WorldWideScience

Sample records for discharge velocity models

  1. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  2. Discharge estimation combining flow routing and occasional measurements of velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Corato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A new procedure is proposed for estimating river discharge hydrographs during flood events, using only water level data at a single gauged site, as well as 1-D shallow water modelling and occasional maximum surface flow velocity measurements. One-dimensional diffusive hydraulic model is used for routing the recorded stage hydrograph in the channel reach considering zero-diffusion downstream boundary condition. Based on synthetic tests concerning a broad prismatic channel, the "suitable" reach length is chosen in order to minimize the effect of the approximated downstream boundary condition on the estimation of the upstream discharge hydrograph. The Manning's roughness coefficient is calibrated by using occasional instantaneous surface velocity measurements during the rising limb of flood that are used to estimate instantaneous discharges by adopting, in the flow area, a two-dimensional velocity distribution model. Several historical events recorded in three gauged sites along the upper Tiber River, wherein reliable rating curves are available, have been used for the validation. The outcomes of the analysis can be summarized as follows: (1 the criterion adopted for selecting the "suitable" channel length based on synthetic test studies has proved to be reliable for field applications to three gauged sites. Indeed, for each event a downstream reach length not more than 500 m is found to be sufficient, for a good performances of the hydraulic model, thereby enabling the drastic reduction of river cross-sections data; (2 the procedure for Manning's roughness coefficient calibration allowed for high performance in discharge estimation just considering the observed water levels and occasional measurements of maximum surface flow velocity during the rising limb of flood. Indeed, errors in the peak discharge magnitude, for the optimal calibration, were found not exceeding 5% for all events observed in the three investigated gauged sections, while the

  3. Influence of increased velocity on the statistical discharge characteristics of He and air barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichen, P.; Sonnenfeld, A.; von Rohr, Ph Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    A detailed study of a description method for microdischarges based on the statistical analysis of single discharge bursts is presented and applied for small electrode arrays. As such, the electrical properties derived from the collective behaviour of the current bursts for microdischarges in helium and synthetic air for different pressure levels and variable voltage gradients are elaborately discussed. Motivated by the possible prolongation of the displacement distance of active species and thus the improved development of an atmospheric afterglow in a low frequency discharge, the interaction between high-speed gas flows and microdischarges in small ducts has been approached presenting first results. Intentionally, gases with different discharge mechanisms known as streamer (synthetic air) and Townsend (helium) have been considered. Similar velocity dependences of the discharge behaviour could be observed in both gases. For helium, subsonic channel velocity is sufficient to distinctively alter the discharge characteristics whereas transonic flow is needed to alter those of synthetic air. Subsequently, a simple model is proposed to explain these findings for elevated velocities in a dielectric setup.

  4. Modelling electric discharge chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.; Wren, J.C.

    1991-07-01

    The chemistry occurring in a electric discharge was modelled to predict how it would be influenced by discharge conditions. The discharge was characterized by a calculated Boltzmann electron-energy distribution, from which rate constants for electron-molecule processes in air were determined. These rate constants were used in a chemical kinetics calculation that also included reactions between neutral molecules, ions, free radicals and electronically excited species. The model describes how the discharge chemistry was influenced by humidity, electric field, electron number density, and concentrations of key reagents identified in the study. The use of an electric discharge to destroy airborne contaminant molecules was appraised, the targeted contaminants being CF 2 Cl 2 , HCN, and SO 2 . The modelling results indicate that an electric discharge should be able to remove HCN and CF 2 Cl 2 effectively, especially if the discharge conditions have been optimized. Effective destruction is achieved with a moderate electric field (over 1 x 10 -15 V.cm 2 ), a substantial electron number density (over 1 x 10 12 cm -3 ), and the presence of H 2 0 in the process air. The residence time in the discharge was also shown to be important in contaminant destruction. An attempt was made to explain the results of the electric discharge abatement of SO 2 , a component of a simulated flue-gas mixture. Results from the model indicate that the discharge parameters that increase the concentration of hydroxyl radical also increase the rate of decomposition of SO 2 . An objective of the study was to explain the apparent enhancement of SO 2 destruction by the presence of a small amount of NO 2 . It was thought that a likely explanation would be the stabilization of HOSO 2 , an important intermediate in the oxidation of SO 2 by NO 2 . (49 figs., 14 tabs., 75 refs.)

  5. Velocity dependent passive sampling for monitoring of micropollutants in dynamic stormwater discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Sharma, Anitha Kumari; Vezzaro, Luca

    2013-01-01

    -ideal for sampling such systems because they sample in a time-integrative manner. This paper reports test of a flow-through passive sampler, deployed in stormwater runoff at the outlet of a residential-industrial catchment. Momentum from the water velocity during runoff events created flow through the sampler......Micropollutant monitoring in stormwater discharges is challenging because of the diversity of sources and thus large number of pollutants found in stormwater. This is further complicated by the dynamics in runoff flows and the large number of discharge points. Most passive samplers are non...... using a dynamic stormwater quality model (DSQM). The paper illustrates how velocity-dependent flow-through passive sampling may revolutionize the way stormwater discharges are monitored. It also opens the possibility to monitor a larger range of discharge sites over longer time periods instead...

  6. Ascent Velocity of Plasmoids Generated by Surface Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Uwe

    The ascent velocity of long-lived plasmoids generated under atmospheric conditions to simulate ball lightning was estimated in [Fussmann et al., Phys. Unserer Zeit 39, 246 (2008) and Jegorov et al., Tech. Phys. 53, 688 (2008): Refs. 1 and 2 in the text, respectively], using a rigid sphere model with poor agreement with the experiment. The plasmoids were, however, deformed. Much better agreement is obtained using the Davies and Taylor formula, which describes the ascent velocity of large spherical-cap bubbles.

  7. Oscillation of the current sheet velocity in plasma focus discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melzacki, K.; Nardi, V.

    1994-01-01

    The oscillation of the propagation speed of the plasma focus current sheet has been recorded with schlieren photography. The sheet stuttering in the propagation during the implosion phase has a frequency of about 60 MHz. The effect could be recorded due to application of long exposure time (60 ns) technique. It is not detectable in the subnanosecond pictures. The pictures are taken in black schlieren. The probing range of the electron density gradient, with integration along the path of the 1 J, Q-switched ruby laser beam, has been selected by the size of the stop and aperture within 3 x 10 18 cm -3 and 3 x 10 20 cm -3 . Raising the sensitivity threshold to 2 x 10 19 cm -3 (refraction angle of 4 mrad) has helped to clear the pictures by limiting their image to high gradients of density only. With this technique (and other diagnostic methods) the dynamics of 6 kJ, 16 kV plasma focus discharges in deuterium at 5 torr, with a 10% decrease of the magnetic insulation at the breech has been investigated. The average implosion velocity of the current sheath obtained with this effect, 5 x 10 6 cm/s, is consistent with those measured by the smear effect, and the electric probe. The electron density gradient has been determined at several instants; at the pinch time it is (3 ± 1.5) x 10 20 cm -4 . The data are discussed on the basis of several pictures

  8. Numerical modelling of barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, K.V.

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of the theory of the barrier discharge in oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The discharge consists of a number of randomly distributed microdischarges of nanosecond duration. This complicated space-time structure must be taken into account in any numerical model of the barrier discharge. In a single discharge channel, three consequent phases can be distinguished; 1) electric breakdown and electron-time-scale processes; 2) ion drift and ion-time-scale processes; 3) slow chemical processes, diffusion of chemical products and heat transfer. The scheme of such a three-phase model is presented and the results of simulation are discussed and compared with experimental data. (J.U.) 9 figs., 15 refs

  9. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    , altimeter, camera) and artificial intelligence. Finally it has more than 0.3 kg payload that can be used for further instruments. With respect to the conventional approach, that uses radar sensors on fixed locations, the system prototype composed of drone and Doppler radar is more flexible and would allow carrying out velocity measurements obtaining the whole transverse surface velocity profile during high flow and for inaccessible river sites as well. This information represents the boundary condition of the entropy model (Moramarco et al. 2004) able to turn the surface velocity in discharge, known the geometry of the river site. Nowadays the prototype is being implemented and the Doppler radar sensor is tested in a static way, i.e. the flow velocity accuracy is determined in real-case situations by comparing the sensor output with that of conventional instruments. The first flying test is planned shortly in some river sites of Tiber River in central Italy and based on the surface velocity survey the capability of the radar-drone prototype will be tested and the benefit in discharge assessment by using the entropy model will be verified. Alimenti, F., Placentino, F., Battistini, A., Tasselli, G., Bernardini, W., Mezzanotte, P., Rascio, D., Palazzari, V., Leone, S., Scarponi, A., Porzi, N., Comez, M. and Roselli, L. (2007). "A Low-Cost 24GHz Doppler Radar Sensor for Traffic Monitoring Implemented in Standard Discrete-Component Technology". Proceedings of the 2007 European Radar Conference (EuRAD 2007), pp. 162-165, Munich, Germany, 10-12 October 2007 Chiu, C. L. (1987). "Entropy and probability concepts in hydraulics". J. Hydr. Engrg., ASCE, 113(5), 583-600. Moramarco, T., Saltalippi, C., Singh, V.P.(2004). "Estimation of mean velocity in natural channels based on Chiu's velocity distribution equation", Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 9 (1), pp. 42-50

  10. Group Velocity Measurements in Laser-Heated Capillary Discharge Waveguides for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieronek, C. V.; Daniels, J.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Benedetti, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-10-01

    To date, the most energetic electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators have been produced using gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides, which increase the acceleration length by mitigating diffraction of the driving laser pulse. To reach higher electron beam energies, lower plasma density is required to reduce bunch dephasing. However, confinement of the driver is reduced for lower plasma density, reducing the acceleration length. A laser-heated capillary discharge waveguide, where the discharge is heated by a coaxial laser pulse, was proposed to create a steeper density gradient at lower density. Here the first measurements of group velocity in laser-heated capillary discharges, obtained via spectral interferometry, are presented. Increase of the driver group velocity and reduction in on-axis plasma density by laser-heating are shown. Work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Additional support by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1415596.

  11. The SCEC Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) Software Framework for Distributing and Querying Seismic Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maechling, P. J.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Shaw, J. H.; Plesch, A.; Olsen, K. B.; Jordan, T. H.; Goulet, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal seismic velocity models and datasets play a key role in regional three-dimensional numerical earthquake ground-motion simulation, full waveform tomography, modern physics-based probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis, as well as in other related fields including geophysics, seismology, and earthquake engineering. The standard material properties provided by a seismic velocity model are P- and S-wave velocities and density for any arbitrary point within the geographic volume for which the model is defined. Many seismic velocity models and datasets are constructed by synthesizing information from multiple sources and the resulting models are delivered to users in multiple file formats, such as text files, binary files, HDF-5 files, structured and unstructured grids, and through computer applications that allow for interactive querying of material properties. The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has developed the Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software framework to facilitate the registration and distribution of existing and future seismic velocity models to the SCEC community. The UCVM software framework is designed to provide a standard query interface to multiple, alternative velocity models, even if the underlying velocity models are defined in different formats or use different geographic projections. The UCVM framework provides a comprehensive set of open-source tools for querying seismic velocity model properties, combining regional 3D models and 1D background models, visualizing 3D models, and generating computational models in the form of regular grids or unstructured meshes that can be used as inputs for ground-motion simulations. The UCVM framework helps researchers compare seismic velocity models and build equivalent simulation meshes from alternative velocity models. These capabilities enable researchers to evaluate the impact of alternative velocity models in ground-motion simulations and seismic hazard analysis applications

  12. Transport modelling and gyrokinetic analysis of advanced high performance discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.E.; Imbeaux, F.; Staebler, G.M.; Budny, R.; Bourdelle, C.; Fukuyama, A.; Garbet, X.; Tala, T.; Parail, V.

    2005-01-01

    Predictive transport modelling and gyrokinetic stability analyses of demonstration hybrid (HYBRID) and advanced tokamak (AT) discharges from the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database are presented. Both regimes have exhibited enhanced core confinement (above the conventional ITER reference H-mode scenario) but differ in their current density profiles. Recent contributions to the ITPA database have facilitated an effort to study the underlying physics governing confinement in these advanced scenarios. In this paper, we assess the level of commonality of the turbulent transport physics and the relative roles of the transport suppression mechanisms (i.e. E x B shear and Shafranov shift (α) stabilization) using data for select HYBRID and AT discharges from the DIII-D, JET and AUG tokamaks. GLF23 transport modelling and gyrokinetic stability analysis indicate that E x B shear and Shafranov shift stabilization play essential roles in producing the improved core confinement in both HYBRID and AT discharges. Shafranov shift stabilization is found to be more important in AT discharges than in HYBRID discharges. We have also examined the competition between the stabilizing effects of E x B shear and Shafranov shift stabilization and the destabilizing effects of higher safety factors and parallel velocity shear. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of idealized low and high safety factor cases reveal some interesting consequences. A low safety factor (i.e. HYBRID relevant) is directly beneficial in reducing the transport, and E x B shear stabilization can dominate parallel velocity shear destabilization allowing the turbulence to be quenched. However, at low-q/high current, Shafranov shift stabilization plays less of a role. Higher safety factors (as found in AT discharges), on the other hand, have larger amounts of Shafranov shift stabilization, but parallel velocity shear destabilization can prevent E x B shear quenching of the turbulent

  13. Transport modeling and gyrokinetic analysis of advanced high performance discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Staebler, G.; Budny, R.; Fukuyama, A.; Tala, T.; Parail, V.

    2005-01-01

    Predictive transport modeling and gyrokinetic stability analyses of demonstration hybrid (HYBRID) and Advanced Tokamak (AT) discharges from the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database are presented. Both regimes have exhibited enhanced core confinement (above the conventional ITER reference H-mode scenario) but differ in their current density profiles. Recent contributions to the ITPA database have facilitated an effort to study the underlying physics governing confinement in these advanced scenarios. In this paper, we assess the level of commonality of the turbulent transport physics and the relative roles of the transport suppression mechanisms (i.e. ExB shear and Shafranov shift (α) stabilization) using data for select HYBRID and AT discharges from the DIII-D, JET, and AUG tokamaks. GLF23 transport modeling and gyrokinetic stability analysis indicates that ExB shear and Shafranov shift stabilization play essential roles in producing the improved core confinement in both HYBRID and AT discharges. Shafranov shift stabilization is found to be more important in AT discharges than in HYBRID discharges. We have also examined the competition between the stabilizing effects of ExB shear and Shafranov shift stabilization and the destabilizing effects of higher safety factors and parallel velocity shear. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of idealized low and high safety factor cases reveals some interesting consequences. A low safety factor (i.e. HYBRID relevant) is directly beneficial in reducing the transport, and ExB shear stabilization can win out over parallel velocity shear destabilization allowing the turbulence to be quenched. However, at low-q/high current, Shafranov shift stabilization plays less of a role. Higher safety factors (as found in AT discharges), on the other hand, have larger amounts of Shafranov shift stabilization, but parallel velocity shear destabilization can prevent ExB shear quenching of the turbulent

  14. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing...... the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow......, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius...

  15. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan, E-mail: zhongshan.li@forbrf.lth.se, E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Moseev, Dmitry [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); FOM Institute DIFFER, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kusano, Yukihiro [Department of Wind Energy, Section for Composites and Materials Mechanics, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Salewski, Mirko [Department of Physics, Section for Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Alpers, Andreas, E-mail: zhongshan.li@forbrf.lth.se, E-mail: alpers@ma.tum.de; Gritzmann, Peter; Schwenk, Martin [Zentrum Mathematik, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2015-01-26

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized high-speed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the single camera image), we provide here a 3D data analysis that includes 3D reconstructions of the plasma column and 3D particle tracking velocimetry based on discrete tomography methods. The 3D analysis, in particular, the determination of the 3D slip velocity between the plasma column and the gas flow, gives more realistic insight into the convection cooling process. Additionally, with the determination of the 3D slip velocity and the 3D length of the plasma column, we give more accurate estimates for the drag force, the electric field strength, the power per unit length, and the radius of the conducting zone of the plasma column.

  16. The Regional Discharge Model development project

    OpenAIRE

    Mäenpää, Tiina; Koivunen, Marita; Lukka, Heli; Wanne, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Theory The goal of the Regional Discharge Model (RDM) project was to develop discharge models, avoid unnecessary hospitalization, and improves the transfer of the patient to the right follow-on treatment or care, utilizing the public and private sector, research and training as well as developing technologies like the Regional Health Information Systems (RHIS) in the Satakunta Hospital District area. The RDM project is part of the ‘Whole life at home’ initiative funded and administere...

  17. Modeling Atmospheric Electromagnetic Field Following a Lightning Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydenko, S.; Mareev, E.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    A numerical model describing the electromagnetic field in the vicinity of an isolated lightning discharge is developed. Both the slow transient (quasistatic) electric field caused by the Maxwell relaxation of the charge disturbance and fast transient (electromagnetic pulse) are calculated in a plane atmosphere using the FDTD method. The lightning discharge is presented as a pulse current producing a distributed charge dipole inside the thundercloud in a case of intra-cloud (IC) flash or monopole charge in a case of cloud-to-ground (CG) flash. A temporal profile of the discharge current implies an existence of the return stroke, continuous current, and its fine features like the M-component. Temporal and spatial dependences of the atmospheric electric field on the flash type (IC or CG), distance to the discharge, disturbance of the electric conductivity inside the thundercloud, altitude(s) and lateral scale(s) of the charge region(s), temporal profile of the discharge current, and velocity of the return stroke are considered. A dependence of the net electric charge transferred to the upper atmospheric layers on the parameters of IC and CG flashes is studied. It is shown that both IC and CG flashes could serve as effective sources in the global electric circuit. A retrieval of the basic discharge parameters on the results of the one- or multipoint measurements of the both electromagnetic and quasistatic electric fields is discussed.

  18. Documentation for the hydrological discharge model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, S.; Duemenil, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    To improve the representation of hydrological land surface processes, which has so far been treated inadequately in global models of the atmospheric general circulation (GCMs), a model for the lateral waterflows from the continents into the ocean on the global scale was developed. The model describes the translation and retention of the lateral discharge as a function of the spatially distributed land surface characteristics that are globally available. Here, global scale refers to the resolution of 0.5 and lower, corresponding to a typical GCM gridbox area of about 2500 km{sup 2}. This model is called the Hydrological Discharge model or HD model. The HD model computes the discharge only at 0.5 resolution. A model input fields (runoff and drainage, see Sect. 3.1.) from the various GCM resolutions are interpolated to the same 0.5 grid. Thus, input fields may be used from any available resolution, if the corresponding interpolation routine to the 0.5 degree grid is provided. Since the HD model uses a time step of one day, a temporal resolution of one day is sufficient for the input fields. (orig.)

  19. ICP Reactor Modeling: CF4 Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    1999-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors are widely used now for etching and deposition applications due to their simpler design compared to other high density sources. Plasma reactor modeling has been playing an important role since it can, in principle, reduce the number of trial and error iterations in the design process and provide valuable understanding of mechanisms. Fluorocarbon precursors have been the choice for oxide etching. We have data available on CF4 from our laboratory. These are current voltage characteristics, La.ngmuir probe data, UV-absorption, and mass spectrometry measurements in a GEC-ICP reactor. We have developed a comprehensive model for ICP reactors which couples plasma generation and transport and neutral species dynamics with the gas flow equations. The model has been verified by comparison with experimental results for a nitrogen discharge in an ICP reactor. In the present work, the model has been applied to CF4 discharge and compared to available experimental data.

  20. Optimal velocity difference model for a car-following theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, G.H.; Cai, X.H.; Liu, C.Q.; Cao, B.F.; Tuo, M.X.

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter, we present a new optimal velocity difference model for a car-following theory based on the full velocity difference model. The linear stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. The unrealistically high deceleration does not appear in OVDM. Numerical simulation of traffic dynamics shows that the new model can avoid the disadvantage of negative velocity occurred at small sensitivity coefficient λ in full velocity difference model by adjusting the coefficient of the optimal velocity difference, which shows that collision can disappear in the improved model. -- Highlights: → A new optimal velocity difference car-following model is proposed. → The effects of the optimal velocity difference on the stability of traffic flow have been explored. → The starting and braking process were carried out through simulation. → The effects of the optimal velocity difference can avoid the disadvantage of negative velocity.

  1. Reduced motor unit discharge rates of maximal velocity dynamic contractions in response to a submaximal dynamic fatigue protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, B; Choi, I; Rice, C L

    2012-12-15

    Fatigability is highly task dependent wherein motor unit (MU) discharge rates and recruitment thresholds are affected differently depending on whether contractions are performed at maximal or submaximal intensities. Although much is described for isometric tasks, the behavior of MU properties during the production of maximal velocity dynamic contractions following submaximal fatiguing contractions is unknown. In seven young men, we evaluated changes in MU recruitment thresholds and MU discharge rates of the anconeus muscle during both submaximal and maximal dynamic elbow extensions following a submaximal dynamic fatiguing protocol of moderate intensity to velocity task failure. Velocity and power of the maximal dynamic contractions declined ∼45 and ∼55%, respectively, but these variables were unchanged for the submaximal target velocity contractions. Discharge rates of the 12 MUs at task failure were unchanged for submaximal dynamic contractions, but were decreased ∼20% for maximal dynamic and ballistic isometric contractions at task failure. MU recruitment thresholds of submaximal dynamic contractions decreased 52% at task failure, but were similar throughout the fatiguing protocol for maximal contractions. These findings support the concept of a common neural mechanism responsible for the relative declines in MU discharge rate associated with submaximal fatigability in both isometric and dynamic contractions.

  2. Modeling tokamak discharges with current holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    Tokamaks with current holes [T.S. Taylor, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 43 (1998) 1783; N.C. Hawkes, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 115001; T. Fujita, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 245001] are interesting, in part, because discharges with true current holes do not consume poloidal flux. The modeling of this Letter suggests that under steady-state conditions their currents may be driven by radial flow of plasma resulting from neutral beam injection

  3. Entrapment investigations of water-droplet behavior in a hot tin melt with varying discharge velocities and orifices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, G.; Mueller, K.

    1983-10-01

    Experiments were performed in which water was pressed through a thermally isolated tube into a clyindrical crucible (diameter 5 cm, height 7,5 cm both measured inside) filled with molten tin (600 K). The diameter of the circular water outlet was varied from 0.5 up to 10 mm and the discharge velocity of the water was in the range of 0.05 up to 20 m/s. In the tin melt the water divides into single drops, which emerged on the melt surface, if an interaction between water and tin melt did not occur. The probability for an interaction increased in experiments with higher discharge velocities of the water and smaller diameters of the water outlet. In experiments with discharge velocities ≥ 5 m/s and outlet diameters ≤ 2 mm one or more interactions occured in each case. At these interactions of water drops entrapped in the tin melt (called entrapment interactions) a portion of the melt was ejected from the crucible. The moment of the interaction and the pulse of the force toward the crucible bottom were recorded. (orig.) [de

  4. Effects of non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution function on two-stream instability in low-pressure discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydorenko, D.; Smolyakov, A.; Kaganovich, I.; Raitses, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Electron emission from discharge chamber walls is important for plasma maintenance in many low-pressure discharges. The electrons emitted from the walls are accelerated by the sheath electric field and are injected into the plasma as an electron beam. Penetration of this beam through the plasma is subject to the two-stream instability, which tends to slow down the beam electrons and heat the plasma electrons. In the present paper, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell code is used to simulate these effects both in a collisionless plasma slab with immobile ions and in a cross-field discharge of a Hall thruster. The two-stream instability occurs if the total electron velocity distribution function of the plasma-beam system is a nonmonotonic function of electron speed. Low-pressure plasmas can be depleted of electrons with energy above the plasma potential. This study reveals that under such conditions the two-stream instability depends crucially on the velocity distribution function of electron emission. It is shown that propagation of the secondary electron beams in Hall thrusters may be free of the two-stream instability if the velocity distribution of secondary electron emission is a monotonically decaying function of speed. In this case, the beams propagate between the walls with minimal loss of the beam current and the secondary electron emission does not affect the thruster plasma properties

  5. ESTIMATING FLOW AND FLUX OF GROUND-WATER DISCHARGE USING WATER TEMPERATURE AND VELOCITY. (R827961)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The nature of ground water discharge to a stream has important implications for nearby ground water flow, especially with respect to contaminant transport and well-head protection. Measurements of ground water discharge were accomplished in this study using (1) differences bet...

  6. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun-Fang, Tian; Bin, Jia; Xin-Gang, Li; Zi-You, Gao

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink–antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model. (general)

  7. A new car-following model considering velocity anticipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Fang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Gao, Zi-You

    2010-01-01

    The full velocity difference model proposed by Jiang et al. [2001 Phys. Rev. E 64 017101] has been improved by introducing velocity anticipation. Velocity anticipation means the follower estimates the future velocity of the leader. The stability condition of the new model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Theoretical results show that the stability region increases when we increase the anticipation time interval. The mKdV equation is derived to describe the kink-antikink soliton wave and obtain the coexisting stability line. The delay time of car motion and kinematic wave speed at jam density are obtained in this model. Numerical simulations exhibit that when we increase the anticipation time interval enough, the new model could avoid accidents under urgent braking cases. Also, the traffic jam could be suppressed by considering the anticipation velocity. All results demonstrate that this model is an improvement on the full velocity difference model.

  8. Luminous phase of nanosecond discharge in deionized water: morphology, propagation velocity and optical emission.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimek, Milan; Pongrác, Branislav; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Lukeš, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2017), č. článku 07LT01. ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12987S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : water * nanosecond discharge * emission spectra * breakdown Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1361-6595/aa758d

  9. Estimating discharge using multi-level velocity data from acoustic doppler instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jane Bang; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer; Ovesen, Niels Bering

    it records the stage. The monthly control measurements made by the water authority office are made with an ADCP-instrument (Streampro, acoustic Doppler current profiler) which is pulled across the stream next to the in situ Doppler instruments. As part of the present project supplementary ADCP-data have been......In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness thus imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations...... and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density...

  10. Structure of turbulent velocity field in the discharge stream from a standard Rushton turbine impeller

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk; Fořt, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2017), s. 151-160 ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-20175S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : rushton turbine * LDA * discharge stream * agitated vessel Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2016

  11. Measurements of 3D slip velocities and plasma column lengths of a gliding arc discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, J.; Gao, J.; Ehn, A.; Alden, M.; Li, Z.; Moseev, D.; Kusano, Y.; Salewski, M.; Alpers, A.; Gritzmann, P.; Schwenk, M.

    2015-01-01

    A non-thermal gliding arc discharge was generated at atmospheric pressure in an air flow. The dynamics of the plasma column and tracer particles were recorded using two synchronized highspeed cameras. Whereas the data analysis for such systems has previously been performed in 2D (analyzing the

  12. Structure of turbulent velocity field in the discharge stream from a standard Rushton turbine impeller

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk; Fořt, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2017), s. 151-160 ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-20175S Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : rushton turbine * LDA * discharge stream * agitated vessel Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2016

  13. A classical model explaining the OPERA velocity paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Broda, Boguslaw

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the paradoxical results of the OPERA Collaboration, we have proposed a classical mechanics model yielding the statistically measured velocity of a beam higher than the velocity of the particles constituting the beam. Ingredients of our model necessary to obtain this curious result are a non-constant fraction function and the method of the maximum-likelihood estimation.

  14. Correction factor to dye-measured flow velocity under varying water and sediment discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye-tracing technique was a widely used method to measure velocity of overland flow in soil erosion studies under both laboratory and field conditions. Few studies were performed to quantify the effects of sediment load on correction factor on steep slopes. The objective was to investigate the poten...

  15. Velocity of detonation-a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Lemi

    2010-06-01

    Based on the principles of conservation of energy and momentum, a mathematical formula has been derived for the squares of detonation velocities of a large set of explosives. The equation is a function of the total energy and molecular weight of an explosive compound considered. A regressed equation has been obtained for a pool of explosives of various types including nitramines, aliphatic and aromatic nitro compounds. Also another regressed equation for nitramines only is given. For the regression, the total energies are obtained using DFT (UB3LYP/6-31G(d)). The regression statistics are given and discussed.

  16. Velocity potential formulations of highly accurate Boussinesq-type models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingham, Harry B.; Madsen, Per A.; Fuhrman, David R.

    2009-01-01

    is of interest because it reduces the computational effort by approximately a factor of two and facilitates a coupling to other potential flow solvers. A new shoaling enhancement operator is introduced to derive new models (in both formulations) with a velocity profile which is always consistent...... structures. Coast. Eng. 53, 929-945) are re-derived in a more general framework which establishes the correct relationship between the model in a velocity formulation and a velocity potential formulation. Although most work with this model has used the velocity formulation, the potential formulation...... with the kinematic bottom boundary condition. The true behaviour of the velocity potential formulation with respect to linear shoaling is given for the first time, correcting errors made by Jamois et al. (Jamois, E., Fuhrman, D.R., Bingham, H.B., Molin, B., 2006. Wave-structure interactions and nonlinear wave...

  17. Study on the Enhancement Effect of Dielectric Barrier Discharge on the Premixed Methane/Oxygen/Helium Flame Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Haibao; Yu, Lin; Li, Ping; Tang, Chenglong; Wang, Jinhua; Zhang, Guanjun

    2015-12-01

    Recently, plasma-assisted combustion has become a potentially applicable technology in many combustion scenarios. In this paper, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma generator is designed to explore the effect of plasma on the CH4 oxidation process, and several properties of combustion are considered. First, in the presence or absence of plasma discharge, physical appearance of the flame is examined and analyzed. Second, the flame propagation velocity is calculated by the flame front extracted from the imaging data with the Bunsen burner method. Finally, the main molecular components and their intensity variation in the flame and the plasma zones are identified with an emission spectrograph to analyze the effect of active species on the combustion process. We also discuss the possible kinetic regime of plasma-assisted combustion. Experimental results imply that plasma discharge applied to the premixed CH4/O2/He mixture significantly raises the flame speed with equivalence ratios ranging from 0.85 to 1.10, with the flame speed improved by 17% to 35%. It can be seen that plasma can improve methane oxidation efficiency in the premixed fuel/oxidizer, especially at a low equivalence ratio. supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. xjj2013086), Natural Science Basic Research Plan in Shaanxi Province of China (No. 2014JQ7254) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51477135)

  18. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  19. Estimation of Continuous Velocity Model Variations in Rock Deformation Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, J. W.; Tomas, R.; Benson, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic interferometry, using either seismic waves coda or ambient noise, is a passive technique to image the sub-surface seismic velocity structure, which directly relates to the physical properties of the material through which they travel. The methodology estimates the Green's function for the volume between two seismic stations by cross-correlating long time series of ambient noise recorded at both stations, with the Green's function being effectively the seismogram recorded at one station due to an impulsive or instantaneous energy source at the second station. In laboratory rock deformation experiments, changes in the velocity structure of the rock sample are generally measured through active surveys using an array of AE piezoelectric P-wave transducers, producing a time series of ultrasonic velocities in both axial and radial directions. The velocity information from the active surveys is used to provide a time dependent velocity model for the inversion of AE event source locations. These velocity measurements are carried out at regular intervals throughout the laboratory test, causing the interruption of passive AE monitoring for the length of the surveys. There is therefore a trade-off between the frequency at which the active velocity surveys are carried out to optimise the velocity model and the availability of a complete AE record during the rock deformation test.This study proposes to use noise interferometry to provide a continuous measurement of velocity variations in a rock sample during a laboratory rock deformation experiment without the need to carry out active velocity surveys while simultaneously passively monitoring AE activity. The continuous noise source in this test, is an AE transducer fed with a white gaussian noise signal from a function generator. Data from all AE transducers is continuously acquired and recorded during the deformation experiment. The cross correlation of the continuous AE record is used to produce a continuous velocity

  20. LDV measurements of the velocity field on the inlet section of a pumped storage equipped with a symmetrical suction elbow for variable discharge values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drǎghici, I; Bosioc, A I; Anton, L E; Muntean, S

    2014-01-01

    The storage pumps are equipped with various types of inlet casings. The flow nonuniformity is generated by the suction elbows being ingested by the impeller leading to unsteady phenomena and worse cavitational behaviour. A symmetrical suction elbow model corresponding to the double flux storage pump was manufactured and installed on the test rig in order to assess the flow field at the pump inlet. The experimental investigations are performed for 9 discharge values from 0.5 to 1.3 of nominal discharge. LDV measurements are performed on the annular section of the pump inlet in order to quantify the flow non-uniformity generated by the symmetrical suction elbow. Both axial and circumferential velocity components are simultaneously measured on the half plane (180°) of the annular inlet section along to 19 survey axis with 62 points on each. The flow field on the next half plane is determined tacking into account the symmetry. As a result, the flow map on the pump inlet annular section is reconstructed revealing a significant variation of the circumferential velocity component. The absolute flow angle is computed showing a significant variation of ±38°

  1. Flood Water Crossing: Laboratory Model Investigations for Water Velocity Reductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasnon N.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of floods may give a negative impact towards road traffic in terms of difficulties in mobilizing traffic as well as causing damage to the vehicles, which later cause them to be stuck in the traffic and trigger traffic problems. The high velocity of water flows occur when there is no existence of objects capable of diffusing the water velocity on the road surface. The shape, orientation and size of the object to be placed beside the road as a diffuser are important for the effective flow attenuation of water. In order to investigate the water flow, a laboratory experiment was set up and models were constructed to study the flow velocity reduction. The velocity of water before and after passing through the diffuser objects was investigated. This paper focuses on laboratory experiments to determine the flow velocity of the water using sensors before and after passing through two best diffuser objects chosen from a previous flow pattern experiment.

  2. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  3. Modeling of Pulsed Direct-Current Glow Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Mu; Zheng Yaru; Fan Yujia; Zhang Nan; Liu Chengsen; Wang Dezhen

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent model was adopted to study the time evolution of low-voltage pulsed DC glow discharge. The distributions of electric field, ion density and electron density in nitrogen were investigated in our simulation, and the temporal shape of the discharge current was also obtained. Our results show that the dynamic behaviors of the discharge depends strongly on the applied pulse voltage, and the use of higher pulse voltages results in a significantly increase of discharge current and a decrease of discharge delay time. The current-voltage characteristic calculated by adjusting secondary electron emission coefficient for different applied pulse voltage under the gas pressure of 1 Torr is found in a reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Model of a stationary microwave argon discharge at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhelyazkov, I.; Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.

    2008-01-01

    The many applications of microwave gas discharges at atmospheric pressure in various fields of science, technology and medicine require an adequate model of these discharges. Such a model is based on the electromagnetic wave's propagation properties and on the elementary processes in the discharge bulk. In contrast to the microwave discharges at low-gas pressures, where many elementary processes might be ignored because of their negligible contribution to the electron and heavy particle's balance equations, for such discharges at atmospheric pressure the consideration of a large number of collisional processes is mandatory. For the build of a successful discharge-column model one needs three important quantities, notably the power θ necessary for sustaining an electron - ion pair, electron - neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer v en , and gas temperature T g . The first two key parameters are obtained by a collisional-radiative model of the argon at atmospheric pressure, while the microwave frequency ω/2π = 2.45 GHz, plasma column radius R, gas pressure p and gas temperature T g are fixed external parameters determined by the experimental conditions. Here, we present a model of a capillary argon microwave plasma column with a length L ≅ 14 cm, sustained by wave power of 110 W - the model yields the longitudinal distributions of the plasma density, expended wave power, wave electric field magnitude, and complex wave number

  5. Modelling the combined impact of radionuclide discharges reaching rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, J.; Small, S.; Hornby, D.; Scarlett, P.; Harvey, M.; Simmonds, J.; Bexon, A.; Jones, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Agency currently authorises direct and indirect (via sewerage systems) discharges of liquid radioactive wastes to rivers from nuclear sites and other registered users of radioactivity. Discharges are normally authorised on a site-by-site basis, taking into account the radiological assessment. Radiological assessments are normally made using dilution models to estimate radionuclide activities in the effluents themselves and in the receiving rivers. These data are then combined with information on habits and dose factor information to give a dose assessment for individuals exposed to the discharge. For each site the highest radiological impact is expected immediately downstream of the disposal point where concentrations of radionuclides and resulting doses are highest. The concentration and doses are expected to decline with increasing distance downstream of the disposal point. However, if discharges are made into the river from other establishments higher up the catchment, the total dose may be higher. Recent Environment Agency research projects provided evidence of the potential radiological significance of multiple discharges to a single river. In the light of these studies, the Agency require a robust modelling tool to assist in the assessment of the effects of combined discharges to river systems. The aim of this R and D project was to develop and test modelling tools that could be used to make assessments of the impact of multiple radiological discharge into river systems and to trial them on the upper Thames river system

  6. Three dimensional reflection velocity analysis based on velocity model scan; Model scan ni yoru sanjigen hanshaha sokudo kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minegishi, M.; Tsuru, T. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Matsuoka, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Introduced herein is a reflection wave velocity analysis method using model scanning as a method for velocity estimation across a section, the estimation being useful in the construction of a velocity structure model in seismic exploration. In this method, a stripping type analysis is carried out, wherein optimum structure parameters are determined for reflection waves one after the other beginning with those from shallower parts. During this process, the velocity structures previously determined for the shallower parts are fixed and only the lowest of the layers undergoing analysis at the time is subjected to model scanning. To consider the bending of ray paths at each velocity boundaries involving shallower parts, the ray path tracing method is utilized for the calculation of the reflection travel time curve for the reflection surface being analyzed. Out of the reflection wave travel time curves calculated using various velocity structure models, one that suits best the actual reflection travel time is detected. The degree of matching between the calculated result and actual result is measured by use of data semblance in a time window provided centering about the calculated reflective wave travel time. The structure parameter is estimated on the basis of conditions for the maximum semblance. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  7. Behaviour of ion velocity distributions for a simple collision model

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Maurice, J.-P.; Schunk, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the ion velocity distributions for a weakly ionized plasma subjected to crossed electric and magnetic fields. An exact solution to Boltzmann's equation has been obtained by replacing the Boltzmann collision integral with a simple relaxation model. At altitudes above about 150 km, where the ion collision frequency is much less than the ion cyclotron frequency, the ion distribution takes the shape of a torus in velocity space for electric fields greater than 40 mV/m. This shape persists for one to two hours after application of the electric field. At altitudes where the ion collision and cyclotron frequencies are approximately equal (about 120 km), the ion velocity distribution is shaped like a bean for large electric field strengths. This bean-shaped distribution persists throughout the lifetime of ionospheric electric fields. These highly non-Maxwellian ion velocity distributions may have an appreciable affect on the interpretation of ion temperature measurements.

