982-06-16

    The results are presented of formation and annealing of defects in InP crystals at 1 to 50 MeV electron irradiation. The recovery of electrical properties in the range of 77 to 970 K during annealing processes is studied. Five low temperature annealing states in n-InP and the reverse annealing in p-InP are observed at 77 to 300 K. Four annealing stages at temperatures higher than 300 K are present. When the electron energy is increased more complicated thermostable defects are formed, and at 50 MeV electron energy besides of the point defect clusters are formed, which anneal at temperatures of 800 to 970 K. It is shown that the peculiarities of the Hall mobility at irradiation and annealing are caused by the scattering centres E/sub c/ - 0.2 eV. The 'limiting' position of the Fermi level in electron irradiated InP crystals is discussed.

  8. Structural evolution of defective graphene under heat treatment and gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yifei; Shi, Jie; Chen, Cheng; Li, Nan; Xu, Zhiwei; Liu, Liangsen; Zhao, Lihuan; Li, Jing; Jing, Miaolei

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the structural change of defective graphene built by annealing in different temperature under the condition of gamma irradiation. Firstly, we found the heat treatment not only reduced but also striped the graphene. This behavior made defects become more firstly and then become less with the increase of temperature. And then gamma irradiation removed some oxygen-containing groups, by a simultaneous changed over carbon in the graphitic lattice from sp3 to sp2. Also, the gamma irradiation decreased the interlayer spacing between graphene lowest to 3.391 Å and made a crosslink which resulting in the size of the ordered gaining. A variation was detected by Raman spectroscopy that the amorphous carbon was declined after gamma irradiation. Furtherly we found the degree of this decline raised first and then diminished with the increase in the number of defects. The change in repair capacity of gamma irradiation presented a strategy for repairing the defects of graphene.

  9. Moessbauer study of defects in molybdenum and chromium irradiated with ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troyan, V.A.; Bogdanov, V.V.; Ivanyushkin, E.M.; Pen'kov, Yu.P.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of ion irradiation of monocrystalline molybdenum and polycrystalline chromium with Co-57 impurity were studied by Moessbauer effect. Molybdenum specimens were irradiated by He + ions at accelerators with 40 keV energy. Chromium specimens were irradiated by hydrogen ions with 1.2 MeV energy up to integral 2x10 17 -2x10 19 ion/cm 2 doses. It is shown, that defect introduction into the source matrix by irradiation results in change of gamma-resonance line form and effect value. The observed effects of defect influence on spectrum parameters are discussed. It is concluded, that study of Moessbauer spectra parameters of diluted Co-57 solutions in matrices of different metals permits to determine dynamics of movement of impurity atoms and defects in metals irradiated with ions [ru

  10. Positron annihilation study of defects in electron-irradiated single crystal zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, C. K.; Yang, B.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.; Ling, C. C.; Gong, M.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized melt grown zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals purchased from Cermet Inc. were irradiated by 2MeV electrons with fluence of 6x1017cm-2. Isochronal annealing from 100°C-800°C was performed on the crystals under argon and air ambience. Variable Energy Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (VEDBS) was carried out on both the as-grown and the irradiated samples at each annealing step. The migration, agglomeration and annealing of grown-in and irradiated-introduced defects were studied. It was observed that the grown-in vacancy-type defects concentration decreased at 300°C and 600 °C. For the irradiated sample annealed in argon, the positron trapping vacancy-type defect concentration decreased at 300°C and 600°C. Further annealing the as-grown and irradiated samples in argon increased the S parameter further. For the irradiated sample annealed in air, the vacancy-type defect concentration decreases at 300°C and 700°C.

  11. Positron annihilation study of defects in electron-irradiated single crystal zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, C K; Yang, B; Beling, C D; Fung, S; Ling, C C [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Gong, M, E-mail: sfung@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: edwardto04@yahoo.com.h [Department of Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized melt grown zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals purchased from Cermet Inc. were irradiated by 2 MeV electrons with fluence of 6x10{sup 17}cm{sup -2}. Isochronal annealing from 100 deg. C - 800 deg. C was performed on the crystals under argon and air ambience. Variable Energy Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (VEDBS) was carried out on both the as-grown and the irradiated samples at each annealing step. The migration, agglomeration and annealing of grown-in and irradiated-introduced defects were studied. It was observed that the grown-in vacancy-type defects concentration decreased at 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. For the irradiated sample annealed in argon, the positron trapping vacancy-type defect concentration decreased at 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. Further annealing the as-grown and irradiated samples in argon increased the S parameter further. For the irradiated sample annealed in air, the vacancy-type defect concentration decreases at 300 deg. C and 700 deg. C.

  12. Positron annihilation study of defects in electron-irradiated single crystal zinc oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To, C K; Yang, B; Beling, C D; Fung, S; Ling, C C; Gong, M

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized melt grown zinc oxide (ZnO) single crystals purchased from Cermet Inc. were irradiated by 2 MeV electrons with fluence of 6x10 17 cm -2 . Isochronal annealing from 100 deg. C - 800 deg. C was performed on the crystals under argon and air ambience. Variable Energy Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (VEDBS) was carried out on both the as-grown and the irradiated samples at each annealing step. The migration, agglomeration and annealing of grown-in and irradiated-introduced defects were studied. It was observed that the grown-in vacancy-type defects concentration decreased at 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. For the irradiated sample annealed in argon, the positron trapping vacancy-type defect concentration decreased at 300 deg. C and 600 deg. C. Further annealing the as-grown and irradiated samples in argon increased the S parameter further. For the irradiated sample annealed in air, the vacancy-type defect concentration decreases at 300 deg. C and 700 deg. C.

  13. Induced defects in neutron irradiated GaN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. W.; Koh, E. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Choh, S. H.; Park, S. S.; Kim, B. G.; Sohn, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The local structure of defects in undoped, Si-doped, and neutron irradiated free standing GaN bulk crystals, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy, has been investigated by employing Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence. The GaN samples were irradiated to a dose of 2 x 10 17 neutrons in an atomic reactor at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. There was no appreciable change in the Raman spectra for undoped GaN samples before and after neutron irradiation. However, a forbidden transition, A 1 (TO) mode, appeared for a neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal. Cathodoluminescence spectrum for the neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal became much more broadened than that for the unirradiated one. The experimental results reveal the generation of defects with locally deformed structure in the wurtzite Si-doped GaN single crystal

  14. Freely-migrating-defect production during irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, T.; Rehn, L. E.; Okamoto, P. R.

    1988-12-01

    Radiation-induced segregation in a Cu-1 at. % Au alloy was investigated using in situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The amount of Au atom depletion in the near surface region was measured as a function of dose during irradiation at 350 °C with four ions of substantially different masses. Relative efficiencies for producing freely migrating defects were evaluated for 1.8-MeV 1H, 4He, 20Ne, and 84Kr ions by determining beam current densities that gave similar radiation-induced segregation rates. Irradiations with primary knock-on atom median energies of 1.7, 13, and 79 keV yielded relative efficiencies of 53, 7, and 6 %, respectively, compared to the irradiation with a 0.83-keV median energy. Despite quite different defect and host alloy properties, the relative efficiencies for producing freely migrating defects determined in Cu-Au are remarkably similar to those found previously in Ni-Si alloys. Hence, the reported efficiencies appear to offer a reliable basis for making quantitative correlations of microstructural changes induced in different alloy systems by a wide variety of irradiation particles.

  15. Enhanced defects recombination in ion irradiated SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, G.; Litrico, G.; Grassia, F.; Calcagno, L.; Foti, G.

    2010-01-01

    Point defects induced in SiC by ion irradiation show a recombination at temperatures as low as 320 K and this process is enhanced after running current density ranging from 80 to 120 A/cm 2 . Ion irradiation induces in SiC the formation of different defect levels and low-temperature annealing changes their concentration. Some levels (S 0 , S x and S 2 ) show a recombination and simultaneously a new level (S 1 ) is formed. An enhanced recombination of defects is besides observed after running current in the diode at room temperature. The carriers introduction reduces the S 2 trap concentration, while the remaining levels are not modified. The recombination is negligible up to a current density of 50 A/cm 2 and increases at higher current density. The enhanced recombination of the S 2 trap occurs at 300 K, which otherwise requires a 400 K annealing temperature. The process can be related to the electron-hole recombination at the associated defect.

  16. Correlation between electron-irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Shogo; Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawata, Hiroaki; Hirai, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Masaaki, E-mail: yasuda@pe.osakafu-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Tada, Kazuhiro [Department of Electrical and Control Systems Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Toyama College, Toyama 939-8630 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the correlation between electron irradiation defects and applied stress in graphene. The electron irradiation effect is introduced by the binary collision model in the MD simulation. By applying a tensile stress to graphene, the number of adatom-vacancy (AV) and Stone–Wales (SW) defects increase under electron irradiation, while the number of single-vacancy defects is not noticeably affected by the applied stress. Both the activation and formation energies of an AV defect and the activation energy of an SW defect decrease when a tensile stress is applied to graphene. Applying tensile stress also relaxes the compression stress associated with SW defect formation. These effects induced by the applied stress cause the increase in AV and SW defect formation under electron irradiation.

  17. Electron irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Kawasuso, A.; Sakai, S.; Naramoto, H.

    2006-01-01

    ZnO crystals were subjected to 3 MeV electron irradiation up to a high dose of 5.5x10 18 cm -2 . The production and recovery of vacancy defects were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The increase of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening S parameter after irradiation indicates introduction of V Zn related defects. Most of these vacancies are annealed at temperatures below 200 o C. However, after annealing at around 400 o C, secondary defects are produced. All the vacancy defects are annealed out at around 700 o C

  18. In situ probing of the evolution of irradiation-induced defects in copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, N.; Hattar, K.; Misra, A.

    2013-01-01

    Through in situ Cu 3+ ion irradiation at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), we have investigated the evolution of defect clusters as a function of the radiation dose at different distances from the 3 {1 1 2} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu. Post in situ ion irradiation, high resolution TEM was used to explore the types of defects, which are composed of a high-density of vacancy stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) and sparsely distributed interstitial Frank loops. During irradiation, defect clusters evolve through four stages: (i) incubation, (ii) non-interaction, (iii) interaction and (iv) saturation; and the corresponding density was observed to initially increase with irradiation dose and then approach saturation. No obvious denuded zone is observed along the 3 {1 1 2} ITB and the configuration of defects at the boundary displays as truncated SFTs. Several defect evolution models have been proposed to explain the observed phenomena

  19. Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO2 fuel during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, A.

    2003-01-01

    Fission gas behaviour is one of the central concern in the fuel design, performance and hypothetical accident analysis. The report 'Defect trap model of gas behaviour in UO 2 fuel during irradiation' is the worldwide literature review of problems studied, experimental results and solutions proposed in related topics. Some of them were described in details in the report chapters. They are: anomalies in the experimental results; fission gas retention in the UO 2 fuel; microstructure of the UO 2 fuel after irradiation; fission gas release models; defect trap model of fission gas behaviour; fission gas release from UO 2 single crystal during low temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; analysis of dynamic release of fission gases from single crystal UO 2 during low temperature irradiation in terms of defect trap model; behaviour of fission gas products in single crystal UO 2 during intermediate temperature irradiation in terms of a defect trap model; modification of re-crystallization temperature of UO 2 in function of burnup and its impact on fission gas release; apparent diffusion coefficient; formation of nanostructures in UO 2 fuel at high burnup; applications of the defect trap model to the gas leaking fuel elements number assessment in the nuclear power station (VVER-PWR)

  20. Low-temperature annealing of radiation defects in electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, A.A.; Megela, I.G.; Buturlakin, A.P.; Goyer, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The isochronal annealing of radiation defects in high-energy electron irradiated n-GaP monocrystals within the 77 to 300 K range has been investigated by optical and electrical techniques. The changes in conductance and charge carrier mobility as functions of annealing temperature as well as the variation of optical absorption spectra of GaP under irradiation and annealing provide evidence that most of radiation defects are likely secondary complexes of defects

  1. Experimental studies of free defect generation during irradiation: Implications for reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, systematic experiments have revealed that irradiations which generate energetically dense cascades are much less effective than light-ion, MeV electron, or thermal neutron irradiations at producing freely-migrating defects. In this paper, the systematic results on freely-migrating defect production from ion irradiation studies are briefly summarized. Difficulties with applying a simple extrapolation of the ion-irradiation results to neutron environments are discussed. This discussion, coupled with our existing knowledge of neutron-induced property changes, indicates that Compton scattering, and the (n,γ), (n,He) and (n,p) nuclear reactions, are considerably more important for producing freely-migrating defects than was previously realized

  2. Defects in electron irradiated vitreous SiO[sub 2] probed by positron annihiliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uedono, Akira; Tanigawa, Shoichiro (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science); Kawano, Takao (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Radioisotope Centre); Itoh, Hisayoshi (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1994-10-10

    Defects in 3 MeV electron irradiated vitreous SiO[sub 2] (v-SiO[sub 2]) were probed by the positron annihilation technique. For unirradiated v-SiO[sub 2] specimens, almost all positrons were found to annihilate from positronium (Ps) states. This high formation probability of Ps was attributed to the trapping of positrons by open-space defects. The formation probability of Ps was decreased by the electron irradiation. The observed inhibition of the Ps formation was attributed to the trapping of positrons by point defects introduced and/or activated by the irradiation. From measurements of the lifetime distribution of Ps, it was found that, by the electron irradiation, the mean size of open-space defects was decreased and the size distribution of such defects was broadened. (Author).

  3. Ion-irradiation-induced defects in bundles of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salonen, E.; Krasheninnikov, A.V.; Nordlund, K.

    2002-01-01

    We study the structure and formation yields of atomic-scale defects produced by low-dose Ar ion irradiation in bundles of single-wall carbon nanotubes. For this, we employ empirical potential molecular dynamics and simulate ion impact events over an energy range of 100-1000 eV. We show that the most common defects produced at all energies are vacancies on nanotube walls, which at low temperatures are metastable but long-lived defects. We further calculate the spatial distribution of the defects, which proved to be highly non-uniform. We also show that ion irradiation gives rise to the formations of inter-tube covalent bonds mediated by carbon recoils and nanotube lattice distortions due to dangling bond saturation. The number of inter-tube links, as well as the overall damage, linearly grows with the energy of incident ions

  4. The semiconductor doping with radiation defects via proton and alpha-particle irradiation. Review

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlov, V A

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents an analytical review devoted to semiconductor doping with radiation defects resulted from irradiation by light ions, in particular, by protons and alpha-particles. One studies formation of radiation defects in silicon, gallium arsenide and indium phosphide under light ion irradiation. One analyzes effect of proton and alpha-particle irradiation on electric conductivity of the above-listed semiconducting materials. Semiconductor doping with radiation defects under light ion irradiation enables to control their electrophysical properties and to design high-speed opto-, micro- and nanoelectronic devices on their basis

  5. Acousto-defect interaction in irradiated and non-irradiated silicon n+-p structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olikh, O. Ya.; Gorb, A. M.; Chupryna, R. G.; Pristay-Fenenkov, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of ultrasound on current-voltage characteristics of non-irradiated silicon n+-p structures as well as silicon structures exposed to reactor neutrons or 60Co gamma radiation has been investigated experimentally. It has been found that the ultrasound loading of the n+-p structure leads to the reversible change of shunt resistance, carrier lifetime, and ideality factor. Specifically, considerable acoustically induced alteration of the ideality factor and the space charge region lifetime was observed in the irradiated samples. The experimental results were described by using the models of coupled defect level recombination, Shockley-Read-Hall recombination, and dislocation-induced impedance. The experimentally observed phenomena are associated with the increase in the distance between coupled defects as well as the extension of the carrier capture coefficient of complex point defects and dislocations. It has been shown that divacancies and vacancy-interstitial oxygen pairs are effectively modified by ultrasound in contrast to interstitial carbon-interstitial oxygen complexes.

  6. Electron irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Q. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)]. E-mail: zhiquanchen@hotmail.com; Maekawa, M. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kawasuso, A. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sakai, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Naramoto, H. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2006-04-01

    ZnO crystals were subjected to 3 MeV electron irradiation up to a high dose of 5.5x10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The production and recovery of vacancy defects were studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The increase of positron lifetime and Doppler broadening S parameter after irradiation indicates introduction of V {sub Zn} related defects. Most of these vacancies are annealed at temperatures below 200 {sup o}C. However, after annealing at around 400 {sup o}C, secondary defects are produced. All the vacancy defects are annealed out at around 700 {sup o}C.

  7. Irradiated strut allografts for reconstructing tumour defects: how effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrid Lobo Gajiwala; Manish Agarwal; Ajay Puri; Cynthia D Lima

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Allografts are biological options for reconstructing large bone defects. We report our experience with 87 irradiated (25 kGy of gamma radiation) strut allografts used in various defects following tumour surgery. Reconstruction in 35 full segment defects involved 22 full segment allografts used alone, 4 allograft prosthetic composites (APC) and 9 allografts combined with a vascularized fibula. Twelve partial segment defects were reconstructed with allograft struts (including 2 APC). Full segment allograft struts (mainly fibulae) were used in 40 contained post-curettage defects. The cases were studied for time to incorporation and complications. The follow-up ranged from 12 to 72 months. Of the 26 full segment defects where allograft alone or APC was used, 2 were lost to follow-up, 5 died before incorporation and 3 grafts were removed (2 infection and 1 local recurrence). Six united primarily at 2-4 years. Seven patients with non union were autografted at both junctions resulting in 6 unions. One patient had early plate breakage and refused further treatment. One allograft fractured after union after autografting. Two of 4 APC also united. In contrast, the 9 allograft-vascularized fibula combinations showed unambiguous incorporation between 5-9 months with only one junction requiring bone grafting. Of the 12 partial segment struts, barring one removed for infection, 11 have completely incorporated. Thirty one out of 40 struts placed within contained post curettage defects have incorporated (2 removed for infection and seven lost to follow-up). There were total 6 infections (7%) 4 of which occurred 1-2 years after surgery. Irradiated full segment struts alone incorporate poorly and are best used combined with a live fibula. Irradiated full and partial segment allografts used inside contained defects give consistently good results. Frozen grafts seem to incorporate faster and better than lyophilised grafts. (Author)

  8. Influence of laser shock peening on irradiation defects in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qiaofeng [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Su, Qing [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Wang, Fei [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Zhang, Chenfei; Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nastasi, Michael [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Cui, Bai, E-mail: bcui3@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The laser shock peening process can generate a dislocation network, stacking faults, and deformation twins in the near surface of austenitic stainless steels by the interaction of laser-driven shock waves with metals. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) irradiation studies suggest that these dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries can serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. As a result, the irradiation resistance is improved as the density of irradiation defects in laser-peened stainless steels is much lower than that in untreated steels. After heating to 300 °C, a portion of the dislocations and stacking faults are annealed out while the deformation twins remain stable, which still provides improved irradiation resistance. These findings have important implications on the role of laser shock peening on the lifetime extension of austenitic stainless steel components in nuclear reactor environments. - Highlights: •Laser shock peening generates a dislocation network, stacking faults and deformation twins in stainless steels. •Dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. •Incoherent twin boundaries remain as stable and effective defect sinks at 300 °C.

  9. The defects produced by electron irradiation in tellurium-doped germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Saito, Haruo

    1989-01-01

    The nature of the irradiation induced defects in a germanium single crystal doped with tellurium was studied by DLTS and electrical measurements. The E c -0.21 eV level produced by irradiation with 1.5 MeV electrons was studied using the DLTS technique. It was found that the defect associated with this level is a divacancy. The E-center like defect (group V impurity-vacancy pair) introduces the E c -0.20 eV level in samples doped with a group V impurity. The level introduced by a tellurium (group VI impurity)-vacancy pair is deeper. The E c -0.16 eV level was generated by annealing at 430 K. A tellurium-vacancies complex is proposed as the defect associated with this level. (author)

  10. Computer simulation of defect behavior under fusion irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Ishino, S.

    1983-01-01

    To simulate defect behavior under irradiation, three kinds of cascade-annealing calculations have been carried out in alpha-iron using the codes MARLOWE, DAIQUIRI and their modifications. They are (1) cascade-annealing calculation with different masses of projectile, (2) defect drifting near dislocations after cascade production and (3) cascade-overlap calculation. The defect survival ratio is found to increase as decreasing mass of the projectile both after athermal close-pair recombination and after thermal annealing. It is shown that at moderate temperatures vacancy clustering is enhanced near dislocations. Cascade-overlap is found to decrease the defect survivability. In addition, the role of helium in vacancy clustering has been calculated in aluminium lattices and its effect is found to depend strongly on temperature, interstitials and the mobility of small clusters. These results correspond well to the experimental data and will be helpful for correlating between fusion and simulation irradiations. (orig.)

  11. Detection of defects in electron-irradiated synthetic silica quartz probed by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watauchi, Satoshi; Uedono, Akira; Ujihira, Yusuke; Yoda, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    Defects in amorphous SiO 2 films, formed on MOS(metal/oxide/semiconductor) devices as gates, perturb its operation. The positron annihilation techniques, were applied to the study of the annealing behavior of the defects, introduced in the high purity synthetic quartz glass by the irradiation of 3-MeV electrons up to the 1x10 18 e - /cm 2 dosage. It was proved that the positron annihilation techniques were sufficiently sensitive to detect the defects in the electron-irradiated silica glasses. Three types of open-space defects were detected by the positron lifetime measurements. These can be attributed to monovacancy or divacancy type defects, vacancy clusters, and open-volume defects. A high formation probability (∼90%) of positroniums(Ps) was found in unirradiated specimens. These Ps were considered to be formed in open-volume defects. The formation probability of Ps was drastically decreased by the electron irradiation. But the size of open-volume defects was kept unchanged by the irradiation. These facts suggest that vacancy-type defects were introduced by the electron irradiation and that positrons were trapped in these defects. By the isochronal annealing in nitrogen atmosphere, the lifetime component (τ 2 ) and its relative intensity (I 2 ), attributed to positrons trapped in monovacancy or divacancy type defects and annihilated there, changed remarkably. τ 2 was constant in the temperature range up to 300degC, getting slightly shorter between 300degC and 700degC, and constant above 700degC. I 2 decreased gradually up to 300degC, constant between 300degC and 550degC, decreased above 550degC, and constant above 700degC. This revealed that the behavior of the defects, in which positrons were trapped, change by the elevation of the annealing temperature. (author)

  12. Defect-induced ferromagnetism in semiconductors: A controllable approach by particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shengqiang

    2014-01-01

    Making semiconductors ferromagnetic has been a long dream. One approach is to dope semiconductors with transition metals (TM). TM ions act as local moments and they couple with free carriers to develop collective magnetism. However, there are no fundamental reasons against the possibility of local moment formation from localized sp states. Recently, ferromagnetism was observed in nonmagnetically doped, but defective semiconductors or insulators including ZnO and TiO 2 . This kind of observation challenges the conventional understanding of ferromagnetism. Often the defect-induced ferromagnetism has been observed in samples prepared under non-optimized condition, i.e. by accident or by mistake. Therefore, in this field theory goes much ahead of experimental investigation. To understand the mechanism of the defect-induced ferromagnetism, one needs a better controlled method to create defects in the crystalline materials. As a nonequilibrium and reproducible approach of inducing defects, ion irradiation provides such a possibility. Energetic ions displace atoms from their equilibrium lattice sites, thus creating mainly vacancies, interstitials or antisites. The amount and the distribution of defects can be controlled by the ion fluence and energy. By ion irradiation, we have generated defect-induced ferromagnetism in ZnO, TiO 2 and SiC. In this short review, we also summarize some results by other groups using energetic ions to introduce defects, and thereby magnetism in various materials. Ion irradiation combined with proper characterizations of defects could allow us to clarify the local magnetic moments and the coupling mechanism in defective semiconductors. Otherwise we may have to build a new paradigm to understand the defect-induced ferromagnetism

  13. Proton irradiation induced defects in Cd and Zn doped InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybicki, G.C.; Williams, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    Proton irradiation induced defects in Zn and Cd doped InP have been studied by deep level transient spectroscopy, (DLTS). After 2 MeV proton irradiation the defects H4 and H5 were observed in lightly Zn doped InP, while the defects H3 and H5 were observed in more heavily Zn and Cd doped InP. The defect properties were not affected by the substitution of Cd for Zn, but the introduction rate of H5 was lower in Cd doped InP. The annealing rate of defects was also higher in Cd doped InP. The use of Cd doped InP may thus result in an InP solar cell with even greater radiation resistance

  14. Study of irradiation induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Gayatri; Sebastian, K.C.; Somayajulu, D.R.S.; Chintalapudi, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    Pure high resistivity (6000 ohm-cm) silicon wafers were recoil implanted with 1.8 MeV 111 In ions. As-irradiated wafers showed a 13 MHz quadrupole interaction frequency, which was not observed earlier. The annealing behaviour of these defects in the implanted wafers was studied between room temperature and 1073 K. At different annealing temperatures two more interaction frequencies corresponding to defect complexes D2 and D3 are observed. Even though the experimental conditions were different, these are identical to the earlier reported ones. Based on an empirical point charge model calculation, an attempt is made to identify the configuration of these defect complexes. (author)

  15. Model of defect reactions and the influence of clustering in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S. M.; Cooper, P. J.; Wampler, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    Transient reactions among irradiation defects, dopants, impurities, and carriers in pulse-neutron-irradiated Si were modeled taking into account the clustering of the primal defects in recoil cascades. Continuum equations describing the diffusion, field drift, and reactions of relevant species were numerically solved for a submicrometer spherical volume, within which the starting radial distributions of defects could be varied in accord with the degree of clustering. The radial profiles corresponding to neutron irradiation were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of vacancy and interstitial distributions obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using a spectrum of primary recoil energies computed for a fast-burst fission reactor. Model predictions of transient behavior were compared with a variety of experimental results from irradiated bulk Si, solar cells, and bipolar-junction transistors. The influence of defect clustering during neutron bombardment was further distinguished through contrast with electron irradiation, where the primal point defects are more uniformly dispersed

  16. Study of irradiation defects in GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loualiche, S.

    1982-11-01

    Characterization techniques: C(V) differential capacity, DLTS deep level transient spectroscopy, DDLTS double deep level transient spectroscopy and DLOS deep level optical spectroscopy are studied and theoretical and experimental fundamentals are re-examined. In particular the centres created by ionic or electronic bombardment of p-type GaAs. New quantitative theoretical bases for the C(V) method are obtained. Study of the optical properties of traps due to irradiation using DLOS. The nature of irradiation defects are discussed [fr

  17. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  18. Defect microstructure in copper alloys irradiated with 750 MeV protons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Horsewell, A.; Singh, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) disks of pure copper and solid solution copper alloys containing 5 at% of Al, Mn, or Ni were irradiated with 750 MeV protons to damage levels between 0.4 and 2 displacements per atom (dpa) at irradiation temperatures between 60 and 200 degrees C. The defect...... significant effect on the total density of small defect clusters, but they did cause a significant decrease in the fraction of defect clusters resolvable as SFT to similar to 20 to 25%. In addition, the dislocation loop density (> 5 nm diameter) was more than an order of magnitude higher in the alloys...

  19. Effect of irradiation-induced defects on fusion reactor ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Structural, thermal, and electrical properties critical to performance of ceramics in a fusion environment can be profoundly altered by irradiation effects. Neutron damage may cause swelling, reduction of thermal conductivity, increase in dielectric loss, and either reduction or enhancement of strength depending on the crystal structure and defect content of the material. Absorption of ionizing energy inevitably leads to degradation of insulating properties, but these changes can be reduced by alterations in structural or compositional makeup. Assessment of the irradiation response of candidate ceramics Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 shows that each may find use in advanced fusion devices. The present understanding of irradiation-induced defects in ceramics, while far from complete, nevertheless points the way to methods for developing improved materials for fusion applications

  20. Accumulation and recovery of defects in ion-irradiated nanocrystalline gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Y. E-mail: chimi@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Iwase, A.; Ishikawa, N.; Kobiyama, M.; Inami, T.; Okuda, S

    2001-09-01

    Effects of 60 MeV {sup 12}C ion irradiation on nanocrystalline gold (nano-Au) are studied. The experimental results show that the irradiation-produced defects in nano-Au are thermally unstable because of the existence of a large volume fraction of grain boundaries. This suggests a possibility of the use of nanocrystalline materials as irradiation-resistant materials.

  1. Positron and positronium studies of irradiation-induced defects and microvoids in vitreous metamict silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Saneyasu, M.; Tabata, M.; Tang, Z.; Nagai, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ito, Y.

    2000-01-01

    To study irradiation-induced defects and structural microvoids in vitreous silica (v-SiO 2 ), positron lifetime, angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), and electron spin resonance (ESR) were measured on v-SiO 2 and quartz (c-SiO 2 ) samples irradiated with fast neutrons up to a dose of 4.1x10 20 n/cm 2 . Two kinds of positron-trapping defects have been found to form in v-SiO 2 by fast neutron irradiation: type-I and type-II defects. Similar defects also appear in the irradiated c-SiO 2 , indicating that both the defects are common in v-SiO 2 and c-SiO 2 . The detailed annealing and photo-illumination studies of positron annihilation and ESR for these two defects suggest that the type-I defects are non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), while the type-II defects are oxygen molecules which cannot be detected by ESR. Higher dose irradiation than 1.0x10 20 n/cm 2 causes c-SiO 2 to change to metamict (amorphous) phase (m-SiO 2 ). Positronium (Ps) atoms are found to form in microvoids with an average radius of about 0.3 nm in the v-SiO 2 and m-SiO 2 . This suggests that microvoids proved by Ps are structurally intrinsic open spaces and reflect the topologically disordered structure of these phases in the subnanometer scale

  2. Structure and flux pinning properties of irradiation defects in YBa2Cu3O7-x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.

    1992-06-01

    We review our investigations of defects produced in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x by various forms of irradiation. The defect microstructure has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Irradiation enhancements of flux pinning have been studied by SQUID magnetometry on single crystals. In many cases the same single crystals were used in both TEM and SQUID investigations. The primary atom recoil spectra for all the irradiations studied have been carefully calculated and used to correlate the TEM and magnetization results for the different types of irradiation. Correlation of annealing experiments, employing both TEM and SQUID measurements, among several types of irradiation has also yielded information on the different defect structures present. Defect densities, sizes and strain field anisotropies have been determined by TEM. Defect flux pinning anisotropies have been determined for two field orientations in twinned single crystals. The temperature dependences of the flux pinning have been measured. The maximum field of irreversibility at 70 K is shown to change markedly upon both neutron and proton irradiations in some crystals and not others. The defect structure, chemistry and location in the unit cell has been determined in some cases. Some interaction with existing defect structure has been observed in proton and electron irradiations. The damage character and directionality has been determined in GeV ion irradiated crystals

  3. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocombette, J.P.

    2005-12-01

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  4. Vacancy-type defects in electron and proton irradiated II-VI compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Balogh, A.G.; Baumann, H.

    1997-01-01

    In this contribution, the authors present a study aimed at investigating the basic properties of radiation induced defects in ZnS and ZnO and the influence of the atmosphere on the annealing characteristics of the defects. Positron annihilation experiments (both lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements) were performed on both single- and polycrystalline samples, irradiated with 3 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. For ZnS it was found that both electron and proton irradiation caused significant changes in the positron annihilation characteristics. The annealing of proton irradiated ZnS in air leads to significant oxidation and eventual transformation into ZnO

  5. Local structure and defects in ion irradiated KTaO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. X.; Xi, J.; Zhang, Y.; Tong, Yang; Xue, H.; Huang, R.; Trautmann, C.; Weber, W. J.

    2018-04-01

    The modification of the local structure in cubic perovskite KTaO3 irradiated with 3 MeV and 1.1 GeV Au ions is studied by Raman and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, complemented by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In the case of irradiation with 3 MeV Au ions where displacement cascade processes are dominant, the Ta L3-edge x-ray absorption measurements suggest that a peak corresponding to the Ta-O bonds in the TaO6 octahedra splits, which is attributed to the formation of TaK antisite defects that are coupled with oxygen vacancies, V O. This finding is consistent with the DFT calculations. Under irradiation with 1.1 GeV ions, the intense ionization and electronic energy deposition lead to a blue shift and an intensity reduction of active Raman bands. In the case of sequential irradiations, extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements reveal a decrease in concentration of coupled TaK-V O defects under subsequent irradiation with 1.1 GeV Au ions.

  6. Influence of irradiation on defects creation in pin diode structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopko, V.; Dammer, J.; Sopko, B.; Chren, D.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the manufacture of type S1 PIN diodes and radiation defect induce by fast neutrons were studied. A shift from VV"- to VV (neutral) is observed in neutron irradiated diodes. From the results obtained, an explanation that clearly offers itself is that the nature of the defects produced by irradiation of material exhibiting N type conductivity is different from those for type P material. Given that the experiments were conducted with the same material, i.e., the dopant present in the material remained unchanged, it can be stated that simply by changing the type of conductivity with increasing dose, a different kind of defects is produced, having different activation energies in the forbidden band. All these results are consistent with the ongoing RD 50 experiments at CERN.

  7. Defect production in Ar irradiated graphene membranes under different initial applied strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Asencio, J., E-mail: jesusmartinez@ua.es [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain); Ruestes, C.J.; Bringa, E. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Caturla, M.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Fase II, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante E-036090 (Spain)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Defects in graphene membranes are formed due to 140 eV Ar ions irradiation using MD. • Different initial strains are applied, which influence the type and number of defects. • Mono-vacancies, di-vacancies and tri-vacancies production behaves linearly with dose. • The total number of defects under compression is slightly higher than under tension. - Abstract: Irradiation with low energy Ar ions of graphene membranes gives rise to changes in the mechanical properties of this material. These changes have been associated to the production of defects, mostly isolated vacancies. However, the initial state of the graphene membrane can also affect its mechanical response. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied defect production in graphene membranes irradiated with 140 eV Ar ions up to a dose of 0.075 × 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} and different initial strains, from −0.25% (compressive strain) to 0.25% (tensile strain). For all strains, the number of defects increases linearly with dose with a defect production of about 80% (80 defects every 100 ions). Defects are mostly single vacancies and di-vacancies, although some higher order clusters are also observed. Two different types of di-vacancies have been identified, the most common one being two vacancies at first nearest neighbours distance. Differences in the total number of defects with the applied strain are observed which is related to the production of a higher number of di-vacancies under compressive strain compared to tensile strain. We attribute this effect to the larger out-of-plane deformations of compressed samples that could favor the production of defects in closer proximity to others.

  8. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocombette, J.P.

    2005-11-01

    The author gives an overview of his research activity since 1995. This activity concerns research in materials science, and more particularly the ageing of oxides present in the nuclear industry, or more generally, the evolution of these materials under irradiation. The first part deals with the investigation of point defects, and more particularly of the structures and energies of these defects. The author discusses results obtained on uranium dioxide, on amorphous silica, and on the solution of oxygen in silver. The second part deals with irradiation-induced damages in crystalline matrices storing radioactive actinides, and more particularly with the effect of alpha disintegration decay nuclei which are the main sources of long term irradiation in these materials

  9. Observations of defect structure evolution in proton and Ni ion irradiated Ni-Cr binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A., E-mail: sabriggs2@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Barr, Christopher M. [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Pakarinen, Janne [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); SKC-CEN Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Mamivand, Mahmood [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hattar, Khalid [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Morgan, Dane D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Taheri, Mitra [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Two binary Ni-Cr model alloys with 5 wt% Cr and 18 wt% Cr were irradiated using 2 MeV protons at 400 and 500 °C and 20 MeV Ni{sup 4+} ions at 500 °C to investigate microstructural evolution as a function of composition, irradiation temperature, and irradiating ion species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to study irradiation-induced void and faulted Frank loops microstructures. Irradiations at 500 °C were shown to generate decreased densities of larger defects, likely due to increased barriers to defect nucleation as compared to 400 °C irradiations. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in a larger density of smaller voids when compared to proton irradiations, indicating in-cascade clustering of point defects. Cluster dynamics simulations were in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting that increases in Cr content lead to an increase in interstitial binding energy, leading to higher densities of smaller dislocation loops in the Ni-18Cr alloy as compared to the Ni-5Cr alloy. - Highlights: • Binary Ni-Cr alloys were irradiated with protons or Ni ions at 400 and 500 °C. • Higher irradiation temperatures yield increased size, decreased density of defects. • Hypothesize that varying Cr content affects interstitial binding energy. • Fitting CD models for loop nucleation to data supports this hypothesis.

  10. Influence of oxygen impurity atoms on defect clusters and radiation hardening in neutron-irradiated vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystal TEM samples and polycrystalline tensile samples of vanadium containing 60-640 wt ppm oxygen were irradiated at about 100 0 C to about 1.3 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 1 MeV) and post-irradiation annealed up to 800 0 C. The defect cluster density increased and the average size decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. Higher oxygen concentrations caused the radiation hardening and radiation-anneal hardening to increase. The observations are consistent with the nucleation of defect clusters by small oxygen or oxygen-point defect complexes and the trapping of oxygen at defect clusters upon post-irradiation annealing

  11. Introduction and recovery of point defects in electron-irradiated ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K.; Look, D.C.; Farlow, G.C.

    2005-01-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the introduction and recovery of point defects in electron-irradiated n-type ZnO. The irradiation (E el =2 MeV, fluence 6x10 17 cm -2 ) was performed at room temperature, and isochronal annealings were performed from 300 to 600 K. In addition, monochromatic illumination of the samples during low-temperature positron measurements was used in identification of the defects. We distinguish two kinds of vacancy defects: the Zn and O vacancies, which are either isolated or belong to defect complexes. In addition, we observe negative-ion-type defects, which are attributed to O interstitials or O antisites. The Zn vacancies and negative ions act as compensating centers and are introduced at a concentration [V Zn ]≅c ion ≅2x10 16 cm -3 . The O vacancies are introduced at a 10-times-larger concentration [V O ]≅3x10 17 cm -3 and are suggested to be isolated. The O vacancies are observed as neutral at low temperatures, and an ionization energy of 100 meV could be fitted with the help of temperature-dependent Hall data, thus indicating their deep donor character. The irradiation-induced defects fully recover after the annealing at 600 K, in good agreement with electrical measurements. The Zn vacancies recover in two separate stages, indicating that the Zn vacancies are parts of two different defect complexes. The O vacancies anneal simultaneously with the Zn vacancies at the later stage, with an activation energy of E V,O m =1.8±0.1 eV. The negative ions anneal out between the two annealing stages of the vacancies

  12. A study on the healing process of bone defect-examination of healing stages of bone defect in the irradiated mandibular rim by microradiography and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoyama, Tetsuo

    1980-01-01

    The mandibular rim of 150 female Donryu strain rats was exposed to 2000 rads (B group) or to 3000 rads (C group), and a bone defect of 1 x 1 x 2 mm in size was formed in the madibular rim. Cure process of this bone defect was observed periodically by microradiography and autoradiography using 45 Ca as a tracer, compared with that in the control group (A group, non-irradiated). Irradiated rats having bone defects recovered smoothly. Microradiographic findings of the A group showed that new bone was formed on the surface of the perosteum of the mandible on the 7th days after the irradiation. Bone defects in all rats were repaired completely by the 49th days after the irradiation. Microradiographic findings of the B and C groups showed that new bone was formed on the tongue side surface of the periosteum of the mandible in the early stage after the irradiation. However, after that, osteogenesis became slower, and the edge of bone defects or a part of the mandible became smaller. Bone defects were not repaired and became larger. These findings were more marked in the C group than in the B group. Autoradiographic findings showed marked uptake of 45 Ca into new bone in the A group. Rats of which bone defects were repaired showed the uptake of 45 Ca in accordance with the shape of the mandibular rim. The edge of bone defect of the B and C groups where new bone was not formed was destroyed since the 14th day after the irradiation. There were some cases in which the uptake of 45 Ca into the surface of the periosteum of the mandible near bone defect was observed even when bone defect was enlarged. (Tsunoda, M.)

  13. Influence of laser shock peening on irradiation defects in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaofeng; Su, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chenfei; Lu, Yongfeng; Nastasi, Michael; Cui, Bai

    2017-06-01

    The laser shock peening process can generate a dislocation network, stacking faults, and deformation twins in the near surface of austenitic stainless steels by the interaction of laser-driven shock waves with metals. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) irradiation studies suggest that these dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries can serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. As a result, the irradiation resistance is improved as the density of irradiation defects in laser-peened stainless steels is much lower than that in untreated steels. After heating to 300 °C, a portion of the dislocations and stacking faults are annealed out while the deformation twins remain stable, which still provides improved irradiation resistance. These findings have important implications on the role of laser shock peening on the lifetime extension of austenitic stainless steel components in nuclear reactor environments.

  14. Influence of ion irradiation induced defects on mechanical properties of copper nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weina; Sun, Lixin; Xue, Jianming; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of copper nanowires irradiated with energetic ions have been investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The Cu ions with energies ranging from 0.2 to 8.0 keV are used in our simulation, and both the elastic properties and yields under tension and compression are analyzed. The results show that two kinds of defects, namely point defects and stacking faults, appear in the irradiated nanowires depending on the incident ion energy. The Young modulus is significantly reduced by the ion irradiation, and the reduction magnitude depends on the vacancy number, which is determined by the ion energy. Moreover, the irradiated nanowires yield at a smaller strain, compared with the unirradiated nanowire. The mechanism for these changes are also discussed

  15. Study of point defect mobilities in zirconium during electron irradiation in a HVEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.

    1993-01-01

    A high voltage electron microscope (HVEM) was used to investigate the nature of intrinsic point defects in α-Zr by direct observation of dislocation climb and cavity growth or shrinkage. The material used was Marz-grade Zr that had been pre-irradiated with neutrons at about 740 K in the Dounreay Fast Reactor. Dislocation loops of vacancy character that had been produced during the neutron irradiation were studied by further irradiation with electrons in the HVEM. Growth of the loops was observed at temperatures as low as 230 K, indicating that, under the conditions of the experiment, some vacancy-type defects were mobile in the temperature regime 230 K-300 K. The nature of these defects is unknown. One possibility is that these defects are not intrinsic in nature, but may be vacancy-Fe complexes. In addition to the climb of dislocation loops, c-component network dislocations and cavities were also studied. Basal plane climb of the network dislocations was observed at 573 K, but was not readily apparent at 320 K. This suggests that preferred climb planes (and possibly loop habit planes) are sensitive to temperature. Cavities that were already in the foil after neutron irradiation or were induced by electron irradiation grew along the c-axis and shrank along a-directions during electron irradiation. This radiation-induced shape change of the cavities strongly suggests the existence of a diffusional anisotropy difference between interstitials and vacancies in α-Zr. (Author) 14 figs., 22 refs

  16. Defect formation in n-type InP at elevated temperatures of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovskij, V.V.; Kol'chenko, T.I.; Lomako, V.M.; Moroz, S.E.

    1990-01-01

    Effect of irradiation temperature within 25-250 deg C traps in InP. Rate of most deep level introduction, as well as, rate of charge carrier removing at the increase of irradiation temperature are shown to decrease and it is explained by defect annealing occuring simultaneously with irradiation

  17. Hydrostatic pressure effects on oxygen-related irradiation-produced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, H.J.; Samara, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure has been used to investigate the E c -0.164 eV acceptor level for the oxygen-vacancy (O-V) defect in γ-ray irradiated Si, and the annealing/formation of oxygen-related defects in neutron-irradiated Si. The acceptor level is found to move closer to the conduction band and away from the valence band. There is also a relatively large inward (outward) breathing mode lattice relaxation accompanying electron emission (capture) from this level. Both results reflect the antibonding nature of the level and are qualitatively consistent with the Watkins-Corbett model for the O-V defect. The annealing rate was found to increase with pressure for the O-V defect at 350 0 C with a derived activation volume of -4.5A 3 /defect, where the negative sign implies inward relaxation (contraction) on annealing. Pressure has relatively little effect on annealing of the C-Si-O C(3) defect which is interstitial in nature, but strongly favors the formation of the dioxygen defect. The intensity of the O 2 -V band after annealing at 20 kbar is 5 times higher than that following similar annealing at 0 kbar. This intensity is higher than that achievable by any isochronal or isothermal annealing steps at 0 kbar. These results are discussed qualitatively in terms of models for the various defects. (author)

  18. Various categories of defects after surface alloying induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dian [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Guangze, E-mail: oaktang@hit.edu.cn [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Ma, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Gu, Le [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Mingren [School of Material Science & Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Liqin [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Four kinds of defects are found during surface alloying by high current electron beam. • Exploring the mechanism how these defects appear after irradiation. • Increasing pulsing cycles will help to get good surface quality. • Choosing proper energy density will increase surface quality. - Abstract: High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) is an attractive advanced materials processing method which could highly increase the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, how to eliminate different kinds of defects during irradiation by HCPEB especially in condition of adding new elements is a challenging task. In the present research, the titanium and TaNb-TiW composite films was deposited on the carburizing steel (SAE9310 steel) by DC magnetron sputtering before irradiation. The process of surface alloying was induced by HCPEB with pulse duration of 2.5 μs and energy density ranging from 3 to 9 J/cm{sup 2}. Investigation of the microstructure indicated that there were several forms of defects after irradiation, such as surface unwetting, surface eruption, micro-cracks and layering. How the defects formed was explained by the results of electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results also revealed that proper energy density (∼6 J/cm{sup 2}) and multi-number of irradiation (≥50 times) contributed to high quality of alloyed layers after irradiation.

  19. High-dose irradiation induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jin Shim

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR treatment induces a DNA damage response, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis in metazoan somatic cells. Because little has been reported in germline cells, we performed a temporal analysis of the DNA damage response utilizing Drosophila oogenesis as a model system. Oogenesis in the adult Drosophila female begins with the generation of 16-cell cyst by four mitotic divisions of a cystoblast derived from the germline stem cells. We found that high-dose irradiation induced S and G2 arrests in these mitotically dividing germline cells in a grp/Chk1- and mnk/Chk2-dependent manner. However, the upstream kinase mei-41, Drosophila ATR ortholog, was required for the S-phase checkpoint but not for the G2 arrest. As in somatic cells, mnk/Chk2 and dp53 were required for the major cell death observed in early oogenesis when oocyte selection and meiotic recombination occurs. Similar to the unscheduled DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs generated from defective repair during meiotic recombination, IR-induced DSBs produced developmental defects affecting the spherical morphology of meiotic chromosomes and dorsal-ventral patterning. Moreover, various morphological abnormalities in the ovary were detected after irradiation. Most of the IR-induced defects observed in oogenesis were reversible and were restored between 24 and 96 h after irradiation. These defects in oogenesis severely reduced daily egg production and the hatch rate of the embryos of irradiated female. In summary, irradiated germline cells induced DSBs, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and developmental defects resulting in reduction of egg production and defective embryogenesis.

  20. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z.; Kirk, M.A.; Daymond, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr"2"+ was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 "oC or 450 "oC. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 "oC irradiation but not at 450 "oC. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2 and both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  1. Irradiation damage in boron carbide: point defects, clusters and helium bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.

    1986-06-01

    Boron carbide is a refractory hard and light material of interest in nuclear technology (fission and also fusion). Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the properties of radiation induced damage. Firstly, the production of point defects and their clustering was studied in samples irradiated by 1 MeV electron in a high voltage electron microscope at selected temperatures from 12 K to 1000 K. Secondly, conventional transmission electron microscopy was used to understand the production of helium bubbles in neutron irradiated boron carbide and their role in the generation of microcracks. Finally, the interaction between point defects and bubbles was also examined

  2. On the recovery of neutron irradiation defects of some metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, H.G.; Matta, M.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work deals with the recovery of mechanical properties of neutron irradiated material to the pre-irradiating values. Rate of migration of defects responsible for radiation hardening and those inducing radiation embrittlement is analyzed. Role of crystalline structure is also studied. Materials of FCC crystal structure used in these investigations are pure Cu, Cu-5 at. % , Al, Cu-5 at. % Si, some Ni base binary alloys and some austenitic stainless steels mainly of AISI types 304 and 316. Among materials of BCC crystalline structure Fe-6 wt % Cr alloy is used. Alloys with CPH structure used in the present investigations are Zr-l wt. % Nb and Mg - 4.8 wt % Li alloys. History of material is studied such as cold worked state and annealed condition. Character of alloying elements and their amounts were of interest in this study. The result showed that the higher the percentage radiation hardening, the slower is the migration of radiation defects. Irradiated pure metals recovered at a higher temperature than alloys. Cold work accelerated the migration of radiation defects. The amount of alloying elements had little effect on the recovery temperatures. Character of solute alloying elements (substitutional or interstitial) revealed sensitive effect on the migration of radiation defects. Rate of migration of defects causing hardening can be different from those causing embrittlement. (author)

  3. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, I; Cizek, J; Lukac, F; Melikhova, O; Valenta, J; Havranek, V; Anwand, W; Skuratov, V A; Strukova, T S

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe 26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×10 12 to 1×10 14 cm -2 . The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments. (paper)

  4. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  5. Study of irradiation induced defects and phase instability in β phase of Zr Excel alloy with in-situ heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H.; Yao, Z., E-mail: 12hy1@queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Kirk, M.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Argonne, IL (United States); Daymond, M.R. [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    In situ heavy ion irradiation with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} was carried out to study irradiation induced phase change and atomic lattice defects in theβ phase of Zr Excel alloy. No decomposition of β-Zr was observed under irradiation at either 200 {sup o}C or 450 {sup o}C. However, ω-Zr particles experienced shape change and shrinkage associated enrichment of Fe in the β/ω interface at 200 {sup o}C irradiation but not at 450 {sup o}C. The defect evolution in the β-phase was examined with single phase Zr-20Nb alloy. It was found that dislocation loops with Burgers vector 1/2<111> and <001> both present in β-Zr under room temperature irradiation. (author)

  6. Study by internal friction of curing low temperature irradiation defects in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouby, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Micromechanical properties and anelastic effects of neutrons irradiated graphites at 300 and 77 0 K are investigated by internal friction analysis and elasticity modulus variations. Defects created by irradiation are studied and evolution versus dose and annealing is followed [fr

  7. Defect formation in heavily doped Si upon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubskaya, V.I.; Kuchinskii, P.V.; Lomako, V.M.

    1981-01-01

    The rates of the carrier removal and radiation defect introduction into n- and p-Si in the concentration range of 10 14 to 10 17 cm -3 upon 7-MeV-electron irradiation have been studied. The spectrum of the vacancy-type defects, defining the carrier removal rate in lightly doped crystals has been found. With doping level increase the carrier removal rate grows irrespective of conductivity type, and at n 0 , p 0 > 10 17 cm -3 is close to the total displacement number. At the same time a decrease in the introduction rate of the known vacancy-type defects is observed. x It is shown that a considerable growth of the carrier removal rate is defined neither by introduction of shallow compensating centers, nor by change in the primary defect charge state. It is suggested that at high doping impurity concentrations compensation in Si is due to the introduction of complexes doping impurity-interstitial or (impurity atom-interstitial) + vacancy, which give deep levels. (author)

  8. Effect of irradiation temperature and initial crystal doping level on defect creation efficiency in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, F.P.; Markevich, V.P.; Medvedeva, I.F.; Murin, L.I.

    1990-01-01

    The defect creation processes in n-type silicon irradiated by 60 Co gamma-rays or fast electrons (E = 4 MeV) have been investigated. Using electrical measurements the dependences of introduction efficiencies of the main radiation defects (A-, E-centres, carbon-related complexes) on the irradiation temperature (T irr = 77-470 K) and material doping level (N h = 2 x 10 12 - 2 x 10 15 cm -3 ) are obtained. It is shown that the efficiency of these defects formation is conditioned by the probability of the Frenkel pairs separation and depends strongly on the Fermi level position in crystals being irradiated. 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Irradiation of amorphous metallic alloys: defect production and local order evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Balanzat, E.; Audouard, A.; Jousset, J.C.

    1983-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of the nature and dynamic characteristics of the ''defects'' which are produced in metallic glasses as a result of irradiation with fast particles. It discusses also the modifications in the state of local order and other structural changes brought by the creation and migration of these defects [fr

  10. Thermal defect annealing of swift heavy ion irradiated ThO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Raul I.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Neuefeind, Joerg; Ewing, Rodney C.; Trautmann, Christina; Lang, Maik

    2017-08-01

    Isochronal annealing, neutron total scattering, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural recovery of polycrystalline ThO2 irradiated with 2-GeV Au ions to a fluence of 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. Neutron diffraction patterns show that the Bragg signal-to-noise ratio increases and the unit cell parameter decreases as a function of isochronal annealing temperature, with the latter reaching its pre-irradiation value by 750 °C. Diffuse neutron scattering and Raman spectroscopy measurements indicate that an isochronal annealing event occurs between 275-425 °C. This feature is attributed to the annihilation of oxygen point defects and small oxygen defect clusters.

  11. Defect analysis of BaSrFBr:Eu irradiated by X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Jeong, J. M.; Kim, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical property of the BaSrFBr:Eu phosphor layer of X-ray image plates was investigated by using image quality (IQ), resolution (LP/mm), and coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) positron annihilation. The screen samples of BaSrFBr:Eu phosphors were irradiated with hospital X-rays in the course of diagnostic radiography at an average rate of 20,000 times per year and were used for various periods of time. The LP/mm values of the irradiated BaSrFBr:Eu image plates varied between 2.4 and 2.0 for three years while the IQ values varied between 35 and 11 over the same period. CDB positron annihilation spectroscopy was used to analyze the defect structures in the phosphor layer. The S parameter values increased in correlation with increased exposure time, which indicated that more defects were generated. There was a positive relationship between the IQ and S parameters. Measurements of the defects indicate that most of the defects were likely to have been generated by the X-ray radiation.