  8. Numerical Simulation Modelling for Velocity Measurement of Electromagnetic Flow Meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J Z; Gong, C L; Tian, G Y; Lucas, G P

    2006-01-01

    An induced voltage EMF in the area of measuring single-phase flow rate in pipes has been used in many industrial areas. To measure the continuous phase velocity profile in multiphase flows where the continuous phase is an electrical conductor, Electrical capacitance and resistance tomography has been comprehensively investigated, except for continuous phase velocity profile measurement. This paper tries to design the numerical simulation model according to the basic electromagnetic induction law and to investigate the relationship between induced electric potential or potential drop and the velocity distribution of the conductive continuous phase in the flow. First, the 3-Dimenssion simulating module for EMF is built. Given the most simple velocity profile of the fluid in the pipe, the value of the induced potential difference between electrodes is obtained by simulation and theoretical computation according to J A Shercliff's weight function. The relative error is 6.066 . This proves that the simulation model is accurate enough to investigate the characteristic of the induced potential difference of EMF. Finally, the relationship between induced potential difference and the velocity profile is analysed in detail where the complicated velocity profile is expressed as vz = 1m/s when 0.022< x2+y2< = 0.02652 and vz = 5m/s when x2+y2< = 0.022

  9. Modeling and Velocity Tracking Control for Tape Drive System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this paper are to formulate mathematical model for the tape drive system (TDS) by designing velocity tracking controller using physical laws. A Matlab function script and Simulink model were developed in Matlab and Simulink environment. The result of the study revealed that 7.07, 8 and 10 of koln values ...

  10. Modeling and Velocity Tracking Control for Tape Drive System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2018-03-23

    Mar 23, 2018 ... ABSTRACT: The objectives of this paper are to formulate mathematical model for the tape drive system (TDS) by designing velocity tracking controller using physical laws. A Matlab function script and Simulink model were developed in Matlab and Simulink environment. The result of the study revealed that ...

  11. Mean flows and blob velocities in scrape-off layer (SOLT) simulations of an L-mode discharge on Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; LaBombard, B.; Hughes, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) code simulations are compared with an L-mode discharge on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [M. Greenwald, et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 110501 (2014)]. Density and temperature profiles for the simulations were obtained by smoothly fitting Thomson scattering and mirror Langmuir probe (MLP) data from the shot. Simulations differing in turbulence intensity were obtained by varying a dissipation parameter. Mean flow profiles and density fluctuation amplitudes are consistent with those measured by MLP in the experiment and with a Fourier space diagnostic designed to measure poloidal phase velocity. Blob velocities in the simulations were determined from the correlation function for density fluctuations, as in the analysis of gas-puff-imaging (GPI) blobs in the experiment. In the simulations, it was found that larger blobs moved poloidally with the ExB flow velocity, v E , in the near-SOL, while smaller fluctuations moved with the group velocity of the dominant linear (interchange) mode, v E + 1/2 v di , where v di is the ion diamagnetic drift velocity. Comparisons are made with the measured GPI correlation velocity for the discharge. The saturation mechanisms operative in the simulation of the discharge are also discussed. In conclusion, it is found that neither sheared flow nor pressure gradient modification can be excluded as saturation mechanisms

  12. Delayed hydride cracking: theoretical model testing to predict cracking velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mieza, Juan I.; Vigna, Gustavo L.; Domizzi, Gladys

    2009-01-01

    Pressure tubes from Candu nuclear reactors as any other component manufactured with Zr alloys are prone to delayed hydride cracking. That is why it is important to be able to predict the cracking velocity during the component lifetime from parameters easy to be measured, such as: hydrogen concentration, mechanical and microstructural properties. Two of the theoretical models reported in literature to calculate the DHC velocity were chosen and combined, and using the appropriate variables allowed a comparison with experimental results of samples from Zr-2.5 Nb tubes with different mechanical and structural properties. In addition, velocities measured by other authors in irradiated materials could be reproduced using the model described above. (author)

  13. Shallow and deep crustal velocity models of Northeast Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karplus, M.; Klemperer, S. L.; Mechie, J.; Shi, D.; Zhao, W.; Brown, L. D.; Wu, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The INDEPTH IV seismic profile in Northeast Tibet is the highest resolution wide-angle refraction experiment imaging the Qaidam Basin, North Kunlun Thrusts (NKT), Kunlun Mountains, North and South Kunlun Faults (NKT, SKT), and Songpan-Ganzi terrane (SG). First arrival refraction modeling using ray tracing and least squares inversion has yielded a crustal p-wave velocity model, best resolved for the top 20 km. Ray tracing of deeper reflections shows considerable differences between the Qaidam Basin and the SG, in agreement with previous studies of those areas. The Moho ranges from about 52 km beneath the Qaidam Basin to 63 km with a slight northward dip beneath the SG. The 11-km change must occur between the SKF and the southern edge of the Qaidam Basin, just north of the NKT, allowing the possibility of a Moho step across the NKT. The Qaidam Basin velocity-versus-depth profile is more similar to the global average than the SG profile, which bears resemblance to previously determined “Tibet-type” velocity profiles with mid to lower crustal velocities of 6.5 to 7.0 km/s appearing at greater depths. The highest resolution portion of the profile (100-m instrument spacing) features two distinct, apparently south-dipping low-velocity zones reaching about 2-3 km depth that we infer to be the locations of the NKF and SKF. A strong reflector at 35 km, located entirely south of the SKF and truncated just south of it, may be cut by a steeply south-dipping SKF. Elevated velocities at depth beneath the surface location of the NKF may indicate the south-dipping NKF meets the SKF between depths of 5 and 10 km. Undulating regions of high and low velocity extending about 1-2 km in depth near the southern border of the Qaidam Basin likely represent north-verging thrust sheets of the NKT.

  14. Two velocity difference model for a car following theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. X.; Cheng, R. J.; Li, Z. P.

    2008-09-01

    In the light of the optimal velocity model, a two velocity difference model for a car-following theory is put forward considering navigation in modern traffic. To our knowledge, the model is an improvement over the previous ones theoretically, because it considers more aspects in the car-following process than others. Then we investigate the property of the model using linear and nonlinear analyses. The Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the KdV equation) near the neutral stability line and the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation (for short, the mKdV equation) around the critical point are derived by applying the reductive perturbation method. The traffic jam could be thus described by the KdV soliton and the kink-anti-kink soliton for the KdV equation and mKdV equation, respectively. Numerical simulations are made to verify the model, and good results are obtained with the new model.

  15. A nonlinear inversion for the velocity background and perturbation models

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2015-08-19

    Reflected waveform inversion (RWI) provides a method to reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the single scattered wavefield obtained using an image. However, current RWI methods usually neglect diving waves, which is an important source of information for extracting the long wavelength components of the velocity model. Thus, we propose a new optimization problem through breaking the velocity model into the background and the perturbation in the wave equation directly. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer the single scattering model, but includes all scattering. We optimize both components simultaneously, and thus, the objective function is nonlinear with respect to both the background and perturbation. The new introduced w can absorb the non-smooth update of background naturally. Application to the Marmousi model with frequencies that start at 5 Hz shows that this method can converge to the accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Application to the SEG2014 demonstrates the versatility of the approach.

  16. Modelling of the initial stage of the surface discharge development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibalov, V.; Pietsch, G.

    1998-01-01

    Computer modelling of the initial stage of the surface discharge was performed by solving numerically the coupled continuity, the Poisson and Townsend ionization equations and taking into account the ionization, attachment and detachment processes. The potential distribution at the dielectric surface and at the boundaries which surround the integration region have been calculated with the charge-image method in a 3D approach. In order to eliminate numerical diffusion effects, the solution of the continuity equation was corrected using a flux correction transport routine. At the positive voltage the development of the discharge channel is determined mainly by the shape of the electrode tip. At the negative voltage the following phases of the discharge may be distinguished: the initial phase, the cathode directed streamer phase resulting in the cathode layer formation, and the propagating phase. The physical processes governing each discharge phase are described in detail. (J.U.)

  17. Model identification for hindered-compression settling velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valverde Pérez, Borja; Climent, Javier; Griffith, Christopher

    process models?” This international research effort aimed to address these questions by carrying out a comprehensive practical identifiability assessment of constitutive functions for hindered and compression settling velocity using laboratory-scale measurements and one-dimensional (1-D) simulation models......Two of the key questions regarding secondary settling are (a) Does a process model exist for which all hindered and compression settling velocity parameters can be estimated using experimental data?; (b) What is the minimum data that need be inferred, from a settling sensor setup to identify....... For model validation, the triangulation technique was used, including independent laboratory- and full-scale measurements as well as 1-D and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation models....

  18. Modelling mid-span water table depth and drainage discharge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-03

    Apr 3, 2015 ... Modelling mid-span water table depth and drainage discharge dynamics using DRAINMOD 6.1 in a sugarcane field in Pongola,. South Africa. M Malota1,2 and A ... and waterlogging and reclamation plans need to be effected ..... model evaluation at a sugarcane field in north-eastern New South. Wales ...

  19. RadVel: General toolkit for modeling Radial Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Petigura, Erik A.; Blunt, Sarah; Sinukoff, Evan

    2018-01-01

    RadVel models Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) time series. The code is written in Python with a fast Kepler's equation solver written in C. It provides a framework for fitting RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and computing robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel can perform Bayesian model comparison and produces publication quality plots and LaTeX tables.

  20. Diagnostics and modeling of high pressure streamer induced discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marode, E.; Dessante, P.; Deschamps, N.; Deniset, C.

    2001-01-01

    A great variety of diagnostic has been applied to gain information on basic parameter governing high pressure nonthermal filamentary plasmas (and namely streamer induced filamentary discharges). Apart from electrical diagnostics, gas discharge, in contrast with solid state physics, can greatly benefit from all optical techniques owing to its ''transparent'' state. Emission and absorption spectroscopy, as well as LIF or CARS (talk are given during this meeting on these two techniques) are among such specific possibilities. The figures gained from these diagnostic measurements has generally no meaning by itself. They must be worked out, by means of calibrated former results, and/or by using them as input in high pressure plasma modeling. Mixing experimental and modeling approach is necessary for reaching relevant physical knowledge of the high pressure filamentary discharges processes. It is shown that diffusion, and thermal space and time distribution, must fully be taken into account

  1. A new approach for modeling dry deposition velocity of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dry deposition process is recognized as an important pathway among the various removal processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. In this field, there are several models reported in the literature useful to predict the dry deposition velocity of particles of different diameters but many of them are not capable of representing dry deposition phenomena for several categories of pollutants and deposition surfaces. Moreover, their applications is valid for specific conditions and if the data in that application meet all of the assumptions required of the data used to define the model. In this paper a new dry deposition velocity model based on an electrical analogy schema is proposed to overcome the above issues. The dry deposition velocity is evaluated by assuming that the resistances that affect the particle flux in the Quasi-Laminar Sub-layers can be combined to take into account local features of the mutual influence of inertial impact processes and the turbulent one. Comparisons with the experimental data from literature indicate that the proposed model allows to capture with good agreement the main dry deposition phenomena for the examined environmental conditions and deposition surfaces to be determined. The proposed approach could be easily implemented within atmospheric dispersion modeling codes and efficiently addressing different deposition surfaces for several particle pollution.

  2. Modeling delamination of FRP laminates under low velocity impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Wen, H. M.; Ren, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic laminates (FRP) have been increasingly used in various engineering such as aeronautics, astronautics, transportation, naval architecture and their impact response and failure are a major concern in academic community. A new numerical model is suggested for fiber reinforced plastic composites. The model considers that FRP laminates has been constituted by unidirectional laminated plates with adhesive layers. A modified adhesive layer damage model that considering strain rate effects is incorporated into the ABAQUS / EXPLICIT finite element program by the user-defined material subroutine VUMAT. It transpires that the present model predicted delamination is in good agreement with the experimental results for low velocity impact.

  3. Global Modeling of CO2 Discharges with Aerospace Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Berenguer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed a global model aiming to study discharges in CO2 under various conditions, pertaining to a large spectrum of pressure, absorbed energy, and feeding values. Various physical conditions and form factors have been investigated. The model was applied to a case of radiofrequency discharge and to helicon type devices functioning in low and high feed conditions. In general, main charged species were found to be CO2+ for sufficiently low pressure cases and O− for higher pressure ones, followed by CO2+, CO+, and O2+ in the latter case. Dominant reaction is dissociation of CO2 resulting into CO production. Electronegativity, important for radiofrequency discharges, increases with pressure, arriving up to 3 for high flow rates for absorbed power of 250 W, and diminishes with increasing absorbed power. Model results pertaining to radiofrequency type plasma discharges are found in satisfactory agreement with those available from an existing experiment. Application to low and high flow rates feedings cases of helicon thruster allowed for evaluation of thruster functioning conditions pertaining to absorbed powers from 50 W to 1.8 kW. The model allows for a detailed evaluation of the CO2 potential to be used as propellant in electric propulsion devices.

  4. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  5. Hydraulic modeling of thermal discharges into shallow, tidal affected streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copp, H.W.; Shashidhara, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    A two-unit nuclear fired power plant is being constructed in western Washington state. Blowdown water from cooling towers will be discharged into the Chehalis River nearby. The location of a diffuser is some 21 miles upriver from Grays Harbor on the Pacific Ocean. Because the Chehalis River is classified as an excellent stream from the standpoint of water quality, State regulatory agencies required demonstration that thermal discharges would maintain water quality standards within fairly strict limits. A hydraulic model investigation used a 1:12 scale, undistorted model of a 1300-foot river reach in the vicinity of the diffuser. The model scale was selected to insure fully turbulent flows both in the stream and from the diffuser (Reynolds similitude). Model operation followed the densimetric Froude similitude. Thermistors were employed to measure temperatures in the model; measurements were taken by computer command and such measurements at some 250 positions were effected in about 2.5 seconds

  6. Cycle life versus depth of discharge update on modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.

    1994-02-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and cycle life vs. depth of discharge data for the following are presented: data as of three years ago; Air Force/Crane-Fuhr-Smithrick; Ken Fuhr's Data; Air Force/Crane Data; Eagle-Pitcher Data; Steve Schiffer's Data; John Smithrick's Data; temperature effects; and E-P, Yardney, and Hughes 26% Data. Other topics covered include the following: LeRC cycling tests of Yardney Space Station Cells; general statements; general observations; two different models of cycle life vs. depth of discharge; and other degradation modes.

  7. Submarine wastewater discharges: dispersion modelling in the Northern Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scroccaro, Isabella; Ostoich, Marco; Umgiesser, Georg; De Pascalis, Francesca; Colugnati, Luigi; Mattassi, Giorgio; Vazzoler, Marina; Cuomo, Marco

    2010-05-01

    Opposite interests must coexist in coastal areas: the presence of significant cities and urban centres, of touristic and recreational areas, and of extensive shellfish farming. To avoid local pollution caused by treated wastewaters along the Northern Adriatic coast (Friuli Venezia-Giulia and Veneto regions), marine outfall systems have been constructed. In this study, the application of a numerical dispersion model is used to support the traditional monitoring methods in order to link information concerning the hydrodynamic circulation and the microbiological features, to evaluate possible health risks associated with recreational and coastal shellfish farming activities. The study is a preliminary analysis of the environmental impact of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with submarine discharge outfalls. It also could be useful for the water profile definition according to the Directive 2006/7/EC on the quality of bathing water and for the integrated areal analysis (Ostoich et al. 2006), to define the area of influence of each submarine discharge point. Historical data on discharges of the considered WWTPs were recovered and evaluated. Data on discharges' control for Veneto region (WWTPs of Lido and Cavallino) were produced by the WWTPs' manager Veritas Laboratory service, while data for the WWTPs of Friuli Venezia-Giulia region were produced by the regional environmental protection agency in the institutional control activity following official methods. The hydrodynamic model used in this work is the three-dimensional version of the finite element model SHYFEM, developed at ISMAR-CNR (Marine Science Institute of the Italian National Research Council) in Venice (Umgiesser et al. J Mar Syst 51:123-145, 2008). Numerical simulations have been carried out with the 3D version of the finite element model SHYFEM for 3 months during autumn 2007 to evaluate the bacterial pollution dispersion along the coasts of Veneto and Friuli Venezia-Giulia regions, prescribing meteo

  8. Small velocity and finite temperature variations in kinetic relaxation models

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A small Knuden number analysis of a kinetic equation in the diffusive scaling is performed. The collision kernel is of BGK type with a general local Gibbs state. Assuming that the flow velocity is of the order of the Knudsen number, a Hilbert expansion yields a macroscopic model with finite temperature variations, whose complexity lies in between the hydrodynamic and the energy-transport equations. Its mathematical structure is explored and macroscopic models for specific examples of the global Gibbs state are presented. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  9. Identifying Clusters with Mixture Models that Include Radial Velocity Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnatowicz, Alexis; Ybarra, Jason E.

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar clusters plays an integral role in the study of star formation. We present a cluster mixture model that considers radial velocity data in addition to spatial data. Maximum likelihood estimation through the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used for parameter estimation. Our mixture model analysis can be used to distinguish adjacent or overlapping clusters, and estimate properties for each cluster.Work supported by awards from the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges (VFIC) Undergraduate Science Research Fellowship and The Research Experience @Bridgewater (TREB).

  10. Predicted and measured velocity distribution in a model heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, D.B.; Carlucci, L.N.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between numerical predictions, using the porous media concept, and measurements of the two-dimensional isothermal shell-side velocity distributions in a model heat exchanger. Computations and measurements were done with and without tubes present in the model. The effect of tube-to-baffle leakage was also investigated. The comparison was made to validate certain porous media concepts used in a computer code being developed to predict the detailed shell-side flow in a wide range of shell-and-tube heat exchanger geometries

  11. Model basin, measurement of particle velocities in wave crests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-15

    A model set-up, which makes it possible to measure water particle velocities in wave crests, has been developed and tested. The technique includes a tri-axial ultrasonic current probe mounted on a movable frame which is moved vertically by a hydraulic piston thus following the oscillating water surface. Recording is hereby done at a constant depth beneath the water surface and the velocity profiles are found by interpolation/extrapolation between the recordings taken in different levels at a given time during the wave time series. The set-up has been successfully used for measurements indeep-water regular and irregular seastates. Detailed analysis and comparison with various theoretical descriptions of wave kinematics has been performed. Furthermore, the set-up has been used for measurements in freak waves reproduced at a limited waterdepth. The analysis and comparisons with theoretical predictions have shed new light on the freak wave phenomenon. Some disturbance into the area of measurements is introduced by the ultrasonic proble. For the maximum values of particle velocities (under a crest or a trough), this disturbance is minimal as the particles move in practically horizontal directons. (BN).

  12. Hydrodynamic Equations for Flocking Models without Velocity Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruani, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    The spontaneous emergence of collective motion patterns is usually associated with the presence of a velocity alignment mechanism that mediates the interactions among the moving individuals. Despite of this widespread view, it has been shown recently that several flocking behaviors can emerge in the absence of velocity alignment and as a result of short-range, position-based, attractive forces that act inside a vision cone. Here, we derive the corresponding hydrodynamic equations of a microscopic position-based flocking model, reviewing and extending previous reported results. In particular, we show that three distinct macroscopic collective behaviors can be observed: i) the coarsening of aggregates with no orientational order, ii) the emergence of static, elongated nematic bands, and iii) the formation of moving, locally polar structures, which we call worms. The derived hydrodynamic equations indicate that active particles interacting via position-based interactions belong to a distinct class of active systems fundamentally different from other active systems, including velocity-alignment-based flocking systems.

  13. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C.

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  14. Experimental study of the positive leader velocity as a function of the current in the initial and final-jump phases of a spark discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A. G.; Bazelyan, E. M.; Bulatov, M. U.; Kuzhekin, I. P.; Makalsky, L. M.; Sukharevskij, D. I.; Syssoev, V. S.

    2008-01-01

    A positive leader in air at gap lengths of up to 8 m was studied experimentally on an open experimental stand. The voltage source was a 6-MV pulsed voltage generator or an artificial charged aerosol cloud. The dependence of the leader velocity on the current in the range 0.2-8 A was determined by simultaneously recording the optical picture and electric parameters of the discharge. Particular attention was paid to the final-jump phase of the discharge, when the gap was completely bridged by the streamer zone of the leader. It is shown that the character of the dependence of the leader velocity on the current in this phase remains unchanged; hence, the final-jump phase can be used in experiments in which the current has to be varied within a wide range. For this purpose, one can use a damping resistance, which is inefficient in the initial phase. The parameters of the power-law dependence of the leader velocity on the current at currents of a few amperes are established reliably. It is found that the power-law dependence with constant parameters is inapplicable to calculate the leader velocity at currents of about 0.1 A, which correspond to the lower limit of the leader viability.

  15. A new settling velocity model to describe secondary sedimentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Yde, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids distribut......Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are the most hydraulically sensitive unit operations in biological wastewater treatment plants. The maximum permissible inflow to the plant depends on the efficiency of SSTs in separating and thickening the activated sludge. The flow conditions and solids...... associated with their calibration. In this study, we developed a new settling velocity model, including hindered, transient and compression settling, and showed that it can be calibrated to data from a simple, novel settling column experimental set-up using the Bayesian optimization method DREAM......(ZS). In addition, correlations between the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model parameters and sludge concentration were identified with data from batch rheological experiments. A 2-D axisymmetric CFD model of a circular SST containing the new settling velocity and rheological model was validated with full...

  16. Electrical model of dielectric barrier discharge homogenous and filamentary modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Fernandez, J A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; López-Callejas, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Muñoz-Castro, A; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an electrical model that combines homogeneous and filamentary modes of an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge cell. A voltage controlled electric current source has been utilized to implement the power law equation that represents the homogeneous discharge mode, which starts when the gas breakdown voltage is reached. The filamentary mode implies the emergence of electric current conducting channels (microdischarges), to add this phenomenon an RC circuit commutated by an ideal switch has been proposed. The switch activation occurs at a higher voltage level than the gas breakdown voltage because it is necessary to impose a huge electric field that contributes to the appearance of streamers. The model allows the estimation of several electric parameters inside the reactor that cannot be measured. Also, it is possible to appreciate the modes of the DBD depending on the applied voltage magnitude. Finally, it has been recognized a good agreement between simulation outcomes and experimental results. (paper)

  17. Electrical model of dielectric barrier discharge homogenous and filamentary modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernandez, J. A.; Peña-Eguiluz, R.; López-Callejas, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Muñoz-Castro, A.; Rodríguez-Méndez, B. G.

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an electrical model that combines homogeneous and filamentary modes of an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge cell. A voltage controlled electric current source has been utilized to implement the power law equation that represents the homogeneous discharge mode, which starts when the gas breakdown voltage is reached. The filamentary mode implies the emergence of electric current conducting channels (microdischarges), to add this phenomenon an RC circuit commutated by an ideal switch has been proposed. The switch activation occurs at a higher voltage level than the gas breakdown voltage because it is necessary to impose a huge electric field that contributes to the appearance of streamers. The model allows the estimation of several electric parameters inside the reactor that cannot be measured. Also, it is possible to appreciate the modes of the DBD depending on the applied voltage magnitude. Finally, it has been recognized a good agreement between simulation outcomes and experimental results.

  18. Model-assisted measurements of suspension-feeding flow velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Clos, Kevin T; Jones, Ian T; Carrier, Tyler J; Brady, Damian C; Jumars, Peter A

    2017-06-01

    Benthic marine suspension feeders provide an important link between benthic and pelagic ecosystems. The strength of this link is determined by suspension-feeding rates. Many studies have measured suspension-feeding rates using indirect clearance-rate methods, which are based on the depletion of suspended particles. Direct methods that measure the flow of water itself are less common, but they can be more broadly applied because, unlike indirect methods, direct methods are not affected by properties of the cleared particles. We present pumping rates for three species of suspension feeders, the clams Mya arenaria and Mercenaria mercenaria and the tunicate Ciona intestinalis , measured using a direct method based on particle image velocimetry (PIV). Past uses of PIV in suspension-feeding studies have been limited by strong laser reflections that interfere with velocity measurements proximate to the siphon. We used a new approach based on fitting PIV-based velocity profile measurements to theoretical profiles from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models, which allowed us to calculate inhalant siphon Reynolds numbers ( Re ). We used these inhalant Re and measurements of siphon diameters to calculate exhalant Re , pumping rates, and mean inlet and outlet velocities. For the three species studied, inhalant Re ranged from 8 to 520, and exhalant Re ranged from 15 to 1073. Volumetric pumping rates ranged from 1.7 to 7.4 l h -1 for M . arenaria , 0.3 to 3.6 l h -1 for M . m ercenaria and 0.07 to 0.97 l h -1 for C . intestinalis We also used CFD models based on measured pumping rates to calculate capture regions, which reveal the spatial extent of pumped water. Combining PIV data with CFD models may be a valuable approach for future suspension-feeding studies. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Seismic velocity models for an internally asymmetric Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, S.; Kowalle, G.

    1994-01-01

    The well-known dichotomy in topography, surface age, and crustal structure between the northern lowlands and the southern uplands of Mars has been explained by both endogenic and exogenic processes. According to the used model this asymmetry might be a result of a certain mechanism of core formation influencing the following planetary evolution. Therefore it has been assumed that the present internal structure of Mars is characterized by different velocity-depth distributions of the mantle for the northern and southern hemisphere, respectively. For both regions significant differences in travel times of seismic waves were calculated. These results may be important for the future seismic exploration of Mars.

  20. Stabilization and Riesz basis property for an overhead crane model with feedback in velocity and rotating velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toure K. Augustin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a variant of an overhead crane model's problem, with a control force in velocity and rotating velocity on the platform. We obtain under certain conditions the well-posedness and the strong stabilization of the closed-loop system. We then analyze the spectrum of the system. Using a method due to Shkalikov, we prove the existence of a sequence of generalized eigenvectors of the system, which forms a Riesz basis for the state energy Hilbert space.

  1. Modeling terrestrial gamma ray flashes produced by relativistic feedback discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2013-05-01

    This paper reports a modeling study of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) produced by relativistic feedback discharges. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes are intense energetic radiation originating from the Earth's atmosphere that has been observed by spacecraft. They are produced by bremsstrahlung interactions of energetic electrons, known as runaway electrons, with air atoms. An efficient physical mechanism for producing large fluxes of the runaway electrons to make the TGFs is the relativistic feedback discharge, where seed runaway electrons are generated by positrons and X-rays, products of the discharge itself. Once the relativistic feedback discharge becomes self-sustaining, an exponentially increasing number of relativistic electron avalanches propagate through the same high-field region inside the thundercloud until the electric field is partially discharged by the ionization created by the discharge. The modeling results indicate that the durations of the TGF pulses produced by the relativistic feedback discharge vary from tens of microseconds to several milliseconds, encompassing all durations of the TGFs observed so far. In addition, when a sufficiently large potential difference is available in thunderclouds, a self-propagating discharge known as the relativistic feedback streamer can be formed, which propagates like a conventional positive streamer. For the relativistic feedback streamer, the positive feedback mechanism of runaway electron production by the positrons and X-rays plays a similar role as the photoionization for the conventional positive streamer. The simulation results of the relativistic feedback streamer show that a sequence of TGF pulses with varying durations can be produced by the streamer. The relativistic streamer may initially propagate with a pulsed manner and turn into a continuous propagation mode at a later stage. Milliseconds long TGF pulses can be produced by the feedback streamer during its continuous propagation. However

  2. Traveling waves in an optimal velocity model of freeway traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Peter; Woods, Andrew

    2001-03-01

    Car-following models provide both a tool to describe traffic flow and algorithms for autonomous cruise control systems. Recently developed optimal velocity models contain a relaxation term that assigns a desirable speed to each headway and a response time over which drivers adjust to optimal velocity conditions. These models predict traffic breakdown phenomena analogous to real traffic instabilities. In order to deepen our understanding of these models, in this paper, we examine the transition from a linear stable stream of cars of one headway into a linear stable stream of a second headway. Numerical results of the governing equations identify a range of transition phenomena, including monotonic and oscillating travelling waves and a time- dependent dispersive adjustment wave. However, for certain conditions, we find that the adjustment takes the form of a nonlinear traveling wave from the upstream headway to a third, intermediate headway, followed by either another traveling wave or a dispersive wave further downstream matching the downstream headway. This intermediate value of the headway is selected such that the nonlinear traveling wave is the fastest stable traveling wave which is observed to develop in the numerical calculations. The development of these nonlinear waves, connecting linear stable flows of two different headways, is somewhat reminiscent of stop-start waves in congested flow on freeways. The different types of adjustments are classified in a phase diagram depending on the upstream and downstream headway and the response time of the model. The results have profound consequences for autonomous cruise control systems. For an autocade of both identical and different vehicles, the control system itself may trigger formations of nonlinear, steep wave transitions. Further information is available [Y. Sugiyama, Traffic and Granular Flow (World Scientific, Singapore, 1995), p. 137].

  3. RadVel: The Radial Velocity Modeling Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Benjamin J.; Petigura, Erik A.; Blunt, Sarah; Sinukoff, Evan

    2018-04-01

    RadVel is an open-source Python package for modeling Keplerian orbits in radial velocity (RV) timeseries. RadVel provides a convenient framework to fit RVs using maximum a posteriori optimization and to compute robust confidence intervals by sampling the posterior probability density via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). RadVel allows users to float or fix parameters, impose priors, and perform Bayesian model comparison. We have implemented real-time MCMC convergence tests to ensure adequate sampling of the posterior. RadVel can output a number of publication-quality plots and tables. Users may interface with RadVel through a convenient command-line interface or directly from Python. The code is object-oriented and thus naturally extensible. We encourage contributions from the community. Documentation is available at http://radvel.readthedocs.io.

  4. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  5. Evaluating the source and seasonality of submarine groundwater discharge using a radon-222 pore water transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Cable, Jaye E.; Martin, Jonathan B.; Roy, Moutusi

    2008-09-01

    Pore water radon ( 222Rn) distributions from Indian River Lagoon, Florida, are characterized by three zones: a lower zone where pore water 222Rn and sediment-bound radium ( 226Ra) are in equilibrium and concentration gradients are vertical; a middle zone where 222Rn is in excess of sediment-bound 226Ra and concentration gradients are concave-downward; and an upper zone where 222Rn concentration gradients are nearly vertical. These 222Rn data are simulated in a one-dimensional numerical model including advection, diffusion, and non-local exchange to estimate magnitudes of submarine groundwater discharge components (fresh or marine). The numerical model estimates three parameters, fresh groundwater seepage velocity, irrigation intensity, and irrigation attenuation, using two Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that (1) ensure the minimization algorithm converges on a global minimum of the merit function and the parameter estimates are consistent within this global minimum, and (2) provide 90% confidence intervals on the parameter estimates using the measured 222Rn activity variance. Model estimates of seepage velocities and discharge agree with previous estimates obtained from numerical groundwater flow models and seepage meter measurements and show the fresh water component decreases offshore and varies seasonally by a factor of nine or less. Comparison between the discharge estimates and precipitation patterns suggests a mean residence time in unsaturated and saturated zones on the order of 5 to 7 months. Irrigation rates generally decrease offshore for all sampling periods. The mean irrigation rate is approximately three times greater than the mean seepage velocity although the ranges of irrigation rates and seepage velocities are the same. Possible mechanisms for irrigation include density-driven convection, wave pumping, and bio-irrigation. Simulation of both advection and irrigation allows the separation of submarine groundwater discharge into fresh groundwater and

  6. An upper-mantle S-wave velocity model for Northern Europe from Love and Rayleigh group velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2008-12-01

    A model of upper-mantle S-wave velocity and transverse anisotropy beneath northwestern Europe is presented, based on regional surface wave observations. Group velocities for both Love and Rayleigh surface waves are measured on waveform data from international and regional data archives (including temporary deployments) and then inverted for group velocity maps, using a method accounting for Fresnel zone sensitivity. The group velocity variations are larger than in global reference maps, and we are able to resolve unprecedented details. We then apply a linear inversion scheme to invert for local 1-D shear wave velocity profiles which are consequently assembled to a 3-D model. By choosing conservative regularization parameters in the 2-D inversion, we ensure the smoothness of the group velocity maps and hence of the resulting 3-D shear wave speed model. To account for the different tectonic regimes in the study region and investigate the sensitivity of the 1-D inversions to inaccuracies in crustal parameters, we analyse inversions with different reference models of increasing complexity (pure 1-D, 3-D crust/1-D mantle and pure 3-D). We find that all inverted models are very consistent at depths below 70 km. At shallower depths, the constraints put by the reference models, primarily Moho depth which we do not invert for, remain the main cause for uncertainty in our inversion. The final 3-D model shows large variations in S-wave velocity of up to +/-12 per cent. We image an intriguing low-velocity anomaly in the depth range 70-150 km that extends from the Iceland plume beneath the North Atlantic and in a more than 400 km wide channel under Southern Scandinavia. Beneath Southern Norway, the negative perturbations are around 10 per cent with respect to ak135, and a shallowing of the anomaly is indicated which could be related to the sustained uplift of Southern Scandinavia in Neogene times. Furthermore, our upper-mantle model reveals good alignment to ancient plate

  7. Entropy-Based Modeling of Velocity Lag in Sediment-Laden Open Channel Turbulent Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manotosh Kumbhakar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, a wide variety of instruments with laser-based techniques have been developed that enable experimentally measuring particle velocity and fluid velocity separately in particle-laden flow. Experiments have revealed that stream-wise particle velocity is different from fluid velocity, and this velocity difference is commonly known as “velocity lag” in the literature. A number of experimental, as well as theoretical investigations have been carried out to formulate deterministic mathematical models of velocity lag, based on several turbulent features. However, a probabilistic study of velocity lag does not seem to have been reported, to the best of our knowledge. The present study therefore focuses on the modeling of velocity lag in open channel turbulent flow laden with sediment using the entropy theory along with a hypothesis on the cumulative distribution function. This function contains a parameter η, which is shown to be a function of specific gravity, particle diameter and shear velocity. The velocity lag model is tested using a wide range of twenty-two experimental runs collected from the literature and is also compared with other models of velocity lag. Then, an error analysis is performed to further evaluate the prediction accuracy of the proposed model, especially in comparison to other models. The model is also able to explain the physical characteristics of velocity lag caused by the interaction between the particles and the fluid.

  8. Hierarchical modeling of plasma and transport phenomena in a dielectric barrier discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, N.; Aggelopoulos, C. A.; Skouras, E. D.; Tsakiroglou, C. D.; Burganos, V. N.

    2017-12-01

    A novel dual-time hierarchical approach is developed to link the plasma process to macroscopic transport phenomena in the interior of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor that has been used for soil remediation (Aggelopoulos et al 2016 Chem. Eng. J. 301 353–61). The generation of active species by plasma reactions is simulated at the microseconds (µs) timescale, whereas convection and thermal conduction are simulated at the macroscopic (minutes) timescale. This hierarchical model is implemented in order to investigate the influence of the plasma DBD process on the transport and reaction mechanisms during remediation of polluted soil. In the microscopic model, the variables of interest include the plasma-induced reactive concentrations, while in the macroscopic approach, the temperature distribution, and the velocity field both inside the discharge gap and within the polluted soil material as well. For the latter model, the Navier–Stokes and Darcy Brinkman equations for the transport phenomena in the porous domain are solved numerically using a FEM software. The effective medium theory is employed to provide estimates of the effective time-evolving and three-phase transport properties in the soil sample. Model predictions considering the temporal evolution of the plasma remediation process are presented and compared with corresponding experimental data.

  9. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  10. Geophysical Conceptual Model for Benthic Flux and Submarine Groundwater Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, J. N.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous investigators characterize benthic flux and submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) using a geochemical conceptual model that relies on the estimation of tracer fluxes into and out of a control volume. (Benthic flux is the rate of flow across the bed of any water body, per unit area of bed. Benthic flux is a vector that includes both discharge and recharge components. SGD is a benthic water discharge flux to a marine water body.) For the geochemical approach, benthic discharge flux or SGD is estimated by summing the flux of tracer into or out of the control volume---a water body or portion of a water body---and deducing that tracer deficiency within the control volume must be explained by SGD. Typically, estimated or measured fluxes include advection and mixing in surface-water, diffusion, evasion across the air-water interface, production, and decay. The geochemical model, however, does not account for fluxes that do not transport tracer. For example, investigators found equivalent (the upper 30 cm of sediment in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, in June and July 2003. At this location, a surface-gravity wave with a five-centimeter amplitude and one-second period in 0.5 m of water forced a 12-cm-per-day SGD. The radon tracer technique may not characterize SGD forced by the one-second wave due to the time scale of the wave, the absence of a radon activity gradient between bed medium and surface water, and the the wave affects the flow field within the porous medium. A new geophysical conceptual model for benthic flux is proposed. The model parses benthic flux into components driven by individual forcing mechanisms. The model recognizes that benthic flux components may interact in a constructive or destructive manner, such that benthic flux generated by multiple forcing mechanisms at the same location may not be equivalent to the linear sum of benthic flux generated by single forcing mechanisms. Restated: the whole may be different than the sum of the parts

  11. Shear wave crustal velocity model of the Western Bohemian Massif from Love wave phase velocity dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Brokešová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 81-104 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA AV ČR IAA300460705; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : love waves * phase velocity dispersion * frequency-time analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2011 www.springerlink.com/content/w3149233l60111t1/

  12. A Multicell Converter Model of DBD Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Fuentes, A. A.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Valencia A, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.; Benitez-Read, J. S.; Pacheco-Sotelo, J. O.

    2006-01-01

    A compact Matlab model of plasma discharges in a DBD reactor consisting of two parallel electrode plates with a small gap and a thin dielectric sheet between them is reported. Its DBD plasma is modelled as a voltage controlled current-source switched on when the voltage across the gap exceeds the breakdown voltage. A three cell voltage-source inverter, configured in half-bridge, has been used as a power supply. This configuration has an excellent performance when operating as an open-loop. The distribution of total energy between a large number of low power converters proofs to be advantageous, allowing an efficient high power drive. Simulation results show that the current source and its output current tend to follow an exponential behaviour. A phenomenological characteristic of the voltage-current behaviour of DBD is then described by power laws with different voltage exponent function values

  13. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that the main cause of failure of these devices is the appearance of partial discharges initiated on edges of armatures. These devices can quickly slam if discharges occur continuously during the liquid impregnation. One of the criteria for selecting impregnating liquids is the behavior of gas bubbles when discharges occur.