  12. What can we learn from Raman Spectroscopy on irradiation-induced defects in UO2?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desgranges, L.; Martin, Ph.; Simon, P.; Guimbretiere, G.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on irradiated UO 2 by Raman spectroscopy evidenced Raman lines that are characteristic of irradiation-induced defects. Three main mechanisms are identified to explain their origin: resonant Raman, formation of new molecular entities, or breakdown in symmetry. Arguments are given to consider breakdown in symmetry as the predominant mechanism. A tentative description of the defects at the origin of this symmetry breakdown is proposed in terms of coordination polyhedrons of uranium. This discussion led us to consider that the Raman defect modes could be related to area with different stoichiometry. (authors)

  13. Insulating Behavior in Graphene with Irradiation-induced Lattice Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Hao; Williams, Ellen; Fuhrer, Michael

    2010-03-01

    We irradiated cleaned graphene on silicon dioxide in ultra-high vacuum with low energy inert gas ions to produce lattice defects [1], and investigated in detail the transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence of the conductivity as a function of defect density. We measured the low field magnetoresistance and temperature-dependent resistivity in situ and find that weak localization can only account for a small correction of the resistivity increase with decreasing temperature. We will discuss possible origins of the insulating temperature dependent resistivity in defected graphene in light of our recent experiments. [4pt] [1] Jian-Hao Chen, W. G. Cullen, C. Jang, M. S. Fuhrer, E. D. Williams, PRL 102, 236805 (2009)

  14. Antisite defects in γ-irradiated InP and InP crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, M.I.; Rashidova, Sh.Sh.; Gusejnova, M.A.; Gadzhieva, N.N.

    2008-01-01

    By means of TL and IR spectroscopy methods, it has been found that γ-irradiation of lnP single crystals doped with Sn leads to TL peak appearance at 230 K with activation energy E a =0.19 eV. This peak is connected with vacancy-antisite donor-type doped defect complex formation under irradiation [ru

  15. Defect structures in YBa2Cu3O/sub 7-x/ produced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Baker, M.C.; Liu, J.Z.; Lam, D.J.; Weber, H.W.

    1987-12-01

    Defect structures in YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ produced by electron irradiation at 300 0 K were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Threshold energies for the production of visible defects were determined to be 152 keV and 131 keV (+- 7 keV) in directions near the a and b (b > a) axes (both perpendicular to c, the long axis in the orthorhombic structure), respectively. During above threshold irradiations in an electron flux of 3 x 10 18 cm -2 s -1 , extended defects were observed to form and grow to sizes of 10 to 50 nm over 1000 s in material thicknesses 20 to 200 nm. Such low electron threshold energies suggest oxygen atom displacements with recoil energies near 20 eV. The observation of movement of twin boundaries during irradiation just above threshold suggests movement of the basal plane oxygen atoms by direct displacement or defect migration processes. Crystals irradiated above threshold were observed after about 24 hours to have transformed to a structure heavily faulted on planes perpendicular to the c axis. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. Identification of equilibrium and irradiation-induced defects in nuclear ceramics: electronic structure calculations of defect properties and positron annihilation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiktor, Julia

    2015-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation the fission of actinide nuclei causes the creation of large amounts of defects, which affect the physical and chemical properties of materials inside the reactor, in particular the fuel and structural materials. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) can be used to characterize irradiation induced defects, empty or containing fission products. This non-destructive experimental technique involves detecting the radiation generated during electron-positron annihilation in a sample and deducing the properties of the material studied. As positrons get trapped in open volume defects in solids, by measuring their lifetime and momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, one can obtain information on the open and the chemical environments of the defects. In this work electronic structure calculations of positron annihilation characteristics were performed using two-component density functional theory (TCDFT). To calculate the momentum distributions of the annihilation radiation, we implemented the necessary methods in the open-source ABINIT program. The theoretical results have been used to contribute to the identification of the vacancy defects in two nuclear ceramics, silicon carbide (SiC) and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). (author) [fr

  17. Defects in hyperpure Fe-based alloys created by 3 MeV e{sup -}-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X H; Moser, P [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee; Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    Information about vacancy defects created in RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessels) steels after neutron irradiations are obtained via a simulation: the RPV steels are simulated by a series of high purity Fe-based alloys; the neutron irradiation is simulated by a 3 MeV electron irradiation; vacancy defects characteristics are obtained by positron lifetime techniques. Irradiations are made at 150 or 288 deg C, with a dose of 4*10{sup 19} e-/cm{sup 2}, and followed by isochronal annealing in the range 20-500 deg C. The observed vacancy defects are single trapped vacancies and small vacancy clusters, the size of which being lower than 10 empty atomic volumes (vacancy clusters containing more than 50 empty atomic volumes were never found). A large recovery step is observed between 200 and 400 deg C, after 150 deg C irradiation and attributed to vacancy-impurity detrapping, and also, vacancy cluster evaporation. The influence of C, Cu and Mo are presented. These results are in agreement with a model supposing, in pure Fe, single vacancy migration at -50 deg C and vacancy-impurity detrapping at 200 deg C. (authors). 4 figs., 15 refs.

  18. Numerical simulation of SPH for dynamics effect of multilayer discontinuous structure irradiated by impulse X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Binbin; Tang Wenhui; Ran Xianwen; Xu Zhihong; Chen Hua

    2012-01-01

    When high energy X-ray irradiates material, it will cause energy deposition in materials, and generates thermal shock wave. At present, finite difference method is used to the numerical simulation of thermal shock usually, but if considering the inter-space between the multilayer materials, the difference method will be more difficult. This paper used the SPH method to simulate multilayer discontinuous structure irradiated by high energy X-ray, and the results show that the gap between the materials of each layer has a certain influence on the thermal shock wave intensity, but doesn't have any affect to gasification impulse. (authors)

  19. Point defects in cubic boron nitride after neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Ide, Munetoshi; Yamaji, Hiromichi; Matsukawa, Tokuo; Fukuoka, Noboru; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo.

    1993-01-01

    The production of point defects induced by reactor neutrons and the thermal behavior of defects in sintered cubic boron nitride are investigated using the optical absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods. A strong structureless absorption over the visible region was observed after fast neutron irradiation to a dose of 5.3 x 10 16 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at 25 K. This specimen also shows an ESR signal with g-value 2.006 ± 0.001, which can be tentatively identified as an electron trapped in a nitrogen vacancy. On examination of the thermal decay of the signal, the activation energy for recovery of the defects was determined to be about 1.79 eV. (author)

  20. Defect reactions on the phosphorus sublattice in low-temperature electron-irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.

    1985-01-01

    This Rapid Communication describes several thermally or electronically stimulated defect reactions involving the dominant deep centers in low-temperature (25--300 K) electron-irradiated InP. Some of these reactions result in an increased concentration of the centers, thereby revealing the existence of a secondary production mechanism of the related defects. Low-energy irradiations allows one to select the type of the ejected atom (P) and gives direct evidence that only a phosphorus species, interstitial or vacancy, is involved in the creation-reaction-annealing events

  1. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening study of defects created by swift ion irradiation in sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liszkay, L.; Gordo, P.M.; Lima, A. de; Havancsak, K.; Skuratov, V.A.; Kajcsos, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Swift ions create a defect profile penetrating deep into a solid compared to the sampling range of typical slow positron beams, which may consequently study a homogeneous zone of defected materials. To investigate the defect population created by energetic ions, we studied α-Al 2 O 3 single crystals irradiated with swift Kr ions by using conventional and pulsed positron beams. Samples irradiated with krypton at 245 MeV energy in a wide fluence range show nearly saturated positron trapping above 5 x 10 10 ions cm -2 fluence, indicating the creation of monovacancies in high concentration. At 1 x 10 14 ions cm -2 irradiation a 500 ps long lifetime component appears, showing the creation of larger voids. This threshold corresponds well to the onset of the overlap of the damage zones after Bi ion irradiation along the ion trajectories observed with microscopic methods. (orig.)

  2. Loop Growth and Point-Defect Profiles during HVEM Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1979-01-01

    The point-defect profile in a thin foil is included in the model for the growth of dislocation loops during HVEM irradiation suggested by Kiritani, Yoshida, Takata, and Maehara, and the possible effect of divacancies is discussed. It is found that there is a fairly wide transition range between...

  3. Charged defects during alpha-irradiation of actinide oxides as revealed by Raman and luminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohun, R.; Desgranges, L.; Léchelle, J.; Simon, P.; Guimbretière, G.; Canizarès, A.; Duval, F.; Jegou, C.; Magnin, M.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Valot, C.; Vauchy, R.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently evidenced an original Raman signature of alpha irradiation-induced defects in UO 2 . In this study, we aim to determine whether the same signature also exists in different actinide oxides, namely ThO 2 and PuO 2 . Sintered UO 2 and ThO 2 were initially irradiated with 21 MeV He 2+ ions using a cyclotron device and were subjected to an in situ luminescence experiment followed by Raman analysis. In addition, a PuO 2 sample which had accumulated self-irradiation damage due to alpha particles was investigated only by Raman measurement. Results obtained for the initially white ThO 2 showed that a blue color appeared in the irradiated areas as well as luminescence signals during irradiation. However, Raman spectroscopic analysis showed the absence of Raman signature in ThO 2 . In contrast, the irradiated UO 2 and PuO 2 confirmed the presence of the Raman signature but no luminescence peaks were observed. The proposed mechanism involves electronic defects in ThO 2 , while a coupling between electronic defects and phonons is required to explain the Raman spectra for UO 2 and PuO 2 .

  4. Vacancy defects in electron-irradiated ZnO studied by Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Q.; Betsuyaku, K.; Kawasuso, A.

    2008-03-01

    Vacancy defects in ZnO induced by electron irradiation were characterized by the Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation measurements together with the local density approximation calculations. Zinc vacancies (VZn) are responsible for positron trapping in the as-irradiated state. These are annealed out below 200°C . The further annealing at 400°C results in the formation of secondary defects attributed to the complexes composed of zinc vacancies and zinc antisites (VZn-ZnO) .

  5. Irradiation defect structures in YBa2Cu3O7-x and their correlation with superconducting properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.

    1990-11-01

    We review our work on irradiation effects in single crystal YBa 2 CU 3 O 7-x . Transmission electron microscopy has been employed to study the defect microstructures produced by irradiations with fast neutrons, MeV ions (Kr, Ne and p), and electrons. The atomic structure within defect cascades was investigated using 50 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiations to low doses. Evidence is shown for an amorphous structure with some incoherent recrystallization within individual cascades. Correlation with enhancements in critical current density produced by neutron irradiations suggest that this cascade structure effectively pins magnetic flux lines. At sufficiently high fluences of fast neutrons or MeV Kr and Ne ions, a cellular microstructure is found. This structure consists of cells or microcrystallites of good cystalline and superconducting material (in the case of neutron irradiation), with cell walls of amorphous material. Full amorphization proceeds with the growth of cell wall volume. The formation of this microstructure coincides with a decrease in critical transport current, but is not observed by magnetization measurements. Increases in critical current density under proton irradiation, comparable to those produced by neutron irradiation, have been reported. The defect structure produced by proton irradiations is examined here and found to differ from that of neutron irradiations. Our most recent measurements of changes in critical temperature and current density, and defect microstructure following electron irradiations will be described. 20 refs., 6 figs

  6. Radiation defects produced by neutron irradiation in germanium single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Honda, Makoto; Atobe, Kozo; Yamaji, Hiromichi; Ide, Mutsutoshi; Okada, Moritami.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of defects produced in germanium single crystals by neutron irradiation at 25 K was studied by measuring the electrical resistivity. It was found that two levels located at E c -0.06 eV and E c -0.13 eV were introduced in an arsenic-doped sample. Electron traps at E c -0.10eV were observed in an indium-doped sample. The change in electrical resistivity during irradiation was also studied. (author)

  7. The Defect Inspection on the Irradiated Fuel Rod by Eddy Current Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, D. S.; Park, Y. K.; Kim, E. K.

    1996-01-01

    The eddy current test(ECT) probe of differential encircling coil type was designed and fabricated, and the optimum condition of ECT was derived for the examination of the irradiated fuel rod. The correlation between ECT test frequency and phase and amplitude was derived by performing the test of the standard rig that includes inner notches, outer notches and through-holes. The defect of through-hole was predicted by ECT at the G33-N2 fuel rod irradiated in the Kori-1 nuclear power reactor. The metallographic examination on the G33-N2 fuel rod was Performed at the defect location predicted by ECT. The result of metallographic examination for the G33-N2 fuel rod was in good agreement with that of ECT. This proves that the evaluation for integrity of irradiated fuel rod by ECT is reliable

  8. Time-domain vibrational study on defects in ion-irradiated crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, M.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the effects of point defects on coherent phonons in ion-implanted bismuth and graphite. Ultrafast dynamics of coherent phonons and photo-generated carriers in the femtosecond time-domain have been investigated by means of pump-probe reflectivity measurements. Point defects are introduced by irradiating graphite with 5 keV He + ions. For Bi the dephasing rate of the A 1g phonon increases linearly with increasing ion dose, which is explained by the additional dephasing process of the coherent phonon originated from scattering of phonons by the defects. For graphite, introduction of the defects enhances the carrier relaxation by opening a decay channel via vacancy-states, which competes efficiently with carrier-phonon scattering. The coherent acoustic phonon relaxation is also accelerated due to an additional scattering by defects. The linear fluence-dependence of the decay rate is understood as scattering of propagating acoustic phonon by single vacancies. (author)

  9. Vacancy-type defects in electron and proton irradiated ZnO and ZnS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Logar, B.; Baumann, H.

    1997-01-01

    A study aimed at investigating basic properties of radiation induced effects in ZnO and ZnS has been presented. Positron annihilation experiments (both lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements) were performed on polycrystalline samples. For ZnO it was found that both electron and proton irradiation caused significant changes in the positron annihilation characteristics and several annealing stages were observed, related to the annealing of variously sized vacancy complexes. The lifetime in defected, proton irradiated polycrystalline ZnS samples, grown by chemical vapour deposition, indicates the formation of large defect complexes. The annealing of proton irradiated ZnS in air at temperatures between 650 C and 750 C leads to significant oxidation and transformation into ZnO. 10 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  10. Vacancy-type defects in electron and proton irradiated ZnO and ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S.; Puff, W.; Logar, B. [Technische Univ., Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Mascher, P. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Balogh, A.G. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany); Baumann, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    1997-10-01

    A study aimed at investigating basic properties of radiation induced effects in ZnO and ZnS has been presented. Positron annihilation experiments (both lifetime and Doppler-broadening measurements) were performed on polycrystalline samples. For ZnO it was found that both electron and proton irradiation caused significant changes in the positron annihilation characteristics and several annealing stages were observed, related to the annealing of variously sized vacancy complexes. The lifetime in defected, proton irradiated polycrystalline ZnS samples, grown by chemical vapour deposition, indicates the formation of large defect complexes. The annealing of proton irradiated ZnS in air at temperatures between 650 C and 750 C leads to significant oxidation and transformation into ZnO. 10 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab.

  11. Bulk and interface defects in electron irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Chen; Sun Heng-hui

    1989-01-01

    Systematic studies on the structure of defects in InP caused by electron irradiation are conducted based on experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. The rates of introduction and annealing-out temperatures of In and P vancancies are estimated using proper theoretical models. These calculations reveal that after room temperature irradiation only complexes may exist. It is also supported by our experimental data that the sum of introducing rates of three detected levels are less than the theoretical value calculated for single vacancies. According to our equation on the relation between interface states and DLTS signal and from the results of computer calculation we believe that the broad peak appearing in the DLTS diagram before irradiation is related to interface states. Its disappearance after electron irradiation suggests the reduction of interface states; this is further confirmed by the reduction of surface recombination rate derived from the results of surface photovoltage measurement

  12. Vacancy defects in electron irradiated RPV steels studied by positron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, P; Li, X H [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee; Akamatsu, M; Van Duysen, J C [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Ecuelles (France)

    1994-12-31

    Specimens of French RPV (reactor pressure vessels) steels at different rates of segregation have been irradiated at 150 and 288 deg C with 3 MeV electrons (irradiation dose: 4*10{sup 19} e-/cm{sup 2}). Vacancy defects are studied by positron lifetime measurements before and after irradiation and at each step of isochronal annealing. After 150 deg C irradiation, a recovery step is observed in both specimens, for annealing treatments in the range 220-370 deg C and is attributed to the dissociation of vacancy-impurity complexes. The size of vacancy clusters never overcome 10 empty atomic volumes. If ``fresh`` dislocations are created just before irradiation, big vacancy clusters could be formed. After 288 deg C irradiation, small vacancy cluster of 4-10 empty atomic volumes are observed. (authors). 3 figs., 7 refs.

  13. Irradiation of defected SAP clad UO2 fuel in the X-7 organic loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.; Cracknell, A.G.; MacDonald, R.D.

    1961-10-01

    This report describes an experiment designed to test the behaviour under irradiation of a UO 2 fuel specimen clad in a defected SAP sheath and cooled by recirculating organic liquid. The specimen containing the defect was irradiated in the X-7 loop in the NRX reactor from the 25th of November until the 13th of December 1960. Up to the 13th of December the behaviour was analogous to that seen with defected UO 2 specimens clad in zircaloy which were irradiated in water loops. Reactor power transients resulted in peaking of gamma ray activities in the loop, but on steady operation these activities tended to fall to a steady state level, Over this period the pressure drop across the fuel increased by a factor of two, the increases occurring after reactor shut downs and start ups. On 13th December the pressure drop increased rapidly, after a reactor shut down and start up, to over five times its original value and the activities in the loop rose to a high level. The specimen was removed and examination showed that the sheath was very badly split and that the volume between the fuel and the sheath was filled with a hard black organic substance. This report gives full details of the irradiation and of the post -irradiation examination. Correlation of the observed phenomenon is attempted and a preliminary assessment of the problems which would be associated with defect fuel in an organic reactor is given. (author)

  14. Irradiation temperature dependence of defect formation of nitrides (A1N and c-BN) during neutron irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo.; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo

    2000-01-01

    The nitrogen vacancy concentration in the more refractory nitrides (A1N and c-BN) is determined as a function of reactor fluence up to 5.2x10 17 thermal neutrons/cm 2 and a function of the irradiation temperature at 25, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 K. It is found that there is no remarkable dependence of the defect formation in nitrides on the irradiation temperature. The production of damage in the nitrides is considerably different from that in oxides. From the irradiation experiments using thermal neutron irradiation field, it is suggested in reactor irradiation that the atomic displacements in the nitrides occur predominately from energetic particles of the nuclear reactions with thermal neutrons in addition to the elastic collisions by fast neutron

  15. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K.; Look, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10 17 cm -2 ) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Positron annihilation and electron spin resonance studies of defects in electron-irradiated 3C-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisayoshi; Yoshikawa, Masahito; Tanigawa, Shoichiro; Nashiyama, Isamu; Misawa, Shunji; Okumura, Hajime; Yoshida, Sadafumi.

    1992-01-01

    Defects induced by 1 MeV electron-irradiation in cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) epitaxially grown by chemical vapor deposition have been studied with positron annihilation and electron spin resonance (ESR). Doppler broadened energy spectra of annihilation γ-rays obtained by using variable-energy positron beams showed the formation of vacancy-type defects in 3C-SiC by the electron-irradiation. An ESR spectrum labeled Tl, which has an isotropic g-value of 2.0029 ± 0.001, was observed in electron-irradiated 3C-SiC. The Tl spectrum is interpreted by hyperfine interactions of paramagnetic electrons with 13 C at four carbon sites and 29 Si at twelve silicon sites, indicating that the Tl center arises from a point defect at a silicon site. Both the results can be accounted for by the introduction of isolated Si vacancies by the irradiation. (author)

  17. Nucleation of voids and other irradiation-produced defect aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.; Katz, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The nucleation of defect clusters in crystalline solids from radiation-produced defects is different from the usual nucleation processes in one important aspect: the condensing defects, interstitial atoms and vacancies, can mutually annihilate and are thus similar to matter and antimatter. The nucleation process is described as the simultaneous reaction of vacancies and interstitials (and gas atoms if present) with embryos of all sizes. The reaction rates for acquisition of point defects (and gas atoms) are calculated from their respective jump frequencies and concentrations in the supersaturated system. The reaction rates for emission of point defects are derived from the free energies of the defect clusters in the thermodynamic equilibrium system, i.e., the system without excess point defects. This procedure differs from that used in conventional nucleation theory and permits the inclusion of the ''antimatter'' defect into the set of reaction-rate equations in a straightforward manner. The method is applied to steady-state nucleation, during irradiation, of both dislocation loops and voids in the absence and in the presence of immobile and mobile gas. The predictions of the nucleation theory are shown to be in qualitative agreement with experimental observations, e.g., void densities increase with increasing displacement rates; gases such as helium enhance void nucleation; at low displacement rates and at high temperatures the presence of gas is essential to void formation. For quantitative predictions, the theory must be extended to include the termination of nucleation

  18. Defect recovery in proton irradiated Ti-modified stainless steel probed by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunkumar, J.; Abhaya, S.; Rajaraman, R.; Amarendra, G. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Nair, K.G.M. [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)], E-mail: kgmn@igcar.gov.in; Sundar, C.S.; Raj, Baldev [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2009-02-28

    The defect recovery in proton irradiated Ti-modified D9 steel has been studied by positron annihilation isochronal and isothermal annealing measurements. D9 samples have been irradiated with 3 MeV protons followed by isochronal annealing at various temperatures in the range of 323 to 1273 K. The dramatic decrease in positron annihilation parameters, viz. positron lifetime and Doppler S-parameter, around 500 K indicates the recovery of vacancy-defects. A clear difference in the recovery beyond 700 K is observed between solution annealed and cold worked state of D9 steel due to the precipitation of TiC in the latter. Isothermal annealing studies have been carried out at the temperature wherein vacancies distinctly migrate. Assuming a singly activated process for defect annealing, the effective activation energy for vacancy migration is estimated to be 1.13 {+-} 0.08 eV.

  19. Study of irradiation defects in bismuth by electric transport measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, M.

    1984-01-01

    Pure monocrystalline bismuth is irradiated near 4K by electrons of different energies. Irradiation effects are measured by galvanomagnetic properties at low temperature. Frenkel pairs created during irradiation have a strong effect on carrier mobilities. The data are quantitatively analyzed assuming a rigid band model. After irradiation with 1 MeV electrons, each Frankel pair created corresponds to a total charge of 0.14 electrons. This result obtained by magnetoresistance and Hall effect is confirmed by Shubnikov-de Haas experiments. There is a linear variation between the excess carrier density (p-n) and the Frenkel pair concentration. The more important step of annealing is observed around 40-50 K. This step is attributed to interstitial migration. Resistivity presents a minimum at low temperature after irradiation with electrons of energy over 1.3 MeV. This is explained by virtual bound levels near the Fermi level. The Kondo effect bound to magnetic defects is discussed [fr

  20. Motion of Defect Clusters and Dislocations at a Crack Tip of Irradiated Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Won Jin; Kwon, Sang Chul; Kim, Whung Whoe

    2007-01-01

    Effects of defect clusters on mechanical properties of irradiated materials have not been clarified until now. Two radiation hardening models have been proposed. One is a dispersed barrier hardening mechanism based on the Orowan hardening model. This explains defect clusters as barriers to a dislocation motion. Generally the dislocation would rather shear or remove the defect clusters than make so-called Orowan loops. And the other is a cascade induced source hardening mechanism, which explains defect clusters as a Cottrell atmosphere for dislocation motions. However, the above mechanisms can not explain the microstructure of deformed material after irradiation and the phenomenon of yield softening. These mechanisms are based on an immobility of clusters. But we observed defect clusters could move into a specific crystallographic direction easily. Through 3 times of High Voltage Electron Microscope analysis, defect clusters have been observed to make one dimensional motion without applied external stress. If very small defect clusters could move under a stress gradient due to interactions between clusters, we can suggest that the clusters will move more actively when a stress gradient is applied externally. In-situ tensile test at TEM, we confirmed that kind of motion. We suggest defect clusters can move into crack tip, a stress-concentrated area due to tensile stress gradient and dislocations move out from the area by shear stress. Therefore radiation hardening can be explained agglomeration of defect clusters at stress concentrated area prohibits a generation of dislocation and make an increase of yield point

  1. High energy ion irradiated III-N semiconductors (AlN, GaN, InN): study of point defect and extended defect creation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sall, Mamour

    2013-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors III N (AlN, GaN, InN) have interesting properties for micro-and opto-electronic applications. In use, they may be subjected to different types of radiation in a wide range of energy. In AlN, initially considered insensitive to electronic excitations (Se), we have demonstrated a novel type of synergy between Se and nuclear collisions (Sn) for the creation of defects absorbing at 4.7 eV. In addition, another effect of Se is highlighted in AlN: climb of screw dislocations under the influence of Se, at high fluence. In GaN, two mechanisms can explain the creation of defects absorbing at 2.8 eV: a synergy between Se and Sn, or a creation only due to Sn but with a strong effect of the size of displacement cascades. The study, by TEM, of the effects of Se in the three materials, exhibits behaviors highly dependent on the material while they all belong to the same family with the same atomic structure. Under monoatomic ion irradiations (velocity between 0.4 and 5 MeV/u), while discontinuous tracks are observed in GaN and InN, no track is observed in AlN with the highest electronic stopping power (33 keV/nm). Only fullerene clusters produce tracks in AlN. The inelastic thermal spike model was used to calculate the energies required to produce track in AlN, GaN and InN, they are 4.2 eV/atom, 1.5 eV/atom and 0.8 eV/atom, respectively. This sensitivity difference according to Se, also occurs at high fluence. (author)

  2. Defect structures in YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ produced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Baker, M.C.; Liu, J.Z.; Lam, D.J.; Weber, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    Defect structures in YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-x/ produced by electron irradiation at 300 K were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Threshold energies for the production of visible defects were determined to be 152 keV and 131 keV (+- 7 keV) in directions near the a and b (b>a) axes (both perpendicular to c, the long axis in the orthorhombic structure), respectively. During above threshold irradiations in an electron flux of 3x10/sup 18/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/, extended defects were observed to form and grow to sizes of 10-50 nm over 1000 s in material thickness 20-200 nm. Such low electron threshold energies suggest oxygen atom displacements with recoil energies near 20 eV. The observation of movement of twin boundaries during irradiation just above threshold suggests movement of the basal plane oxygen atoms by direct displacement or defect migration processes. Crystals irradiated above threshold were observed after about 24 hours to have transformed to a structure heavily faulted on planes perpendicular to the c axis

  3. Irradiation-induced defects in ZnO studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, F.; Saarinen, K. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology (Finland); Look, D.C. [Semiconductor Research Center, Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio (United States)

    2004-08-01

    We have used positron annihilation spectroscopy to study the point defects induced by 2 MeV electron irradiation (fluence 6 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) in single crystal n-type ZnO samples. The positron lifetime measurements have shown that the zinc vacancies in their doubly negative charge state, which act as dominant compensating centers in the as-grown material, are produced in the irradiation and their contribution to the electrical compensation is important. The lifetime measurements reveal also the presence of competing positron traps with low binding energy and lifetime close to that of the bulk lattice. The analysis of the Doppler broadening of the 511 keV annihilation line indicates that these defects can be identified as neutral oxygen vacancies. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Defects in TiO2 crystals produced by neutron irradiations at 20 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Atobe, K.; Kawabata, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The single crystals rutile (TiO 2 ), cut parallel and perpendicular to the c-axis, are irradiated by reactor neutrons at 20 K (8.0x10 16 n/cm 2 ; E>0.1 MeV). By means of optical measurements an intense absorption band, which has a maximum peak near 1 μm (having FWHM similar 0.87 eV), is observed and is annealed out at about 220 K. Also, some kinds of defect centers can be distinguished by ESR measurements. The broad band has similar characteristics to that in reduced TiO 2 crystal, in which the band has a maximum peak at 1.5 μm. With heavy reduction, the intensity of the broad band enhances with increasing electrical conductivity. It has been proposed that the origin of the band in reduced crystals may be attributable to the absorption of donors due to the polaron effects. The evidence for the assignment to the defect in the irradiated crystals is obtained by optical, ESR, and electrical resistivity measurements. The results lead to quite a different origin for the irradiation produced defect centers. ((orig.))

  5. Effect of irradiation temperature on the efficiency of introduction of multivacancy defects into n-Si crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagava, T. A.

    2006-01-01

    The n-Si single crystals are studied in order to gain insight into the effect of the temperature of irradiation T irr on the defect-production process. The samples under study were irradiated with 2-MeV electrons in the range T irr = 20-400 deg. C. Irradiated crystals were annealed isochronously in the temperature range from 80 to 600 deg. C. Measurements were carried out by the Hall method in the temperature range from 77 to 300 K. It is shown that the efficiency of introduction of radiation defects with a high thermal stability (T ann ≥ 350 deg. C) attains a maximum at T irr = 150 deg. C. The observed effect is accounted for by formation of multivacancy defects PV 2 on the basis of ionized E centers and nonequilibrium vacancies

  6. Defect evolution in a Ni−Mo−Cr−Fe alloy subjected to high-dose Kr ion irradiation at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Massey de los [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission (NFCRC), 50 Grenfell Street Adelaide South Australia, 5000 (Australia); Voskoboinikov, Roman [The National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Kurchatov Sq 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Kirk, Marquis A. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Huang, Hefei [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), 2019 Jialuo Road, Jiading District, Shanghai 201800 (China); Lumpkin, Greg [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia); Bhattacharyya, Dhriti, E-mail: dhriti.bhattacharyya@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    A candidate Ni−Mo−Cr−Fe alloy (GH3535) for application as a structural material in a molten salt nuclear reactor was irradiated with 1 MeV Kr{sup 2+} ions (723 K, max dose of 100 dpa) at the IVEM-Tandem facility. The evolution of defects like dislocation loops and vacancy- and self-interstitial clusters was examined in-situ. For obtaining a deeper insight into the true nature of these defects, the irradiated sample was further analysed under a TEM post-facto. The results show that there is a range of different types of defects formed under irradiation. Interaction of radiation defects with each other and with pre-existing defects, e.g., linear dislocations, leads to the formation of complex microstructures. Molecular dynamics simulations used to obtain a greater understanding of these defect transformations showed that the interaction between linear dislocations and radiation induced dislocation loops could form faulted structures that explain the fringed contrast of these defects observed in TEM.

  7. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1975-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low fluence irradiations suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model applied to the dechanneling spectra. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects

  8. Dechanneling measurements of defect depth profiles and effective cross-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in ion-irradiated gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, P.P.

    1976-01-01

    Defect depth profiles for self-ion and He + irradiated gold are obtained from single and multiple scatter dechanneling analysis in single-crystal gold films. Quantitative defect densities are obtained through use of atomic-scattering cross sections. Integral damage profiles are extracted from the dechanneling spectra and subsequently differentiated to yield the volume concentration of defects as a function of depth. Results from the self-ion irradiations suggest that incident ions produce defect distributions across depths much greater than predicted by random stopping theory. This is in agreement with TEM observations of others. Comparison of the experimental profiles is made with theoretical vacancy distributions predicted by defect diffusion in a radiation environment. Similarities are observed for the low-fluence irradiations, suggesting that profile characteristics may be controlled by rapid migration and loss of interstitials to the film surfaces during irradiation. Information on the across-channel distribution of misaligned atoms in the damaged films is obtained with the steady increase of transverse energy model. A predominance of slight misalignment is observed with no contribution to dechanneling coming from atoms displaced significantly close to the center of the channels. This is in keeping with what is expected for crystal distortions caused by the strain fields associated with vacancy cluster defects. (Auth.)

  9. Thermal conductivity of graphene with defects induced by electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekpour, Hoda; Ramnani, Pankaj; Srinivasan, Srilok; Balasubramanian, Ganesh; Nika, Denis L.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Lake, Roger K.; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is analyzed using the Boltzmann transport equation and molecular dynamics simulations. The results are important for understanding phonon - point defect scattering in two-dimensional systems and for practical applications of graphene in thermal management.We investigate the thermal conductivity of suspended graphene as a function of the density of defects, ND, introduced in a controllable way. High-quality graphene layers are synthesized using chemical vapor deposition, transferred onto a transmission electron microscopy grid, and suspended over ~7.5 μm size square holes. Defects are induced by irradiation of graphene with the low-energy electron beam (20 keV) and quantified by the Raman D-to-G peak intensity ratio. As the defect density changes from 2.0 × 1010 cm-2 to 1.8 × 1011 cm-2 the thermal conductivity decreases from ~(1.8 +/- 0.2) × 103 W mK-1 to ~(4.0 +/- 0.2) × 102 W mK-1 near room temperature. At higher defect densities, the thermal conductivity reveals an intriguing saturation-type behavior at a relatively high value of ~400 W mK-1. The thermal conductivity dependence on the defect density is

  10. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupica, John; Goradia, Chandra; Swartz, Clifford K.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n+p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10-MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the highest radiation resistance. Deep level transient spectroscopy which showed two deep level defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study with those from earlier work using 1-MeV electron irradiation shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked similarity: the absence of the boron-interstitial-oxygen-interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell.

  11. Structural and defects induced phenomena in γ-rays irradiated 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibuyi, P.; Ngom, B.D.; Kotsedi, L.

    2016-01-01

    Damages and/or defects induced by γ-rays irradiation on 6H-SiC single crystals in channeled configuration towards 〈006〉/〈0012〉 crystallographic directions are reported in the range of 0–1200 kGy. Atomic force microscopy, X-rays diffraction, Raman and photoluminescence investigations were used to obtain a comprehensive set of informations on the nature and population distribution of the induced defects. Primarily, there was no carbon clusterization upon γ-rays irradiation and hence no formation of others SiC polytypes. In contrast, the γ-rays irradiation has induced an increase of the surface roughness at higher doses, which indicates a structural degradation. Larger doses induced an emergence of deeper shallow traps at energies greater than 350 meV below the bandgap. - Highlights: • No formation of others SiC polytypes. • The gamma rays irradiation has induced a slight surface amorphization. • A re-crystallization at lower and higher doses is noticed. • Larger doses induced a substantial internal stress.

  12. Defect creation rates in CdTe irradiated by electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caillot, M.

    1978-01-01

    Up to now, the defect creation rates in CdTe irradiated by electrons were unknown. They have been calculated for different electron kinetic energies. As the samples studied are thick, the energy loss when the electrons penetrate the material has been taken into account. The cross-sections of Cd and Te displacements vs the depth of electron penetration were determined for different electron kinetic energies, and the defect creation rates obtained for each sublattice. These creation rates have been compared with those deduced from experiments and it was found that the experimental creation rates were lower than the calculated ones. This discrepancy can be explained in terms of creation of neutral Frenkel pairs. (Auth.)

  13. Effect of He+ fluence on surface morphology and ion-irradiation induced defect evolution in 7075 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ma, Qian; Wan, Hao; Yang, Bin; Ge, Junjie; Zhang, Lingyu; Si, Naichao

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of microstructure for 7075 aluminum alloys with 50 Kev helium ions irradiation were studied by using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fluences of 1 × 1015, 1 × 1016 and 1 × 1017 ions cm-2 were selected, and irradiation experiments were conducted at room temperatures. The transmission process of He+ ions was simulated by using SRIM software, including distribution of ion ranges, energy losses and atomic displacements. Experimental results show that irradiated pits and micro-cracks were observed on irradiation sample surface, and the size of constituent particles (not including Mg2Si) decreased with the increasing dose. The x-ray diffraction results of the pair of peaks is better resolved in irradiated samples might indicate that the stressed structure consequence due to crystal defects (vacancies and interstitials) after He+ implantation. TEM observation indicated that the density of MgZn2 phase was significantly reduced after helium ion irradiation which is harmful to strength. Besides, the development of compressive stress produced a large amount of dislocation defects in the 1015 ions cm-2 sample. Moreover, higher fluence irradiation produced more dislocations in sample. At fluence of 1016 ions cm-2, dislocation wall formed by dislocation slip and aggregation in the interior of grains, leading to the refinement of these grains. As fluence increased to 1017 ions cm-2, dislocation loops were observed in pinned dislocation. Moreover, dislocation as effective defect sink, irradiation-induced vacancy defects aggregated to these sinks, and resulted in the formation of helium bubbles in dislocation.

  14. Production and aging of paramagnetic point defects in P-doped floating zone silicon irradiated with high fluence 27 MeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joita, A. C.; Nistor, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    Enhancing the long term stable performance of silicon detectors used for monitoring the position and flux of the particle beams in high energy physics experiments requires a better knowledge of the nature, stability, and transformation properties of the radiation defects created over the operation time. We report the results of an electron spin resonance investigation in the nature, transformation, and long term stability of the irradiation paramagnetic point defects (IPPDs) produced by high fluence (2 × 1016 cm-2), high energy (27 MeV) electrons in n-type, P-doped standard floating zone silicon. We found out that both freshly irradiated and aged (i.e., stored after irradiation for 3.5 years at 250 K) samples mainly contain negatively charged tetravacancy and pentavacancy defects in the first case and tetravacancy defects in the second one. The fact that such small cluster vacancy defects have not been observed by irradiation with low energy (below 5 MeV) electrons, but were abundantly produced by irradiation with neutrons, strongly suggests the presence of the same mechanism of direct formation of small vacancy clusters by irradiation with neutrons and high energy, high fluence electrons, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Differences in the nature and annealing properties of the IPPDs observed between the 27 MeV electrons freshly irradiated, and irradiated and aged samples were attributed to the presence of a high concentration of divacancies in the freshly irradiated samples, defects which transform during storage at 250 K through diffusion and recombination processes.

  15. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J.; Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P.; Robertson, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  16. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Robertson, I.M., E-mail: ian.robertson@tcd.ie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  17. Point defects and irradiation in oxides: simulations at the atomic scale; Defauts ponctuels et irradiation dans les oxydes: simulation a l'echelle atomique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocombette, J.P

    2005-12-15

    The studies done by Jean-Paul Crocombette between 1996 and 2005 in the Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique of the Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire in Saclay are presented in this Habilitation thesis. These works were part of the material science researches on the ageing, especially under irradiation, of oxides of interest for the nuclear industry. In this context simulation studies at the atomic scale were performed on two elementary components of ageing under irradiation : point defects and displacement cascades ; using two complementary simulation techniques : ab initio electronic structure calculations and empirical potential molecular dynamics. The first part deals with point defects : self defects (vacancies or interstitials) or hetero-atomic dopants. One first recalls the energetics of such defects in oxides, the specific features of defects calculations and the expected accuracy of these calculations. Then one presents the results obtained on uranium dioxide, oxygen in silver and amorphous silica. The second part tackles the modelling of disintegration recoil nuclei in various?displacement cascades created by crystalline matrices for actinide waste disposal. Cascade calculations give access to the amorphization mechanisms under irradiation of these materials. One thus predicts that the amorphization in zircon takes place directly in the tracks whereas in lanthanum zirconate, the amorphization proceeds through the accumulation of point defects. Finally the prospects of these studies are discussed. (author)

  18. Electrically active defects in p-type silicon after alpha-particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danga, Helga T.; Auret, F. Danie; Tunhuma, Shandirai M.; Omotoso, Ezekiel; Igumbor, Emmanuel; Meyer, Walter E.

    2018-04-01

    In this work, we investigated the defects introduced when boron (B) doped silicon (Si) was irradiated by making use of a 5.4 MeV americium (Am) 241 foil radioactive source with a fluence rate of 7×106 cm-2 s-1 at room temperature. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS measurements were used to investigate the electronic properties of the introduced defects. After exposure at a fluence of 5.1×1010 cm-2, the energy levels of the hole traps measured were: H(0.10), H(0.16), H(0.33) and H(0.52) The defect level H(0.10) was tri-vacancy related. H(0.33) was identified as the interstitial carbon (Ci) related defect which was a result of radiation induced damage. H(0.52) was a B-related defect. Explicit deductions about the origin of H(0.16) have not yet been achieved.

  19. Influence of preliminary reactor irradiation on defect formation in quartz fibers under γ- ray activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Baydjanov, M.I.; Ibragimov, J.D.; Rustamov, I.R.; Islamov, A.Kh.; Nuritdinov, I.; Gasanov, E.M.; Yuldashev, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: For study of influence of preliminary structure defects and type of cladding material on additional defects accumulation kinetics we investigated the absorption spectra of optical fibers (OF) marked FVP-400 (quartz core and quartz clad) and FSHA-800 (quartz core and polymeric clad) preliminary irradiated by fast neutrons fluencies 10 12 , 10 13 , 10 14 , 10 15 cm -2 before and after additional irradiation by γ-rays of 60 Co source. Preliminary irradiation of samples was conducted in cadmium-plated channel of the reactor. Dose rate of accompanying γ-radiation is determined as 1250 R/s using KI quartz glass based dosimeter. The spectra of the induced absorption (losses) were calculated by an expression A(λ)=(10/L)x lg[T(λ)/T 0 (λ)], where T 0 (λ) and (λ) are transmissions of samples before and after irradiation, L-sample length [m], A(λ)- optical losses [dB/m]. It's established that the transformation processes of previously existing structure damages arising during fiber drawing into other ones and creations of additional defects under influence of neutrons depends on hydroxyl content and type of fibers cladding material. It's shown that under influence of γ-rays at doses 10 5 , 5·10 5 , 10 6 , 5.10 6 , 10 7 , 5·10 7 and 10 8 R the two-stage accumulation of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) is observed in preliminary neutron-irradiated OF. The first stage is caused by appearance of potential NBOHC arising during fiber drawing and irradiation of OF by neutrons. The dose value of γ-rays at the beginning of the second stage that is connected to creation of additional NBOHC under γ-rays action decreases with growth of preliminary irradiation fluence. We suppose that under neutron irradiation of OF along with transformation of previously existing damages and creation of additional point defects there is formation of areas with the higher density than in quartz glass which concentration increases with growth of irradiation fluence. Hence

  20. Lattice strain in irradiated materials unveils a prevalent defect evolution mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debelle, Aurélien; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Boulle, Alexandre; Chartier, Alain; Jourdan, Thomas; Pellegrino, Stéphanie; Bachiller-Perea, Diana; Carpentier, Denise; Channagiri, Jayanth; Nguyen, Tien-Hien; Garrido, Frédérico; Thomé, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    Modification of materials using ion beams has become a widespread route to improve or design materials for advanced applications, from ion doping for microelectronic devices to emulation of nuclear reactor environments. Yet, despite decades of studies, major issues regarding ion/solid interactions are not solved, one of them being the lattice-strain development process in irradiated crystals. In this work, we address this question using a consistent approach that combines x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements with both molecular dynamics (MD) and rate equation cluster dynamics (RECD) simulations. We investigate four distinct materials that differ notably in terms of crystalline structure and nature of the atomic bonding. We demonstrate that these materials exhibit a common behavior with respect to the strain development process. In fact, a strain build-up followed by a strain relaxation is observed in the four investigated cases. The strain variation is unambiguously ascribed to a change in the defect configuration, as revealed by MD simulations. Strain development is due to the clustering of interstitial defects into dislocation loops, while the strain release is associated with the disappearance of these loops through their integration into a network of dislocation lines. RECD calculations of strain depth profiles, which are in agreement with experimental data, indicate that the driving force for the change in the defect nature is the defect clustering process. This study paves the way for quantitative predictions of the microstructure changes in irradiated materials.

  1. Freely migrating defects in ion-irradiated Cu3Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, L.C.; Lang, E.; Flynn, C.P.; Averback, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of producing freely migrating vacancy defects in irradiated Cu 3 Au was examined using electrical resistivity measurements of radiation-induced ordering on highly perfect single-crystal films. Relative efficiencies for He, Ne, and Ar bombardments at different ion energy and specimen temperature were obtained. The ratio of the efficiencies of 0.6 MeV Ne to He increased with temperature from ∼0.25 at 340 K to a saturation value of ∼0.40 at 520 K. For Ar and He, the ratio increased from ∼0.11 at 360 K to ∼0.18 at 540 K. Estimates indicate that about half of all defects created in cascades are freely migrating. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Swift heavy ion irradiation effects in Pt/C and Ni/C multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ajay; Pandita, Suneel; Avasthi, D. K.; Lodha, G. S.; Nandedkar, R. V.

    1998-12-01

    Irradiation effects of 100 MeV Ag ion irradiation on Ni/C and Pt/C multilayers have been studied using X-ray reflectivity measurements. Modifications are observed in both the multilayers at (dE/dx)e values much below the threshold values for Ni and Pt. This effect is attributed to the discontinuous nature of the metal layers. In both the multilayers interfacial roughness increases with irradiation dose. While Ni/C multilayers exhibit large ion-beam induced intermixing, no observable intermixing is observed in the case of Pt/C multilayer. This difference in the behavior of the two systems suggests a significant role for chemically guided defect motion in the mixing process associated with swift heavy ion irradiation.

  3. Kinetics of cluster-related defects in silicon sensors irradiated with monoenergetic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, R.; Pintilie, I.; Makarenko, L. F.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    2018-04-01

    This work focuses on the kinetic mechanisms responsible for the annealing behavior of radiation cluster-related defects with impact on the electrical performance of silicon sensors. Such sensors were manufactured on high resistivity n-type standard float-zone (STFZ) and oxygen enriched float-zone (DOFZ) material and had been irradiated with mono-energetic electrons of 3.5 MeV energy and fluences of 3 × 1014 cm-2 and 6 × 1014 cm-2. After irradiation, the samples were subjected either to isochronal or isothermal heat treatments in the temperature range from 80 °C to 300 °C. The specific investigated defects are a group of three deep acceptors [H(116 K), H(140 K), and H(152 K)] with energy levels in the lower half of the band gap and a shallow donor E(30 K) with a level at 0.1 eV below the conduction band. The stability and kinetics of these defects at high temperatures are discussed on the basis of the extracted activation energies and frequency factors. The annealing of the H defects takes place similarly in both types of materials, suggesting a migration rather than a dissociation mechanism. On the contrary, the E(30 K) defect shows a very different annealing behavior, being stable in STFZ even at 300 °C, but annealing-out quickly in DOFZ material at temperatures higher than 200 °C , with a high frequency factor of the order of 1013 s-1. Such a behavior rules out a dissociation process, and the different annealing behavior is suggested to be related to a bistable behavior of the defect.

  4. Radiation defect distribution in silicon irradiated with 600 keV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazdra, P.; Dorschner, H.

    2003-01-01

    Low-doped n-type float zone silicon was irradiated with 600 keV electrons to fluences from 2x10 13 to 1x10 15 cm -2 . Radiation defects, their introduction rates and full-depth profiles were measured by two complementary methods - the capacitance deep level spectroscopy and the high-voltage current transient spectroscopy. Results show that, in the vicinity of the anode junction, the profile of vacancy-related defect centers is strongly influenced by electric field and an excessive generation of vacancies. In the bulk, the slope of the profile can be derived from the distribution of absorbed dose taking into the account the threshold energy necessary for Frenkel pair formation and the dependency of the defect introduction rate on electron energy

  5. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Moritami; Atobe, Kozo; Nakagawa, Masuo

    2004-01-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, α-Al 2 O 3 (sapphire) and TiO 2 (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature (∼370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 μm band in TiO 2 differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and α-Al 2 O 3 . Results for MgO and α-Al 2 O 3 show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO 2 includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and α-Al 2 O 3 , this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO 2 , in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 μm band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization

  6. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of lattice defects in some neutron-irradiated oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Moritami [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 5900494 (Japan)]. E-mail: okada@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Atobe, Kozo [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto, Tokushima 7728502 (Japan); Nakagawa, Masuo [Faculty of Education, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 7608522 (Japan)

    2004-11-01

    Temperature dependence of production efficiency of irradiation-induced defects in neutron-irradiated oxides has been investigated. Some oxide single crystals, MgO, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) and TiO{sub 2} (rutile), were irradiated at several controlled temperatures, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150 and 200 K, using the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL), and at ambient temperature ({approx}370 K) in the same facility. Irradiation temperature dependence of production efficiency of a 1 {mu}m band in TiO{sub 2} differs greatly from that of anion vacancy (F-type centers) in MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Results for MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} show steep negative gradients from 10 to 370 K, whereas that for TiO{sub 2} includes a valley between 40 and 60 K and a hump at about 130 K, and then disappear at about 200 K. In MgO and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, this behavior can be explained by the recombination of Frenkel pairs, which is activated at higher temperature. In TiO{sub 2}, in addition to the recombination mechanism, a covalent bonding property is thought to be exerted strong influence, and it is suggested that a disappearance of the 1 {mu}m band at above 200 K is due to the recombination process of Frenkel pairs which is caused by the irradiation-induced crystallization.

  7. Radiation damage and defect behavior in proton irradiated lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stupica, J.; Goradia, C.; Swartz, C.K.; Weinberg, I.

    1987-01-01

    Two lithium-counterdoped n/sup +/p silicon solar cells with different lithium concentrations were irradiated by 10 MeV protons. Cell performance was measured as a function of fluence, and it was found that the cell with the highest concentration of lithium had the higher radiation resistance. Deep level defects were studied using deep level transient spectroscopy which yielded two defects that were lithium related. Relating the defect energy levels obtained from this study under 10 MeV protons, with an earlier work using 1 MeV electron irradiations shows no correlation of the defect energy levels. There is one marked comparison though. The absence of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. This consistency strengthens the belief that lithium interacts with oxygen to prevent the formation of the boron interstitial-oxygen interstitial defect. The present results indicate that, in general, addition of lithium in small amounts to the p-base of a boron doped silicon solar cell such that the base remains p-type, tends to increase the radiation resistance of the cell

  8. X-ray and optical study on point defect formation and interaction under irradiation adn doping of KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braude, I S; Rogozyanskaya, L M [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov. Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst. Nizkikh Temperatur

    1978-08-01

    Optical and X-ray diffuse scattering methods have been applied to investigate structural changes, taking place in KCl crystals during irradiation with ..gamma..-quanta and doping with barium. It is shown that ..gamma..-irradiation of ''pure'' and doped KCl crystals mainly leads to formation of F-centers and spherical vacancy complexes. F-center concentration in irradiated addition crystals (3x10/sup -6/) has turned out to be 25% lower, than in irradiated pure ones (4x10/sup -6/), which is connected with interaction of radiation and addition defects. The type of defects, causing assymetry in the distribution of diffuse scattering has been determined. Appearance of scattering ability modulation over direction < 100 > during irradiation of KCl pure crystals has been found. Critical radius of spherical complexes formed during irradiation has been estimated, it appeared to be 2.5 a, where a is a lattice period.

  9. Depth distribution of Frank loop defects formed in ion-irradiated stainless steel and its dependence on Si addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongyue, E-mail: dychen@safety.n.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Kenta [The University of Tokyo, Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Dohi, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Li, Zhengcao, E-mail: zcli@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Li; Sekimura, Naoto [The University of Tokyo, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, 7-3-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Although heavy ion irradiation is a good tool to simulate neutron irradiation-induced damages in light water reactor, it produces inhomogeneous defect distribution. Such difference in defect distribution brings difficulty in comparing the microstructure evolution and mechanical degradation between neutron and heavy ion irradiation, and thus needs to be understood. Stainless steel is the typical structural material used in reactor core, and could be taken as an example to study the inhomogeneous defect depth distribution in heavy ion irradiation and its influence on the tested irradiation hardening by nano-indentation. In this work, solution annealed stainless steel model alloys are irradiated by 3 MeV Fe{sup 2+} ions at 400 °C to 3 dpa to produce Frank loops that are mainly interstitial in nature. The silicon content of the model alloys is also tuned to change point defect diffusion, so that the loop depth distribution influenced by diffusion along the irradiation beam direction could be discussed. Results show that in low Si (0% Si) and base Si (0.42% Si) samples the depth distribution of Frank loop density quite well matches the dpa profile calculated by the SRIM code, but in high Si sample (0.95% Si), the loop number density in the near-surface region is very low. One possible explanation could be Si’s role in enhancing the effective vacancy diffusivity, promoting recombination and thus suppressing interstitial Frank loops, especially in the near-surface region, where vacancies concentrate. By considering the loop depth distribution, the tested irradiation hardening is successfully explained by the Orowan model. A hardening coefficient of around 0.30 is obtained for all the three samples. This attempt in interpreting hardening results may make it easier to compare the mechanical degradation between different irradiation experiments.

  10. Observation of magnetically anisotropic defects during stage I recovery in nickel after low-temperature electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsch, K.; Hemmerich, J.; Knoll, H.; Lucki, G.