  14. Results of verification and investigation of wind velocity field forecast. Verification of wind velocity field forecast model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Kayano, Mitsunaga; Kikuchi, Hideo; Abe, Takeo; Saga, Kyoji

    1995-01-01

    In Environmental Radioactivity Research Institute, the verification and investigation of the wind velocity field forecast model 'EXPRESS-1' have been carried out since 1991. In fiscal year 1994, as the general analysis, the validity of weather observation data, the local features of wind field, and the validity of the positions of monitoring stations were investigated. The EXPRESS which adopted 500 m mesh so far was improved to 250 m mesh, and the heightening of forecast accuracy was examined, and the comparison with another wind velocity field forecast model 'SPEEDI' was carried out. As the results, there are the places where the correlation with other points of measurement is high and low, and it was found that for the forecast of wind velocity field, by excluding the data of the points with low correlation or installing simplified observation stations to take their data in, the forecast accuracy is improved. The outline of the investigation, the general analysis of weather observation data and the improvements of wind velocity field forecast model and forecast accuracy are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  16. Comparison of the modeling solutions with the hydrogen discharge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    With the availability of experimental values for H 2 vibrational population distributions up to v=8 and measured distributions up to v=5 with simultaneous measurements of the H - concentration, it has become possible to test some features of the full-spectrum model of H - generation. The application of the code developed by Gorse et al. to these discharges by the groups at both Bari and at the Ecole Polytechnique has extended the vibrational distribution calculation to include also the H - concentration. Comparing the vibrational population calculated by these two groups at the higher levels, where the onset of H - production occurs, one finds populations for the υ=5 level that are a factor of eight to ten larger than the experimental values. Since these workers have omitted the role of the H 3 + ions known to be present in the discharge, the inclusion of the appropriate S-V process should increase the population discrepancies another factor of two or three. This excess population poses something of a dilemma: Since the Bari code simultaneously reproduces the observed H - concentration but overestimates the vibrational population by a large factor, the standard model of vibrational excitation followed by dissociative attachment is open to question. If measured rather than calculated distributions were used in the H - calculation, the calculated H - concentration would presumably be an order-of-magnitude smaller than the observed value. The measured population distributions taken against the background of the modelling solutions would seem to imply alternate sources of H - production other than dissociative attachment. To examine this problem, we have generated new modelling solutions for comparison with the data of Eenshuistra et al

  17. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  18. Using observed postconstruction peak discharges to evaluate a hydrologic and hydraulic design model, Boneyard Creek, Champaign and Urbana, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Thomas M.; Soong, David T.; Holmes, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    Boneyard Creek—which drains an urbanized watershed in the cities of Champaign and Urbana, Illinois, including part of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) campus—has historically been prone to flooding. Using the Stormwater Management Model (SWMM), a hydrologic and hydraulic model of Boneyard Creek was developed for the design of the projects making up the first phase of a long-term plan for flood control on Boneyard Creek, and the construction of the projects was completed in May 2003. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Cities of Champaign and Urbana and UIUC, installed and operated stream and rain gages in order to obtain data for evaluation of the design-model simulations. In this study, design-model simulations were evaluated by using observed postconstruction precipitation and peak-discharge data. Between May 2003 and September 2008, five high-flow events on Boneyard Creek satisfied the study criterion. The five events were simulated with the design model by using observed precipitation. The simulations were run with two different values of the parameter controlling the soil moisture at the beginning of the storms and two different ways of spatially distributing the precipitation, making a total of four simulation scenarios. The simulated and observed peak discharges and stages were compared at gaged locations along the Creek. The discharge at one of these locations was deemed to be critical for evaluating the design model. The uncertainty of the measured peak discharge was also estimated at the critical location with a method based on linear regression of the stage and discharge relation, an estimate of the uncertainty of the acoustic Doppler velocity meter measurements, and the uncertainty of the stage measurements. For four of the five events, the simulated peak discharges lie within the 95-percent confidence interval of the observed peak discharges at the critical location; the fifth was just outside the upper end of

  19. The Candy Wrapper Velocity Model for the Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattesini, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent global expansion of seismic data motivated a number of seismological studies of the Earth's inner core that proposed the existence of increasingly complex structure and anisotropy. In the meantime, new hypotheses of dynamic mechanisms have been put forward to interpret seismological results. Here, the nature of hemispherical dichotomy and anisotropy is re-investigated by bridging the observations of PKP(bc-df) differential travel-times with the iron bcc/hcp elastic properties computed from first-principles methods.The Candy Wrapper velocity model introduced here accounts for a dynamic picture of the inner core (i.e., the eastward drift of material), where different iron crystal shapes can be stabilized at the two hemispheres. We show that seismological data are best explained by a rather complicated, mosaic-like, structure of the inner core, where well-separated patches of different iron crystals compose the anisotropic western hemispherical region, and a conglomerate of almost indistinguishable iron phases builds-up the weakly anisotropic eastern side.

  20. Oxygen discharge and post-discharge kinetics experiments and modeling for the electric oxygen-iodine laser system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, A D; Zimmerman, J W; Woodard, B S; Carroll, D L; Verdeyen, J T; Lim, T C; Solomon, W C

    2007-07-26

    Laser oscillation at 1315 nm on the I(2P1/2)-->I(2P3/2) transition of atomic iodine has been obtained by a near resonant energy transfer from O2(a1Delta) produced using a low-pressure oxygen/helium/nitric oxide discharge. In the electric discharge oxygen-iodine laser (ElectricOIL) the discharge production of atomic oxygen, ozone, and other excited species adds levels of complexity to the singlet oxygen generator (SOG) kinetics which are not encountered in a classic purely chemical O2(a1Delta) generation system. The advanced model BLAZE-IV has been introduced to study the energy-transfer laser system dynamics and kinetics. Levels of singlet oxygen, oxygen atoms, and ozone are measured experimentally and compared with calculations. The new BLAZE-IV model is in reasonable agreement with O3, O atom, and gas temperature measurements but is under-predicting the increase in O2(a1Delta) concentration resulting from the presence of NO in the discharge and under-predicting the O2(b1Sigma) concentrations. A key conclusion is that the removal of oxygen atoms by NOX species leads to a significant increase in O2(a1Delta) concentrations downstream of the discharge in part via a recycling process; however, there are still some important processes related to the NOX discharge kinetics that are missing from the present modeling. Further, the removal of oxygen atoms dramatically inhibits the production of ozone in the downstream kinetics.

  1. An extended continuum model considering optimal velocity change with memory and numerical tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingtao, Zhai; Hongxia, Ge; Rongjun, Cheng

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, an extended continuum model of traffic flow is proposed with the consideration of optimal velocity changes with memory. The new model's stability condition and KdV-Burgers equation considering the optimal velocities change with memory are deduced through linear stability theory and nonlinear analysis, respectively. Numerical simulation is carried out to study the extended continuum model, which explores how optimal velocity changes with memory affected velocity, density and energy consumption. Numerical results show that when considering the effects of optimal velocity changes with memory, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. Both the memory step and sensitivity parameters of optimal velocity changes with memory will enhance the stability of traffic flow efficiently. Furthermore, numerical results demonstrates that the effect of optimal velocity changes with memory can avoid the disadvantage of historical information, which increases the stability of traffic flow on road, and so it improve the traffic flow stability and minimize cars' energy consumptions.

  2. Effects of electrostatic discharge on three cryogenic temperature sensor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courts, S. Scott; Mott, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic temperature sensors are not usually thought of as electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitive devices. However, the most common cryogenic thermometers in use today are thermally sensitive diodes or resistors - both electronic devices in their base form. As such, they are sensitive to ESD at some level above which either catastrophic or latent damage can occur. Instituting an ESD program for safe handling and installation of the sensor is costly and it is desirable to balance the risk of ESD damage against this cost. However, this risk cannot be evaluated without specific knowledge of the ESD vulnerability of the devices in question. This work examines three types of cryogenic temperature sensors for ESD sensitivity - silicon diodes, Cernox(trade mark, serif) resistors, and wire wound platinum resistors, all manufactured by Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. Testing was performed per TIA/EIA FOTP129 (Human Body Model). Damage was found to occur in the silicon diode sensors at discharge levels of 1,500 V. For Cernox(trade mark, serif) temperature sensors, damage was observed at 3,500 V. The platinum temperature sensors were not damaged by ESD exposure levels of 9,900 V. At the lower damage limit, both the silicon diode and the Cernox(trade mark, serif) temperature sensors showed relatively small calibration shifts of 1 to 3 K at room temperature. The diode sensors were stable with time and thermal cycling, but the long term stability of the Cernox(trade mark, serif) sensors was degraded. Catastrophic failure occurred at higher levels of ESD exposure

  3. Modeling Electric Discharges with Entropy Production Rate Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Christen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Under which circumstances are variational principles based on entropy production rate useful tools for modeling steady states of electric (gas discharge systems far from equilibrium? It is first shown how various different approaches, as Steenbeck’s minimum voltage and Prigogine’s minimum entropy production rate principles are related to the maximum entropy production rate principle (MEPP. Secondly, three typical examples are discussed, which provide a certain insight in the structure of the models that are candidates for MEPP application. It is then thirdly argued that MEPP, although not being an exact physical law, may provide reasonable model parameter estimates, provided the constraints contain the relevant (nonlinear physical effects and the parameters to be determined are related to disregarded weak constraints that affect mainly global entropy production. Finally, it is additionally conjectured that a further reason for the success of MEPP in certain far from equilibrium systems might be based on a hidden linearity of the underlying kinetic equation(s.

  4. MODELING AND SIMULATION OF COMBUSTION AND DETONATION BY SUBCRITICAL STREAMER DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Bulat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider the possibilities of combustion and detonation initiation for propane mixtured with air by microwave discharges created by a quasi-optical electromagnetic beam. Comparison of initiation is performed by different types of discharge: spark, streamer, and attached one. The formation theory of streamer discharges is given, the velocity of their propagation and the volume of energy supplies are analyzed. Experiments have been carried out together with calculation of the propane-air mixture ignition by various types of discharges. It is shown that when burning is initiated by a streamer discharge, a multiple increase in the propagation velocity of the flame front and the completeness of the fuel combustion is obtained as compared to a spark discharge with an equal energy contribution. In the prechamber initiation of combustion by igniting a streamer discharge on the inner walls of the quartz tube, a significant acceleration of combustion was obtained up to the rates characteristic for the transition of deflagration to detonation. The results can be applied in the development of multivolumetric volumetric ignition systems in internal combustion engines, gas turbine engines, low-emission combustion chambers, for combustion in supersonic flow, and in combustion chambers for detonation engines.

  5. Modelling groundwater discharge areas using only digital elevation models as input data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brydsten, Lars

    2006-10-01

    Advanced geohydrological models require data on topography, soil distribution in three dimensions, vegetation, land use, bedrock fracture zones. To model present geohydrological conditions, these factors can be gathered with different techniques. If a future geohydrological condition is modelled in an area with positive shore displacement (say 5,000 or 10,000 years), some of these factors can be difficult to measure. This could include the development of wetlands and the filling of lakes. If the goal of the model is to predict distribution of groundwater recharge and discharge areas in the landscape, the most important factor is topography. The question is how much can topography alone explain the distribution of geohydrological objects in the landscape. A simplified description of the distribution of geohydrological objects in the landscape is that groundwater recharge areas occur at local elevation curvatures and discharge occurs in lakes, brooks, and low situated slopes. Areas in-between these make up discharge areas during wet periods and recharge areas during dry periods. A model that could predict this pattern only using topography data needs to be able to predict high ridges and future lakes and brooks. This study uses GIS software with four different functions using digital elevation models as input data, geomorphometrical parameters to predict landscape ridges, basin fill for predicting lakes, flow accumulations for predicting future waterways, and topographical wetness indexes for dividing in-between areas based on degree of wetness. An area between the village of and Forsmarks' Nuclear Power Plant has been used to calibrate the model. The area is within the SKB 10-metre Elevation Model (DEM) and has a high-resolution orienteering map for wetlands. Wetlands are assumed to be groundwater discharge areas. Five hundred points were randomly distributed across the wetlands. These are potential discharge points. Model parameters were chosen with the

  6. Modelling groundwater discharge areas using only digital elevation models as input data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brydsten, Lars [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Biology and Environmental Science

    2006-10-15

    Advanced geohydrological models require data on topography, soil distribution in three dimensions, vegetation, land use, bedrock fracture zones. To model present geohydrological conditions, these factors can be gathered with different techniques. If a future geohydrological condition is modelled in an area with positive shore displacement (say 5,000 or 10,000 years), some of these factors can be difficult to measure. This could include the development of wetlands and the filling of lakes. If the goal of the model is to predict distribution of groundwater recharge and discharge areas in the landscape, the most important factor is topography. The question is how much can topography alone explain the distribution of geohydrological objects in the landscape. A simplified description of the distribution of geohydrological objects in the landscape is that groundwater recharge areas occur at local elevation curvatures and discharge occurs in lakes, brooks, and low situated slopes. Areas in-between these make up discharge areas during wet periods and recharge areas during dry periods. A model that could predict this pattern only using topography data needs to be able to predict high ridges and future lakes and brooks. This study uses GIS software with four different functions using digital elevation models as input data, geomorphometrical parameters to predict landscape ridges, basin fill for predicting lakes, flow accumulations for predicting future waterways, and topographical wetness indexes for dividing in-between areas based on degree of wetness. An area between the village of and Forsmarks' Nuclear Power Plant has been used to calibrate the model. The area is within the SKB 10-metre Elevation Model (DEM) and has a high-resolution orienteering map for wetlands. Wetlands are assumed to be groundwater discharge areas. Five hundred points were randomly distributed across the wetlands. These are potential discharge points. Model parameters were chosen with the

  7. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  8. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  9. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  10. An improved LTE model of a high pressure sulfur discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, C W; Heijden, H W P van der; Hartgers, A; Garloff, K; Dijk, J van; Mullen, J J A M van der [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2004-01-21

    An existing LTE model (Johnston C W et al 2002 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 342) of a high pressure sulfur discharge is improved upon by more accurate and complete treatment of each term in the energy balance. The simulation program PLASIMO (Janssen G M et al 1999 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 8 1, van Dijk J 2001 Modelling of plasma light sources: an object-oriented approach PhD Thesis Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands, ISBN 90-386-1819-0), which is an integrated environment for construction and execution of plasma models, has been used to define and solve all aspects of the model. The electric field is treated as being dc, and the temperature dependent nature of species interactions is incorporated in determination of transport coefficients. In addition to the main radiative transition, B3{sup {sigma}}{sub g}{sup -}, several others in S{sub 2} are included. These are B''3{sup {pi}}{sub u} {yields} X3{sup {sigma}}{sub g}{sup -}, B'3{sup {pi}}{sub g} {yields} {l_brace}A3{sup {sigma}}{sub u}{sup +}, A'3{sup {delta}}{sub u}{r_brace} and e1{sup {pi}}{sub g} {yields} c1{sup {sigma}}{sub u}{sup -}. The S{sub 3} molecule is also included in the composition as an absorbing particle. Furthermore, radiation production is treated quantum mechanically. The principle improvement over the previous work is that both the position of the spectral maximum and the pressure shift are quantitatively described by the current model. Both are chiefly due to the presence of S{sub 3}.

  11. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by a digital sinusoidal generator. The acquisitions of Partial Discharges are made every 5 mn. The sensibility of measure is adjusted to limit the number of discharges emerging from chosen measuring range. An electric detection system with an assembly of current pulses visualization composed from a measuring resistor as ...

  12. Semi-analytical modelling of positive corona discharge in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiga, Francisco; Yanallah, Khelifa; Chen, Junhong

    2013-09-01

    Semianalytical approximate solutions of the spatial distribution of electric field and electron and ion densities have been obtained by solving Poisson's equations and the continuity equations for the charged species along the Laplacian field lines. The need to iterate for the correct value of space charge on the corona electrode has been eliminated by using the corona current distribution over the grounded plane derived by Deutsch, which predicts a cos m θ law similar to Warburg's law. Based on the results of the approximated model, a parametric study of the influence of gas pressure, the corona wire radius, and the inter-electrode wire-plate separation has been carried out. Also, the approximate solutions of the electron number density has been combined with a simplified plasma chemistry model in order to compute the ozone density generated by the corona discharge in the presence of a gas flow. This work was supported by the Consejeria de Innovacion, Ciencia y Empresa (Junta de Andalucia) and by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, Spain, within the European Regional Development Fund contracts FQM-4983 and FIS2011-25161.

  13. Statistical Modelling of Pre-Impact Velocities in Car Crashes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Kager; I. Kryven; K.W. Myerscough (Keith); T. van Opstal; T. Rot; R. Planqué (Robert); S. Bhulai (Sandjai); J. Hulshof; W. Kager; T. Rot

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe law wants to determine if any party involved in a car crash is guilty. The Dutch court invokes the expertise of the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to answer this question. We discuss the present method of the NFI to determine probabilities on pre-impact car velocities, given

  14. Validation of Velocity the Lower Tagus Valley (Portugal) velocity model using H/V technique

    OpenAIRE

    Furtado, A; Borges, JF; Bezzeghoud, M; Caldeira, B

    2010-01-01

    Along his history the Lower Tagus Valley LTV area was shaken by several earthquakes. The largest reported had their origin in the southwestern part of Iberia. These earth- quakes were destructive, and some of them were produced in large ruptures of offshore structures located southwest of the Portu- guese coastline; other moderates earthqua- kes were produced by local sources such as the 1344, 1531 and the 1909 (Benavente). In the last years, due to 3D structural model improvement and develop...

  15. Considering sampling strategy and cross-section complexity for estimating the uncertainty of discharge measurements using the velocity-area method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despax, Aurélien; Perret, Christian; Garçon, Rémy; Hauet, Alexandre; Belleville, Arnaud; Le Coz, Jérôme; Favre, Anne-Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Streamflow time series provide baseline data for many hydrological investigations. Errors in the data mainly occur through uncertainty in gauging (measurement uncertainty) and uncertainty in the determination of the stage-discharge relationship based on gaugings (rating curve uncertainty). As the velocity-area method is the measurement technique typically used for gaugings, it is fundamental to estimate its level of uncertainty. Different methods are available in the literature (ISO 748, Q + , IVE), all with their own limitations and drawbacks. Among the terms forming the combined relative uncertainty in measured discharge, the uncertainty component relating to the limited number of verticals often includes a large part of the relative uncertainty. It should therefore be estimated carefully. In ISO 748 standard, proposed values of this uncertainty component only depend on the number of verticals without considering their distribution with respect to the depth and velocity cross-sectional profiles. The Q + method is sensitive to a user-defined parameter while it is questionable whether the IVE method is applicable to stream-gaugings performed with a limited number of verticals. To address the limitations of existing methods, this paper presents a new methodology, called FLow Analog UnceRtainty Estimation (FLAURE), to estimate the uncertainty component relating to the limited number of verticals. High-resolution reference gaugings (with 31 and more verticals) are used to assess the uncertainty component through a statistical analysis. Instead of subsampling purely randomly the verticals of these reference stream-gaugings, a subsampling method is developed in a way that mimicks the behavior of a hydrometric technician. A sampling quality index (SQI) is suggested and appears to be a more explanatory variable than the number of verticals. This index takes into account the spacing between verticals and the variation of unit flow between two verticals. To compute the

  16. Negative corona discharges modelling. Application to the electrostatic precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaychet, S.

    2010-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation presents many advantages from the nuclear wastes treatment's point of view. Indeed, this kind of process can capture submicron particles without producing secondary wastes (no filter media) and without pressure looses in the exhaust circuit. The work presented in this thesis concerns the study of negative corona discharges in air at atmospheric pressure occurring in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) developed by the CEA (Atomic Energy Committee). The aim of this study is to determine how the electrostatic precipitation dedicated phenomena, especially the specific high voltage generator, the gas temperature and the fact that particles are flowing through the gap then collapsing on the electrodes, modify the discharge to improve the efficiency of ESPs. This work is based on a fundamental experimental study of the negative corona discharge and on numerical simulations of this discharge under conditions close to those of the lab scale ESP developed by the CEA. (author) [fr

  17. Multijam Solutions in Traffic Models with Velocity-Dependent Driver Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Paul; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The optimal-velocity follow-the-leader model is augmented with an equation that allows each driver to adjust their target headway according to the velocity difference between the driver and the car in front. In this more detailed model, which is investigated on a ring, stable and unstable multipu...

  18. Modelling Velocity Spectra in the Lower Part of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.R.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    Principles used when constructing models for velocity spectra are reviewed. Based upon data from the Kansas and Minnesota experiments, simple spectral models are set up for all velocity components in stable air at low heights, and for the vertical spectrum in unstable air through a larger part of...

  19. Branching Patterns and Stepped Leaders in an Electric-Circuit Model for Creeping Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidetsugu Sakaguchi,; Sahim M. Kourkouss,

    2010-06-01

    We construct a two-dimensional electric circuit model for creeping discharge. Two types of discharge, surface corona and surface leader, are modeled by a two-step function of conductance. Branched patterns of surface leaders surrounded by the surface corona appear in numerical simulation. The fractal dimension of branched discharge patterns is calculated by changing voltage and capacitance. We find that surface leaders often grow stepwise in time, as is observed in lightning leaders of thunder.

  20. Submarine groundwater discharge to a small estuary estimated from radon and salinity measurements and a box model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusius, J.; Koopmans, D.; Bratton, J.F.; Charette, M.A.; Kroeger, K.D.; Henderson, P.; Ryckman, L.; Halloran, K.; Colman, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge was quantified by a variety of methods in Salt Pond, adjacent to Nauset Marsh on Cape Cod, USA. Discharge estimates based on radon and salinity took advantage of the presence of the narrow channel connecting Salt Pond to Nauset Marsh, which allowed constructing whole-pond mass balances as water flowed in and out due to tidal fluctuations. A box model was used to estimate discharge separately to Salt Pond and to the channel by simulating the timing and magnitude of variations in the radon and salinity data in the channel. Discharge to the pond is estimated to be 2200??1100 m3 d-1, while discharge to the channel is estimated to be 300??150m3 d-1, for a total discharge of 2500??1250 m3 d-1 to the Salt Pond system. This translates to an average groundwater flow velocity of 3??1.5 cm d -1. Seepage meter flow estimates are broadly consistent with this figure, provided discharge is confined to shallow sediments (water depth radon data can be modeled assuming all groundwater fluxes to both the channel and to the pond are fresh, with no need to invoke a saline component. The absence of a saline component in the radon flux may be due to removal of radon from saline groundwater by recent advection of seawater or it may to due to the presence of impermeable sediments in the center of the pond that limit seawater recirculation. This groundwater flux estimated from the radon and salinity data is comparable to a value of 3200-4500 m3 d-1 predicted by a recent hydrologic model (Masterson, 2004; Colman and Masterson, 20041). Additional work is needed to determine if the measured rate of discharge is representative of the long-term average, and to determine the rate of groundwater discharge seaward of Salt Pond. Data also suggest a TDN flux from groundwater to Salt Pond of ???2.6 mmol m-2 d-1, a figure comparable to fluxes observed in other eutrophic settings.

  1. Effects of Unsteady River Discharge on Delta Progradation: A Modelling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W.; Shao, D.; Zheng Bing, W.; Rajput, P.; Yang, W.; Sun, T.; Cui, B.

    2017-12-01

    Rivers in the world are characterized with natural and human-induced variability in their discharges regardless of their scales and geographic locations. While previous studies have established that unsteady river discharge would impact on delta morphology, its direct morphological effects remain hitherto elusive. As a large-scale direct human regulation of river discharge at one of the largest rivers in the world, water and sediment regulation scheme (WSRS) has been implemented since 2002 at Xiaolangdi Reservoir to generate artificial flood pulses to mitigate siltation in the lower reaches of the Yellow River during wet seasons, and maintain base flow during dry seasons. In this study, analyses based on remote sensing images along with the relevant hydrographic data of the Yellow River Delta subject to the WSRS verified that the fluctuating delta progradation is highly correlated with the unsteady river discharge. To further explore the morphological effects of unsteady river discharge, numerical simulations with realistic unsteady river discharge scenarios schematized using four Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA) parameters were performed in Delft3D, and further used to calibrate a modified box model that incorporated unsteady river discharge. While the overall trends of delta progradation and the ultimate delta area created were found to be similar between the unsteady river discharge scenarios and their corresponding constant discharge scenarios, the nuances of intermittent zig-zag variation in natural delta area were well reproduced in model simulations assuming unsteady river discharge scenarios. When confounding factors such as waves and variable sediment capture ratio were taken into consideration, model simulations for unsteady river discharge scenarios exhibit significant deviations from constant discharge scenarios. In addition, decadal-scale delta progradation predictions suggested the potential existence of a tipping point in the delta area

  2. Modeling of hazardous air pollutant removal in the pulsed corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshesh, Marzie; Abedi, Jalal; Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two parts of the performance equation of the pulsed corona reactor, which is one of the non-thermal plasma processing tools of atmospheric pressure for eliminating pollutant streams. First, the effect of axial dispersion in the diffusion term and then the effect of different orders of the reaction in the decomposition rate term were considered. The mathematical model was primarily developed to predict the effluent concentration of the pulsed corona reactor using mass balance, and considering axial dispersion, linear velocity and decomposition rate of pollutant. The steady state form of this equation was subsequently solved assuming different reaction orders. For the derivation of the performance equation of the reactor, it was assumed that the decomposition rate of the pollutant was directly proportional to discharge power and the concentration of the pollutant. The results were validated and compared with another predicted model using their experimental data. The model developed in this study was also validated with two other experimental data in the literature for N 2 O

  3. Using multiple watershed models to predict water, nitrogen, and phosphorus discharges to the Patuxent estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomer, Kathleen M.B.; Weller, Donald E.; Jordan, Thomas E.; Linker, Lewis; Liu, Zhi-Jun; Reilly, James; Schenk, Gary; Voinov, A.

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed an ensemble of watershed models that predict flow, nitrogen, and phosphorus discharges. The models differed in scope and complexity and used different input data, but all had been applied to evaluate human impacts on discharges to the Patuxent River or to the Chesapeake Bay. We compared

  4. Lithium-manganese dioxide cells for implantable defibrillator devices-Discharge voltage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Michael J.

    The discharge potential behavior of lithium-manganese dioxide cells designed for implantable cardiac defibrillators was characterized as a function of extent of cell depletion for tests designed to discharge the cells for times between 1 and 7 years. The discharge potential curves may be separated into two segments from 0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.51 and ∼0.51 ≤ x ≤ 1.00, where x is the dimensionless extent of discharge referenced to the rated cell capacity. The discharge potentials conform to Tafel kinetics in each segment. This behavior allows the discharge potential curves to be predicted for an arbitrary discharge load and long term discharge performance may be predicted from short term test results. The discharge potentials may subsequently be modeled by fitting the discharge curves to empirical functions like polynomials and Padé approximants. A function based on the Nernst equation that includes a term accounting for nonideal interactions between lithium ions and the cathode host material, such as the Redlich-Kister relationship, also may be used to predict discharge behavior.

  5. Theoretical analysis of a hybrid traffic model accounting for safe velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhou, Chao-Fan; Yan, Bo-Wen; Zhang, De-Chen; Wang, Ji-Xin; Jia, Bin; Gao, Zi-You; Wu, Qing-Song

    2017-04-01

    A hybrid traffic-flow model [Wang-Zhou-Yan (WZY) model] is brought out in this paper. In WZY model, the global equilibrium velocity is replaced by the local equilibrium one, which emphasizes that the modification of vehicle velocity is based on the view of safe-driving rather than the global deployment. In the view of safe-driving, the effect of drivers’ estimation is taken into account. Moreover, the linear stability of the traffic model has been performed. Furthermore, in order to test the robustness of the system, the evolvement of the density wave and the velocity wave of the traffic flow has been numerically calculated.

  6. Effects of Glen Canyon Dam discharges on water velocity and temperatures at the confluence of the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers and implications for habitat for young-of-year humpback chub (Gila cypha-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protiva, Frank R.; Ralston, Barbara E.; Stone, Dennis M.; Kohl, Keith A.; Yard, Michael D.; Haden, G. Allen

    2010-01-01

    Water velocity and temperature are physical variables that affect the growth and survivorship of young-of-year (YOY) fishes. The Little Colorado River, a tributary to the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, is an important spawning ground and warmwater refuge for the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha) from the colder mainstem Colorado River that is regulated by Glen Canyon Dam. The confluence area of the Little Colorado River and the Colorado River is a site where YOY humpback chub (size 30-90 mm) emerging from the Little Colorado River experience both colder temperatures and higher velocities associated with higher mainstem discharge. We used detailed surveying and mapping techniques in combination with YOY velocity and temperature preferenda (determined from field and lab studies) to compare the areal extent of available habitat for young fishes at the confluence area under four mainstem discharges (227, 368, 504, and 878 m3/s). Comparisons revealed that the areal extent of low-velocity, warm water at the confluence decreased when discharges exceeded 368 m3/s. Furthermore, mainstem fluctuations, depending on the rate of upramp, can affect velocity and temperature dynamics in the confluence area within several hours. The amount of daily fluctuations in discharge can result in the loss of approximately 1.8 hectares of habitat favorable to YOY humpback chub. Consequently, flow fluctuations and the accompanying changes in velocity and temperature at the confluence may diminish the recruitment potential of humpback chub that spawn in the tributary stream. This study illustrates the utility of multiple georeferenced data sources to provide critical information related to the influence of the timing and magnitude of discharge from Glen Canyon Dam on potential rearing environment at the confluence area of the Little Colorado River.

  7. Modeling a short dc discharge with thermionic cathode and auxiliary anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, E. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); University ITMO, Kronverkskiy pr. 49, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Demidov, V. I. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kaganovich, I. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Koepke, M. E. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Kudryavtsev, A. A. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    A short dc discharge with a thermionic cathode can be used as a current and voltage stabilizer, but is subject to current oscillation. If instead of one anode two anodes are used, the current oscillations can be reduced. We have developed a kinetic model of such a discharge with two anodes, where the primary anode has a small opening for passing a fraction of the discharge current to an auxiliary anode. The model demonstrates that the current-voltage relationship of the discharge with two anodes is characterized everywhere by positive slope, i.e., positive differential resistance. Therefore, the discharge with two anodes is expected to be stable to the spontaneous oscillation in current that is induced by negative differential resistance. As a result, such a discharge can be used in an engineering application that requires stable plasma, such as a current and voltage stabilizer.

  8. Comparison of fluid-dynamic modeling of flow with velocity-encoded MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.; Hearshen, D.O.; Rankin, G.W.; Haggar, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper develops a fluid dynamic model using finite difference methods characterizing flow in phantoms simulating in vivo conditions and to compare those results with velocity encoded MR images. The phantom consisted of 1-inch (2.5-cm) tubing with semicircular insert and fluid with viscosity, T1, and T2 comparable to blood. Numeric solutions to Navier-Stokes equations for this system were obtained using finite difference methods, with velocity input function of zero at walls and parabolic at both ends. In resulting color raster (CR) images, color temperature represented velocity value. In velocity-encoded MR images acquired under the same flow conditions, phase is proportional to average velocity during application of flow-encoding gradients. Because these gradients are applied along one direction per acquisition, magnitude and direction of velocity are obtained

  9. Lagrangian velocity statistics of directed launch strategies in a Gulf of Mexico model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial dependence of Lagrangian displacement and velocity statistics is studied in the context of a data assimilating numerical model of the Gulf Mexico. In the active eddy region of the Western Gulf, a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian measures are used to locate strongly hyperbolic regions of the flow. The statistics of the velocity field sampled by sets of drifters launched specifically in these hyperbolic regions are compared to those produced by randomly chosen launch sites. The results show that particle trajectories initialized in hyperbolic regions preferentially sample a broader range of Eulerian velocities than do members of ensembles of randomly launched drifters. The velocity density functions produced by the directed launches compare well with Eulerian velocity pdfs. Implications for the development of launch strategies to improve Eulerian velocity field reconstruction from drifter data are discussed.

  10. Crust and Mantle Deformation Revealed from High-Resolution Radially Anisotropic Velocity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, A.; Dave, R.; Yao, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Love wave tomography, which can achieve a similar model resolution as Rayleigh wave, so far has limited applications to the USArray data. Recently, we have developed high-resolution Love wave phase velocity maps in the Wyoming craton and Texas using data at the Transportable Array stations. 3-D, radially anisotropic velocity models are obtained by jointly inverting Love and Rayleigh wave phase velocities. A high-velocity anomaly extending to about 200 km depth beneath central Wyoming correlates with negative radial anisotropy (Vsv>Vsh), suggesting that mantle downwelling develops under the cratonic lithosphere. Surprisingly, the significantly low velocity beneath the Yellowstone hotspot, which has been interpreted as partial melting and asthenospheric upwelling, is associated with the largest radial anisotropy (Vsh>Vsv) in the area. This observation does not support mantle upwelling. Instead, it indicates that the upper mantle beneath the hotspot has experienced strong shear deformation probably by the plate motion and large-scale mantle flow. In Texas, positive radial anisotropy in the lower crust extends from the coast to the Ouachita belt, which is characterized by high velocity and negative radial anisotropy. In the upper mantle, large variations of velocity and anisotropy exit under the coastal plain. A common feature in these anisotropic models is that high-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle often correlate with negative anisotropy (Vsv>Vsh) while low-velocity anomalies are associated with positive anisotropy (Vsh>Vsv). The manifestation of mantle downweling as negative radial anisotropy is largely due to the relatively high viscosity of the high-velocity mantle block, which is less affected by the surrounding large-scale horizontal flow. However, mantle upwelling, which is often associated with low-velocity anomalies, presumably low-viscosity mantle blocks, is invisible in radial anisotropy models. Such upwelling may happen too quickly to make last

  11. Velocity Deficits in the Wake of Model Lemon Shark Dorsal Fins Measured with Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, K. N.; Turner, V.; Hackett, E.

    2017-12-01

    Aquatic animals' morphology provides inspiration for human technological developments, as their bodies have evolved and become adapted for efficient swimming. Lemon sharks exhibit a uniquely large second dorsal fin that is nearly the same size as the first fin, the hydrodynamic role of which is unknown. This experimental study looks at the drag forces on a scale model of the Lemon shark's unique two-fin configuration in comparison to drag forces on a more typical one-fin configuration. The experiments were performed in a recirculating water flume, where the wakes behind the scale models are measured using particle image velocimetry. The experiments are performed at three different flow speeds for both fin configurations. The measured instantaneous 2D distributions of the streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are ensemble averaged to generate streamwise velocity vertical profiles. In addition, velocity deficit profiles are computed from the difference between these mean streamwise velocity profiles and the free stream velocity, which is computed based on measured flow rates during the experiments. Results show that the mean velocities behind the fin and near the fin tip are smallest and increase as the streamwise distance from the fin tip increases. The magnitude of velocity deficits increases with increasing flow speed for both fin configurations, but at all flow speeds, the two-fin configurations generate larger velocity deficits than the one-fin configurations. Because the velocity deficit is directly proportional to the drag force, these results suggest that the two-fin configuration produces more drag.

  12. High order fluid model for ionization fronts in streamer discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Markosyan (Aram); S. Dujko (Sasa); W. Hundsdorfer (Willem); U. Ebert (Ute)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWhen non-ionized or lowly ionized matter is exposed to high electric fields, non-equilibrium ionization processes, streamer discharges, can develop. Streamers occur in nature and as well in many industrial applications such as the treatment of exhaust gasses, polluted water or biogas. A

  13. experimental verification of discharge sediment model at incipient

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1983-09-01

    Sep 1, 1983 ... armour on cessation of sediment - feed. The study is being conducted in a laboratory flume because the required tests for the necessary hydraulic quantities like discharge can be scaled down avoiding the necessity for large capital for equipment and personnel that would have been the case in the field.

  14. Study and optimization of the partial discharges in capacitor model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decay on the thin film of Polyethylene Terephthalate,. Journal of Electrostatics; Elsevier, Vol. 67, Issue 2+3,. 198-202. [10] Dervos C., Bourkas P.d., kayafos E.A & Stathopules. I.A., 1990. Enhanced Partial Discharges due to temperature increase in the combined system of a solid liquid dielectric, IEEE Trans on Elect Insula, ...

  15. Analyses of precooling parameters for a bottom flooding ECCS rewetting velocity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    An extension work of the previous paper on the rewetting velocity model is presented. Application of the rewetting velocity model presented elsewhere requires a priori values of phi. In the absence of phi values, film boiling heat transfer coefficient (hsub(df)) and fog-film length (1) data are needed. To provide these informations, a modified Bromley's correlation is first derived and used to obtain hsub(df) values at higher pressure conditions. In addition, the analysis of the precooling parameters, such as phi and 1 is further extended using much more expensive PWR FLECHT data. Thus, the applicable range of the rewetting velocity model is further expanded in this work. (author)

  16. Impact of velocity correlation and distribution on transport in fractured media: Field evidence and theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Bour, Olivier; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-02-01

    Flow and transport through fractured geologic media often leads to anomalous (non-Fickian) transport behavior, the origin of which remains a matter of debate: whether it arises from variability in fracture permeability (velocity distribution), connectedness in the flow paths through fractures (velocity correlation), or interaction between fractures and matrix. Here we show that this uncertainty of distribution- versus correlation-controlled transport can be resolved by combining convergent and push-pull tracer tests because flow reversibility is strongly dependent on velocity correlation, whereas late-time scaling of breakthrough curves is mainly controlled by velocity distribution. We build on this insight, and propose a Lagrangian statistical model that takes the form of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) with correlated particle velocities. In this framework, velocity distribution and velocity correlation are quantified by a Markov process of particle transition times that is characterized by a distribution function and a transition probability. Our transport model accurately captures the anomalous behavior in the breakthrough curves for both push-pull and convergent flow geometries, with the same set of parameters. Thus, the proposed correlated CTRW modeling approach provides a simple yet powerful framework for characterizing the impact of velocity distribution and correlation on transport in fractured media.

  17. Detecting exoplanets: jointly modeling radial velocity and stellar activity time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David Edward; Stenning, David; Ford, Eric B.; Wolpert, Robert L.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2017-06-01

    The radial velocity method is one of the most successful techniques for detecting exoplanets, but stellar activity often corrupts the radial velocity signal. This corruption can make it difficult to detect low mass planets and planets orbiting more active stars. A principled approach to recovering planet radial velocity signals in the presence of stellar activity was proposed by Rajpaul et al. (2015) and involves the use of dependent Gaussian processes to jointly model the corrupted radial velocity signal and multiple proxies for stellar activity. We build on this work in two ways: (i) we propose using dimension reduction techniques to construct more informative stellar activity proxies; (ii) we extend the Rajpaul et al. (2015) model to a larger class of models and use a model comparison procedure to select the best model for the particular stellar activity proxies at hand. Our framework enables us to compare the performance of various proxies in terms of the resulting statistical power for planet detection.

  18. The development of microdischarges of barrier discharges in N2/O2 mixtures-experimental investigations and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H-E; Yurgelenas, Yu V; Brandenburg, R

    2005-01-01

    The spatially resolved cross-correlation spectroscopy (CCS) was used for systematic investigations of the barrier discharge (BD) in N 2 /O 2 mixtures at atmospheric pressure. The spatio-temporal distributions of the microdischarge (MD) radiation intensities were recorded for the spectral bands of the (0-0) transitions of the 2nd positive (λ = 337.1 nm) and 1st negative system of molecular nitrogen (λ = 391.4 nm). The velocities of the cathode-directed ionization waves were evaluated from the CCS data. In the middle of the gap, the MD channel diameter was found to be about 0.3 mm and to expand towards both electrodes. On the dielectrics, outward propagating discharges were observed. A computational model of the BD is proposed, to explain the MD formation in short (1-2 mm) air gaps by a Townsend mechanism. The two-dimensional dynamics of the MD development and the channel radiation for the second positive system of nitrogen are simulated. The proposed model explains satisfactorily the experimental results on the velocity of the cathode-directed ionization wave and the MD radiation of the 2nd positive system

  19. A self-discharge model of Lithium-Sulfur batteries based on direct shuttle current measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef

    2016-01-01

    . A simple but comprehensive mathematical model of the Li-S battery cell self-discharge based on the shuttle current was developed and is presented. The shuttle current values for the model parameterization were obtained from the direct shuttle current measurements. Furthermore, the battery cell depth......-of-discharge values were recomputed in order to account for the influence of the self-discharge and provide a higher accuracy of the model. Finally, the derived model was successfully validated against laboratory experiments at various conditions....

  20. Evaluation of a Model for Predicting the Tidal Velocity in Fjord Entrances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalander, Emilia [The Swedish Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion, Division of Electricity, Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); Thomassen, Paul [Team Ashes, Trondheim (Norway); Leijon, Mats [The Swedish Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion, Division of Electricity, Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Sufficiently accurate and low-cost estimation of tidal velocities is of importance when evaluating a potential site for a tidal energy farm. Here we suggest and evaluate a model to calculate the tidal velocity in fjord entrances. The model is compared with tidal velocities from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements in the tidal channel Skarpsundet in Norway. The calculated velocity value from the model corresponded well with the measured cross-sectional average velocity, but was shown to underestimate the velocity in the centre of the channel. The effect of this was quantified by calculating the kinetic energy of the flow for a 14-day period. A numerical simulation using TELEMAC-2D was performed and validated with ADCP measurements. Velocity data from the simulation was used as input for calculating the kinetic energy at various locations in the channel. It was concluded that the model presented here is not accurate enough for assessing the tidal energy resource. However, the simplicity of the model was considered promising in the use of finding sites where further analyses can be made.

  1. Model of hospital-supported discharge after stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torp, Claus Rydahl; Vinkler, Sonja; Pedersen, Kirsten Damgaard

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Readmission rate within 6 months after a stroke is 40% to 50%. The purpose of the project was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary stroke team could reduce length of hospital stay, readmission rate, increase patient satisfaction and reduce dependency of help. METHODS......: One hundred and ninety-eight patients with acute stroke were randomized into 103 patients whose discharge was supported by an interdisciplinary stroke team and 95 control patients who received standard aftercare. Baseline characteristics were comparable in the 2 groups. The patients were evaluated...... services. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in functional scores or patient satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: In this setting we could not show benefit of an interdisciplinary stroke team supporting patients at discharge perhaps because standard aftercare was very efficient already....

  2. Electrical modelling of homogeneous dielectric barrier discharges under an arbitrary excitation voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuhai; Neiger, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    In order to quantitatively describe the electrical working principles of dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), a dynamic electrical model for homogeneous DBDs has been put forward that is composed of a new equivalent circuit for homogeneous DBDs and the equations derived from it. This model is a global and self-consistent model, valid for an arbitrary external excitation voltage. This model reveals instantaneous relations of internal electrical quantities in the gap (gap voltage, internal discharge current and internal power consumption process) to external electrical quantities (external voltage and external total current) and provides the theoretical fundamentals to calculate the temporal development processes of all internal electrical quantities in the discharge gap from the measured external voltage and external total current. The knowledge obtained of dynamic processes of DBDs in the discharge gap explains quantitatively the mechanisms that result in ignition, development and extinction of DBDs and provide physical interpretation of the measured external total current and other phenomena such as memory effect and multiple current pulses in one half period. In this model, several current terms (external total current, external displacement current, external discharge current, internal discharge current and internal displacement current) are introduced to distinguish the different currents involved in DBDs. Moreover, the equations for charge and energy deposition by one discharge and in one half period are derived. Applications of this model to studying a bipolar sine wave excited DBD and a unipolar pulse excited DBD are also included. This model has been proved to be a useful tool to understand DBDs better

  3. Improving Seismic Velocity Models with Constraints from Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise and Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2016-0098 TR-2016-0098 IMPROVING SEISMIC VELOCITY MODELS WITH CONSTRAINTS FROM AUTOCORRELATION OF AMBIENT SEISMIC ...TYPE Final Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 24 Apr 2014 – 24 Mar 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improving Seismic Velocity Models with Constraints from...Autocorrelation of Ambient Seismic Noise and Signal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-14-C-0214 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62601F 6

  4. Analytical–numerical global model of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaroni, C; Chabert, P; Lieberman, M A; Lichtenberg, A J; Leblanc, A

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid analytical–numerical global model of atmospheric-pressure, radio-frequency (rf) driven capacitive discharges is developed. The feed gas is assumed to be helium with small admixtures of oxygen or nitrogen. The electrical characteristics are modeled analytically as a current-driven homogeneous discharge. The electron power balance is solved analytically to determine a time-varying Maxwellian electron temperature, which oscillates on the rf timescale. Averaging over the rf period yields effective rate coefficients for gas phase activated processes. The particle balance relations for all species are then integrated numerically to determine the equilibrium discharge parameters. The coupling of analytical solutions of the time-varying discharge and electron temperature dynamics, and numerical solutions of the discharge chemistry, allows for a fast solution of the discharge equilibrium. Variations of discharge parameters with discharge composition and rf power are determined. Comparisons are made to more accurate but numerically costly fluid models, with space and time variations, but with the range of parameters limited by computational time. (paper)

  5. Predictors of Discharge Disposition in Older Adults With Burns: A Study of the Burn Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tam N; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Martinez, Erin; Lezotte, Dennis; Rietschel, Carly; Holavanahalli, Radha; Kowalske, Karen; Esselman, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Older patients with burn injury have a greater likelihood for discharge to nursing facilities. Recent research indicates that older patients discharged to nursing facilities are two to three times as likely to die within a 3-year period relative to those discharged to home. In light of these poor long-term outcomes, we conducted this study to identify predictors for discharge to independent vs nonindependent living status in older patients hospitalized for burns. We retrospectively reviewed all older adults (age ≥ 55 years) who were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal multicenter study of outcomes from 1993 to 2011. Patient, injury, and treatment outcomes data were analyzed. Recognizing that transfer to inpatient rehabilitation may have impacted final hospital discharge disposition: we assessed the likelihood of inpatient rehabilitation stay, based on identified predictors of inpatient rehabilitation. We subsequently performed a logistic regression analysis on the clustered, propensity-matched cohort to assess associations of burn and injury characteristics on the primary outcome of final discharge status. A total of 591 patients aged ≥55 years were treated and discharged alive from three participating U.S. burn centers during the study period. Mean burn size was 14.8% (SD 11.2%) and mean age was 66.7 years (SD 9.3 years). Ninety-three patients had an inpatient rehabilitation stay before discharge (15.7%). Significant factors predictive of inpatient rehabilitation included a burn >20% TBSA, mechanical ventilation, older age, range of motion deficits at acute care discharge, and study site. These factors were included in the propensity model. Four hundred seventy-one patients (80%) were discharged to independent living status. By matched propensity analysis, older age was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of discharge to nonindependent living (P burn centers need to be elucidated to better understand discharge disposition status in older

  6. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  7. Optimization of Roller Velocity for Quenching Machine Based on Heat Transfer Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During quenching process of steel plate, control parameters are important to product quality. In this work, heat transfer mathematical model has been developed for roller-type quenching machine to predict the temperature field of plate at first, and then an optimization schedule considering quenching technology and equipment limitations is developed firstly based on the heat transfer mathematical model with considering the shortest quenching time. A numerical simulation is performed during optimization process to investigate the effects of roller velocity on the temperature of representative plate. Based on the optimization method, study is also performed for different thickness of plate to obtain the corresponding roller velocity. The results show that the optimized roller velocity can be achieved for the roller-type continuous quenching machine based on the heat transfer mathematical model. With the increasing of plate’s thickness, the optimized roller velocity decreases exponentially.

  8. Simulation and Modelling of Climate Change Effects on River Awara Flow Discharge using WEAP Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyati E.N.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of stream flow and discharge of river Awara under changed climate conditions using CLIMGEN for stochastic weather generation and WEAP model was used to simulate reserviour storage volume, water demand and river discharges at high spatial resolution (0.5°×0.5°, total 66,420 grid cells. Results of CLM-Based flow measurement shows a linear regression with R 2 = 0.99 for IFPRI-MNP- IGSM_WRS calibration. Sensitivity simulation of ambient long-term shows an increase in temperature with 0.5 o c thus the results of the studies generally show that annual runoff and river discharges could largely decrease. The projection of water demand 150 million m 3 by 2020 against the reservoir storage volume 60 million m 3 and decrease in rainfall depth by -5.7 mm. The output of the combined models used in this study is veritable to create robust water management system under different climate change scenarios.

  9. Using Contaminant Transport Modeling to Determine Historical Discharges at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogwell, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    When it is determined that a contaminated site needs to be remediated, the issue of who is going to pay for that remediation is an immediate concern. This means that there needs to be a determination of who the responsible parties are for the existing contamination. Seldom is it the case that records have been made and kept of the surface contaminant discharges. In many cases it is possible to determine the relative amount of contaminant discharge at the surface of the various responsible parties by employing a careful analysis of the history of contaminant transport through the surface, through the vadose zone, and within the saturated zone. The process begins with the development of a dynamic conceptual site model that takes into account the important features of the transport of the contaminants through the vadose zone and in the groundwater. The parameters for this model can be derived from flow data available for the site. The resulting contaminant transport model is a composite of the vadose zone transport model, together with the saturated zone (groundwater) flow model. Any calibration of the model should be carefully employed in order to avoid using information about the conclusions of the relative discharge amounts of the responsible parties in determining the calibrated parameters. Determination of the leading edge of the plume is an important first step. It is associated with the first discharges from the surface of the site. If there were several discharging parties at the same time, then it is important to establish a chemical or isotopic signature of the chemicals that were discharged. The time duration of the first discharger needs to be determined as accurately as possible in order to establish the appropriate characterization of the leading portion of the resulting plume in the groundwater. The information about the first discharger and the resulting part of the plume associated with this discharger serves as a basis for the determination of the

  10. Discharge simulations performed with a hydrological model using bias corrected regional climate model input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. van Pelt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated that precipitation on Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes has increased in the last decades and that it is likely that this trend will continue. This will have an influence on discharge of the river Meuse. The use of bias correction methods is important when the effect of precipitation change on river discharge is studied. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of using two different bias correction methods on output from a Regional Climate Model (RCM simulation. In this study a Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2 run is used, forced by ECHAM5/MPIOM under the condition of the SRES-A1B emission scenario, with a 25 km horizontal resolution. The RACMO2 runs contain a systematic precipitation bias on which two bias correction methods are applied. The first method corrects for the wet day fraction and wet day average (WD bias correction and the second method corrects for the mean and coefficient of variance (MV bias correction. The WD bias correction initially corrects well for the average, but it appears that too many successive precipitation days were removed with this correction. The second method performed less well on average bias correction, but the temporal precipitation pattern was better. Subsequently, the discharge was calculated by using RACMO2 output as forcing to the HBV-96 hydrological model. A large difference was found between the simulated discharge of the uncorrected RACMO2 run, the WD bias corrected run and the MV bias corrected run. These results show the importance of an appropriate bias correction.

  11. Efficient use of the velocity gradients tensor in flow modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    For models of fabric development in rocks, with vorticity as a variable parameter, the choice of an unsuitable reference frame for instantaneous flow can hamper clear presentation of results. The orientation of most fabric elements which develop in deforming rocks is attached to some principal

  12. Modelling of low-current self-generated oscillations in a hollow cathode discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Donko, Z

    1999-01-01

    Low-current self-generated oscillations in a rectangular hollow cathode discharge in helium gas were investigated experimentally and by means of a two-dimensional self-consistent hybrid model. The model combines Monte Carlo simulation of the motion of fast electrons and a fluid description of slow electrons and positive ions. The low-frequency (<=20 kHz) oscillations were found to arise as an effect of the interaction of the gas discharge and the external electric circuit - consisting of a stable voltage source, a series resistor and a capacitor formed by the discharge electrodes. Good agreement was found between the experimentally observed and calculated oscillation frequency and current wave forms. Beside these characteristics the modelling also made it possible to calculate the time dependence of numerous other discharge characteristics (e.g. electron multiplication, ion density, potential distribution) and provided detailed insight into the mechanism of oscillations. The advantage of the present model ...

  13. The critical role of the routing scheme in simulating peak river discharge in global hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F.; Veldkamp, T.; Frieler, K.; Schewe, J.; Ostberg, S.; Willner, S. N.; Schauberger, B.; Gosling, S.; Mueller Schmied, H.; Portmann, F. T.; Leng, G.; Huang, M.; Liu, X.; Tang, Q.; Hanasaki, N.; Biemans, H.; Gerten, D.; Satoh, Y.; Pokhrel, Y. N.; Stacke, T.; Ciais, P.; Chang, J.; Ducharne, A.; Guimberteau, M.; Wada, Y.; Kim, H.; Yamazaki, D.

    2017-12-01

    Global hydrological models (GHMs) have been applied to assess global flood hazards, but their capacity to capture the timing and amplitude of peak river discharge—which is crucial in flood simulations—has traditionally not been the focus of examination. Here we evaluate to what degree the choice of river routing scheme affects simulations of peak discharge and may help to provide better agreement with observations. To this end we use runoff and discharge simulations of nine GHMs forced by observational climate data (1971-2010) within the ISIMIP2a project. The runoff simulations were used as input for the global river routing model CaMa-Flood. The simulated daily discharge was compared to the discharge generated by each GHM using its native river routing scheme. For each GHM both versions of simulated discharge were compared to monthly and daily discharge observations from 1701 GRDC stations as a benchmark. CaMa-Flood routing shows a general reduction of peak river discharge and a delay of about two to three weeks in its occurrence, likely induced by the buffering capacity of floodplain reservoirs. For a majority of river basins, discharge produced by CaMa-Flood resulted in a better agreement with observations. In particular, maximum daily discharge was adjusted, with a multi-model averaged reduction in bias over about 2/3 of the analysed basin area. The increase in agreement was obtained in both managed and near-natural basins. Overall, this study demonstrates the importance of routing scheme choice in peak discharge simulation, where CaMa-Flood routing accounts for floodplain storage and backwater effects that are not represented in most GHMs. Our study provides important hints that an explicit parameterisation of these processes may be essential in future impact studies.

  14. Modeling the cathode region of noble gas mixture discharges using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donko, Z.; Janossy, M.

    1992-10-01

    A model of the cathode dark space of DC glow discharges was developed in order to study the effects caused by mixing small amounts (≤2%) of other noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) to He. The motion of charged particles was described by Monte Carlo simulation. Several discharge parameters (electron and ion energy distribution functions, electron and ion current densities, reduced ionization coefficients, and current density-voltage characteristics) were obtained. Small amounts of admixtures were found to modify significantly the discharge parameters. Current density-voltage characteristics obtained from the model showed good agreement with experimental data. (author) 40 refs.; 14 figs

  15. Dynamic model based on voltage transfer curve for pattern formation in dielectric barrier glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ben; He, Feng; Ouyang, Jiting, E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Duan, Xiaoxi [Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Simulation work is very important for understanding the formation of self-organized discharge patterns. Previous works have witnessed different models derived from other systems for simulation of discharge pattern, but most of these models are complicated and time-consuming. In this paper, we introduce a convenient phenomenological dynamic model based on the basic dynamic process of glow discharge and the voltage transfer curve (VTC) to study the dielectric barrier glow discharge (DBGD) pattern. VTC is an important characteristic of DBGD, which plots the change of wall voltage after a discharge as a function of the initial total gap voltage. In the modeling, the combined effect of the discharge conditions is included in VTC, and the activation-inhibition effect is expressed by a spatial interaction term. Besides, the model reduces the dimensionality of the system by just considering the integration effect of current flow. All these greatly facilitate the construction of this model. Numerical simulations turn out to be in good accordance with our previous fluid modeling and experimental result.

  16. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  17. Modeling the response of Northwest Greenland to enhanced ocean thermal forcing and subglacial discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlighem, M.; Wood, M.; Seroussi, H. L.; Bondzio, J. H.; Rignot, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Glacier-front dynamics is an important control on Greenland's ice mass balance. Warm and salty Atlantic water, which is typically found at a depth below 200-300 m, has the potential to trigger ice-front retreats of marine-terminating glaciers, and the corresponding loss in resistive stress leads to glacier acceleration and thinning. It remains unclear, however, which glaciers are currently stable but may retreat in the future, and how far inland and how fast they will retreat. Here, we quantify the sensitivity and vulnerability of marine-terminating glaciers along the Northwest coast of Greenland (from 72.5° to 76°N) to ocean forcing using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM), and its new ice front migration capability. We rely on the ice melt parameterization from Rignot et al. 2016, and use ocean temperature and salinity from high-resolution ECCO2 simulations on the continental shelf to constrain the thermal forcing. The ice flow model includes a calving law based on a Von Mises criterion. We investigate the sensitivity of Northwest Greenland to enhanced ocean thermal forcing and subglacial discharge. We find that some glaciers, such as Dietrichson Gletscher or Alison Gletscher, are sensitive to small increases in ocean thermal forcing, while others, such as Illullip Sermia or Qeqertarsuup Sermia, are very difficult to destabilize, even with a quadrupling of the melt. Under the most intense melt experiment, we find that Hayes Gletscher retreats by more than 50 km inland into a deep trough and its velocity increases by a factor of 10 over only 15 years. The model confirms that ice-ocean interactions are the triggering mechanism of glacier retreat, but the bed controls its magnitude. This work was performed at the University of California Irvine under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cryospheric Sciences Program (#NNX15AD55G), and the National Science Foundation's ARCSS program (#1504230).

  18. Development of Artificial Neural-Network-Based Models for the Simulation of Spring Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohan Raju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs in predicting the weekly spring discharge. The study was based on the weekly spring discharge from a spring located near Ranichauri in Tehri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand, India. Five models were developed for predicting the spring discharge based on a weekly interval using rainfall, evaporation, temperature with a specified lag time. All models were developed both with one and two hidden layers. Each model was developed with many trials by selecting different network architectures and different number of hidden neurons; finally a best predicting model presented against each developed model. The models were trained with three different algorithms, that is, quick-propagation algorithm, batch backpropagation algorithm, and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm using weekly data from 1999 to 2005. A best model for the simulation was selected from the three presented algorithms using the statistical criteria such as correlation coefficient (, determination coefficient, or Nash Sutcliff's efficiency (DC. Finally, optimized number of neurons were considered for the best model. Training and testing results revealed that the models were predicting the weekly spring discharge satisfactorily. Based on these criteria, ANN-based model results in better agreement for the computation of spring discharge. LMR models were also developed in the study, and they also gave good results, but, when compared with the ANN methodology, ANN resulted in better optimized values.

  19. Investigation on velocity distribution of TFM and DEM phase in hybrid model of CBFB in mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyu; Feng, Ying; Zhao, Zhening

    2017-05-01

    As a novel model for gas solid flow simulation, the investigation of TFM-DEM hybrid model is far from completely, including mutual interaction of TFM and DEM phase, selection of DEM portion and coherence of the predicted results from both phases. Therefore, in present study, the consistency of velocity distribution between TFM and DEM phase is investigated. The correlation of instantaneous and time-averaged velocity distribution of TFM and DEM phase in specific area in CBFB for mining is studied. And the differences of the axial and radial velocity between the particles of different sizes are discussed. The influence of particle diameter and the ratio of DEM and TFM phase on the correlation of velocity, both instantaneous and time-averaged, are taken into consideration.

  20. Modeling of velocity regimens for anaerobic and aerobic power exercises in high-performance swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issurin, V B; Kaufman, L E; Tenenbaum, G

    2001-12-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the validity and eligibility of a modeling method to determine velocity regimes of highly intensive swimming exercises. The model postulates that swimming velocity regimens, which correspond to the three biomotor components, i.e.: Maximal Anaerobic Power, Anaerobic Capacity, and Aerobic Power, can be predicted by special equations using a 50 m all out swim velocity, and the equation coefficient, which determine swimmer's classification. The swimmers are classified into 12 categories according to pre-determined race distance records, and swimmer's capability level. Comparative field study was used to contrast predicted velocity regimens with observed velocity regimes. National swimming center at the Wingate Institute for Physical Education. 22 highly trained swimmers (14 male and 8 female) participated in this study and were examined 1-4 times within a period of two years in totally 162 sessions. The 50 m all-out trial was performed and three basic velocity regimens were predicted according to the modeling procedure. Three different interval sets were carried out by all the swimmers for validation procedures. The blood lactate (BLA) samples were taken after test completion. The correlations between the observed and predicted velocities within each of the three tests were very strong. The RM-ANOVA with respect to lactic acid concentration revealed that across the three measures (different tests) BLA concentration was significantly higher in male swimmers than in female swimmers, and highest in butterfly followed by breaststroke, backstroke, and freestyle stroke. The modeling method allows to predict desirable velocity regimes in order to develop the main biomotor components of the swimmers. This procedure is recommended for practice as a non-invasive method for designing desired training regimens.

  1. Modeling and control of a flexible one-link robot driven by a velocity controlled actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, D.; De Schutter, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach to control flexible robots. Many control schemes for flexible robots have been developed and published in robotics research literature. All of them assume the use of torque controlled actuators (DC-motors), while most commercially available robots have velocity controlled actuators. It is possible to extend a traditional controller, which uses velocity controlled actuators and which is designed to control rigid robots, to a controller for flexible robots. However, it is shown that the high gain velocity loop introduces a controllability problem. The proposed control approach is based on state feedback, built around a high gain velocity controlled actuator. The total dynamic model consists of a parallel combination of the models relating the differential velocity input to the joint position on the one hand and relating the differential velocity input to the flexible deformation on the other. This structure is proven to solve the controllability problem. By state feedback together with feedforward, accurate tracking, proper positioning and oscillation suppression during and after positioning of the end point are achieved. Test results on a bread board model prove the applicability of the proposed control scheme.

  2. Modelling and forecasting monthly and daily river discharge data using hybrid models and considering autoregressive heteroscedasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolgayova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    hydrological models. However, the GARCH family of models proved to be suited in removing it only in daily time step. The basic GARCH model was not applicable on any of the time series. In all other investigated cases, the EGARCH(1,1) model had to be used. Unlike in econometric time series, where the so called leverage effect (i.e. the series reacts more strongly to negative changes) is present and pointed out by this model, here the data tends to react more strongly on positive changes. In this particular case it was found, that the general property of hydrological processes, that the rise of discharge is rainfall driven (a highly nonlinear chaotic intermittent process) and the decrease of discharge is ruled by the damping effects of the water storage in the driven system (catchment or river reach), is present also in the hydrological model error series. This shows, that the modelling and forecasting of floods (pulse like rising discharge) is a more demanding task than that of droughts (slowly decreasing flows). Even though the GARCH models did show partial improvements in the modelling and forecasting of flows, they still have several serious disadvantages (such as high sensitivity to the chosen fitting period) and possible further use should be further investigated. These results are of importance with respect to future attempts of modelling of error time series of hydrological models in such hybrid frameworks. They underpin the need of a non-mechanistic approach in the case based analysis of such data and the physical interpretation of statistical modelling results.

  3. Hydrodynamic model of a dielectric-barrier discharge in pure chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtaeva, S. V.

    2017-08-01

    A one-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) in pure chlorine is developed, and the properties of the discharge are modeled. The discharge is excited in an 8-mm-long discharge gap between 2-mm-thick dielectric quartz layers covering metal electrodes. The DBD spatiotemporal characteristics at gas pressures of 15-100 Torr are modeled for the case in which a 100-kHz harmonic voltage with an amplitude of 8 kV is applied to the electrodes. The average power density deposited in the discharge over one voltage period is 2.5-5.8 W/cm3. It is shown that ions and electrons absorb about 95 and 5% of the discharge power, respectively. In this case, from 67 to 97% of the power absorbed by electrons is spent on the dissociation and ionization of Cl2 molecules. Two phases can be distinguished in the discharge dynamics: the active (multispike) phase, which follows the breakdown of the discharge gap, and the passive phase. The active phase is characterized by the presence of multiple current spikes, a relatively high current, small surface charge density on the dielectrics, and large voltage drop across the discharge gap. The passive phase (with no current spikes) is characterized by a low current, large surface charge density on the dielectrics, and small voltage drop across the discharge gap. The peak current density in the spikes at all pressures is about 4 mA/cm2. In the multispike phase, there are distinct space charge sheaths with thicknesses of 1.5-1.8 mm and a mean electron energy of 4.3-7 eV and the central region of quasineutral plasma with a weak electric field and a mean electron energy of 0.8-3 eV. The degree of ionization of chlorine molecules in the discharge is 0.02% at a pressure of 15 Torr and 0.01% at 100 Torr. The DBD plasma is electronegative due to the fast attachment of electrons to chlorine atoms: e + Cl2 → Cl + Cl-. The most abundant charged particles are Cl 2 + and Cl- ions, and the degree of ionization during current

  4. One-dimensional velocity model of the Middle Kura Depresion from local earthquakes data of Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetirmishli, G. C.; Kazimova, S. E.; Kazimov, I. E.

    2011-09-01

    We present the method for determining the velocity model of the Earth's crust and the parameters of earthquakes in the Middle Kura Depression from the data of network telemetry in Azerbaijan. Application of this method allowed us to recalculate the main parameters of the hypocenters of the earthquake, to compute the corrections to the arrival times of P and S waves at the observation station, and to significantly improve the accuracy in determining the coordinates of the earthquakes. The model was constructed using the VELEST program, which calculates one-dimensional minimal velocity models from the travel times of seismic waves.

  5. Rotorcraft flight endurance estimation based on a new battery discharge model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng CHENG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To avoid the numerical complexities of the battery discharge law of electric-powered rotorcrafts, this study uses the Kriging method to model the discharge characteristics of Li-Po batteries under standard conditions. A linear current compensation term and an ambient temperature compensation term based on radial basis functions are then applied to the trained Kriging model, leading to the complete discharged capacity-terminal voltage model. Using an orthogonal experimental design and a sequential method, the coefficients of the current and ambient temperature compensation terms are determined through robust optimization. An endurance calculation model for electric-powered rotorcrafts is then established, based on the battery discharge model, through numerical integration. Laboratory tests show that the maximum relative error of the proposed discharged capacity-terminal voltage model at detection points is 0.0086, and that of the rotorcraft endurance calculation model is 0.0195, thus verifying their accuracy. A flight test further demonstrates the applicability of the proposed endurance model to general electric-powered rotorcrafts.

  6. UCVM: An Open Source Framework for 3D Velocity Model Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, D.; Maechling, P. J.; Jordan, T. H.; Plesch, A.; Taborda, R.; Callaghan, S.; Small, P.

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity models provide fundamental input data to ground motion simulations, in the form of structured or unstructured meshes or grids. Numerous models are available for California, as well as for other parts of the United States and Europe, but models do not share a common interface. Being able to interact with these models in a standardized way is critical in order to configure and run 3D ground motion simulations. The Unified Community Velocity Model (UCVM) software, developed by researchers at the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC), is an open source framework designed to provide a cohesive way to interact with seismic velocity models. We describe the several ways in which we have improved the UCVM software over the last year. We have simplified the UCVM installation process by automating the installation of various community codebases, improving the ease of use.. We discuss how UCVM software was used to build velocity meshes for high-frequency (4Hz) deterministic 3D wave propagation simulations, and how the UCVM framework interacts with other open source resources, such as NetCDF file formats for visualization. The UCVM software uses a layered software architecture that transparently converts geographic coordinates to the coordinate systems used by the underlying velocity models and supports inclusion of a configurable near-surface geotechnical layer, while interacting with the velocity model codes through their existing software interfaces. No changes to the velocity model codes are required. Our recent UCVM installation improvements bundle UCVM with a setup script, written in Python, which guides users through the process that installs the UCVM software along with all the user-selectable velocity models. Each velocity model is converted into a standardized (configure, make, make install) format that is easily downloaded and installed via the script. UCVM is often run in specialized high performance computing (HPC

  7. Modeling technique of capacitive discharge pumping of metal vapor lasers for electrode capacitance optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, F A; Evtushenko, G S; Vuchkov, N K; Sukhanov, V B; Shiyanov, D V

    2012-05-01

    To estimate optimum gas discharge tube (GDT) electrode capacitance of metal vapor lasers (MVLs) pumped by a longitudinal capacitive discharge, we offer to use series connection of capacitors to the electrodes of a conventionally pumped GDT with inner electrodes. It has been demonstrated that the maximum output power in CuBr lasers is obtained when the capacitances of high-voltage and ground electrodes are equal. When using a model circuit an average output power reaches 12 W that suggests the possibility of generating high average output power (>10 W) in MVLs pumped using a capacitive discharge.

  8. Dynamic modeling of environmental risk associated with drilling discharges to marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgut, İsmail; Rye, Henrik; Reed, Mark; Smit, Mathijs G D; Ditlevsen, May Kristin

    2015-10-15

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of base-fluids, chemicals and particulates, and may, after discharge to the marine environment, result in adverse effects on benthic communities. A numerical model was developed to estimate the fate of drilling discharges in the marine environment, and associated environmental risks. Environmental risk from deposited drilling waste in marine sediments is generally caused by four types of stressors: oxygen depletion, toxicity, burial and change of grain size. In order to properly model these stressors, natural burial, biodegradation and bioturbation processes were also included. Diagenetic equations provide the basis for quantifying environmental risk. These equations are solved numerically by an implicit-central differencing scheme. The sediment model described here is, together with a fate and risk model focusing on the water column, implemented in the DREAM and OSCAR models, both available within the Marine Environmental Modeling Workbench (MEMW) at SINTEF in Trondheim, Norway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Natural Language Processing for Cohort Discovery in a Discharge Prediction Model for the Neonatal ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Michael W; Lehmann, Christoph U; Fabbri, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Discharging patients from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can be delayed for non-medical reasons including the procurement of home medical equipment, parental education, and the need for children's services. We previously created a model to identify patients that will be medically ready for discharge in the subsequent 2-10 days. In this study we use Natural Language Processing to improve upon that model and discern why the model performed poorly on certain patients. We retrospectively examined the text of the Assessment and Plan section from daily progress notes of 4,693 patients (103,206 patient-days) from the NICU of a large, academic children's hospital. A matrix was constructed using words from NICU notes (single words and bigrams) to train a supervised machine learning algorithm to determine the most important words differentiating poorly performing patients compared to well performing patients in our original discharge prediction model. NLP using a bag of words (BOW) analysis revealed several cohorts that performed poorly in our original model. These included patients with surgical diagnoses, pulmonary hypertension, retinopathy of prematurity, and psychosocial issues. The BOW approach aided in cohort discovery and will allow further refinement of our original discharge model prediction. Adequately identifying patients discharged home on g-tube feeds alone could improve the AUC of our original model by 0.02. Additionally, this approach identified social issues as a major cause for delayed discharge. A BOW analysis provides a method to improve and refine our NICU discharge prediction model and could potentially avoid over 900 (0.9%) hospital days.

  10. The model of beam-plasma discharge in the rocket environment during an electron beam injection in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishin, E.V.; Ruzhin, Yu.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    The model of beam-plasma discharge in the rocket environment during electron beam injection in the ionosphere is constructed. The discharge plasma density dependence on the neutral gas concentration and the beam parameters is found

  11. Crustal P-wave velocity model for the central-western region of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, J.; Escudero, C. R.; Perez, O. G.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Several studies require a p-wave velocity model to obtain accurate results moreover such models could provide an insight of the tectonic structure of the study area. Accordingly, in this study we estimate the crustal 3D p-wave velocity model for the Jalisco Block located at the central-western region of Mexico. The Jalisco Block is limited on its eastern side by the Colima and Tepic-Zacoalcos Rifts, and the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt; while on its western side it is limited by the Mesoamerican Trench. Cocos and Rivera plates are subducting beneath the Jalisco Block conforming a tectonically complex region. We used earthquakes occurring within the limits of lithosphere volume from which we want to estimate the velocity model. Such events were registered by the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone experiment (MARS) and the Seismic and Acelerometric Network of Jalisco (RESAJ). During MARS experiment 51broadband stations active from January 2006 to June 2007 were deployed while RESAJ by July of 2012consists of nine active stations however more stations will be deployed until reach 30 stations. The velocity model is estimated using the Fast Marching Tomography (FMTOMO) software. FMTOMO uses the Fast Marching Method (FMM) in order to solve the forward problem; the FMM is a numerical algorithm that tracks the interfaces evolution along a nodes narrow band, and travel times are updated solving the eikonal equation. Finally , the inverse problem is about adjusting the model parameters (interface depth, velocity, hypocenter location) in order to try to satisfy the observed data (travel times). We perform a resolution test using several events that show good resolution results up to a 60 km depth. We present a 3D p-wave velocity model, we compare our results within the MARS data with previous results for greater depths, approximately the upper mantle, finally we also present studies towards the northern portion of the Jalisco Block using the RESAJ data.

  12. Building Subsurface Velocity Models with Sharp Interfaces Using Interface-Guided Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Youzuo; Huang, Lianjie

    2017-11-01

    Reverse-time migration has the potential to image complex subsurface structures, including steeply-dipping fault zones, but the method requires an accurate velocity model. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion is a promising tool for high-resolution velocity model building. Because of the ill-posedness of acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion, it is a great challenge to obtain accurate velocity models containing sharp interfaces. To improve velocity model building, we develop an acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme to improve the inversion accuracy and robustness, particularly for models with sharp interfaces and steeply-dipping fault zones with widths much smaller than the seismic wavelength. The new regularization scheme incorporates interface information into seismic full-waveform inversion. The interface information of subsurface interfaces is obtained iteratively using migration imaging during waveform inversion. Seismic migration is robust for subsurface imaging. Our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion takes advantage of the robustness of migration imaging to improve velocity estimation. We use synthetic seismic data for a complex model containing sharp interfaces and several steeply-dipping fault zones to validate the improved capability of our new acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion method. Our inversion results are much better than those produced without using interface-guided regularization. Acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion with an interface-guided modified total-variation regularization scheme has the potential to accurately build subsurface velocity models with sharp interfaces and/or steep fault zones.

  13. Coupling circuit model and discharge waveform prediction for Keda Torus eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Wei [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lan, Tao, E-mail: lantao@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yang, Lei, E-mail: lyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chijin [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Mao, Wenzhe; You, Wei; Li, Chenguang; Tu, Cui; Tan, Mingsheng; Luo, Bin; Fu, Chengshuo; Huang, Fangchen; Xu, Hangqi; Deng, Tijian; Zhu, Junfeng [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fu, Peng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wen, Xiaohui; Zhou, Haiyang; Wang, Hai; Wan, Shude [CAS Key Laboratory of Basic Plasma Physics and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • A coupling circuit model has been successfully developed for Keda Torus eXperiment to predict discharge waveforms. • The multigroup poloidal and toroidal winding circuits are adopt in the coupling model. • The delay effect due to resistive vacuum vessel is considered in the coupling model. • The results shows the design of power supply system is capable of achieving the expected discharge waveforms. - Abstract: A poloidal and toroidal magnetic field coupling circuit model is developed to simulate discharge waveforms of the Keda Torus eXperiment (KTX) reversed field pinch (RFP) to ensure that the design of the power supply systems is able to achieve the typical discharge parameters. The radial profiles of plasma current density and magnetic field used in the coupling model are characterized by modified Bessel function model (MBFM) derived from the well-known Taylor's theory. The power balance in the energy conservation of poloidal and toroidal fields is used to establish the connection between these two fields. The numerical solutions of the coupling show that the KTX power supply system is capable of achieving the designed discharge parameters, such as field reversal parameter (F), pinch parameter (Θ), magnetic field, plasma current and loop voltage. Furthermore, the delay of magnetic field penetration due to the effect of vacuum vessel is also considered in the model.

  14. Fluid model of dc glow discharge with nonlocal ionization source term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafatov, I R; Bogdanov, E A; Kudryavtsev, A A

    2012-01-01

    We developed and tested a simple hybrid model for a glow discharge, which incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into the fluid framework. Calculations have been performed for an argon gas. Comparison with the experimental data as well as with the hybrid (particle) and fluid modelling results demonstated good applicability of the proposed model.

  15. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical modelling of ozone production in a wire-cylinder corona discharge and comparison with a wire-plate corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Pengxiang; Chen Junhong

    2009-01-01

    The effect of electrode configuration on ozone production in the direct-current corona discharge of dry and humid air is studied by a numerical model that combines the electron distribution in the corona plasma, plasma chemistry and transport phenomena. Two electrode configurations are considered: wire-cylinder discharge with air flowing along the wire axis and wire-plate discharge with air flowing transverse to the wire. The ozone distributions in both types of discharges are compared. For both electrode configurations, the ozone production rate is higher in the negative corona than in the positive corona and it decreases with an increase in relative humidity. More importantly, the detailed ozone distribution in the neighbourhood of the discharge wire, together with the ozone kinetics, reveals the possible difference in the ozone production from the two discharges. With the same operating conditions and sufficiently short flow residence time, the ozone production rate is nearly the same for both electrode configurations. When the flow residence time is longer than the characteristic time for homogeneous ozone destruction, the net ozone production is higher in the wire-cylinder discharge than in the wire-plate discharge due to relatively less ozone destruction.

  17. Numerical modelling of ozone production in a wire-cylinder corona discharge and comparison with a wire-plate corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengxiang; Chen, Junhong

    2009-02-01

    The effect of electrode configuration on ozone production in the direct-current corona discharge of dry and humid air is studied by a numerical model that combines the electron distribution in the corona plasma, plasma chemistry and transport phenomena. Two electrode configurations are considered: wire-cylinder discharge with air flowing along the wire axis and wire-plate discharge with air flowing transverse to the wire. The ozone distributions in both types of discharges are compared. For both electrode configurations, the ozone production rate is higher in the negative corona than in the positive corona and it decreases with an increase in relative humidity. More importantly, the detailed ozone distribution in the neighbourhood of the discharge wire, together with the ozone kinetics, reveals the possible difference in the ozone production from the two discharges. With the same operating conditions and sufficiently short flow residence time, the ozone production rate is nearly the same for both electrode configurations. When the flow residence time is longer than the characteristic time for homogeneous ozone destruction, the net ozone production is higher in the wire-cylinder discharge than in the wire-plate discharge due to relatively less ozone destruction.

  18. Readmissions and death after ICU discharge: development and validation of two predictive models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Badawi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Early discharge from the ICU is desirable because it shortens time in the ICU and reduces care costs, but can also increase the likelihood of ICU readmission and post-discharge unanticipated death if patients are discharged before they are stable. We postulated that, using eICU® Research Institute (eRI data from >400 ICUs, we could develop robust models predictive of post-discharge death and readmission that may be incorporated into future clinical information systems (CIS to assist ICU discharge planning. METHODS: Retrospective, multi-center, exploratory cohort study of ICU survivors within the eRI database between 1/1/2007 and 3/31/2011. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: DNR or care limitations at ICU discharge and discharge to location external to hospital. Patients were randomized (2∶1 to development and validation cohorts. Multivariable logistic regression was performed on a broad range of variables including: patient demographics, ICU admission diagnosis, admission severity of illness, laboratory values and physiologic variables present during the last 24 hours of the ICU stay. Multiple imputation was used to address missing data. The primary outcomes were the area under the receiver operator characteristic curves (auROC in the validation cohorts for the models predicting readmission and death within 48 hours of ICU discharge. RESULTS: 469,976 and 234,987 patients representing 219 hospitals were in the development and validation cohorts. Early ICU readmission and death was experienced by 2.54% and 0.92% of all patients, respectively. The relationship between predictors and outcomes (death vs readmission differed, justifying the need for separate models. The models for early readmission and death produced auROCs of 0.71 and 0.92, respectively. Both models calibrated well across risk groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our models for death and readmission after ICU discharge showed good to excellent discrimination and good calibration. Although

  19. Northern Korean Peninsula 1-D velocity model from surface wave dispersion and full-waveform data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. J.; Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Kang, T. S.; Cho, C.