    1974-01-01

    The measurement of defect-induced changes of magnetic anisotropy in a nickel single crystal after low-temperature electron irradiation was undertaken. A dynamic measuring method was used after reorienting a certain fraction of the radiation-induced defects in an external magnetic field of 5 kOe. In the temperature range of recovery stage I sub(C,D,E) (45 to 60 k) the crystallographic direction dependence of defect-induced anisotropy could be determined. The results show that in this temperature range the (100) split interstitial is mobile and able to reorient. The obtained data are further discussed with respect to existing information on magnetic after effect and resistivity annealing in electron-irradiated nickel

  11. Investigation of defects in electron-irradiated diamond of the type Ia by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Ositinskaya, T.D.; Mikhalenkov, V.S.; Chernyashevskij, A.V.; Shakhovtsov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1997-01-01

    To produce vacancy defects, type Ia diamond was irradiated with 3.5 MeV electrons at doses of 5 centre dot 10 16 , 2 centre dot 10 17 , 4 centre dot 10 17 , and 2 centre dot 10 18 e/cm -2 . After each dose, the specimen was investigated using positron annihilation (ACAR), optical spectroscopy in IR, visible regions, and EPR. From ACAR spectra, the S-parameters were found and positron trapping rates were determined. Their behaviour with increasing irradiation doses shows that, in type Ia diamond along with neutral vacancies V degree, deeper traps of positrons are formed, which are most likely vacancies in the negative charge state V - . Specific trapping rates of the V 0 and V - defects are found to be 1.3 centre dot 10 15 and 3.8 centre dot 10 15 s -1 , respectively; trapping cross sections for these defects are also estimated

  12. Performance, Defect Behavior and Carrier Enhancement in Low Energy, Proton Irradiated p(+)nn(+) InP Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Rybicki, G. C.; Vargas-Aburto, C.; Jain, R. K.; Scheiman, D.

    1994-01-01

    InP p(+)nn(+) cells, processed by MOCVD, were irradiated by 0.2 MeV protons and their performance and defect behavior observed to a maximum fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. Their radiation induced degradation, over this fluence range, was considerably+less than observed for similarly irradiated, diffused junction n p InP cells. Significant degradation occurred in both the cell's emitter and base regions the least degradation occurring in the depletion region. A significant increase in series resistance occurs at the highest fluenc.e. Two majority carrier defect levels, E7 and E10, are observed by DLTS with activation energies at (E(sub C) - 0.39)eV and (E(sub C) - 0.74)eV respectively. The relative concentration of these defects differs considerably from that observed after 1 MeV electron irradiation. An increased carrier concentration in the cell's n-region was observed at the highest proton fluence, the change in carrier concentration being insignificant at the lower fluences. In agreement with previous results, for 1 and 1.5 MeV electron irradiated InP p(+)n junctions, the defect level E10 is attributed to a complex between zinc, diffused into the n-region from the zinc doped emitter, and a radiation induced defect. The latter is assumed to be either a phosphorus vacancy or interstitial. The increased, or enhanced carrier concentration is attributed to this complex acting as a donor.

  13. Behavior of defective LWR-type fuel rods irradiated under postulated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; Croucher, D.W.; Seiffert, S.L.; Cook, B.A.; Kerwin, D.K.; Mehner, A.S.; Ploger, S.A.

    1979-05-01

    The irradiation experiments reported here have been conducted by the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program of EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Five of the rods were irradiated in PCM tests and one in a LOC test. During these tests, the six rods lost cladding integrity prior to or during the transient phase of the test due to either manufacturing defects or intentional rod design and operation. Of the five defective rods tested under PCM conditions, one (Rod IE-008, Test IE-1) had a hydride rupture below the region of the rod, which was in film boiling during the transient; two (Rod A-0021, Test PCM-3 and Rod IE-019, Test IE-5) contained defects (a pin hole and a small axial crack, respectively) within the film boiling zone; and two (Rod 201-1, Test PCM-1 and Rod 205-8, Test PCM-5) failed by cladding embrittlement within the film boiling zone. Rod 312-3 was waterlogged before being subjected to LOC conditions in Test LLR-3

  14. The influence of irradiation defects on tritium release from Li{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru; Grishmanov, V [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    During reactor irradiation of Li{sub 2}O defects are introduced by neutrons, triton and helium ions produced by {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H reactions and {gamma}-rays. Simultaneous measurements of luminescence emission and tritium release were performed under various conditions (temperature, sweep gas chemical composition) for Li{sub 2}O single crystal and polycrystal in order to elucidate possible influence of defects on tritium release. (author)

  15. Numerical solution of kinetics equation for point defects accumulation in metals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldzhambekova, G.T.; Iskakov, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    In the report the mathematical model, describing processes of generation and accumulation of defects in solids under irradiation is considered. The equations of this model take into account the velocity of Frenkel pairs generation, the mutual recombination of vacancies and the interstitials, as well as velocity of defects absorption by discharge channeling of vacancies and interstitials. By Runge-Kutta method the numerical solution of the model was carried out

  16. Cascade defect production and irradiation enhanced diffusion in Cu3Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, M.A.; Funk, L.L.

    1986-03-01

    By using the ordering alloy Cu 3 Au and measuring resistivity changes during and following fast-neutron irradiations at IPNS, we have studied cascade defect production and irradiation enhanced diffusion between 10 and 460 0 K. Ordering and disordering rates were measured as functions of irradiation temperature, neutron dose, neutron dose rate, time following cessation of flux, and step annealing. Free and clustered vacancy production was observed. The temperature dependence of the production of total migrating vacancy concentrations was determined. Vacancy sink production was linear with neutron dose and is compared with recent transmission electron microscopy experiments on the production of dislocation loops in this alloy. Time dependent and quasi-steady state vacancy concentrations were measured and compared with solutions of reaction rate equations for irradiation enhanced diffusion. The influence of recombination of vacancies with interstitials is observed at low sink concentrations (low neutron doses)

  17. Study of defect annealing behaviour in neutron irradiated Cu and Fe using positron annihilation and electrical conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eldrup, M.; Singh, B.N.

    2000-01-01

    To compare the defect accumulation and the annealing behaviour in an fcc and a bcc metal, OFHC-Cu and pure Fe were neutron irradiated at 100 deg. C to a fluence of 1.5 x 10 24 n/m 2 , (E > 1 MeV). Isochronal annealing was carried out and the annealing behaviour followed by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) as well as electrical conductivity measurements. The results for the two specimens in the as-irradiated state are very different. In Cu the defect positron lifetime is characteristic of single vacancies, very small vacancy clusters or stacking fault tetrahedra, while in Fe the defect lifetimes confirm the presence of micro-voids and voids. The electrical conductivity, on the other hand does not discriminate between the two types of damage in the irradiated specimens. During annealing of the irradiated Fe below stage V, the average void size grows by migration and coalescence of the micro-voids and voids. At and above stage V the void density decreases and the voids finally anneal out at ∼500 deg. C. In contrast, the annealing of irradiated Cu below stage V does not yield any evidence for the evolution of micro-voids or voids. The implications of these results are discussed. One conclusion is that neutron irradiation below stage V causes higher void swelling in bcc iron than in fcc copper

  18. Simulating the production of free defects in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1995-01-01

    Under cascade-producing irradiation by high energy neutrons or charged particles, only a small fraction of the initially displaced atoms contribute to the population of free defects that are available to migrate throughout the metal and cause microstructural changes. Although, in principle, computer simulations of free defect production could best be done using molecular dynamics, in practice, the wide ranges of time and distance scales involved can be done only by a combination of atomistic models that employ various levels of approximation. An atomic-scale, multi-model approach has been developed that combines molecular dynamics, binary collision models and stochastic annealing simulation. The annealing simulation is utilized in calibrating binary collision simulations to the results of molecular dynamics calculations, as well as to model the subsequent migration of the defects on more macroscopic time and size scales. The annealing simulation and the method of calibrating the multi-model approach are discussed, and the results of simulations of cascades in copper are presented. The temperature dependence of free defect production following simulated annealing of isolated cascades in copper shows a differential in the fractions of free vacancies and interstitial defects escaping from the cascade above stage V. This differential, a consequence of the direct formation of interstitial clusters in cascades and the relative thermal stability of vacancy and interstitial clusters during subsequent annealing, is the basis for the production bias mechanism of void swelling. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of defect formation in helium irradiated Y2O3 doped W-Ti alloys by positron annihilation and nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Asta; Anwand, Wolfgang; Chen, Chun-Liang; Böttger, Roman

    2017-10-01

    Helium implanted tungsten-titanium ODS alloys are investigated using positron annihilation spectroscopy and nanoindentation. Titanium reduces the brittleness of the tungsten alloy, which is manufactured by mechanical alloying. The addition of Y2O3 nanoparticles increases the mechanical properties at elevated temperature and enhances irradiation resistance. Helium ion implantation was applied to simulate irradiation effects on these materials. The irradiation was performed using a 500 kV He ion implanter at fluences around 5 × 1015 cm-2 for a series of samples both at room temperature and at 600 °C. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the pristine and irradiated W-Ti-ODS alloy are compared with respect to the titanium and Y2O3 content. Radiation damage is studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy analyzing the lifetime and the Doppler broadening. Three types of helium-vacancy defects were detected after helium irradiation in the W-Ti-ODS alloy: small defects with high helium-to-vacancy ratio (low S parameter) for room temperature irradiation, larger open volume defects with low helium-to-vacancy ratio (high S parameter) at the surface and He-vacancy complexes pinned at nanoparticles deeper in the material for implantation at 600 °C. Defect induced hardness was studied by nanoindentation. A drastic hardness increase is observed after He ion irradiation both for room temperature and elevated irradiation temperature of 600 °C. The Ti alloyed tungsten-ODS is more affected by the hardness increase after irradiation compared to the pure W-ODS alloy.

  20. The behavior of lattice defects produced in Al2O3 irradiated by neutrons at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, K.; Koizumi, T.; Okada, M.

    2003-01-01

    Single crystals of α-Al 2 O 3 were irradiated by the two reactors, KUR and JMTR, at three different temperatures. Lattice defects produced by irradiation were studied by esr (electron spin resonance). Three kinds of esr spectram, which are denoted as A, B and C spectram, are observed. The spectram A was observed at three different irradiation temperatures and was ascribed to oxygen vacancies. The spectram B showed no angular dependence for the rotation of external magnetic field to the crystal axis, and the defect density of this spectram decreased with an increase of annealing temperature. When the specimen was annealed at 400 degC after irradiation at 200 degC, the spectram C was observed and was presumed to be due to Al-colloids. (Y. Kazumata)

  1. Optical spectroscopy of vacancy related defects in silicon carbide generated by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, C.; Sperlich, A.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G.V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kraus, H. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Makino, T.; Sato, S.I.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Dyakonov, V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); ZAE Bayern, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Defects in silicon carbide (SiC) received growing attention in recent years, because they are promising candidates for spin based quantum information processing. In this study we examine silicon vacancies in 4H-SiC crystals generated by proton irradiation. By the use of confocal microscopy the implantation depth of Si vacancies for varying proton energies can be verified. An important issue is to ascertain the nature and distribution of the defects. For this purpose, we use the characteristic photoluminescence spectrum of Si vacancies, whose intensity is proportional to the defect density. Using xyz-scans, where the photoluminescence at each mapping point is recorded, one can thus determine the vacancies nature and their distribution in the SiC crystal. Additionally we verify the nature of the examined defects by measuring their uniquely defined zero-field-splitting by using ODMR associated with defect spins.

  2. A study of defect cluster formation in vanadium by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekimura, Naoto; Shirao, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Kazunori [Tokyo Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Formation of defect clusters in thin foils of vanadium was investigated by heavy ion irradiation. In the very thin region of the specimens less than 20 nm, vacancy clusters were formed under gold ion irradiation, while very few clusters were detected in the specimens irradiated with 200 and 400 keV self-ions up to 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/m{sup 2}. The density of vacancy clusters were found to be strongly dependent on ion energy. Only above the critical value of kinetic energy transfer density in vanadium, vacancy clusters are considered to be formed in the cascade damage from which interstitials can escape to the specimen surface in the very thin region. (author)

  3. Defect cascades produced by neutron irradiation in YBa2Cu3O7-δ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A.; Farmer, J.

    1994-02-01

    The defect cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ single crystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The visible defects were found to have sizes between 1 and 5 rim. Defect densities were obtained as a function of neutron fluence between 2 and 8x 10 21 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV). The measured defect density scales linearly with fluence and amounts to 1x10 22 m -3 at a neutron fluence of 2x10 2l m -2 . The defect stability was studied at room temperature and through annealing to 400 degrees C

  4. Defect cascades produced by neutron irradiation in YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A.; Farmer, J.; Greenwood, L.R.; Weber, H.W.

    1992-12-01

    The defect cascades produced by fast neutron irradiation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ single crystals were studied by transmission electron microscopy. The visible defects were found to have sizes between 1 and 5 nm. Defect densities were obtained as a function of neutron fluence between 2 and 8 x 10 21 m -2 (E>0.1 MeV) and compared to damage calculations. The measured defect density was found to scale linearly with fluence and to be 1 x 10 22 m -3 at 2 x 10 21 m -2 . The defect stability was studied at room temperature and through annealing to 400 degrees C. The high fluence regime (∼10 22 m -2 ) was investigated as well

  5. Defects in CdSe thin films, induced by high energy electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, L.; Antohe, S.; Tutuc, D.; Antohe, V.A.; Tazlaoanu, C.

    2004-01-01

    Defects induced in CdSe thin films by high energy electron irradiation are investigated by means of thermally stimulated currents (TSC) spectroscopy. Films were obtained by vacuum deposition from a single source and irradiated with a 5 x 10 13 electrons/cm 2 s -1 beam of 6-MeV energy. It was found that electrical properties of the films are controlled by a deep donor state, located at 0.38 eV below the bottom edge of the conduction band. Parameters of the traps responsible for the recorded TSC peaks were determined. (authors)

  6. Argon defect complexes in low energy Ar irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veen, A. van; Buters, W.T.M.; Kolk, G.J. van der; Caspers, L.M.; Armstrong, T.R.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry has been used to study the defects created in Mo irradiated along the direction with Ar ions ranging in energy from 0.1 to 2 keV. In addition to monitoring the release of the implanted Ar, additional information has been obtained by decoration of the defects with low energy helium and subsequent monitoring of the helium release. The studies show evidence that the Ar can be trapped in both substitutional sites and in a configuration in which the Ar is associated with vacancies (ArVsub(n), n >= 2). Most of the Ar implanted at high energy is released at approx. equal to 1500 K by thermal vacancy assisted diffusion. Argon trapped closer to the surface is released at lower temperatures via at least three different surface related release mechanisms. Additional results are presented on the interaction of self interstitial atoms (introduced by 100 eV Xe bombardment) with the Ar defects. Substitutional Ar is found to convert to interstitial Ar which seems to be mobile at room temperature. The Ar-vacancy complexes are found to be reduced to substitutional Ar. The results of atomistic calculations of the release mechanisms will also be presented. (orig.)

  7. Defect production in natural diamond irradiated with high energy Ni ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varichenko, V.S.; Martinovich, V.A.; Penina, N.M.; Zajtsev, A.M.; Stel'makh, V.F.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Fahrner, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    Defect production in diamond irradiated by 335 MeV Ni ions within a dose range of 5 · 10 12 - 5 · 10 14 cm -2 has been studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. The irradiation leads to the appearance in diamond lattice of quasi-one-dimensional track like structures with non tetrahedral atomic configurations. Possible mechanism of microwave conductivity in the modified structures is discussed. Peculiarities of depth distribution profile of concentration of paramagnetic centres in modified structures are explained by track channeling and by stopped ions because of their elastic collisions with lattice atoms during ion stopping. (author). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Critical current densities and flux creep rate in Co-doped BaFe2As2 with columnar defects introduced by heavy-Ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Y.; Tsuchiya, Y.; Taen, T.; Yagyuda, H.; Tamegai, T.; Okayasu, S.; Sasase, M.; Kitamura, H.; Murakami, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report the formation of columnar defects in Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 single crystals with different heavy-ion irradiations. The formation of columnar defects by 200 MeV Au ion irradiation is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and their density is about 40% of the irradiation dose. Magneto-optical imaging and bulk magnetization measurements reveal that the critical current density J c is enhanced in the 200 MeV Au and 800 MeV Xe ion irradiated samples while J c is unchanged in the 200 MeV Ni ion irradiated sample. We also find that vortex creep rates are strongly suppressed by the columnar defects. We compare the effect of heavy-ion irradiation into Co-doped BaFe 2 As 2 and cuprate superconductors.

  9. Small interstitial clusters as opposite defect recombinators in decomposing solid solutions under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, A.N.; Trushin, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    An attempt was made to make allowance for the role of binary and ternary interstitials in the kinetics of radiation point defects both in the presence and in the absence of coherent preseparation. It is shown that in solid solutions, decomposing under irradiation, recombination with binary and ternary interstitials proceeds more quickly than directly, and this difference is more pronounced (from 2 up to 20 time growth) due to defect flow for preseparation at the stage of coherent preseparation formation

  10. Magnetic circular dichroism study of electron-irradiation induced defects in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gislason, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A strong magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) absorption band centered at 1.07 eV in electron irradiated InP is reported. Temperature and magnetic field dependence of the signal reveal that the centre giving rise to this band is a spin triplet. By simulating neutral and reverse bias conditions of junction measurements through a careful choice of irradiation dose and starting material, the MCD band is shown to have an annealing behaviour closely resembling that of the majority carrier traps which control the Fermi level position in n- and p-type InP. The 1.07 eV MCD band represents the first magneto-optical signal connected with this family of complex irradiation-induced defects in InP. (author) 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  11. Effect of defects induced by doping and fast neutron irradiation on the thermal properties of lithium ammonium sulphate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, S.H.; Ramadan, T.A.; Darwish, M.M.; Kassem, M.E.; El-Khatib, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Structural defects were introduced in lithium ammonium sulphate crystals (LAS) either in the process of crystal growth (in the form of foreign ions) or by neutron irradiation. The effect of such defects on the thermal properties of LAS crystals was studied in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was assumed that the doped LAS crystals are composed of a two-phase system having different thermal parameters in each phase. The specific heat at constant pressure, C p , of irradiated samples was found to decrease with increasing irradiation doses. The thermal expansion of LAS crystals was found to be dependent on neutron irradiation, and was attributed to two processes: the release of new species and the trapping process. (author)

  12. Relation between the punctual defects dynamics and irradiation growth in Zr and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarce, A.; Monti, A.M.; Smetniansky-De Grande, N.

    1990-01-01

    The knowledge of the static properties punctual defects and their interaction with the drains present in the material, such as dislocations and grain borders, is of fundamental importance for the correct prediction of the reactor's components behaviour under irradiation. This work calculates the Zr alloys growth under irradiation and results are compared with the stretching values of the cooling channels measured at the Atucha I nuclear power plant. (Author) [es

  13. Internal hydriding in irradiated defected Zircaloy fuel rods: A review (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, J.C.

    1987-10-01

    Although not a problem in recent commercial power reactors, including the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor, internal hydriding of Zircaloy cladding was a persistent cause of gross cladding failures during the 1960s. It occurred in the fuel rods of water-cooled nuclear power reactors that had a small cladding defect. This report summarizes the experimental findings, causes, mechanisms, and methods of minimizing internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods. Irradiation test data on the different types of defected fuel rods, intentionally fabricated defected and in-pile operationally defected rods, are compared. Significant factors affecting internal hydriding in defected Zircaloy-clad fuel rods (defect hole size, internal and external sources of hydrogen, Zircaloy cladding surface properties, nickel alloy contamination of Zircaloy, the effect of heat flux and fluence) are discussed. Pertinent in-pile and out-of-pile test results from Bettis and other laboratories are used as a data base in constructing a qualitative model which explains hydrogen generation and distribution in Zircaloy cladding of defected water-cooled reactor fuel rods. Techniques for minimizing internal hydride failures in Zircaloy-clad fuel rods are evaluated

  14. Combination of BMP-2-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponges with autologous bone marrow for bone regeneration of X-ray-irradiated rabbit ulnar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Hokugo, Akishige; Takahashi, Yoshitake; Nakano, Takayoshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of gelatin sponges incorporating β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules (gelatin/β-TCP sponges) to enhance bone regeneration at a segmental ulnar defect of rabbits with X-ray irradiation. After X-ray irradiation of the ulnar bone, segmental critical-sized defects of 20-mm length were created, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponges with or without autologous bone marrow were applied to the defects to evaluate bone regeneration. Both gelatin/β-TCP sponges containing autologous bone marrow and BMP-2-releasing sponges enhanced bone regeneration at the ulna defect to a significantly greater extent than the empty sponges (control). However, in the X-ray-irradiated bone, the bone regeneration either by autologous bone marrow or BMP-2 was inhibited. When combined with autologous bone marrow, the BMP-2 exhibited significantly high osteoinductivity, irrespective of the X-ray irradiation. The bone mineral content at the ulna defect was similar to that of the intact bone. It is concluded that the combination of bone marrow with the BMP-2-releasing gelatin/β-TCP sponge is a promising technique to induce bone regeneration at segmental bone defects after X-ray irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron-irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (0.01, 0.1, and 0.5 at %) indicate a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures, and mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration on the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six-level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and nonclassical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing

  16. Role of Defects in Swelling and Creep of Irradiated SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Voyles, Paul [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-16

    Silicon carbide is a promising cladding material because of its high strength and relatively good corrosion resistance. However, SiC is brittle and therefore SiC-based components need to be carefully designed to avoid cracking and failure by fracture. In design of SiC-based composites for nuclear reactor applications it is essential to take into account how mechanical properties are affected by radiation and temperature, or in other words, what strains and stresses develop in this material due to environmental conditions. While thermal strains in SiC can be predicted using classical theories, radiation-induced strains are much less understood. In particular, it is critical to correctly account for radiation swelling and radiation creep, which contribute significantly to dimensional instability of SiC under radiation. Swelling typically increases logarithmically with radiation dose and saturates at relatively low doses (damage levels of a few dpa). Consequently, swelling-induced stresses are likely to develop within a few months of operation of a reactor. Radiation-induced volume swelling in SiC can be as high as 2%, which is significantly higher than the cracking strain of 0.1% in SiC. Swelling-induced strains will lead to enormous stresses and fracture, unless these stresses can be relaxed via some other mechanism. An effective way to achieve stress relaxation is via radiation creep. Although it has been hypothesized that both radiation swelling and radiation creep are driven by formation of defect clusters, existing models for swelling and creep in SiC are limited by the lack of understanding of specific defects that form due to radiation in the range of temperatures relevant to fuel cladding in light water reactors (LWRs) (<1000°C). For example, defects that can be detected with traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques account only for 10-45% of the swelling measured in irradiated SiC. Here, we have undertaken an integrated experimental and

  17. Role of Defects in Swelling and Creep of Irradiated SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul; Sridharan, Kumar; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a promising cladding material because of its high strength and relatively good corrosion resistance. However, SiC is brittle and therefore SiC-based components need to be carefully designed to avoid cracking and failure by fracture. In design of SiC-based composites for nuclear reactor applications it is essential to take into account how mechanical properties are affected by radiation and temperature, or in other words, what strains and stresses develop in this material due to environmental conditions. While thermal strains in SiC can be predicted using classical theories, radiation-induced strains are much less understood. In particular, it is critical to correctly account for radiation swelling and radiation creep, which contribute significantly to dimensional instability of SiC under radiation. Swelling typically increases logarithmically with radiation dose and saturates at relatively low doses (damage levels of a few dpa). Consequently, swelling-induced stresses are likely to develop within a few months of operation of a reactor. Radiation-induced volume swelling in SiC can be as high as 2%, which is significantly higher than the cracking strain of 0.1% in SiC. Swelling-induced strains will lead to enormous stresses and fracture, unless these stresses can be relaxed via some other mechanism. An effective way to achieve stress relaxation is via radiation creep. Although it has been hypothesized that both radiation swelling and radiation creep are driven by formation of defect clusters, existing models for swelling and creep in SiC are limited by the lack of understanding of specific defects that form due to radiation in the range of temperatures relevant to fuel cladding in light water reactors (LWRs) (<1000°C). For example, defects that can be detected with traditional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques account only for 10-45% of the swelling measured in irradiated SiC. Here, we have undertaken an integrated experimental and

  18. Influence of ion beam irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of tellurium nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Narinder [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Department of Physics, Haryana College of Technology & Management, Kaithal, 136027 (India); Kumar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, RN College of Engineering & Technology, Madlauda, 132104 (India); Kumar, Sushil, E-mail: sushil_phys@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Chakarvarti, S.K. [Research and Development, Manav Rachana International University, Faridabad, 121001 (India)

    2016-11-01

    In this study, tellurium nanowires were electrodeposited into the polymer membranes from aqueous acidic bath containing HTeO{sub 2}{sup +} ions. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images confirmed the formation of uniform and straight nanowires. The influence of 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of as–deposited tellurium nanowires were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and current–voltage (I–V) measurements. The XRD data depicted the hexagonal phase of tellurium nanowires and further revealed a variation in the intensity of diffraction peaks of ion irradiated nanowires. Williamson–Hall (WH) analysis is used for convoluting the size and microstrain contributions to the width of diffraction peaks. Tellurium nanowires exhibited a distinct absorbance band in the visible region at 686 nm, while this was absent in bulk tellurium. Electrical properties of nanowires are explored on the basis of I–V curves, which revealed a significant increase in the electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires. A possible mechanism for the enhanced electrical conductivity is the increase in carrier concentration due to thermally excited defects. The defects produced by ion irradiation play a vital role in modifying the properties of semiconducting nanowires. - Highlights: • 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion beam induced changes in tellurium nanowires have been examined. • Nanowires were prepared using template electrodeposition method. • Irradiation improved the electrical conductivity of tellurium nanowires. • Mechanism for enhanced electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires was discussed.

  19. Effect of defects induced by doping and fast neutron irradiation on the thermal properties of lithium ammonium sulphate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandil, S.H.; Ramadan, T.A.; Darwish, M.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Materials Science); Kassem, M.E.; El-Khatib, A.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-05-01

    Structural defects were introduced in lithium ammonium sulphate crystals (LAS) either in the process of crystal growth (in the form of foreign ions) or by neutron irradiation. The effect of such defects on the thermal properties of LAS crystals was studied in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was assumed that the doped LAS crystals are composed of a two-phase system having different thermal parameters in each phase. The specific heat at constant pressure, C[sub p], of irradiated samples was found to decrease with increasing irradiation doses. The thermal expansion of LAS crystals was found to be dependent on neutron irradiation, and was attributed to two processes: the release of new species and the trapping process. (author).

  20. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000`s of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in {alpha}Fe during irradiation at 600 K.

  1. Atomic scale modeling of defect production and microstructure evolution in irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Soneda, N.; Shimomura, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Irradiation effects in materials depend in a complex way on the form of the as-produced primary damage state and its spatial and temporal evolution. Thus, while collision cascades produce defects on a time scale of tens of picosecond, diffusion occurs over much longer time scales, of the order of seconds, and microstructure evolution over even longer time scales. In this report the authors present work aimed at describing damage production and evolution in metals across all the relevant time and length scales. They discuss results of molecular dynamics simulations of displacement cascades in Fe and V. They show that interstitial clusters are produced in cascades above 5 keV, but not vacancy clusters. Next, they discuss the development of a kinetic Monte Carlo model that enables calculations of damage evolution over much longer time scales (1000's of s) than the picosecond lifetime of the cascade. They demonstrate the applicability of the method by presenting predictions on the fraction of freely migrating defects in αFe during irradiation at 600 K

  2. Correlation between intrinsic hardness and defect structures of ion irradiated Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, C.; Jin, H. H.; Kwon, J.

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of micro structures and mechanical properties during an in-service irradiation is one of the key issues to be addressed in nuclear materials. Ion irradiation is an effective method to study these irradiation effects thanks to an ease in handling post-irradiated specimens. But the characteristics of an ion irradiation pose a certain difficulty in evaluating irradiation effects. For example, ion irradiated region extends only a few hundred nano-meters from the surface of a sample and the depth profile of an irradiation damage level is quite heterogeneous. Thus it requires special care to quantify the changes in properties after an ion irradiation. We measured changes in a hardness by using a nano-indentation combined with a continuous stiffness measurement (CSM technique. Although the SM technique allows for a continuous measurement of hardness along penetration depth of an indenter; it is difficult to obtain an intrinsic hardness of an irradiation hardened region because one is measuring hardness of a hard layer located on a soft matrix. Thus we modeled the nano-indentation test by using a finite element method. We can extract the intrinsic hardness and the yield stress of an irradiation hardened region by using a so-called inverse method. We investigated the irradiation effects on Fe-Cr binary alloy by using the methods mentioned above. TEM analysis revealed that an irradiation forms dislocation loops with Burgers vector of and 1/2 . These loops varied in size and density with the Cr content and dose level. We discuss in detail a correlation between the measured irradiation-induced changes in the surface hardness and an irradiation induced defect. (authors)

  3. Monitoring for fuel sheath defects in three shipments of irradiated CANDU nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of radioactive gases within the Pegase shipping flask were performed at the outset and at the completion of three shipments of irradiated nuclear fuel from the Douglas Point Generating Station to Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. No increases in the concentration of active gases, volatiles or particulates were observed. The activity of the WR-1 bay water rose only marginally due to the storage of the fuel. Other tests indicated that minimal surface contamination was present. These data established that defects in fuel element sheaths did not arise during the transport or the handling of this irradiated fuel. The observation has significance for the prospect of irradiated nuclear fuel transfer and handling in preparation for storage or disposal. (author)

  4. Effect of electron injection on defect reactions in irradiated silicon containing boron, carbon, and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, L. F.; Lastovskii, S. B.; Yakushevich, H. S.; Moll, M.; Pintilie, I.

    2018-04-01

    Comparative studies employing Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy and C-V measurements have been performed on recombination-enhanced reactions between defects of interstitial type in boron doped silicon diodes irradiated with alpha-particles. It has been shown that self-interstitial related defects which are immobile even at room temperatures can be activated by very low forward currents at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Their activation is accompanied by the appearance of interstitial carbon atoms. It has been found that at rather high forward current densities which enhance BiOi complex disappearance, a retardation of Ci annealing takes place. Contrary to conventional thermal annealing of the interstitial boron-interstitial oxygen complex, the use of forward current injection helps to recover an essential part of charge carriers removed due to irradiation.

  5. Irradiation induced defects containing oxygen atoms in germanium crystal as studied by deep level transient spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Kambe, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Haruo; Matsuda, Koji.

    1984-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was applied to the electron trapping levels which are associated with the irradiation induced lattice defects in germanium crystals. The germanium crystals used in the study were doped with oxygen, antimony or arsenic and the defects were formed by electron irradiation of 1.5MeV or 10MeV. The nature of so called ''thermal defect'' formed by heat treatment at about 670K was also studied. The trapping levels at Esub(c)-0.13eV, Esub(c)-0.25eV and Esub(c)-0.29eV were found to be associated with defects containing oxygen atoms. From the experimental results the Esub(c)-0.25eV level was attributed to the germanium A-center (interstitial oxygen atom-vacancy pair). Another defect associated with the 715cm -1 infrared absorption band was found to have a trapping level at the same position at Esub(c)-0.25eV. The Esub(c)-0.23eV and Esub(c)-0.1eV levels were revealed to be associated with thermal donors formed by heat treatment at about 670K. Additional two peaks (levels) were observed in the DLTS spectrum. The annealing behavior of the levels suggests that the thermal donors originate from not a single type but several types of defects. (author)

  6. Indium antimonide crystal defects formed by fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitovskij, N.A.; Dolgolenko, A.P.; Mashovets, T.V.; Oganesyan, O.V.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown, that indium antimonide irradiation with fast neutrons of reactor results in the formation of disorded regions with a mean radius of approximately 130 A surrounded with space charge regions forming barriers for main carriers. But the found values of defect cluster depolarization coefficient (Lsub(x)sup(n)=0.18 and Lsub(x)sup(p)=0.29) show, that the clusters have marked conductivity for main charge carriers. The found position of the Fermi level in the disorded regions Esub(F)=Esub(c)-0.085 eV does not depend on the impurity type and its concentration in an initial material. The disorded regions play the main part in charge carrier scattering at low temperatures and markedly contribute to the change of mobility at 80 K. It is found, that irradiation temperature change in the range from 77 to 300 K does not effect practically on the disorded region parameters

  7. The theory of dissipative structures of the kinetic system for defects of nonlinear physical system 'metal+loading+irradiation'. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.A.; Borikov, T.L.; Kryzhanovskaya, T.V.; Chernezhenko, S.A.; Rusov, V.D.

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic system for defects of physical nonlinear system 'metal + load + irradiation' is specified [1, 2, 3]. Developing the approaches offered in [4], where distinctions of mechanisms of radiating creep and areas of their applicability are formalized (depending on external parameters) for fuel and constructional metals, division of kinetic systems for defects of constructional and fuel metals is carrying out. Thus the accent on the autocatalytic features of kinetic system for defects of reactor fuel metals, resulting from the exoenergic autocatalytic character of nuclear fission reactions being the main point defect source is done. In this part of the article the basic attention is given to the kinetic of sink drains for point defects. For kinetic systems of sinks-sources new approaches for the task of boundary conditions are offered. The possible structure of the computer program modelling kinetic system for defects of nonlinear physical system 'metal + load + irradiation' is considered

  8. Combining in situ transmission electron microscopy irradiation experiments with cluster dynamics modeling to study nanoscale defect agglomeration in structural metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donghua; Wirth, Brian D.; Li Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a combinatorial approach that integrates state-of-the-art transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in situ irradiation experiments and high-performance computing techniques to study irradiation defect dynamics in metals. Here, we have studied the evolution of visible defect clusters in nanometer-thick molybdenum foils under 1 MeV krypton ion irradiation at 80 °C through both cluster dynamics modeling and in situ TEM experiments. The experimental details are reported elsewhere; we focus here on the details of model construction and comparing the model with the experiments. The model incorporates continuous production of point defects and/or small clusters, and the accompanying interactions, which include clustering, recombination and loss to the surfaces that result from the diffusion of the mobile defects. To account for the strong surface effect in thin TEM foils, the model includes one-dimensional spatial dependence along the foil depth, and explicitly treats the surfaces as black sinks. The rich amount of data (cluster number density and size distribution at a variety of foil thickness, irradiation dose and dose rate) offered by the advanced in situ experiments has allowed close comparisons with computer modeling and permitted significant validation and optimization of the model in terms of both physical model construct (damage production mode, identities of mobile defects) and parameterization (diffusivities of mobile defects). The optimized model exhibits good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the in situ TEM experiments. The combinatorial approach is expected to bring a unique opportunity for the study of radiation damage in structural materials.

  9. The behavior of lattice defects produced in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} irradiated by neutrons at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, K.; Koizumi, T. [Naruto Univ. of Education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, M. [Kyoto Univ., Research Reactor Inst., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    Single crystals of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were irradiated by the two reactors, KUR and JMTR, at three different temperatures. Lattice defects produced by irradiation were studied by esr (electron spin resonance). Three kinds of esr spectram, which are denoted as A, B and C spectram, are observed. The spectram A was observed at three different irradiation temperatures and was ascribed to oxygen vacancies. The spectram B showed no angular dependence for the rotation of external magnetic field to the crystal axis, and the defect density of this spectram decreased with an increase of annealing temperature. When the specimen was annealed at 400 degC after irradiation at 200 degC, the spectram C was observed and was presumed to be due to Al-colloids. (Y. Kazumata)

  10. Positron annihilation study of vacancy-type defects in fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Li, Zhuoxin; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Wei, Long; Xu, Qiu; Atobe, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Detection of Al monovacancy by positron lifetime spectroscopy in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl 2 O 3 (n=2). •Concentration of defects is also estimated for Al monovacancy. •O atom peak was observed by using coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy. -- Abstract: The positron lifetimes of fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl 2 O 3 single crystals were measured to investigate the formation of cation vacancies. Al monovacancy was possibly observed in samples irradiated by fast neutrons at ultra-low temperatures. Additionally, vacancy-oxygen complex centers were possibly observed in samples irradiated at higher temperatures and fast neutron fluences. Coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectra were measured to obtain information regarding the vicinity of vacancy-type defects. A peak at approximately 11 × 10 −3 m 0 c was observed, which may be due to the presence of oxygen atoms in the neighborhood of the vacancies

  11. Influence of defects on the incommensurate modulation in irradiated Ba2NaNb5O15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, S.; Mutka, H.; Roucau, C.; Litzler, A.; Schneck, J.; Toledano, J.C.; Bouffard, S.; Rullier-Albenque, F.

    1991-01-01

    Defect-induced properties of barium sodium niobate (Ba 2 NaNb 5 O 15 ) have been studied as a function of electron irradiation dose. Birefringence measurements at low doses indicate that the lock-in transition temperature, originally at about 280 degree C, decreases linearly with increasing dose. Complementary irradiations in situ in a high-voltage electron microscope show that the incommensurate phase can be stabilized down to room temperature. Simultaneously the satellite diffraction spots broaden and the lock-in transition becomes diffuse. The modification of the hysteresis of the birefringence, observed already at the lowest doses, indicates a progressive extension of the stability range of the 2q modulated phase to lower temperatures as the defect concentration increases. A similar conclusion can be drawn from the satellite reflection dark-field electron micrographs that show, once the incommensurate phase is stabilized at room temperature, the doubly modulated texture characteristic of the 2q modulated phase. Low doses of irradiation do not change qualitatively the configuration of the residual discommensurations in the lock-in phase nor the temperature dependence of the incommensurability. Accordingly, already in the as-grown samples the defects dominate the pinning of the incommensurate modulation and the intrinsic properties of this incommensurate system are not clearly observable

  12. Coordination defects in vitreous As2S3 induced by γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpotyuk, O.; Balitska, V.

    1997-01-01

    Destruction-polymerization transformations in vitreous As 2 S 3 , associated with coordination defects formation process induced by γ-irradiation, were studied by the IR Fourier Spectroscopy method in the region of 400-100 cm -1 . All topological variants of these processes, statistically possible in the investigated samples, were taken into account for physical consideration of the real structural changes. (author)

  13. Formation and evolution of point defects created in alkali halogen compounds irradiated by heavy ions; Formation et evolution des defauts ponctuels crees dans certains halogenures alcalins irradies par des ions lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdequin, E [Nantes Univ., 44 (France)

    1993-07-16

    The goal of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the heavy-ion material interaction. Alkali halogen crystals were chosen since the color centers produced by heavy ions can be distinguished easier from those generated by X rays. Measurements on KI irradiated at low temperature showed that the usual process of non radiative de-excitation of self-captured exciton is not prevailing. As the main objective of this work was the exact determination of the defects created by accelerated heavy ions, an important effort was dedicated to the spectrum deconvolution. Due to the high quality of the obtained spectra the V band analyse was possible. The defect stability was found to have the same nature in all the cubical alkali halogens and depend essentially on the crystal type. The defect evolution after irradiation is related to the diffusion coefficients corresponding to each mobile species and to the crystal lattice in which they move. Based on measurements made at different temperatures a simple modeling of the recombination kinetics was proposed. This effect was found to be specific to irradiation by heavy ions. It is difficult to determine the initial processes from the fossil defects, so, the defect history must be known as the described investigation methods do not permit to establish the transient aspect of defect creation. The important role of impurities should be stressed as the third intruder in the ion/crystal configuration; it can modify significantly the final state of the irradiated crystal, as it was found in KI, for instance. The open problems underlined in this study will probably be solved by using the atomic force microscopy and diffraction or on-line Raman measurements in ISOC chamber to avoid the passage to ambient conditions of the crystals irradiated at low temperatures 60 refs.

  14. Irradiation defects in the A-15 compounds V3Si and Nb3Ge: effects on superconducting and transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rullier-Albenque, F.

    1984-11-01

    In the first part the mechanisms of atomic displacements under electron irradiation in these diatomic ordered solids are studied. In the case of superconducting alloys, simultaneous measurements of electrical resistivity at 20 K and critical temperature allow to distinguish the influence of point defects created in each sub-lattice and antisite defects. The threshold energies have been determined. In the case of V 3 Si, Frenkel pairs have been characterized by their specific resistivities and the decrease of Tsub(c) by vanadium vacancies. The Tsub(c) results obtained on V 3 Si also reveal the existence of a threshold electron energy to produce antisite defects. The second part is a comparative study of irradiation effects in Nb 3 Ge with very different kinds of projectiles: 2.5 MeV electrons, fast neutrons or 100 MeV heavy ions (uranium fission fragments). For these three types of irradiation, resistivity and critical temperature damage can be described in terms of point defects: Frenkel pairs and antisite defects. In the third part we have studied the influence of 2.5 MeV electron or fission fragment-irradiation on the resistivity versus temperature curves of Nb 3 Ge. For both projectiles, negative temperature coefficients of resistivity drho)/dT, were measured and correlated with resistivity at 280 K and 25 K. These anomalous transport properties are related to an electron localization process assisted by electron-phonon and electron-electron interaction [fr

  15. Trapping of point defects and segregation at the free surfaces of a metal sheet under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarce, Alicia

    2003-01-01

    The migration of irradiation produced vacancies and interstitials to the free surfaces of a sheet of thickness d (pure metal and binary alloys AB of hcp structure) is calculated. For alloys, the irradiation temperature when no segregation exists (critical temperature) is obtained. The anisotropy of the diffusion of point defects in the hcp lattice is explicitly included in the calculations. (author)

  16. Analysis of nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in Fe-base materials by means of small angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, G.

    2008-12-01

    Thermonuclear fusion of light atoms is considered since decades as an unlimited, safe and reliable source of energy that could eventually replace classical sources based on fossil fuel or nuclear fuel. Fusion reactor technology and materials studies are important parts of the fusion energy development program. For the time being, the most promising materials for structural applications in the future fusion power reactors are the Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels for which the greatest technology maturity has been achieved, i.e., qualified fabrication routes, welding technology and a general industrial experience are almost available. The most important issues concerning the future use of RAFM steels in fusion power reactors are derived from their irradiation by 14 MeV neutrons that are the product, together with 3.5 MeV helium ions, of the envisaged fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. Indeed, exposure of metallic materials to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons will result in the formation of severe displacement damage (about 20-30 dpa per year) and high amounts of helium, which are at the origin of significant changes in the physical and mechanical properties of materials, such as hardening and embrittlement effects. This PhD Thesis work was aimed at investigating how far the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) technique could be used for detecting and characterizing nano-sized irradiation-induced defects in RAFM steels. Indeed, the resolution limit of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) is about 1 nm in weak beam TEM imaging, and it is usually thought that a large number of irradiation-induced effects have a size below 1 nm in RAFM steels and that these very small defects actually contribute to the irradiation-induced hardening and embrittlement of RAFM steels occurring at irradiation temperatures below about 400 °C. The aim of this work was achieved by combining SANS experiments on unirradiated and irradiated specimens

  17. Study of the point defect creation and of the excitonic luminescence in alkali halides irradiated by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protin, L.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this experimental thesis is to study the excitonic mechanisms and of the defect creation, in NaCl and KBr, under dense electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ion irradiations. In the first part, we present the main features of the interaction of swift heavy ions with solid targets, and after we review the well known radiolytic processes of the defect creation during X-ray irradiation. In the second chapter, we describe our experimental set-up. In the chapter III, we present our results of the in-situ optical absorption measurements. This results show that defect creation is less sensitive to the temperature than during a classical irradiation. Besides, we observe new mechanisms concerning the defect aggregation. In the chapter IV, we present the results of excitonic luminescence induced by swift by swift heavy ions. We observe that the luminescence yields only change with the highest electronic stopping power. In the chapter V, we perform thermal spike and luminescence yields calculations and we compare the numerical results to the experiments presented in the chapter IV. (author). 121 refs., 65 figs., 30 tabs

  18. Evolution of the radiation-induced defect structure in 316 type stainless steel after post-irradiation annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Renterghem, W., E-mail: wvrenter@sckcen.be; Konstantinović, M.J., E-mail: mkonstan@sckcen.be; Vankeerberghen, M., E-mail: mvankeer@sckcen.be

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • TEM study of irradiated CW316 steel after post-irradiation annealing. • Frank loops were removed after annealing at 550 °C, by unfaulting and growing. • The cavity density decreases after annealing at 550 °C, but not completely removed. • Frank loop and cavity removal is controlled by the annealing temperature. • The dissolution of γ' precipitates is controlled by the iron diffusion length. - Abstract: The thermal stability of Frank loops, black dots, cavities and γ′ precipitates in an irradiated 316 stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The samples were retrieved from a thimble tube irradiated at around 320 °C up to 80 dpa in a commercial nuclear power reactor, and thermally annealed, varying both annealing temperature and time. With increasing annealing temperature the density of all defects gradually decreased, resulting in the complete removal of Frank loops at 550 °C. In contrast to other defects, the density of the γ′ precipitates sharply decreased with increasing annealing time, which indicates that the dissolution of the γ′ precipitates is governed by the iron diffusion length.

  19. Utilization of shear stress for determination of activation energy of the defects created by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental technique used for the determination thermodynamical parameters such as activation energy using the thermal annealing of increments of Critical resolved Shear Stress of the defects created by neutron irradiation at 77 K. The doses chosen for this work was 3.1 x 10 16 n/cm 2 since the defects are stable to plastic deformation and the cascades of atomic displacements do not overlap. Specimens without any prior deformation were used allowing then the single addition of the initial stress to that due to the created defects. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced defect-formation in lithium hydride and deuteride monocrystals. [Electron and X-ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovarov, V.A.; Betenekova, T.A.; Zav' yalov, N.A.; Cholakh, S.O. (Ural' skij Politekhnicheskij Inst., Sverdlovsk (USSR))

    1983-08-01

    Methods of stationary and pulse absorption spectroscopy were used to investigate into processes of formation and decay of radiation defects in cubic LiH and LiD crystals. F- and V-centers form at low temperatures during crystal irradiation by photons, creating excitons selectively, accelerator electrons, X-ray radiation. Analysis of possible mechanisms of defect formation shows that radiation defect formation in LiH is based on radiationless exciton decay. It is shown that efficiency of F- and V-centers generation in pure and impure crystals in 80-298 K range is the same. Exciton decay with formation of Frenkel radiation defects in pure LiH and LiD crystals takes place, probably, in regular crystal lattice points. Process of radiation defect formation as a result of near activator exciton decay takes place in impure LiH-Na, LiD-Na crystals.

  1. Alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in SiO2 films of Si-SiO2 structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koman, B.P.; Gal'chynskyy, O.V.; Kovalyuk, R.O.; Shkol'nyy, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the work was to investigate alpha-particle irradiation induced defects in Si-SiO 2 structures by means of the thermostimulated discharge currents (TSDC) analysis. The object of investigation were (p-Si)-SiO 2 structures formed by a combined oxidation of the industrial p-Si wafers in dry and wet oxygen at temperature of 1150 C. The TSD currents were investigated in the temperature range between 90 and 500 K under linear heating rate. Pu 238 isotopes were the source of alpha-particles with an energy of 4-5 MeV and a density of 5.10 7 s -1 cm -2 . The TSD current curves show two peculiar maxima at about 370 and 480 K. Alpha-particle irradiation doesn't affect the general shape of the TSDC curves but leads to a shift of the maximum at 370 K and reduces the total electret charge which is accumulated in the Si-SiO 2 structures during polarization. The energy distribution function of the defects which are involved in SiO 2 polarization has been calculated. It showes that defects with activation energies of about 0.8 and 1.0 eV take part in forming the electret state, and these activation energies have certain energy distributions. It has been found that the TSDC maximum at 370 K has space charge nature and is caused by migration of hydrogen ions. In irradiated samples hydrogen and natrium ions localize on deeper trapping centres induced by alpha-particle irradiation. (orig.)

  2. Irradiation-induced defects in graphite and glassy carbon studied by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Kajino, M.; Kuwahara, H.; Yamaguchi, S.; Kuramoto, E.; Takenaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    ACAR and positron lifetime measurements have been made on, HOPG, isotropic fine-grained graphites, glassy carbons and C 60 /C 70 . HOPG showed a marked bimodal ACAR distribution along the c-axis. By irradiation of 1.0 X 10 19 fast neutrons/cm 2 remarkable narrowing in the ACAR curves and disappearance of the bimodal distribution were observed. Lifetime in HOPG increased from 225 psec to 289 psec (positron-lifetime in vacancies and their small clusters) by the irradiation. The irradiation on isotropic graphites and glassy carbons, however, gave slight narrowing in ACAR curves and decrease in lifetimes (360 psec → 300psec). This suggests irradiation-induced vacancy trapping in crystallites. In C 60 /C 70 powder two lifetime components were detected: τ 1 =177psec, τ 2 =403psec (I 2 =58%). The former is less than the bulk lifetime of HOPG, while the latter being very close to lifetimes in the isotropic graphites and glassy carbons. This and recent 2D-ACAR study of HOPG surface [15] strongly suggest free and defect surface states around ''soccer ball'' cages

  3. Failure of RNA synthesis to recover after UV irradiation: an early defect in cells from individuals with Cockayne's syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, L.V.; Lehmann, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work has shown that in cells from the ultraviolet-sensitive genetic disorder, Cockayne's syndrome, DNA synthesis fails to recover after ultraviolet irradiation, despite the fact that these cells have no detectable defect in either excision or daughter-strand repair pathways. We now show that Cockayne cells, as well as cells from a number of patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, are sensitive to the lethal effects of UV irradiation in stationary phase under conditions in which no DNA is synthesized after irradiation. Furthermore, in normal and defective human fibroblasts, RNA synthesis is depressed after UV irradiation. In normal (dividing) cells, RNA synthesis recovers very rapidly, but this recovery does not occur in Cockayne cells, and it is reduced or absent in xeroderma pigmentosum cells from different complementation groups. Qualitatively, similar results are obtained with cells in stationary phase. The recovery of RNA synthesis in the various defective cell strains is not correlated with the overall extent of excision repair, but there is some correlation between recovery of RNA synthesis and cell survival after ultraviolet irradiation. These results implicate recovery of RNA synthesis as an important early response to ultraviolet irradiation

  4. Doping of semiconductors using radiation defects produced by irradiation with protons and alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, V.A.; Kozlovski, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    One of the modern methods for modifying semiconductors using beams of protons and alpha particles is analyzed; this modification is accomplished by the controlled introduction of radiation defects into the semiconductor. It is shown that doping semiconductors with radiation defects produced by irradiation with light ions opens up fresh opportunities for controlling the properties of semiconducting materials and for the development of new devices designed for optoelectronics, microelectronics, and nanoelectronics based on these materials; these devices differ favorably from those obtained by conventional doping methods, i.e., by diffusion, epitaxy, and ion implantation

  5. The effect of alloying elements on the vacancy defect evolution in electron-irradiated austenitic Fe-Ni alloys studied by positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druzhkov, A.P. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)], E-mail: druzhkov@imp.uran.ru; Perminov, D.A.; Davletshin, A.E. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch RAS, 18 Kovalevskaya St., 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-01-31

    The vacancy defect evolution under electron irradiation in austenitic Fe-34.2 wt% Ni alloys containing oversized (aluminum) and undersized (silicon) alloying elements was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy at temperatures between 300 and 573 K. It is found that the accumulation of vacancy defects is considerably suppressed in the silicon-doped alloy. This effect is observed at all the irradiation temperatures. The obtained results provide evidence that the silicon-doped alloy forms stable low-mobility clusters involving several Si and interstitial atoms, which are centers of the enhanced recombination of migrating vacancies. The clusters of Si-interstitial atoms also modify the annealing of vacancy defects in the Fe-Ni-Si alloy. The interaction between small vacancy agglomerates and solute Al atoms is observed in the Fe-Ni-Al alloy under irradiation at 300-423 K.

  6. Study of supersaturation of defects under neutron irradiation by Zener relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Justus, Francisco J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Vacancy supersaturation in dynamic equilibrium under fast neutron irradiation could be determined by anelastic relaxation. This phenomenon is particularly noticeable in some substitutional binary alloys. Relaxation is due to the reordering of atoms pairs under a stress, being a local reordering at the atomic scale. Relaxation time (τ) is inversely proportional to the vacancy concentration (Cv) and decreases under irradiation because a dynamical equilibrium of vacancy concentration, higher than thermodynamic equilibrium, is established. Theoretical models allow estimating the magnitude of that supersaturation. Determinations of τ at different temperatures, with and without fast neutron irradiations, were made with an 'in situ' device placed in the high temperature loop in the RA1 CAC-CNEA reactor. An alloy Au-30% Ni was used, since it presents an appreciable Zener effect. The measurements were performed in a spring-shaped specimen in order to minimize temperature and flux gradients. An Arrhenius plot of τ was obtained, and it was observed that for temperatures lower than 220 C degrees a vacancy supersaturation exists. The lowest temperature of our experiments was 190 C degrees. A value of τ at this temperature was three times lower under irradiations. A plot of τ vs. fast neutron fluence (φ f t) at the irradiation temperature T= 203 C degrees was obtained. An increase of τ was observed. After an annealing at T = 280 C degrees, the value of τ recovers the value corresponding to the unirradiated case. This fact suggests that the loops produced by irradiation act as defect sinks. (author) [es

  7. Raman investigation of lattice defects and stress induced in InP and GaN films by swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, P.P. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, J., E-mail: J.Liu@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, S.X. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Maaz, K. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Nanomaterials Research Group, Physics Division, PINSTECH, Nilore, 45650 Islamabad (Pakistan); Zeng, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); Guo, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), Beijing 100049 (China); Zhai, P.F.; Duan, J.L.; Sun, Y.M.; Hou, M.D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-04-01

    InP crystals and GaN films were irradiated by swift heavy ions {sup 86}Kr and {sup 209}Bi with kinetic energies of 25 and 9.5 MeV per nucleon and ion fluence in the range 5 × 10{sup 10} to 3.6 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The characteristic optical bands were studied by Raman spectroscopy to reveal the disorder and defects induced in the samples during the irradiation process. The crystallinity of InP and GaN was found to be deteriorated after irradiation by the swift heavy ions and resulted in the amorphous nature of the samples along the ion tracks. The amorphous tracks observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the formation of lattice defects. In typical F{sub 2}(LO) mode, in case of InP, the spectra shifted towards the lower wavenumbers with a maximum shift of 7.6 cm{sup −1} induced by 1030 MeV Bi ion irradiation. While in case of GaN, the typical E{sub 2}(high) mode shifted towards the higher wavenumbers, with maximum shift of 5.4 cm{sup −1} induced by 760 MeV Bi ion irradiation at ion fluence of 1 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The observed Raman shifts reveal the presence of lattice defects and disorder induced in the samples after irradiation by the swift heavy ions. This irradiation also generated lattice stress in the samples, which has been investigated and discussed in detail in this work.