    2016-12-01

    Monitoring seismic activities in the northern Korean Peninsula is important not only for understanding the characteristics of earthquakes but also for watching nuclear tests. To better monitor those natural and man-made seismic activities, reliable seismic velocity models are required. However, the seismic velocity structure of the region is not known well due to the lack of available seismic data directly measured in the region. This study presents 1-D velocity models of the region using two different datasets comprised of two-year-long continuous waveform and the 2013 North Korea nuclear test event waveform recorded at stations surrounding the region. Two reference 1-D models for the inland and offshore areas (Western East Sea) were estimated by 1-D inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements from ambient noise cross-correlations of the continuous waveform. To investigate the variations in the velocity models, many 1-D models for the paths between the 2013 nuclear test site and stations in China and South Korea were constructed by forward waveform modeling. The velocity variations are not significant for both models representing the inland and offshore paths, respectively. The 1-D models for the inland paths are similar to the models constructed for the southern Korean Peninsula. Interestingly, waveforms sampling through the offshore paths are not well explained by simple 1-D isotropic models. The preliminary result indicates that there exists radial anisotropy with SH being faster than SV by 3-5% in the upper mantle beneath the offshore northern Korean Peninsula, although further studies are necessary to explain the origin of anisotropy. A proper characterization of propagation effects along the offshore paths would be useful for monitoring future nuclear tests because many seismic stations in the eastern South Korea record waveforms sampling the offshore region from the nuclear test site to those stations.

  20. Velocity and Drag Evolution From the Leading Edge of a Model Mangrove Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Maria; Adler, Katherine; Ramos, Diogo; Garcia, Adrian Mikhail; Nepf, Heidi

    2017-11-01

    An experimental study of unidirectional flow through a model mangrove forest measured both velocity and forces on individual trees. The individual trees were 1/12th scale models of mature Rhizophora, including 24 prop roots distributed in a three-dimensional layout. Thirty-two model trees were distributed in a staggered array producing a 2.5 m long forest. The velocity evolved from a boundary layer profile at the forest leading edge to a vertical profile determined by the vertical distribution of frontal area, with significantly higher velocity above the prop roots. Fully developed conditions were reached at the fifth tree row from the leading edge. Within the root zone the velocity was reduced by up to 50% and the TKE was increased by as much as fivefold, relative to the upstream conditions. TKE in the root zone was mainly produced by root and trunk wakes, and it agreed in magnitude with the estimation obtained using the Tanino and Nepf (2008) formulation. Maximum TKE occurred at the top of the roots, where a strong shear region was associated with the change in frontal area. The drag measured on individual trees decreased from the leading edge and reached a constant value at the fifth row and beyond, i.e., in the fully developed region. The drag exhibited a quadratic dependence on velocity, which justified the definition of a quadratic drag coefficient. Once the correct drag length-scale was defined, the measured drag coefficients collapsed to a single function of Reynolds number.

  1. Methodological approach for the estimation of a new velocity model for continental Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Marco P.; Staller, Alejandra; Toulkeridis, Theofilos; Parra, Humberto

    2017-12-01

    We used 33 stations belonging of the Ecuador Continuous Monitoring GNSS Network (REGME) during the period 2008-2014, with aim to contribute with a methodological approach for the estimation of a new velocity model for Continental Ecuador. We used daily solutions to perform the analysis of GNSS time series, to obtain models of the series that best fit, taking into count the trend, seasonal variations and the type of noise. The sum of all these components represent the real-time series, and thus we can have a better estimation of the velocity parameter and its uncertainty. The velocities were calculated introducing the trend, seasonality and noise that were presented in each series into the overall model, which improved uncertainty by 12% and changed in magnitude up to 1.7 mm/yr and 2.5 mm/yr in the horizontal and vertical components, respectively, with respect to the initial velocities. The velocity field describes the crustal movement of the REGME stations in mainland Ecuador with uncertainty of 1 mm/yr and 2 mm/yr for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. Finally, a velocity model has been developed using the kriging technique whose geostatistical approach has been based on the data to identify the spatial characteristics by examining the observations by peers. The mean square error (rms) of prediction obtained in this method is 1.78 mm/yr and 1.95 mm/yr in the east and north components, respectivaly. The vertical component could not be modeled due to its chaotic behavior.

  2. The Efficacy of Telemedicine-Supported Discharge Within an In Home Model of Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenup, Edwin P; McCusker, Melissa; Potts, Boyd A; Bryett, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    To determine if mobile videoconferencing technology can facilitate the discharge of low-acuity patients receiving in-home care without compromising short-term health outcomes. A 6-month trial commenced in July 2015 with 345 patients considered unsuited to Criteria Led Discharge (CLD) receiving in-home care included as participants. Nurses providing clinical support to patients in their homes were supplied with a tablet computer (Apple iPad) with Internet connectivity (Telstra 4G Network) and videoconferencing software (Cisco Jabber for Telepresence). Device usage data combined with hospital admission records were collected to determine (a) instances where a telemedicine-facilitated discharge occurred and (b) if the accepted measure of short-term health outcomes (readmission within 28 days) was adversely affected by this alternative method. Telemedicine technology facilitated the discharge of 10.1% (n = 35) of patients considered unsuitable for CLD from the Hospital in the Home model during the trial period. Statistically insignificant differences in rates of readmission between patients discharged in person versus those participating in the telemedicine-supported model suggest that the clinical standards of the service have been maintained. The results of evaluating telemedicine support for nurses providing low-acuity in-home care indicate that patients may be discharged remotely while maintaining the existing clinical standards of the service.

  3. Velocity Model Analysis Based on Integrated Well and Seismic Data of East Java Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, Fathul; Widya, Aviandy; Eka Nurcahya, Budi; Nurul Mahmudah, Erma; Purwaman, Indro; Radityo, Aryo; Shirly, Agung; Nurwani, Citra

    2018-03-01

    Time to depth conversion is an important processof seismic interpretationtoidentify hydrocarbonprospectivity. Main objectives of this research are to minimize the risk of error in geometry and time to depth conversion. Since it’s using a large amount of data and had been doing in the large scale of research areas, this research can be classified as a regional scale research. The research was focused on three horizons time interpretation: Top Kujung I, Top Ngimbang and Basement which located in the offshore and onshore areas of east Java basin. These three horizons was selected because they were assumed to be equivalent to the rock formation, which is it has always been the main objective of oil and gas exploration in the East Java Basin. As additional value, there was no previous works on velocity modeling for regional scale using geological parameters in East Java basin. Lithology and interval thickness were identified as geological factors that effected the velocity distribution in East Java Basin. Therefore, a three layer geological model was generated, which was defined by the type of lithology; carbonate (layer 1: Top Kujung I), shale (layer 2: Top Ngimbang) and Basement. A statistical method using three horizons is able to predict the velocity distribution on sparse well data in a regional scale. The average velocity range for Top Kujung I is 400 m/s - 6000 m/s, Top Ngimbang is 500 m/s - 8200 m/s and Basement is 600 m/s - 8000 m/s. Some velocity anomalies found in Madura sub-basin area, caused by geological factor which identified as thick shale deposit and high density values on shale. Result of velocity and depth modeling analysis can be used to define the volume range deterministically and to make geological models to prospect generation in details by geological concept.

  4. CONSTRAINING THE NFW POTENTIAL WITH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXY VELOCITY FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Mihos, J. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    We model the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) potential to determine if, and under what conditions, the NFW halo appears consistent with the observed velocity fields of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We present mock DensePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) velocity fields and rotation curves of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric potentials that are well matched to the spatial resolution and velocity range of our sample galaxies. We find that the DensePak IFU can accurately reconstruct the velocity field produced by an axisymmetric NFW potential and that a tilted-ring fitting program can successfully recover the corresponding NFW rotation curve. We also find that nonaxisymmetric potentials with fixed axis ratios change only the normalization of the mock velocity fields and rotation curves and not their shape. The shape of the modeled NFW rotation curves does not reproduce the data: these potentials are unable to simultaneously bring the mock data at both small and large radii into agreement with observations. Indeed, to match the slow rise of LSB galaxy rotation curves, a specific viewing angle of the nonaxisymmetric potential is required. For each of the simulated LSB galaxies, the observer's line of sight must be along the minor axis of the potential, an arrangement that is inconsistent with a random distribution of halo orientations on the sky.

  5. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wágner, Dorottya S; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter; Dechesne, Arnaud; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient and compression settling velocity functions were estimated by carrying out biweekly batch settling tests using a novel column setup through a four-month long measurement campaign. To estimate viscosity model parameters, rheological experiments were carried out on the same sludge sample using a rotational viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through altering the hindered settling velocity and yield stress parameter. Strikingly, this is not the case for Chloroflexi, occurring in more than double the abundance of M. parvicella, and forming filaments primarily protruding from the flocs. The transient and compression settling parameters show a comparably high variability, and no significant association with filamentous abundance. A two-dimensional, axi-symmetrical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to assess calibration scenarios to model filamentous bulking. Our results suggest that model predictions can significantly benefit from explicitly accounting for filamentous bulking by calibrating the hindered settling velocity function. Furthermore, accounting for the transient and compression settling velocity in the computational domain is crucial to improve model accuracy when modelling filamentous bulking. However, the case-specific calibration of transient and compression settling parameters as well as yield stress is not necessary, and an average parameter set - obtained under bulking and good settling

  6. On the assimilation of ice velocity and concentration data into large-scale sea ice models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dulière

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Data assimilation into sea ice models designed for climate studies has started about 15 years ago. In most of the studies conducted so far, it is assumed that the improvement brought by the assimilation is straightforward. However, some studies suggest this might not be true. In order to elucidate this question and to find an appropriate way to further assimilate sea ice concentration and velocity observations into a global sea ice-ocean model, we analyze here results from a number of twin experiments (i.e. experiments in which the assimilated data are model outputs carried out with a simplified model of the Arctic sea ice pack. Our objective is to determine to what degree the assimilation of ice velocity and/or concentration data improves the global performance of the model and, more specifically, reduces the error in the computed ice thickness. A simple optimal interpolation scheme is used, and outputs from a control run and from perturbed experiments without and with data assimilation are thoroughly compared. Our results indicate that, under certain conditions depending on the assimilation weights and the type of model error, the assimilation of ice velocity data enhances the model performance. The assimilation of ice concentration data can also help in improving the model behavior, but it has to be handled with care because of the strong connection between ice concentration and ice thickness. This study is first step towards real data assimilation into NEMO-LIM, a global sea ice-ocean model.

  7. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: I. Model and velocity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J [Cardiovascular Research Group Physics, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351 (Australia); Buick, J M [Department of Mechanical and Design Engineering, University of Portsmouth, Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-21

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool in the investigation of human blood flow and arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is known that near wall velocity and shear are important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper results for a simulation of blood flow in a three-dimensional carotid artery geometry using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented. The velocity fields in the body of the fluid are analysed at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. It is found that the three-dimensional model agrees well with previous literature results for carotid artery flow. Regions of low near wall velocity and circulatory flow are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery, which are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  8. Three-dimensional modelling of the human carotid artery using the lattice Boltzmann method: I. Model and velocity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, J; Buick, J M

    2008-01-01

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool in the investigation of human blood flow and arterial diseases such as atherosclerosis. It is known that near wall velocity and shear are important in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis. In this paper results for a simulation of blood flow in a three-dimensional carotid artery geometry using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented. The velocity fields in the body of the fluid are analysed at six times of interest during a physiologically accurate velocity waveform. It is found that the three-dimensional model agrees well with previous literature results for carotid artery flow. Regions of low near wall velocity and circulatory flow are observed near the outer wall of the bifurcation and in the lower regions of the external carotid artery, which are regions that are typically prone to atherosclerosis.

  9. Car-following model with relative-velocity effect and its experimental verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Daisuke; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishi, Ryosuke; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2011-04-01

    In driving a vehicle, drivers respond to the changes of both the headway and the relative velocity to the vehicle in front. In this paper a new car-following model including these maneuvers is proposed. The acceleration of the model becomes infinite (has a singularity) when the distance between two vehicles is zero, and the asymmetry between the acceleration and the deceleration is incorporated in a nonlinear way. The model is simple but contains enough features of driving for reproducing real vehicle traffic. From the linear stability analysis, we confirm that the model shows the metastable homogeneous flow around the critical density, beyond which a traffic jam emerges. Moreover, we perform experiments to verify this model. From the data it is shown that the acceleration of a vehicle has a positive correlation with the relative velocity.

  10. Ab initio calculation of the sound velocity of dense hydrogen: implications for models of Jupiter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1995-01-01

    First-principles molecular dynamics simulations were used to calculate the sound velocity of dense hydrogen, and the results were compared with extrapolations of experimental data that currently conflict with either astrophysical models or data obtained from recent global oscillation measurements of

  11. Inertialess Velocity Change and a Two Particle Model of the Photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Spencer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Building on the idea presented earlier that the gravitational fields outside of basic particles are those particles’ inertia and that acceleration results only from inertial field imbalances, inertialess velocity changes may result when motivation for motion arises from within basic particles. A two particle model of the photon shows how this might work

  12. Modeling the Coupled Effects of Pore Space Geometry and Velocity on Colloid Transport and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has demonstrated that pore space geometry and hydrodynamics can play an important role in colloid retention under unfavorable attachment conditions. Computer models that only consider the average pore-water velocity and a single attachment rate coefficient a...

  13. Analytical models for predicting the ion velocity distributions in JET in the presence of ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.; Eriksson, L.G.; Lisak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The present report summarizes the work performed within the contract JT4/9008, the aim of which is to derive analytical models for ion velocity distributions resulting from ICRF heating on JET. The work has been performed over a two-year-period ending in August 1986 and has involved a total effort of 2.4 man years. (author)

  14. Mass discharge estimation from contaminated sites: Multi-model solutions for assessment of conceptual uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, N. I.; Troldborg, M.; McKnight, U. S.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-04-01

    Mass discharge estimates are increasingly being used in the management of contaminated sites. Such estimates have proven useful for supporting decisions related to the prioritization of contaminated sites in a groundwater catchment. Potential management options can be categorised as follows: (1) leave as is, (2) clean up, or (3) further investigation needed. However, mass discharge estimates are often very uncertain, which may hamper the management decisions. If option 1 is incorrectly chosen soil and water quality will decrease, threatening or destroying drinking water resources. The risk of choosing option 2 is to spend money on remediating a site that does not pose a problem. Choosing option 3 will often be safest, but may not be the optimal economic solution. Quantification of the uncertainty in mass discharge estimates can therefore greatly improve the foundation for selecting the appropriate management option. The uncertainty of mass discharge estimates depends greatly on the extent of the site characterization. A good approach for uncertainty estimation will be flexible with respect to the investigation level, and account for both parameter and conceptual model uncertainty. We propose a method for quantifying the uncertainty of dynamic mass discharge estimates from contaminant point sources on the local scale. The method considers both parameter and conceptual uncertainty through a multi-model approach. The multi-model approach evaluates multiple conceptual models for the same site. The different conceptual models consider different source characterizations and hydrogeological descriptions. The idea is to include a set of essentially different conceptual models where each model is believed to be realistic representation of the given site, based on the current level of information. Parameter uncertainty is quantified using Monte Carlo simulations. For each conceptual model we calculate a transient mass discharge estimate with uncertainty bounds resulting from

  15. Comparison of data-driven Takagi Sugeno models of rainfall discharge dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernieuwe, Hilde; Georgieva, Olga; De Baets, Bernard; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; De Troch, François P.

    2005-02-01

    Over the last decades, several data-driven techniques have been applied to model the rainfall-discharge dynamics of catchments. Among these techniques are fuzzy rule-based models, which attempt to describe the catchment response to rainfall input through fuzzy relationships. In this paper, we demonstrate three different methods for constructing fuzzy rule-based models of the Takagi-Sugeno type relating rainfall to catchment discharge. They correspond to the grid partitioning, subtractive clustering, and Gustafson-Kessel (GK) clustering identification methods. The data set used to parametrize and validate the models consists of hourly precipitation and discharge records. The models are parametrized using a 1-year identification data set and are then applied to a 4-year data set. Although the models show a similar performance, the best results are obtained for the GK method. A real-time flood forecasting algorithm is then developed, in which discharge measurements are assimilated into the model at either an hourly or a daily time step. The results suggest that the GK method can potentially be used as an operational flood forecasting tool with a low computational cost.

  16. Regional regression models of watershed suspended-sediment discharge for the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, David C.; Vogel, Richard M.; Schwarz, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of mean annual watershed sediment discharge, derived from long-term measurements of suspended-sediment concentration and streamflow, often are not available at locations of interest. The goal of this study was to develop multivariate regression models to enable prediction of mean annual suspended-sediment discharge from available basin characteristics useful for most ungaged river locations in the eastern United States. The models are based on long-term mean sediment discharge estimates and explanatory variables obtained from a combined dataset of 1201 US Geological Survey (USGS) stations derived from a SPAtially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) study and the Geospatial Attributes of Gages for Evaluating Streamflow (GAGES) database. The resulting regional regression models summarized for major US water resources regions 1–8, exhibited prediction R2 values ranging from 76.9% to 92.7% and corresponding average model prediction errors ranging from 56.5% to 124.3%. Results from cross-validation experiments suggest that a majority of the models will perform similarly to calibration runs. The 36-parameter regional regression models also outperformed a 16-parameter national SPARROW model of suspended-sediment discharge and indicate that mean annual sediment loads in the eastern United States generally correlates with a combination of basin area, land use patterns, seasonal precipitation, soil composition, hydrologic modification, and to a lesser extent, topography.

  17. Traffic jam and discontinuity induced by slowdown in two-stage optimal-velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Nagai, Ryoichi; Nagatani, Takashi

    2006-10-01

    We study the traffic states and jams induced by a slowdown of vehicles in a single-lane highway. The two-stage optimal velocity model is used in which the optimal velocity function has two turning points. The fundamental (flow-density) diagrams are calculated. At low density, the flow (current) increases linearly with density, while it saturates at some values of intermediate density. When the flow saturates, the discontinuous front (stationary shock wave) appears before or within the section of slowdown. The values of saturated flow are determined by the extreme values of theoretical current curves. The relationship between the densities is derived before and after the discontinuity.

  18. 3D Crustal Velocity Structure Model of the Middle-eastern North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Y.; Wang, F.; Lin, J.; Wei, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Lithosphere thinning and destruction in the middle-eastern North China Craton (NCC), a region susceptible to strong earthquakes, is one of the research hotspots in solid earth science. Up to 42 wide-angle reflection/refraction deep seismic sounding (DSS) profiles have been completed in the middle-eastern NCC, we collect all the 2D profiling results and perform gridding of the velocity and interface depth data, and build a 3D crustal velocity structure model for the middle-eastern NCC, named HBCrust1.0, using the Kriging interpolation method. In this model, four layers are divided by three interfaces: G is the interface between the sedimentary cover and crystalline crust, with velocities of 5.0-5.5 km/s above and 5.8-6.0 km/s below. C is the interface of the upper and lower crust, with velocity jump from 6.2-6.4 km/s to 6.5-6.6 km/s. M is the interface between the crust and upper mantle, with velocity 6.7-7.0 km/s at the crust bottom and 7.9-8.0 km/s on mantle top. Our results show that the first arrival time calculated from HBCust1.0 fit well with the observation. It also demonstrates that the upper crust is the main seismogenic layer, and the brittle-ductile transition occurs at depths near interface C. The depth of interface Moho varies beneath the source area of the Tangshan earth-quake, and a low-velocity structure is found to extend from the source area to the lower crust. Based on these observations, it can be inferred that stress accumulation responsible for the Tangshan earthquake may have been closely related to the migration and deformation of the mantle materials. Comparisons of the average velocities of the whole crust, the upper and the lower crust show that the average velocity of the lower crust under the central part of the North China Basin (NCB) in the east of the craton is obviously higher than the regional average, this high-velocity probably results from longterm underplating of the mantle magma. This research is founded by the Natural Science

  19. Characterization and modeling of 2D-glass micro-machining by spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) with constant velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didar, Tohid Fatanat; Dolatabadi, Ali; Wüthrich, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    Spark-assisted chemical engraving (SACE) is an unconventional micro-machining technology based on electrochemical discharge used for micro-machining nonconductive materials. SACE 2D micro-machining with constant speed was used to machine micro-channels in glass. Parameters affecting the quality and geometry of the micro-channels machined by SACE technology with constant velocity were presented and the effect of each of the parameters was assessed. The effect of chemical etching on the geometry of micro-channels under different machining conditions has been studied, and a model is proposed for characterization of the micro-channels as a function of machining voltage and applied speed

  20. Modeling Tool to Quantify Metal Sources in Stormwater Discharges at Naval Facilities (NESDI Project 455)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    demonstration/validation project to assess the use of the urban stormwater model Windows Source Loading and Management Model (WinSLAMM) to characterize...the urban stormwater model Windows Source Loading and Management Model (WinSlamm) to characterize sources of copper and zinc in storm runoff at Navy...are ubiquitous contaminants found in stormwater discharges in urban and industrialized areas. These contaminants originate from a variety of sources

  1. Chemical kinetics with electrical and gas dynamics modelization for NOx removal in an air corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichwald, O.; Guntoro, N.A.; Yousfi, M.; Benhenni, M.

    2002-01-01

    A non-stationary reactive gas dynamics model in a mono-dimensional geometry, including radial mass diffusion, gas temperature variation and chemical kinetics, is developed in this paper. The aim is to analyse the spatio-temporal evolution of the main neutral species involved in a corona discharge used for NO pollution control in polluted air at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. The present reactive gas dynamics model takes into account 16 neutral chemical species (including certain metastable species) reacting following 110 selected chemical reactions. The initial concentration of each neutral species is obtained from a 1.5D electrical discharge model. The gas temperature variations are due to direct Joule heating during the discharge phase, and also result from the delayed heating due to the relaxation of the vibrational energy into a random thermal energy during the post-discharge phase. The simulation conditions are those of an existing experimental setup (anode voltage of 10 kV in the case of a point to plane geometry with an interelectrode distance of 10 mm). The obtained results show that the diffusion phenomena and the gas temperature rise affect quite well the gas reactivity and the neutral species evolution. This allows us to better understand the different reaction processes and transport phenomena affecting the NO concentration magnitude inside the discharge channel. (author)

  2. A New Open-Loop Fiber Optic Gyro Error Compensation Method Based on Angular Velocity Error Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanshun; Guo, Yajing; Li, Chunyu; Wang, Yixin; Wang, Zhanqing

    2015-01-01

    With the open-loop fiber optic gyro (OFOG) model, output voltage and angular velocity can effectively compensate OFOG errors. However, the model cannot reflect the characteristics of OFOG errors well when it comes to pretty large dynamic angular velocities. This paper puts forward a modeling scheme with OFOG output voltage  and temperature  as the input variables and angular velocity error  as the output variable. Firstly, the angular ve...

  3. Angular velocity estimation based on star vector with improved current statistical model Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, He

    2016-11-20

    Angular velocity information is a requisite for a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control system. In this paper, an approach for angular velocity estimation based merely on star vector measurement with an improved current statistical model Kalman filter is proposed. High-precision angular velocity estimation can be achieved under dynamic conditions. The amount of calculation is also reduced compared to a Kalman filter. Different trajectories are simulated to test this approach, and experiments with real starry sky observation are implemented for further confirmation. The estimation accuracy is proved to be better than 10-4  rad/s under various conditions. Both the simulation and the experiment demonstrate that the described approach is effective and shows an excellent performance under both static and dynamic conditions.

  4. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumo, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy

    1997-12-31

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors. 45 refs. The thesis includes also five previous publications by author.

  5. Modelling of two-phase flow based on separation of the flow according to velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumo, T.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development work of a physical one-dimensional two-fluid model that is based on Separation of the Flow According to Velocity (SFAV). The conventional way to model one-dimensional two-phase flow is to derive conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy over the regions occupied by the phases. In the SFAV approach, the two-phase mixture is divided into two subflows, with as distinct average velocities as possible, and momentum conservation equations are derived over their domains. Mass and energy conservation are treated equally with the conventional model because they are distributed very accurately according to the phases, but momentum fluctuations follow better the flow velocity. Submodels for non-uniform transverse profile of velocity and density, slip between the phases within each subflow and turbulence between the subflows have been derived. The model system is hyperbolic in any sensible flow conditions over the whole range of void fraction. Thus, it can be solved with accurate numerical methods utilizing the characteristics. The characteristics agree well with the used experimental data on two-phase flow wave phenomena Furthermore, the characteristics of the SFAV model are as well in accordance with their physical counterparts as of the best virtual-mass models that are typically optimized for special flow regimes like bubbly flow. The SFAV model has proved to be applicable in describing two-phase flow physically correctly because both the dynamics and steady-state behaviour of the model has been considered and found to agree well with experimental data This makes the SFAV model especially suitable for the calculation of fast transients, taking place in versatile form e.g. in nuclear reactors

  6. Numerical Material Model for Composite Laminates in High-Velocity Impact Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Abstract A numerical material model for composite laminate, was developed and integrated into the nonlinear dynamic explicit finite element programs as a material user subroutine. This model coupling nonlinear state of equation (EOS, was a macro-mechanics model, which was used to simulate the major mechanical behaviors of composite laminate under high-velocity impact conditions. The basic theoretical framework of the developed material model was introduced. An inverse flyer plate simulation was conducted, which demonstrated the advantage of the developed model in characterizing the nonlinear shock response. The developed model and its implementation were validated through a classic ballistic impact issue, i.e. projectile impacting on Kevlar29/Phenolic laminate. The failure modes and ballistic limit velocity were analyzed, and a good agreement was achieved when comparing with the analytical and experimental results. The computational capacity of this model, for Kevlar/Epoxy laminates with different architectures, i.e. plain-woven and cross-plied laminates, was further evaluated and the residual velocity curves and damage cone were accurately predicted.

  7. Minimum 1D P wave velocity model for the Cordillera Volcanica de Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araya, Maria C.; Linkimer, Lepolt; Taylor, Waldo

    2016-01-01

    A minimum velocity model is derived from 475 local earthquakes registered by the Observatorio Vulcanologico y Sismologico Arenal Miravalles (OSIVAM) for the Cordillera Volcanica de Guanacaste, between January 2006 and July 2014. The model has consisted of six layers from the surface up to 80 km the depth. The model has presented speeds varying between 3,96 and 7,79 km/s. The corrections obtained from the seismic stations have varied between -0,28 to 0,45, and they have shown a trend of positive values on the volcanic arc and negative on the forearc, in concordance with the crustal thickness. The relocation of earthquakes have presented three main groups of epicenters that could be associated with activity in inferred failures. The minimum ID velocity model has provided a simplified idea of the crustal structure and aims to contribute with the improvement of the routine location of earthquakes performed by OSIVAM. (author) [es

  8. Jenkins Model Based Ferrofluid Lubrication of a Curved Rough Annular Squeeze Film with Slip Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the combined effect of roughness and slip velocity on the performance of a Jenkins model based ferrofluid squeeze film in curved annular plates. Beavers and Joseph’s slip model has been adopted to incorporate the effect of slip velocity. The stochastic model of Christensen and Tonder has been deployed to evaluate the effect of surface roughness. The associated stochastically averaged Reynolds type equation is solved to derive the pressure distribution, leading to the calculation of load carrying capacity. The graphical representation makes it clear that although, the effect of transverse surface roughness is adverse in general, Jenkins model based ferrofluid lubrication provides some measures in mitigating the adverse effect and this becomes more manifest when the slip parameter is reduced and negatively skewed roughness occurs. Of course, a judicious choice of curvature parameters and variance (-ve add to this positive effect.

  9. Characterising and modelling groundwater discharge in anagricultural wetland on the French Atlantic coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ph. Weng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Interaction between a wetland and its surrounding aquifer was studied in the Rochefort agricultural marsh (150 km2. Groundwater discharge in the marsh was measured with a network of nested piezometers. Hydrological modelling of the wetland showed that a water volume of 770,000 m3 yr–1 is discharging into the marsh, but that this water flux essentially takes place along the lateral borders of the wetland. However, this natural discharge volume represents only 20% of the artificial freshwater injected each year into the wetland to maintain the water level close to the soil surface. Understanding and quantifying the groundwater component in wetland hydrology is crucial for wetland management and conservation. Keywords: wetland, hydrology, groundwater, modelling, marsh

  10. Development of a State-Wide 3-D Seismic Tomography Velocity Model for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, C. H.; Lin, G.; Zhang, H.; Hauksson, E.; Shearer, P.; Waldhauser, F.; Hardebeck, J.; Brocher, T.

    2007-12-01

    We report on progress towards the development of a state-wide tomographic model of the P-wave velocity for the crust and uppermost mantle of California. The dataset combines first arrival times from earthquakes and quarry blasts recorded on regional network stations and travel times of first arrivals from explosions and airguns recorded on profile receivers and network stations. The principal active-source datasets are Geysers-San Pablo Bay, Imperial Valley, Livermore, W. Mojave, Gilroy-Coyote Lake, Shasta region, Great Valley, Morro Bay, Mono Craters-Long Valley, PACE, S. Sierras, LARSE 1 and 2, Loma Prieta, BASIX, San Francisco Peninsula and Parkfield. Our beta-version model is coarse (uniform 30 km horizontal and variable vertical gridding) but is able to image the principal features in previous separate regional models for northern and southern California, such as the high-velocity subducting Gorda Plate, upper to middle crustal velocity highs beneath the Sierra Nevada and much of the Coast Ranges, the deep low-velocity basins of the Great Valley, Ventura, and Los Angeles, and a high- velocity body in the lower crust underlying the Great Valley. The new state-wide model has improved areal coverage compared to the previous models, and extends to greater depth due to the data at large epicentral distances. We plan a series of steps to improve the model. We are enlarging and calibrating the active-source dataset as we obtain additional picks from investigators and perform quality control analyses on the existing and new picks. We will also be adding data from more quarry blasts, mainly in northern California, following an identification and calibration procedure similar to Lin et al. (2006). Composite event construction (Lin et al., in press) will be carried out for northern California for use in conventional tomography. A major contribution of the state-wide model is the identification of earthquakes yielding arrival times at both the Northern California Seismic

  11. Modelling the landslide area and sediment discharge in landslide-dominated region, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Tse-Yang; Huang, -Chuan, Jr.; Lee, Tsung-Yu; Chen, Yi-Chin; Jan, Ming-Young; Liu, Cheng-Chien

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have indicated the magnified increase of rainfall intensification, landsliding and subsequent sediment discharge due to the global warming effect. However, a few works synthesized the "chain reaction" from rainfall, landsliding to sediment discharge at the same time because of the limited observations of landslide area and sediment discharge during episodes. Besides, the sediment transport strongly depends on the sediment supply and stream power which interact conditionally. In this study, our goal is to build a model that can simulate time-series landslide area and subsequent sediment discharge. The synthesized model would be applied onto Tsengwen Reservoir watershed in southern Taiwan, where lots of landslides occur every year. Unlike other studies, our landslide model considers not only rainfall effect but also previous landslide status, which may be applied to landslide-dominated regions and explains the irrelevant relationship between typhoon rainfall and landslide area. Furthermore, our sediment transport model considers the sediment budget which couples transport- and supply-limited of sediment. The result shows that the simulated time-series landslide area and the sediment transport agree with the observation and the R2 are 0.88 and 0.56, respectively. Reactivated ratio of previous landslide area is 72.7% which indicates the high reoccurrence of historical landslide in landslide-dominated regions. We divided nine historical typhoons into three periods to demonstrate the effect of sediment supply/supply-limited condition upon sediment transport. For instance, the rainfall is smaller in period 3 than in period 1 but the sediment transport is higher in period 3 due to the catastrophic landslide (typhoon Morakot) during period 2. We argue that quantifying sediment transport should couple not only with water discharge but sediment budget, which is rarely considered in calculating sediment transport. Moreover, the parameterization of the controlling

  12. A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model was proposed in this study to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining (EDM). The temperature distribution of workpiece materials was included, and the crater formation process was explained from the perspective of hydrodynamic characteristics of the molten region. To better track the morphology of the crater and the movement of debris, the level-set method was introduced in this study. Simulation results showed that the crater appears shortly after the ignition of the discharge, and the molten material is removed by vaporizing in the initial stage, then by splashing at the following time. The driving force for the detachment of debris in the splashing removal stage comes from the extremely large pressure difference in the upper part of the molten region, and the morphology of the crater is also influenced by the shearing flow of molten material. It was found that the removal ratio of molten material is only about 7.63% under the studied conditions, leaving most to form the re-solidification layer on the surface of the crater. The size of the crater reaches the maximum at the end of discharge duration then experiences a slight reduction because of the reflux of molten material after the discharge. The results of single pulse discharge experiments showed that the morphologies and sizes between the simulation crater and actual crater are good at agreement, verifying the feasibility of the proposed thermo-hydraulic coupling model in explaining the mechanisms of crater formation in EDM.

  13. Depth-integrated modelling on onshore and offshore sandbar migration: Revision of fall velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Hong; Sanchez-Arcilla, Agustin; Caceres, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of morphodynamic modelling and analysis of onshore and offshore sandbar migration based on a depth-integrated approach. The coastal flow was modeled using the Boussinesq equation and the morphological evolution was modeled using the suspended sediment transport equation and bed load formulae based on the instantaneous velocity and acceleration. The proposed model was applied to the accretive and erosive conditions and the model reproduced the onshore and offshore sandbar migration and the formation of a berm around the shoreline reasonably. An analysis of the computed results revealed the following. (i) The vertical flow velocity can affect the suspension time of the sediments considerably and the bottom evolution. (ii) The suspended load is the main contributor to the morphological changes in terms of the quantity and quality, regardless of the accretive or erosive conditions. (iii) Regardless of accretive or erosive conditions, in terms of the time-average, the instantaneous flow velocity and acceleration-based bed load models always yielded an offshore and onshore direction sediment flux, respectively, except in the swash zone. On the other hand, the suspended sediment flux calculated by the advection-diffusion equation results in the sediment transport in either direction depending on the flow field.

  14. Computational modeling of dissipation and regeneration of fluvial sand dunes under variable discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, M.; Kimura, I.; Hsu, S. M.; Giri, S.; Shimizu, Y.

    2015-07-01

    It is observed, during flood events, that bed forms initially grow in height and make the riverbed rougher. But later, under high discharge, the bed forms grow longer with the opposite effect of making the riverbed smoother. After the discharge drops to a lower value, new bed forms regenerate on top of the elongated bed forms. This mechanism leads to a significant variation in the bed roughness and the water stage and hence determines the behavior of floods and the risk of flood disasters. This work presents detailed modeling of bed forms under discharge hydrographs and simulates the conditions under which the bed is flattened out in the upper plane bed regime. The flow was simulated by large-eddy simulation, and the sediments were considered as rigid spheres and modeled in a Lagrangian framework. The bed morphodynamics were the result of entrainment and deposition of sediment particles. We examined several discharge hydrographs. In the first case, we increased the discharge linearly and then kept it constant after reaching the upper plane bed condition. The dunes were generated and grew during the rising stage of discharge. When the flow conditions reached the upper plane bed regime, high-frequency ripples were generated and helped to flatten the bed. The results also showed that in contrast with mechanisms in the dune regime, the flattening of the bed was associated with a distinct pattern of sediment transport which deposited sediment mainly in the lee side of the dunes and led to flattening of the bed. After flattening, the sediments were mainly transported in suspension mode. As long as flow conditions stayed in the upper plane bed regime, the bed remained flat with small high-frequency ripples. We also examined two other scenarios: one with an immediate falling stage of discharge after the rising stage and the other with a period of constant discharge between the rising and falling stages. Dunes were regenerated during the falling stage of discharge for both

  15. Three-dimensional S-wave velocity model of the Bohemian Massif from Bayesian ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentová, Lubica; Gallovič, František; Maierová, Petra

    2017-10-01

    We perform two-step surface wave tomography of phase-velocity dispersion curves obtained by ambient noise cross-correlations in the Bohemian Massif. In the first step, the inter-station dispersion curves were inverted for each period (ranging between 4 and 20 s) separately into phase-velocity maps using 2D adjoint method. In the second step, we perform Bayesian inversion of the set of the phase-velocity maps into an S-wave velocity model. To sample the posterior probability density function, the parallel tempering algorithm is employed providing over 1 million models. From the model samples, not only mean model but also its uncertainty is determined to appraise the reliable features. The model is correlated with known main geologic structures of the Bohemian Massif. The uppermost low-velocity anomalies are in agreement with thick sedimentary basins. In deeper parts (4-20 km), the S-wave velocity anomalies correspond, in general, to main tectonic domains of the Bohemian Massif. The exception is a stable low-velocity body in the middle of the high-velocity Moldanubian domain and high-velocity body resembling a promontory of the Moldanubian into the Teplá-Barrandian domain. The most pronounced (high-velocity) anomaly is located beneath the Eger Rift that is a part of a Tertiary rift system across Europe.

  16. An example of application of stochastic model to forecasting karst springs discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic Vakanjac, V.; Stevanovic, Z.; Milanovic, S.; Vasic, Lj.

    2012-04-01

    The groundwater resources in karst are one of the most significant sources of drinking water supply worldwide. The importance of karst is reflected in the ability of karst massifs to accumulate a certain quantity of water and subsequently release it through karst springs. Therefore, well developed karst could amortize the effects of huge and intensive rainfalls, i.e. these regions could largely reduce the impact of floods and preserve stored water for certain period of time. The extensive use of karst groundwater in water supply systems throughout many countries in SE Europe is due to the wide distribution of karstic areas, the abundant reserves, and its excellent quality. However, because of an unstable flow regime when only natural springflow is tapped, numerous problems arise during the recession period (summer-autumn). A mathematical model that simulates daily discharges of karst springs in the multiannual period was developed at the Department of Hydrogeology of the Faculty of Mining & Geology, Serbia. This model contains several independent levels. Each level performs a specific function, different by their mathematical structure and period of time discretization, with the same final goal to define daily discharge over a certain period. The model was conceived at 5 levels (modules) of different computing functions and purposes (Ristić, 2007): •level 1. - completing the series of available mean monthly discharge by MNC model •level 2. - determining the duration of an appropriate period for evaluation of elements of multiannual water balance of the karst aquifer - INTKR •level 3. - water budget of the karst aquifer - BILANS •level 4. - identifying parameters of transformation functions module - TRANSFUNK •level 5. - simulation of daily discharges for a multi annual period - SIMIST The model is applied on the Mlava Spring, at the northern margin of Beljanica Mt. which is the largest spring of Carpathian Arch in Eastern Serbia. The coefficient of

  17. An extended macro traffic flow model accounting for multiple optimal velocity functions with different probabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-08-01

    Due to the maximum velocity and safe headway distance of the different vehicles are not exactly the same, an extended macro model of traffic flow with the consideration of multiple optimal velocity functions with probabilities is proposed in this paper. By means of linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability condition considering multiple probabilities optimal velocity is obtained. The KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line through nonlinear analysis. The numerical simulations of influences of multiple maximum velocities and multiple safety distances on model's stability and traffic capacity are carried out. The cases of two different kinds of maximum speeds with same safe headway distance, two different types of safe headway distances with same maximum speed and two different max velocities and two different time-gaps are all explored by numerical simulations. First cases demonstrate that when the proportion of vehicles with a larger vmax increase, the traffic tends to unstable, which also means that jerk and brakes is not conducive to traffic stability and easier to result in stop and go phenomenon. Second cases show that when the proportion of vehicles with greater safety spacing increases, the traffic tends to be unstable, which also means that too cautious assumptions or weak driving skill is not conducive to traffic stability. Last cases indicate that increase of maximum speed is not conducive to traffic stability, while reduction of the safe headway distance is conducive to traffic stability. Numerical simulation manifests that the mixed driving and traffic diversion does not have effect on the traffic capacity when traffic density is low or heavy. Numerical results also show that mixed driving should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when the traffic density is lower, while the traffic diversion should be chosen to increase the traffic capacity when

  18. Models for assessing the relative phase velocity in a two-phase flow. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffrath, A.; Ringel, H.