  8. Dependence of J c on pinning center morphology: An explanation of record J c observed for discontinuous columnar pinning of vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, R.; Gandini, A.; Parks, D.; Sawh, R.; Mayes, B.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study of defects caused by ion irradiation has proven that very discontinuous multiple-in-line-damage results in much higher J c than continuous columnar pinning centers. This is contrary to conventional wisdom. We develop a first approximation to a theory relating J c to the morphology of pinning centers. Qualitative agreement with experiment is achieved. Conclusions indicate the relative importance of pinning potential, percolation, and critical temperature for various morphologies. Results suggest the leading importance of pinning, compared to texture, weak links and oxygenation in achievement of the goal of high J c especially in large grain HTS

  9. Electron irradiation effects and recovery of defect clusters in TiC through high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Michio; Kirihara, Tomoo; Ushijima, Susumu; Ohashi, Hideki.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide(TiCsub(0.8)) prepared by plasma-jet melting was irradiated to an electron dose less than 6x10 26 e/m 2 from room temperature to 800 0 C. The number density and average size of the defect clusters formed at irradiation temperatures below 400 0 C were less than those formed above 600 0 C. Since TiCsub(0.8) has an order structure of carbon below around 600 0 C, the ordered phase is more resistant to radiation than the disordered one in higher temperatures. The clusters decrease in number density and develop to dislocation loops during post irradiation annealing above 1,000 0 C. The burgers vector of the loops was determined as a/2 . There were two temperature region for the recovery of the defect clusters. It is conceivable that the first one appeared in the temperature region around 600 0 C caused by migration of carbon vacancies, and the second one appeared above 1,000 0 C by migration of titanium vacancies. (author)

  10. The evolution of interaction between grain boundary and irradiation-induced point defects: Symmetric tilt GB in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Qin, Yuan; Yang, Yingying; Yao, Man; Wang, Xudong; Xu, Haixuan; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2018-03-01

    Molecular dynamics method is used and scheme of calculational tests is designed. The atomic evolution view of the interaction between grain boundary (GB) and irradiation-induced point defects is given in six symmetric tilt GB structures of bcc tungsten with the energy of the primary knock-on atom (PKA) EPKA of 3 and 5 keV and the simulated temperature of 300 K. During the collision cascade with GB structure there are synergistic mechanisms to reduce the number of point defects: one is vacancies recombine with interstitials, and another is interstitials diffuse towards the GB with vacancies almost not move. The larger the ratio of the peak defect zone of the cascades overlaps with the GB region, the statistically relative smaller the number of surviving point defects in the grain interior (GI); and when the two almost do not overlap, vacancy-intensive area generally exists nearby GBs, and has a tendency to move toward GB with the increase of EPKA. In contrast, the distribution of interstitials is relatively uniform nearby GBs and is affected by the EPKA far less than the vacancy. The GB has a bias-absorption effect on the interstitials compared with vacancies. It shows that the number of surviving vacancies statistically has increasing trend with the increase of the distance between PKA and GB. While the number of surviving interstitials does not change much, and is less than the number of interstitials in the single crystal at the same conditions. The number of surviving vacancies in the GI is always larger than that of interstitials. The GB local extension after irradiation is observed for which the interstitials absorbed by the GB may be responsible. The designed scheme of calculational tests in the paper is completely applicable to the investigation of the interaction between other types of GBs and irradiation-induced point defects.

  11. Evolution of defects in a multicomponent glass irradiated by 1 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingyan; Geng Hongbin; Sun Chengyue; Zhang Zhonghua; He Shiyu

    2010-01-01

    The optical properties and microstructural degradation of a multicomponent glass after exposure to 1 MeV electrons for fluences of 10 13 to 10 16 e - /cm 2 , as well as the recovery during annealing at room temperature (RT) for the fluence of 10 16 e - /cm 2 , are investigated. The non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs), as well as trapped electrons (TEs), are mainly attributed to optical absorption bands and paramagnetic spectra. In comparison of the exponential curves, the in-growth kinetics for each type of defect with increasing fluence are separable, and a new linearly-combined exponential model is used to describe the structural responses during irradiation. Accordingly, RT bleaching curves of defects follow a linearly-combined exponential decay function. Consistent results from optical and paramagnetic signals suggest that this linearly-combined model provides a reasonable kinetic description of the growth and bleaching process of defects.

  12. Spontaneous recombination volumes of Frenkel defects in neutron-irradiated non-fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, M.; Mansel, W.; Boening, K.; Rosner, P.; Vogl, G.

    1979-01-01

    Production and production-rate curves for the non-fcc metals Fe, Mo, Ta, W, Zr, and Sn are obtained by electrical-resistivity measurements taken at 4.6 K during reactor neutron irradiations. The saturation concentration of Frenkel defects, c/sub s/, and the recombination volume v/sub o/ are evaluated. A parabolic relation between the spontaneous recombination volume v 0 and the compressibility kappa for a series of bcc metals is found

  13. Tunneling and migration of the dumbbell defect in electron irradiated aluminum-zinc alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements have been made on irradiated Al-Zn alloys (Zn concentrations of .01%, .1%, and .5% atomic). They provide strong evidence for a tunneling relaxation of the predominant mixed dumbbell defect at low temperatures and for mixed dumbbell migration at the Stage II anneal temperature. The effect of an internal strain varying with the zinc concentration of the measured decrement and modulus change is striking. Evaluated in the framework of a six level system, this reveals the simultaneous action of resonance and non-classical relaxation processes. Using Fe as a probe atom, it is shown that mixed dumbbell dissociation is in an insignificant component of the annealing of this defect. The decrease of the annealing temperature at higher zinc concentrations provides evidence that the mixed dumbbell migrates as a unit during annealing. The energies associated with dumbbell migration and interstitial escape are derived. Further evidence for the migration mechanism is obtained from successive irradiation and annealing measurements on the Al-Zn .01% alloy, and from a comparison of these results with published radiation damage rate measurements of dilute Al-Zn alloys

  14. Irradiation defects in clayey minerals in association with discordance-type uranium deposit; Les Defauts d'Irradiation dans les Mineraux argileux associes aux gisements d'Uranium de type Discordance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morichon, E.; Beaufort, D. [Universite de Poitiers, Laboratoire HydrASA, CNRS-FRE 3114, 86 - Poitiers (France); Morichon, E.; Allard, Th. [IMPMC, UMR 7590, 75 - Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Radioactivity generates defects in minerals and these defects are the witnesses of the presence of radio-elements, and therefore represent an interesting potential for uranium prospecting. Investigations made in the Athabasca basin in Canada reveal irradiation defects in very old clays (kaolinite, illite and sudoite) in the alteration halo of discordance-type uranium deposits. The authors comment the defect concentration variation among the different drillings. These differences show that hexavalent uranium circulated in the whole geological system

  15. A molecular dynamics simulation study of irradiation induced defects in gold nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenqiang; Chen, Piheng; Qiu, Ruizhi; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie; Hou, Mingdong; Duan, Jinglai

    2017-08-01

    Displacement cascade in gold nanowires was studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. Primary knock-on atoms (PKAs) with different kinetic energies were initiated either at the surface or at the center of the nanowires. We found three kinds of defects that were induced by the cascade, including point defects, stacking faults and crater at the surface. The starting points of PKAs influence the number of residual point defects, and this consequently affect the boundary of anti-radiation window which was proposed by calculation of diffusion of point defects to the free surface of nanowires. Formation of stacking faults that expanded the whole cross-section of gold nanowires was observed when the PKA's kinetic energy was higher than 5 keV. Increasing the PKA's kinetic energy up to more than 10 keV may lead to the formation of crater at the surface of nanowires due to microexplosion of hot atoms. At this energy, PKAs started from the center of nanowires can also result in the creation of crater because length of cascade region is comparable to diameter of nanowires. Both the two factors, namely initial positions of PKAs as well as the craters induced by higher energy irradiation, would influence the ability of radiation resistance of metal nanowires.

  16. USING CUSTOM TRIFLANGE IMPLANT IN REVISION HIP ARTHROPLASTY IN PATIENT WITH PELVIC DISCONTINUITY (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Revision hip arthroplasty rate is growing, and pelvic discontinuity rate ranges from 1% to 5% of acetabular component revision reasons. According to AAOS acetabular defects classification, pelvic discontinuity is fourth type defect in which cranial part of hip bone is separated from caudal part at acetabular level. Usually it occurs from bone loss secondary to osteolysis, infection, fracture or aseptic loosening. There are a lot of techniques for pelvis discontinuity treatment. Published results of bulk allografts and antiprotrusion cages have generally been poor. More preferable methods with acceptable rate of good results are cup-cage systems and custom triflange acetabular components(CTAC. CTACs are designed based on preoperative CT scans to build a custom titanium 3D-printed implant to address the patient's specific bone defect and provide secure fixation in the ilium, pubis, and ischium. We faced pelvic discontinuity, in which extensive iliac bone loss was added to caudal hip bone part medial displacement and pelvic ring deformity, in patient with multiple hip surgeries. Preoperative investigation called into question the possibility of using off-the-shelf hip implants, which could restore the biomechanics of the hip and provide reliable primary fixation at the same time. We present case report of the patient with pelvic discontinuity and massive bone loss treatment using a custom triflange component.

  17. Low-temperature electron irradiation induced defects in gallium arsenide: bulk and surface acoustic wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brophy, M.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Irradiation of GaAs with 2.25 to 2.5 MeV electrons at temperatures below 190 K produces two peaks in ultrasonic attenuation versus temperature. The defects responsible for both peaks have trigonal symmetry and were observed in n-type and semi-insulating GaAs with bulk and surface acoustic waves (SAW) respectively. Bulk waves at eight frequencies between 9 and 130 MHz and SAW at 73 and 145 MHz were used. The reorientation kinetics of both peaks follow the Arrhenius law. The annealing of both peaks was studied with isochronal and isothermal anneals in the temperature range 200 to 335 K. Peak I anneals with a spectrum of activation energies in the range 0.7-1.1 eV between 220 and 335 K. Peak II anneals with a single activation energy of about 1.1 eV above 300K. The different annealing characteristics indicate that these peaks represent two distinct defects. The annealing above 300 K has not been seen in electrical resistivity measurements, but was observed in earlier length change experiments. Irradiation of GaAs:Cr produces no Cr-radiation defect complexes. The attenuation peak associated with Cr 2+ decrease with electron dose, but starts to recover at 150 K

  18. Deep defect levels in standard and oxygen enriched silicon detectors before and after **6**0Co-gamma-irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Stahl, J; Lindström, G; Pintilie, I

    2003-01-01

    Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (C-DLTS) measurements have been performed on standard and oxygen-doped silicon detectors manufactured from high-resistivity n-type float zone material with left angle bracket 111 right angle bracket and left angle bracket 100 right angle bracket orientation. Three different oxygen concentrations were achieved by the so-called diffusion oxygenated float zone (DOFZ) process initiated by the CERN-RD48 (ROSE) collaboration. Before the irradiation a material characterization has been performed. In contrast to radiation damage by neutrons or high- energy charged hadrons, were the bulk damage is dominated by a mixture of clusters and point defects, the bulk damage caused by **6**0Co-gamma-radiation is only due to the introduction of point defects. The dominant electrically active defects which have been detected after **6**0Co-gamma-irradiation by C-DLTS are the electron traps VO//i, C//iC//s, V//2( = /-), V //2(-/0) and the hole trap C//i O//i. The main difference betwe...

  19. Evolution of extended defects in polycrystalline Au-irradiated UO{sub 2} using in situ TEM: Temperature and fluence effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofri, C., E-mail: claire.onofri@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Sabathier, C. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Baumier, C.; Bachelet, C. [CSNSM/CNRS, PARIS-SUD University, F-91400 Orsay (France); Palancher, H. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Legros, M. [CEMES/CNRS, F-31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2016-12-15

    In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy irradiations were performed on polycrystalline UO{sub 2} thin foils with 4 MeV gold ions at three different temperatures: 600 °C, room and liquid nitrogen temperature. In order to study the dislocation evolution and to determine the growth mechanisms, the dislocation loop and line densities and the loop size repartition were monitored as a function of fluence, and irradiation temperature. We show that dislocation loops, with Burgers vectors along the <110> directions, evolve into dislocation lines with increasing fluence by a loop overlapping mechanism. Furthermore, a fluence offset is highlighted between the irradiations performed at high and low temperature due to an increase of the defect mobility. Indeed, a growth by Oswald ripening is probably activated at room temperature and 600 °C and changes the kinetic evolution of loops into lines. After this transformation, and for all the irradiation temperatures, a steady state equilibrium is reached where both extended defects (dislocation lines and small dislocations loops -around 5 nm in size-) are observed simultaneously. A continuous nucleation of small dislocation loops and of nanometer-sized cavities formed directly by irradiation is also highlighted.

  20. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  1. Investigation of room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities induced by laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Jiang, Yijian

    2010-08-01

    We studied the room temperature UV emission of ZnO films with different defect densities which is fabricated by KrF laser irradiation process. It is shown room temperature UV photoluminescence of ZnO film is composed of contribution from free-exciton (FX) recombination and its longitudinal-optical phonon replica (FX-LO) (1LO, 2LO). With increase of the defect density, the FX emission decreased and FX-LO emission increased dramatically; and the relative strengths of FX to FX-LO emission intensities determine the peak position and intensity of UV emission. What is more, laser irradiation with moderate energy density could induce the crystalline ZnO film with very flat and smooth surface. This investigation indicates that KrF laser irradiation could effectively modulate the exciton emission and surface morphology, which is important for the application of high performance of UV emitting optoelectronic devices. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects in the stress field of a moving dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, E.

    1987-01-01

    The cellular model of a dislocation is used for an investigation of the time-dependent diffusion process of irradiation-induced point defects interacting with the stress field of a moving dislocation. An analytic solution is given taking into account the elastic interaction due to the first-order size effect and the stress-induced interaction, the kinematic interaction due to the dislocation motion as well as the presence of secondary neutral sinks. The results for the space and time-dependent point defect concentration, represented in terms of Mathieu-Bessel and Mathieu-Hankel functions, emphasize the influence of the parameters which have been taken into consideration. Proceeding from these solutions, formulae for the diffusion flux reaching unit length of the dislocation, which plays an important role with regard to void swelling and irradiation-induced creep, are derived

  3. Effects of point defect trapping and solute segregation on irradiation-induced swelling and creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansur, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    The theory of irradiation swelling and creep, generalized to include impurity trapping of point defects and impurity-induced changes in sink efficiencies for point defects, is reviewed. The mathematical framework is developed and significant results are described. These include the relation between vacancy and interstitial trapping and the effectiveness of trapping as compared to segregation-induced changes in sink efficiencies in modifying void nucleation, void growth, and creep. Current understanding is critically assessed. Several areas requiring further development are identified. In particular those given special attention are the treatment of nondilute solutions and the consequences of current uncertainties in fundamental materials properties whose importance has been identified using the theory

  4. Positron annihilation study of vacancy-type defects in fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur, E-mail: zayed82000@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquanlu Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Zhuoxin; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Wei, Long [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquanlu Shijingshan District, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Qiu [Reactor Research Institute, Kyoto University 2, Asashiro-Nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Atobe, Kozo [Nuclear Safety Technology Center, 9-15, 1-chome, Utsubohonmachi, Nishi Ku, Osaka 550-0004 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: •Detection of Al monovacancy by positron lifetime spectroscopy in fast neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}(n=2). •Concentration of defects is also estimated for Al monovacancy. •O atom peak was observed by using coincidence Doppler broadening spectroscopy. -- Abstract: The positron lifetimes of fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystals were measured to investigate the formation of cation vacancies. Al monovacancy was possibly observed in samples irradiated by fast neutrons at ultra-low temperatures. Additionally, vacancy-oxygen complex centers were possibly observed in samples irradiated at higher temperatures and fast neutron fluences. Coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectra were measured to obtain information regarding the vicinity of vacancy-type defects. A peak at approximately 11 × 10{sup −3} m{sub 0}c was observed, which may be due to the presence of oxygen atoms in the neighborhood of the vacancies.

  5. Influence of impurities on the evolution of vacancy-type defects in neutron-irradiated nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhkov, A.P.; Perminov, D.A.; Arbuzov, V.L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We study, by means of PAS, the effects of purity on damage evolution in neutron-irradiated Ni at 330 K. ► Impurity carbon atoms in solution decrease the cascade efficiency during irradiation. ► C–V complexes are formed on the recovery stage III in impure Ni irradiated with 10 −4 dpa. ► The formation of V-loops and SFTs dominate on stage III with increasing dose level. ► The thermal stability of SFTs in impure Ni is similar to that in pure Ni. - Abstract: In order to investigate the effect of impurities on vacancy defect evolution in nickel, specimens with high (5N) and technical (3N) purity were neutron-irradiated at ∼330 K in the IVV-2M reactor (Russia) to fluencies in the range of 1 × 10 21 –1 × 10 23 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) corresponding to displacement dose levels in the range of about 0.0001–0.01 dpa and subsequently stepwise annealed to about 900 K. The specimens of Ni with different purities were characterized both in as-irradiated state as well as after post-irradiation annealing by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The formation of three-dimensional vacancy clusters (3D-VCs) in cascades was observed under neutron irradiation. The density and size of 3D-VCs depended not only on dose level, but also on purity. The population of 3D-VCs in the technical Ni is lower than that in the high-purity Ni. 3D-VCs collapse into secondary-type clusters (stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) and vacancy loops) during stepwise annealing at 350–450 K (stage III in Ni). The suppression of secondary cluster formation in 3N Ni is attributed to an effective vacancy interaction with impurity carbon atoms, which based on a relatively large vacancy–carbon atom binding energy (0.32–0.35 eV). The trapping of vacancies released at the collapse of 3D-VCs by the interstitial impurity atoms dominates at low irradiation dose level (10 −4 dpa). Thus, we found that carbon impurity atoms have strong effects both on the primary vacancy-type defect

  6. Direct observation of cascade defect formation at low temperatures in ion-irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muroga, T.; Hirooka, K.; Ishino, S.

    1984-01-01

    Direct transmission electron microscopy observations of cascade defect formation have been carried out in gold, Type 316 stainless steel, and aluminum irradiated by Al + , Ar - , and Xe + ions with energies between 80 and 400 keV. By utilizing a link of an ion accelerator to an electron microscope, in situ observations at low temperature (-150 0 C) have become possible. In gold, subcascade structures are clearly observed in all cases. Obvious dependence on projectile mass and energy is observed for cascade structure and vacancy clustering efficiency in gold and for defect visibility in aluminum and Type 316 stainless steel. A computer simulation calculation using MARLOWE shows subcascade distributions a little smaller in size and larger in number than the present observation

  7. Continuity Conditions on Schrodinger Wave Functions at Discontinuities of the Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, David

    1979-01-01

    Several standard arguments which attempt to show that the wave function and its derivative must be continuous across jump discontinuities of the potential are reviewed and their defects discussed. (Author/HM)

  8. A study on structure defects in irradiated lithium fluoride (thermal neutrons); Etude des imperfections de structure du fluorure de lithium irradie (neutrons thermiques)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, M

    1958-06-19

    A study was made of the behavior of atomic defects, vacancies and interstitials, generated from the Li{sup 6}(n,{alpha})H{sup 3} reaction in Lip crystals. Defects appear as cavities and platelets around ten angstrom in size and increase both with neutron dose and annealing temperature. For longer irradiations, metallic lithium precipitates out, in epitaxy with LiF lattice, and later, lithium salts appear due to the penetration of atmospheric gases through the cracks present in the damaged crystal. Various x-ray experiments followed the formation and evolution of these imperfections when their atomic concentration reached 10{sup -4}. (author)

  9. EL2-related defects in neutron irradiated GaAs1/sub -x/P/sub x/ alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, E.; Garcia, F.; Jimenez, B.; Calleja, E.; Gomez, A.; Alcober, V.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of EL2-related defects in GaAsP alloys by fast neutron irradiation has been studied through deep level transient spectroscopy and photocapacitance techniques. After irradiation p-n junctions were not annealed at high temperatures. In the composition range x>0.4, fast neutrons generate a broad center at E/sub c/-0.7 eV that it is suggested to belong to the EL2 family. The presence of photocapacitance quenching effects has been taken as a preliminary fingerprint to make the above assignment. From computer analysis of the nonexponential transient capacitance waveforms, evidence that neutron irradiation creates a family of midgap levels, EL2-related, is found

  10. Defect pin behaviour in the DFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloss, W.M.; Bagley, K.Q.; Edmonds, E.; Potter, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    A program of defective fuel pin irradiations has been carried out in the DFR. This program employed fuel pins which had failed during previous irradiations (natural defects) and pins in which simulated failures (artificial defects) had been induced prior to irradiation or during an intermediate examination stage at moderate or substantial burnups. The artificial defects simulated longitudinal ruptures and were normally located at positions near the top, middle and bottom of the pin where clad temperatures were 450, 540 and 630 0 C respectively. The fuel was mixed U-Pu oxide, and fuel form, stoichiometry, clad type, pin diameter, linear rating, and burnup were among the variables examined. The defect pin tests were normally carried out in single pin or trefoil type vehicles. After irradiation all the pins were subjected to the normal nondestructive examination procedures and the visual, radiographic, gamma-scanning, and dimensional change results are presented. Several pins were destructively examined and the metallographic data are discussed

  11. Defect kinetics in novel detector materials

    CERN Document Server

    MacEvoy, B C

    2000-01-01

    Silicon particle detectors will be used extensively in experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, where unprecedented particle fluences will cause significant atomic displacement damage. We present a model of the evolution of defect concentrations and consequent electrical behaviour in "novel" detector materials with various oxygen and carbon impurity concentrations. The divacancy-oxygen (V/sub 2/O) defect is identified as the cause of changes in device characteristics during /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation. In the case of hadron irradiation changes in detector doping concentration (N/sub eff/) are dominated by cluster defects, in particular the divacancy (V/sub 2/), which exchange charge directly via a non-Shockley-Read- Hall mechanism. The V/sub 2/O defect also contributes to Ne/sub eff/. This defect is more copiously produced during 24 GeV/c proton irradiation than during 1 MeV neutron irradiation on account of the higher vacancy introduction rate, hence the radiation hardness of materials is more sensiti...

  12. Fusion neutron irradiation induced ordering and defect production in Cu3Au at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Kirk, M.A.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-08-01

    We irradiate three Cu 3 Au alloys different degrees of initial long-range order at temperatures between 300K and 434K. The resistivity of samples is monitored during irradiation and related to the long-term order parameter by the Muto relation. The results show that the ordering rate, which is proportional to the concentration of freely migrating vacancies, increases at the beginning and then decreases later with fluence. The decrease is a result of the continuous production of sinks in the form of dislocation loops. The effect of sinks on vacancy annihilation in some cases causes a reversed temperature dependence of ordering rate. The free vacancy production rate and the rate of sink production are determined using an ordering kinetics theory. The results of the 14 MeV neutron irradiations are compared to those obtained in other neutron spectra and particle irradiations. The estimated free vacancy production rate is also compared to the primary defect production rate measured at 4.2K in disordered samples

  13. DLTS and capacitance transients study of defects induced by neutron irradiation in MOS structures CCD process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahaitouf, A.; Losson, E.; Charles, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study neutron irradiation effects on PMOS capacitors and NMOSFETs transistors. The characterization of induced defects was made by capacitance transients C(t) measurements, DLTS spectroscopy, and optical DLTS (ODLTS). DLTS spectra present three peaks due to deep levels created in the semiconductor and two peaks due to minority carrier generation. Two levels are reported in the literature. Two other minority carrier traps have been observed on ODLTS spectra after irradiation. This can explain the decrease of the minority carrier generation lifetime observed by capacitance transients measurements. (authors)

  14. Direct observation of gliding dislocations interactions with defects in irradiated niobium single crystals by means of the high voltage electronic microscopy (HVEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The interactions of gliding dislocations with defects in irradiated niobium that result in the formation of dislocations channels. The effects in the mechanical behaviour of [941]- and [441]- oriented Nb single crystals due to oxygen addition, neutron and electron irradiation was observed either by macroscopic deformation in a Instron machine or 'in-situ' deformation in the HVEM-High Voltage Electron Microscope. Some specimens were irradiated at IPNS-Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, at 325 K, with 5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 , others were irradiated with electrons in the HVEM. The interactions between gliding dislocations with clusters point defects and dislocations were observed. The primary mechanism for removal of the clusters by the gliding dislocations was the 'sweeping' of the clusters along with the gliding dislocations. As to the point defects, they were 'swept' by the gliding dislocations and left as aligned loops close to the intersections of the gliding dislocations with the upper and lower specimen surfaces. For the illustration of this phenomena, a schematic drawing was made. The mechanism of 'bowing-out' interaction of dislocations with defect clusters was also observed. The reported anomalous slip observed to operate in the [941]- oriented Nb was also directly observed and a qualitive explanation along with a schematic drawing was proposed. This would explain the softenig observed after the yield stress in the [941]- oriented Nb deformed in the Instron machine. (Author) [pt

  15. Flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in YBa2Cu3O7 epitaxial films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budhani, R.C.; Zhu, Y.; Suenaga, M.

    1992-01-01

    We report some transport measurements carried out to study flux pinning by heavy-ion-irradiation induced linear defects in Y 1 Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7 films. Our results show that in these in situ deposited films containing a large concentration of defects frozen-in at the time of film growth, a marginal enhancement in critical current density occurs when the density of linear defects 10 /cm 2 , and their diameter of the order of coherence length. This criterion is satisfied by Ag +21 ions. The damage due to Au +24 ions is much too severe to improve the J c

  16. Defect production in silica glasses under gamma-irradiation at the quenched nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussaeva, M.A.; Kalanov, M.U.; Ibragimova, E.M.; Sandalov, V.N.; Muminov, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Radiation defect production in oxides is highly interesting for atom and solar energy, and also for burying nuclear waste. Combine effect of neutron and gamma-radiation on materials was studied extensively and only neutrons are believed to displace atoms, although 60 Co-gamma quanta were proved to displace light anions (O, F) by inelastic mechanism. On the example of polished plates of pure fused quartz and barium-silica glasses containing nano-crystalline inclusions, and also nano-porous glass, the effect of gamma-radiation of the quenched reactor was studied in the energy range of 0.2-7 MeV. The time period was selected when practically constant current ∼10-20 nA is maintained in the ionizing chamber, corresponding to the average gamma-flux of 15-30 Gy/s. Optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra and also structure of the grasses were studied. It turned out, that the charged oxygen vacancies accumulation rate is higher in Barium glass than in the pure one, because for SiO 2 with small Z the photoelectric effect is weak, while the Compton scattering and photonuclear reactions prevail, and for Barium - just the opposite. The radiation-induced growth of the crystalline precipitates was noticed in the both glasses, which before had been attributed to the elastic atom displacements by fast neutrons. The density of Ba-glass increases with irradiation. The efficiency of defect production by the gamma-component even of the quenched reactor turned out much higher than that under irradiation with 60 Co gamma-source of ∼1.25 MeV to the equivalent dose at the current dose rate of ∼ 7 Gy/s (and before at 45 Gy/s). A 100-times increase of the surface proton conductivity was discovered in the porous glasses under gamma-irradiation due to water vapor radiolysis on the pore surface. The irradiated porous glass is recommended as an active electrode in the hydrogen fuel element. The work was done under the grant F2.1.2 from Center of Science and Technology

  17. On the application of the weak-beam technique to the determination of the sizes of small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have made an analysis of the conditions necessary for the successful use of the weak-beam technique for identifying and characterizing small point-defect clusters in ion-irradiated copper. The visibility of small defects was found to depend only weakly on the magnitude of the beam-convergence. In general, the image sizes of small clusters were found to be most sensitive to the magnitude of Sa with the image sizes of some individual defects changing by large amounts with changes as small as 0.025 nm -1 . The most reliable information on the true defect size is likely to be obtained by taking a series of 5-9 micrographs with a systematic variation of deviation parameter from 0.2-0.3 nm -1 . This procedure allows size information to be obtained down to a resolution limit of about 0.5 nm for defects situated throughout a foil thickness of 60 nm. The technique has been applied to the determination of changes in the sizes of small defects produced by a low-temperature in-situ irradiation and annealing experiment

  18. Microstructural defect evolution in neutron – Irradiated 12Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel during subsequent isochronous annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsay, K.V.; Maksimkin, O.P.; Turubarova, L.G.; Rofman, O.V. [Institute of Nuclear Physics NNC RK, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.com [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements were used to examine changes in microstructure and associated strengthening induced in austenitic stainless steel 12Cr18Ni9Ti irradiated to ∼0.001 and ∼5 dpa in the WWR-K reactor before and after being subjected to post-irradiation isochronal annealing. The relatively low values of irradiation temperature and dpa rate (∼80 °C and ∼1.2 × 10{sup −8} dpa/s) experienced by this steel allowed characterization of defect microstructures over a wide range of defect ensembles, all at constant composition, produced first by irradiation and then by annealing at temperatures between 450 and 1050 °C. It was shown that the dispersed barrier hardening model with commonly accepted physical properties successfully predicted the observed hardening. It was also observed that when TiC precipitates form at higher annealing temperatures, the alloy does not change in hardness, reflecting a balance between precipitate-hardening and matrix-softening due to removal of solute-strengthening elements titanium and carbon. Such matrix-softening is not often considered in other studies, especially where the contribution of precipitates to hardening is a second-order effect.

  19. Microstructural defect evolution in neutron – Irradiated 12Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel during subsequent isochronous annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsay, K.V.; Maksimkin, O.P.; Turubarova, L.G.; Rofman, O.V.; Garner, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements were used to examine changes in microstructure and associated strengthening induced in austenitic stainless steel 12Cr18Ni9Ti irradiated to ∼0.001 and ∼5 dpa in the WWR-K reactor before and after being subjected to post-irradiation isochronal annealing. The relatively low values of irradiation temperature and dpa rate (∼80 °C and ∼1.2 × 10 −8 dpa/s) experienced by this steel allowed characterization of defect microstructures over a wide range of defect ensembles, all at constant composition, produced first by irradiation and then by annealing at temperatures between 450 and 1050 °C. It was shown that the dispersed barrier hardening model with commonly accepted physical properties successfully predicted the observed hardening. It was also observed that when TiC precipitates form at higher annealing temperatures, the alloy does not change in hardness, reflecting a balance between precipitate-hardening and matrix-softening due to removal of solute-strengthening elements titanium and carbon. Such matrix-softening is not often considered in other studies, especially where the contribution of precipitates to hardening is a second-order effect

  20. The relationship between the hardness and the point-defect-density in neutron-irradiated MgO·3.0Al2O3 and AlN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Yatsui, K.; Yano, T.

    2001-01-01

    MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 single crystals and sintered AlN polycrystals were irradiated with fast neutrons in various conditions and the hardness of the irradiated and unirradiated samples was measured with a Vickers hardness tester. The hardness of as-irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 and AlN samples increased by 23 and 51%, respectively. After isochronal annealing, the hardness gradually decreased and mostly recovered to that of the unirradiated one up to 1400degC. Volume of the sample also increased after the irradiation and changed in the same way as the hardness by annealing. A relationship between the hardness and the density of point defects is proposed and the experimental results agree with the relationship. It implies that the point defects generated by the irradiation pin down dislocations and increase the hardness of neutron irradiated MgO·3.0Al 2 O 3 samples. (author)

  1. Defect attributed variations of the photoconductivity and photoluminescence in the HVPE and MOCVD as-grown and irradiated GaN structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaubas, E.; Pobedinskas, P.; Vaitkus, J.; Uleckas, A.; Zukauskas, A.; Blue, A.; Rahman, M.; Smith, K.M.; Aujol, E.; Beaumont, B.; Faurie, J.-P.; Gibart, P.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of native and radiation induced defects on the photoconductivity transients and photoluminescence spectra have been examined in GaN epitaxial layers of 2.5 and 12μm thickness grown on bulk n-GaN/sapphire substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). For comparison, free-standing GaN as-grown samples of 500μm thickness, fabricated by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE), were investigated. Manifestation of defects induced by 10-keV X-ray irradiation with the dose of 600Mrad and 100-keV neutrons with the fluences of 5x10 14 and 10 16 cm -2 as well as of 24GeV/c protons with fluence 10 16 cm -2 have been revealed through contact photoconductivity and microwave absorption transients. The amplitude of the initial photoconductivity decay is significantly reduced by the native and radiation defects density. Synchronous decrease of the steady-state PL intensity of yellow, blue and ultraviolet bands peaked at 2.18, 2.85, and 3.42eV, respectively, with density of radiation-induced defects is observed. The decrease of the PL intensity is accompanied by an increase of asymptotic decay lifetime in the photoconductivity transients, which is due to excess-carrier multi-trapping. The decay fits the stretched exponent approximation exp[-(t/τ) α ] with the different factors α in as-grown material (α∼0.7) and irradiated samples (α∼0.3). The fracton dimension d s of disordered structure changes from 4.7 to 0.86 for as-grown and irradiated material, respectively, and it implies the percolative carrier motion on an infinite cluster of dislocations net in the as-grown material and cluster fragmentation into finite fractons after irradiations

  2. EPR and cathodoluminescence of defects in diamond irradiated by nickel ions with energy of 335 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varichenko, V.S.; Martinovich, V.A.; Filipp, A.Z.; Didyk, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    Defect production in natural diamond irradiated by 335 MeV Ni ions within a dose range of 5·10 12 - 5·10 14 cm -2 has been studied by EPR and cathodoluminescence techniques. It is shown that the high energy ion irradiation leads to the appearance of modified track like one-dimensional structures with nontetrahedral coordination of atoms. A mechanism of microwave conductivity in modified structures of irradiated samples discussed in frame of a model of mobile quasi-particles of corresponding paramagnetic centres. Peculiarities of concentration distributions of paramagnetic centres corresponding to ion-modified structures and cathodoluminescence centres through the irradiated layer are connected with track channeling and stopped of a part of ions because of their elastic collisions with lattice atoms during ion stopping. (author). 18 refs., 5 figs

  3. Study of crystalline defects in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlop, A.

    1981-01-01

    We study here the configurations of the defects produced in ferromagnetic metals (Fe, Co, Ni) during low-temperature irradiations. In the first part we find an anomalous shape of the damage production rate curves Δrho(.)(Δrho) (Δrho: resistivity increase; Δrho(.)=dΔrho/dPHI; PHI: irradiation fluence) of iron and nickel during neutron irradiations. We propose the following interpretation: - stability of the defect configurations created during low-temperature self-ion irradiations of these metals; - instability of these defect configurations where there is a sufficient cascade overlap. This agglomeration leads to a decrease of the average resistivity of the defects. Using this model, we can reproduce the iron results with the following parameters: - characteristic volume for the recovery: 3.3 x 10 -18 cm 3 ; - division of the average resistivity of the defects by 2.3 to 3 when they agglomerate. In the second part we study the influence of irradiation defects on the longitudinal magnetoresistance of the samples. The increase in the number of scattering centers (n, e - irradiations) makes the resistivity anisotropy (deltarho=rho// - rho perpendicular) change gradually from a region in which the 'normal' magnetoresistance is predominant to another in which the spontaneous anisotropy dominates. This last regime is studied with the two-current conduction model in ferromagnetics [fr

  4. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  5. Monte-Carlo simulation of defect-cluster nucleation in metals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasuji, Toshiki; Morishita, Kazunori; Ruan, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process of copper-vacancy clusters in Fe. • Nucleation paths were obtained as a function of temperature and the damage rate. - Abstract: A multiscale modeling approach was applied to investigate the nucleation process of CRPs (copper rich precipitates, i.e., copper-vacancy clusters) in α-Fe containing 1 at.% Cu during irradiation. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process, with the rate theory equation analysis to evaluate the concentration of displacement defects, along with the molecular dynamics technique to know CRP thermal stabilities in advance. Our MC simulations showed that there is long incubation period at first, followed by a rapid growth of CRPs. The incubation period depends on irradiation conditions such as the damage rate and temperature. CRP’s composition during nucleation varies with time. The copper content of CRPs shows relatively rich at first, and then becomes poorer as the precipitate size increases. A widely-accepted model of CRP nucleation process is finally proposed.

  6. Monte-Carlo simulation of defect-cluster nucleation in metals during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasuji, Toshiki, E-mail: t-nakasuji@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morishita, Kazunori [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ruan, Xiaoyong [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process of copper-vacancy clusters in Fe. • Nucleation paths were obtained as a function of temperature and the damage rate. - Abstract: A multiscale modeling approach was applied to investigate the nucleation process of CRPs (copper rich precipitates, i.e., copper-vacancy clusters) in α-Fe containing 1 at.% Cu during irradiation. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to investigate the nucleation process, with the rate theory equation analysis to evaluate the concentration of displacement defects, along with the molecular dynamics technique to know CRP thermal stabilities in advance. Our MC simulations showed that there is long incubation period at first, followed by a rapid growth of CRPs. The incubation period depends on irradiation conditions such as the damage rate and temperature. CRP’s composition during nucleation varies with time. The copper content of CRPs shows relatively rich at first, and then becomes poorer as the precipitate size increases. A widely-accepted model of CRP nucleation process is finally proposed.

  7. Defect clustering in concentrated alloys during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Shigenaka, N.; Fuse, M.

    1992-01-01

    A rate theory based model is presented to investigate the kinetics of interstitial clustering processes in a face-centered cubic (fcc) binary alloy containing A- and B-atoms. Three types of interstitial dumbbells, AA-, BB- and AB-type dumbbells, are considered. Conversions between these interstitial dumbbells are explicitly introduced into the formulation, based on the consideration of dumbbell configurations and movements. A di- interstitial is assumed to be the nucleus of a dislocation loop. Reactions of point defect production by irradiation, mutual recombination of an interstitial and a vacancy, dislocation loop nucleation and their growth are included in the model. Parameter values are chosen based on the atom size of the alloy elements, and dislocation loop formation kinetics are investigated while varying alloy compositions. Two different types of kinetics are obtained in accordance with the dominant loop nucleus types. Conversions between interstitial dumbbells are important in the determination of the interstitial dumbbell concentration ratios, of the dominant nucleus types, and consequently, the loop formation kinetics. Dislocation loop concentration decreases with increasing undersized atom content, but dose rate and temperature dependence of loop concentration are insensitive to alloy compositions. (author)

  8. Field-ion microscope studies of the defect structure of the primary state of damage of irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of field ion microscope applications in studies of point defect distribution in irradiated metals. FIM results on the primary state of radiation damage in neutron and ion-irradiated iridium and tungsten, at both room-temperature and 78 0 K, showed that it consists of: (1) isolated vacancies; (2) depleted zones; (3) compact vacancy clusters of voids; and (4) dislocation loops. The fraction of vacancies stored in the dislocation loops represented a small fraction of the total vacancy concentration; in the case of tungsten it was approximately 10 percent. These FIM observations provide a simple explanation of the low yield-factor, determined by transmission electron microscopy, for a number of ion-irradiated metals

  9. Interactions between impurities and defects created by irradiation in iron; Interactions entre les impuretes et les defauts crees par irradiation dans le fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigier, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    Chapter 1 is a brief review of the most important properties of point defects: the author is particularly interested in radiation damage; the different models proposed until now to explain the five annealing stages are exposed. Chapter 2 describes the experimental processes insisting on how fruitful is the magnetic after-effect to investigate point-defects. In chapter 3, new experimental results are exposed and discussed. Owing to addition of impurities to iron, magnetic after effect, stored energy, resistivity and length measurements have allowed to establish that stage I is correctly explained by the Granato-Nilan model (90): only the last stage, I{sub E}, is related to the interstitial-vacancy annihilation after the interstitial have freely migrated into the network. Several models are discussed for stage II; though it is highly probable that di-interstitials have been observed after electron irradiation, after neutron irradiation none of the after-effect zones can be connected with them. Special phenomena are observed in irradiated iron containing such impurities as nickel, silicium (appearance of new after effect zones, their transformation); they show the successive complication of an elementary defect: iron interstitial associated with an impurity atom. In the last section, the author describes some experiments on iron-carbon alloy; these show that carbon atoms (having precipitated at a temperature lower than 300 deg. C return to solid solution when the alloy is heated above 330 deg. C. (author) [French] Au cours du premier chapitre consacre a un bref rappel des principales proprietes des defauts ponctuels, l'auteur s'attache particulierement a l'effet de l'irradiation; les divers modeles proposes jusqu'alors pour expliquer les cinq stades de disparition des defauts sont exposes. Le deuxieme chapitre decrit les techniques experimentales en insistant sur la richesse du trainage magnetique comme moyen d'investigation. Le troisieme chapitre est consacre a l

  10. High-voltage electron-microscope investigation of point-defect agglomerates in irradiated copper during in-situ annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, W.; Urban, K.; Frank, W.

    1980-01-01

    Thin copper foils were irradiated with 650 keV electrons at 10 K in a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) to doses phi in the range 2 x 10 23 electrons/m 2 approximately 25 electrons /m 2 and then annealed in situ up to room temperature and outside the HVEM between room temperature and 470 K. During irradiation visible defect clusters were formed only at phi >= 2.5 x 10 24 electrons/m 2 . At smaller doses defect clusters became visible after annealing at 50 K. Between 50 K and 120 K further clusters, mainly dislocation loops on brace111 planes, appeared. Above 120 K, particularly between 160 K and 300 K, some of the dislocation loops became glissile. They glided out of the specimens or agglomerated to larger clusters of frequently complex shapes. As a consequence between 160 K and 300 K the cluster density decreased strongly, whereas the mean cluster size increased monotonously through the entire range of annealing temperatures covered. Contrast analyses between 180 K and 400 K revealed that the great majority of the dislocation loops were of interstitial type. At 470 K a new type of small clusters emerged, presumably of vacancy type. These observations are compared with other studies on electron-irradiated copper and with the current models of radiation damage in metals. (author)

  11. A channeling investigation of the interaction between solute atoms and irradiation-produced defects in magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.; Swanson, M.L.; Quenneville, A.F.

    1978-01-01

    The trapping of irradiation-produced defects by solute atoms in Mg crystals was monitored by measuring the displacement of the solute atoms from lattice sites using the backscattering-channeling technique. In Mg-0.2 at.% Ag crystals, irradiation at 30 K with 1 MeVHe + ions resulted in a very large fraction of Ag atoms being displaced from their lattice sites. The Ag atom displacement appeared to be along directions and is attributed to the trapping of migrating Mg interstitial atoms by Ag atoms to form Mg-Ag mixed dumbbells. Recovery of the Ag atom displacements and the irradiation-induced dechanneling increment occurred principally in two stages, 80-160 K (stage III) and 200-280 K (stage IV). Stage III is attributed mainly to some type of interstitial migration and stage IV is attributed to the migration of single vacancies. In contrast to the Mg-Ag results, a very small displaced fraction of Bi atoms occurred in an irradiated Mg-0.08 at.% Bi crystal; hence Mg-Bi mixed dumbbells do not appear to be formed. (author)

  12. 3D Volumetric Modeling and Microvascular Reconstruction of Irradiated Lumbosacral Defects After Oncologic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Tutor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locoregional flaps are sufficient in most sacral reconstructions. However, large sacral defects due to malignancy necessitate a different reconstructive approach, with local flaps compromised by radiation and regional flaps inadequate for broad surface areas or substantial volume obliteration. In this report, we present our experience using free muscle transfer for volumetric reconstruction in such cases, and demonstrate 3D haptic models of the sacral defect to aid preoperative planning.Methods: Five consecutive patients with irradiated sacral defects secondary to oncologic resections were included, surface area ranging from 143-600cm2. Latissimus dorsi-based free flap sacral reconstruction was performed in each case, between 2005 and 2011. Where the superior gluteal artery was compromised, the subcostal artery was used as a recipient vessel. Microvascular technique, complications and outcomes are reported. The use of volumetric analysis and 3D printing is also demonstrated, with imaging data converted to 3D images suitable for 3D printing with Osirix software (Pixmeo, Geneva, Switzerland. An office-based, desktop 3D printer was used to print 3D models of sacral defects, used to demonstrate surface area and contour and produce a volumetric print of the dead space needed for flap obliteration. Results: The clinical series of latissimus dorsi free flap reconstructions is presented, with successful transfer in all cases, and adequate soft-tissue cover and volume obliteration achieved. The original use of the subcostal artery as a recipient vessel was successfully achieved. All wounds healed uneventfully. 3D printing is also demonstrated as a useful tool for 3D evaluation of volume and dead-space.Conclusion: Free flaps offer unique benefits in sacral reconstruction where local tissue is compromised by irradiation and tumor recurrence, and dead-space requires accurate volumetric reconstruction. We describe for the first time the use of

  13. Positron annihilation study of vacancy-type defects in fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad Saliqur; Li, Zhuoxin; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi; Wei, Long; Xu, Qiu; Atobe, Kozo

    2014-09-01

    The positron lifetimes of fast-neutron-irradiated MgO·nAl2O3 single crystals were measured to investigate the formation of cation vacancies. Al monovacancy was possibly observed in samples irradiated by fast neutrons at ultra-low temperatures. Additionally, vacancy-oxygen complex centers were possibly observed in samples irradiated at higher temperatures and fast neutron fluences. Coincidence Doppler broadening (CDB) spectra were measured to obtain information regarding the vicinity of vacancy-type defects. A peak at approximately 11 × 10-3 m0c was observed, which may be due to the presence of oxygen atoms in the neighborhood of the vacancies.

  14. Influence of radiation defects on electrical losses in silicon diodes irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poklonski, N. A.; Gorbachuk, N. I.; Shpakovski, S. V.; Lastovskii, S. B.; Wieck, A.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon diodes with a p + -n junction irradiated with 3.5-MeV electrons (the fluence ranged from 10 15 to 4 x 10 16 cm -2 ) have been studied. It is established that the dependence of the tangent of the angle of electrical losses tanδ on the frequency f of alternating current in the range f = 10 2 -10 6 Hz is a nonmonotonic function with two extrema: a minimum and a maximum. Transformation of the dependences tanδ(f) as the electron fluence and annealing temperature are increased is caused by a variation in the resistance of n-Si (the base region of the diodes) as a result of accumulation (as the fluence is increased) or disappearance and reconfiguration (in the course of annealing) of radiation defects. The role of time lag of the defect recharging in the formation of tanδ(f) is insignificant.

  15. Decoupling and tuning competing effects of different types of defects on flux creep in irradiated YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, S.; Leroux, M.; Rupich, M. W.; Miller, D. J.; Sheng, H.; Niraula, P. M.; Kayani, A.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. -K.; Civale, L.

    2016-11-15

    YBa2Cu3O7-δ coated conductors (CCs) have achieved high critical current densities (J c) that can be further increased through the introduction of additional defects using particle irradiation. However, these gains are accompanied by increases in the flux creep rate, a manifestation of competition between the different types of defects. Here, we study this competition to better understand how to design pinning landscapes that simultaneously increase J c and reduce creep. CCs grown by metal organic deposition show non-monotonic changes in the temperature-dependent creep rate, S(T). Notably, in low fields, there is a conspicuous dip to low S as the temperature (T) increases from ~20 to ~65 K. Oxygen-, proton-, and Au-irradiation substantially increase S in this temperature range. Focusing on an oxygen-irradiated CC, we investigate the contribution of different types of irradiation-induced defects to the flux creep rate. Specifically, we study S(T) as we tune the relative density of point defects to larger defects by annealing both an as-grown and an irradiated CC in O2 at temperatures T A = 250 °C–600 °C. We observe a steady decrease in S(T > 20 K) with increasing T A, unveiling the role of pre-existing nanoparticle precipitates in creating the dip in S(T) and point defects and clusters in increasing S at intermediate temperatures.

  16. Ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN with surface defect region under 60Co gamma or MeV electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixiang; Li, Lei; Fang, Xin; Xie, Ziang; Li, Shuti; Song, Weidong; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jicai; Huang, Zengli; Li, Qiangjie; Xu, Wanjing; Fu, Engang; Qin, G. G.

    2018-01-01

    Generally, the diffusion and gettering of impurities in GaN needs high temperature. Calculated with the ambient-temperature extrapolation value of the high temperature diffusivity of Pt atoms in GaN reported in literature, the time required for Pt atoms diffusing 1 nm in GaN at ambient temperature is about 19 years. Therefore, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can hardly be observed. In this work, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN is reported for the first time. It is demonstrated by use of secondary ion mass spectroscopy that in the condition of introducing a defect region on the GaN film surface by plasma, and subsequently, irradiated by 60Co gamma-ray or 3 MeV electrons, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN can be detected. It is more obvious with larger irradiation dose and higher plasma power. With a similar surface defect region, the ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in GaN stimulated by 3 MeV electron irradiation is more marked than that stimulated by gamma irradiation. The physical mechanism of ambient-temperature diffusion and gettering of Pt atoms in a GaN film with a surface defect region stimulated by gamma or MeV electron irradiation is discussed.

  17. Study of points defects produced by irradiation of monocrystalline nickel and polycrystalline gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cope, R.

    1969-07-01

    The work described in this thesis falls into two parts: the first comprises a study of magnetocrystalline nickel by resistivity measurements; the second is a description of resistivity and magnetic after effect measurements on an h.c.p. ferromagnetic crystal other than cobalt, namely gadolinium. For the first part we have demonstrated the existence of a small but definite orientation dependence in the creation of point defects by electron irradiation (20 deg. K) of a nickel single crystal. In particular, the effect is manifested in the form of the stage I C , II and III in the resistivity recovery. In the second part an important result has emerged: namely that there is no magnetic after effect phenomenon in a neutron irradiated (27 deg. K) ferromagnetic metal. Several considerations are discussed by way of a preliminary interpretation of this important difference between gadolinium and cobalt. (author) [fr

  18. Electrical conductivity of In2O3 and Ga2O3 after low temperature ion irradiation; implications for instrinsic defect formation and charge neutrality level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, L; Bhoodoo, C; von Wenckstern, H; Grundmann, M

    2017-12-13

    The evolution of sheet resistance of n-type In 2 O 3 and Ga 2 O 3 exposed to bombardment with MeV 12 C and 28 Si ions at 35 K is studied in situ. While the sheet resistance of Ga 2 O 3 increased by more than eight orders of magnitude as a result of ion irradiation, In 2 O 3 showed a more complex defect evolution and became more conductive when irradiated at the highest doses. Heating up to room temperature reduced the sheet resistivity somewhat, but Ga 2 O 3 remained highly resistive, while In 2 O 3 showed a lower resistance than as deposited samples. Thermal admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy did not reveal new defect levels for irradiation up to [Formula: see text] cm -2 . A model where larger defect complexes preferentially produce donor like defects in In 2 O 3 is proposed, and may reveal a microscopic view of a charge neutrality level within the conduction band, as previously proposed.

  19. Electrical conductivity of In2O3 and Ga2O3 after low temperature ion irradiation; implications for instrinsic defect formation and charge neutrality level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, L.; Bhoodoo, C.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of sheet resistance of n-type In2O3 and Ga2O3 exposed to bombardment with MeV 12C and 28Si ions at 35 K is studied in situ. While the sheet resistance of Ga2O3 increased by more than eight orders of magnitude as a result of ion irradiation, In2O3 showed a more complex defect evolution and became more conductive when irradiated at the highest doses. Heating up to room temperature reduced the sheet resistivity somewhat, but Ga2O3 remained highly resistive, while In2O3 showed a lower resistance than as deposited samples. Thermal admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy did not reveal new defect levels for irradiation up to 2 × 1012 cm-2. A model where larger defect complexes preferentially produce donor like defects in In2O3 is proposed, and may reveal a microscopic view of a charge neutrality level within the conduction band, as previously proposed.

  20. Automatic inspection of surface defects in die castings after machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Świłło

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A new camera based machine vision system for the automatic inspection of surface defects in aluminum die casting was developed by the authors. The problem of surface defects in aluminum die casting is widespread throughout the foundry industry and their detection is of paramount importance in maintaining product quality. The casting surfaces are the most highly loaded regions of materials and components. Mechanical and thermal loads as well as corrosion or irradiation attacks are directed primarily at the surface of the castings. Depending on part design and processing techniques, castings may develop surface discontinuities such as cracks or tears, inclusions due to chemical reactions or foreign material in the molten metal, and pores that greatly influence the material ability to withstand these loads. Surface defects may act as a stress concentrator initiating a fracture point. If a pressure is applied in this area, the casting can fracture. The human visual system is well adapted to perform in areas of variety and change; the visual inspection processes, on the other hand, require observing the same type of image repeatedly to detect anomalies. Slow, expensive, erratic inspection usually is the result. Computer based visual inspection provides a viable alternative to human inspectors. Developed by authors machine vision system uses an image processing algorithm based on modified Laplacian of Gaussian edge detection method to detect defects with different sizes and shapes. The defect inspection algorithm consists of three parameters. One is a parameter of defects sensitivity, the second parameter is a threshold level and the third parameter is to identify the detected defects size and shape. The machine vision system has been successfully tested for the different types of defects on the surface of castings.