    2000-06-01

    The knowledge of slip or drift flux in two phase flow is necessary for several technical processes (e.g. two phase pressure losses, heat and mass transfer in steam generators and condensers, dwell period in chemical reactors, moderation effectiveness of two phase coolant in BWR). In the following the most important models for two phase flow with different phase velocities (e.g. slip or drift models, analogy between pressure loss and steam quality, ε - ε models and models for the calculation of void distribution in reposing fluids) are classified, described and worked up for a further comparison with own experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    A spectral tensor model is presented for turbulent fluctuations of wind velocity components and temperature, assuming uniform vertical gradients in mean temperature and mean wind speed. The model is built upon rapid distortion theory (RDT) following studies by Mann and by Hanazaki and Hunt, using...... the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...

  20. Modeling spike-wave discharges by a complex network of neuronal oscillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medvedeva, T.M.; Sysoeva, M.V.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Sysoev, I.V.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The organization of neural networks and the mechanisms, which generate the highly stereotypical for absence epilepsy spike-wave discharges (SWDs) is heavily debated. Here we describe such a model which can both reproduce the characteristics of SWDs and dynamics of coupling between brain

  1. Modeling suspended sediment discharge from the Waipaoa River system, New Zealand : The last 3000 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kettner, A.J.; Gomez, B.; Syvitski, J.P.M.

    2007-01-01

    HydroTrend, a hydrologic-transport model, is used to simulate the water and suspended sediment discharge of the Waipaoa River system over the last 3 Kyr, a time period in which a well-documented sequence of natural events and anthropogenic activities that profoundly impacted drainage basin processes

  2. Cycle life versus depth of discharge update on modeling studies. [Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and cycle life vs. depth of discharge data for the following are presented: data as of three years ago; Air Force/Crane-Fuhr-Smithrick; Ken Fuhr's Data; Air Force/Crane Data; Eagle-Pitcher Data; Steve Schiffer's Data; John Smithrick's Data; temperature effects; and E-P, Yardney, and Hughes 26% Data. Other topics covered include the following: LeRC cycling tests of Yardney Space Station Cells; general statements; general observations; two different models of cycle life vs. depth of discharge; and other degradation modes.

  3. Modeling of high frequency atmospheric pressure Ar/H2/SiH4 glow discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Juan; Sun Jizhong; Wang Dezhen; Sang Chaofeng; Liu Liying

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model is applied to simulate high frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges. The results show that the plasma density and current density depend strongly on the excitation frequency. When the excitation frequency is below 13.56 MHz, the discharge operates in the α mode, and when the excitation frequency is above 13.56 MHz, the discharge operates in a γ-like mode. The densities of species including SiH 3 + , SiH 3 - , SiH 3 , SiH 2 , H, Ar + , Ar* and electron are enhanced with the frequency increasing from 6.78 to 27.12 MHz. Similar discharge mode transition was observed experimentally in radio frequency atmospheric pressure He glow discharges. The effects of excitation frequency on plasma characteristics and densities of precursors for μc-Si:H film are further discussed. This study reveals that an appropriate excitation frequency is important for the growth of μc-Si:H film.

  4. A global model of cylindrical and coaxial surface-wave discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaneci, Efe; Mitschker, Felix; Rudolph, Marcel; Szeremley, Daniel; Eremin, Denis; Awakowicz, Peter; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2017-06-01

    A volume-averaged global model is developed to investigate surface-wave discharges inside either cylindrical or coaxial structures. The neutral and ion wall flux is self-consistently estimated based on a simplified analytical description both for electropositive and electronegative plasmas. The simulation results are compared with experimental data from various discharge setups of either argon or oxygen, measured or obtained from the literature over a wide range of pressure and power, for a continuous and a pulse-modulated power input. A good agreement is observed between the simulations and the measurements. The contribution of the wall flux on the net loss rates is quantified for a variety of species in different discharge setups. A coaxial plasmaline is further investigated to reveal the detailed behaviour of plasma properties with respect to input power and pressure.

  5. Inlet and outlet boundary conditions for the discrete velocity direction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Qingjun; Lu, Guojing; Xu, Jianzhong

    2018-02-01

    The discrete velocity direction model is an approximate method to the Boltzmann equation, which is an optional kinetic method to microgas flow and heat transfer. In this paper, the treatment of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions for the model is proposed. In the computation strategy, the microscopic molecular speed distribution functions at inlet and outlet are indirectly determined by the macroscopic gas pressure, mass flux and temperature, which are all measurable parameters in microgas flow and heat transfer. The discrete velocity direction model with the pressure correction boundary conditions was applied into the plane Poiseuille flow in microscales and the calculations cover all flow regimes. The numerical results agree well with the data of the NS equation near the continuum regime and the date of linearized Boltzmann equation and the DSMC method in the transition regime and free molecular flow. The Knudsen paradox and the nonlinear pressure distributions have been accurately captured by the discrete velocity direction model with the present boundary conditions.

  6. A seismic waves velocity model for Gran Canaria Island from ambient noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jerez, Antonio; Almendros, Javier; Martínez-Arévalo, Carmen; de Lis Mancilla, Flor; Luzón, Francisco; Carmona, Enrique; Martín, Rosa; Sánchez, Nieves

    2014-05-01

    We have analysed continuous ambient seismic noise recorded by a temporary array in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain) in order to find a velocity model for the top few kilometers. The SISTEVOTENCAN-IGN seismic array consisted of five broadband stations surrounding a sixth central one placed close to Pico de las Nieves, at the center of the island. The array had a radius of 12-14 km, with interstation distances ranging from 10 to 27 km. This network was operative from December 2009 to November 2011. The Green's functions between the 15 pairs of stations have been estimated in the time domain by stacking cross-correlations of 60-s time windows for the whole recording period (~2 years). The effects of several processing adjustments such as 1-bit normalization and spectral whitening are discussed. We observe significant differences (mainly in amplitude) between causal and acausal parts of the estimated Green's functions, which can be associated to an uneven distribution of the seismic noise sources. The application of a phase-matched filter based on an average dispersion curve allowed the effective reduction of some spurious early arrivals and the selection of fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave pulses, making possible an automatic extraction of their group velocities. Then, Rayleigh-wave dispersion curves were retrieved for the set of paths by using frequency-time analysis (FTAN) as well as by following the procedure described by Herrin and Goforth (1977, BSSA) based on the iterative fitting of a phase-matched filter which optimally undisperses the signal. Reliable curves were obtained from 1 s to 6-7 s with group velocities ranging between 1.5 and 2.2 km/s. Some lateral variations in velocity have been detected in spite of the limited spatial coverage and path density, which substantially restricted the resolution. A mean S-wave velocity model has been inverted for this area down to ~3 km.

  7. Assessment of Climate Change Impact on River Discharge using Reduced Uncertainty Ensemble Modeling Framewor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Singh, R.; Mishra, A.; Chatterjee, C.

    2015-12-01

    A reduced uncertainty ensemble modeling framework is used to analyze the impact of changing climate on discharge variations in a sub-catchment of Mahanadi River Basin in India. An ensemble of five hydrological models, comprising of one distributed physically based and four lumped conceptual hydrological models, developed using weighted average method was chosen as the best-performing ensemble, based on categorical and temporal assessment of several ensembles developed using eight hydrological models and eight ensemble methods. The member models of the chosen ensemble were then used to simulate the river discharge over 2006 - 2050, using the projected climatic data of two regional climate models (RegCM4 and HadGEM3) under two emission scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5). The trend analysis of the ensemble discharge using Mann Kendall test shows that monthly peak discharge and mean monthly discharge are increasing in the first and last months of the monsoon season (June and September) and decreasing in the middle two months (July and August) in case of RCP 4.5. In case of RCP 8.5, however, the monthly peak discharge and mean monthly discharge show a decreasing trend in the starting two months (June - July) and an increasing trend in the last two months. The analysis of monthly proportion of annual yield shows that there is a persistent decrease in the percent yield after monsoon to the next monsoon in case of RCP 4.5, though the condition is less serious in case of RCP 8.5 due to alternate increasing and decreasing trend in various months. The annual yield, however, is found to be decreasing and increasing in case of RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5 respectively. We further quantified the rate of change using Sen's slope method followed by analysis of temporal change in dependable flow at different levels under both the emission scenarios, and found that dependable flow is increasing with atmospheric CO2 concentration level at almost all times of exceedance.

  8. A vorticity transport model to restore spatial gaps in velocity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Siavash; Shadden, Shawn

    2017-11-01

    Often measurements of velocity data do not have full spatial coverage in the probed domain or near boundaries. These gaps can be due to missing measurements or masked regions of corrupted data. These gaps confound interpretation, and are problematic when the data is used to compute Lagrangian or trajectory-based analyses. Various techniques have been proposed to overcome coverage limitations in velocity data such as unweighted least square fitting, empirical orthogonal function analysis, variational interpolation as well as boundary modal analysis. In this talk, we present a vorticity transport PDE to reconstruct regions of missing velocity vectors. The transport model involves both nonlinear anisotropic diffusion and advection. This approach is shown to preserve the main features of the flow even in cases of large gaps, and the reconstructed regions are continuous up to second order. We illustrate results for high-frequency radar (HFR) measurements of the ocean surface currents as this is a common application of limited coverage. We demonstrate that the error of the method is on the same order of the error of the original velocity data. In addition, we have developed a web-based gateway for data restoration, and we will demonstrate a practical application using available data. This work is supported by the NSF Grant No. 1520825.

  9. Modelling of the combustion velocity in UIT-85 on sustainable alternative gas fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenskaya, N. M.; Korneev, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    The flame propagation velocity is one of the determining parameters characterizing the intensity of combustion process in the cylinder of an engine with spark ignition. Strengthening of requirements for toxicity and efficiency of the ICE contributes to gradual transition to sustainable alternative fuels, which include the mixture of natural gas with hydrogen. Currently, studies of conditions and regularities of combustion of this fuel to improve efficiency of its application are carried out in many countries. Therefore, the work is devoted to modeling the average propagation velocities of natural gas flame front laced with hydrogen to 15% by weight of the fuel, and determining the possibility of assessing the heat release characteristics on the average velocities of the flame front propagation in the primary and secondary phases of combustion. Experimental studies, conducted the on single cylinder universal installation UIT-85, showed the presence of relationship of the heat release characteristics with the parameters of the flame front propagation. Based on the analysis of experimental data, the empirical dependences for determination of average velocities of flame front propagation in the first and main phases of combustion, taking into account the change in various parameters of engine operation with spark ignition, were obtained. The obtained results allow to determine the characteristics of heat dissipation and to assess the impact of addition of hydrogen to the natural gas combustion process, that is needed to identify ways of improvement of the combustion process efficiency, including when you change the throttling parameters.

  10. A New Open-Loop Fiber Optic Gyro Error Compensation Method Based on Angular Velocity Error Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanshun Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the open-loop fiber optic gyro (OFOG model, output voltage and angular velocity can effectively compensate OFOG errors. However, the model cannot reflect the characteristics of OFOG errors well when it comes to pretty large dynamic angular velocities. This paper puts forward a modeling scheme with OFOG output voltage  and temperature  as the input variables and angular velocity error  as the output variable. Firstly, the angular velocity error  is extracted from OFOG output signals, and then the output voltage , temperature  and angular velocity error  are used as the learning samples to train a Radial-Basis-Function (RBF neural network model. Then the nonlinear mapping model over T,  and  is established and thus  can be calculated automatically to compensate OFOG errors according to  and . The results of the experiments show that the established model can be used to compensate the nonlinear OFOG errors. The maximum, the minimum and the mean square error of OFOG angular velocity are decreased by ,  and  relative to their initial values, respectively. Compared with the direct modeling of gyro angular velocity, which we researched before, the experimental results of the compensating method proposed in this paper are further reduced by ,  and , respectively, so the performance of this method is better than that of the direct modeling for gyro angular velocity.

  11. A new open-loop fiber optic gyro error compensation method based on angular velocity error modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanshun; Guo, Yajing; Li, Chunyu; Wang, Yixin; Wang, Zhanqing

    2015-02-27

    With the open-loop fiber optic gyro (OFOG) model, output voltage and angular velocity can effectively compensate OFOG errors. However, the model cannot reflect the characteristics of OFOG errors well when it comes to pretty large dynamic angular velocities. This paper puts forward a modeling scheme with OFOG output voltage u and temperature T as the input variables and angular velocity error Δω as the output variable. Firstly, the angular velocity error Δω is extracted from OFOG output signals, and then the output voltage u, temperature T and angular velocity error Δω are used as the learning samples to train a Radial-Basis-Function (RBF) neural network model. Then the nonlinear mapping model over T, u and Δω is established and thus Δω can be calculated automatically to compensate OFOG errors according to T and u. The results of the experiments show that the established model can be used to compensate the nonlinear OFOG errors. The maximum, the minimum and the mean square error of OFOG angular velocity are decreased by 97.0%, 97.1% and 96.5% relative to their initial values, respectively. Compared with the direct modeling of gyro angular velocity, which we researched before, the experimental results of the compensating method proposed in this paper are further reduced by 1.6%, 1.4% and 1.42%, respectively, so the performance of this method is better than that of the direct modeling for gyro angular velocity.

  12. Quantitative explanation of circuit experiments and real traffic using the optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Macoto; Shibata, Akihiro; Sugiyama, Yuki; Tadaki, Shin-ichi; Yukawa, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the occurrence of a traffic jam is a dynamical phase transition (Tadaki et al 2013 New J. Phys. 15 103034, Sugiyama et al 2008 New J. Phys. 10 033001). In this study, we investigate whether the optimal velocity (OV) model can quantitatively explain the results of experiments. The occurrence and non-occurrence of jammed flow in our experiments agree with the predictions of the OV model. We also propose a scaling rule for the parameters of the model. Using this rule, we obtain critical density as a function of a single parameter. The obtained critical density is consistent with the observed values for highway traffic.

  13. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for stations of the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, M.; Malservisi, R.; Hugentobler, U.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that error models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is computationally expensive and is usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies, which allows for a reliable estimation of the velocity error. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Small differences may originate from non-normal distribution of the noise.

  14. Comparison of a hybrid model to a global model of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency capacitive discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzaroni, C; Lieberman, M A; Lichtenberg, A J; Chabert, P

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimensional hybrid analytical-numerical global model of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency (rf) driven capacitive discharges, previously developed, is compared with a basic global model. A helium feed gas with small admixtures of oxygen is studied. For the hybrid model, the electrical characteristics are calculated analytically as a current-driven homogeneous discharge. The electron power balance is solved analytically to determine a time-varying Maxwellian electron temperature, which oscillates on the rf timescale. Averaging over the rf period yields effective rate coefficients for gas phase activated processes. For the basic global model, the electron temperature is constant in time and the sheath physics is neglected. For both models, the particle balance relations for all species are integrated numerically to determine the equilibrium discharge parameters. Variations of discharge parameters with composition and rf power are determined and compared. The rate coefficients for electron-activated processes are strongly temperature dependent, leading to significantly larger neutral and charged particle densities for the hybrid model. For small devices, finite sheath widths limit the operating regimes to low O 2 fractions. This is captured by the hybrid model but cannot be predicted from the basic global model.

  15. The Three-Dimensional Velocity Distribution of Wide Gap Taylor-Couette Flow Modelled by CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shina Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is conducted for the flow between two concentric cylinders with a wide gap, relevant to bearing chamber applications. This wide gap configuration has received comparatively less attention than narrow gap journal bearing type geometries. The flow in the gap between an inner rotating cylinder and an outer stationary cylinder has been modelled as an incompressible flow using an implicit finite volume RANS scheme with the realisable k-ε model. The model flow is above the critical Taylor number at which axisymmetric counterrotating Taylor vortices are formed. The tangential velocity profiles at all axial locations are different from typical journal bearing applications, where the velocity profiles are quasilinear. The predicted results led to two significant findings of impact in rotating machinery operations. Firstly, the axial variation of the tangential velocity gradient induces an axially varying shear stress, resulting in local bands of enhanced work input to the working fluid. This is likely to cause unwanted heat transfer on the surface in high torque turbomachinery applications. Secondly, the radial inflow at the axial end-wall boundaries is likely to promote the transport of debris to the junction between the end-collar and the rotating cylinder, causing the build-up of fouling in the seal.

  16. Slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct-current glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseev, S. I.; Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the formulation of slow electron energy balance for hybrid models of direct current (DC) glow discharge. Electrons originating from non-local ionization (secondary) contribute significantly to the energy balance of slow electrons. An approach towards calculating effective energy brought by a secondary electron to the group of slow electrons by means of Coulomb collisions is suggested. The value of effective energy shows a considerable dependence on external parameters of a discharge, such as gas pressure, type, and geometric parameters. The slow electron energy balance was implemented into a simple hybrid model that uses analytical formulation for the description of non-local ionization by fast electrons. Simulations of short (without positive column) DC glow discharge in argon are carried out for a range of gas pressures. Comparison with experimental data showed generally good agreement in terms of current-voltage characteristics, electron density, and electron temperature. Simulations also capture the trend of increasing electron density with decreasing pressure observed in the experiment. Analysis shows that for considered conditions, the product of maximum electron density ne and electron temperature Te in negative glow is independent of gas pressure and depends on the gas type, cathode material, and discharge current. Decreasing gas pressure reduces the heating rate of slow electrons during Coulomb collisions with secondary electrons, which leads to lower values of Te and, in turn, higher maximum ne.

  17. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  18. Modeling of a Ne/Xe dielectric barrier discharge excilamp for improvement of VUV radiation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodja, K.; Belasri, A.; Loukil, H.

    2017-08-01

    This work is devoted to excimer lamp efficiency optimization by using a homogenous discharge model of a dielectric barrier discharge in a Ne-Xe mixture. The model includes the plasma chemistry, electrical circuit, and Boltzmann equation. In this paper, we are particularly interested in the electrical and kinetic properties and light output generated by the DBD. Xenon is chosen for its high luminescence in the range of vacuum UV radiation around 173 nm. Our study is motivated by interest in this type of discharge in many industrial applications, including the achievement of high light output lamps. In this work, we used an applied sinusoidal voltage, frequency, gas pressure, and concentration in the ranges of 2-8 kV, 10-200 kHz, 100-800 Torr, and 10-50%, respectively. The analyzed results concern the voltage V p across the gap, the dielectric voltage V d, the discharge current I, and the particles densities. We also investigated the effect of the electric parameters and xenon concentration on the lamp efficiency. This investigation will allow one to find out the appropriate parameters for Ne/Xe DBD excilamps to improve their efficiency.

  19. Sensitivity Modeling and Evaluation of Evapotranspiration Effects on Flow Discharge of River Owena in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O Idogho

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of discharges, precipitation and temperature and some other meteorological-hydrological variables from 1996-2011 at the section of Owena River Basin. The evaluation, correlations, and the relationship between precipitation and discharge time series indicate a strong relationship. Minimum discharge values of 0.8 m 3 /s and 1.2 m 3 /s were observed in January and December and these values correspond to rainfall depth of 1.4 mm and 8.2 mm respectively. The average annual rainfall, river discharge were computed as 1,306.7 mm, 1,165 m 3 /s and mean temperature and evaporation of 31.1 oC and 4.6 mm. Evapotranspiration computation using pan evaporation model overestimated the evapotranspiration values by 0.5 mm and 0.21 mm over IHACRES and CROPWAT model for the total period of 15-year. Integration of the simulation outputs would be veritable in creating realistic-robust water management system for domestic and agricultural applications.

  20. Evaluation of accuracy of linear regression models in predicting urban stormwater discharge characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarang, Krish J; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-06-01

    Stormwater runoff has been identified as a source of pollution for the environment, especially for receiving waters. In order to quantify and manage the impacts of stormwater runoff on the environment, predictive models and mathematical models have been developed. Predictive tools such as regression models have been widely used to predict stormwater discharge characteristics. Storm event characteristics, such as antecedent dry days (ADD), have been related to response variables, such as pollutant loads and concentrations. However it has been a controversial issue among many studies to consider ADD as an important variable in predicting stormwater discharge characteristics. In this study, we examined the accuracy of general linear regression models in predicting discharge characteristics of roadway runoff. A total of 17 storm events were monitored in two highway segments, located in Gwangju, Korea. Data from the monitoring were used to calibrate United States Environmental Protection Agency's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). The calibrated SWMM was simulated for 55 storm events, and the results of total suspended solid (TSS) discharge loads and event mean concentrations (EMC) were extracted. From these data, linear regression models were developed. R(2) and p-values of the regression of ADD for both TSS loads and EMCs were investigated. Results showed that pollutant loads were better predicted than pollutant EMC in the multiple regression models. Regression may not provide the true effect of site-specific characteristics, due to uncertainty in the data. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of grid resolution in fluid-model simulation of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Weizhuo; Fukagata, Koji

    2018-04-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation of a surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator, driven by a nanosecond voltage pulse, is conducted. A special focus is laid upon the influence of grid resolution on the computational result. It is found that the computational result is not very sensitive to the streamwise grid spacing, whereas the wall-normal grid spacing has a critical influence. In particular, the computed propagation velocity changes discontinuously around the wall-normal grid spacing about 2 μm due to a qualitative change of discharge structure. The present result suggests that a computational grid finer than that was used in most of previous studies is required to correctly capture the structure and dynamics of streamer: when a positive nanosecond voltage pulse is applied to the upper electrode, a streamer forms in the vicinity of upper electrode and propagates along the dielectric surface with a maximum propagation velocity of 2 × 108 cm/s, and a gap with low electron and ion density (i.e., plasma sheath) exists between the streamer and dielectric surface. Difference between the results obtained using the finer and the coarser grid is discussed in detail in terms of the electron transport at a position near the surface. When the finer grid is used, the low electron density near the surface is caused by the absence of ionization avalanche: in that region, the electrons generated by ionization is compensated by drift-diffusion flux. In contrast, when the coarser grid is used, underestimated drift-diffusion flux cannot compensate the electrons generated by ionization, and it leads to an incorrect increase of electron density.

  2. Assessment of earthquake locations in 3-D deterministic velocity models: A case study from the Altotiberina Near Fault Observatory (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, D.; Mirabella, F.; Chiaraluce, L.; Trippetta, F.; Lomax, A.

    2016-11-01

    The accuracy of earthquake locations and their correspondence with subsurface geology depends strongly on the accuracy of the available seismic velocity model. Most modern methods to construct a velocity model for earthquake location are based on the inversion of passive source seismological data. Another approach is the integration of high-resolution geological and geophysical data to construct deterministic velocity models in which earthquake locations can be directly correlated to the geological structures. Such models have to be kinematically consistent with independent seismological data in order to provide precise hypocenter solutions. We present the Altotiberina (AT) seismic model, a three-dimensional velocity model for the Upper Tiber Valley region (Northern Apennines, Italy), constructed by combining 300 km of seismic reflection profiles, six deep boreholes (down to 5 km depth), detailed data from geological surveys and direct measurements of P and S wave velocities performed in situ and in laboratory. We assess the robustness of the AT seismic model by locating 11,713 earthquakes with a nonlinear, global-search inversion method and comparing the probabilistic hypocenter solutions to those calculated in three previously published velocity models, constructed by inverting passive seismological data only. Our results demonstrate that the AT seismic model is able to provide higher-quality hypocenter locations than the previous velocity models. Earthquake locations are consistent with the subsurface geological structures and show a high degree of spatial correlation with specific lithostratigraphic units, suggesting a lithological control on the seismic activity evolution.

  3. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanallah, K; Castellanos, A; Pontiga, F; Fernandez-Rueda, A

    2009-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  4. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanallah, K; Pontiga, F; Fernández-Rueda, A; Castellanos, A

    2009-03-01

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  5. A semi-analytical stationary model of a point-to-plane corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanallah, K; Pontiga, F

    2012-01-01

    A semi-analytical model of a dc corona discharge is formulated to determine the spatial distribution of charged particles (electrons, negative ions and positive ions) and the electric field in pure oxygen using a point-to-plane electrode system. A key point in the modeling is the integration of Gauss' law and the continuity equation of charged species along the electric field lines, and the use of Warburg's law and the corona current–voltage characteristics as input data in the boundary conditions. The electric field distribution predicted by the model is compared with the numerical solution obtained using a finite-element technique. The semi-analytical solutions are obtained at a negligible computational cost, and provide useful information to characterize and control the corona discharge in different technological applications. (paper)

  6. Experimental investigation and numerical modelling of positive corona discharge: ozone generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanallah, K; Castellanos, A [Departamento de Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Pontiga, F; Fernandez-Rueda, A [Departamento de FIsica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-03-21

    The spatial distribution of the species generated in a wire-cylinder positive corona discharge in pure oxygen has been computed using a plasma chemistry model that includes the most significant reactions between electrons, ions, atoms and molecules. The plasma chemistry model is included in the continuity equations of each species, which are coupled with Poisson's equation for the electric field and the energy conservation equation for the gas temperature. The current-voltage characteristic measured in the experiments has been used as an input data to the numerical simulation. The numerical model is able to reproduce the basic structure of the positive corona discharge and highlights the importance of Joule heating on ozone generation. The average ozone density has been computed as a function of current intensity and compared with the experimental measurements of ozone concentration determined by UV absorption spectroscopy.

  7. How position, velocity, and temporal information combine in the prospective control of catching: data and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessing, Joost C; Peper, C Lieke E; Bullock, Daniel; Beek, Peter J

    2005-04-01

    The cerebral cortex contains circuitry for continuously computing properties of the environment and one's body, as well as relations among those properties. The success of complex perceptuomotor performances requires integrated, simultaneous use of such relational information. Ball catching is a good example as it involves reaching and grasping of visually pursued objects that move relative to the catcher. Although integrated neural control of catching has received sparse attention in the neuroscience literature, behavioral observations have led to the identification of control principles that may be embodied in the involved neural circuits. Here, we report a catching experiment that refines those principles via a novel manipulation. Visual field motion was used to perturb velocity information about balls traveling on various trajectories relative to a seated catcher, with various initial hand positions. The experiment produced evidence for a continuous, prospective catching strategy, in which hand movements are planned based on gaze-centered ball velocity and ball position information. Such a strategy was implemented in a new neural model, which suggests how position, velocity, and temporal information streams combine to shape catching movements. The model accurately reproduces the main and interaction effects found in the behavioral experiment and provides an interpretation of recently observed target motion-related activity in the motor cortex during interceptive reaching by monkeys. It functionally interprets a broad range of neurobiological and behavioral data, and thus contributes to a unified theory of the neural control of reaching to stationary and moving targets.

  8. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29

    . Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well

  9. High-velocity two-phase flow two-dimensional modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathes, R.; Alemany, A.; Thilbault, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    The two-phase flow in the nozzle of a LMMHD (liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic) converter has been studied numerically and experimentally. A two-dimensional model for two-phase flow has been developed including the viscous terms (dragging and turbulence) and the interfacial mass, momentum and energy transfer between the phases. The numerical results were obtained by a finite volume method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. They have been verified by an experimental facility using air-water as a simulation pair and a phase Doppler particle analyzer for velocity and droplet size measurement. The numerical simulation of a lithium-cesium high-temperature pair showed that a nearly homogeneous and isothermal expansion of the two phases is possible with small pressure losses and high kinetic efficiencies. In the throat region a careful profiling is necessary to reduce the inertial effects on the liquid velocity field

  10. Coarse analysis of collective behaviors: Bifurcation analysis of the optimal velocity model for traffic jam formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yasunari; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2017-12-01

    We present a general method for analyzing macroscopic collective phenomena observed in many-body systems. For this purpose, we employ diffusion maps, which are one of the dimensionality-reduction techniques, and systematically define a few relevant coarse-grained variables for describing macroscopic phenomena. The time evolution of macroscopic behavior is described as a trajectory in the low-dimensional space constructed by these coarse variables. We apply this method to the analysis of the traffic model, called the optimal velocity model, and reveal a bifurcation structure, which features a transition to the emergence of a moving cluster as a traffic jam.

  11. Dry deposition models for radionuclides dispersed in air: a new approach for deposition velocity evaluation schema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.; Cervone, A.; De Rosa, F.; Lombardo, C.; Casamirra, M.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of a National Research Program funded by the Italian Minister of Economic Development, the Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models (DEIM) of Palermo University and ENEA Research Centre of Bologna, Italy are performing several research activities to study physical models and mathematical approaches aimed at investigating dry deposition mechanisms of radioactive pollutants. On the basis of such studies, a new approach to evaluate the dry deposition velocity for particles is proposed. Comparisons with some literature experimental data show that the proposed dry deposition scheme can capture the main phenomena involved in the dry deposition process successfully.

  12. Critique of the use of deposition velocity in modeling indoor air quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Weschler, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Among the potential fates of indoor air pollutants are a variety of physical and chemical interactions with indoor surfaces. In deterministic mathematical models of indoor air quality, these interactions are usually represented as a first-order loss process, with the loss rate coefficient given as the product of the surface-to-volume ratio of the room times a deposition velocity. In this paper, the validity of this representation of surface-loss mechanisms is critically evaluated. From a theoretical perspective, the idea of a deposition velocity is consistent with the following representation of an indoor air environment. Pollutants are well-mixed throughout a core region which is separated from room surfaces by boundary layers. Pollutants migrate through the boundary layers by a combination of diffusion (random motion resulting from collisions with surrounding gas molecules), advection (transport by net motion of the fluid), and, in some cases, other transport mechanisms. The rate of pollutant loss to a surface is governed by a combination of the rate of transport through the boundary layer and the rate of reaction at the surface. The deposition velocity expresses the pollutant flux density (mass or moles deposited per area per time) to the surface divided by the pollutant concentration in the core region. This concept has substantial value to the extent that the flux density is proportional to core concentration. Published results from experimental and modeling studies of fine particles, radon decay products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides are used as illustrations of both the strengths and weaknesses of deposition velocity as a parameter to indicate the rate of indoor air pollutant loss on surfaces. 66 refs., 5 tabs

  13. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  14. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardaya, P. D.; Noh, K. A. B. M.; Yusoff, W. I. B. W.; Ridha, S.; Nurhandoko, B. E. B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic wave

  15. Discharge and Nitrogen Transfer Modelling in the Berze River: A HYPE Setup and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veinbergs Arturs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on water quality and quantity modelling in the Berze River basin located in the Zemgale region of Latvia. The contributing basin area of 872 km2 is furthermore divided into 15 sub-basins designated according to the characteristics of hydrological network and water sampling programme. The river basin of interest is a spatially complex system with agricultural land and forests as two predominant land use types. Complexity of the system reflects in the discharge intensity and diffuse pollution of nitrogen compounds into the water bodies of the river basin. The presence of urban area has an impact as the load from the existing wastewater treatment plants consist up to 76 % of the total nitrogen load in the Berze River basin. Representative data sets of land cover, agricultural field data base for crop distribution analysis, estimation of crop management, soil type map, digital elevation model, drainage conditions, network of water bodies and point sources were used for the modelling procedures. The semi-distributed hydro chemical model HYPE has a setup to simulate discharge and nitrogen transfer. In order to make the model more robust and appropriate for the current study the data sets previously stated were classified by unifying similar spatially located polygons. The data layers were overlaid and 53 hydrological response units (SLCs were created. Agricultural land consists of 48 SLCs with the details of soils, drainage conditions, crop types, and land management practices. Manual calibration procedure was applied to improve the performance of discharge simulation. Simulated discharge values showed good agreement with the observed values with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.82 and bias of −6.6 %. Manual calibration of parameters related to nitrogen leakage simulation was applied to test the most sensitive parameters.

  16. Discharge and Nitrogen Transfer Modelling in the Berze River: A HYPE Setup and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinbergs, Arturs; Lagzdins, Ainis; Jansons, Viesturs; Abramenko, Kaspars; Sudars, Ritvars

    2017-05-01

    This study is focused on water quality and quantity modelling in the Berze River basin located in the Zemgale region of Latvia. The contributing basin area of 872 km2 is furthermore divided into 15 sub-basins designated according to the characteristics of hydrological network and water sampling programme. The river basin of interest is a spatially complex system with agricultural land and forests as two predominant land use types. Complexity of the system reflects in the discharge intensity and diffuse pollution of nitrogen compounds into the water bodies of the river basin. The presence of urban area has an impact as the load from the existing wastewater treatment plants consist up to 76 % of the total nitrogen load in the Berze River basin. Representative data sets of land cover, agricultural field data base for crop distribution analysis, estimation of crop management, soil type map, digital elevation model, drainage conditions, network of water bodies and point sources were used for the modelling procedures. The semi-distributed hydro chemical model HYPE has a setup to simulate discharge and nitrogen transfer. In order to make the model more robust and appropriate for the current study the data sets previously stated were classified by unifying similar spatially located polygons. The data layers were overlaid and 53 hydrological response units (SLCs) were created. Agricultural land consists of 48 SLCs with the details of soils, drainage conditions, crop types, and land management practices. Manual calibration procedure was applied to improve the performance of discharge simulation. Simulated discharge values showed good agreement with the observed values with the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.82 and bias of -6.6 %. Manual calibration of parameters related to nitrogen leakage simulation was applied to test the most sensitive parameters.

  17. River Discharge Estimation by Using Altimetry Data and Simplified Flood Routing Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Moramarco

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A methodology to estimate the discharge along rivers, even poorly gauged ones, taking advantage of water level measurements derived from satellite altimetry is proposed. The procedure is based on the application of the Rating Curve Model (RCM, a simple method allowing for the estimation of the flow conditions in a river section using only water levels recorded at that site and the discharges observed at another upstream section. The European Remote-Sensing Satellite 2, ERS-2, and the Environmental Satellite, ENVISAT, altimetry data are used to provide time series of water levels needed for the application of RCM. In order to evaluate the usefulness of the approach, the results are compared with the ones obtained by applying an empirical formula that allows discharge estimation from remotely sensed hydraulic information. To test the proposed procedure, the 236 km-reach of the Po River is investigated, for which five in situ stations and four satellite tracks are available. Results show that RCM is able to appropriately represent the discharge, and its performance is better than the empirical formula, although this latter does not require upstream hydrometric data. Given its simple formal structure, the proposed approach can be conveniently utilized in ungauged sites where only the survey of the cross-section is needed.

  18. Energy dissipation in plasma treated Nb and Secondary Electron Emission for modeling of multipactor discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samolov, Ana; Popovic, Svetozar; Vuskovic, Leposava; Basovic, Milos; Cuckov, Filip; Raitses, Yevgeny; Kaganovich, Igor

    2013-09-01

    Electron-induced Secondary Electron Emission (SEE) is important in many gas discharge applications such as Hall thrusters, surface and multipactor discharges. Often they present the inhibiting phenomena in designing and operating of these systems, examples being the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. The multipactor discharges depend on the resonant field configuration and on the SEE from the cavity surface. SEE is proportional to the energy dissipated by the primary electrons near the surface. Our analysis of energy spectra of secondary electrons indicates that the fraction of dissipated energy of primary electrons in solid reaches the maximum at the primary energies that produce the maximum yield. The better understanding of this mechanism is crucial for successful modeling of the multipactor discharge and design of vacuum electronic devices. We have developed an experimental set up to measure energy distribution of SEE from Nb coupons under different incident angles, since Nb is used for manufacturing of SRF accelerating cavities. Samples are placed in carousel target manifolds which are manipulated by robotic arm providing multiple degrees of freedom of a whole target system. Work supported by JSA/DOE contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  19. Thrust Force Analysis of Tripod Constant Velocity Joint Using Multibody Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Hideki; Matsunaga, Tsugiharu; Mizutani, Yoshiteru; Ando, Yosei; Kashiwagi, Isashi

    A tripod constant velocity joint is used in the driveshaft of front wheel drive vehicles. Thrust force generated by this joint causes lateral vibration in these vehicles. To analyze the thrust force, a detailed model is constructed based on a multibody dynamics approach. This model includes all principal parts of the joint defined as rigid bodies and all force elements of contact and friction acting among these parts. This model utilizes a new contact modeling method of needle roller bearings for more precise and faster computation. By comparing computational and experimental results, the appropriateness of this model is verified and the principal factors inducing the second and third rotating order components of the thrust force are clarified. This paper also describes the influence of skewed needle rollers on the thrust force and evaluates the contribution of friction forces at each contact region to the thrust force.

  20. Application of neural models as controllers in mobile robot velocity control loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerkala, Jakub; Jadlovska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an inverse neural models used as controllers in comparison to classical PI controllers for velocity tracking control task used in two-wheel, differentially driven mobile robot. The PI controller synthesis is based on linear approximation of actuators with equivalent load. In order to obtain relevant datasets for training of feed-forward multi-layer perceptron based neural network used as neural model, the mathematical model of mobile robot, that combines its kinematic and dynamic properties such as chassis dimensions, center of gravity offset, friction and actuator parameters is used. Neural models are trained off-line to act as an inverse dynamics of DC motors with particular load using data collected in simulation experiment for motor input voltage step changes within bounded operating area. The performances of PI controllers versus inverse neural models in mobile robot internal velocity control loops are demonstrated and compared in simulation experiment of navigation control task for line segment motion in plane.

  1. Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation in Magnetorhelogical fluids based on an effective density fluid model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetrohelogical fluids (MRFs represent a class of smart materials whose rheological properties change in response to the magnetic field, which resulting in the drastic change of the acoustic impedance. This paper presents an acoustic propagation model that approximates a fluid-saturated porous medium as a fluid with a bulk modulus and effective density (EDFM to study the acoustic propagation in the MRF materials under magnetic field. The effective density fluid model derived from the Biot’s theory. Some minor changes to the theory had to be applied, modeling both fluid-like and solid-like state of the MRF material. The attenuation and velocity variation of the MRF are numerical calculated. The calculated results show that for the MRF material the attenuation and velocity predicted with this effective density fluid model are close agreement with the previous predictions by Biot’s theory. We demonstrate that for the MRF material acoustic prediction the effective density fluid model is an accurate alternative to full Biot’s theory and is much simpler to implement.

  2. Electron Induced Discharge Modeling, Testing, and Analysis for Scatha. Volume I. Phenomenology Study and Model Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-12-31

    means, e.g., discharging a charged capacitor to 18 various points on a spacecraft or charging an insulation blanket until it arcs through or over (Ref...the upper copper foil bulged outward in the region of the punchthrough. Although this bulging could have been due to gas formed under the foil during...The capacitor arrangement chosen was developed in an attempt to provide sufficient capacitance for the discharge to give a detectable signal, with a

  3. Modeling study on the effects of pulse rise rate in atmospheric pulsed discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Wang, Yan-Hui

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we present a modeling study on the discharge characteristics driven by short pulsed voltages, focusing on the effects of pulse rise rate based on the fluid description of atmospheric plasmas. The numerical results show that the breakdown voltage of short pulsed discharge is almost linearly dependent on the pulse rise rate, which is also confirmed by the derived equations from the fluid model. In other words, if the pulse rise rate is fixed as a constant, the simulation results clearly suggest that the breakdown voltage is almost unchanged, although the amplitude of pulsed voltage increases significantly. The spatial distribution of the electric field and electron density are given to reveal the underpinning physics. Additionally, the computational data and the analytical expression also indicate that an increased repetition frequency can effectively decrease the breakdown voltage and current density, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  4. Discharge Fee Policy Analysis: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model of Water Resources and Water Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Guohua Fang; Ting Wang; Xinyi Si; Xin Wen; Yu Liu

    2016-01-01

    To alleviate increasingly serious water pollution and shortages in developing countries, various kinds of policies have been implemented by local governments. It is vital to quantify and evaluate the performance and potential economic impacts of these policies. This study develops a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model to simulate the regional economic and environmental effects of discharge fees. Firstly, water resources and water environment factors are separated from the input and out...

  5. Uncertainty estimation of the velocity model for the TrigNet GPS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Malservisi, Rocco; Hugentobler, Urs; Wonnacott, Richard

    2010-05-01

    Satellite based geodetic techniques - above all GPS - provide an outstanding tool to measure crustal motions. They are widely used to derive geodetic velocity models that are applied in geodynamics to determine rotations of tectonic blocks, to localize active geological features, and to estimate rheological properties of the crust and the underlying asthenosphere. However, it is not a trivial task to derive GPS velocities and their uncertainties from positioning time series. In general time series are assumed to be represented by linear models (sometimes offsets, annual, and semi-annual signals are included) and noise. It has been shown that models accounting only for white noise tend to underestimate the uncertainties of rates derived from long time series and that different colored noise components (flicker noise, random walk, etc.) need to be considered. However, a thorough error analysis including power spectra analyses and maximum likelihood estimates is quite demanding and are usually not carried out for every site, but the uncertainties are scaled by latitude dependent factors. Analyses of the South Africa continuous GPS network TrigNet indicate that the scaled uncertainties overestimate the velocity errors. So we applied a method similar to the Allan Variance that is commonly used in the estimation of clock uncertainties and is able to account for time dependent probability density functions (colored noise) to the TrigNet time series. Finally, we compared these estimates to the results obtained by spectral analyses using CATS. Comparisons with synthetic data show that the noise can be represented quite well by a power law model in combination with a seasonal signal in agreement with previous studies.

  6. A Global Model of The Light Curves and Expansion Velocities of Type II-plateau Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Prieto, Jose L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ~230 velocity and ~6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard \\mathscr{R}_V˜ 3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  7. A GLOBAL MODEL OF THE LIGHT CURVES AND EXPANSION VELOCITIES OF TYPE II-PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejcha, Ondřej [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Prieto, Jose L., E-mail: pejcha@astro.princeton.edu [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército 441 Santiago (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We present a new self-consistent and versatile method that derives photospheric radius and temperature variations of Type II-Plateau supernovae based on their expansion velocities and photometric measurements. We apply the method to a sample of 26 well-observed, nearby supernovae with published light curves and velocities. We simultaneously fit ∼230 velocity and ∼6800 mag measurements distributed over 21 photometric passbands spanning wavelengths from 0.19 to 2.2 μm. The light-curve differences among the Type II-Plateau supernovae are well modeled by assuming different rates of photospheric radius expansion, which we explain as different density profiles of the ejecta, and we argue that steeper density profiles result in flatter plateaus, if everything else remains unchanged. The steep luminosity decline of Type II-Linear supernovae is due to fast evolution of the photospheric temperature, which we verify with a successful fit of SN 1980K. Eliminating the need for theoretical supernova atmosphere models, we obtain self-consistent relative distances, reddenings, and nickel masses fully accounting for all internal model uncertainties and covariances. We use our global fit to estimate the time evolution of any missing band tailored specifically for each supernova, and we construct spectral energy distributions and bolometric light curves. We produce bolometric corrections for all filter combinations in our sample. We compare our model to the theoretical dilution factors and find good agreement for the B and V filters. Our results differ from the theory when the I, J, H, or K bands are included. We investigate the reddening law toward our supernovae and find reasonable agreement with standard R{sub V}∼3.1 reddening law in UBVRI bands. Results for other bands are inconclusive. We make our fitting code publicly available.

  8. Multi-temperature state-dependent equivalent circuit discharge model for lithium-sulfur batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Propp, Karsten; Marinescu, Monica; Auger, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    pulse profile at four temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C, giving linearized ECN parameters for a range of states-of-charge, currents and temperatures. These are used to create a nonlinear polynomial-based battery model suitable for use in a battery management system. When the model is used to predict......Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are described extensively in the literature, but existing computational models aimed at scientific understanding are too complex for use in applications such as battery management. Computationally simple models are vital for exploitation. This paper proposes a non......-linear state-of-charge dependent Li-S equivalent circuit network (ECN) model for a Li-S cell under discharge. Li-S batteries are fundamentally different to Li-ion batteries, and require chemistry-specific models. A new Li-S model is obtained using a ‘behavioural’ interpretation of the ECN model; as Li...

  9. A fifth equation to model the relative velocity the 3-D thermal-hydraulic code THYC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouhanique, T.; Rascle, P.

    1995-11-01

    E.D.F. has developed, since 1986, a general purpose code named THYC (Thermal HYdraulic Code) designed to study three-dimensional single and two-phase flows in rod tube bundles (pressurised water reactor cores, steam generators, condensers, heat exchangers). In these studies, the relative velocity was calculated by a drift-flux correlation. However, the relative velocity between vapor and liquid is an important parameter for the accuracy of a two-phase flow modelling in a three-dimensional code. The range of application of drift-flux correlations is mainly limited by the characteristic of the flow pattern (counter current flow ...) and by large 3-D effects. The purpose of this paper is to describe a numerical scheme which allows the relative velocity to be computed in a general case. Only the methodology is investigated in this paper which is not a validation work. The interfacial drag force is an important factor of stability and accuracy of the results. This force, closely dependent on the flow pattern, is not entirely established yet, so a range of multiplicator of its expression is used to compare the numerical results with the VATICAN test section measurements. (authors). 13 refs., 6 figs

  10. High Voltage Breakdown, Partial Discharge and Aging in Lapped Tape Insulated Cold Dielectric Model Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauers, I.; James, D. R.; Pace, M. O.; Ellis, A. R.; Muller, A. C.

    2004-06-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) power cables generally follow either of two generic designs, cold dielectric and warm dielectric. In the cold dielectric design, lapped tape insulation and liquid nitrogen are used in combination to provide the electrical insulation between the conductor and the ground shield of an HTS cable. Lapped tape insulated model cables have been tested at high voltage, including AC breakdown, negative impulse breakdown, partial discharge, and long term aging under AC stress. Tapes tested include Cryoflex™ (a proprietary tape developed by Southwire) and PPLP® (a commercial semi synthetic tape). Two high voltage cryostats have been built for short and long term aging studies that permit testing of model cables under the combined conditions of high electric stress, cryogenic temperature and elevated pressures up to 15 bar. For the aging studies, a log-log plot of electric stress versus time-to-breakdown has yielded an estimate of cable lifetime. Since aging at cryogenic temperatures is not expected to have a thermal cause, dielectric wear in HTS cables reduces to partial discharge as the primary aging mechanism. Phase and amplitude resolved partial discharge data of model cables in liquid nitrogen will be presented.

  11. Temporal modelling of ballast water discharge and ship-mediated invasion risk to Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Robert C; Prowse, Thomas A A; Ross, Joshua V; Wittmann, Talia A; Cassey, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    Biological invasions have the potential to cause extensive ecological and economic damage. Maritime trade facilitates biological invasions by transferring species in ballast water, and on ships' hulls. With volumes of maritime trade increasing globally, efforts to prevent these biological invasions are of significant importance. Both the International Maritime Organization and the Australian government have developed policy seeking to reduce the risk of these invasions. In this study, we constructed models for the transfer of ballast water into Australian waters, based on historic ballast survey data. We used these models to hindcast ballast water discharge over all vessels that arrived in Australian waters between 1999 and 2012. We used models for propagule survival to compare the risk of ballast-mediated propagule transport between ecoregions. We found that total annual ballast discharge volume into Australia more than doubled over the study period, with the vast majority of ballast water discharge and propagule pressure associated with bulk carrier traffic. As such, the ecoregions suffering the greatest risk are those associated with the export of mining commodities. As global marine trade continues to increase, effective monitoring and biosecurity policy will remain necessary to combat the risk of future marine invasion events.

  12. Self-consistent nonlinear transmission line model of standing wave effects in a capacitive discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, P.; Raimbault, J.L.; Rax, J.M.; Lieberman, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown previously [Lieberman et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 11, 283 (2002)], using a non-self-consistent model based on solutions of Maxwell's equations, that several electromagnetic effects may compromise capacitive discharge uniformity. Among these, the standing wave effect dominates at low and moderate electron densities when the driving frequency is significantly greater than the usual 13.56 MHz. In the present work, two different global discharge models have been coupled to a transmission line model and used to obtain the self-consistent characteristics of the standing wave effect. An analytical solution for the wavelength λ was derived for the lossless case and compared to the numerical results. For typical plasma etching conditions (pressure 10-100 mTorr), a good approximation of the wavelength is λ/λ 0 ≅40 V 0 1/10 l -1/2 f -2/5 , where λ 0 is the wavelength in vacuum, V 0 is the rf voltage magnitude in volts at the discharge center, l is the electrode spacing in meters, and f the driving frequency in hertz

  13. Jenkins model based ferrofluid lubrication of a curved rough annular squeeze film: Effect of slip velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Jimit R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the combined effect of slip velocity and transverse roughness on the performance of a Jenkins model based ferrofluid lubrication of a squeeze film in curved rough annular plates. The slip model of Beavers and Joseph has been invoked to evaluate the effect of slip velocity. In order to find the effect of surface roughness the stochastic averaging model of Christensen and Tonder has been used. The pressure distribution is obtained by solving the concerned stochastically averaged Reynolds type equation. The load carrying capacity is calculated. The graphical representations of the results indicate that the effect of transverse surface roughness is adverse in general, however, the situation is relatively better in the case of negatively skewed roughness. Further, Jenkins model based ferrofluid lubrication offers some measures in reducing the adverse effect of roughness when slip parameter is kept at reduced level with a suitable ratio of curvature parameters. Lastly, the positive effect of magnetization gets a boost due to the combined effect of variance (-ve and negatively skewed roughness suitably choosing the aspect ratio.

  14. Flood modeling using WMS model for determining peak flood discharge in southwest Iran case study: Simili basin in Khuzestan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Yaser; Azari, Arash; Pilpayeh, Alireza

    2017-10-01

    It is of high importance to determine the flood discharge of different basins, in studies on water resources. However, it is necessary to use new models to determine flood hydrograph parameters. Therefore, it will be beneficial to conduct studies to calibrate the models, keeping in mind the local conditions of different regions. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the peak flood discharge of a basin located in Southwest Iran, using the TR-20, TR55, and HEC-1 methods of the WMS model (watershed modeling system). The obtained results were compared with empirical values, as well as those of the soil conservation service (SCS) approach. Based on the results obtained, the TR55 method of the WMS model recorded the highest agreement with empirical values in Southwest Iran.

  15. Simulation of High Velocity Impact on Composite Structures - Model Implementation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Dominik; Toso-Pentecôte, Nathalie; Voggenreiter, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    High velocity impact on composite aircraft structures leads to the formation of flexural waves that can cause severe damage to the structure. Damage and failure can occur within the plies and/or in the resin rich interface layers between adjacent plies. In the present paper a modelling methodology is documented that captures intra- and inter-laminar damage and their interrelations by use of shell element layers representing sub-laminates that are connected with cohesive interface layers to simulate delamination. This approach allows the simulation of large structures while still capturing the governing damage mechanisms and their interactions. The paper describes numerical algorithms for the implementation of a Ladevèze continuum damage model for the ply and methods to derive input parameters for the cohesive zone model. By comparison with experimental results from gas gun impact tests the potential and limitations of the modelling approach are discussed.

  16. Modeling solar oscillation power spectra. II. Parametric model of spectral lines observed in Doppler-velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorontsov, Sergei V.; Jefferies, Stuart M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler-velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements, and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudomodes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  17. Modeling solar oscillation power spectra. II. Parametric model of spectral lines observed in Doppler-velocity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorontsov, Sergei V. [Astronomy Unit, School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Jefferies, Stuart M., E-mail: S.V.Vorontsov@qmul.ac.uk, E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, HI 96768 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    We describe a global parametric model for the observed power spectra of solar oscillations of intermediate and low degree. A physically motivated parameterization is used as a substitute for a direct description of mode excitation and damping as these mechanisms remain poorly understood. The model is targeted at the accurate fitting of power spectra coming from Doppler-velocity measurements and uses an adaptive response function that accounts for both the vertical and horizontal components of the velocity field on the solar surface and for possible instrumental and observational distortions. The model is continuous in frequency, can easily be adapted to intensity measurements, and extends naturally to the analysis of high-frequency pseudomodes (interference peaks at frequencies above the atmospheric acoustic cutoff).

  18. Softverski model estimatora radijalne brzine ciljeva / Software model of a radial velocity estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan S. Ivković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available U radu je softverski modelovan novi blok u delu za obradu signala softverskog radarskog prijemnika, koji je nazvan estimator radijalne brzine. Detaljno je opisan način procene Doplerove frekvencije na osnovu MUSIC algoritma i ukratko prikazan način rada pri merenju. Svi parametri pri merenju klatera i detekcije simuliranih i realnih ciljeva dati su tabelarno, a rezultati grafički. Na osnovu analize prikazanih rezultata može se zaključiti da se pomoću projektovanog estimatora radijalne brzine može precizno proceniti Doplerov pomak u reflektovanom signalu od pokretnog cilja, a samim tim može se precizno odrediti njegova brzina. / In all analyses the MUSIC method has given better results than the FFT method. The MUSIC method proved to be better at estimation precision as well as at resolving two adjacent Doppler frequencies. On the basis of the obtained results, the designed estimator of radial velocity can be said to estimate Doppler frequency in the reflected signal from a moving target precisely, and, consequently, the target velocity. It is thus possible to improve the performances of the current radar as far as a precise estimation of velocity of detected moving targets is concerned.

  19. Vibrationally-Fluidized Granular Flows: Impact and Bulk Velocity Measurements Compared with Discrete Element and Continuum Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Kamyar

    A new laser displacement probe was developed to measure the impact velocities of particles within vibrationally-fluidized beds. The sensor output was also used to measure bulk flow velocity along the probe window and to provide a measure of the media packing. The displacement signals from the laser sensors were analyzed to obtain the probability distribution functions of the impact velocity of the particles. The impact velocity was affected by the orientation of the laser probe relative to the bulk flow velocity, and the density and elastic properties of the granular media. The impact velocities of the particles were largely independent of their bulk flow speed and packing density. Both the local impact and bulk flow velocities within a tub vibratory finisher were predicted using discrete element modelling (DEM) and compared to the measured values for spherical steel media. It was observed that the impact and bulk flow velocities were relatively insensitive to uncertainties in the contact coefficients of friction and restitution. It was concluded that the predicted impact and bulk flow velocities were dependent on the number of layers in the model. Consequently, the final DE model mimicked the key aspects of the experimental setup, including the submerged laser sensor. The DE method predictions of both impact velocity and bulk flow velocity were in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements, with maximum differences of 20% and 30%, respectively. Discrete element modeling of granular flows is effective, but requires large numerical models. In an effort to reduce computational effort, this work presents a finite element (FE) continuum model of a vibrationally-fluidized granular flow. The constitutive equations governing the continuum model were calibrated using the discrete element method (DEM). The bulk flow behavior of the equivalent continuum media was then studied using both Lagrangian and Eulerian FE formulations. The bulk flow velocities predicted

  20. Flow instability originating from particle configurations using the two-dimensional optimal velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2015-12-01

    The two-dimensional optimal velocity model has potential applications to pedestrian dynamics and the collective motion of animals. In this paper, we extend the linear stability analysis presented in a previous paper [A Nakayama et al., Phys. Rev. E. 77, 016105 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016105] and investigate the effects of particle configuration on the stability of several wave modes of collective oscillations of moving particles. We find that, when a particle moves without interacting with particles that are positioned in a diagonally forward or backward direction, the stable region of the particle flow is completely removed by the elliptically polarized mode.

  1. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  2. Nonlinear analysis of a new car-following model accounting for the global average optimal velocity difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guanghan; Lu, Weizhen; He, Hongdi

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new car-following model is proposed by considering the global average optimal velocity difference effect on the basis of the full velocity difference (FVD) model. We investigate the influence of the global average optimal velocity difference on the stability of traffic flow by making use of linear stability analysis. It indicates that the stable region will be enlarged by taking the global average optimal velocity difference effect into account. Subsequently, the mKdV equation near the critical point and its kink-antikink soliton solution, which can describe the traffic jam transition, is derived from nonlinear analysis. Furthermore, numerical simulations confirm that the effect of the global average optimal velocity difference can efficiently improve the stability of traffic flow, which show that our new consideration should be taken into account to suppress the traffic congestion for car-following theory.

  3. Synchronous Surface Pressure and Velocity Measurements of standard model in hypersonic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Sun

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in the Hypersonic Wind tunnel of NUAA(NHW present synchronous measurements of bow shockwave and surface pressure of a standard blunt rotary model (AGARD HB-2, which was carried out in order to measure the Mach-5-flow above a blunt body by PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry as well as unsteady pressure around the rotary body. Titanium dioxide (Al2O3 Nano particles were seeded into the flow by a tailor-made container. With meticulous care designed optical path, the laser was guided into the vacuum experimental section. The transient pressure was obtained around model by using fast-responding pressure-sensitive paint (PSPsprayed on the model. All the experimental facilities were controlled by Series Pulse Generator to ensure that the data was time related. The PIV measurements of velocities in front of the detached bow shock agreed very well with the calculated value, with less than 3% difference compared to Pitot-pressure recordings. The velocity gradient contour described in accord with the detached bow shock that showed on schlieren. The PSP results presented good agreement with the reference data from previous studies. Our work involving studies of synchronous shock-wave and pressure measurements proved to be encouraging.

  4. Predictive K-PLSR myocardial contractility modeling with phase contrast MR velocity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Lin; Wu, Qian; Huntbatch, Andrew; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing versatility of CMR, further understanding of intrinsic contractility of the myocardium can be achieved by performing subject-specific modeling by integrating structural and functional information available. The recent introduction of the virtual tagging framework allows for visualization of the localized deformation of the myocardium based on phase contrast myocardial velocity mapping. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of a non-linear, Kernel-Partial Least Squares Regression (K-PLSR) predictive motion modeling scheme for the virtual tagging framework. The method allows for the derivation of a compact non-linear deformation model such that the entire deformation field can be predicted by a limited number of control points. When applied to virtual tagging, the technique can be used to predictively guide the mesh refinement based on the motion of the coarse grid, thus greatly reducing the search space and increasing the convergence speed of the algorithm. The effectiveness and numerical accuracy of the proposed technique are assessed with both numerically simulated data sets and in vivo phase contrast CMR velocity mapping from a group of 7 subjects. The technique presented has a distinct advantage over the conventional mesh refinement scheme and brings CMR myocardial contractility analysis closer to routine clinical practice.

  5. Improved Near-surface Velocity Models from Waveform Tomography Applied to Vibroseis MCS Reflection Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithyman, B.; Clowes, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Multichannel vibroseis reflection surveys are prevalent in the land exploration seismic industry because of benefits in speed and cost, along with reduced environmental impact when compared to explosive sources. Since the downgoing energy must travel through the shallow subsurface, an improved model of near-surface velocity can in theory substantially improve the resolution of deeper reflections. We describe techniques aimed at allowing the use of vibroseis data for long-offset refraction processing of first-arrival traveltimes and waveforms. Refraction processing of surface vibroseis data is typically limited to near-offset refraction statics. Velocity models of the shallow subsurface can be built to facilitate CDP stacking and migration, but these models are typically coarse and of limited use for interpretation. Waveform tomography combines inversion of first-arrival traveltime data with full waveform inversion of densely-sampled refracted arrivals. Since inversion of the waveform amplitude and phase is not limited by the ray-theory approximation, identification of low-velocity zones and small scattering targets is possible. Incorporating a wide range of offsets is critical for a more complete characterization of the near-surface. Because of the use of a non-linear frequency-domain approach to the solution of this inverse problem, low data frequencies are important in comparison with conventional reflection processing. Through the use of waveform tomography, we plan to build useful, detailed near-surface velocity models for both the reflection work flow and direct interpretation. Several difficulties exist in first-arrival analysis and waveform inversion of vibroseis data. The mixed-phase vibroseis source signature exhibits variations in phase with offset that are difficult to quantify without detailed a priori knowledge of the near-surface. This causes difficulties with picking and initial model building, which is critical for non-linear waveform inversion. A

  6. An advanced time-dependent collisional-radiative model of helium plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claustre, J.; Boukandou-Mombo, C.; Margot, J.; Matte, J.-P.; Vidal, F.

    2017-10-01

    A new spatially averaged time-dependent collisional-radiative model for helium plasmas, coupled to the electron Boltzmann equation (EBE), has been developed. Its main novelties are: (1) full time dependence for both the multi-species kinetics and the EBE. It is shown that this is necessary to correctly simulate discharges where the parameters vary on nanoseconds-microsecond timescales. (2) All electron processes are accounted for accurately. In particular, for the various ionization and recombination processes, free electrons are added or removed at the appropriate energy, with the appropriate interpolation on the energy grid. (3) The energy dependence of the electron loss by ambipolar diffusion is taken into account approximately. (4) All of the processes which are known to be important in helium discharges for pressure P≤slant 760 Torr are included, and 42 energy levels up to n = 6, where n is the main quantum number, are taken into account. Atomic and molecular ions, as well as excimers, are also included. (5) The gas temperature is calculated self-consistently. The model is validated through comparisons with known numerical steady-state results of Santos et al (2014 J. Phys. D. 47 265201) which they compared to their experimental results, and good agreement is obtained for their measured quantities. It is then applied to post-discharge decay cases with very short power decay times. The time evolution of the population densities and reaction rates are analyzed in detail with emphasis on the observed large increase of the metastable density.

  7. A fault tree model to assess probability of contaminant discharge from shipwrecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landquist, H; Rosén, L; Lindhe, A; Norberg, T; Hassellöv, I-M; Lindgren, J F; Dahllöf, I

    2014-11-15

    Shipwrecks on the sea floor around the world may contain hazardous substances that can cause harm to the marine environment. Today there are no comprehensive methods for environmental risk assessment of shipwrecks, and thus there is poor support for decision-making on prioritization of mitigation measures. The purpose of this study was to develop a tool for quantitative risk estimation of potentially polluting shipwrecks, and in particular an estimation of the annual probability of hazardous substance discharge. The assessment of the probability of discharge is performed using fault tree analysis, facilitating quantification of the probability with respect to a set of identified hazardous events. This approach enables a structured assessment providing transparent uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. The model facilitates quantification of risk, quantification of the uncertainties in the risk calculation and identification of parameters to be investigated further in order to obtain a more reliable risk calculation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kylian, O; Rauscher, H; Gilliland, D; Bretagnol, F; Rossi, F [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via E Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Italy)], E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.it

    2008-05-07

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper.

  9. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylián, O.; Rauscher, H.; Gilliland, D.; Brétagnol, F.; Rossi, F.

    2008-05-01

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper.

  10. Remote Sensing Data in Wind Velocity Field Modelling: a Case Study from the Sudetes (SW Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancewicz, Kacper

    2014-06-01

    The phenomena of wind-field deformation above complex (mountainous) terrain is a popular subject of research related to numerical modelling using GIS techniques. This type of modelling requires, as input data, information on terrain roughness and a digital terrain/elevation model. This information may be provided by remote sensing data. Consequently, its accuracy and spatial resolution may affect the results of modelling. This paper represents an attempt to conduct wind-field modelling in the area of the Śnieżnik Massif (Eastern Sudetes). The modelling process was conducted in WindStation 2.0.10 software (using the computable fluid dynamics solver Canyon). Two different elevation models were used: the Global Land Survey Digital Elevation Model (GLS DEM) and Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Level 2. The terrain roughness raster was generated on the basis of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC 2006) data. The output data were post-processed in ArcInfo 9.3.1 software to achieve a high-quality cartographic presentation. Experimental modelling was conducted for situations from 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012, and 26 May 2012, based on a limited number of field measurements and using parameters of the atmosphere boundary layer derived from the aerological surveys provided by the closest meteorological stations. The model was run in a 100-m and 250-m spatial resolution. In order to verify the model's performance, leave-one-out cross-validation was used. The calculated indices allowed for a comparison with results of former studies pertaining to WindStation's performance. The experiment demonstrated very subtle differences between results in using DTED or GLS DEM elevation data. Additionally, CLC 2006 roughness data provided more noticeable improvements in the model's performance, but only in the resolution corresponding to the original roughness data. The best input data configuration resulted in the following mean values of error measure: root mean squared error of velocity

  11. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    viscometer. Quantitative fluorescence in-situ hybridisation (qFISH) analysis, targeting Microthrix parvicella and phylum Chloroflexi, was used. This study finds that M. parvicella - predominantly residing inside the microbial flocs in our samples - can significantly influence secondary settling through...... altering the hindered settling velocity and yield stress parameter. Strikingly, this is not the case for Chloroflexi, occurring in more than double the abundance of M. parvicella, and forming filaments primarily protruding from the flocs. The transient and compression settling parameters show a comparably...... high variability, and no significant association with filamentous abundance. A two-dimensional, axi-symmetrical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to assess calibration scenarios to model filamentous bulking. Our results suggest that model predictions can significantly benefit from...

  12. Ion swarm data for electrical discharge modeling in air and flue gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.; Benhenni, M.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The first step of this work is the determination of the elastic and inelastic ion-molecule collision cross sections for the main ions (N 2 + , O 2 + , CO 2 + , H 2 O + and O - ) usually present either in the air or flue gas discharges. The obtained cross section sets, given for ion kinetic energies not exceeding 100 eV, correspond to the interactions of each ion with its parent molecule (symmetric case) or nonparent molecule (asymmetric case). Then by using these different cross section sets, it is possible to obtain the ion swarm data for the different gas mixtures involving N 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O and O 2 molecules whatever their relative proportions. These ion swarm data are obtained from an optimized Monte Carlo method well adapted for the ion transport in gas mixtures. This also allows us to clearly show that the classical linear approximations usually applied for the ion swarm data in mixtures such as Blanc's law are far to be valid. Then, the ion swarm data are given in three cases of gas mixtures: a dry air (80% N 2 , 20% O 2 ), a ternary gas mixture (82% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 ) and a typical flue gas (76% N 2 , 12% CO 2 , 6% O 2 , 6% H 2 O). From these reliable ion swarm data, electrical discharge modeling for a wire to plane electrode configuration has been carried out in these three mixtures at the atmospheric pressure for different applied voltages. Under the same discharge conditions, large discrepancies in the streamer formation and propagation have been observed in these three mixture cases. They are due to the deviations existing not only between the different effective electron-molecule ionization rates but also between the ion transport properties mainly because of the presence of a highly polar molecule such as H 2 O. This emphasizes the necessity to properly consider the ion transport in the discharge modeling

  13. Quantification of Submarine Groundwater Discharge Using a Radon (222-Rn) Mass Balance and Hydrogeological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petermann, Eric; Stollberg, Reiner; Scholten, Jan; Knöller, Kay; Schubert, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Apart from river and surface water runoff subsurface discharge of groundwater plays a key role in coastal water and matter budgets. Two major forms of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be distinguished: (i) pure freshwater discharge from continental aquifers that are connected to the coastal sea driven by a positive hydraulic gradient (fresh SGD) and (ii) re-circulation of seawater that has penetrated permeable coastal sediments (re-circulated SGD), e.g. driven by tidal pumping. The localization of SGD zones and the quantification of SGD fluxes is of high interest for coastal water management due to potential threats related to SGD, namely (i) the detrimental impact of discharging nutrient- or contaminant-laden groundwater on coastal seawater quality, an aspect that is of relevance along coastlines which are impacted by agriculture, industry or intense urbanization, and (ii) the loss of freshwater to the ocean, an issue that is of major relevance in all coastal areas with (seasonally) limited freshwater availability. In this work, we discuss estimates for the total (fresh + re-circulated) SGD fluxes derived from a mass balance of the radioactive noble gas radon (222-Rn) with estimates of fresh SGD fluxes derived by hydrogeological modelling. The precision of the mass balance results depends on the adequate determination of the mass balance source and sink terms. These terms are calculated based on field observations of environmental tracers (salinity, δ18O, 222-Rn, 223-Ra, 224-Ra, 226-Ra) in seawater and porewater, as well as on meteorological data. The numerical hydrogeological model estimates groundwater flow based on groundwater monitoring data, river flow data, groundwater recharge estimates, tidal dynamics, and density effects along the freshwater/seawater interface. We compare these two independent methodological approaches of SGD flux estimation, discuss results regarding their relevance for the regional water balance and reason the implications of

  14. Model-guided control of hippocampal discharges by local direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Faten; Modolo, Julien; Recher, Fanny; Dieuset, Gabriel; Biraben, Arnaud; Benquet, Pascal; Wendling, Fabrice

    2017-05-10

    Neurostimulation is an emerging treatment for drug-resistant epilepsies when surgery is contraindicated. Recent clinical results demonstrate significant seizure frequency reduction in epileptic patients, however the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect are largely unknown. This study aimed at gaining insights into local direct current stimulation (LDCS) effects on hyperexcitable tissue, by i) analyzing the impact of electrical currents locally applied on epileptogenic brain regions, and ii) characterizing currents achieving an "anti-epileptic" effect (excitability reduction). First, a neural mass model of hippocampal circuits was extended to accurately reproduce the features of hippocampal paroxysmal discharges (HPD) observed in a mouse model of epilepsy. Second, model predictions regarding current intensity and stimulation polarity were confronted to in vivo mice recordings during LDCS (n = 8). The neural mass model was able to generate realistic hippocampal discharges. Simulation of LDCS in the model pointed at a significant decrease of simulated HPD (in duration and occurrence rate, not in amplitude) for cathodal stimulation, which was successfully verified experimentally in epileptic mice. Despite the simplicity of our stimulation protocol, these results contribute to a better understanding of clinical benefits observed in epileptic patients with implanted neurostimulators. Our results also provide further support for model-guided design of neuromodulation therapy.

  15. Impact modelling of water resources development and climate scenarios on Zambezi River discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Kling

    2014-07-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Comparisons between historical and future scenarios show that the biggest changes have already occurred. Construction of Kariba and CahoraBassa dams in the mid 1900s altered the seasonality and flow duration curves. Future irrigation development will cause decreases of a similar magnitude to those caused by current reservoir evaporation losses. The discharge is highly sensitive to small precipitation changes and the two climate models used give different signs for future precipitation change, suggestive of large uncertainty. The river basin model and database are available as anopen-online Decision Support System to facilitate impact assessments of additional climate or development scenarios.

  16. Submarine groundwater discharge to a small estuary estimated from radon and salinity measurements and a box model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Crusius

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Submarine groundwater discharge was quantified by a variety of methods for a 4-day period during the early summer of 2004, in Salt Pond, adjacent to Nauset Marsh, on Cape Cod, USA. Discharge estimates based on radon and salinity took advantage of the presence of the narrow channel connecting Salt Pond to Nauset Marsh, which allowed constructing whole-pond mass balances as water flowed in and out due to tidal fluctuations. The data suggest that less than one quarter of the discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond happened within the pond itself, while three quarters or more of the discharge occurred immediately seaward of the pond, either in the channel or in adjacent regions of Nauset Marsh. Much of this discharge, which maintains high radon activities and low salinity, is carried into the pond during each incoming tide. A box model was used as an aid to understand both the rates and the locations of discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond. The model achieves a reasonable fit to both the salinity and radon data assuming submarine groundwater discharge is fresh and that most of it occurs either in the channel or in adjacent regions of Nauset Marsh. Salinity and radon data, together with seepage meter results, do not rule out discharge of saline groundwater, but suggest either that the saline discharge is at most comparable in volume to the fresh discharge or that it is depleted in radon. The estimated rate of fresh groundwater discharge in the vicinity of Salt Pond is 3000-7000 m3 d-1. This groundwater flux estimated from the radon and salinity data is comparable to a value of 3200-4500 m3 d-1 predicted by a recent hydrologic model (Masterson, 2004; Colman and Masterson, 2004, although the model predicts this rate of discharge to the pond whereas our data suggest most of the groundwater bypasses the pond prior to discharge. Additional work is needed to determine if the measured rate of discharge is representative of the long-term average, and to

  17. Towards a new technique to construct a 3D shear-wave velocity model based on converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetényi, G.; Colavitti, L.

    2017-12-01

    A 3D model is essential in all branches of solid Earth sciences because geological structures can be heterogeneous and change significantly in their lateral dimension. The main target of this research is to build a crustal S-wave velocity structure in 3D. The currently popular methodologies to construct 3D shear-wave velocity models are Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) and Local Earthquake Tomography (LET). Here we propose a new technique to map Earth discontinuities and velocities at depth based on the analysis of receiver functions. The 3D model is obtained by simultaneously inverting P-to-S converted waveforms recorded at a dense array. The individual velocity models corresponding to each trace are extracted from the 3D initial model along ray paths that are calculated using the shooting method, and the velocity model is updated during the inversion. We consider a spherical approximation of ray propagation using a global velocity model (iasp91, Kennett and Engdahl, 1991) for the teleseismic part, while we adopt Cartesian coordinates and a local velocity model for the crust. During the inversion process we work with a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity, with a flexible mesh for the depth of the interfaces. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter space. Depending on the studied area, this method can accommodate possible independent and complementary geophysical data (gravity, active seismics, LET, ANT, etc.), helping to reduce the non-linearity of the inversion. Our first focus of application is the Central Alps, where a 20-year long dataset of

  18. A new car-following model for autonomous vehicles flow with mean expected velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Xing, Zhu; Li-Dong, Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Due to the development of the modern scientific technology, autonomous vehicles may realize to connect with each other and share the information collected from each vehicle. An improved forward considering car-following model was proposed with mean expected velocity field to describe the autonomous vehicles flow behavior. The new model has three key parameters: adjustable sensitivity, strength factor and mean expected velocity field size. Two lemmas and one theorem were proven as criteria for judging the stability of homogeneousautonomous vehicles flow. Theoretical results show that the greater parameters means larger stability regions. A series of numerical simulations were carried out to check the stability and fundamental diagram of autonomous flow. From the numerical simulation results, the profiles, hysteresis loop and density waves of the autonomous vehicles flow were exhibited. The results show that with increased sensitivity, strength factor or field size the traffic jam was suppressed effectively which are well in accordance with the theoretical results. Moreover, the fundamental diagrams corresponding to three parameters respectively were obtained. It demonstrates that these parameters play almost the same role on traffic flux: i.e. before the critical density the bigger parameter is, the greater flux is and after the critical density, the opposite tendency is. In general, the three parameters have a great influence on the stability and jam state of the autonomous vehicles flow.

  19. Observation of thermal plumes from submerged discharges in the Great Lakes and their implications for modeling and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditmars, J.D.; Paddock, R.A.; Frigo, A.A.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of thermal plumes from submerged discharges of power plant cooling waters into the Great Lakes provide the opportunity to view the mixing processes at prototype scales and to observe the effects of the ambient environment on those processes. Examples of thermal plume behavior in Great Lakes' ambient environments are presented to demonstrate the importance of measurements of the detailed structure of the ambient environment, as well as of the plumes, for interpretation of prototype data for modeling and monitoring purposes. The examples are drawn from studies by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at the Zion Nuclear PowerStation and the D. C. Cook Nuclear Plant on Lake Michigan and at the J. A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Plant on Lake Ontario. These studies included measurements of water temperatures from a moving boat which provide a quasi-synoptic view of the three-dimensional temperature structure of the thermal plume and ambient water environment. Additional measurements of water velocities, which are made with continuously recording, moored, and profiling current meters, and of wind provide data on the detailed structure of the ambient environment. The detailed structure of the ambient environment, in terms of current, current shear, variable winds, and temperature stratification, often influence greatly thermal plume behavior. Although predictive model techniques and monitoring objectives often ignore the detailed aspects of the ambient environment, useful interpretation of prototype data for model evaluation or calibration and monitoring purposes requires detailed measurement of the ambient environment. Examination of prototype thermal plume data indicates that, in several instances, attention to only the gross characteristics of the ambient environment can be misleading and could result in significant errors in model calibration and extrapolation of data bases gathered in monitoring observations

  20. Numerical simulation of Trichel pulses of negative DC corona discharge based on a plasma chemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyue; Lan, Lei; Lu, Hailiang; Wang, Yu; Wen, Xishan; Du, Xinyu; He, Wangling

    2017-10-01

    A numerical simulation method of negative direct current (DC) corona discharge based on a plasma chemical model is presented, and a coaxial cylindrical gap is adopted. There were 15 particle species and 61 kinds of collision reactions electrons involved, and 22 kinds of reactions between ions are considered in plasma chemical reactions. Based on this method, continuous Trichel pulses are calculated on about a 100 us timescale, and microcosmic physicochemical process of negative DC corona discharge in three different periods is discussed. The obtained results show that the amplitude of Trichel pulses is between 1-2 mA, and that pulse interval is in the order of 10-5 s. The positive ions produced by avalanche ionization enhanced the electric field near the cathode at the beginning of the pulse, then disappeared from the surface of cathode. The electric field decreases and the pulse ceases to develop. The negative ions produced by attachment slowly move away from the cathode, and the electric field increases gradually until the next pulse begins to develop. The positive and negative ions with the highest density during the corona discharge process are O4+ and O3- , respectively.

  1. Discharge Fee Policy Analysis: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE Model of Water Resources and Water Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Fang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate increasingly serious water pollution and shortages in developing countries, various kinds of policies have been implemented by local governments. It is vital to quantify and evaluate the performance and potential economic impacts of these policies. This study develops a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE model to simulate the regional economic and environmental effects of discharge fees. Firstly, water resources and water environment factors are separated from the input and output sources of the National Economic Production Department. Secondly, an extended Social Accounting Matrix (SAM of Jiangsu province is developed to simulate various scenarios. By changing values of the discharge fees (increased by 50%, 100% and 150%, three scenarios are simulated to examine their influence on the overall economy and each industry. The simulation results show that an increased fee will have a negative impact on Gross Domestic Product (GDP. However, waste water may be effectively controlled. Also, this study demonstrates that along with the economic costs, the increase of the discharge fee will lead to the upgrading of industrial structures from a situation of heavy pollution to one of light pollution which is beneficial to the sustainable development of the economy and the protection of the environment.