  1. Formation Mechanisms for Entry and Exit Defects in Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tamadon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW is an innovative variant for the solid state welding process whereby a rotating symmetrical tool causes a fully penetrated bond. Despite the process development, there are still unknown variables in the characterization of the process parameters which can cause uncontrolled weld defects. The entry zone and the exit zone consist of two discontinuity-defects and removing them is one of the current challenges for improving the weld quality. In the present research, the characteristic features of the entry and exit defects in the weld structure and formation mechanism of them during the BFSW processing was investigated. Using stacked layers of multi-colour plasticine the material flow, analogous to metal flow, can be visualised. By using different colours as the path markers of the analogue model, the streamline flow can be easily delineated in the discontinuity defects compared with the metal welds. AA6082-T6 aluminium plates and multi-layered plasticine slabs were employed to replicate the entry-exit defects in the metal weld and analogue samples. The fixed-bobbin tool utilized for this research was optimized by adding a thread feature and tri-flat geometry to the pin and closed-end spiral scrolls on both shoulder surfaces. Samples were processed at different rotating and longitudinal speeds to show the degree of dependency on the welding parameters for the defects. The analogue models showed that the entry zone and the exit zone of the BFSW are affected by the inhomogeneity of the material flow regime which causes the ejection or disruption of the plastic flow in the gap between the bobbin shoulders. The trial aluminium welds showed that the elimination of entry-exit defects in the weld body is not completely possible but the size of the defects can be minimized by modification of the welding parameters. For the entry zone, the flow pattern evolution suggested formation mechanisms for a sprayed tail, island zone

  2. Irradiation damage in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Most superconductors are quite sensitive to irradiation defects. Critical temperatures may be depressed, critical currents may be increased, by irradiation, but other behaviours may be encountered. In compounds, the sublattice in which defects are created is of significant importance. 24 refs

  3. Hardening in AlN induced by point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, H.; Mitchell, T.E.; Iseki, T.; Yano, T.

    1991-01-01

    Pressureless-sintered AIN was neutron irradiated and the hardness change was examined by Vickers indentation. The hardness was increased by irradiation. When the samples were annealed at high temperature, the hardness gradually decreased. Length was also found to increase and to change in the same way as the hardness. A considerable density of dislocation loops still remained, even after the hardness completely recovered to the value of the unirradiated sample. Thus, it is concluded that the hardening in AIN is caused by isolated point defects and small clusters of point defects, rather than by dislocation loops. Hardness was found to increase in proportion to the length change. If the length change is assumed to be proportional to the point defect density, then the curve could be fitted qualitatively to that predicted by models of solution hardening in metals. Furthermore, the curves for three samples irradiated at different temperatures and fluences are identical. There should be different kinds of defect clusters in samples irradiated at different conditions, e.g., the fraction of single point defects is the highest in the sample irradiated at the lowest temperature. Thus, hardening is insensitive to the kind of defects remaining in the sample and is influenced only by those which contribute to length change

  4. Defects annihilation behavior of neutron-irradiated SiC ceramics densified by liquid-phase-assisted method after post-irradiation annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Idzat Idris

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies on the recovery behavior of neutron-irradiated high-purity SiC have shown that most of the defects present in it are annihilated by post-irradiation annealing, if the neutron fluence is less than 1×1026 n/m2 (>0.1MeV and the irradiation is performed at temperatures lower than 973K. However, the recovery behavior of SiC fabricated by the nanoinfiltrated and transient eutectic phase (NITE process is not well understood. In this study, the effects of secondary phases on the irradiation-related swelling and recovery behavior of monolithic NITE-SiC after post-irradiation annealing were studied. The NITE-SiC specimens were irradiated in the BR2 reactor at fluences of up to 2.0–2.5×1024 n/m2 (E>0.1MeV at 333–363K. This resulted in the specimens swelling up ∼1.3%, which is 0.1% higher than the increase seen in concurrently irradiated high-purity SiC. The recovery behaviors of the specimens after post-irradiation thermal annealing were examined using a precision dilatometer; the specimens were heated at temperatures of up to 1673K using a step-heating method. The recovery curves were analyzed using a first-order model, and the rate constants for each annealing step were obtained to determine the activation energy for volume recovery. The NITE-A specimen (containing 12 wt% sintering additives recovered completely after annealing at ∼1573K; however, it shrank because of the volatilization of the oxide phases at 1673K. The NITE-B specimen (containing 18wt% sintering additives did not recover fully, since the secondary phase (YAG was crystallized during the annealing process. The recovery mechanism of NITE-A SiC was based on the recombination of the C and Si Frenkel pairs, which were very closely sited or only slightly separated at temperatures lower than 1223K, as well as the recombination of the slightly separated C Frenkel pairs and the migration of C and Si interstitials at temperatures of 1223–1573K. That is to say, the

  5. A case of divided latissimus dorsi flap repair for chest wall defect after wide resection of post-irradiation angiosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Yukiko; Sawaizumi, Masayuki; Imai, Tomohiro; Maeda, Takuma; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Matsumoto, Seiichi; Iwase, Takuji; Motoi, Noriko; Kanda, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who had undergone breast-conserving surgery for left breast cancer, followed by irradiation at a total dose of 66 Gy in 2005. When 5 years 1 month had elapsed after the operation, redness of the left chest wall was observed. A biopsy was performed and the histopathological diagnosis was angiosarcoma. Extended resection of the full thickness of the skin was performed. Adequate resection left a massive defect 15 x 18 cm in size. The divided latissimus dorsi flap was designed, and the oval-shaped skin defect was closed with the skin island of this flap. Post-irradiation sarcoma involving the vessels is a rare entity and occurs in 0.07-0.48% of all cases after radiation therapy. It metastasizes to the distant organs in an early stage and has a poor prognosis. No standard therapy for the disease has been established. Early detection and extended resection are considered to contribute to improvement of the prognosis. The divided latissimus dorsi flap is very useful for reconstructing a wide chest wall defect without the need to wide skin graft the donor site. (author)

  6. Raman D-band in the irradiated graphene: Origin of the non-monotonous dependence of its intensity with defect concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codorniu Pujals, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is one of the most used experimental techniques in studying irradiated carbon nanostructures, in particular graphene, due to its high sensibility to the presence of defects in the crystalline lattice. Special attention has been given to the variation of the intensity of the Raman D-band of graphene with the concentration of defects produced by irradiation. Nowadays, there are enough experimental evidences about the non-monotonous character of that dependence, but the explanation of this behavior is still controversial. In the present work we developed a simplified mathematical model to obtain a functional relationship between these two magnitudes and showed that the non-monotonous dependence is intrinsic to the nature of the D-band and that it is not necessarily linked to amorphization processes. The obtained functional dependence was used to fit experimental data taken from other authors. The determination coefficient of the fitting was 0.96.

  7. Quantitative Estimation of Transmitted and Reflected Lamb Waves at Discontinuity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Hyung Jin; Sohn, Hoon

    2010-01-01

    For the application of Lamb wave to structural health monitoring(SHM), understanding its physical characteristic and interaction between Lamb wave and defect of the host structure is an important issue. In this study, reflected, transmitted and mode converted Lamb waves at discontinuity of a plate structure were simulated and the amplitude ratios are calculated theoretically using Modal decomposition method. The predicted results were verified comparing with finite element method(FEM) and experimental results simulating attached PZTs. The result shows that the theoretical prediction is close to the FEM and the experimental verification. Moreover, quantitative estimation method was suggested using amplitude ratio of Lamb wave at discontinuity

  8. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  9. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid; Iqbal, Masood; Ahmad, Munir

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  10. Defect sizing of post-irradiated nuclear fuels using grayscale thresholding in their radiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Usman Khurshid, E-mail: ukhurshid@hotmail.co [Department of Physics and Applied Mathematics, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Masood, E-mail: masiqbal@hotmail.co [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Munir [Nondestructive Testing Group, Directorate of Technology, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15

    Quantification of different types of material defects in a number of reference standard post-irradiated nuclear fuel image samples have been carried out by virtue of developing a computer program that takes radiographic images of the fuel as input. The program is based on user adjustable grayscale thresholding in the regime of image segmentation whereby it selects and counts the pixels having graylevel values less than or equal to the computed threshold. It can size the defects due to chipping in nuclear fuel, cracks, voids, melting, deformation, inclusion of foreign materials, heavy isotope accumulation, non-uniformity, etc. The classes of fuel range from those of research and power reactors to fast breeders and from pellets to annular and vibro-compacted fuel. The program has been validated against ground truth realities of some locally fabricated metallic plates having drilled holes of known sizes simulated as defects in them in which the results indicate that it either correctly selects and quantifies at least 94% of the actual required regions of interest in a given image or it gives less than 8.1% false alarm rate. Also, the developed program is independent of image size.

  11. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  12. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium – A dilatometry-based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Savkliyildiz, Ilyas [Rutgers University (United States)

    2016-08-15

    S−200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 10{sup 20} cm{sup −2} peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100–200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation {sup 4}He and {sup 3}H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. The study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  13. Transformation of point defects under annealing of neutron-irradiated Si and Si:Ge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomozov, Yu.V.; Khirunenko, L.I.; Shakhovtsev, V.I.; Yashnik, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of point radiation defects under isochronous annealing of neurton-irradaited Si and Si:Ge is studied. It is determined, that occurence of several new centers which produce A-centre range absorption bands is observed at annealing within 423-493 K temperature range. It is shown that vacancy and oxygen are included in the centers composition. It is found that VO centre transformation into VO 2 at annealing occurs via intermediate stage in contrast to that occuring in electron-irradiated crystals via VO direct diffusion to interstitial oxygen. Transformation of centers under Si ansd Si:Ge annealing occurs similarly

  14. Identification of defects in GaAs induced by 1 MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, S.T.; Nener, B.D.; Faraone, L.; Nassibian, A.G. [Western Australia Univ., Nedlands, WA (Australia); Hotchkis, M.A.C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    This paper shows that 1 MeV electron irradiation on n-type vapor phase epitaxial (VPE) GaAs creates three electron traps E1, E2 and EL6, and results in the splitting of the EL2 center into two levels EL2-A and EL2-B. A 15 minutes isochronal anneal results in the annihilation of the E1 and E2 traps, a reduction in EL6 trap concentration, and the return of EL2 to a single level EL2-A. A defect model is outlined which correlates with the observed results. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  15. Identification of defects in GaAs induced by 1 MeV electron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, S T; Nener, B D; Faraone, L; Nassibian, A G [Western Australia Univ., Nedlands, WA (Australia); Hotchkis, M A.C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    This paper shows that 1 MeV electron irradiation on n-type vapor phase epitaxial (VPE) GaAs creates three electron traps E1, E2 and EL6, and results in the splitting of the EL2 center into two levels EL2-A and EL2-B. A 15 minutes isochronal anneal results in the annihilation of the E1 and E2 traps, a reduction in EL6 trap concentration, and the return of EL2 to a single level EL2-A. A defect model is outlined which correlates with the observed results. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  16. On the position of local levels of defects in proton-irradiated Pb1-xSnxTe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, N.B.; Gas'kov, A.M.; Ladygin, E.A.; Skipetrov, E.P.; Khorosh, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of fast proton irradiation (T≅300 K, E=200 keV, F≤2x10 14 cm -2 ) on electrophysical properties of thin layers p-Pb 1-x Sn x Te (0.17 ≤x≤ 0.26) is investigated. Saturation of radiation flux dependences of hole density due to occurrence of a resonance level under irradiation, which is near the ceiling of the valence band of alloys, and due to stabilization of the Fermi level with the resonance level is detected. Possibility of coordination of novadays data on the position of the levels of radiation defects in alloys Pb 1-x Sn x Te is discussed

  17. The amorphous phase transition in irradiated NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Kissinger, H.E.; Pelton, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    Observed supralinear dose dependence for the amorphous transformation during irradiation of NiTi is compatible with a cascade overlap model for heavy ion (2.5 MeV Ni + , 6 MeV Ta +++ ) irradiations. A model based on total defect build-up, however, is necessary to explain the amorphous transition induced by electron irradiation and can also be applied to heavy ion irradiation. The cascade effects in this latter model are manifested by non-uniform defect distribution in the lattice. The defect build-up model requires a high activation energy for interstitial migration which is not incompatible with recent findings. The form of the temperature dependence can also be rationalized using a defect build-up model (amorphous phase transition, heavy-ion irradiation, electron irradiation, NiTi, defect build-up, cascade overlap). (author)

  18. Positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation studies of defects in neutron and heavy ion irradiated Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shenyun; Li Anli; Li Donghong; Huang Hanchen; Zheng Shengnan; Du Hongshan; Ding Honglin; Gou Zhenhui; Iwata, T.

    1995-01-01

    The positron annihilation and perturbed angular correlation methods have been used to study the radiation damage induced defects in Si irradiated by the fast neutrons of 1.45x10 20 /cm 2 and the 178 W heavy ions of 5x10 11 /cm 2 . The divacancies, quadrivacancies and different types of monovacancy-, divacancy- and quadrivacancy-oxygen complexes were observed. The results obtained by both methods are consistent. (orig.)

  19. Strain and defect microstructure in ion-irradiated GeSi/Si strained layers as a function of annealing temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasko, J.M.; Elliman, R.G.; Zou, J.; Cockayne, D.J.H.; Fitz Gerald, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    High energy (1 MeV), ion irradiation of GeSi/Si strained layers at elevated temperatures can cause strain relaxation. In this study, the effect of subsequent thermal annealing was investigated. Three distinct annealing stages were identified and correlated with the evolution of the defect microstructure. In the temperature range from 350 to 600 deg C, a gradual recovery of strain is observed. This is believed to result from the annealing of small defect clusters and the growth of voids. The voids are visible at annealing temperatures in excess of 600 deg C, consistent with an excess vacancy concentration in the irradiated alloy layer. The 600 to 750 deg C range is marked by pronounced maximal recovery of strain, and is correlated with the dissolution of faulted loops in the substrate. At temperatures in the range 750-1000 deg C, strain relaxation is observed and is correlated with the growth of intrinsic dislocations within the alloy layer. These dislocations nucleate at the alloy-substrate interface and grow within the alloy layer, towards the surface. (authors)

  20. Immunologic effects of whole body ultraviolet (uv) irradiation. II. Defect in splenic adherent cell antigen presentation for stimulation of T cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Fox, I.J.; Greene, M.I.; Benacerraf, B.; Germain, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation has been shown to alter many parameters of the immunologic reactivity of mice. The altered responsiveness of uv-irradiated mice, as measured by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and primary in vitro plaque-forming cell (PFC) responses to T-dependent antigens, has recently been correlated with a functional defect in the splenic adherent cell population of these animals. The present studies describe a model of this altered responsiveness, which allows further clarification of the effects of external uv irradiation on the splenic antigen-presenting cell (APC) in its interactions with T cells

  1. Effect of thermal friction on the generation and transport of interstitial defects in irradiated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, S L

    2002-01-01

    Generation of interstitial and vacancy defects under 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation is expected to drive the evolution of microstructure of materials in a future fusion power station. We investigate effects of thermal friction associated with the interaction between mobile clusters of interstitial atoms produced in collision cascades and phonon excitations. Phonons give rise to the random Brownian motion of clusters in the crystal lattice. Phonon excitations are also responsible for the dissipation of energy of rapidly moving clusters formed at the periphery of collision cascades. We investigate how the coefficient of thermal friction depends on the structure of clusters. We also discuss implications of our findings for understanding the origin of higher resistance of bcc metals to irradiation and the connection between this phenomenon and the long-range effect observed in experiments on ion implantation.

  2. Alloys under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Bellon, P.; Soisson, F.

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, some effort has been devoted to establishing a phenomenology for alloys under irradiation. Theoretically, the effects of the defect supersaturation, sustained defect fluxes and ballistic mixing on solid solubility under irradiation can now be formulated in a unified manner, at least for the most simple cases: coherent phase transformations and nearest-neighbor ballistic jumps. Even under such restrictive conditions, several intriguing features documented experimentally can be rationalized, sometimes in a quantitative manner and simple qualitative rules for alloy stability as a function of irradiation conditions can be formulated. A quasi-thermodynamic formalism can be proposed for alloys under irradiation. However, this point of view has limits illustrated by recent computer simulations. (orig.)

  3. Structural properties and neutron irradiation effects of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Toyohiko

    1994-01-01

    In high temperature gas-cooled reactors and nuclear fusion reactors being developed at present, various ceramics are to be used in the environment of neutron irradiation for undertaking important functions. The change of the characteristics of those materials by neutron irradiation must be exactly forecast, but it has been known that the response of the materials is different respectively. The production method of ceramics and the resulted structures of ceramics which control their characteristics are explained. The features of covalent bond and ionic bond, the synthesis of powder and the phase change by heating, sintering and sintering agent, and grain boundary phase are described. The smelling of ceramics by neutron irradiation is caused by the formation of the clusters of Frenkel defects and minute spot defects. Its restoration by annealing is explained. The defects remaining in materials after irradiation are the physical defects by flipping atoms cut due to the collision with high energy particles and the chemical defects by nuclear transformation. Some physical defects can be restored, but chemical defects are never restored. The mechanical properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them, and the thermal properties of ceramics and the effect of irradiation on them are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Raman ratios on the repair of grafted surgical bone defects irradiated or not with laser (λ780 nm) or LED (λ850 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; de Souza, Renato Aparecido; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-05

    This work aimed to assess biochemical changes associated to mineralization and remodeling of bone defects filled with Hydroxyapatite+Beta-Beta-tricalcium phosphate irradiated or not with 2 light sources. Ratios of intensities, band position and bandwidth of selected Raman peaks of collagen and apatites were used. Sixty male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups subdivided into 2 subgroups (15th and 30th days). A standard surgical defect was created on one femur of each animal. In 3 groups the defects were filled with blood clot (Clot, Clot+Laser and Clot+LED groups) and in the remaining 3 groups the defects were filled with biomaterial (Biomaterial, Biomaterial+Laser and Biomaterial+LED groups). When indicated, the defects were irradiated with either Laser (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ∼0.4 cm(2)) or LED (λ850±10 nm, 150 mW, Φ∼0.5 cm(2)), 20 J/cm(2) each session, at 48 h intervals/2 weeks (140 J/cm(2) treatment). Following sacrifice, bone fragments were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis (ANOVA General Linear Model, pRaman ratios of selected protein matrix and phosphate and carbonate HA indicated that the use of biphasic synthetic micro-granular HA+Beta-TCP graft improved the repair of bone defects, associated or not with Laser or LED light, because of the increasing deposition of HA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Irradiation Microstructure of Austenitic Steels and Cast Steels Irradiated in the BOR-60 Reactor at 320°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chen, Yiren; Huang, Yina; Allen, Todd; Rao, Appajosula

    Reactor internal components are subjected to neutron irradiation in light water reactors, and with the aging of nuclear power plants around the world, irradiation-induced material degradations are of concern for reactor internals. Irradiation-induced defects resulting from displacement damage are critical for understanding degradation in structural materials. In the present work, microstructural changes due to irradiation in austenitic stainless steels and cast steels were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The specimens were irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor, a fast breeder reactor, up to 40 dpa at 320°C. The dose rate was approximately 9.4x10-7 dpa/s. Void swelling and irradiation defects were analyzed for these specimens. A high density of faulted loops dominated the irradiated-altered microstructures. Along with previous TEM results, a dose dependence of the defect structure was established at 320°C.

  6. Creation of radiation defects in KCl crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushchik, A.Ch.; Pung, L.A.; Khaldre, Yu.Yu.; Kolk, Yu.V.

    1981-01-01

    Optical and EPR methods were used to study the creation of anion and cation Frenkel defects in KCl crystals irradiated by X-ray and VUV-radiation. The decay of excitons with the creation of charged Frenkel defects (α and I centres) was detected and investigated at 4.2 K. The decay of excitons as well as the recombination of electrons with self-trapped holes leads to the creation of neutral Frenkel defects (F and H centres). The creation of Cl 3 - and Vsub(F) centres (cation vacancy is a component of these centres) by X-irradiation at 80 K proves the possibility of cation defects creation in KCl [ru

  7. Irradiation effects in superconductor oxides. Effets d'irradiation dans les oxydes supraconducteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullier-Albenque, F; Konczykowski, M [CEA-Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. d' Etudes des Solides Irradies

    1993-01-01

    Several effects of irradiation on the 92 K - oxide superconductor YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] are reported. Whatever irradiation type, the critical temperature T[sub c] is found to decrease and the resistivity to increase. At sufficiently high damage levels, YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] is no longer superconducting and even displays a semiconducting-like behaviour. The alterations of superconducting properties are clearly related to oxygen defects - in the CuO[sub 2] planes or CuO chains... but we have shown experimentally that copper defects are also important. Magnetic properties of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7] in mixed state are also very sensitive to irradiation. By pinning the flux lines, irradiation defects can considerably increase the critical current density j[sub c]. At present, irradiations by highly energetic heavy ions (6 GeV Pb for instance), which produce cylindrical tubes of amorphous material (latent tracks) throughout the whole thickness of the samples, are probably the most efficient way to enhance j[sub c]. (Author). 18 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Hall effect measurements of Frenkel defect clustering in aluminium during high-dose reactor irradiation at 4.6 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Mauer, W.; Pfaendner, K.; Rosner, P.

    1976-01-01

    The low-field Hall coefficient R 0 of irradiated aluminium at 4.6 K is independent of the Frenkel defect (FD) concentration, however sensitively dependent of their configuration. Since measurement of R 0 is not too difficult, rather extensive investigations of FD clustering during irradiation can be performed, but only qualitative interpretations are possible. Several pure Al samples have been irradiated with reactor neutrons at 4.6 K up to very high doses phit resp. resistivity increments Δrho 0 (maximum 91% of extrapolated saturation value Δrho 0 sup(sat) approximately 980 nΩcm). The main results are 1.FD clustering within a single displacement cascade is not a very strong effect in Al, since the R 0 values are essentially the same after reactor and after electron irradiation. Rough cascade averages are: volume Vsub(c) approximately 2.1 x 10 5 at.vol. and FD concentration csub(c) approximately 1100 ppm. 2. There is practically no dose-dependent FD clustering up to Δrho 0 approximately 350 nΩcm, since R 0 remains essentially constant there. It follows that dose-dependent FD clustering can only occur for high-order overlap of cascade volumes. The differential dose curve dΔrho 0 /dphit is perfectly linear in Δrho 0 as long as R 0 = const. 3. For Δrho 0 > 350 nΩcm FD clustering becomes increasingly important and R 0 changes strongly. Surprisingly dR 0 /dphit approximately const whence there is a constant rate of cluster size increase in spite of the vanishing rate of FD production, evidence of the continuous regrouping of the lattice and its defects. (author)

  9. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petykhov, Yu.V.

    1999-01-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ( 60 Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects

  10. First-principles investigation of neutron-irradiation-induced point defects in B4C, a neutron absorber for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yan; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko

    2018-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a leading candidate neutron absorber material for sodium-cooled fast nuclear reactors owing to its excellent neutron-capture capability. The formation and migration energies of the neutron-irradiation-induced defects, including vacancies, neutron-capture reaction products, and knocked-out atoms were studied by density functional theory calculations. The vacancy-type defects tend to migrate to the C–B–C chains of B4C, which indicates that the icosahedral cage structures of B4C have strong resistance to neutron irradiation. We found that lithium and helium atoms had significantly lower migration barriers along the rhombohedral (111) plane of B4C than perpendicular to this plane. This implies that the helium and lithium interstitials tended to follow a two-dimensional diffusion regime in B4C at low temperatures which explains the formation of flat disk like helium bubbles experimentally observed in B4C pellets after neutron irradiation. The knocked-out atoms are considered to be annihilated by the recombination of the close pairs of self-interstitials and vacancies.

  11. DAMAGE IN MOLYBDENUM ASSOCIATED WITH NEUTRON IRRADIATION AND SUBSEQUENT POST-IRRADIATION ANNEALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastel, B.

    1963-07-23

    Molybdemum containing carbon was studied in an attempt to establish the combined effect of impurity content and neutron irradiation on the properties and structure of specific metals. Molybdenum foils were punched into discs and heat treated in vacuum. They were then slow-cooled and irradiated. After irradiation and subsequent decay of radioactivity to a low level the foils were subjected to x-ray diffraction measurements. Cold-worked foils with less than 10 ppm carbon showed no change in microstructure due to irradiation. Molybdenum foils that were annealed prior to irradiation showed spot defects. In foils containing up to 500 ppm carbon, it was concluded that the small loops present after irradiation are due to the clustering of point defects at interstitial carbon atoms, followed by collapse to form a dislocation loop. The amount of lattice expansion after irradiation was strongly dependent on impurity content. Neutron irradiation was found to reduce the number of active slip systems. (M.C.G.)

  12. On an aspect of kinetics both defects accumulation and gas absorption in an irradiated metals oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuseev, T.; Polyakov, A.I.; Bitenbaev, M.I.

    2001-01-01

    In the work an analysis of experimental data during study both gases adsorption processes and radiation defects accumulation in irradiated (ultraviolet, gamma-, neutron-, alpha-particle- and proton radiation) in the oxides (SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , BeO, Se 2 O 3 , Dy 2 O 3 , La 2 O 3 , Er 2 O 3 ) is carried out. It is determined, that these processes are correlating with each other and equivalent kinetic equations for its description are proposed

  13. A study of defects in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Defects, intrinsic and extrinsic, in natural and synthetic diamond, have been studied using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and optical absorption techniques. EPR measurements have been used in conjunction with infrared absorption to identify the defect-induced one-phonon infrared spectra produced by ionised single substitutional nitrogen, N s + . This N s + spectrum is characterised by a sharp peak at the Raman energy, 1332 cm -1 , accompanied by several broader resonances at 950(5), 1050(5), and 1095(5) cm -1 . Detailed concentration measurements show that a concentration of 5.5(5) ppm gives rise to an absorption of 1 cm -1 at 1332 cm -1 . The optical absorption band ND1, identified as the negative vacancy (V - ), is frequently used by diamond spectroscopists to measure the concentration of V - . Isoya has identified V - in the EPR spectra of irradiated diamond. The accuracy of EPR in determining concentrations, has been used to correlate the integrated absorption of the ND1 zero-phonon line to the concentration of V - centres. The parameter derived from this correlation is ∼16 times smaller than the previously accepted value obtained by indirect methods. A systematic study has been made - using EPR and optical absorption techniques - of synthetic type IIa diamonds, which have been irradiated with 2 MeV electrons in a specially developed dewar, allowing irradiation down to a measured sample temperature of 100K. Measurement of defect creation rates of the neutral vacancy and EPR defects, show a radical difference in the production rate of the EPR defect R2 between irradiation with the sample held at 100K and 350K. At 100K its production rate is 1.1(1) cm -1 , ∼10 times greater that at 350K. Observation of the di- -split interstitial (Ri) after irradiation at 100K proves the self-interstitial in diamond must be mobile at 100K, under the conditions of irradiation. Further study of the properties of the R2 defect (the most dominant EPR after electron

  14. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.I.; Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Zashkvara, O. V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Petukhov, Yu. V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g(Δ)=[2(ω-ω 0 )+α] -1/2 , where ω 0 =γH 0 , α is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N loc , the following expression is used: ω=ω 0 +1/2α(3cos 2 θ-1), where θ is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in beryllium oxides and ceramics at the expense of resonance line hyperfine splitting on atoms of

  15. Investigation of anisotropy in EPR spectra of radiation defects in irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I; Petukhov, Yu V [Inst. of Physics and Technology, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2004-07-01

    Full text: In this work results of analysis of anisotropy and hyperfine structure in EPR spectra of paramagnetic defects in irradiated samples of beryllium ceramics are presented. To explain peculiarities in a shape and parameters of the EPR spectrum hyperfine structure in beryllium ceramics, we have analyzed several versions of model representations for the radiation-induced paramagnetic defects uniformly distributed in a sample as well as for cluster defects which hyperfine structure is determined by interactions between electrons and nuclei of impurity atoms (S=1/2) and which are characterized by anisotropy in the g factors. Calculations of a shape of the uniformly widened EPR spectra are carried out by the model of random interactions between electron spins. The EPR spectra, widened at the expense of anisotropy in the g factors, are calculated by the following equation: g({delta})=[2({omega}-{omega}{sub 0})+{alpha}]{sup -1/2}, where {omega}{sub 0}={gamma}H{sub 0}, {alpha} is the quantify proportional to the anisotropy shift. To describe wings of spectral lines, where the equation doesn't work, we use the Gaussian function. To determine the frequency of precession of electron spins packages with local concentration N{sub loc}, the following expression is used: {omega}={omega}{sub 0}+1/2{alpha}(3cos{sup 2}{theta}-1), where {theta} is an angle between the symmetry axis and the direction of the external magnetic field. It is shown that the best agreement between the calculated and experimental EPR spectra is observed with the following computational model: paramagnetic radiation defects are distributed uniformly over a ceramics sample, and the g factors of its EPR spectra have the anisotropy typical for dipole-dipole interaction in powder samples. By results of the data we obtained, it's clear that in future we'll need in more detailed information than that published in scientific journals about formation of the paramagnetic defect EPR spectra structure in

  16. Influence of the parameters of pulsed electron irradiation on the efficiency of formation of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdusattarov, A.G.; Emtsev, V.V.; Mashovets, T.V.

    1989-01-01

    There is as yet no agreement about the mechanism of the influence of the rate of irradiation on the rate of radiation-defect formation in semiconductors. In the case of silicon some authors attribute this mechanism to the influence of excitation of the electron subsystem on the processes resulting in the formation of secondary defects. Other authors are of the opinion that the rate of excitation of the electron subsystem influences the ratio of the probabilities of separation and annihilation of components of a Frenkel pair. A more careful analysis of this situation however forces are to revise this point of view. The authors consider in greater detail the process of homogeneous annihilation of the components of a Frenkel pair in silicon

  17. Study of the point defect creation and of the excitonic luminescence in alkali halides irradiated by swift heavy ions; Etude de la creation de defauts ponctuels et de la luminescence excitonique d`halogenures d`alcalins irradies par les ions lourds de grande vitesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Protin, L

    1994-10-05

    The aim of this experimental thesis is to study the excitonic mechanisms and of the defect creation, in NaCl and KBr, under dense electronic excitations induced by swift heavy ion irradiations. In the first part, we present the main features of the interaction of swift heavy ions with solid targets, and after we review the well known radiolytic processes of the defect creation during X-ray irradiation. In the second chapter, we describe our experimental set-up. In the chapter III, we present our results of the in-situ optical absorption measurements. This results show that defect creation is less sensitive to the temperature than during a classical irradiation. Besides, we observe new mechanisms concerning the defect aggregation. In the chapter IV, we present the results of excitonic luminescence induced by swift by swift heavy ions. We observe that the luminescence yields only change with the highest electronic stopping power. In the chapter V, we perform thermal spike and luminescence yields calculations and we compare the numerical results to the experiments presented in the chapter IV. (author). 121 refs., 65 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Properties of point defects either native or induced by irradiation in the 3C and 6H polytypes of silicon carbide determined by positron annihilation and EPR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerbiriou, X.

    2006-02-01

    Potential applications of silicon carbide (SiC) in micro-electronics have justified many studies on point defects, which play an important role in the electrical compensation. Moreover, this material has many assets to take part in the fissile materials confining in the gas cooled reactors of the future (4. generation). In this thesis, we have used Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy to study the properties of point defects (nature, size, charge state, migration and agglomeration during annealing), either native or induced by irradiation with various particles (H + , e - , carbon ions), in the 3C and 6H polytypes of SiC. The positron annihilation study of native defects in 6H-SiC has shown the presence of a strong concentration of non-vacancy traps of acceptor type, which are not present in the 3C-SiC crystals. The nature of the defects detected after irradiation with low energy electrons (190 keV) depends on the polytype. Indeed, while silicon Frenkel pairs and carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 6H crystals, only carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 3C crystals. We propose that these differences concerning the populations of detected point defects result from different values of the silicon displacement threshold energy for the two polytypes (approximately 20 eV for 6H and 25 V for 3C). In addition, the irradiations with 12 MeV protons and 132 MeV carbon ions have created silicon mono-vacancies as well as VSi-VC di-vacancies. Neither the particle (protons or ions carbon), nor the polytype (3C or 6H) influence the nature of the generated defects. Finally the study of the annealing of 6H-SiC monocrystals irradiated with 12 MeV protons have revealed several successive processes. The most original result is the agglomeration of the silicon mono-vacancies with the VSi-VC di-vacancies which leads to the formation of VSi-VC-VSi tri-vacancies. (author)

  19. Direct Observation of Radiation Defects: Experiment and Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudarev, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Electron microscopy is arguably the only available experimental method suitable for the direct visualization of nano-scale defect structures formed under irradiation. Images of dislocation loops and point-defect clusters in crystals are usually produced using diffraction contrast methods. For relatively large defects, a combination of dynamical imaging and image contrast simulations is required for determining the nature of visible radiation defects. At the same time, density functional theory (DFT) models developed over the last decade have provided unique information about the structure of nano-scale defects produced by irradiation, including the defects that are so small that they cannot be observed in an electron microscope, and about the pathways of migration and interaction between radiation defects. DFT models, involving no experimental input parameters and being as quantitatively accurate and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques for the direct observation of defects, have created a new paradigm for the scientific investigation of radiation damage phenomena. In particular, DFT models offer new insight into the origin of temperature-dependent response of materials to irradiation, a problem of pivotal significance for applications. By combining information derived from the first-principles models for radiation defects with information derived from small-scale experimental observations it may be possible to acquire quantitative knowledge about how materials respond to irradiation and, using this knowledge, develop materials suitable for advanced applications in fission and fusion. It now appears possible to pose the question about the development of integrated fusion power plant models, combining neutron transport calculations and microscopic models for microstructural evolution of materials, for example models for ab initio prediction of helium embrittlement. Such models, based on scientific principles and quantitative data, and developed

  20. Progress of research on the mechanism of microstructure evolution during irradiation with collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiritani, Michio

    1997-01-01

    Progress of the research on microstructural evolution during radiation damage accompanied with collision cascades, particularly by neutrons, is summarized from the researches reported in 1995 and 1996. The major part of irradiation was performed with JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor), and comparisons were made with the result of D-T fusion neutron irradiation with RTNS-II (Rotating Target Neutron Source, LLNL). The subjects concerned are: (1) Microstructure evolution during irradiation, (2) Processes controlling the accumulation of defects during cascade damage, (3) Subcascades from the viewpoint of point defect cluster formation, (4) Mechanism of suppression of microstructure evolution during temperature cycle neutron irradiation of nickel, (5) Identification of the nature of neutron-irradiation-induced point defect clusters in copper by means of electron irradiation, (6) Easy one-dimensional motion of small interstitial clusters, (7) Identification of the nature of small point defect clusters in neutron irradiated Fe-16Ni-15Cr, (8) Spatial distribution of nucleation of point defect clusters by high energy particle irradiation, (9) Crystallographic orientation dependence of dislocation structures in neutron irradiated metals, (10) Examination of defect accumulation mode with multi-section-removable-irradiation-rig in Japan Material Testing Reactor, (11) Estimation of freely migrating point defects during cascade damage by the growth of helical dislocations, (12) Identification of the nature of neutron-irradiation-induced small point defect clusters in Nickel by means of electron irradiation, (13) Thermal stability of point defect clusters in neutron irradiated Fe-16Ni-15Cr. (author)

  1. Reconstruction of irradiated bone segmental defects with a biomaterial associating MBCP+(R), microstructured collagen membrane and total bone marrow grafting: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégoux, Franck; Goyenvalle, Eric; Cognet, Ronan; Malard, Olivier; Moreau, Francoise; Daculsi, Guy; Aguado, Eric

    2009-12-15

    The bone tissue engineering models used today are still a long way from any oncologic application as immediate postimplantation irradiation would decrease their osteoinductive potential. The aim of this study was to reconstruct a segmental critical size defect in a weight-bearing bone irradiated after implantation. Six white New Zealand rabbits were immediately implanted with a biomaterial associating resorbable collagen membrane EZ(R) filled and micro-macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate granules (MBCP+(R)). After a daily schedule of radiation delivery, and within 4 weeks, a total autologous bone marrow (BM) graft was injected percutaneously into the center of the implant. All the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks. Successful osseous colonization was found to have bridged the entire length of the defects. Identical distribution of bone ingrowth and residual ceramics at the different levels of the implant suggests that the BM graft plays an osteoinductive role in the center of the defect. Periosteum-like formation was observed at the periphery, with the collagen membrane most likely playing a role. This model succeeded in bridging a large segmental defect in weight-bearing bone with immediate postimplantation fractionated radiation delivery. This has significant implications for the bone tissue engineering approach to patients with cancer-related bone defects.

  2. Energy and orientation dependence of electron-irradiation-induced defects in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibille, A.; Suski, J.; LeRoux, G.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of several electron-irradiation-induced deep defect levels in InP has been measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) as a function of electron energy. The dominant centers exhibit a threshold at about 100 keV, which clearly points to a primary production event by electron--phosphorus-atom collision. This unambiguous determination allowed a test of the recently proposed orientation dependence technique to find the nature of the sublattice involved in the collision process for III-V compounds. A good quantitative agreement is obtained with a hard-sphere model for secondary collisions if disorientation of the beam in the sample is taken into account. Other traps exhibit higher thresholds which correspond either to indium-atom displacements or to the involvement of secondary collisions in the production event

  3. Neutron diffraction and lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Yoshikazu

    1974-01-01

    Study on lattice defects by neutron diffraction technique is described. Wave length of neutron wave is longer than that of X-ray, and absorption cross-section is small. Number of defects observed by ESR is up to several defects, and the number studied with electron microscopes is more than 100. Information obtained by neutron diffraction concerns the number of defects between these two ranges. For practical analysis, several probable models are selected from the data of ESR or electron microscopes, and most probable one is determined by calculation. Then, defect concentration is obtained from scattering cross section. It is possible to measure elastic scattering exclusively by neutron diffraction. Minimum detectable concentration estimated is about 0.5% and 10 20 - 10 21 defects per unit volume. A chopper and a time of flight system are used as a measuring system. Cold neutrons are obtained from the neutron sources inserted into reactors. Examples of measurements by using similar equipments to PTNS-I system of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are presented. Interstitial concentration in the graphite irradiated by fast neutrons is shown. Defects in irradiated MgO were also investigated by measuring scattering cross section. Study of defects in Ge was made by measuring total cross section, and model analysis was performed in comparison with various models. (Kato, T.)

  4. Annealing study of the electron-irradiation-induced defects H4 and E11 in InP: Defect transformation (H4-E11)→H4'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretagnon, T.; Bastide, G.; Rouzeyre, M.

    1990-01-01

    Capacitance spectroscopy has been used to study the two dominant deep levels, H 4 and E 11 , produced in InP by low-energy electron irradiation. The annealing rates of H 4 and E 11 in the p-type material are found to be identical, as is also the dependence on free-carrier recombination and on the chemical nature of the acceptor (Cd or Zn). Recombination-enhanced annealing converts these traps to a hole trap H 4 ' , which is not detectable by conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy. Its emission and capture properties are measured and analyzed. The similarity of the creation and annealing behavior of H 4 and E 11 shows that they share a common point defect. Our results lead to the tentative identification of the defect as a phosphorous vacancy-acceptor complex and we show how this may anneal to the H 4 ' center

  5. Conductivity of γ-irradiated LiF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckelsberger, K.

    1974-01-01

    The conductivity of pure monocrystalline LiF, γ-irradiated, was measured in the temperature range 0.3-100 deg K. The F centers produced by irradiation disperse phonons like point defects, the corresponding fluorine atoms on inter-lattice sites appear as clusters of about 10 A diameter, and high irradiation doses (above 10 8 R) give rise to extensive perturbation zones. Each of these 3 defects influences heat conduction in a characteristic temperature range and may thus be analyzed during irradiation and consecutive recovery [fr

  6. Interaction of alpha radiation with thermally-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Akbar; Majid, Abdul

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of radiation-induced defects created by energetic alpha particles and thermally-induced defects in silicon has been studied using a Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. Two thermally-induced defects at energy positions E c -0.48 eV and E c -0.25 eV and three radiation-induced defects E2, E3 and E5 have been observed. The concentration of both of the thermally-induced defects has been observed to increase on irradiation. It has been noted that production rates of the radiation-induced defects are suppressed in the presence of thermally-induced defects. A significant difference in annealing characteristics of thermally-induced defects in the presence of radiation-induced defects has been observed compared to the characteristics measured in pre-irradiated samples

  7. Effects of irradiation on the interface between U-Mo and zirconium diffusion barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Jan-Fong; Keiser, Dennis D.; Miller, Brandon D.; Madden, James W.; Robinson, Adam B.; Rabin, Barry H.

    2018-02-01

    Irradiated fuel plates were characterized by microscopy that focused on the interface between U-Mo and Zr. Before irradiation, there were three major sub-layers identified in the U-Mo/Zr interface, namely, UZr2, Mo2Zr, and U with low Mo. The typical total thickness of this U-Mo/Zr interaction is 2-3 μm. The UZr2 sub-layer formed during fuel plate fabrication remains stable after irradiation, without large bubbles/porosity accumulation. However, this sub-layer becomes increasingly discontinuous as burnup increases. The low-Mo sub-layer exhibits numerous sub-micron bubbles/porosity at low burnup. Larger, interconnected porosity in this sub-layer was observed in a medium-burnup fuel specimen. However, at higher burnup, regions with the extra-large bubbles/porosity (i.e., larger than 5 μm) were observed in the U-Mo fuel foil at least 5 μm away from the original location of this sub-layer. The mechanism for the formation of the extra-large bubbles/porosity is still unclear at this time. In general, the U-Mo/Zr interface in monolithic U-Mo fuels is relatively stable after irradiation. No large detrimental defects, such as large interfacial bubbles or cracks/delamination, were observed in the fuel plates characterized.

  8. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in radiation defects formed in tungsten by neutron and ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Shimada, M. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Alimov, V.Kh.; Shi, J.; Hara, M.; Nozaki, T. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Okuno, K. [Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Yoshida, N.; Futagami, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Sugiyama, K.; Roth, J.; Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Dorner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Takagi, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hatakeyama, M.; Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-15

    Retention of D in neutron-irradiated W and desorption were examined after plasma exposure at 773 K. Deuterium was accumulated at a relatively high concentration up to a large depth of 50–100 μm due to the trapping effects of defects uniformly induced in the bulk. A significant D release in a vacuum continued to temperatures ⩾1173 K because of the small effective diffusion coefficient and the long diffusion distance. Exposure of ion-irradiated W to D{sub 2} gas showed a clear correlation between concentrations of trapped and solute D as determined by the trapping–detrapping equilibrium. These observations indicated that the accumulation of tritium in high concentrations is possible even at high temperatures if the concentration of solute tritium is high, and baking at moderate temperatures is ineffective for removal of tritium deeply penetrating into the bulk. Nevertheless, clear enhancement of D release was observed under the presence of solute H.

  9. Studies of defects in neutron-irradiated p-type silicon by admittance measurements of n+-p diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Y.; Usami, A.

    1978-01-01

    Defects introduced in p-type silicon by neutron irradiation were studied by measuring the admittance of n + -p diodes. It was shown that the energy levels and capture cross sections estimated from the temperature dependence of the admittance had some uncertainty due to the temperature dependence of the concentration of free carriers in the bulk and the high-frequency-junction capacitance. So, we presented the method of determination of the energy levels, capture cross sections, and concentrations of defects from the frequency dependence of the admittance. This method consists of the measurements of G/ω and C as a function of frequency. From this method, assuming that capture cross sections are independent of temperature, the energy levels of E/sub v/+0.16 and E/sub v/+0.36 eV were obtained. For these defects, the calculated values of the hole capture cross section were 2.4 x 10 -14 and 3.7 x 10 -14 cm 2 , respectively. Comparing with other published data, the energy level of E/sub v/+0.36 eV was found to be correlated with the divacancy

  10. Gamma-induced defect production in ZrO2-Y2O3 crystals with different defectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashurov, M.Kh.; Amonov, M.Z.; Rakov, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The defectiveness degree of ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 crystals depends on stabilizer concentration. The work is aimed at study gamma-induced defect production in crystals with different concentration of stabilizer and defects generated by neutron irradiation. Absorption spectra were measured with Specord M-40. It was found, that after gamma-irradiation of as-grown crystals up to some dose the intensity of absorption band at 420 nm reaches the maximum level of saturation. The dose of saturation depends of the concentration of stabilizer. It means that gamma-radiation does not produce any additional defects of structure. The oxygen vacancies existing in as-grown crystals are filled by the radiation induced electrons. Since the number of oxygen vacancies depends on the stabilizer concentration, then all these vacancies can be occupied by electrons at different gamma-doses. In crystals pre-irradiated with different neutron fluences followed by gamma-irradiation, the intensity of absorption bands at 420 and 530 nm increases in two stages. The gamma-dose of the second stage beginning decreases as the neutron fluence grows. The first stage of the absorption increase is due to developing of vacancies existing in as-grown crystals. The second stage is caused by generation of additional vacancies as the result of non-radiative exciton decay near the existing structure damages. The decrease of the gamma-dose, when the second stage of vacancy accumulation begins, results from the neutron induced structure damage degree

  11. Electric field dependent paramagnetic defect creation in single step implanted Simox films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leray, J.L.; Margail, J.

    1991-01-01

    X irradiation induced oxygen-vacancy defect creation has been studied in SIMOX produced by single step implantation and annealing. It is shown that SIMOX is substantially more radiation sensitive (for these defects) than thermal or bulk oxide. Irradiation in the presence of an electric field 0.5 -1 MV cm -1 is found to enhance the rate of defect creation by ≥ 2 times. Further enhanced defect creation is observed in SIMOX samples whose substrate has been chemically thinned prior to irradiation. This enhancement is attributed to modification of the network induced by hydrogen introduced during the thinning process

  12. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Quan, E-mail: wangq@mail.ujs.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yang, Qizhi [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State key laboratory of Robotics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shengyang 110000 (China)

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  13. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabikin, Yu.A.; Polyakov, A.I.; Petukhov, Yu.V.; Bitenbaev, M.I.; Zashkvara, O.V.

    2000-01-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  14. ESR investigations of gamma irradiated beryllium ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabikin, Yu A; Polyakov, A I; Petukhov, Yu V; Bitenbaev, M I; Zashkvara, O V [Physical-Technical Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2000-04-01

    In this report the result of ESR- investigation of kinetics of radiation paramagnetic defects accumulated in beryllium ceramics under gamma irradiation are presented. The data on quantum yield and destruction rate constants of these defects under ionizing irradiation are obtained. (orig.)

  15. Effect of deep levels of radiation-induced defects in silicon γ-irradiated Al-V-n-Si structures characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzaneva, E.V.; Vdovichenko, A.D.; Kuznetsov, G.V.; Muntyan, Yu.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of high energy γ-quanta irradiation on the mechanism of current transmission in Al-V-N-Si structures employed in Schottky barrier instruments has been investigated. Before irradiation the structures have been annealed in the nitrogen atmosphere at T=500 deg C. The samples have been γ-irradiated on the side of the metall film at T=20 deg C. The irradiation spectrum is continuous, maximum γ-quanta energy 50 MeV, medium one is 20 MeV. The integral flux of γ-quanta, PHIsub(γ) varied from 10 7 to 10 13 quantum/cm -2 . The volt-ampere and volt-farad characteristics have been measred. It is shown that variation of the main electrophysical characteristics of the Al-V-nSi structures upon γ-irradiation is due to deep levels of radiation defects arising in silicon with the energetic position Esub(c)-E=0.38-0.4 eV and Esub(v)+Esub(2)=0.23-0.25 → β, where Esub(c), Esub(v) are energies for the conduction band bottom and the valence band ceiling. In the 77-293 K temperature range the determining range the determining effect on current mission mechanism in irradiated structures is exerted by resonance electron tunnelling with participation of a level with the Esub(c)-Esub(1)=0.38-0.4 eV

  16. Damage under irradiation of lithium aluminate γ-LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray-Gely, M.H.

    1987-11-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption have been used to detect the point defects created by different irradiations (electrons, He + ions, protons, X and gamma photons), transmission electron microscopy has been used to analyse samples before irradiation and observe the extended defects produced by irradiation. Defect nature is also discussed [fr

  17. Channeling studies of impurity-defect interactions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiggers, L.W.

    1978-01-01

    This thesis deals with the mechanism of defect production and interaction of introduced defects with impurity atoms in silicon single crystals. Defects are created by irradiation with energetic light particles (.2 - 3 MeV H + or He + ions). Mostly simple defects like vacancies and interstitials are produced during bombardment. (Auth.)

  18. Ion irradiation-induced swelling and hardening effect of Hastelloy N alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li, D.H.; Chen, H.C.; Lei, G.H.; Huang, H.F.; Zhang, W.; Wang, C.B. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Yan, L., E-mail: yanlong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Fu, D.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro-and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Tang, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The volumetric swelling and hardening effect of irradiated Hastelloy N alloy were investigated in this paper. 7 MeV and 1 MeV Xe ions irradiations were performed at room temperature (RT) with irradiation dose ranging from 0.5 to 27 dpa. The volumetric swelling increases with increasing irradiation dose, and reaches up to 3.2% at 27 dpa. And the irradiation induced lattice expansion is also observed. The irradiation induced hardening initiates at low ion dose (≤1dpa) then saturates with higher ion dose. The irradiation induced volumetric swelling may be ascribed to excess atomic volume of defects. The irradiation induced hardening may be explained by the pinning effect where the defects can act as obstacles for the free movement of dislocation lines. And the evolution of the defects' size and number density could be responsible for the saturation of hardness. - Highlights: •Irradiation Swelling: The irradiation induced volumetric swelling increases with ion dose. •Irradiation Hardening: The irradiation hardening initiates below 1 dpa, then saturates with higher ion dose (1–10 dpa). •Irradiation Mechanism: The irradiation phenomena are ascribed to the microstructural evolution of the irradiation defects.

  19. Point defects in GaAs and other semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrhart, P.; Karsten, K.; Pillukat, A.

    1993-01-01

    In order to understand the properties of intrinsic point defects and their interactions at high defect concentrations GaAs wafers were irradiated at 4.5 K with 3 MeV electrons up to a dose of 4 · 10 19 e - /cm 2 . The irradiated samples were investigated by X-ray Diffraction and optical absorption spectroscopy. The defect production increases linearly with irradiation dose and characteristic differences are observed for the two sublattices. The Ga-Frenkel pairs are strongly correlated and are characterized by much larger lattice relaxations (V rel = 2--3 atomic volumes) as compared to the As-Frenkel pairs (V rel ∼1 at. vol.). The dominating annealing stage around 300 K is attributed to the mobility of the Ga interstitial atoms whereas the As-interstitial atoms can recombine with their vacancies only around 500 K. These results are compared to those for InP, ZnSe and Ge. Implications for the understanding of the damage after ion irradiation and implantation are discussed

  20. Dipole defects in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, B A; Cordeiro, R C; Blak, A R

    2010-01-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be 3 Al 2 Si 6 O 18 ) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  1. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450ee)C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800ee)C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  2. Microstructure evolution by neutron irradiation during cyclic temperature variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiritani, M.; Yoshiie, T.; Iseki, M.; Kojima, S.; Hamada, K.; Horiki, M.; Kizuka, Y.; Inoue, H.; Tada, T.; Ogasawara, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Utilizing a technique to control the temperature which is not influenced by the operation mode of a reactor, an irradiation during which the temperature was alternatively changed several times between two temperatures (T-cycle) has been performed. Some defect structures are understood as combinations of the defect processes at lower and higher temperatures, and some others are understood if the defect processes during the transient between the two temperatures are taken into consideration. However, the most remarkable characteristic of defect processes associated with the temperature variation is the reaction of point defect clusters induced by lower-temperature irradiation at the higher temperature. During lower-temperature irradiation, there is a greater accumulation of vacancy clusters as stacking fault tetrahedra in fcc metals than that of interstitial clusters as dislocation loops. Vacancies evaporated from the vacancy clusters at higher temperature can eliminate interstitial clusters completely, and the repetition of these processes leads to unexpectedly slow defect structure development by T-cycle irradiation. ((orig.))

  3. Irradiation induced precipitation: a thermodynamical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, J.-L.; Martin, Georges.

    1979-02-01

    A binary alloy (A, B) under steady state irradiation is considered as a ternary alloy (A, B, defects) in constrained equilibrium (the constraint represented by the irradiation consists in maintaining a given supersaturation of point defects). All possible two-body interactions (attractive, repulsive) have been checked between the solvent A, the solute B, and the defects C. The conditions of an irradiation corresponds to a low point-defect concentration; the only cases of interest are those where such a low concentration makes new phases precipitate, which are richer in solute than the initial solid-solution. Radiation induced precipitation is expected to occur under the following necessary conditions: - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows ordering or is ideal, a necessary condition is that the binary solute-defects must show ordering. - when the binary alloy (A, B) shows clustering, a necessary condition is that the temperature must be close to the critical mixing temperature Tsub(AB)sup(D). The physical significance of these conditions is discussed [fr

  4. Ionization-induced rearrangement of defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinetskij, V.L.; Manojlo, M.A.; Matvijchuk, A.S.; Strikha, V.I.; Kholodar', G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing factor effect on defect rearrangement in silicon including centers with deep local electron levels in the p-n-transition region is considered. Deep center parameters were determined using non-steady-state capacity spectroscopy of deep levels (NCDLS) method. NCDLS spectrum measurement was performed using source p + -n - diodes and after their irradiation with 15 keV energy electrons or laser pulses. It is ascertained that in silicon samples containing point defect clusters defect rearrangement under ionizing factor effect takes place, i.e. deep level spectra are changed. This mechanism is efficient in case of silicon irradiation with subthreshold energy photons and electrons and can cause degradation of silicon semiconducting structures

  5. Improvement in the repair of defects in maxillofacial soft tissue in irradiated minipigs by a mixture of adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-rich fibrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanzheng; Niu, Zhanguo; Xue, Yan; Yuan, Fukang; Fu, Yanjie; Bai, Nan

    2014-10-01

    To find out if adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), alone or combined, had any effect on the repair of maxillofacial soft tissue defects in irradiated minipigs, ASC were isolated, characterised, and expanded. Twenty female minipigs, the right parotid glands of which had been irradiated, were randomly divided into 4 groups of 5 each: those in the first group were injected with both ASC and PRF (combined group), the second group was injected with ASC alone (ASC group), the third group with PRF alone (PRF group), and the fourth group with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) (control group). Six months after the last injection, the size and depth of each defect were assessed, and subcutaneous tissues were harvested, stained with haematoxylin and eosin, and examined immunohistologically and for apoptosis. Expanded cells were successfully isolated and identified. Six months after injection the defects in the 3 treated groups were significantly smaller (p<0.001) and shallower (p<0.001) than those in the control group. Those in the combined group were the smallest and shallowest. Haematoxylin and eosin showed that the 3 treated groups contained more subcutaneous adipose tissue than the control group, and also had significantly greater vascular density (p<0.001) and fewer apoptotic cells (p<0.001). Both ASC and PRF facilitate the repair of defects in maxillofacial soft tissue in irradiated minipigs, and their combined use is more effective than their use as single agents. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Abnormal recovery of DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated cell cultures of Drosophila melanogaster which are defective in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.C.; Boyd, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Cell cultures prepared from embryos of a control stock of Drosophila melanogaster respond to ultraviolet light with a decline and subsequent recovery both of thymidine incorporation and in the ability to synthesize nascent DNA in long segments. Recovery of one or both capacities is absent or diminished in irradiated cells from ten nonallelic mutants that are defective in DNA repair and from four of five nonallelic mutagen-sensitive mutants that exhibit normal repair capabilities. Recovery of thymidine incorporation is not observed in nine of ten DNA repair-defective mutants. On the other hand, partial or complete recovery of incorporation is observed in all but one repair-proficient mutagen-sensitive mutant. (orig./AJ) [de

  7. Experimental study of defect power reactor fuel. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Jonsson, T.

    1982-01-01

    Two BWR fuel rods, one intact and one defect, with the same manufacturing and irradiation data have been examined in a comparative study. The defect rod has been irradiated in a defect condition during approximately one reactor cycle and has consequently some secondary defects. The defect rod has two penetrating defects at a distance of about 1.5 meters from each other. Comparison with the intact rod shows a large Cs loss from the defect rod, especially between the cladding defects, where the loss is measured to about 30 %. The leachibility in deionized water is higher for Cs, U and Cm for fuel from the defect rod. The leaching results are more complex for Sr-90, Pu and Am. The fuel in the defect rod has undergone a change of structure with gain growth and formation of oriented fuel structure. The cladding of the defect rod is hydrided locally in some parts of the lower part of the rod and furthermore over a more extended region near the end of the rod. (Authors)

  8. Electroluminescence analysis of injection-enhanced annealing of electron irradiation-induced defects in GaInP top cells for triple-junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Tiancheng; Lu, Ming; Yang, Kui; Xiao, Pengfei; Wang, Rong, E-mail: wangr@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-09-15

    Direct injection-enhanced annealing of defects in a GaInP top cell for GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells irradiated with 1.8 MeV electrons with a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} has been observed and analyzed using electroluminescence (EL) spectra. Minority-carrier injection under forward bias conditions is observed to enhance defect annealing in the GaInP top cell, and recovery of the EL intensity of the GaInP top cell was observed even at room temperature. Moreover, the injection-enhanced defect annealing rates obey a simple Arrhenius law; therefore, the annealing activation energy was determined and is equal to 0.51 eV. Lastly, the H2 defect has been identified as the primary non-radiative recombination center based on a comparison of the annealing activation energies.

  9. Diffuse x-ray scattering studies of defect reactions in electron-irradiated dilute nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averback, R.S.; Ehrhart, P.

    1984-01-01

    Huang diffuse scattering was employed to study defect properties in dilute Ni-Si alloys. Ni alloys containing 1 at.% and 0.05 at.% Si were irradiated with electrons at 4.2 K and were subsequently isochronally annealed. It was found that, prior to annealing, the Frenkel-pair resistivities and self-interstitial atom configurations were the same in the alloys as in pure Ni. The independence of the Frenkel-pair resistivity to Si concentration indicates that the resistivities arising from Frenkel pairs and Si solute are linearly additive in Ni. After annealing through stage I to 85 K, the defect cluster size grew to 1.5, 2.3 and 3.0 interstitial atoms for the 1 at.% Si, 0.05 at.% Si and pure Ni specimens, respectively. These results demonstrate that self-interstitial atoms are not immobilised by single Si atoms in Ni, but rather complexes involving several Si atoms and/or two interstitial atoms are the stable defects at the end of annealing stage I. It was also observed that Si solute in Ni strongly suppresses the growth of interstitial clusters in stage II. In the 1 at.% Si alloys di-interstitials were immobilised up to temperatures between 200 and 300 K. There was no indication that Si solute reduced vacancy mobility in annealing stage III. The consequences of these results for the understanding of high-temperature radiation effects in alloys are discussed. (author)

  10. Effects of low temperature periodic annealing on the deep-level defects in 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. S.; Chiu, T. T.; Loo, R. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The GaAs solar cell has shown good potential for space applications. However, degradation in performance occurred when the cells were irradiated by high energy electrons and protons in the space environment. The considered investigation is concerned with the effect of periodic thermal annealing on the deep-level defects induced by the 200 keV protons in the AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells. Protons at a fluence of 10 to the 11th P/sq cm were used in the irradiation cycle, while annealing temperatures of 200 C (for 24 hours), 300 C (six hours), and 400 C (six hours) were employed. The most likely candidate for the E(c) -0.71 eV electron trap observed in the 200 keV proton irradiated samples may be due to GaAs antisite, while the observed E(v) +0.18 eV hole trap has been attributed to the gallium vacancy related defect. The obtained results show that periodic annealing in the considered case does not offer any advantages over the one time annealing process.

  11. In situ defect annealing of swift heavy ion irradiated CeO2 and ThO2 using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, Raul I.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Park, Changyong; Popov, Dmitry; Trautmann, Christina; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-04-16

    Hydrothermal diamond anvil cells (HDACs) provide facile means for coupling synchrotron X-ray techniques with pressure up to 10 GPa and temperature up to 1300 K. This manuscript reports on an application of the HDAC as an ambient-pressure sample environment for performingin situdefect annealing and thermal expansion studies of swift heavy ion irradiated CeO2and ThO2using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The advantages of thein situHDAC technique over conventional annealing methods include rapid temperature ramping and quench times, high-resolution measurement capability, simultaneous annealing of multiple samples, and prolonged temperature and apparatus stability at high temperatures. Isochronal annealing between 300 and 1100 K revealed two-stage and one-stage defect recovery processes for irradiated CeO2and ThO2, respectively, indicating that the morphology of the defects produced by swift heavy ion irradiation of these two materials differs significantly. These results suggest that electronic configuration plays a major role in both the radiation-induced defect production and high-temperature defect recovery mechanisms of CeO2and ThO2.

  12. The detection of radiation defects by means of the Kossel effect investigated in proton-irradiated GaP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, H.J.; Rolle, S.; Geist, V.; Stephan, D.

    1984-01-01

    The line intensity of Ga-K/sub α/- and P-K/sub α/-Kossel reflections from GaP irradiated by 0.3 to 1.3 MeV protons in a wide dose range (10 14 to 5 x 10 17 cm -2 ) has been investigated. The excitation of the characteristic X-rays inside the crystal lattice has been performed either by 40 keV electrons or 1.3 MeV protons. It is established that, in contrast to the P-K/sub α/-lines, certain Ga-K/sub α/-reflections respond very sensitively to radiation defects, manifest as increase or decrease in line intensity. The reason is probably a modification of extinction effects caused by lattice defects. The different behaviour of these phenomena is discussed and an explanation proposed. The lattice disorder is determined by channeling backscattering measurements. (author)

  13. Observation and analysis of defect cluster production and interactions with dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Matsukawa, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The current understanding of defect production fundamentals in neutron-irradiated face centered cubic (FCC) and body centered cubic (BCC) metals is briefly reviewed, based primarily on transmission electron microscope observations. Experimental procedures developed by Michio Kiritani and colleagues have been applied to quantify defect cluster size, density, and nature. Differences in defect accumulation behavior of irradiated BCC and FCC metals are discussed. Depending on the defect cluster obstacle strength, either the dispersed barrier hardening model or the Friedel-Kroupa-Hirsch weak barrier model can be used to describe major aspects of radiation hardening. Irradiation at low temperature can cause a change in deformation mode from dislocation cell formation at low doses to twinning or dislocation channeling at higher doses. The detailed interaction between dislocations and defect clusters helps determine the dominant deformation mode. Recent observations of the microstructure created by plastic deformation of quenched and irradiated metals are summarized, including in situ deformation results. Examples of annihilation of stacking fault tetrahedra by gliding dislocations and subsequent formation of mobile superjogs are shown

  14. Freely-migrating defects: Their production and interaction with cascade remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Wiedersich, H.

    1991-05-01

    Many microstructural changes that occur during irradiation are driven primarily by freely-migrating defects, i.e. those defects which escape from nascent cascades to migrate over distances that are large relative to typical cascade dimensions. Several measurements during irradiation at elevated temperatures have shown that the survival rate of freely-migrating defects decreases much more strongly with increasing primary recoil energy than does the survival rate for defects generated at liquid helium temperatures. For typical fission or fusion recoil spectra, and for heavy-ion bombardment, the fraction of defects that migrate long-distances is apparently only ∼1% of the calculated dpa. This small surviving fraction of freely-migrating defects results at least partially from additional intracascade recombination at elevated temperatures. However, cascade remnants, e.g., vacancy and interstitial clusters, also contribute by enhancing intercascade defect annihilation. A recently developed rate-theory approach is used to discuss the relative importance of intra- and intercascade recombination to the survival rate of freely-migrating defects. Within the validity of certain simplifying assumptions, the additional sink density provided by defect clusters produced directly within individual cascades can explain the difference between a defect survival rate of about 30% for low dose, low temperature irradiations with heavy ions, and a survival rate of only ∼1% for freely-migrating defects at elevated temperatures. The status of our current understanding of freely-migrating defects, including remaining unanswered questions, is also discussed. 33 refs., 5 figs

  15. Atomistic observations and analyses of lattice defects in transmission electron microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, H

    2003-01-01

    The transmission electron microscope (TEM) -accelerators was developed. TEM-Accelerator made possible to observe in situ experiments of ion irradiation and implantation. The main results are the experimental proof of new lattice defects by irradiation, the formation process and synthesized conditions of carbon onion by ion implantation, the microstructure and phase transformation conditions of graphite by ion irradiated phase transformation, the irradiation damage formation process by simultaneous irradiation of electron and ion and behavior of fullerene whisker under irradiation. The microstructural evolution of defect clusters in copper irradiated with 240-keV Cu sup + ions and a high resolution electron micrograph of carbon onions synthesized by ion implantation are explained as the examples of recent researches. (S.Y.)

  16. A polarity-induced defect mechanism for conductivity and magnetism at polar-nonpolar oxide interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liping; Zunger, Alex

    2014-10-13

    The discovery of conductivity and magnetism at the polar-nonpolar interfaces of insulating nonmagnetic oxides such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3 has raised prospects for attaining interfacial functionalities absent in the component materials. Yet, the microscopic origin of such emergent phenomena remains unclear, posing obstacles to design of improved functionalities. Here we present first principles calculations of electronic and defect properties of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interfaces and reveal a unifying mechanism for the origins of both conductivity and magnetism. We demonstrate that the polar discontinuity across the interface triggers thermodynamically the spontaneous formation of certain defects that in turn cancel the polar field induced by the polar discontinuity. The ionization of the spontaneously formed surface oxygen vacancy defects leads to interface conductivity, whereas the unionized Ti-on-Al antisite defects lead to interface magnetism. The proposed mechanism suggests practical design principles for inducing and controlling both conductivity and magnetism at general polar-nonpolar interfaces.

  17. Damage evolution of ion irradiated defected-fluorite La 2 Zr 2 O 7 epitaxial thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gigax, Jonathan G.; Shao, Lin; Bowden, Mark E.; Varga, Tamas; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Spurgeon, Steven R.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Henager, Charles H.

    2017-05-01

    Pyrochlore-structure oxides, A2B2O7, may exhibit remarkable radiation tolerance due to the ease with which they can accommodate disorder by transitioning to a defected fluorite structure. The mechanism of defect formation was explored by evaluating the radiation damage behavior of high quality epitaxial La2Zr2O7 thin films with the defected fluorite structure, irradiated with 1 MeV Zr+ at doses up to 10 displacements per atom (dpa). The level of film damage was evaluated as a function of dose by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling geometry (RBS/c) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). At lower doses, the surface of the La2Zr2O7 film amorphized, and the amorphous fraction as a function of dose fit well to a stimulated amorphization model. As the dose increased, the surface amorphization slowed, and amorphization appeared at the interface. Even at a dose of 10 dpa, the core of the film remained crystalline, despite the prediction of amorphization from the model. To inform future ab initio simulations of La2Zr2O7, the bandgap of a thick La2Zr2O7 film was measured to be indirect at 4.96 eV, with a direct transition at 5.60 eV.

  18. Classical integrable defects as quasi Bäcklund transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doikou, Anastasia, E-mail: a.doikou@hw.ac.uk

    2016-10-15

    We consider the algebraic setting of classical defects in discrete and continuous integrable theories. We derive the “equations of motion” on the defect point via the space-like and time-like description. We then exploit the structural similarity of these equations with the discrete and continuous Bäcklund transformations. And although these equations are similar they are not exactly the same to the Bäcklund transformations. We also consider specific examples of integrable models to demonstrate our construction, i.e. the Toda chain and the sine-Gordon model. The equations of the time (space) evolution of the defect (discontinuity) degrees of freedom for these models are explicitly derived.

  19. Irradiation creep models - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.; Finnis, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The modelling of irradiation creep is now highly developed but many of the basic processes underlying the models are poorly understood. A brief introduction is given to the theory of cascade interactions, point defect clustering and dislocation climb. The range of simple irradiation creep models is reviewed including: preferred nucleation of interstitial loops; preferred absorption of point defects by dislocations favourably orientated to an applied stress; various climb-enhanced glide and recovery mechanisms, and creep driven by internal stresses produced by irradiation growth. A range of special topics is discussed including: cascade effects; creep transients; structural and induced anisotropy; and the effect of impurities. The interplay between swelling and growth with thermal and irradiation creep is emphasized. A discussion is given on how irradiation creep theory should best be developed to assist the interpretation of irradiation creep observations and the requirements of reactor designers. (orig.)

  20. Organising medication discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nixon, Michael; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-01-01

    medication? Methods: Twenty four GPs were interviewed using a maximum variation sample strategy. Participant observations were done in three general practices, for one day each, totalling approximately 30 consultations. Results: The results show that different discontinuation cues (related to the type...... a medication, in agreement with the patients, from a professional perspective. Three research questions were examined in this study: when does medication discontinuation occur in general practice, how is discontinuing medication handled in the GP’s practice and how do GPs make decisions about discontinuing...

  1. Irradiation effects on c-axis lattice parameter in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} irradiated with energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Norito; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Akihiro; Maeta, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tsuru, Koji; Michikami, Osamu

    1997-03-01

    We report an irradiation effect on c-axis lattice parameter in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} oxide superconductors when irradiated with ions of energy ranging from 0.85 to 200 MeV. For the irradiation with low energy (0.85-2 MeV) ions, the defect production and the resultant c-axis lattice expansion were dominated by elastic collisions. On the other hand, for the irradiation with high energy (120-200 MeV) ions, the change in the c-axis lattice parameter was found to be much greater than that expected from the elastic displacement of target atoms. For high energy ion irradiation we could observe the excessive increase of c-axis lattice parameter reflecting additional production of defects which can be attributed to the electronic excitation. The large increase in c-axis lattice parameter due to high energy ion irradiation should be taken into account for the study on the interaction between vortices and irradiation-induced defects. (author)

  2. Irradiation behavior evaluation of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel cladding tubes irradiated in JOYO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shinichiro, E-mail: yamashita.shinichiro@jaea.go.jp; Yano, Yasuhide; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsunemitsu; Kaito, Takeji; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Tanaka, Kenya

    2013-11-15

    Irradiation behavior of ODS steel cladding tubes was evaluated for the further progress in understanding of the neutron-irradiation effects on ODS steel. Two types of ODS (9Cr–ODS{sub F}/M, 12Cr–ODS{sub F}) steel cladding tubes with differences in basic compositions and matrix phases were irradiated in JOYO. Post-irradiation examination data concerning hardness, ring tensile property, and microstructure were obtained. Hardness measurement after irradiation showed that there was an apparent irradiation temperature dependence on hardness for 9Cr–ODS{sub F}/M steel whereas no distinct temperature dependence for 12Cr–ODS{sub F} steel. Also, there was no significant change in tensile strengths after irradiation below 923 K, but those above 1023 K up to 6.6 × 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV) were decreased by about 20%. TEM observations showed that the radiation-induced defect cluster formation during irradiation was suppressed because of high density sink site for defect such as initially-existed dislocation, and precipitate interfaces. In addition, oxide particles were stable up to the maximum doses of this irradiation test.

  3. Characterization of irradiation induced deep and shallow impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Krammer, Manfred; Valentan, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    Silicon Detectors close to the interaction point of the High Luminosity Large Hardron Collider (HL-LHC) have to withstand a harsh irradiation environment. In order to evaluate the behaviour of shallow and deep defects, induced by neutron irradiation, spreading resistance resistivity measurements and capacitance voltage measurements have been performed. These measurements, deliver information about the profile of shallow impurities after irradiation as well as indications of deep defects in the Space Charge Region (SCR) and the Electrical Neutral Bulk (ENB). By considering the theoretical background of the measurement both kinds of defects can be investigated independently from each other.

  4. Characterization of irradiation induced deep and shallow impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treberspurg, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.treberspurg@oeaw.ac.at; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Krammer, Manfred; Valentan, Manfred

    2013-12-21

    Silicon Detectors close to the interaction point of the High Luminosity Large Hardron Collider (HL-LHC) have to withstand a harsh irradiation environment. In order to evaluate the behaviour of shallow and deep defects, induced by neutron irradiation, spreading resistance resistivity measurements and capacitance voltage measurements have been performed. These measurements, deliver information about the profile of shallow impurities after irradiation as well as indications of deep defects in the Space Charge Region (SCR) and the Electrical Neutral Bulk (ENB). By considering the theoretical background of the measurement both kinds of defects can be investigated independently from each other.

  5. Characterization of irradiation induced deep and shallow impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Krammer, Manfred; Valentan, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Silicon Detectors close to the interaction point of the High Luminosity Large Hardron Collider (HL-LHC) have to withstand a harsh irradiation environment. In order to evaluate the behaviour of shallow and deep defects, induced by neutron irradiation, spreading resistance resistivity measurements and capacitance voltage measurements have been performed. These measurements, deliver information about the profile of shallow impurities after irradiation as well as indications of deep defects in the Space Charge Region (SCR) and the Electrical Neutral Bulk (ENB). By considering the theoretical background of the measurement both kinds of defects can be investigated independently from each other

  6. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  7. Early discontinuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Felde, Lina; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    prevalence and rate of early discontinuation of different drugs consisting of, in this study, lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensive drugs, antidepressants, antidiabetics and drugs against osteoporosis. Material and methods This was a register study based on prescription data covering a 4-year period...... and consisting of 470,000 citizens. For each practice and group of drug, a 1-year prevalence for 2002 and the rate of early discontinuation among new users in 2002-2003 were estimated. Early discontinuation was defined as no prescriptions during the second half-year following the first prescription....... There was a positive association between the prevalence of prescribing for the specific drugs studied (antidepressants, antidiabetics, drugs against osteoporosis and lipid-lowering drugs) and early discontinuation (r = 0.29 -0.44), but not for anti-hypertensive drugs. The analysis of the association between prevalence...

  8. Ferromagnetism in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Wei Zhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal. An initial increase in proton dose leads to pronounced ferromagnetism, accompanying with obvious increase in vacancy concentration. Further increase in irradiation dose lowers the saturation magnetization with the decrease in total vacancy defects due to the defects recombination. It is found that divacancies are the mainly defects in proton irradiated 4H-SiC and responsible for the observed ferromagnetism.

  9. A study on electric properties for pulse laser annealing of ITO film after wet etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.J.; Lin, H.K.; Li, C.H.; Chen, L.X.; Lee, C.C.; Wu, C.W.; Huang, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The electric properties of ITO thin film after UV or IR laser annealing and wet etching was analyzed via grazing incidence in-plane X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra and residual stress measurement. The laser annealing process readily induced microcracks or quasi-microcracks on the ITO thin film due to the residual tension stress of crystalline phase transformation between irradiated and non-irradiated areas, and these defects then became the preferred sites for a higher etching rate, resulting in discontinuities in the ITO thin film after the wet etching process. The discontinuities in the residual ITO thin film obstruct carrier transmission and further result in electric failure. - Highlights: ► The laser annealing process induces microcracks in InSnO 2 thin films. ► The defects result in higher local etching rate during wet etching. ► These process defects originate from residual tension stress. ► Decreasing the thermal shock is suggested in order to reduce these process defects.

  10. Coloring of Topaz After Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salama, S.; Helal, A.I.; Gomaa, M.A.M.; Abou-Salem, L.I.; Nafie, H.; Badawi, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Raw topaz stone samples are subjected to irradiation by neutrons from the Egyptian research reactor and by γ rays from a gamma source. Changes in the color of the stones are observed which can be attributed to the formation of defects in the structure of the stones. The defects can absorb certain wave length which is observed as a change in the stone color .The absorption of light is investigated by an optical spectrophotometer technique at different irradiation and heating conditions. Raman studies of topaz stones showed a relation between the color changes with changes in the intensities of the band of scattered peaks corresponding to OH group stretching modes of vibration.Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) technique is used to study the behavior of defect concentration in topaz in two states; pure and irradiated stones by neutrons and γ. It has been shown that positrons are trapped in imperfect locations in topaz samples and their mean lifetime can be influenced by changes in the concentration of such defects.

  11. Spectrally resolved thermally stimulated luminescence of irradiated anion-defective alumina single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortov, V., E-mail: vskortov@mail.ru [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Lushchik, A.; Nagirnyi, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwald Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Ananchenko, D. [Ural Federal University, Mira Str. 19, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Romet, I. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwald Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2017-06-15

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) spectra in the 313–580 K temperature range have been studied in anion-defective alumina crystals (named in literature as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) exposed to different irradiation doses. The TSL curve features two peaks with the maxima at T{sub m1}=437 K and T{sub m2}=565 K. The TSL spectrum of the first peak contains the emission of F centers and the R line of Cr{sup 3+} impurity ions. The absence of the emission of F{sup +} centers indicates that electron traps are responsible for the first dosimetric TSL peak. The TSL spectrum of the second peak features emission bands of F, F{sup +} centers, R line as well as a wide band centered at 550 nm and associated with the formation of aggregate centers (F{sub 2} and F{sub 2}{sup 2+}) under irradiation. Possible excitation mechanisms of the TSL emission bands that involve both electron and hole traps related to anion vacancies and impurities are discussed. - Highlights: •TSL curve of alumina crystals features peaks at 437 and 565 K. •There are emission bands of 410 and 695 nm in the TSL spectrum of the first peak. •TSL spectrum of the second peak features bands of F, F{sub 2}-type centers and the R line of trivalent chromium. •Excitation mechanisms of the emission bands in TSL spectra are discussed.

  12. Granularity controlled irradiation response of cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, N.C.; Behera, D.; Mohanty, T.; Mohanta, D.; Kanjilal, D.; Mehta, G.K.; Pinto, R.

    1999-01-01

    Confining to an energy range where ions can neither create defects through elastic energy loss nor they can create defects through latent track formation, we study the effect of 140 MeV Si-ion irradiation in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x (YBCO). We show that the evolution of superconducting and normal state properties in such situation is largely governed by the initial defects structure, particularly the grain boundary characteristics of the YBCO system. Both intra- and inter-granular defect structure in films of two batches were made widely different by having Ag as composite and substituent in one and by aging the other prior to irradiation. Evolution of the resistivity vs temperature characteristics in these films with ion fluence reveals the importance of Ag in bringing about both inter- and intra-granular modifications and making the films insensitive to ion irradiation

  13. Study of the temperature evolution of defect agglomerates in neutron irradiated molybdenum single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambri, O.A.; Zelada-Lambri, G.I.; Cuello, G.J.; Bozzano, P.B.; Garcia, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature, differential thermal analysis, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in low rate neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum, at room temperature, for checking the evolution of the defects agglomerates in the temperature interval between room temperature and 1200 K. The onset of vacancies mobility was found to happen in temperatures within the stage III of recovery. At around 550 K, the agglomerates of vacancies achieve the largest size, as determined from the Guinier approximation for spherical particles. In addition, the decrease of the vacancy concentration together with the dissolution of the agglomerates at temperatures higher than around 920 K was observed, which produce the release of internal stresses in the structure.

  14. Study of the temperature evolution of defect agglomerates in neutron irradiated molybdenum single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambri, O.A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario. Member of the CONICET' s Research Staff, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina)], E-mail: olambri@fceia.unr.edu.ar; Zelada-Lambri, G.I. [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Laboratorio de Materiales, Escuela de Ingenieria Electrica, Avda. Pellegrini 250, (2000) Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Cuello, G.J. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble (France); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain); Bozzano, P.B. [Laboratorio de Microscopia Electronica. Unidad de Actividad Materiales, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin (Argentina); Garcia, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologia, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao, Pais Vasco (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    Small angle neutron scattering as a function of temperature, differential thermal analysis, electrical resistivity and transmission electron microscopy studies have been performed in low rate neutron irradiated single crystalline molybdenum, at room temperature, for checking the evolution of the defects agglomerates in the temperature interval between room temperature and 1200 K. The onset of vacancies mobility was found to happen in temperatures within the stage III of recovery. At around 550 K, the agglomerates of vacancies achieve the largest size, as determined from the Guinier approximation for spherical particles. In addition, the decrease of the vacancy concentration together with the dissolution of the agglomerates at temperatures higher than around 920 K was observed, which produce the release of internal stresses in the structure.

  15. A study of point defects created by electron irradiation of dilute iron-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, J.L.

    1969-10-01

    Resistivity and magnetic after effect (m.a.e.) measurements are used to study the influence of carbon atoms on the annealing process of point defects created by electron irradiation (3 MeV) at low temperature (20 deg. K). The presence of the carbon atoms has a strong influence on the recovery sub-stage I E and stage III. For the former, the carbon impurity traps the freely migrating iron interstitial. For the latter the effect is interpreted as being due to formation during annealing, of a carbon vacancy pair. A pronounced m.a.e. band is attributed to the reorientation of this carbon vacancy complex. All these results are coherent with the interpretation of a low temperature migrating free interstitial. (author) [fr

  16. Swelling of spinel after low-dose neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Itoh, N.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    Swelling was determined in samples of single-crystal MgAl 2 O 4 spinel, irradiated to doses as high as 8 x 10 22 n/m 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) at approx. =50 0 C in the Omega West Reactor. Swelling effectively saturated at approx. =2 x 10 22 n/m 2 which corresponds to a damage level of only approx. =2 x 10 -3 dpa. In addition subsequent measurements after irradiation have revealed that the samples continued swelling for several weeks. These results imply that irradiation defects begin to interact by recombination and aggregation at low damage levels in this material at 50 0 C and perhaps continue to cluster at room temperature after irradiation. Rate equations have been employed to determine defect concentrations at saturation. Results to date show that the observed swelling is consistent with the number of surviving defects if swelling per Frenkel defect pair is taken to be one atomic volume

  17. Combined computational and experimental study of Ar beam induced defect formation in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pregler, Sharon K.; Hayakawa, Tetsuichiro; Yasumatsu, Hisato; Kondow, Tamotsu; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2007-01-01

    Irradiation of graphite, commonly used in nuclear power plants, is known to produce structural damage. Here, experimental and computational methods are used to study defect formation in graphite during Ar irradiation at incident energies of 50 eV. The experimental samples are analyzed with scanning tunneling microscopy to quantify the size distribution of the defects that form. The computational approach is classical molecular dynamic simulations that illustrate the mechanisms by which the defects are produced. The results indicate that defects in graphite grow in concentrated areas and are nucleated by the presence of existing defects

  18. Electrical properties of indium arsenide irradiated with fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolin, N.G.; Osvenskii, V.B.; Rytova, N.S.; Yurova, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of irradiation with fast reactor neutrons on electrical properties of indium arsenide samples with different dopant concentrations. The laws governing the formation and annealing of radiation defects in indium arsenide were found to be governed by the donor-acceptor interaction. Depending on the density of free carriers in the original crystal, irradiation could produce charged defects of predominantly donor or acceptor types. Donor defects in irradiated InAs samples were annealed practically completely, whereas a considerable fraction of residual acceptor defects was retained even after heat treatment at 900 degree C. The concentration of these residual acceptors depended on the electron density at the annealing temperature

  19. low temperature irradiation effects in iron-alloys and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi; Abe, Hironobu; Tanaka, Minoru; Nishi, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Noriyuki.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation at 77K and neutron irradiation at 20K were carried out on Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Ni alloys and ZnO and graphite system ceramics, and by measuring positron annihilation lifetime, the micro-information about irradiation-introduced defects was obtained. The temperature of the movement of atomic vacancies in pure iron is about 200K, but it was clarified that by the addition of Cr, it was not much affected. However, in the case of high concentration Cr alloys, the number of atomic vacancies which take part in the formation of micro-voids decreased as compared with the case of pure iron. It is considered that among the irradiation defects of ZnO, O-vac. restored below 300degC. It is considered that in the samples without irradiation, the stage of restoration exists around 550degC, which copes with structural defects. By the measurement of graphite without irradiation, the positron annihilation lifetime corresponding with the interface of matrix and crystal grains, grain boundaries and internal surfaces was almost determined. The materials taken up most actively in the research and development of nuclear fusion reactor materials are austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, and their irradiation defects have been studied. (K.I.)

  20. Heavy ions amorphous semiconductors irradiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmalek, M.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of amorphous semiconductors (germanium and germanium and arsenic tellurides) under ion bombardment at energies up to 2 MeV was studied. The irradiation induced modifications were followed using electrical parameter changes (resistivity and activation energy) and by means of the transmission electron microscopy observations. The electrical conductivity enhancement of the irradiated samples was interpreted using the late conduction theories in amorphous compounds. In amorphous germanium, Electron Microscopy showed the formations of 'globules', these defects are similar to voids observed in irradiated metals. The displacement cascade theory was used for the interpretation of the irradiation induced defects formation and a coalescence mechanism of growth was pointed out for the vacancy agglomeration [fr

  1. Phonons, defects and optical damage in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosic, Thomas J.; Hill, Jeffrey R.; Dlott, Dana D.

    1986-04-01

    Intense picosecond pulses cause accumulated optical damage in acetanilide crystals at low temperature. Catastrophic damage to the irradiated volume occurs after an incubation period where defects accumulate. The optical damage is monitored with subanosecond time resolution. The generation of defects is studied with damage-detected picosecond spectroscopy. The accumulation of defects is studied by time-resolved coherent Raman scattering, which is used to measure optical phonon scattering from the accumulating defects.

  2. Temperature dependence of radiation induced defect creation in a-SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Grouillet, A.; Berlivet, J.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of oxygen vacancy defect creation in samples of amorphous SiO 2 subjected to ultraviolet laser or ionizing particle radiation (energetic H + ions) has been measured as a function of sample temperature during irradiation. For the case of laser radiation (E photon ≅ 5 eV) we find that vacancy centers are only created when the irradiation temperature is above 150 K. The efficiency of peroxy radical defect creation observed after post irradiation annealing is consistent with the behaviour of the oxygen vacancy creation efficiency. In samples with energetic protons, the opposite behaviour is observed and one finds that defect creation is enhanced as the implantation temperature is lowered. Possible physical mechanisms controlling the defect creation efficiency as a function of sample temperature and radiation are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Extrinsic- and intrinsic-defect creation in amorphous SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.A.B.; Francou, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the creation efficiency of various intrinsic and extrinsic defects in high-[OH] amorphous silica subjected to the ultraviolet emission from an O 2 plasma or 60 Co γ-ray radiation. Both oxygen-vacancy- and nitrogen-related defects are observed following γ-ray irradiation or ultraviolet exposure. The wavelength range responsible for defect creation is estimated to be 200 approx-lt λ approx-lt 300 nm (4 approx-lt E photon approx-lt 5.9 eV). The ultraviolet power output of the plasma estimated by comparing defect yields with those from a Hg lamp (λ=185 and 254 nm) suggests 200 approx-lt P approx-lt 900 mW cm -2 for a plasma power density ∼300 mW cm -3 . Nonbridging oxygen-hole centers and hydrogen-related defect centers as well as methyl radical (CH 3 . ) defects are observed after γ-ray irradiation but not after ultraviolet exposure. The efficiency of creation of the various defects is material dependent

  4. Peculiarities of radiation defect formation and annealing in n-Si due to their interaction with each other and defect clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugakov, P.F.; Lukyanitsa, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rearrangement processes proceeding during annealing (T/sub a/ = 50 to 500 0 C) of radiation defects in 60 Co γ-irradiated (T/sub irr/ 0 C) n-Si crystals (rho = 100 to 600 Ωcm) grown by the vacuum float-zone technique are studied. The temperature dependences of the Hall coefficient are measured. The results obtained are interpreted taking into account the interaction during annealing of vacancy-type defects (E-centres, divacancies) with each other and interstitial radiation defects (C/sub i/-C/sub s/ complexes, interstitial carbon C/sub i/). Phosphorus-two vacancies complexes, stable to T/sub a/ >= 500 0 C, are shown to be formed as a result of rearrangements and interaction of E-centres between themselves. The character of interaction of vacancy defects with interstitial ones is found to change significantly in the presence of defect clusters in the bulk of the crystal which are formed under heat treatment (T = 800 0 C, two hours) of the samples preliminary irradiated with fast neutrons (flux PHI/sub n/ = 1x10 14 to 1x10 16 cm -2 ). The peculiarities of radiation defects annealing observed in this case are explained taking into account the influence of defect clusters on the migration processes of mobile defects. Nature of radiation defects being formed at various stages of annealing is discussed. (author)

  5. Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in lithium orthosilicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiliks, J.E.; Kizane, G.K.; Supe, A.A.; Abramenkovs, A.A.; Tiliks, J.J. (Latvian Univ., Riga (Latvia)); Vasiljev, V.G. (Acad. A.A. Bochvar Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-12-01

    Formation and properties of radiation-induced defects and radiolysis products in polycrystalline powders and ceramic pellets of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} were studied under the effect of various types of ionizing irradiation ({gamma} quants, accelerated electrons, reactor irradiation), humidity, temperature, impurities in the samples, etc. The content of radiation defects and radiolysis products poorly depends on irradiation type, dose rate, admixture elements. The concentration of defects highly depends on the temperature of irradiation, humidity, granural size. Empirical dependence of radiolysis degree {alpha} on the dose was found: {alpha}=5x10{sup -2}xD{sup 0.5} for {gamma} and electron irradiation (T{sub rad}=300-350 K) and {alpha}=5x10{sup -3}xD{sup 0.5} for reactor radiation (T{sub rad}=700-800 K); {alpha} - matrix dissociation degree (in %); D - dose (in MGy). Colloidal lithium and silicon, lithium and silicon oxides, and O{sub 2} are the final products of radiolysis. Radiation-induced defects change tritium thermo-extraction parameters, deteriorate mechanical, thermo-physical and electric properties of ceramics. (orig.).

  6. Electric resistivity of 241-americium and 244-curium metals. Creation of defects and isochronous annealing of 241-americium metal after self-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenkel, R.

    1977-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of thin films of bulk 241 Am metal were measured between 300 and 4.5 K. The room temperature resistivity was found to be 68.90μΩcm. At room temperature the electrical resistivity of americium increases with pressure (3% up to 13 kbar). The application of 13 kbar pressure did not change the low temperature power law in the electrical resistivity. The resistivity vs temperature curve can be explained by assuming s-d scattering of conduction electrons. The localized 5f electrons are considered to be about 5eV below the Fermi level. Americium therefore should be the first lanthanide-like element in the actinide series. The defect production due to self-irradiation damage was studied by measuring the increase of the resistivity at 4.2 K over a period of 738 h. A saturation resistivity of 16.036 μΩcm was found corresponding to a defect concentration of about 0.22 a/o. After isochronal annealing two recovery stages were observed at about 65 and 145 K. The two stages shift with increasing initial defect concentration to lower temperatures. Estimates of the activation energies and the reaction order were made and possible defect reactions suggested. The magnetic contribution to the electrical resistivity of curium, which shows an antiferromagnetic transition at 52.5 k, was obtained by subtracting the resistivity of americium (to be considered as phonon part). Comparison with theoretical models were made. At low temperatures the measurements are strongly affected by self-irradiation damage [drho/dt(t=0)=9.8μΩcm/h

  7. Unirradiated UO2 in irradiated zirconium alloy sheathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, R.D.; Hardy, D.G.; Hunt, C.E.L.; Scoberg, J.A.

    1979-07-01

    Zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel elements have defected in power reactors when element power outputs were raised significantly after a long irradiation at low power. We have irradiated fuel elements fabricated from fresh UO 2 pellets and zirconium alloy sheaths previously irradiated without fuel. This gave a fuel element with radiation-damaged low-ductility sheathing but with no fission products in the fuel. The elements were power boosted in-reactor to linear power outputs up to 84 kW/m for two five-day periods. No elements defected despite sheath strains of 0.82 percent at circumferential ridge postions. Half of these elements were subsequently soaked at low power to build up the fission product inventory in the fuel and then power boosted to 63 kW/m for a third time. Two elements defected on this final boost. We conclude that these defects were caused by fission product induced stress-corrosion cracking and that this mechanism plays an importent role in power reactor fuel defects. (auth)

  8. Direct observation of the point-defect structure of depleted-zones in ion-irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, C.

    1978-01-01

    The point-defect structure of individual depleted zones has been studied systematically. Four-pass zone-refined tungsten field-ion microscope (FIM) specimens were irradiated in-situ at 10 K with 30 keV Cr + , Mo + , or W + ions to a total dose of (2 to 10) x 10 12 ion cm -2 and examined by the pulse field-evaporation technique at 10 K. The experimental conditions were such that each depleted zone was created by a single incident-ion. The number of vacant lattice sites within a depleted zone was compared with a modified Kinchin--Pease model. The radial distribution function was determined for each depleted zone; it was found that the vacant lattice sites within the volume of each depleted zone tended to exist in a highly clustered state. It was found that the diameter D of each depleted zone was described by the equation D approximately equal to [y 2 ]/sup 1 / 2 / where [y 2 ]/sup 1 / 2 / is the second moment of the theoretical distribution curve, of the fraction of incident ion energy deposited in atom motion, transverse to the direction of the incident ion-beam. The spatial distribution of self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) in a specimen irradiated with 30 keV Cr + ions and in a specimen irradiated with 18 keV Au + ions, at 10 K, was determined. A low bound to the average range of replacement collision sequences (RCSs) was found to be 175 +- 85 A. A detailed FIM study was also made of the vacancy structure of a (220) platelet created by a single 30 keV W + ion in a platinum-4.0 at. % gold alloy; the specimen was irradiated at 40 K and then isochronally warmed to 100 K. The (220) platelet was found to consist of 31 vacant lattice sites, lying in four (220) planes, and clustered in a disc-shaped region which is approximately 20 A in diameter. It was suggested that prismatic dislocation loops lying on (220) type planes in ion or fast neutron irradiated platinum can form as a result of the direct collapse of (220) type vacancy platelets

  9. Effect of random inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of radiation-induced defect clusters on carrier transport through the thin base of a heterojunction bipolar transistor upon neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V., E-mail: obolensk@rf.unn.ru; Kozlov, V. A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (NNSU) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    We analyze the electron transport through the thin base of a GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor with regard to fluctuations in the spatial distribution of defect clusters induced by irradiation with a fissionspectrum fast neutron flux. We theoretically demonstrate that the homogeneous filling of the working region with radiation-induced defect clusters causes minimum degradation of the dc gain of the heterojunction bipolar transistor.

  10. Evidence for two distinct defects contributing to the H4 deep-level transient spectroscopy peak in electron-irradiated InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwich, R.; Massarani, B.; Kaaka, M.; Awad, F.

    2000-01-01

    Deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) has been used to study the dominant deep-level H4 produced in InP by electron irradiation. The characteristics of the H4 peak in Zn-doped Inp has been studied as a function of pulse duration (t p ) before and after annealing. The results show that at least two traps contribute to the H4 peak: one is a fast trap (labeled H4 f ) and the other is a show trap (labeled H4 s ). This is show through several results concerning the activation energy, the capture cross section, the full width at half-maximum, and the peak temperature shift. It is shown that both traps are irradiation defects created in P sublattice. (authors)

  11. Non-Destructive Detection of Wire Rope Discontinuities from Residual Magnetic Field Images Using the Hilbert-Huang Transform and Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwei Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic methods are commonly employed to detect wire rope discontinuities. However, determining the residual strength of wire rope based on the quantitative recognition of discontinuities remains problematic. We have designed a prototype device based on the residual magnetic field (RMF of ferromagnetic materials, which overcomes the disadvantages associated with in-service inspections, such as large volume, inconvenient operation, low precision, and poor portability by providing a relatively small and lightweight device with improved detection precision. A novel filtering system consisting of the Hilbert-Huang transform and compressed sensing wavelet filtering is presented. Digital image processing was applied to achieve the localization and segmentation of defect RMF images. The statistical texture and invariant moment characteristics of the defect images were extracted as the input of a radial basis function neural network. Experimental results show that the RMF device can detect defects in various types of wire rope and prolong the service life of test equipment by reducing the friction between the detection device and the wire rope by accommodating a high lift-off distance.

  12. F-type centers in neutron-irradiated AIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo.

    1990-01-01

    The production of point defects by neutron irradiation and thermal decay in sintered AIN polycrystal are investigated. The absorption band at 370 nm is observed after reactor neutron irradiation to a dose of 10 16 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The defect corresponding to the band is tentatively assigned as an F-type center from the optical absorption and electron spin resonance. (author)

  13. Formation mechanism of solute clusters under neutron irradiation in ferritic model alloys and in a reactor pressure vessel steel: clusters of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meslin-Chiffon, E.

    2007-11-01

    The embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under irradiation is partly due to the formation of point defects (PD) and solute clusters. The aim of this work was to gain more insight into the formation mechanisms of solute clusters in low copper ([Cu] = 0.1 wt%) FeCu and FeCuMnNi model alloys, in a copper free FeMnNi model alloy and in a low copper French RPV steel (16MND5). These materials were neutron-irradiated around 300 C in a test reactor. Solute clusters were characterized by tomographic atom probe whereas PD clusters were simulated with a rate theory numerical code calibrated under cascade damage conditions using transmission electron microscopy analysis. The confrontation between experiments and simulation reveals that a heterogeneous irradiation-induced solute precipitation/segregation probably occurs on PD clusters. (author)

  14. Defective bursa regeneration after irradiation of young thymectomized chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhogal, B.S.; Chi, D.S.; Galton, J.E.; Bell, M.K.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of the bursa of Fabricius to regenerate after gamma-irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution was examined in chickens thymectomized (TX) immediately after hatching. Irradiation (2 X 500 R) 3 weeks after hatching was followed by impaired bursa regeneration, as judged both by bursa/body weight ratios and by bursa follicle development 3-6 weeks later in TX as compared to control birds. Germinal center formation in the spleen was deficient, and immune responses to sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) and B. abortus (BA) were moderately reduced in the TX as compared to control birds irradiated at 3 weeks but not in TX birds irradiated at 5 weeks of age

  15. Organising medication discontinuation: a qualitative study exploring the views of general practitioners toward discontinuing statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Michael; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-07-07

    Discontinuing medications is a complex decision making process and an important medical practice. It is a tool in reducing polypharmacy, reducing health system expenditure and improving patient quality of life. Few studies have looked at how general practitioners (GPs) discontinue a medication, in agreement with the patients, from a professional perspective. Three research questions were examined in this study: when does medication discontinuation occur in general practice, how is discontinuing medication handled in the GP's practice and how do GPs make decisions about discontinuing medication? Twenty four GPs were interviewed using a maximum variation sample strategy. Participant observations were done in three general practices, for one day each, totalling approximately 30 consultations. The results show that different discontinuation cues (related to the type of consultation, medical records and the patient) create situations of dissonance that can lead to the GP considering the option of discontinuation. We also show that there is a lot of ambiguity in situations of discontinuing and that some GPs trialled discontinuing as means of generating more information that could be used to deal with the ambiguity. We conclude that the practice of discontinuation should be conceptualised as a continually evaluative process and one that requires sustained reflection through a culture of systematically scheduled check-ups, routinely eliciting the patient's experience of taking drugs and trialling discontinuation. Some policy recommendations are offered including supporting GPs with lists or handbooks that directly address discontinuation and by developing more person centred clinical guidelines that discuss discontinuation more explicitly.

  16. Comparison of irradiated and hydrogen implanted German RPV steels using PAS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecko, Stanislav, E-mail: stanislav.pecko@stuba.sk; Sojak, Stanislav; Slugeň, Vladimír

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • German RPV steels were originally studied by positron annihilation spectroscopy. • Neutron irradiated and hydrogen ion implanted specimens were studied. • Both irradiation ways caused to increase of defect size. • We determined that the defect size was higher in implanted specimens. - Abstract: Radiation degradation of nuclear materials can be experimentally simulated via ion implantation. In our case, German reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels were studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). This spectroscopic method is a really effective tool for the evaluation of microstructural changes and for the analysis of degradation of reactor steels due to irradiation. German commercial reactor pressure vessel steels, originally from CARISMA program, were used in our study. The German experimental reactor VAK was selected as the proper irradiation facility in the 1980s. A specimen in as-received state and 2 different irradiated cuts from the same material were measured by PALS and size of defects with their intensity was indentified. Afterwards there was prepared an experiment with concern in simulation of neutron irradiation by hydrogen ion implantation on a linear accelerator with energy of 100 keV. Results are concerning on comparison between defects caused by neutron irradiation and hydrogen implantation. The size and intensity of defects reached a similar level as in the specimens irradiated in the nuclear reactor due to hydrogen ions implantation.

  17. The fractal character of radiation defects aggregation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylbekov, A.; Akimbekov, E.; Baktybekov, K.; Vasil'eva, I.

    2002-01-01

    In processes of self-organization, which characterize open systems, the source of ordering is a non-equilibrium. One of the samples of ordering system is radiation-stimulated aggregation of defects in solids. In real work the analysis of criterions of ordering defects structures in solid, which is continuously irradiate at low temperature is presented. The method of cellular automata used in simulation of irradiation. It allowed us to imitate processes of defects formation and recombination. The simulation realized on the surfaces up to 1000x1000 units with initial concentration of defects C n (the power of dose) 0.1-1 %. The number of iterations N (duration of irradiation) mounted to 10 6 cycles. The single centers, which are the sources of formation aggregates, survive in the result of probabilistic nature of formation and recombination genetic pairs of defects and with strictly fixed radius of recombination (the minimum inter anionic distance). For determination the character of same type defects distribution the potential of their interaction depending of defects type and reciprocal distance is calculated. For more detailed study of processes, proceeding in cells with certain sizes of aggregates, the time dependence of potential interaction is constructed. It is shown, that on primary stage the potential is negative, then it increase and approach the saturation in positive area. The minimum of interaction potential corresponds to state of physical chaos in system. Its increasing occurs with formation of same type defects aggregates. Further transition to saturation and 'undulating' character of curves explains by formation and destruction aggregates. The data indicated that - these processes occur simultaneously in cells with different sizes. It allows us to assume that the radiation defects aggregation have a fractal nature

  18. Survival and SOS response induction in ultraviolet B irradiated Escherichia coli cells with defective repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada Medina, Cesar Augusto; Aristizabal Tessmer, Elke Tatjana; Quintero Ruiz, Nathalia; Serment-Guerrero, Jorge; Fuentes, Jorge Luis

    2016-06-01

    Purpose In this paper, the contribution of different genes involved in DNA repair for both survival and SOS induction in Escherichia coli mutants exposed to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB, [wavelength range 280-315 nm]) was evaluated. Materials and methods E. coli strains defective in uvrA, oxyR, recO, recN, recJ, exoX, recB, recD or xonA genes were used to determine cell survival. All strains also had the genetic sulA::lacZ fusion, which allowed for the quantification of SOS induction through the SOS Chromotest. Results Five gene products were particularly important for survival, as follows: UvrA > RecB > RecO > RecJ > XonA. Strains defective in uvrA and recJ genes showed elevated SOS induction compared with the wild type, which remained stable for up to 240 min after UVB-irradiation. In addition, E. coli strains carrying the recO or recN mutation showed no SOS induction. Conclusions The nucleotide excision and DNA recombination pathways were equally used to repair UVB-induced DNA damage in E. coli cells. The sulA gene was not turned off in strains defective in UvrA and RecJ. RecO protein was essential for processing DNA damage prior to SOS induction. In this study, the roles of DNA repair proteins and their contributions to the mechanisms that induce SOS genes in E. coli are proposed.

  19. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  20. Stored energy in fusion magnet materials irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, R.L.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R.

    1989-08-01

    During the power cycle of a fusion reactor, the radiation reaching the superconducting magnet system will produce an accumulation of immobile defects in the magnet materials. During a subsequent warm-up cycle of the magnet system, the defects will become mobile and interact to produce new defect configurations as well as some mutual defect annihilations which generate heat-the release of stored energy. This report presents a brief qualitative discussion of the mechanisms for the production and release of stored energy in irradiated materials, a theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials, theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials during warm-up, and a discussion of the possible impact of stored energy release on fusion magnet operation 20 refs

  1. Polarity-dependence of the defect formation in c-axis oriented ZnO by the irradiation of an 8 MeV proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kazuto; Yano, Mitsuaki; Gonda, Shun-ichi; Uedono, Akira; Ishibashi, Shoji; Kojima, Kazunobu; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.

    2018-04-01

    The polarity dependence of the radiation hardness of single-crystalline ZnO bulk crystals is studied by irradiating the Zn-polar and O-polar c-planes with an 8 MeV proton beam up to the fluence of 4.2 × 1016 p/cm2. To analyze the hardness, radiation-induced defects were evaluated using positron annihilation (PA) analysis, and the recovery by post-annealing was examined using continuous-wave photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. It was suggested by the PA and PL analyses that the major defects in both polarities were VZnVO divacancies. While the PA data did not show the clear dependence on the polarity, the PL and TRPL results showed that the Zn-polar c-plane had a little higher radiation tolerance than that of the O-polar c-plane, which was consistent with the result that the increase in the electrical resistance by proton beam irradiation was smaller for the former one. Considering these results in total, the polarity dependence is considered to be not so large, but the Zn-polar c-plane has a little higher tolerance than that of the O-polar one.

  2. Phase instability in crystals under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.

    1975-01-01

    A diffusion term is introduced in the standard chemical rate model of the defect population in crystals under irradiation. For point defect generation rates larger than a critical value (g*), the uniform point defect population is shown to be unstable with respect to spatial fluctuations of the point defect concentration. g* is temperature dependent. Severala effects including the nucleation of arrays of point defect clusters, or radiation induced precipitation may occur above the instability threshold. Defect-defect interaction potentials play a crucial role in the numerical value of this threshold [fr

  3. Raman study of the repair of surgical bone defects grafted with biphasic synthetic microgranular HA + β-calcium triphosphate and irradiated or not with λ780 nm laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Luiz Guilherme P; Marques, Aparecida Maria C; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S; Santos, Nicole R; Aciole, Jouber Mateus S; Souza, Caroline Mathias C; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz B; Silveira, Landulfo

    2014-09-01

    The treatment of bone loss due to different etiologic factors is difficult, and many techniques aim to improve repair, including a wide range of biomaterials and, recently, photobioengineering. This work aimed to assess, through Raman spectroscopy, the level of bone mineralization using the intensities of the Raman peaks of both inorganic (∼ 960, ∼ 1,070, and ∼ 1,077 cm(-1)) and organic (∼ 1,454 and ∼ 1,666 cm(-1)) contents of bone tissue. Forty rats were divided into four groups each subdivided into two subgroups according to the time of killing (15 and 30 days). Surgical bone defects were made on femur of each animal with a trephine drill. On animals of group Clot, the defect was filled only by blood clot; on group Laser, the defect filled with the clot was further irradiated. On animals of groups Biomaterial and Laser + Biomaterial, the defect was filled by biomaterial and the last one was further irradiated (λ780 nm, 70 mW, Φ ∼ 0.4 cm(2), 20 J/cm(2) session, 140 J/cm(2) treatment) in four points around the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 2 weeks. At both 15th and 30th day following killing, samples were taken and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. At the end of the experimental time, the intensities of both inorganic and organic contents were higher on group Laser + Biomaterial. It is concluded that the use of laser phototherapy associated to biomaterial was effective in improving bone healing on bone defects as a result of the increasing deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite measured by Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Some physical properties of irradiated and non-irradiated oxide glasses containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, V.; Ardelean, I.; Simon, S.; Cozar, O.; Milea, I.; Lupsa, I.; Mih, V.

    1995-01-01

    The x U O 3 (1-x) [2 P 2 O 5 · Na 2 O] non-irradiated and gamma irradiated glasses (0 3+ , U 4+ and U 5+ ions. The gamma irradiation induces paramagnetic defects around the glass network forming sites occupied by phosphorous atoms. The non-irradiated samples are weak paramagnetic up to x = 0.1. For higher U O 3 concentration (0.1 < x ≤ 0.2) the magnetic measurements indicated a larger number of paramagnetic ions which are magnetically isolated and exhibit a Curie type behaviour. (author) 5 figs., 14 refs

  5. Defects in boron ion implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, W.K.

    1975-05-01

    The crystal defects formed after post-implantation annealing of B-ion-implanted Si irradiated at 100 keV to a moderate dose (2 x 10 14 /cm 2 ) were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Contrast analysis and annealing kinetics show at least two different kinds of linear rod-like defects along broken bracket 110 broken bracket directions. One kind either shrinks steadily remaining on broken bracket 110 broken bracket at high temperatures (greater than 850 0 C), or transforms into a perfect dislocation loop which rotates toward broken bracket 112 broken bracket perpendicular to its Burgers vector. The other kind shrinks steadily at moderate temperatures (approximately 800 0 C). The activation energy for shrinkage of the latter (3.5 +- 0.1 eV) is the same as that for B diffusion in Si, suggesting that this linear defect is a boron precipitate. There also exist a large number of perfect dislocation loops with Burgers vector a/2broken bracket 110 broken bracket. The depth distribution of all these defects was determined by stereomicroscopy. The B precipitates lying parallel to the foil surfaces are shown to be at a depth of about 3500 +- 600 A. The loops are also at the same depth, but with a broader spread, +-1100 A. Si samples containing B and samples containing no B (P-doped) were irradiated in the 650-kV electron microscope. Irradiation at 620 0 C resulted in the growth of very long linear defects in the B-doped samples but not in the others, suggesting that at 620 0 C Si interstitials produced by the electron beam replace substitutional B some of which precipitates in the form of long rods along broken bracket 110 broken bracket. (DLC)

  6. Radiation defects in lithium fluoride induced by heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautmann, C.; Schwartz, K.; Steckenreiter, T. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Costantini, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France). DPTA/SPMC; Toulemonde, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherches avec les Ions Lourds (CIRIL), 14 - Caen (France)

    1998-07-01

    Single crystals of lithium fluoride were irradiated with various species of heavy ions in the energy regime between 1 and 30 MeV/u. The induced radiation damage was studied with techniques such as optical absorption spectroscopy, small-angle x-ray scattering, chemical etching and profilometry, complemented by annealing experiments. Clear evidence is given for a complex track structure and defect morphology. Single defects such as F-centers are produced in a large halo of several tens of nanometers around the ion trajectory. The defect creation in this zone is similar to that under conventional radiation. For heavy ions above a critical energy loss of 10 keV/nm, new effects occur within a very small core region of 2-4 nm in diameter. The damage in this zone is responsible for chemical etching and for a characteristic anisotropic x-ray scattering. It is assumed that in this core, complex defect aggregates (e.g., cluster of color centers, molecular anions and vacancies) are created. Their formation is only slightly influenced by the irradiation temperature and takes place even at 15 K where diffusion processes of primary defects are frozen. Furthermore, irradiation with heavy ions leads to pronounced swelling effects which can be related to an intermediate zone of around 10 nm around the ion path. (orig.) 40 refs.

  7. Effect of the value of bond energy on the defect formation in the samples of CdTe - HqTe system under the influence of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramchenko, O.A.; Pashkovskij, N.V.

    1984-01-01

    The bonds break energy in solid solutions of the CdTe-HgTe system is calculated. The correctness of the statement that bonds strength in a chemical compound, particularly for the CdTe-HgTe system with decreases with the increase of atomic number. It is shown that in the process of transition from CdTe binary compound to solid solutions of the CdTe-HgTe system a part of Cd atoms is substituted by Hg atoms, which causes relative decrease of the number Cd-Te bonds. At the same time increased is the number of Cd-Te bonds which during irradiation break more probably than the Cd-Te bonds forming however only Frenkel close vapours annihilating during irradiation. During the experiment these defects lead to temperature region washout in which properties reconstruction at isochronous annealing begins. The beginning of annealing is shifted towards higher temperatures which has been observed in the course of investigation. X decrease for the Cdsub(x)Hgsub(1-x)Te solid solution increases the annealing temperature of radiation defects The results of theoretical calculations coincide with the experimental data and permit to confirm that the properties changes arising during irradiation of matters with weak chemical bonds can be conserved only at very low temperatures

  8. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy

  9. Photoluminescence study of high energy proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Bonhyeong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, June Hyuk [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Donghyeop [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Ahn, Byung Tae, E-mail: btahn@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byungha, E-mail: byungha@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-31

    We have studied the effect of proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films using photoluminescence (PL). We used a 10 MeV proton beam with varying doses from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. Intensity-dependent low temperature PL measurements suggest that the proton irradiation does not create a new defect level but instead changes the number of preexisting defects in the detection range of the PL system. By comparing PL spectra after the proton irradiation with those obtained after thermal annealing under inert gas as well as under hydrogen gas ambient, we find that the irradiation-induced change in the defect structure does not originate from the incorporation of hydrogen but from energetics of the irradiating particles. Electrical resistivity of the proton irradiated CIGS thin films is shown to decrease after the proton irradiation, and this is explained by the reduction of the concentration of compensating donor-like defects, specifically selenium vacancies, based on the PL results. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence study of 10 MeV proton irradiation on CIGS at 10 K. • Irradiation modified population of existing defects without introducing new levels. • Changes in CIGS by 10 MeV irradiation are due to energetics of irradiating protons.

  10. Creation of point defects in superconductors. A short review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quere, Yves; Rullier-Albenque, Florence.

    1981-11-01

    Many experiments have been published concerning the radiation damage in superconductors, but relatively few about the mechanisms of defect creation. A short review is presented of what is known on point defect creation in superconductors either by cold-work or by irradiation

  11. Computer simulation of defect cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-01

    In order to elucidate individual element process of various defects and defect clusters of used materials under irradiation environments, interatomic potential with reliability was investigated. And for comparison with experimental results, it is often required to adopt the temperature effect and to investigate in details mechanism of one dimensional motion of micro conversion loop and so forth using the molecular dynamic (MD) method. Furthermore, temperature effect is also supposed for stable structure of defects and defect clusters, and many problems relating to alloy element are also remained. And, simulation on photon life at the defects and defect clusters thought to be important under comparison with equipment can also be supposed an improvement of effectiveness due to relation to theses products. In this paper, some topics in such flow was extracted to explain them. In particular, future important problems will be potential preparation of alloy, structure, dynamic behavior and limited temperature of intralattice atomic cluster. (G.K.)

  12. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  13. Point defects induced in LiF by low energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe; Montereali, Rosa Maria [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy); Scacco, Augusto [Rome, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[INFM, Rome (Italy); Cremona, Marco; D`Auria, Giuliano

    1997-09-01

    A systematic study of the coloring of LiF crystals and films irradiated by 3 keV electrons at various temperatures was carried out analysing their absorption and luminescence spectra. The three stage behaviour of the F coloring curve as a function of the irradiation dose was revealed and the saturation of the process was identified for the first time with this kind of radiation. The kinetics of the defect formation confirmed the expectations derived from the most comprehensive theoretical model developed to explain the coloring process. The irradiation temperature was found to have an influence on both the proportion of different defects created and on their stability and the overall coloring efficiency turned out to be higher when the irradiation was performed on films. Various explanations to these observations are put forward and discussed.

  14. Point defects induced in LiF by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Scacco, Augusto; Cremona, Marco; D'Auria, Giuliano.

    1997-09-01

    A systematic study of the coloring of LiF crystals and films irradiated by 3 keV electrons at various temperatures was carried out analysing their absorption and luminescence spectra. The three stage behaviour of the F coloring curve as a function of the irradiation dose was revealed and the saturation of the process was identified for the first time with this kind of radiation. The kinetics of the defect formation confirmed the expectations derived from the most comprehensive theoretical model developed to explain the coloring process. The irradiation temperature was found to have an influence on both the proportion of different defects created and on their stability and the overall coloring efficiency turned out to be higher when the irradiation was performed on films. Various explanations to these observations are put forward and discussed

  15. Defect properties from X-ray scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peisl, H.

    1976-01-01

    Lattice distortions due to defects in crystals can be studied most directly by elastic X-ray or neutron scattering experiments. The 'size' of the defects can be determined from the shift of the Bragg reflections. Defect induced diffuse scattering intensity close to and between Bragg reflections gives information on the strength and symmetry of the distortion fields and yields the atomic structure of point defects (interstitials, vacancies, small aggregates). Diffuse scattering is a very sensitive method to decide whether defects are present as isolated point defects or have formed aggregates. X-ray scattering has been used to study defects produced in various ionic crystals by γ- and neutron irradiation. After an introduction to the principles of the method the experimental results will be reviewed and discussed in some detail. (orig.) [de

  16. Irradiation creep by climb-enables glide of dislocations resulting from preferred absorption of point defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L K [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1979-04-01

    A mechanism of irradiation creep arising from the climb-enabled glide of dislocations due to stress-induced preferred absorption of radiation-produced point defects is proposed. This creep component is here termed preferred absorption glide, PAG. PAG-creep operates in addition to the previously studied components of creep from climb by stress-induced preferred absorption, (SI) PA-creep, and the climb-enabled glide due to excess absorption of interstitials on dislocations during swelling, I-creep. A formulation of the various climb and climb-enabled glide processes which includes earlier results is presented. PAG-creep is comparable in magnitude to PA-creep in the parameter range of applications. While the PSA-creep rate and the I-creep rate are linear in stress, the PAG-creep rate is quadratic in stress and thus dominates at high stresses.

  17. Infrared studies of defects formed during postirradiation anneals of Czochralski silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londos, C. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Fytros, L. G.

    1998-10-01

    This article reports on defect studies of neutron-irradiated Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) material by means of infrared spectroscopy. In particular, the investigation was focused on the evolution of the 828 cm-1 well-known band of A-center, due to isochronal anneals from room temperature (RT) up to ≈700 °C. The strength of the VO band begins to increase above ≈200 gradually up to 300 °C (stage I); then, it begins to decrease up to ≈400 °C (stage II), where upon it stabilizes up to ≈550 °C (stage III). Upon re-irradiation under exactly the same conditions and repeating the annealing process, the increase of the VO signal in stage I disappears. The phenomenon is ascribed to the existence of defect aggregates labeled as Xi centers which are correlated with (impurity-defect) clusters that compete with Oi in capturing vacancies. The presence of Xi centers is related to the thermal annealings performed. Comparison of the evolution of VO (828 cm-1) and VO2 (887 cm-1) bands between irradiated and re-irradiated materials, during stage II, is made and the results are discussed in the framework of established reaction patterns. The stabilization of the amplitude of the 828 cm-1 line in stage III is examined. The prevailing aspect is that a portion of A-centers in neutron-irradiated Si acquires larger thermal stability by relaxing in the vicinity of larger defects.

  18. Irradiation damage in gamma lithium aluminate - LiAlO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvray-Gely, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of gamma lithium aluminate (of tetragonal structure) are irradiated) with various projectiles (electrons, He ions, protons, X and gamma photons) and we used (i) electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption to detect the defects produced, and (ii) transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The lithium aluminate single crystals irradiated with electrons or ions contain five different paramagnetic defects. Each of them has several anisotropic configurations whose EPR signals (i) have a Lande factor close to 2, (ii) exhibit a resolved hyperfine structure and (iii) are identical only when the static magnetic field is along /001/. In addition, four optical absorption bands appear in the range 1-6 eV in the same irradiation conditions. But only three among the five paramagnetic defects and one of the optical bands appear in X-and gamma-ray irradiated samples. Using these observations, we discuss the nature of the detected defects and we conclude about the type of their production mechanism. Particularly, we assign a six-line EPR signal and an optical band in the ultraviolet range to the F + -centre. We compare this hypothesis to a defect model based on the computation of approximate electronic wave functions using the variational method. Our TEM study shows that when gamma-LiAlO 2 single crystals are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (fluence: 10 20 electrons/sqcm), tridimensional defects (of mean dimension 100 nm) appear. At lower energies, the defect production is hidden by a thermal effect that is sufficient to induce the evaporation of lithium oxyde and the formation of LiAl 5 0 8 [fr

  19. Investigation of the chemical vicinity of defects in Mg and AZ31 with positron coincident Doppler boarding spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Within the scope of the present work, two main goals have been achieved: Firstly, the coincident Doppler broadening spectrometer (CDBS) at the high intense positron source NEPOMUC has been elaborately improved in order to increase the spatial resolution for defect mapping measurements and to investigate samples with shallow positron trapping sites which are present e. g. in magnesium. Secondly, as an application, the chemical vicinity of defects in the industrially used magnesium based alloy AZ31 has been examined by means of the detailed investigation of ion-irradiated specimen with positron annihilation spectroscopy. Detailed simulations with the finite-element simulation tool COMSOL were used to optimize the focal diameter of the positron beam at the sample position in order to increase the spatial resolution. With a value of 0.3 mm, sub-mm resolution has now been reached. The CDBS has been furthermore equipped with a sample cooling unit in order to reach liquid nitrogen temperature, maintaining the feature of scanning the sample for defect mapping. Defects and their chemical surrounding in ion irradiated magnesium and the magnesium based alloy AZ31 were then investigated on an atomic scale with the CDBS. In the respective spectra the chemical information and the defect contribution have been thoroughly separated. For this purpose, samples of annealed Mg were irradiated with Mg-ions in order to create exclusively defects. In addition Al- and Zn-ion irradiations on Mg-samples were performed in order to create samples with both defects and impurity atoms. The ion irradiated area on the samples was investigated with laterally and depth resolved positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and compared with SRIM-simulations of the vacancy distribution. The investigation of the chemical vicinity of crystal defects in AZ31 was performed with CDBS on Mg-ion irradiated AZ31 with Mg-ion irradiated Mg. The outer tail of the energy distribution in the annihilation

  20. Investigation of the chemical vicinity of defects in Mg and AZ31 with positron coincident Doppler boarding spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Martin

    2008-03-10

    Within the scope of the present work, two main goals have been achieved: Firstly, the coincident Doppler broadening spectrometer (CDBS) at the high intense positron source NEPOMUC has been elaborately improved in order to increase the spatial resolution for defect mapping measurements and to investigate samples with shallow positron trapping sites which are present e. g. in magnesium. Secondly, as an application, the chemical vicinity of defects in the industrially used magnesium based alloy AZ31 has been examined by means of the detailed investigation of ion-irradiated specimen with positron annihilation spectroscopy. Detailed simulations with the finite-element simulation tool COMSOL were used to optimize the focal diameter of the positron beam at the sample position in order to increase the spatial resolution. With a value of 0.3 mm, sub-mm resolution has now been reached. The CDBS has been furthermore equipped with a sample cooling unit in order to reach liquid nitrogen temperature, maintaining the feature of scanning the sample for defect mapping. Defects and their chemical surrounding in ion irradiated magnesium and the magnesium based alloy AZ31 were then investigated on an atomic scale with the CDBS. In the respective spectra the chemical information and the defect contribution have been thoroughly separated. For this purpose, samples of annealed Mg were irradiated with Mg-ions in order to create exclusively defects. In addition Al- and Zn-ion irradiations on Mg-samples were performed in order to create samples with both defects and impurity atoms. The ion irradiated area on the samples was investigated with laterally and depth resolved positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) and compared with SRIM-simulations of the vacancy distribution. The investigation of the chemical vicinity of crystal defects in AZ31 was performed with CDBS on Mg-ion irradiated AZ31 with Mg-ion irradiated Mg. The outer tail of the energy distribution in the annihilation

  1. Growth kinetics of dislocation loops in irradiated ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Kinoshita, C.

    2002-01-01

    Ceramic materials are expected to be applied in the future fusion reactor as radio frequency (RF) windows, toroidal insulating breaks and diagnostic probes. The radiation resistance of ceramic materials, degradation of the electrical properties and radiation induced conductivity of these materials under neutron irradiation are determined by the kinetics of the accumulation of point defects in the matrix and point defect cluster formation (dislocation loops, voids, etc.). Under irradiation, due to the ionization process, excitation of electronic subsystem and covalent type of interaction between atoms the point defects in ceramic materials are characterized by the charge state (e.g. an F + center, an oxygen vacancy with a single trapped electron) and the effective charge. For the investigation of radiation resistance of ceramic materials for future fusion applications it is very important to understand the physical mechanisms of formation and growth of dislocation loops and voids under irradiation taking into account in this system the effective charge of point defects. In the present paper the physical mechanisms of dislocation loop growth in ceramic material are investigated. For this aim a theoretical model is suggested for the description of the kinetics of point defect accumulation in the matrix taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of an electric field on diffusion migration process of charged point defects. A self-consistent system of kinetic equations describing the generation of electrical fields near dislocation loops and diffusion migration of charged point defects in elastic and electrical fields is formulated. The solution of the kinetic equations allows to find the growth rate of dislocation loops in ceramic materials under irradiation taking into account the charge state of the point defects and the effect of electric and elastic stress fields near dislocation loop on the diffusion processes

  2. Influence of radiation defects on tritium release parameters from Li2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishmanov, V.; Tanaka, S.; Yoneoka, T.

    1998-01-01

    The study of the influence of radiation defects on tritium release behavior from polycrystalline Li 2 O was performed by simultaneous measurements of the luminescence emission and tritium release. It was found that the radiation defects in Li 2 O introduced by electron irradiation cause the retention of tritium. It is thought that the tritium recovery is affected by the formation of a Li-T bond, which is tolerant of high temperatures. The retardation of tritium decreases with increasing absorbed dose in the dose range from 50 to 140 MGy. The aggregation of radiation defects at high irradiation doses is considered to be responsible for the decrease of the interaction of tritium with radiation defects. The mechanism of the interaction of radiation defects with tritium is discussed. (orig.)

  3. System dynamics with interaction discontinuity

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Albert C J

    2015-01-01

    This book describes system dynamics with discontinuity caused by system interactions and presents the theory of flow singularity and switchability at the boundary in discontinuous dynamical systems. Based on such a theory, the authors address dynamics and motion mechanism of engineering discontinuous systems due to interaction. Stability and bifurcations of fixed points in nonlinear discrete dynamical systems are presented, and mapping dynamics are developed for analytical predictions of periodic motions in engineering discontinuous dynamical systems. Ultimately, the book provides an alternative way to discuss the periodic and chaotic behaviors in discontinuous dynamical systems.

  4. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hara, Masanori; Otsuka, Teppei; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 10 26 m −2 ) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min −1 up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h

  5. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hara, Masanori; Otsuka, Teppei; Oya, Yasuhisa; Hatano, Yuji

    2015-08-01

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min-1 up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h.

  6. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Masashi, E-mail: Masashi.Shimada@inl.gov [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hara, Masanori [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan); Otsuka, Teppei [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Oya, Yasuhisa [Radioscience Research Laboratory, Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka (Japan); Hatano, Yuji [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Three tungsten samples irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to deuterium plasma (ion fluence of 1 × 10{sup 26} m{sup −2}) at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C min{sup −1} up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 h. These procedures were repeated three times to uncover defect-annealing effects on deuterium retention. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 70% for at 500 °C after each annealing, and radiation damages were not annealed out completely even after the 3rd annealing. TMAP modeling revealed the trap concentration decreases approximately 80% after each annealing at 900 °C for 0.5 h.

  7. Infrared defect dynamics—Nitrogen-vacancy complexes in float zone grown silicon introduced by electron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naohisa; Kawamura, Yuichi

    2018-05-01

    The interaction of nitrogen and intrinsic point defects, vacancy (V) and self-interstitial (I), was examined by infrared absorption spectroscopy on the electron irradiated and post-annealed nitrogen doped float zone (FZ) silicon crystal. Various absorption lines were observed, at 551 cm-1 in as-grown samples, at 726 and 778 cm-1 in as-irradiated samples (Ir group), at 689 cm-1 after post-annealing at 400 °C and above (400 °C group), at 762 and 951 cm-1 after annealing at 600 °C (600 °C group), and at 714 cm-1 up to 800 °C (800 °C group). By irradiation, a part of N2 was changed into the Ir group. VN2 is the candidate for the origin of the Ir group. By the post annealing at 400 and 600 °C, a part of N2 and the Ir group were changed into the 400 °C group, to less extent at 600 °C. V2N2 is the candidate for the origin of the 400 °C group. By annealing at 600 °C, most of the Ir group turned into 400 °C and 600 °C groups. By annealing at 800 °C, N2 recovered almost completely, and most other complexes were not observed. Recently, lifetime degradation has been observed in the nitrogen doped FZ Si annealed at between 450 and 800 °C. The N-V interaction in the same temperature range revealed here will help to understand the lifetime degradation mechanism. The behavior of the 689 cm-1 line corresponded well to the lifetime degradation.

  8. Defects induced by helium implantation in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliviero, E.; Barbot, J.F.; Declemy, A.; Beaufort, M.F.; Oliviero, E.

    2008-01-01

    SiC is one of the considered materials for nuclear fuel conditioning and for the fabrication of some core structures in future nuclear generation reactors. For the development of this advance technology, a fundamental research on this material is of prime importance. In particular, the implantation/irradiation effects have to be understood and controlled. It is with this aim that the structural alterations induced by implantation/irradiation in SiC are studied by different experimental techniques as transmission electron microscopy, helium desorption, X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. In this work, the different types of defects induced by helium implantation in SiC, point or primary defects (obtained at low energy (∼100 eV) until spread defects (obtained at higher energy (until ∼2 MeV)) are exposed. The amorphization/recrystallization and swelling phenomena are presented too. (O.M.)

  9. Fundamental investigation of point defect interactions in FE-CR alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Lee, H.J.; Wong, K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Fe-Cr alloys are a leading candidate material for structural applications in Generation TV and fusion reactors, and there is a relatively large database on their irradiation performance. However, complete understanding of the response of Fe-Cr alloys to intermediate-to-high temperature irradiation, including the radiation induced segregation of Cr, requires knowledge of point defect and point defect cluster interactions with Cr solute atoms and impurities. We present results from a hierarchical multi-scale modelling approach of defect cluster behaviour in Fe-Cr alloys. The modelling includes ab initio electronic structure calculations performed using the VASP code with projector-augmented electron wave functions using PBE pseudo-potentials and a collinear treatment of magnetic spins, molecular dynamics using semi-empirical Finnic-Sinclair type potentials, and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of coupled defect and Cr transport responsible for microstructural evolution. The modelling results are compared to experimental observations in both binary Fe-Cr and more complex ferritic-martensitic alloys, and provide a basis for understanding a dislocation loop evolution and the observations of Cr enrichment and depletion at grain boundaries in various irradiation experiments. (authors)

  10. Modelling irradiation-induced softening in BCC iron by crystal plasticity approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiazi; Terentyev, Dmitry; Yu, Long; Song, Dingkun; Bakaev, A.; Duan, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Crystal plasticity model (CPM) for BCC iron to account for radiation-induced strain softening is proposed. CPM is based on the plastically-driven and thermally-activated removal of dislocation loops. Atomistic simulations are applied to parameterize dislocation-defect interactions. Combining experimental microstructures, defect-hardening/absorption rules from atomistic simulations, and CPM fitted to properties of non-irradiated iron, the model achieves a good agreement with experimental data regarding radiation-induced strain softening and flow stress increase under neutron irradiation. - Highlights: • A stress- and thermal-activated defect absorption model is proposed for the dislocation-loop interaction. • A temperature-dependent plasticity theory is proposed for the irradiation-induced strain softening of irradiated BCC metals. • The numerical results of the model match with the corresponding experimental data.

  11. Modelling irradiation-induced softening in BCC iron by crystal plasticity approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiazi [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Terentyev, Dmitry, E-mail: dterenty@SCKCEN.BE [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Yu, Long; Song, Dingkun [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bakaev, A. [Structural Material Group, Institute of Nuclear Materials Science, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Duan, Huiling, E-mail: hlduan@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); CAPT, HEDPS and IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center of MoE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Crystal plasticity model (CPM) for BCC iron to account for radiation-induced strain softening is proposed. CPM is based on the plastically-driven and thermally-activated removal of dislocation loops. Atomistic simulations are applied to parameterize dislocation-defect interactions. Combining experimental microstructures, defect-hardening/absorption rules from atomistic simulations, and CPM fitted to properties of non-irradiated iron, the model achieves a good agreement with experimental data regarding radiation-induced strain softening and flow stress increase under neutron irradiation. - Highlights: • A stress- and thermal-activated defect absorption model is proposed for the dislocation-loop interaction. • A temperature-dependent plasticity theory is proposed for the irradiation-induced strain softening of irradiated BCC metals. • The numerical results of the model match with the corresponding experimental data.

  12. Investigation of neutron irradiated reactor vessel steels using post-irradiation annealing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Hayato; Fukuya, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    The matrix damage is known to be a major factor that contributes to embrittlement and hardening of irradiated reactor vessel steels, and is assumed to be composed of the point defect clusters. However field emission gun scanning transmission electron microscopy (FEGSTEM) and atom probe (AP) could not detect any evidence of the matrix damage. In this study, post irradiation annealing experiments combining positron annihilation lineshape analysis (PALA) and hardness experiments were applied to an actual surveillance test specimen and a sample of reactor vessel steel irradiated in a material test reactor (MTR), in order to investigate the matrix damage recovery behavior and its contribution to hardening. It was confirmed that higher fluence increased the hardness and the volume fraction of open volume defects and that higher flux decreased the thermal stability of matrix damage and the effect on hardening. The contribution of matrix damage to hardening could be estimated to be below 30%. (author)

  13. Defect production by fast neutrons and thermal recovery in amorphous Pd80Si20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, G.; Petry, W.; Klaumuenzer, S.; Wallner, G.; Weck, G.

    1985-01-01

    Defects were introduced into variously pretreated strips of glassy Pd 80 Si 20 by fast neutron irradiation at 4.6 K 2 . The electrical resistivity was measured during irradiation up to 2.10 19 n/cm 2 as well as subsequent isochronal annealing up to 483 K. Most of the results can be understood in terms of the familiar concept of vacancy and interstitial-like defects. However, in addition to the well-known process of mutual annihilation an important mechanism for defect relaxation is the disintegration of localized defects into subatomic ones which are distributed among many atoms

  14. Effect of irradiation spectrum on the microstructure of ion-irradiated Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    Polycrystalline samples of alpha-alumina have been irradiated with various ions ranging from 3.6 MeV Fe + to 1 MeV H + ions at 650 C. Cross-section transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the depth-dependent microstructure of the irradiated specimens. The microstructure following irradiation was observed to be dependent on the irradiation spectrum. In particular, defect cluster nucleation was effectively suppressed in specimens irradiated with light ions such as 1 MeV H + ions. On the other hand, light ion irradiation tended to accelerate the growth rate of dislocation loops. The microstructural observations are discussed in terms of ionization enhanced diffusion processes

  15. Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Feklisova, O V; Yakimov, E B; Weber, J

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen interaction with radiation defects in p-type silicon has been investigated by deep-level non-stationary spectroscopy. Hydrogen is introduced into the high-energy electron-irradiated crystals under chemical etching in acid solutions at room temperature followed by the reverse-bias annealing at 380 K. It is observed that passivation of the irradiation-induced defects is accompanied by formation of novel electrically active defects with hydrogen-related profiles. Effect of hydrogen on the electrical activity of the C sub s C sub i complexes is shown for the first time. Based on the spatial distribution and passivation kinetics, possible nature of the novel complexes is analyzed. The radii for hydrogen capture by vacancies, K-centers, C sub s C sub i centers and the novel complexes are determined

  16. On the stability of rotational discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, P.; Scholer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of symmetric rotational discontinuities in which the magnetic field rotates by 180 degree is investigated by means of a one-dimensional self-consistent hybrid code. Rotational discontinuities with an angle Θ > 45 degree between the discontinuity normal direction and the upstream magnetic field are found to be relatively stable. The discontinuity normal is in the x direction and the initial magnetic field has finite y component only in the transition region. In the case of the ion (left-handed) sense of rotation of the tangential magnetic field, the transition region does not broaden with time. In the case of the electron (right-handed) sense of rotation, a damped wavetrain builds up in the B y component downstream of the rotational discontinuity and the discontinuity broadens with time. Rotational discontinuities with smaller angles, Θ, are unstable. Examples for a rotational discontinuity with Θ = 30 degree and the electron sense of rotation as well as a rotational discontinuity with Θ = 15 degree and the ion sense of rotation show that these discontinuities into waves. These waves travel approximately with Alfven velocity in the upstream direction and are therefore phase standing in the simulation system. The magnetic hodograms of these disintegrated discontinuities are S-shaped. The upstream portion of the hodogram is always right-handed; the downstream portion is always left-handed

  17. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H.; Fontaine, J.C.; Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.)

  18. Defects and related phenomena in electron irradiated ordered or disordered Fe-Co and Fe-Co-V alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, J.P.; Dinhut, J.F.; Desarmot, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two B 2 type alloys Fe 50 at.%-Co 50 at.% and Fe 49 at.%-Co 49 at.%-V 2 at.% either in the ordered or the disordered state have been irradiated with 2.5 MeV electrons at liquid hydrogen temperature. The recovery of the resistivity damage was studied during subsequent isochronal annealing up to 700 K. The resistivity damage rates for both initially disordered Fe-Co and Fe-Co-V alloys are interpreted in terms of point defect production. The intrinsic resistivities rhosub(F) of Frenkel pairs and the effective recombination volumes V 0 are determined. In the Fe-Co ordered alloy point defect production superimposed with a disordering process can account for the resistivity damage. The effective displacement rate causing disordering is determined, indicating that replacement collisions are the dominant disordering mechanism. A calculation of the average number of replacements along directions per Frenkel pair is proposed. During the recovery of the radiation induced resistivity three main stages are observed in both ordered and disordered alloys. The particular resistivity behavior of the Fe-Co-V alloy complicates the interpretation of production and recovery data. (author)

  19. Low temperature irradiation effects on iron boron based amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouard, A.

    1982-09-01

    Three Fe-B amorphous alloys (Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 27 Mo 2 B 20 and Fe 75 B 25 ) and the crystallized Fe 3 B alloy have been irradiated at the temperature of liquid hydrogen. Electron irradiation and irradiation by 10 B fission fragments induce point defects in amorphous alloys. These defects are characterized by an intrinsic resistivity and a formation volume. The threshold energy for the displacement of iron atoms has also been calculated. Irradiation by 235 U fission fragments induces some important structural modifications in the amorphous alloys [fr

  20. Computer stimulation of radiation-induced defects in metals irradiated with heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupchishin, A.A.; Kupchishin, A.I.; Shmygaleva, T.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In the work for account of defect concentration at ion irradiation the formula is proposed with use the modified cascade-probability function. It is necessary to find a real domain of result for account of cascade-probability functions (CPF) subject to losses of energy for ions depend upon a number of interactions. CPF first grows, achieving a maximum, then one decreases in the found region. The regularities of behavior of result region at change of a charge of flying particles are the following: 1. The increase of a charge z of a flying particle results in a displacement of result determination region to the left and narrowing it; 2. At the large value z, the maximum value of CPF displaces to the left as respects of h/λ already at small depths, and at the large depths the result is in a narrow region (less than 1 %, silver, gold); 3. The narrowest region of result arises at a large charge of flying particle and a target with small charge on the end of run and amounts to 100-th shares of percents

  1. Ferrobielastic twinning in irradiated quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiau, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cultured quartz is usually free from electrical twinning; however, it may occur if the seed crystal is twinned or if undue applied forces are exerted on the crystal. Ferrobielastic twinning was studied optically (photoelastic effect) and electrically (piezoelectric effect). At room temperature, twins were perceptible at stresses of about 2.l5 x 10 8 N/m 2 , and crystals switched from their original states to the alternative twin states at stresses about 5.0 x 10 8 N/m 2 (called coercive stress). The decrease in coercive stress with increasing temperature was observed, and these coercive stresses become very low as temperatures reach to 300 0 C. The effects of irradiation on the twinning in quartz were also studied. The presence of defects produced by irradiation was utilized to pin the domain wall motion. Both neutrons and gamma rays were employed. The stress required to nucleate an appreciable volume of twins is about twice as high for irradiated crystals than for those unirradiated. This result demonstrated that the irradiated crystals can tolerate higher stresses. However, the coercive stress for complete switch-over was not much different for irradiated and unirradiated crystals. It appears that the defects caused by irradiation eliminate the initial twinning events but do not affect switch-over

  2. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, K.M. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA, 94720 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E{sub F} approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E{sub FS}. At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E{sub F} and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. N-type doping of InGaN by high energy particle irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews our extensive studies of the effects of native defects introduced by high energy particles on the electrical and optical properties of InGaN alloys. We show that the electronic properties of irradiated InGaN can be well described by the amphoteric defect model. Because of the extremely low position of the conduction band edge of InN the formation energy of native donor defects is very low in In-rich InGaN alloys. High energy particle irradiation of InN and In-rich InGaN, will therefore produce donor defects and result in more n-type materials. As the irradiation dose increases, the electron concentration increases until the Fermi energy E F approaches the Fermi stabilization energy E FS . At this point both donor and acceptor-type defects are formed at similar rates, and compensate each other, leading to stabilization of E F and a saturation of the electron concentration. Hence a large increase and then saturation in the Burstein-Moss shift of the optical absorption edge is also observed. Furthermore we also found that mobilities in the irradiated films can be well described by scattering from triply charged defects, providing strong evidence that native defects in InN are triple donors. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and predictions based on the ADM suggests that particle irradiation can be an effective and simple method to control the doping (electron concentration) in In-rich In x Ga 1-x N via native point defects. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  5. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  6. Optical properties of electron-irradiated gallium phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brailovskii, E.Yu.; Grigoryan, N.E.; Eritsyan, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of optical absorption and photoconductivity measurements in the 0.1 to 2.4 eV range of GaP crystals irradiated with 7.5 and 50 MeV electrons are presented. The absorption of irradiated crystals near the edge can be represented by two exponential regions. In the free carrier absorption region one can observe as a result of irradiation a decrease of the power index p in the dependence α proportional to lambdap. Photoconductivity with long-time relaxation takes place in the spectral interval where the additional absorption is observed. The quenching of residual conductivity can be observed at hν=1.0eV. Variations in absorption and photoconductivity are attributed to the 'tails' of density states near the zone edges arising at introduction of both point defects and disordered regions. At hν=2.1eV one can observe a resonance band which is attributed to intra-centre transitions on point defects. A recovery of the optical properties of GaP at annealing is studied. In heavily irradiated GaP crystals point defects can form gatherings which display themselves as disordered regions. (author)

  7. Fundamental aspects on ion-beam surface modification: defect production and migration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Averback, R.S.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-09-01

    Ion-beam modification of metals is generating increasing scientific interest not only because it has exciting technological potential, but also because it has raised fundamental questions concerning radiation-induced diffusion processes. In addition to the implanted species, several defect production and migration mechanisms contribute to changes in the near-surface composition of an alloy during ion bombardment, e.g., atoms exchange positions via displacements and replacement sequences; preferential sputtering effects arise; radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation occur. The latter two defect migration mechanisms are of particular significance since they can alter the composition to depths which are much greater than the implanted ion range. By altering various parameters such as irradiation temperature, ion mass, energy, and current density, and initial alloying distributions, a rich variety of near-surface composition profiles can be created. We have utilized changes in ion mass and energy, and irradiation temperature to distinguish defect production from defect migration effects. Experimental results are presented which provide a guide to the relative efficiencies of different mechanisms under various irradiation conditions. 46 references

  8. Radiation hardening: study of production velocity and post-irradiation recovery of defect clusters produced by neutron irradiation at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Hector C.; Miralles, Monica T.

    1999-01-01

    This work includes three basic studies using radiation hardening of Cu single crystals irradiated at 77 K in the RA-1-reactor of CNEA: 1) The initial of a production curve of defect clusters originated during radiation until 5.2 x 10 20 n m 2 . The shape of the curve is compared with those obtained from measurement of resistivity increased (Δρ) with neutronic doses (φt) and the acceptance of the linear dependency of Δρ with Frenkel Pairs concentration (PFs); 2) The isochronal hardening recovery in the temperature interval of stage V (T > 450 K). The existence of the sub-stages Vb (∼ 550 K) and Vc (∼ 587 K), determined for the first time from hardening measurements, are shown and compared with results obtained by other techniques; 3) Isothermal recoveries performed in the temperature interval of the sub-stage Vc to determine phenomenologically the apparent activation energy of the sub-stage. The value obtained was in agreement with the energy for Cu vacancies auto diffusion. (author)

  9. Long term evolution of the immune response in the rat irradiated at mean and high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malarbet, J.L.; Veyrat, M.; Le Go, R.; Prudhomme, J.; Genest, L.; Castelnau, L.

    1977-01-01

    In irradiated animals, the lymphocytes, immunity vectors, are quickly and quantitatively depressed. Their ability to respond to an antigenic stimulus was tested in rats during post-irradiation lymphopenia and after restoration of normal lymphocytosis. The antigenic stimulus, sheep erythrocytes, was applied first 2 and 3 weeks, then 1, 2 and 3 months after exposures to 60 Co gamma rays (doses 300 and 600 rads). This study covered the 3rd through the 10th day after immunisation. Blood lymphocytes were separated by the Ficoll-Contrix gradient method and spleen lymphocytes were obtained by crushing. A lymphocyte sub-population separation was obtained from centrifugation on 4 discontinuous Ficoll-Contrix gradients. Size distribution spectra show that the lighter sub-population is made up of large-sized cells and that the heavier the cells, the smaller they are. The determination of surface immunoglobulins with fluorescent antigens shows that cells bearing immunoglobulins are predominant in the low-density sub-population. The measurement of electrophoretic mobility shows a low-mobility, low-density population and a higher density, faster mobility population which could reflect a higher proportion of B-cells in the low density population and of T-cells in the higher density population. The immune response was tested on the sub-populations. The rosette-forming ability was depressed during 1 month after irradiation then became progressively normal. The cellular plaque-forming ability was markedly suppressed 15 days after irradiation, but was soon active again. These results show the qualitative aspect of the post-irradiation immune defect [fr

  10. Secondary defects in non-metallic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashbee, K.H.G.; Hobbs, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper points out features of secondary defect formation which are peculiar to non-metallic solids (excluding elemental semiconductors). Most of the materials of interest are compounds of two or more (usually more or less ionic) atomic species, and immediate consequence of which is a need to maintain both stoichiometry (or accommodate non-stoichiometry) and order. Primary defects in these solids, whether produced thermally, chemically or by irradiation, seldom are present or aggregate in exactly stoichiometric proportions, and the resulting extending defect structures can be quite distinct from those found in metallic solids. Where stoichiometry is maintained, it is often convenient to describe extended defects in terms of alterations in the arrangement of 'molecular' units. The adoption of this procedure enables several novel features of extended defect structures in non-metals to be explained. There are several ways in which a range of non-stoichiometry can be accommodated, which include structural elimination of point defects, nucleation of new coherent phases of altered stoichiometry, and decomposition. (author)

  11. On kinetics of paramagnetic radiation defects accumulation in beryllium ceramics; O kinetike nakopleniya paramagnitnykh radiatsionnykh defektov v berillievykh keramikakh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, A I; Ryabikin, Yu A; Zashkvara, O V; Bitenbaev, M I; Petykhov, Yu V [Fiziko-Tekhnicheskij Inst., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    1999-07-01

    Results of paramagnetic radiation defects concentration dependence study in beryllium ceramics from gamma-irradiation dose ({sup 60}Co) within interval 0-100 Mrem are cited. Obtained dose dependence has form of accumulation curve with saturation typical of for majority of solids (crystals, different polymers, organic substances and others) , in which under irradiation occur not only formation of paramagnetic radiation defects, but its destruction due to recombination and interaction with radiation fields. Analysis of accumulation curve by the method of distant asymptotics allows to determine that observed in gamma-irradiated beryllium ceramics double line of electron spin resonance is forming of two types of paramagnetic radiation defects. It was defined, that sum paramagnetic characteristics of beryllium ceramics within 1-100 Mrad gamma- irradiation dose field change insignificantly and define from first type of paramagnetic radiation defects.

  12. Properties of point defects either native or induced by irradiation in the 3C and 6H polytypes of silicon carbide determined by positron annihilation and EPR; Proprietes des defauts ponctuels natifs et induits par irradiation dans les polytypes 3C et 6H du carbure de silicium determinees par annihilation de positons et RPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerbiriou, X

    2006-02-15

    Potential applications of silicon carbide (SiC) in micro-electronics have justified many studies on point defects, which play an important role in the electrical compensation. Moreover, this material has many assets to take part in the fissile materials confining in the gas cooled reactors of the future (4. generation). In this thesis, we have used Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy to study the properties of point defects (nature, size, charge state, migration and agglomeration during annealing), either native or induced by irradiation with various particles (H{sup +}, e{sup -}, carbon ions), in the 3C and 6H polytypes of SiC. The positron annihilation study of native defects in 6H-SiC has shown the presence of a strong concentration of non-vacancy traps of acceptor type, which are not present in the 3C-SiC crystals. The nature of the defects detected after irradiation with low energy electrons (190 keV) depends on the polytype. Indeed, while silicon Frenkel pairs and carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 6H crystals, only carbon mono-vacancies are detected in the 3C crystals. We propose that these differences concerning the populations of detected point defects result from different values of the silicon displacement threshold energy for the two polytypes (approximately 20 eV for 6H and 25 V for 3C). In addition, the irradiations with 12 MeV protons and 132 MeV carbon ions have created silicon mono-vacancies as well as VSi-VC di-vacancies. Neither the particle (protons or ions carbon), nor the polytype (3C or 6H) influence the nature of the generated defects. Finally the study of the annealing of 6H-SiC monocrystals irradiated with 12 MeV protons have revealed several successive processes. The most original result is the agglomeration of the silicon mono-vacancies with the VSi-VC di-vacancies which leads to the formation of VSi-VC-VSi tri-vacancies. (author)

  13. Effect of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber gain behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.; Brom, J.M.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Sigward, M.H. [Institute de Recherches Subatomiques, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Fontaine, J.C. [Universite de Haute Alsace, GRPHE, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Barthe, S.; Schunck, J.P. [Laboratoire PHASE (UPR 292 du CNRS), 23 rue du Loess, BP 28, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify the influence of radiation-induced substrate defects on microstrip gas chamber (MSGC) gain behaviour. The first part of this paper focuses on radiation effects on a typical MSGC substrate: Desag D263 glass. Defect generation was studied for Desag D263 with pure silica (Suprasil 1) as a reference. We studied the evolution of defect concentration with respect to accumulated doses up to 480 kGy. Annealing studies of defects in Desag D263 were also performed. In the second part, the radiation sensitivity of Desag D263 glass has been linked to the behaviour of the detector under irradiation. Comparative gain measurements were taken before and after substrate irradiation at 10 and 80 kGy the minimal dose received during LHC operation and the dose for which defect density is maximum (respectively). (orig.) 26 refs.

  14. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badillo, A.; Bellon, P.; Averback, R. S.

    2015-04-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni-Si and Al-Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation.

  15. A phase field model for segregation and precipitation induced by irradiation in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo, A; Bellon, P; Averback, R S

    2015-01-01

    A phase field model is introduced to model the evolution of multicomponent alloys under irradiation, including radiation-induced segregation and precipitation. The thermodynamic and kinetic components of this model are derived using a mean-field model. The mobility coefficient and the contribution of chemical heterogeneity to free energy are rescaled by the cell size used in the phase field model, yielding microstructural evolutions that are independent of the cell size. A new treatment is proposed for point defect clusters, using a mixed discrete-continuous approach to capture the stochastic character of defect cluster production in displacement cascades, while retaining the efficient modeling of the fate of these clusters using diffusion equations. The model is tested on unary and binary alloy systems using two-dimensional simulations. In a unary system, the evolution of point defects under irradiation is studied in the presence of defect clusters, either pre-existing ones or those created by irradiation, and compared with rate theory calculations. Binary alloys with zero and positive heats of mixing are then studied to investigate the effect of point defect clustering on radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in undersaturated solid solutions. Lastly, irradiation conditions and alloy parameters leading to irradiation-induced homogeneous precipitation are investigated. The results are discussed in the context of experimental results reported for Ni–Si and Al–Zn undersaturated solid solutions subjected to irradiation. (paper)

  16. Point defects dynamics in a stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetniansky de De Grande, Nelida.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence of anisotropic defect diffusion on stress is studied for a hexagonal close packed (hcp) material under irradiation and uniaxially stressed. The diffusion is described as a discrete process of thermally activated jumps. It is shown that the presence of an external stress field enhances the intrinsic anisotropic diffusion, being this variation determined by the defect dipole tensors' symmetry in the equilibrium and saddle point configurations. Also, the point defect diffusion equations to sinks, like edge dislocations and spherical cavities, are solved and the sink strengths are calculated. The conclusion is that the dynamics of the interaction between defects and sinks is controlled by the changes in diffusivity induced by stress fields. (Author) [es

  17. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. I. Trap mediated interstitial cluster diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The microstructure that develops under low temperature irradiation in ferritic alloys is dominated by a high density of small (2–5 nm) defects. These defects have been widely observed to move via occasional discrete hops during in situ thin film irradiation experiments. Cluster dynamics models are used to describe the formation of these defects as an aggregation process of smaller clusters created as primary damage. Multiple assumptions regarding the mobility of these damage features are tested in the models, both with and without explicit consideration of such irradiation induced hops. Comparison with experimental data regarding the density of these defects demonstrates the importance of including such motions in a valid model. In particular, discrete hops inform the limited dependence of defect density on irradiation temperature observed in experiments, which the model was otherwise incapable of producing.

  18. Effects of LED phototherapy on bone defects grafted with MTA, bone morphogenetic proteins and guided bone regeneration: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Soares, Luiz G P; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T; Santos, Nicole R S; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S; Silveira Júnior, Landulfo

    2012-09-01

    We studied peaks of calcium hydroxyapatite (CHA) and protein and lipid CH groups in defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) treated or not with LED irradiation, bone morphogenetic proteins and guided bone regeneration. A total of 90 rats were divided into ten groups each of which was subdivided into three subgroups (evaluated at 15, 21 and 30 days after surgery). Defects were irradiated with LED light (wavelength 850 ± 10 nm) at 48-h intervals for 15 days. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defects. There were no statistically significant differences in the CHA peaks among the nonirradiated defects at any of the experimental time-points. On the other hand, there were significant differences between the defects filled with blood clot and the irradiated defects at all time-points (p Raman spectral analysis indicate that infrared LED light irradiation improves the deposition of CHA in healing bone grafted or not with MTA.

  19. Implications of defect clusters formed in cascades on free defect generation and microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1992-12-01

    A large fraction of the defects produced by irradiation with energetic neutrons or heavy ions originates in cascades. Not only increased recombination of vacancy and interstitial defects but also significant clustering of like defects occur. Both processes reduce the number of point defects available for long range migration. Consequences of defect clustering in cascades will be discussed in a semi-quantitative form with the aid of calculations using a very simplified model: Quasi-steady-state distributions of immobile vacancy and/or interstitial clusters develop which, in turn, can become significant sinks for mobile defects, and, therefore reduce their lifetime. Although cluster sinks will cause segregation and, potentially, precipitation of second phases due to local changes of composition, the finite lifetime of clusters will not lead to lasting, local compositional changes. A transition from highly dense interstitial and vacancy cluster distributions to the void swelling regime occurs when the thermal evaporation of vacancies from small vacancy clusters becomes significant at higher temperatures. Unequal clustering of vacancies and interstitials leads to an imbalance of their fluxes of in the matrix and, hence, to unequal contributions to atom transport by interstitials and by vacancies even in the quasi-steady state approximation

  20. The irradiation alterations in non radioactive materials: mineralogic and environmental implications; Les degats d irradiation dans les mineraux non radioactifs: implications mineralogiques et environnementales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calas, G.; Allard, T.; Morin, G. [Institut de Mineralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenses, Paris, (France); Balan, E. [IRD, Paris (France)

    2006-07-01

    This work presents an outlook of the results obtained on different types of defects in a wide series of minerals. The trapping of irradiation defects by substituted impurities will be illustrated by natural fluorines and apatites, allowing then to illustrate the use of these data to better know the thermal history of minerals or the role of the trace elements to stabilize these defects on geological period of times. Are also presented the native defects of clayey minerals, in relation to the natural irradiation of their alumino-silicated lattice, as in the case of kaolinite or montmorillonite. Here also, the presence of substituted impurities allows to explain the stability of these centers on geological period of times. (O.M.)

  1. Interaction of electron irradiation with nitrogen-related deep levels in InGaAsN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Gou, J.; Imazumi, M.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present an investigation of 1 MeV electron irradiation-induced defects in p-InGaAsN and their impact on nitrogen-related defects. A hitherto existing nitrogen-related electron trap E1 (0.20 eV) shows a significant increase in concentration after 1 MeV electron irradiation. In addition, 1 MeV electron irradiation induced a hole trap H1 at energy of about 0.75 eV above the valence band. Isothermal annealing analysis indicates that E1 is a complex defect involving an interstitial or a substitutional atom in combination with some other defect, whose concentration is enhanced by irradiation. A correlation exists between the recovery of free carrier concentration and recovery of the E1 center to preradiation concentrations, which indicates the possibility of the E1 as an acceptorlike center

  2. Positron annihilation measurements in high-energy alpha-irradiated n-type gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Sandip; Mandal, Arunava; SenGupta, Asmita [Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Roychowdhury, Anirban [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, Kolkata, West Bengal (India)

    2015-07-15

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening annihilation line-shape measurements have been carried out in 40-MeV alpha-irradiated n-type GaAs. After irradiation, the sample has been subjected to an isochronal annealing over temperature region of 25-800 C with an annealing time of 30 min at each set temperature. After each annealing, the positron measurements are taken at room temperature. Formation of radiation-induced defects and their recovery with annealing temperature are investigated. The lifetime spectra of the irradiated sample have been fitted with two lifetimes. The average positron lifetime τ{sub avg} = 244 ps at room temperature after irradiation indicates the presence of defects, and the value of τ{sub 2} (262 ps) at room temperature suggests that the probable defects are mono-vacancies. Two distinct annealing stages in τ{sub avg} at 400-600 C and at 650-800 C are observed. The variations in line-shape parameter (S) and defect-specific parameter (R) during annealing in the temperature region 25-800 C resemble the behaviour of τ{sub avg} indicating the migration of vacancies, formation of vacancy clusters and the disappearance of defects between 400 and 800 C. (orig.)

  3. Electrical properties of gallium arsenide irradiated with electrons and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kol'chenko, T.I.; Lomako, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of changes in the electrical properties of GaAs doped with Te, S, Se, Si, Ge, Sn (n 0 approximately 10 16 -10 18 cm -3 ) and irradiated either with 2.5-28 MeV electrons or with fast reactor neutrons. An analysis of changes in the electron density indicated that the rate of carrier removal by electron bombardment was independent of the dopant but was governed by isolated radiation defects. The change in the mobility due to irradiation with 2.5-10 MeV electrons was also governed by isolated defects. When the electron energy was increased to 28 MeV the main contribution to the change in the mobility was made by defect clusters. In the neutron-irradiation case the changes in the carrier density and mobility were mainly due to defect clusters and the nature of changes in the electrical properties was again independent of the dopant

  4. Annealing study of main electron irradiation-induced defects (H4 and H5) in P-In P using DLTS technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massarani, B.; Awad, F.; Kaaka, M.

    1992-12-01

    Thermal annealing of the two hole traps H 4 and H 5 in room-temperature electron-irradiated In P Schottky diodes was investigated. Electron-irradiation energy ranging between 0.15 and 1.5 MeV with doses ranging between 5 x 10 14 and 10 16 e/cm 2 . DLTS technique with double-phase detector was used in this study. Contrary to what is generally admitted, we found that H 5 anneals out at about 150 C o with an activation energy of 1 eV. We have shown that H 4 is a complex defect having two components that we could resolve. While the first one, having lower emission cross section and higher capture cross section with ΔE = 0.37 eV anneals out at about 110 C o . The other component, with ΔE = 0.50 eV is thermally stable even above 170 C o . (author). 13 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Facilities for studying radiation damage in nonmetals during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, P.W.

    1984-08-01

    Two facilities have been developed for making optical absorption, luminescence and other measurements on a single sample before, during and after irradiation. One facility uses 60 Co gamma rays and the other 0.5 to 3 MeV electrons from an accelerator. Optical relays function as spectrophotometers, luminescenc detectors, etc. All radiation sensitive components are outside of walk-in irradiation chambers; all measurement control and data recording is computerized. Irradiations are made at controlled temperatures between 5K and 900 0 C. The materials studied include glasses, quartz, alkali halides (especially natural rock salt), organic crystals, etc. As determined from color center measurements the damage formation rate in all materials studied at 25 0 C or above is strongly temperature dependent. The defect concentration during irradiation is usually much greater than that measured after irradiation. The fraction of defects annealing after irradiation and the annealing rate usually increases as the irradiation temperature increases. The completed studies demonstrate that, in most cases, the extent of maximum damage and the damage formation and annealing kinetics can be determined only by making measurements during irradiation

  6. A new human photosensitive subject with a defect in the recovery of DNA synthesis after ultraviolet-light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Kano, Y.; Goto, K.; Shimizu, K.

    1981-01-01

    A non-sensitive, 8-yr-old male patient (termed UV81KO) with only acute recurrent sunburns and without any other physical or neuromental retardations was studied. The patient's skin exhibited lowered minimal erythema doses between 280 and 300 nm monochromatic wavelengths without delayed peaking of erythema. UV81KO skin fibroblasts in culture was 5-fold more sensitive to 254 nm UV killing than normal cells, though the response of obligatory heterozygotes was normal. UV81KO cells were also more sensitive to killings by fluorescent sunlamp (295-300 nm UV-B) radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-hydroxy-acetyl aminofluorene, but not by monofunctional decarbamoyl mitomycin C, bifunctional mitomycin C, and alkylating agents (methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea). Assays for unscheduled DNA synthesis, T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (pyrimidine dimers), endogenous excision-break accumulation by arabinofuranosyl cytosine-plus-hydroxyurea, single-strand-break rejoining, and molecular-weight increase of pulse-chased DNA in irradiated cells indicated no apparently detectable defects in nucleotide-excision repair processes and in replicative bypass in UV81KO cells. Despite the repair proficiency as such, UV81KO cells showed the defective recovery of DNA synthesis after 254 nm UV irradiation with 1 and 5 J/m2, at which dose the recovery occurred in normal cells. The base line level of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was higher in UV81KO cells (10-12 SCEs/cell) than in normal cells (5 SCEs/cell), although the induction rate of SCEs by 254 nm UV in UV81KO cells was the same as in normal cells. Such clinical, cellular and molecular characteristics and comparison to those in the other photodermatoses (xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome, the 11961 disorder, Bloom's syndrome) can make a clear distinction of UV81KO from the others

  7. A new human photosensitive subject with a defect in the recovery of DNA synthesis after ultraviolet-light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Kano, Y.; Goto, K.; Shimizu, K.

    1981-09-01

    A non-sensitive, 8-yr-old male patient (termed UV81KO) with only acute recurrent sunburns and without any other physical or neuromental retardations was studied. The patient's skin exhibited lowered minimal erythema doses between 280 and 300 nm monochromatic wavelengths without delayed peaking of erythema. UV81KO skin fibroblasts in culture was 5-fold more sensitive to 254 nm UV killing than normal cells, though the response of obligatory heterozygotes was normal. UV81KO cells were also more sensitive to killings by fluorescent sunlamp (295-300 nm UV-B) radiation, 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, and N-hydroxy-acetyl aminofluorene, but not by monofunctional decarbamoyl mitomycin C, bifunctional mitomycin C, and alkylating agents (methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea). Assays for unscheduled DNA synthesis, T4 endonuclease V-susceptible sites (pyrimidine dimers), endogenous excision-break accumulation by arabinofuranosyl cytosine-plus-hydroxyurea, single-strand-break rejoining, and molecular-weight increase of pulse-chased DNA in irradiated cells indicated no apparently detectable defects in nucleotide-excision repair processes and in replicative bypass in UV81KO cells. Despite the repair proficiency as such, UV81KO cells showed the defective recovery of DNA synthesis after 254 nm UV irradiation with 1 and 5 J/m2, at which dose the recovery occurred in normal cells. The base line level of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was higher in UV81KO cells (10-12 SCEs/cell) than in normal cells (5 SCEs/cell), although the induction rate of SCEs by 254 nm UV in UV81KO cells was the same as in normal cells. Such clinical, cellular and molecular characteristics and comparison to those in the other photodermatoses (xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne's syndrome, the 11961 disorder, Bloom's syndrome) can make a clear distinction of UV81KO from the others.

  8. Studies of defects on ion irradiated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P.F.; Prawer, S.; Spargo, A.E.C.; Bursill, L.A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    It is known that diamond is amorphized or graphitized when irradiated above a critical dose. Above this critical dose, D{sub c}, the resistance R is found to drop very rapidly due to the formation of graphite regions which overlap at D{sub c} to form a semi-continuous electrically conducting pathway through the sample. One particularly interesting method of studying this transformation is electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Using EELS, the different phases of carbon can be identified and distinguished from each other using the extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) of the core-loss part of the spectrum. EELS is a sensitive method for determining the electronic structure of small areas of a sample. In this paper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and EELS measurements of the ion irradiated diamond were combined in an attempt to correlate the microstructural nature of the ion-beam induced damage to the changes in the electrical and other properties. 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  9. Studies of defects on ion irradiated diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, P F; Prawer, S; Spargo, A E.C.; Bursill, L A [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    It is known that diamond is amorphized or graphitized when irradiated above a critical dose. Above this critical dose, D{sub c}, the resistance R is found to drop very rapidly due to the formation of graphite regions which overlap at D{sub c} to form a semi-continuous electrically conducting pathway through the sample. One particularly interesting method of studying this transformation is electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Using EELS, the different phases of carbon can be identified and distinguished from each other using the extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS) of the core-loss part of the spectrum. EELS is a sensitive method for determining the electronic structure of small areas of a sample. In this paper, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and EELS measurements of the ion irradiated diamond were combined in an attempt to correlate the microstructural nature of the ion-beam induced damage to the changes in the electrical and other properties. 7 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  10. Production and recombination of radiation defects in argon and krypton crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giersberg, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    Relative changes in the lattice constants of argon and krypton crystals have been measured by X-ray diffraction. As a result X-ray irradiation is found to produce stable defects. The recombination behaviour of these defects can be determined by isochronous and isothermal annealing. The creation of primary defects can be explained by exciton excitation and double-ionisation. (orig.) [de

  11. Positron annihilation lifetime in float-zone n-type silicon irradiated by fast electrons: a thermally stable vacancy defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunov, Nikolay; Emtsev, Vadim; Oganesyan, Gagik; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Elsayed, Mohamed; Kozlovskii, Vitalii

    2016-01-01

    Temperature dependency of the average positron lifetime has been investigated for n-type float-zone silicon, n-FZ-Si(P), subjected to irradiation with 0.9 MeV electrons at RT. In the course of the isochronal annealing a new defect-related temperature-dependent pattern of the positron lifetime spectra has been revealed. Beyond the well known intervals of isochronal annealing of acceptor-like defects such as E-centers, divacancies and A-centers, the positron annihilation at the vacancy defects has been observed in the course of the isochronal annealing from ∝ 320 C up to the limit of reliable detecting of the defect-related positron annihilation lifetime at ≥ 500 C. These data correlate with the ones of recovery of the concentration of the charge carriers and their mobility which is found to continue in the course of annealing to ∝ 570 C; the annealing is accomplished at ∝650 C. A thermally stable complex consisting of the open vacancy volume and the phosphorus impurity atom, V_o_p-P, is suggested as a possible candidate for interpreting the data obtained by the positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. An extended couple of semi-vacancies, 2V_s_-_e_x_t, as well as a relaxed inwards a couple of vacancies, 2V_i_n_w, are suggested as the open vacancy volume V_o_p to be probed with the positron. It is argued that a high thermal stability of the V_s_-_e_x_t PV_s_-_e_x_t (or V_i_n_wPV_i_n_w_.) configuration is contributed by the efficiency of PSi_5 bonding. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Effect of oxygen defects on transport properties and Tc of YBa2Cu3O6+x: Displacement energy for plane and chain oxygen and implications for irradiation-induced resistivity and Tc suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolpygo, S.K.; Lin, J.; Gurvitch, M.; Hou, S.Y.; Phillips, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of electron irradiation with energy from 20 to 120 keV on the resistivity, Hall coefficient, and superconducting critical temperature T c of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x thin films has been studied. The threshold energy of incident electrons for T c suppression has been found, and the displacement energy for oxygen in CuO 2 planes has been evaluated as 8.4 eV for irradiation along the c axis. The kinetics of production of the in-plane oxygen vacancies has been studied and found to be governed by athermal recombination of vacancy-interstitial pairs. The evaluated recombination volume constitutes about 21 unit cells. The increase in the T-linear resistivity slope and Hall coefficient at unchanged T c was observed in irradiations with subthreshold incident energies and was ascribed to the effect of chain oxygen displacements. The upper limit on the displacement energy for chain oxygen has been estimated as 2.8 eV. In x=0.9 samples the T c suppression by in-plane oxygen defects and increase in residual resistivity have been found to be, respectively, -280 K and 1.5 mΩcm per defect in the unit cell. It is shown that T c suppression by in-plane oxygen defects is a universal function of the transport impurity scattering rate and can be described qualitatively by pair-breaking theory for d-wave superconductors with nonmagnetic potential scatterers. Evaluation of scattering and pair-breaking rates as well as the scattering cross section and potential is given. A comparison of the influence of in-plane oxygen defects on transport properties with that of other in-plane defects, such as Zn and Ni substitutions for Cu, is also made. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Aggregation of Frenkel defects under irradiation: a mesoscopic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.; Kotomin, E.

    1993-08-01

    The radiation-induced aggregation of Frenkel defects in solids is studied in terms of a mesoscopic approach. The asymmetry in elastic interactions between mobile interstitials (I-I) and between interstitials and vacancies (I-V) plays a decisive role in the aggregation of similar defects. The conditions for defect aggregation are studied in detail for NaCl crystals. The critical dose rate for aggregation has been calculated as a function of the temperature as well as the aggregation rate as a function of temperature and dose rate. Furthermore, the role of deep traps (like impurities and di-vacancies), reducing the mobility of interstitials, and the role of dislocations serving as sinks for interstitials, are studied. The aggregation appears to reach a maximum at a distinct temperature which is in agreement both with experiment and the Jain-Lidiard theory. The model also predicts a shift of this maximum towards lower temperatures if the dose rate is decreased. The consequences of the model for the disposal of nuclear waste in rock salt formations, are briefly discussed. (orig.)

  14. Positron annihilation spectroscopy in defects of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujinami, Masanori

    2002-01-01

    Interaction of positron and defects, application to research of defects of semiconductor and defects on the surface of semiconductor are explained. Cz (Czochralski)-Si single crystal with 10 18 cm -3 impurity oxygen was introduced defects by electron irradiation and the positron lifetime was measured at 90K after annealing. The defect size and recovery temperature were determined by the lifetime measurement. The distribution of defects in the depth direction is shown by S-E curve. The chemical state analysis is possible by CBS (Coincidence Doppler Broadening) spectra. The application to silicon-implanted (100 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon and oxygen-implanted (180 keV, 2x10 15 cm -2 ) silicon are stated. On the oxygen-implanted silicon, the main product was V2 after implantation, V 6 O 2 at 600degC and V 10 O 6 at 800degC. (S.Y.)

  15. Study of irradiation effects in non-metallic conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Fukuoka, Noboru; Honda, Makoto; Kondo, Tadashi; Morishima, Kouichi; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo

    1998-01-01

    The production of point defects induced by reactor and the thermal behavior of defects in sintered AlN and c-BN have been investigated using the optical absorption and electron spin resonance (ESR) methods. The absorption band at 370 nm (AlN) and the structureless absorption over the visible region are observed. These specimens also show ESR signals with g-value 2.007 (AlN), 2.006 (BN), which are probably caused by N vacancies with a trapped electron. In addition to these experiments, the difference of the photoluminescence(PL) lines on neutron irradiated CZ-Si and FZ-Si has been also studied. The models of the defect associated with neutron irradiation are discussed. (author)

  16. Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechanical Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillpot, Simon R.

    2012-01-01

    The work funded from this project has been published in six papers, with two more in draft form, with submission planned for the near future. The papers are: (1) Kinetically-Evolving Irradiation-Induced Point-Defect Clusters in UO 2 by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation; (2) Kinetically driven point-defect clustering in irradiated MgO by molecular-dynamics simulation; (3) Grain-Boundary Source/Sink Behavior for Point Defect: An Atomistic Simulation Study; (4) Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic structure calculations; (5) Thermodynamics of fission products in UO 2±x ; and (6) Atomistic study of grain boundary sink strength under prolonged electron irradiation. The other two pieces of work that are currently being written-up for publication are: (1) Effect of Pores and He Bubbles on the Thermal Transport Properties of UO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation; and (2) Segregation of Ruthenium to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

  17. Effect of Ion Irradiation in Cadmium Niobate Pyrochlores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Weilin; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation experiments have been performed for cadmium niobate pyrochlore (CdNb2O) single crystals at both 150 and 300 K using 1.0 MeV Au ions over fluences ranging from 0.01 to 0.10 ions/nm. In-situ 3.0 MeV He Rutherford backscattering spectrometry along the -axial channeling direction (RBS/C) has been applied to study the damage states ranging from small defect concentrations to a fully amorphous state. Results show that the crystal can be readily amorphized under the irradiation conditions. Room-temperature recovery of the defects produced at 150 K has been observed, while the defects produced at 300 K are thermally stable at room temperature. Results also indicate that the RBS/C analysis used in this study induced negligible damage in the near-surface regime. In addition, irradiation at and below room temperature using He and C3 ions leads to surface exfoliation at the corresponding damage peaks

  18. [Grain boundary and interface kinetics during ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwater, H.A.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed here is renewed support of a research program focused on interface motion and phase transformation during ion irradiation, with emphasis on elemental semiconductors. Broadly speaking, the aims of this program are to explore defect kinetics in amorphous and crystalline semiconductors, and to relate defect dynamics to interface motion and phase transformations. Over the last three years, we initiated a program under DOE support to explore crystallization and amorphization of elemental semiconductors under irradiation. This research has enabled new insights about the nature of defects in amorphous semiconductors and about microstructural evolution in the early stages of crystallization. In addition, we have demonstrated almost arbitrary control over the relative rates of crystal nucleation and crystal growth in silicon. As a result, the impinged grain microstructure of thin (100 nm) polycrystalline films crystallized under irradiation can be controlled with grain sizes ranging from a few nanometers to several micrometers, which may have interesting technological implications

  19. Irradiation and pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouraqui, A; Creuzillet, C; Barrat, J [Hopital Saint-Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)

    1985-04-21

    Every single person is exposed to natural (7 rads) or artificail (7.25 rads) irradiation throughout life. To which must be added, for many, irradiation from radiological examinations, which may cause malformations, genetic defects or cancer. The management of irradiated pregnant women depends on the dose received and on the age of pregnancy and requires, when the patient is seen, close co-operation between genetician, radiologist and gynaecologist. A radiological examination may be irreplaceable for diagnostic purposes, but the benefits to be expected from it should not lead to problems, particularly human problems, that are extremely difficult to solve. Non-urgent X-ray examinations should be performed outside pregnancy.

  20. 3D printed plano-freeform optics for non-coherent discontinuous beam shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Bisrat G.; Saastamoinen, Toni; Biskop, Joris; Kuittinen, Markku; Turunen, Jari; Saarinen, Jyrki

    2018-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of freeform optics for LED-based complex target irradiance distribution are challenging. Here, we investigate a 3D printing technology called Printoptical® technology in order to relax or push forward both the fabrication limits and LED-based applications of thick freeform lenses with small slope features. The freeform designs are carried out with an assumption of small-sized LED source using an existing point-source-based Tailoring method, which is available in the semi-commercial software. The numerical methods of the designs are characterized by ray-tracing software. The irradiance patterns of the 3D printed freeform lenses are promising considering the average shape conformity deviation of around ± 40 µm and center area surface roughness around ± 12 nm, which is to our knowledge by far the best result reported for 3D printed freeform lenses with a thickness greater than 1 mm. Applications of freeform lenses with discontinuous target irradiance distribution patterns are expected in eco-friendly energy efficient lighting such as in zebra-cross lighting.

  1. 3D printed plano-freeform optics for non-coherent discontinuous beam shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Bisrat G.; Saastamoinen, Toni; Biskop, Joris; Kuittinen, Markku; Turunen, Jari; Saarinen, Jyrki

    2018-03-01

    The design, fabrication, and characterization of freeform optics for LED-based complex target irradiance distribution are challenging. Here, we investigate a 3D printing technology called Printoptical® technology in order to relax or push forward both the fabrication limits and LED-based applications of thick freeform lenses with small slope features. The freeform designs are carried out with an assumption of small-sized LED source using an existing point-source-based Tailoring method, which is available in the semi-commercial software. The numerical methods of the designs are characterized by ray-tracing software. The irradiance patterns of the 3D printed freeform lenses are promising considering the average shape conformity deviation of around ± 40 µm and center area surface roughness around ± 12 nm, which is to our knowledge by far the best result reported for 3D printed freeform lenses with a thickness greater than 1 mm. Applications of freeform lenses with discontinuous target irradiance distribution patterns are expected in eco-friendly energy efficient lighting such as in zebra-cross lighting.

  2. Radiation defect production in quartz crystals with various structure perfectness degree; Radiatsionnoe defektoobrazovanie v kristallakh kvartsa s razlichnoj stepen`yu sovershenstva struktury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khushvakov, O B

    1992-01-01

    Radiation defects production processes in pure and doped quartz crystals with various structure defectness, caused by preliminary irradiation with neutrons, protons, deuterons and {alpha}-particles, during various electron excitation densities were investigated. The distribution of colour centres along the thickness of irradiated quartz crystals was measured. It was supposed that colour centres are produced on account of inelastic energy losses as the result of collective decay of two or more interacting excitons. It was shown that in quartz crystals under the actions of protons with overthreshold energy 18 MeV and electrons with subthreshold energy 100 keV the same structure defects are formed. It was established that radiation defect production process has two stages. The first stage reveals radiation defects produced by preliminary irradiation. The second one reveals additional intrinsic defects formed under the action of gamma-rays and electrons. The probability dependence of defect production on neutron fluence and masses of incident particles was studied. It was supposed that the creation of additional defects in preliminary irradiated crystals is due to non-radiative decay of electron excitations near radiation-induced defects. It was shown that increase of impurity concentration leads to rate growth of accumulation of radiation induced defects. (A.A.D.) 15 refs. 4 figs.

  3. Low temperature irradiation effects on iron-boron based amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audouard, Alain.

    1983-01-01

    Three iron-boron amorphous alloys and the crystalline Fe 3 B alloy have been irradiated at liquid hydrogen temperature. 2,4 MeV electron irradiation induces the creation of point defects in the amorphous alloys as well as in the crystalline Fe 3 B alloy. These point defects can be assimilated to iron ''Frenkel pairs''. They have been characterized by determining their intrinsic electrical resistivity and their formation volume. The displacement threshold energy of iron atoms has also been determined. 10 B fission fragments induce, in these amorphous alloys, displacement cascades which lead to stable vacancy rich zones. This irradiation also leads to a structural disorder in relation with the presence of defects. 235 U fission fragments irradiation modifies drastically the structure of the amorphous alloys. The results have been interpreted on the basis of the coexistence of two opposite processes which induce local disorder and crystallisation respectively [fr

  4. Entropy-driven metastable defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, B.; Peaker, A.R.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1989-01-01

    The known metastable defects are usually describable by a configuration coordinate diagram in which two energy minima are separated by a barrier. This diagram does not change with temperature and each configuration is stable over some temperature range. Here we report the observation of a novel metastability: A configuration change occurs spontaneously and abruptly at a critical temperature, giving rise to a discontinuous DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) spectrum. We propose that this phenomenon is a manifestation of entropy variations in the configurational space. (author) 12 refs., 4 figs

  5. Thermal conductivity of electron-irradiated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    We report results of a systematic analysis of thermal transport in electron-irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene sheets based on nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. We focus on the dependence of the thermal conductivity, k, of the irradiated graphene sheets on the inserted irradiation defect density, c, as well as the extent of defect passivation with hydrogen atoms. While the thermal conductivity of irradiated graphene decreases precipitously from that of pristine graphene, k0, upon introducing a low vacancy concentration, c reduction of the thermal conductivity with the increasing vacancy concentration exhibits a weaker dependence on c until the amorphization threshold. Beyond the onset of amorphization, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the vacancy concentration becomes significantly weaker, and k practically reaches a plateau value. Throughout the range of c and at all hydrogenation levels examined, the correlation k = k0(1 + αc)-1 gives an excellent description of the simulation results. The value of the coefficient α captures the overall strength of the numerous phonon scattering centers in the irradiated graphene sheets, which include monovacancies, vacancy clusters, carbon ring reconstructions, disorder, and a rough nonplanar sheet morphology. Hydrogen passivation increases the value of α, but the effect becomes very minor beyond the amorphization threshold.

  6. Electron irradiation effect on single crystal of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otero, M.P.; Lucki, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of electron irradiation (900 KeV) on gliding dislocations of single crystal Nb with its tensile axe in the [941] orientation was observed for the in-situ deformation in a high voltage electron microscope (HVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental was carried out by the 1 hour-electron irradiation with no stress applied. Straight dislocations actuating as sinks for the electron produced defects became helicoidal as the irradiation proceeded. Frenkel pairs were created in Nb for electron energies > = 650 KeV and, as the single vacancies do not undergo long-range migration in Nb at temperatures much below 620 K, the defects that are entrapped by the dislocations are self-interstitials produced by electron displacement. Applying the stress it was possible to observe that modified dislocations did not glide while the dislocations not affected by the irradiation are visibly in movement. This important result explains the neutron and electron-irradiation induced work-hardening effect for Nb that was previously observed. (Author) [pt

  7. Investigations on the structural and optical properties of the swift heavy ion irradiated 6H-SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, E.; Katharria, Y.S.; Selvakumar, S.; Arulchakkaravarthi, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Sivaji, K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We have reported the structural and optical properties of SHI irradiated 6H-SiC. → The change in Raman modes evidences the disorder accumulation with respect to ion fluence. → The disorder also causes the modification in the optical properties. → The time resolved photoluminescence reflects multiple lifetimes due to the degenerate defects states. → The study also reveals the presence of partial amorphous region due to SHI irradiation. -- Abstract: Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers have been irradiated with 150 MeV Ag 12+ ions with fluences ranging from 1 x 10 11 to 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 at 300 K. The defect accumulation as a function of fluence was studied to determine changes in structural and optical properties. The variation in the fundamental Raman modes of the crystalline 6H-SiC due to irradiation has been correlated with the disorder accumulation. The creation of defect states due to irradiation in the bandgap affects the blue-green photoluminescence emission in the irradiated samples. The UV-Visible absorption studies support the existence of defect states in the bandgap which is observed by the shift in the absorption edge towards the lower energy side with increasing fluence. Time Correlated Single Photon Counting photoluminescence decay results suggest that the existing defect states are radiative, exhibiting three lifetimes when irradiated with a fluence 5 x 10 11 ions/cm 2 . The total number of lifetime components was reduced for a fluence 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 as the defect states produced increase the non-radiative defect centres. These results suggest that the accumulation of defects due to irradiation at fluences 5 x 10 11 and 1 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 are degenerate configurations which exhibit multiple lifetimes in photoluminescence studies. It is inferred that the optically active defect states influence the transition rate of charge carriers in this device material.

  8. Investigations on the structural and optical properties of the swift heavy ion irradiated 6H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, E. [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Katharria, Y.S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moleculaires, Equipe Plasma-Surface, case 241, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Selvakumar, S. [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India); Arulchakkaravarthi, A. [Sinmat Inc., 2153 SE Hawthorne Rd., Gainesville Fl-32641 (United States); Kanjilal, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, P.O. Box 10502, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sivaji, K., E-mail: sivaji.krishnan@yahoo.co [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600025 (India)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} We have reported the structural and optical properties of SHI irradiated 6H-SiC. {yields} The change in Raman modes evidences the disorder accumulation with respect to ion fluence. {yields} The disorder also causes the modification in the optical properties. {yields} The time resolved photoluminescence reflects multiple lifetimes due to the degenerate defects states. {yields} The study also reveals the presence of partial amorphous region due to SHI irradiation. -- Abstract: Single crystal 6H-SiC wafers have been irradiated with 150 MeV Ag{sup 12+} ions with fluences ranging from 1 x 10{sup 11} to 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} at 300 K. The defect accumulation as a function of fluence was studied to determine changes in structural and optical properties. The variation in the fundamental Raman modes of the crystalline 6H-SiC due to irradiation has been correlated with the disorder accumulation. The creation of defect states due to irradiation in the bandgap affects the blue-green photoluminescence emission in the irradiated samples. The UV-Visible absorption studies support the existence of defect states in the bandgap which is observed by the shift in the absorption edge towards the lower energy side with increasing fluence. Time Correlated Single Photon Counting photoluminescence decay results suggest that the existing defect states are radiative, exhibiting three lifetimes when irradiated with a fluence 5 x 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2}. The total number of lifetime components was reduced for a fluence 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} as the defect states produced increase the non-radiative defect centres. These results suggest that the accumulation of defects due to irradiation at fluences 5 x 10{sup 11} and 1 x 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} are degenerate configurations which exhibit multiple lifetimes in photoluminescence studies. It is inferred that the optically active defect states influence the transition rate of charge carriers in this

  9. Doping influence by some transition elements on the irradiation effects in nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florent, Olivier

    2006-06-01

    High-level waste glasses are submitted to auto-irradiation. Modelling it using external irradiations on simple glasses revealed defects production and non negligible structural changes. This thesis aims at determining the impact of a more complex composition on these effects, especially the influence of adding polyvalent transition metals. Silicate, soda-lime and alumino-borosilicate glasses are doped with different iron, chromium and manganese concentrations then β irradiated at different doses up to 10 9 Gy. Non doped glasses show an increase of their density and polymerisation coupled with a molecular oxygen and point defects production. Adding 0.16 mol% Fe decreases the amount of defects by 85 % and all irradiation effects. A Fe 3+ reduction is also observed by EPR, optical absorption and indirectly by Raman spectroscopy. A higher than 0.32 mol% Fe concentration causes complete blockage of the evolution of polymerisation, density and defect production. The same results are obtained on chromium or manganese doped glasses. An original in situ optical absorption device shows the quick decrease of Fe 3+ amount to a 25 % lower level during irradiation. Stopping irradiation causes a lower decrease of 65 %, suggesting a dynamic (h 0 /e-) consuming equilibrium. He + and Kr 3+ ions and γ irradiated glasses tend to confirm these phenomena for all kind of irradiation with electronic excitations. (author)

  10. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocik, J.; Keilova, E.

    1993-01-01

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Radiation damage structure in irradiated and annealed 440 WWER-Type reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocik, J; Keilova, E [Czech Nuclear Society, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    A review of irradiation damages in WWER-type RPV steels based on conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy investigations in a power reactor and a research reactor, is presented; the samples consist in Cr-Mo-V ferritic steel (15Kh2MFA type). The visible part of radiation-induced defects consists of very fine vanadium carbide precipitates, small dislocation loops and black dots (presumably corresponding) to clusters and particle embryos formed from vacancies and solute-atoms (vanadium, copper, phosphorus) and carbon associated with vanadium. Radiation-induced defects are concentrated at dislocation substructure during irradiation in a power reactor, revealing the role of radiation-enhanced diffusion in damage structure forming process. Contrarily, the distribution of defects resulting from annealing of specimens irradiated in the research reactor is pre-determined by an homogenous distribution of radiation-induced defects prior to annealing. Increasing the number of re-irradiation and annealing cycles, the amount of dislocation loops among all defects seems to be growing. Simultaneously, the dislocation substructure recovers considerably. (authors). 14 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. High defect stage, contralateral defects, and poor flexibility are negative predictive factors of bone union in pediatric and adolescent athletes with spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazufumi; Kota, Shintaro; Oikawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yoshiji

    2018-01-01

    To identify predisposition to spondylolysis and physical characteristics associated with "bone union" following conservative spondylolysis treatment among pediatric and adolescent athletes. We retrospectively analyzed pediatric and adolescent athletes with spondylolysis who underwent conservative treatment and rehabilitation for three or more consecutive months following sports activity cessation. Patients with terminal spondylolysis or who did not discontinue sports activities were excluded. We compared physical fitness factors in the union and nonunion groups and examined the association between bone union and spondylolysis severity by logistic regression analysis. Of 183 patients with spondylolysis who underwent rehabilitation over a four-year period, 127 patients with 227 defects were included in the final analysis. Bone union was achieved in 66.5% (151/227) of the pars interarticularis defects and 70.1% (89/127) of the patients. On multivariate analysis, stage of pars interarticularis defect (odds ratio [OR], 0.26;p = 0.0027), stage of contralateral pars interarticularis defect (OR, 0.51;p = 0.00026), and straight leg-raising test (OR, 1.06;p = 0.028) were significantly associated with bone union. High defect stage, stage of the contralateral pars interarticularis defect, and poor flexibility were negative prognostic factors of bone healing in athletes with spondylolysis. J. Med. Invest. 65:126-130, February, 2018.

  13. Irradiation-induced doping of Bismuth Telluride Bi2Te3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischau, Carl Willem

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth Telluride Bi 2 Te 3 has attracted enormous attention because of its thermoelectric and topological insulator properties. Regarding its bulk band structure Bi 2 Te 3 is a band insulator with an energy gap of around 150-170 meV. However, the native anti-site defects that are present in real samples always dope this band insulator and shift the chemical potential into the valence or conduction band. In this PhD, the Fermi surface of as-grown and electron irradiated p-type Bi 2 Te 3 single crystals has been investigated extensively using electrical transport experiments. For moderate hole concentrations (p ∼< 5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), it is confirmed that electrical transport can be explained by a six-valley model and the presence of strong Zeeman-splitting. At high doping levels (p≅5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), the hole concentrations determined from Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect differ significantly which is attributed to an impurity/defect band introduced by the anti-site defects. In this work, we show that it is possible to dope p-type Bi 2 Te 3 in a very controlled manner using electron-irradiation by performing detailed in- and ex-situ electrical transport studies on samples irradiated at room and at low temperatures with 2.5 MeV electrons. These studies show that the defects induced at both irradiation temperatures act as electron donors and can thus be used to convert the conduction from p- to n-type. The point of optimal compensation is accompanied by an increase of the low-temperature resistivity by several orders of magnitude. Irradiation at room temperature showed that both the p-type samples obtained after irradiation to intermediate doses as well as the samples in which the conduction has been converted to n-type by irradiation, still have a well defined Fermi surface as evidenced by SdH oscillations. By studying the Hall coefficient in-situ during low temperature electron irradiation, the coexistence of electron- and hole-type carriers was evidenced

  14. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni(Si) alloys at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, are irradiated with 14 MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures are monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14 MeV fusion neutrons is only 6 to 7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6 to 7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  15. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni(Si) alloys at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.S.; Guinan, M.W.; Hahn, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, are irradiated with 14 MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures are monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14 MeV fusion neutrons is only 6 to 7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2 MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6 to 7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Micromechanical and internal discontinuity aspects in fusion welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nur Azida Che Lah; Aidy Ali

    2009-01-01

    Full text: This paper deals with characterization of macrostructure, microstructure, hardness, elemental compositions and internal discontinuities of ASTM A516 grade 70 fusion welded joints. The welded joints of ASTM A516 grade 70 carbon steel, which are widely used in pressure vessel fabrication were prepared using welding procedures of Manual Metal Arc (MMA), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG). Local microstructural condition and elemental composition of the welds were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in association with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Radiography testing was applied to study the common internal weld defects. This comprehensive information provides a practical guide in order to determine the most adequate welding procedure and assisting in understanding the behaviour of the weld zones. (author)

  17. Anisotropic shift of the irreversibility line by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauerzopf, F.M.; Wiesinger, H.P.; Weber, H.W.; Crabtree, G.W.; Frischherz, M.C.; Kirk, M.A.

    1991-09-01

    The irreversibility line of high-T c superconductors is shifted considerably by irradiating the material with fast neutrons. The anisotropic and non-monotonous shift is qualitatively explained by a simple model based on an interaction between three pinning mechanisms, the intrinsic pinning by the ab-planes, the weak pinning by the pre-irradiation defect structure, and strong pinning by neutron induced defect cascades. A correlation between the cascade density and the position of the irreversibility line is observed

  18. Defects induced magnetic transition in Co doped ZnS thin films: Effects of swift heavy ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Shiv P., E-mail: shivpoojanbhola@gmail.com [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Pivin, J.C. [CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS, Batiment 108, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Patel, M.K; Won, Jonghan [Materials Science and Technology Division, MST-8, P.O.Box 1663, Mail Stop G755, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Chandra, Ramesh [Nanoscience Laboratory, IIC, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247667 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India); Kumar, Lokendra [Physics Department, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The effect of swift heavy ions (SHI) on magnetic ordering in ZnS thin films with Co ions substituted on Zn sites is investigated. The materials have been synthesized by pulsed laser deposition on substrates held at 600 Degree-Sign C for obtaining films with wurtzite crystal structure and it showed ferromagnetic ordering up to room temperature with a paramagnetic component. 120 MeV Ag ions have been used at different fluences of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} ions/cm{sup 2} and 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} for SHI induced modifications. The long range correlation between paramagnetic spins on Co ions was destroyed by irradiation and the material became purely paramagnetic. The effect is ascribed to the formation of cylindrical ion tracks due to the thermal spikes resulting from electron-phonon coupling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of swift heavy ions on magnetic ordering in Co doped ZnS thin films are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetization in the pristine films is composed of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The films become purely paramagnetic after swift heavy ions irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic transition is ascribed to the formation of ion track (or cylindrical defects) due to the thermal spikes.

  19. Study of points defects produced by irradiation of monocrystalline nickel and polycrystalline gadolinium; Etude des defauts ponctuels crees par irradiation dans: - le nickel monocristallin - le gadolinium polycristallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The work described in this thesis falls into two parts: the first comprises a study of magnetocrystalline nickel by resistivity measurements; the second is a description of resistivity and magnetic after effect measurements on an h.c.p. ferromagnetic crystal other than cobalt, namely gadolinium. For the first part we have demonstrated the existence of a small but definite orientation dependence in the creation of point defects by electron irradiation (20 deg. K) of a nickel single crystal. In particular, the effect is manifested in the form of the stage I{sub C}, II and III in the resistivity recovery. In the second part an important result has emerged: namely that there is no magnetic after effect phenomenon in a neutron irradiated (27 deg. K) ferromagnetic metal. Several considerations are discussed by way of a preliminary interpretation of this important difference between gadolinium and cobalt. (author) [French] Le travail qui a fait l'objet de ce memoire comporte deux parties distinctes: une premiere constituee de l'etude du nickel sous la forme de monocristaux, a l'aide de mesures de resistivite; la seconde partie est composee d'experiences de resistivite et de trainage magnetique sur un cristal h.c.p. ferromagnetique autre que le cobalt, le gadolinium. Dans la premiere partie, nous avons mis en evidence un effet sensible de la direction de l'irradiation electronique (a 20 deg. K) sur la creation des defauts ponctuels dans le nickel monocristallin, en particulier au niveau des stades I{sub C}, II et III des courbes de revenu de la resistivite. Dans la deuxieme partie, un point particulier a ete mis en evidence: l'absence de phenomene de trainage magnetique dans un metal ferromagnetique irradie par des neutrons (a 27 deg. K). Quelques points d'interpretations preliminaires sont avances pour expliquer la difference notable entre le gadolinium et le cobalt. (auteur)

  20. Electron and gamma-ray irradiated NTD Si p-n structures static and dynamic parameters trade-off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, I.G.; Zhdanovich, N.E.; Karas', V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The comparison of different radiation defects types influence on static and dynamic parameters trade-off of power diodes fabricated on neutron-transmutation doped silicon have been fulfilled. Various defects sets were introduced utilizing electron irradiation (E=6 MeV), gamma-ray Co 60 irradiation and electron irradiation and subsequent annealing at temperature 700 degrees centigrade. It is established that optimal trade-of between forward voltage drop and operation speed is achieved in case of electron irradiation and annealing. In this case recombination process is governed by defect with energy level near middle of forbidden gap (E c -0.53 eV). The results obtained indicate on possibility of using these defect recombination properties for speed control in production of power fast high-voltage devices on the base of neutron-transmutation doped silicon. (authors)

  1. General Practitioners’ Decisions about Discontinuation of Medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nixon, Michael Simon; Vendelø, Morten Thanning

    2016-01-01

    insights about decision making when discontinuing medication. It also offers one of the first examinations of how the institutional context embedding GPs influences their decisions about discontinuation. For policymakers interested in the discontinuation of medication, the findings suggest that de......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate how general practitioners’ (GPs) decisions about discontinuation of medication are influenced by their institutional context. Design/methodology/approach – In total, 24 GPs were interviewed, three practices were observed and documents were...... a weak frame for discontinuation. Three reasons for this are identified: the guidelines provide dominating triggers for prescribing, they provide weak priming for discontinuation as an option, and they underscore a cognitive constraint against discontinuation. Originality/value – The analysis offers new...

  2. Mechanical properties of irradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, I.M.; Robach, J.; Wirth, B.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of metals is considered with particular attention being paid to the development of defect-free channels following uniaxial tensile loading. The in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique is coupled with dislocation dynamic computer simulations to reveal the fundamental processes governing the elimination of defects by glissile dislocations. The observations of preliminary experiments are reported.(author)

  3. Radiation damage in heavy irradiated aluminum nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru [Naruto Univ. of education, Tokushima (Japan); Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo

    1996-04-01

    AlN, one of candidate for ceramic materials used in nuclear fusion reactor, was irradiated by fast and thermal neutrons. The high concentration of irradiated defects and the nuclear transformation elements were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. The exposure of fast neutron and thermal neutron were 1.2x10{sup 20}n/cm{sup 2} and 1.2x10{sup 21}n/cm{sup 2}, respectively. The spreads of ESR spectra of ultra hyperfine structure depending on interaction between {sup 27}Al nuclear spin and electron trapped in tetrahedron consisted of Al atoms was found in the spectra of heavy irradiated AlN. F type defects was estimated 10{sup 19}n/cm{sup 3}. Photoelectrons from 2s and 2p in {sup 28}Si which produced in process of {beta}-decay of {sup 27}Al(n,{gamma}){sup 28}Al were observed in XPS spectra of irradiated samples. (S.Y.)

  4. Radiation damage in heavy irradiated aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atobe, Kozo; Honda, Makoto; Fukuoka, Noboru; Okada, Moritami; Nakagawa, Masuo.

    1996-01-01

    AlN, one of candidate for ceramic materials used in nuclear fusion reactor, was irradiated by fast and thermal neutrons. The high concentration of irradiated defects and the nuclear transformation elements were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method. The exposure of fast neutron and thermal neutron were 1.2x10 20 n/cm 2 and 1.2x10 21 n/cm 2 , respectively. The spreads of ESR spectra of ultra hyperfine structure depending on interaction between 27 Al nuclear spin and electron trapped in tetrahedron consisted of Al atoms was found in the spectra of heavy irradiated AlN. F type defects was estimated 10 19 n/cm 3 . Photoelectrons from 2s and 2p in 28 Si which produced in process of β-decay of 27 Al(n,γ) 28 Al were observed in XPS spectra of irradiated samples. (S.Y.)

  5. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements of vanadium alloy and F82H irradiated with fission and fusion neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Inoue, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Xu, Q.; Wakai, E.; Kutsukake, C.; Ochiai, K.

    2009-01-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti, F82H, Ni and Cu were irradiated with fission and fusion neutrons at room temperature and 473 K. Defect structures were analyzed and compared using positron annihilation lifetime measurement, and microstructural evolution was discussed. The mean lifetime of positrons (the total amount of residual defects) increased with the irradiation dose. The effect of cascade impact was detected in Ni at room temperature. The size and the number of vacancy clusters were not affected by the displacement rate in the fission neutron irradiation at 473 K for the metals studied. The vacancy clusters were not formed in V-4Cr-4Ti irradiated at 473 K in the range of 10 -6 -10 -3 dpa. In F82H irradiated at 473 K, the defect evolution was prevented by pre-existing defects. The mean lifetime of positrons in fission neutron irradiation was longer than that in fusion neutron irradiation in V-4Cr-4Ti at 473 K. It was interpreted that more closely situated subcascades were formed in the fusion neutron irradiation and subcascades interacted with each other, and consequently the vacancy clusters did not grow larger.

  6. Factors affecting IUCD discontinuation in Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thapa, Subash; Paudel, Ishwari Sharma; Bhattarai, Sailesh

    2015-01-01

    Information related to contraception discontinuation, especially in the context of Nepal is very limited. A nested case-control study was carried out to determine the factors affecting discontinuation of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs). A total of 115 cases (IUCD discontinuers) and 115...

  7. Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechancial Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon R. Phillpot

    2012-06-08

    The work funded from this project has been published in six papers, with two more in draft form, with submission planned for the near future. The papers are: (1) Kinetically-Evolving Irradiation-Induced Point-Defect Clusters in UO{sub 2} by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation; (2) Kinetically driven point-defect clustering in irradiated MgO by molecular-dynamics simulation; (3) Grain-Boundary Source/Sink Behavior for Point Defect: An Atomistic Simulation Study; (4) Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic structure calculations; (5) Thermodynamics of fission products in UO{sub 2{+-}x}; and (6) Atomistic study of grain boundary sink strength under prolonged electron irradiation. The other two pieces of work that are currently being written-up for publication are: (1) Effect of Pores and He Bubbles on the Thermal Transport Properties of UO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation; and (2) Segregation of Ruthenium to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

  8. Fusion neutron irradiation of Ni-Si alloys at high temperature*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. S.; Guinan, M. W.; Hahn, P. A.

    1988-07-01

    Two Ni-4% Si alloys, with different cold work levels, have been irradiated with 14-MeV fusion neutrons at 623 K, and their Curie temperatures have been monitored during irradiation. The results are compared to those of an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. The results show that increasing dislocation density increases the Curie temperature change rate. At the same damage rate, the Curie temperature change rate for the alloy irradiated by 14-MeV fusion neutrons is only 6-7% of that for an identical alloy irradiated by 2-MeV electrons. It is well known that the migration of radiation induced defects contributes to segregation of silicon atoms at sinks in this alloy, causing the Curie temperature changes. The current results imply that the relative free defect production efficiency decreases from one for the electron irradiated sample to 6-7% for the fusion neutron irradiated sample.

  9. Effects of ion beam irradiation on the microstructures and strengths of different carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo; Kurumada, Akira; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Inagaki, Michio

    1998-01-01

    The high energy argon ion was irradiated to different carbon fibers with various microstructures. The cross-sectional structures and strengths properties have been evaluated before and after ion irradiation. As a result, the diameter of fibers decreased due to ion irradiation, except for the fiber with dual structure. The tensile strength also decreased due to ion irradiation, except for fibers which were not heat-treated. This suggests that it is necessary to consider not only the defects in the vertical cross-section but also changes in defect structures in the axial direction. The results of computer simulation indicated that argon ion with 175MeV/1μA produced homogeneous defects in the carbon fibers with the diameter of about 20 μm. (author)

  10. Defects in Ceramic Matrix Composites and Their Impact on Elastic Properties (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    SiC (CG Nicalon™) fiber, coated with boron nitride, in a matrix of sil- icon , nitrogen and carbon manufactured by multiple itera- tions of a polymer...For the dry fibers defect, Eq. (1) for E1d is modified to include the effect of the stress-discontinuity in the fibers direction utilizing a5

  11. Large lattice relaxation deep levels in neutron-irradiated GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.; Zhang, J.D.; Beling, C.D.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.X.; Gong, M.; Sarkar, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) measurements have been carried out in neutron-irradiated n-type hydride-vapor-phase-epitaxy-grown GaN. A defect center characterized by a DLTS line, labeled as N1, is observed at E C -E T =0.17 eV. Another line, labeled as N2, at E C -E T =0.23 eV, seems to be induced at the same rate as N1 under irradiation and may be identified with E1. Other defects native to wurtzite GaN such as the C and E2 lines appear to enhance under neutron irradiation. The DLOS results show that the defects N1 and N2 have large Frank-Condon shifts of 0.64 and 0.67 eV, respectively, and hence large lattice relaxations. The as-grown and neutron-irradiated samples all exhibit the persistent photoconductivity effect commonly seen in GaN that may be attributed to DX centers. The concentration of the DX centers increases significantly with neutron dosage and is helpful in sustaining sample conductivity at low temperatures, thus making possible DLTS measurements on N1 an N2 in the radiation-induced deep-donor defect compensated material which otherwise are prevented by carrier freeze-out

  12. Photoluminescence and positron annihilation spectroscopic investigation on a H+ irradiated ZnO single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A.; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sanyal, D.; Bhowmick, D.; Dechoudhury, S.; Chakrabarti, A.; Rakshit, Tamita; Ray, S. K.

    2012-08-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence and room temperature positron annihilation spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the defects incorporated by 6 MeV H+ ions in a hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystal. Prior to irradiation, the emission from donor bound excitons is at 3.378 eV (10 K). The irradiation creates an intense and narrow emission at 3.368 eV (10 K). The intensity of this peak is nearly four times that of the dominant near band edge peak of the pristine crystal. The characteristic features of the 3.368 eV emission indicate its origin as a ‘hydrogen at oxygen vacancy’ type defect. The positron annihilation lifetime measurement reveals a single component lifetime spectrum for both the unirradiated (164 ± 1 ps) and irradiated crystal (175 ± 1 ps). It reflects the fact that the positron lifetime and intensity of the new irradiation driven defect species are a little higher compared to those in the unirradiated crystal. However, the estimated defect concentration, even considering the high dynamic defect annihilation rate in ZnO, comes out to be ˜4 × 1017 cm-3 (using SRIM software). This is a very high defect concentration compared to the defect sensitivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy. A probable reason is the partial filling of the incorporated vacancies (positron traps), which in ZnO are zinc vacancies. The positron lifetime of ˜175 ps (in irradiated ZnO) is consistent with recent theoretical calculations for partially hydrogen-filled zinc vacancies in ZnO. Passivation of oxygen vacancies by hydrogen is also reflected in the photoluminescence results. A possible reason for such vacancy filling (at both Zn and O sites) due to irradiation has also been discussed.

  13. Photoluminescence and positron annihilation spectroscopic investigation on a H+ irradiated ZnO single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, A; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sanyal, D; Bhowmick, D; Dechoudhury, S; Chakrabarti, A; Rakshit, Tamita; Ray, S K

    2012-01-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence and room temperature positron annihilation spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the defects incorporated by 6 MeV H + ions in a hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystal. Prior to irradiation, the emission from donor bound excitons is at 3.378 eV (10 K). The irradiation creates an intense and narrow emission at 3.368 eV (10 K). The intensity of this peak is nearly four times that of the dominant near band edge peak of the pristine crystal. The characteristic features of the 3.368 eV emission indicate its origin as a ‘hydrogen at oxygen vacancy’ type defect. The positron annihilation lifetime measurement reveals a single component lifetime spectrum for both the unirradiated (164 ± 1 ps) and irradiated crystal (175 ± 1 ps). It reflects the fact that the positron lifetime and intensity of the new irradiation driven defect species are a little higher compared to those in the unirradiated crystal. However, the estimated defect concentration, even considering the high dynamic defect annihilation rate in ZnO, comes out to be ∼4 × 10 17 cm -3 (using SRIM software). This is a very high defect concentration compared to the defect sensitivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy. A probable reason is the partial filling of the incorporated vacancies (positron traps), which in ZnO are zinc vacancies. The positron lifetime of ∼175 ps (in irradiated ZnO) is consistent with recent theoretical calculations for partially hydrogen-filled zinc vacancies in ZnO. Passivation of oxygen vacancies by hydrogen is also reflected in the photoluminescence results. A possible reason for such vacancy filling (at both Zn and O sites) due to irradiation has also been discussed. (paper)

  14. Photoluminescence and positron annihilation spectroscopic investigation on a H(+) irradiated ZnO single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Chakrabarti, Mahuya; Sanyal, D; Bhowmick, D; Dechoudhury, S; Chakrabarti, A; Rakshit, Tamita; Ray, S K

    2012-08-15

    Low temperature photoluminescence and room temperature positron annihilation spectroscopy have been employed to investigate the defects incorporated by 6 MeV H(+) ions in a hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystal. Prior to irradiation, the emission from donor bound excitons is at 3.378 eV (10 K). The irradiation creates an intense and narrow emission at 3.368 eV (10 K). The intensity of this peak is nearly four times that of the dominant near band edge peak of the pristine crystal. The characteristic features of the 3.368 eV emission indicate its origin as a 'hydrogen at oxygen vacancy' type defect. The positron annihilation lifetime measurement reveals a single component lifetime spectrum for both the unirradiated (164 ± 1 ps) and irradiated crystal (175 ± 1 ps). It reflects the fact that the positron lifetime and intensity of the new irradiation driven defect species are a little higher compared to those in the unirradiated crystal. However, the estimated defect concentration, even considering the high dynamic defect annihilation rate in ZnO, comes out to be ∼4 × 10(17) cm(-3) (using SRIM software). This is a very high defect concentration compared to the defect sensitivity of positron annihilation spectroscopy. A probable reason is the partial filling of the incorporated vacancies (positron traps), which in ZnO are zinc vacancies. The positron lifetime of ∼175 ps (in irradiated ZnO) is consistent with recent theoretical calculations for partially hydrogen-filled zinc vacancies in ZnO. Passivation of oxygen vacancies by hydrogen is also reflected in the photoluminescence results. A possible reason for such vacancy filling (at both Zn and O sites) due to irradiation has also been discussed.

  15. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  16. The effects of photobiomodulation on healing of bone defects in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez Costa Lino, Maíra D.; Bastos de Carvalho, Fabíola; Ferreira Moraes, Michel; Augusto Cardoso, José; Pinheiro, Antônio L. B.; Maria Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana

    2011-03-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of Low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the repair of bone defects, but there are only a few that associates bone healing in the presence of a metabolic disorder as Diabetes Melitus and LLLT. The aim of this study was to assess histologically the effect of LLLT (AsGaAl), 780nm, 70mW, CW, Ø~0.4mm, 16J/cm2 per session) on the repair of surgical defects created in the femur of diabetic and non-diabetic Wistar Albinus rats. Surgical bone defects were created in 60 animals divided into four groups of 15 animals each: Group C (non-diabetic - control); Group CL (non-diabetic + LLLT); Group CD (diabetic); Group CDL (diabetic + LLLT). The animals on the irradiated group received 16 J/cm2 per session divided into four points around the defect, being the first irradiation immediately after surgery and repeated every 48h for 14 days. The animals were killed 15, 21 and 30 days after surgery. The results of the present investigation showed histological evidence of improved amount of collagen fibers at early stages of the bone healing (15 days) and increased amount of well organized bone trabeculae at the end of the experimental period (30 days) on irradiated animals, (diabetic and non-diabetic) compared to non irradiated ones. It is concluded that LLLT has a positive biomodulative effect on the healing process of bone defects, even when diabetes mellitus was present.

  17. Osteogenic Matrix Cell Sheets Facilitate Osteogenesis in Irradiated Rat Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Uchihara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of large bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors is a significant challenge in orthopedic surgery. Extracorporeal autogenous irradiated bone grafting is a treatment option for bone reconstruction. However, nonunion often occurs because the osteogenic capacity is lost by irradiation. In the present study, we established an autogenous irradiated bone graft model in the rat femur to assess whether osteogenic matrix cell sheets improve osteogenesis of the irradiated bone. Osteogenic matrix cell sheets were prepared from bone marrow-derived stromal cells and co-transplanted with irradiated bone. X-ray images at 4 weeks after transplantation showed bridging callus formation around the irradiated bone. Micro-computed tomography images at 12 weeks postoperatively showed abundant callus formation in the whole circumference of the irradiated bone. Histology showed bone union between the irradiated bone and host femur. Mechanical testing showed that the failure force at the irradiated bone site was significantly higher than in the control group. Our study indicates that osteogenic matrix cell sheet transplantation might be a powerful method to facilitate osteogenesis in irradiated bones, which may become a treatment option for reconstruction of bone defects after resection of malignant musculoskeletal tumors.

  18. 27 CFR 555.128 - Discontinuance of business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Discontinuance of business... Discontinuance of business. Where an explosive materials business or operations is discontinued and succeeded by... such facts and shall be delivered to the successor. Where discontinuance of the business or operations...

  19. The influence of radiation-induced defects on thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence of α-Al_2O_3:C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyirenda, A.N.; Chithambo, M.L.

    2017-01-01

    It is known that when α-Al_2O_3:C is exposed to excessive amounts of ionising radiation, defects are induced within its matrix.