  2. Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid modelling of dc glow discharges: Comparison with fluid models, reliability, and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eylenceoğlu, E.; Rafatov, I., E-mail: rafatov@metu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Kudryavtsev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State University, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    Two-dimensional hybrid Monte Carlo–fluid numerical code is developed and applied to model the dc glow discharge. The model is based on the separation of electrons into two parts: the low energetic (slow) and high energetic (fast) electron groups. Ions and slow electrons are described within the fluid model using the drift-diffusion approximation for particle fluxes. Fast electrons, represented by suitable number of super particles emitted from the cathode, are responsible for ionization processes in the discharge volume, which are simulated by the Monte Carlo collision method. Electrostatic field is obtained from the solution of Poisson equation. The test calculations were carried out for an argon plasma. Main properties of the glow discharge are considered. Current-voltage curves, electric field reversal phenomenon, and the vortex current formation are developed and discussed. The results are compared to those obtained from the simple and extended fluid models. Contrary to reports in the literature, the analysis does not reveal significant advantages of existing hybrid methods over the extended fluid model.

  3. Two-dimensional velocity models for paths from Pahute Mesa and Yucca Flat to Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walck, M.C.; Phillips, J.S.

    1990-11-01

    Vertical acceleration recordings of 21 underground nuclear explosions recorded at stations at Yucca Mountain provide the data for development of three two-dimensional crystal velocity profiles for portions of the Nevada Test Site. Paths from Area 19, Area 20 (both Pahute Mesa), and Yucca Flat to Yucca Mountain have been modeled using asymptotic ray theory travel time and synthetic seismogram techniques. Significant travel time differences exist between the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa source areas; relative amplitude patterns at Yucca Mountain also shift with changing source azimuth. The three models, UNEPM1, UNEPM2, and UNEYF1, successfully predict the travel time and amplitude data for all three paths. 24 refs., 34 figs., 8 tabs

  4. A computational model for assessing high-velocity debris impact in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergh, M.; Garcia, V.

    2017-07-01

    Man-made space debris is dominating the background meteorite environment with a growing debris population leading to increased collision risks for satellites, especially in the low Earth orbit and geostationary orbit protected environments. Here we present a computational model for estimating the effect of hypervelocity impact from debris particles on non-shielded propellant and pressurant tanks. Eulerian hydrocode simulation is utilised to model firstly penetration and shock wave formation in the propellant and secondly subsequent detonation wave propagation and interaction with the tank wall. Furthermore, reactive molecular dynamics is used to estimate the risk of detonation in a liquid hydrazine layer. We present simulations of a 3.5 mm aluminium spherical debris particle at a velocity of 14 km/s relative to a hydrazine tank. We find that the degree of damage is strongly dependent on tank temperature and hence on the satellite thermal configuration at its end of life.

  5. CFD model of thermal and velocity conditions in a particular indoor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora Perez, Miguel; Lopez Patino, Gonzalo; Lopez Jimenez, P. Amparo [Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering Department, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Guillen Guillamon, Ignacio [Applied Physics Department, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    The demand for maintaining high indoor environmental quality (IEQ) with the minimum energy consumption is rapidly increasing. In the recent years, several studies have been completed to investigate the impact of indoor environment factors on human comfort, health and energy efficiency. Therefore, the design of the thermal environment in any sort of room, specially offices, has huge economic consequences. In this paper, a particular analysis on the air temperature in a multi-task room environment is modeled, in order to represent the velocities and temperatures inside the room by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. This model will help to designers to analyze the thermal comfort regions inside the studied air volume and to visualize the whole temperatures inside the room, determining the effect of the fresh external incoming air in the internal air temperature.

  6. Assessment Model to Identify Patients With Stroke With a High Possibility of Discharge to Home: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaya, Takahiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Ota, Akiko; Nomura, Eiichi; Fukushima, Tomoko; Nishigaki, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    Discharge planning for inpatients with acute stroke can enhance reasonable use of healthcare resources, as well as improve clinical outcomes and decrease financial burden of patients. Especially, prediction for discharge destination is crucial for discharge planning. This study aimed to develop an assessment model to identify patients with a high possibility of discharge to home after an acute stroke. We reviewed the electronic medical records of 3200 patients with acute stroke who were admitted to a stroke center in Japan between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2015. The outcome variable was the discharge destination of postacute stroke patients. The predictive variables were identified through logistic regression analysis. Data were divided into 2 data sets: the learning data set (n=2240) for developing the instrument and the test data set (n=960) for evaluating the predictive capability of the model. In all, 1548 (48%) patients were discharged to their homes. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified 5 predictive variables for discharge to home: living situation, type of stroke, functional independence measure motor score on admission, functional independence measure cognitive score on admission, and paresis. The assessment model showed a sensitivity of 85.0% and a specificity of 75.3% with an area under the curve equal to 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.89) when the cutoff point was 10. On evaluating the predictive capabilities, the model showed a sensitivity of 88.0% and a specificity of 68.7% with an area under the curve equal to 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.89). We have developed an assessment model for identifying patients with a high possibility of being discharged to their homes after an acute stroke. This model would be useful for health professionals to adequately plan patients' discharge soon after their admission. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Approximation to the Modelling of Charge and Discharge Processes in Electrochemical Batteries by Integral Equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balenzategui, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    A new way for the modelling of the charge and discharge processes in electrochemical batteries based on the use of integral equations is presented. The proposed method models the charge curves by the so called fractional or cumulative integrals of a certain objective function f(t) that must be sought. The charge figures can be easily fitted by breaking down this objective function as the addition of two different Lorentz type functions: the first one is associated to the own charge process and the second one to the overcharge process. The method allows calculating the starting voltage for overcharge as the intersection between both functions. The curve fitting of this model to different experimental charge curves, by using the Marquart algorithm, has shown very accurate results. In the case of discharge curves, two possible methods for modelling purposes are suggested, well by using the same kind of integral equations, well by the simple subtraction of an objective function f(t) from a constant value V O D. Many other aspects for the study and analysis of this method in order to improve its results in further developments are also discussed. (Author) 10 refs

  8. Calibration of HEC-Ras hydrodynamic model using gauged discharge data and flood inundation maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rui; Komma, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The estimation of flood is essential for disaster alleviation. Hydrodynamic models are implemented to predict the occurrence and variance of flood in different scales. In practice, the calibration of hydrodynamic models aims to search the best possible parameters for the representation the natural flow resistance. Recent years have seen the calibration of hydrodynamic models being more actual and faster following the advance of earth observation products and computer based optimization techniques. In this study, the Hydrologic Engineering River Analysis System (HEC-Ras) model was set up with high-resolution digital elevation model from Laser scanner for the river Inn in Tyrol, Austria. 10 largest flood events from 19 hourly discharge gauges and flood inundation maps were selected to calibrate the HEC-Ras model. Manning roughness values and lateral inflow factors as parameters were automatically optimized with the Shuffled complex with Principal component analysis (SP-UCI) algorithm developed from the Shuffled Complex Evolution (SCE-UA). Different objective functions (Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, the timing of peak, peak value and Root-mean-square deviation) were used in single or multiple way. It was found that the lateral inflow factor was the most sensitive parameter. SP-UCI algorithm could avoid the local optimal and achieve efficient and effective parameters in the calibration of HEC-Ras model using flood extension images. As results showed, calibration by means of gauged discharge data and flood inundation maps, together with objective function of Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient, was very robust to obtain more reliable flood simulation, and also to catch up with the peak value and the timing of peak.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Mutual Effect among Nearby Needles in a Multi-Needle Configuration of an Atmospheric Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Zhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study has been conducted to understand the mutual effect among nearby needles in a multi-needle electrode dielectric barrier discharge. In the present paper, a fluid-hydrodynamic model is adopted. In this model, the mutual effect among nearby needles in a multi-needle configuration of an atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge are investigated using a fluid-hydrodynamic model including the continuity equations for electrons and positive and negative ions coupled with Poisson’s equation. The electric fields at the streamer head of the middle needle (MN and the side needles (SNs in a three-needle model decreased under the influence of the mutual effects of nearby needles compared with that in the single-needle model. In addition, from the same comparison, the average propagation velocities of the streamers from MN and SNs, the electron average energy profile of MN and SNs (including those in the streamer channel, at the streamer head, and in the unbridged gap, and the electron densities at the streamer head of the MN and SNs also decreased. The results obtained in the current paper agreed well with the experimental and simulation results in the literature.

  10. A Black-box Modelling Engine for Discharge Produced Plasma Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, S.V.; Choi, P.; Krukovskiy, A.Y.; Zhang, Q.; Novikov, V.G.; Zakharov, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    A Blackbox Modelling Engine (BME), is an instrument based on the adaptation of the RMHD code Z*, integrated into a specific computation environment to provide a turn key simulation instrument and to enable routine plasma modelling without specialist knowledge in numerical computation. Two different operating modes are provided: Detailed Physics mode and Fast Numerics mode. In the Detailed Physics mode, non-stationary, non-equilibrium radiation physics have been introduced to allow the modelling of transient plasmas in experimental geometry. In the Fast Numerics mode, the system architecture and the radiation transport is simplified to significantly accelerate the computation rate. The Fast Numerics mode allows the BME to be used realistically in parametric scanning to explore complex physical set up, before using the Detailed Physics mode. As an example of the results from the BME modelling, the EUV source plasma dynamics in the pulsed capillary discharge are presented

  11. A Novel Dynamic Model for Predicting Pressure Wave Velocity in Four-Phase Fluid Flowing along the Drilling Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic pressure wave velocity model is presented based on momentum equation, mass-balance equation, equation of state, and small perturbation theory. Simultaneously, the drift model was used to analyze the flow characteristics of oil, gas, water, and drilling fluid multiphase flow. In addition, the dynamic model considers the gas dissolution, virtual mass force, drag force, and relative motion of the interphase as well. Finite difference and Newton-Raphson iterative are introduced to the numerical simulation of the dynamic model. The calculation results indicate that the wave velocity is more sensitive to the increase of gas influx rate than the increase of oil/water influx rate. Wave velocity decreases significantly with the increase of gas influx. Influenced by the pressure drop of four-phase fluid flowing along the annulus, wave velocity tends to increase with respect to well depth, contrary to the gradual reduction of gas void fraction at different depths with the increase of backpressure (BP. Analysis also found that the growth of angular frequency will lead to an increase of wave velocity at low range. Comparison with the calculation results without considering virtual mass force demonstrates that the calculated wave velocity is relatively bigger by using the presented model.

  12. Investigation of the velocity distribution in the flow of a journal bearing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobis, Matthias; Reinke, Peter; Schmidt, Marcus; Riedel, Marco; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    In many previous studies the main focus was put on the pressure distribution in the lubricating gap. Due to the limited space in the gap an investigation of the velocity distribution is very difficult or rather impossible. Based on the geometrical shapes of a real journal bearing, a bearing model test rig with an increased relative gap width has been developed. Thus, it is possible to detect the distribution of the flow speed within the gap by using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV). The comparability of the flow to the flow in a real journal bearing is ensured by observing the Reynolds similarity. Due to a targeted eccentricity in the system and the circumferential groove over 180°, there is in connection with the outlet hole in the rotating shaft a permanent change in the outflow conditions. The consequence is a periodically varying system pressure with effects to the pressure and volumetric flow rate at the inlet and outlet. The velocity measurements with a triggered LDV are done by considering these transient boundary conditions at the system boundaries. In this paper the experimental setup, the expiration of the investigations and some exemplary results are presented. Attendant to the experiment, numerical simulations are carried out and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  13. Investigation of the velocity distribution in the flow of a journal bearing model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis Matthias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In many previous studies the main focus was put on the pressure distribution in the lubricating gap. Due to the limited space in the gap an investigation of the velocity distribution is very difficult or rather impossible. Based on the geometrical shapes of a real journal bearing, a bearing model test rig with an increased relative gap width has been developed. Thus, it is possible to detect the distribution of the flow speed within the gap by using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV. The comparability of the flow to the flow in a real journal bearing is ensured by observing the Reynolds similarity. Due to a targeted eccentricity in the system and the circumferential groove over 180°, there is in connection with the outlet hole in the rotating shaft a permanent change in the outflow conditions. The consequence is a periodically varying system pressure with effects to the pressure and volumetric flow rate at the inlet and outlet. The velocity measurements with a triggered LDV are done by considering these transient boundary conditions at the system boundaries. In this paper the experimental setup, the expiration of the investigations and some exemplary results are presented. Attendant to the experiment, numerical simulations are carried out and the results are compared with the experimental data.

  14. Three-dimensional velocity model of crustal structure in the southern Korean Peninsula and its full-waveform validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhie, J.; Kim, S.; Woo, J. U.; Song, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    To obtain a high-resolution crustal three-dimensional (3-D) model, we incorporate multiple regional ambient noise datasets in different scales, which consist of 150 accelerometer stations (1-6 s group velocity), 37 regional broadband stations (5-30 s group and phase velocity), and longer period phase velocity maps from previous study (25-40 s phase velocity). A 3-D structure of shear wave velocity is constrained by integrating one-dimensional depth profiles from inversions of surface wave dispersions. The model estimation is carried out thoroughly in a trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian inversion framework, such that the resulting model is less biased by arbitrary assumptions in the inversion process. To obtain P-wave velocity structure, then, a previous estimation of the variation of Vp/Vs ratio is applied. A 1-D velocity model will be replaced by this new 3-D model for determining accurate hypocenters and source processes of local earthquakes in the region. In addition, the new model will make more reliable seismic hazard analysis for scenario earthquakes possible. Before adopting the new model for various applications, it is necessary to validate it. To verify the validity of the model, full-waveform simulations for recent local earthquakes are performed. Two well observed moderate earthquakes occurred at NE and SW of the southern Korean Peninsula are considered for waveform simulations. The comparison between synthetic and observed waveforms shows that the new model reasonably well represents the seismic wave propagation characteristics in the southern Korean Peninsula.

  15. Mass discharge estimation from contaminated sites: Multi-model solutions for assessment of conceptual uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Nanna Isbak; Troldborg, Mads; McKnight, Ursula S.

    2012-01-01

    ) leave as is, (2) clean up, or (3) further investigation needed. However, mass discharge estimates are often very uncertain, which may hamper the management decisions. If option 1 is incorrectly chosen soil and water quality will decrease, threatening or destroying drinking water resources. The risk...... consisting of PCE (perchloroethylene) has contaminated a fractured clay till aquitard overlaying a limestone aquifer. The exact shape and nature of the source is unknown and so is the importance of transport in the fractures. The result of the multi-model approach is a visual representation...

  16. Shallow Crustal Structure in the Northern Salton Trough, California: Insights from a Detailed 3-D Velocity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajala, R.; Persaud, P.; Stock, J. M.; Fuis, G. S.; Hole, J. A.; Goldman, M.; Scheirer, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Coachella Valley is the northern extent of the Gulf of California-Salton Trough. It contains the southernmost segment of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) for which a magnitude 7.8 earthquake rupture was modeled to help produce earthquake planning scenarios. However, discrepancies in ground motion and travel-time estimates from the current Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) velocity model of the Salton Trough highlight inaccuracies in its shallow velocity structure. An improved 3-D velocity model that better defines the shallow basin structure and enables the more accurate location of earthquakes and identification of faults is therefore essential for seismic hazard studies in this area. We used recordings of 126 explosive shots from the 2011 Salton Seismic Imaging Project (SSIP) to SSIP receivers and Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) stations. A set of 48,105 P-wave travel time picks constituted the highest-quality input to a 3-D tomographic velocity inversion. To improve the ray coverage, we added network-determined first arrivals at SCSN stations from 39,998 recently relocated local earthquakes, selected to a maximum focal depth of 10 km, to develop a detailed 3-D P-wave velocity model for the Coachella Valley with 1-km grid spacing. Our velocity model shows good resolution ( 50 rays/cubic km) down to a minimum depth of 7 km. Depth slices from the velocity model reveal several interesting features. At shallow depths ( 3 km), we observe an elongated trough of low velocity, attributed to sediments, located subparallel to and a few km SW of the SAF, and a general velocity structure that mimics the surface geology of the area. The persistence of the low-velocity sediments to 5-km depth just north of the Salton Sea suggests that the underlying basement surface, shallower to the NW, dips SE, consistent with interpretation from gravity studies (Langenheim et al., 2005). On the western side of the Coachella Valley, we detect depth-restricted regions of

  17. KdV-Burgers equation in a new continuum model based on full velocity difference model considering anticipation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rongjun; Ge, Hongxia; Wang, Jufeng

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a new continuum model based on full velocity difference car following model is developed with the consideration of driver's anticipation effect. By applying the linear stability theory, the new model's linear stability is obtained. Through nonlinear analysis, the KdV-Burgers equation is derived to describe the propagating behavior of traffic density wave near the neutral stability line. Numerical simulation shows that the new model possesses the local cluster, and it is capable of explaining some particular traffic phenomena Numerical results show that when considering the effects of anticipation, the traffic jams can be suppressed efficiently. The key improvement of this new model is that the anticipation effect can improve the stability of traffic flow.

  18. Waste water discharges into natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marri, P.; Barsanti, P.; Mione, A.; Posarelli, M.

    1996-12-01

    The aqueous discharges into natural waters is a very technical solution expecially for surface buoyant discharges. It is not only convenient to limit the concentration levels of the discharges, but also to improve the turbolent processes that diluite the discharge. Mostly these processes depend by some geometric parameters of the discharge and by some physical parameters of the effluent and of the receiving water body. An appropriate choice of some parameters, using also suitable mathematical models, allows to design discharges with a very high dilution; so the decreasing of the pollutant levels is improved and the environmental impact can be reduced versus a not diluted effluent. The simulations of a mathematical model, here described, prove that in some circumstances, expecially in case of discharges of fresh water into saline water bodies with a low velocity of the current, the dilution is poor; the effluent can be trapped in a narrow water surface layer where the pollutant concentrations remain high. also far away from the discharge point

  19. Kinematic Modeling of Normal Voluntary Mandibular Opening and Closing Velocity-Initial Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawriołek, Krzysztof; Gawriołek, Maria; Komosa, Marek; Piotrowski, Paweł R; Azer, Shereen S

    2015-06-01

    Determination and quantification of voluntary mandibular velocity movement has not been a thoroughly studied parameter of masticatory movement. This study attempted to objectively define kinematics of mandibular movement based on numerical (digital) analysis of the relations and interactions of velocity diagram records in healthy female individuals. Using a computerized mandibular scanner (K7 Evaluation Software), 72 diagrams of voluntary mandibular velocity movements (36 for opening, 36 for closing) for women with clinically normal motor and functional activities of the masticatory system were recorded. Multiple measurements were analyzed focusing on the curve for maximum velocity records. For each movement, the loop of temporary velocities was determined. The diagram was then entered into AutoCad calculation software where movement analysis was performed. The real maximum velocity values on opening (Vmax ), closing (V0 ), and average velocity values (Vav ) as well as movement accelerations (a) were recorded. Additionally, functional (A1-A2) and geometric (P1-P4) analysis of loop constituent phases were performed, and the relations between the obtained areas were defined. Velocity means and correlation coefficient values for various velocity phases were calculated. The Wilcoxon test produced the following maximum and average velocity results: Vmax = 394 ± 102, Vav = 222 ± 61 for opening, and Vmax = 409 ± 94, Vav = 225 ± 55 mm/s for closing. Both mandibular movement range and velocity change showed significant variability achieving the highest velocity in P2 phase. Voluntary mandibular velocity presents significant variations between healthy individuals. Maximum velocity is obtained when incisal separation is between 12.8 and 13.5 mm. An improved understanding of the patterns of normal mandibular movements may provide an invaluable diagnostic aid to pathological changes within the masticatory system. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Efficient scattering-angle enrichment for a nonlinear inversion of the background and perturbations components of a velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zedong; Alkhalifah, Tariq

    2017-09-01

    Reflection-waveform inversion (RWI) can help us reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full-waveform inversion by inverting for the background velocity model using the wave path of a single scattered wavefield to an image. However, current RWI implementations usually neglect the multiscattered energy, which will cause some artefacts in the image and the update of the background. To improve existing RWI implementations in taking multiscattered energy into consideration, we split the velocity model into background and perturbation components, integrate them directly in the wave equation and formulate a new optimization problem for both components. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer a single-scattering model, but includes all scattering. Through introducing a new cheap implementation of scattering angle enrichment, the separation of the background and perturbation components can be implemented efficiently. We optimize both components simultaneously to produce updates to the velocity model that is nonlinear with respect to both the background and the perturbation. The newly introduced perturbation model can absorb the non-smooth update of the background in a more consistent way. We apply the proposed approach on the Marmousi model with data that contain frequencies starting from 5 Hz to show that this method can converge to an accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Also, our proposed method works well when applied to a field data set.

  1. Efficient scattering-angle enrichment for a nonlinear inversion of the background and perturbations components of a velocity model

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2017-07-04

    Reflection-waveform inversion (RWI) can help us reduce the nonlinearity of the standard full-waveform inversion (FWI) by inverting for the background velocity model using the wave-path of a single scattered wavefield to an image. However, current RWI implementations usually neglect the multi-scattered energy, which will cause some artifacts in the image and the update of the background. To improve existing RWI implementations in taking multi-scattered energy into consideration, we split the velocity model into background and perturbation components, integrate them directly in the wave equation, and formulate a new optimization problem for both components. In this case, the perturbed model is no longer a single-scattering model, but includes all scattering. Through introducing a new cheap implementation of scattering angle enrichment, the separation of the background and perturbation components can be implemented efficiently. We optimize both components simultaneously to produce updates to the velocity model that is nonlinear with respect to both the background and the perturbation. The newly introduced perturbation model can absorb the non-smooth update of the background in a more consistent way. We apply the proposed approach on the Marmousi model with data that contain frequencies starting from 5 Hz to show that this method can converge to an accurate velocity starting from a linearly increasing initial velocity. Also, our proposed method works well when applied to a field data set.

  2. Modeling of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre V.; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Macheret, Sergey O.; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed physical model for an asymmetric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in air driven by repetitive nanosecond voltage pulses is developed. In particular, modeling of DBD with high voltage repetitive negative and positive nanosecond pulses combined with positive dc bias is carried out. Operation at high voltage is compared with operation at low voltage, highlighting the advantage of high voltages, however the effect of backward-directed breakdown in the case of negative pulses results in a decrease of the integral momentum transferred to the gas. The use of positive repetitive pulses with dc bias is demonstrated to be promising for DBD performance improvement. The effects of the voltage waveform not only on force magnitude, but also on the spatial profile of the force, are shown. The crucial role of background photoionization in numerical modeling of ionization waves (streamers) in DBD plasmas is demonstrated

  3. Deformation at a Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundary: Modeling the Southern California GPS Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Murray-Moraleda, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Because of EarthScope and related deployments, Southern California has perhaps the highest Global Positioning System (GPS) station density of any of Earth’s seismically active regions. Here we provide an updated analysis of the Southern California velocity field to illustrate both the strengths of high station density and the inherent limitations of surface geodetic measurements for quantifying earthquake-related deformation processes. Modeling GPS velocity fields in seismically active regions worldwide indicates deformation can be efficiently and usefully described as relative motions among elastic, fault-bounded crustal blocks. However, subjective choices of block geometry are unavoidable and introduce significant uncertainties in model formulation and in the resultant GPS fault slip rate estimates. To facilitate comparison between GPS and geologic results in southern California we use the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) and geologic slip rates tabulated in the 2008 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF2) report as starting points for identifying the most important faults and specifying the block geometry. We then apply this geometry in an inversion of the SCEC Crustal Motion Model (CMM4) GPS velocity field to estimate block motions and intra-block fault slip rates and compare our results with previous work. In most parts of southern California—for example, north of the San Andreas Big Bend and SE of Los Angeles--our block geometry closely resembles that assumed in previous studies (McCaffrey 2005 JGR; Meade & Hager 2005 JGR; Becker et al. 2005 GJI). In these regions GPS slip rates can be reliably estimated and values for individual faults generally agree from one study to another and are also consistent with geologic estimates. However, there is no consensus on block geometry in the Transverse Ranges, Los Angeles Basin and Central Mojave Desert, where CFM faults are densely distributed, UCERF2 slip rates on several faults are comparable, and

  4. The time-dependent Ginzburg—Landau equation for the two-velocity difference model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shu-Zhen; Ge Hong-Xia; Cheng Rong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic theory is formulated to describe the phase transition and critical phenomenon in traffic flow. Based on the two-velocity difference model, the time-dependent Ginzburg—Landau (TDGL) equation under certain condition is derived to describe the traffic flow near the critical point through the nonlinear analytical method. The corresponding two solutions, the uniform and the kink solutions, are given. The coexisting curve, spinodal line and critical point are obtained by the first and second derivatives of the thermodynamic potential. The modified Korteweg de Vries (mKdV) equation around the critical point is derived by using the reductive perturbation method and its kink—antikink solution is also obtained. The relation between the TDGL equation and the mKdV equation is shown. The simulation result is consistent with the nonlinear analytical result. (general)

  5. Multi-temperature state-dependent equivalent circuit discharge model for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, Karsten; Marinescu, Monica; Auger, Daniel J.; O'Neill, Laura; Fotouhi, Abbas; Somasundaram, Karthik; Offer, Gregory J.; Minton, Geraint; Longo, Stefano; Wild, Mark; Knap, Vaclav

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries are described extensively in the literature, but existing computational models aimed at scientific understanding are too complex for use in applications such as battery management. Computationally simple models are vital for exploitation. This paper proposes a non-linear state-of-charge dependent Li-S equivalent circuit network (ECN) model for a Li-S cell under discharge. Li-S batteries are fundamentally different to Li-ion batteries, and require chemistry-specific models. A new Li-S model is obtained using a 'behavioural' interpretation of the ECN model; as Li-S exhibits a 'steep' open-circuit voltage (OCV) profile at high states-of-charge, identification methods are designed to take into account OCV changes during current pulses. The prediction-error minimization technique is used. The model is parameterized from laboratory experiments using a mixed-size current pulse profile at four temperatures from 10 °C to 50 °C, giving linearized ECN parameters for a range of states-of-charge, currents and temperatures. These are used to create a nonlinear polynomial-based battery model suitable for use in a battery management system. When the model is used to predict the behaviour of a validation data set representing an automotive NEDC driving cycle, the terminal voltage predictions are judged accurate with a root mean square error of 32 mV.

  6. Influence of running velocity on vertical, leg and joint stiffness : modelling and recommendations for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brughelli, Matt; Cronin, John

    2008-01-01

    Human running can be modelled as either a spring-mass model or multiple springs in series. A force is required to stretch or compress the spring, and thus stiffness, the variable of interest in this paper, can be calculated from the ratio of this force to the change in spring length. Given the link between force and length change, muscle stiffness and mechanical stiffness have been areas of interest to researchers, clinicians, and strength and conditioning practitioners for many years. This review focuses on mechanical stiffness, and in particular, vertical, leg and joint stiffness, since these are the only stiffness types that have been directly calculated during human running. It has been established that as running velocity increases from slow-to-moderate values, leg stiffness remains constant while both vertical stiffness and joint stiffness increase. However, no studies have calculated vertical, leg or joint stiffness over a range of slow-to-moderate values to maximum values in an athletic population. Therefore, the effects of faster running velocities on stiffness are relatively unexplored. Furthermore, no experimental research has examined the effects of training on vertical, leg or joint stiffness and the subsequent effects on running performance. Various methods of training (Olympic style weightlifting, heavy resistance training, plyometrics, eccentric strength training) have shown to be effective at improving running performance. However, the effects of these training methods on vertical, leg and joint stiffness are unknown. As a result, the true importance of stiffness to running performance remains unexplored, and the best practice for changing stiffness to optimize running performance is speculative at best. It is our hope that a better understanding of stiffness, and the influence of running speed on stiffness, will lead to greater interest and an increase in experimental research in this area.

  7. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac pacemaker implantation - discharge; Artificial pacemaker - discharge; Permanent pacemaker - discharge; Internal pacemaker - discharge; Cardiac resynchronization therapy - discharge; CRT - discharge; ...

  8. Plasma kinetics of Ar/O2 magnetron discharge by two-dimensional multifluid modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, C.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.; Gousset, G.

    2010-01-01

    Multifluid two-dimensional model was developed to describe the plasma kinetics of the direct current Ar/O 2 magnetron, coupling two modules: charged particles and neutrals. The first module deals with three positive ions - Ar + , O 2 + , and O + - and two negative species - e - and O - - treated by the moments of Boltzmann's equation. The second one follows seven neutral species (Ar, O 2 , O, O 3 , and related metastables) by the multicomponent diffusion technique. The two modules are self-consistently coupled by the mass conservation and kinetic coefficients taking into account more than 100 volume reactions. The steady state is obtained when the overall convergence is achieved. Calculations for 10%O 2 in Ar/O 2 mixture at 2.67 and 4 Pa show that the oxygen excited species are mainly created by electron collisions in the negative glow of the discharge. Decreasing the pressure down to 0.67 Pa, the model reveals the nonlocal behavior of the reactive species. The density gradient of O 2 ground state is reversed with respect to all gradients of the other reactive species, since the latter ones originate from the molecular ground state of oxygen. It is also found that the wall reactions drastically modify the space gradient of neutral reactive species, at least as much as the pressure, even if the discharge operates in compound mode.

  9. Quantifying Groundwater Nutrient Discharge to a Large Glacial Lake using a Watershed Loading Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, K. E.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater discharge to a lake is an important, if often neglected, component to water and nutrient budgets. Point measurements of groundwater discharge into a lake are prone to error, so in this study of 15.57 km2 West Lake Okoboji, Iowa, a watershed-based groundwater loading model was developed. Located in northwest Iowa, West Lake Okoboji is considered one of Iowa's premier tourist destinations but is threatened by eutrophication. A network of 21 observation wells was installed in the watershed to evaluate groundwater recharge and quality under representative land cover types in a range of landscape positions. Our objective was to develop typical groundwater responses from various land cover-landscape associations for scaling up to unmonitored areas in the watershed. Results indicated substantial variation in groundwater recharge and quality in the 3847 ha watershed. Recharge was similar among land covers under vegetation but was much lower under urban pavement. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were highest under cropped fields and lowest under perennial grassland and golf courses, whereas dissolved phosphorus was highest under residential and urban areas, including an engineered bioswale. A groundwater load allocation model indicated 91% of the nitrate load was from cropped areas and 7% from residential areas. In contrast, P loads were more equally divided among cropped fields (43%), perennial grass (36%) and residential (19%) areas. Based on the mass of nitrate and P in the lake, groundwater accounts for 71% and 18% of the nutrient inputs, respectively.

  10. Generic models for use in assessing the impact of discharges of radioactive substances to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The concern of society in general for the quality of the environment and the realization that all human activities have some environmental effect has led to the development of a procedure for environmental impact analysis. This procedure is a predictive one, which forecasts probable environmental effects before some action, such as the construction and operation of a nuclear power station, is decided upon. The method of prediction is by the application of models that describe the environmental processes in mathematical terms in order to produce a quantitative result which can be used in the decision making process. This report describes such a procedure for application to radioactive discharges and is addressed to the national regulatory bodies and technical and administrative personnel responsible for performing environmental impact analyses. The report is also intended to support the recently published IAEA Safety Guide on Regulatory Control of Radioactive Discharges to the Environment. It expands on and supersedes previous advice published in IAEA Safety Series No. 57 on Generic Models and Parameters for Assessing the Environmental Transfer of Radionuclides from Routine Releases. This Safety Report was developed through a series of consultants meetings and three Advisory Group Meetings

  11. Minimum 1D velocity models in Central and Southern Italy: a contribution to better constrain hypocentral determinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Frepoli

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We computed one-dimensional ( I D velocity models and station corrections for Centrai and Southern Italy, in- verting re-picked P-wave alTival times recorded by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica seismic network. The re-picked data yield resolved P-wave velocity results and proved to be more suited than bulletin data for de- tailed tomographic studies. Using the improved velocity models, we relocated the most significant earthquakes which occurt.ed in the Apennines in the past 7 years, achieving constrained hypocentral determinations for events within most of the Apenninic belt. The interpretation of the obtained lD velocity models allows us to infer interesting features on the deep structure of the Apennines. Smooth velocity gradients with depth and low P-wave velocities are ob,'ierved beneath the Apennines. We believe that our results are effective to constrain hypocentral locations in Italy and may represent a first step towards more detailed seismotectonic analyses.

  12. Probing dark energy models with extreme pairwise velocities of galaxy clusters from the DEUS-FUR simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillot, Vincent R.; Alimi, Jean-Michel; Corasaniti, Pier-Stefano; Rasera, Yann

    2015-06-01

    Observations of colliding galaxy clusters with high relative velocity probe the tail of the halo pairwise velocity distribution with the potential of providing a powerful test of cosmology. As an example it has been argued that the discovery of the Bullet Cluster challenges standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model predictions. Halo catalogues from N-body simulations have been used to estimate the probability of Bullet-like clusters. However, due to simulation volume effects previous studies had to rely on a Gaussian extrapolation of the pairwise velocity distribution to high velocities. Here, we perform a detail analysis using the halo catalogues from the Dark Energy Universe Simulation Full Universe Runs (DEUS-FUR), which enables us to resolve the high-velocity tail of the distribution and study its dependence on the halo mass definition, redshift and cosmology. Building upon these results, we estimate the probability of Bullet-like systems in the framework of Extreme Value Statistics. We show that the tail of extreme pairwise velocities significantly deviates from that of a Gaussian, moreover it carries an imprint of the underlying cosmology. We find the Bullet Cluster probability to be two orders of magnitude larger than previous estimates, thus easing the tension with the ΛCDM model. Finally, the comparison of the inferred probabilities for the different DEUS-FUR cosmologies suggests that observations of extreme interacting clusters can provide constraints on dark energy models complementary to standard cosmological tests.

  13. Internal velocity and mass distributions in simulated clusters of galaxies for a variety of cosmogonic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue

    1994-01-01

    The mass and velocity distributions in the outskirts (0.5-3.0/h Mpc) of simulated clusters of galaxies are examined for a suite of cosmogonic models (two Omega(sub 0) = 1 and two Omega(sub 0) = 0.2 models) utilizing large-scale particle-mesh (PM) simulations. Through a series of model computations, designed to isolate the different effects, we find that both Omega(sub 0) and P(sub k) (lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc) are important to the mass distributions in clusters of galaxies. There is a correlation between power, P(sub k), and density profiles of massive clusters; more power tends to point to the direction of a stronger correlation between alpha and M(r less than 1.5/h Mpc); i.e., massive clusters being relatively extended and small mass clusters being relatively concentrated. A lower Omega(sub 0) universe tends to produce relatively concentrated massive clusters and relatively extended small mass clusters compared to their counterparts in a higher Omega(sub 0) model with the same power. Models with little (initial) small-scale power, such as the hot dark matter (HDM) model, produce more extended mass distributions than the isothermal distribution for most of the mass clusters. But the cold dark matter (CDM) models show mass distributions of most of the clusters more concentrated than the isothermal distribution. X-ray and gravitational lensing observations are beginning providing useful information on the mass distribution in and around clusters; some interesting constraints on Omega(sub 0) and/or the (initial) power of the density fluctuations on scales lambda less than or = 16/h Mpc (where linear extrapolation is invalid) can be obtained when larger observational data sets, such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, become available.

  14. Two-dimensional model of the Penning discharge in a cylindrical chamber with the axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhikov, S. T.

    2017-08-01

    The drift-diffusion model of a Penning discharge in molecular hydrogen under pressures of about 1 Torr with regard to the external electric circuit has been proposed. A two-dimensional axially symmetric discharge geometry with a cylindrical anode and flat cathodes perpendicular to the symmetry axis has been investigated. An external magnetic field of about 0.1 T is applied in the axial direction. Using the developed drift-diffusion model, the electrodynamic structure of a Penning discharge in the pressure range of 0.5-5 Torr at a current source voltage of 200-500 V is numerically simulated. The evolution of the discharge electrodynamic structure upon pressure variations in zero magnetic field (the classical glow discharge mode) and in the axial magnetic field (Penning discharge) has been studied using numerical experiments. The theoretical predictions of the existence of an averaged electron and ion motion in a Penning discharge both in the axial and radial directions and in the azimuthal direction have been confirmed by the calculations.

  15. Model velocities assessment and HF radar data assimilation in the Ibiza Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Lasheras, Jaime; Mourre, Baptiste; Reyes, Emma; Marmain, Julien; Orfila, Alejandro; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2017-04-01

    High Frequency Radar (HFR) provides continuous and high-resolution surface current measurements over wide coastal areas, enabling the observation of dynamic processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface, where a lot of momentum and heat exchange takes place, which is still not fully understood. Furthermore, HFR data provide critical information to improve numerical model predictions through data assimilation. However, the routine assimilation of HFR surface current data in operational models is still a challenge from both the methodological and computational points of view. Since 2012, SOCIB, the Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System, operates two coastal HFR sites with the purpose of monitoring the surface currents of the Ibiza Channel (Western Mediterranean Sea). It is an area characterized by important meridional flow exchanges with significant impacts on ecosystems. The circulation in the Ibiza Channel results from the complex interaction of different water masses under strong topographic constraints. This makes the area very challenging from the point of view of numerical modeling. Indeed, models are generally found to represent erroneous flows across this section. In this work, we perform the first steps to evaluate the potential of HFR data to improve the model circulation in the Ibiza Channel area with data assimilation. A multimodel Ensemble Optimal Interpolation scheme has been coupled to the SOCIB Western Mediterranean Operational Model (WMOP) to assimilate multiplatform observations, including the HFR surface velocities. WMOP is a 2-km resolution configuration of the ROMS model using CMEMS numerical products as initial and boundary conditions and high-resolution surface forcing from the Spanish Meteorological Agency. To evaluate whether the model properly captures the main dynamical features observed in the Ibiza Channel (which is a prerequisite for a successful data assimilation), comparison of spatial empirical orthogonal function

  16. Shear-wave velocity structure of young Atlantic Lithosphere from dispersion analysis and waveform modelling of Rayleigh waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Lange, Dietrich; Schippkus, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The lithosphere is the outermost solid layer of the Earth and includes the brittle curst and brittle uppermost mantle. It is underlain by the asthenosphere, the weaker and hotter portion of the mantle. The boundary between the brittle lithosphere and the asthenosphere is call the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, or LAB. The oceanic lithosphere is created at spreading ridges and cools and thickens with age. Seismologists define the LAB by the presence of a low shear wave velocity zone beneath a high velocity lid. Surface waves from earthquakes occurring in young oceanic lithosphere should sample lithospheric structure when being recorded in the vicinity of a mid-ocean ridge. Here, we study group velocity and dispersion of Rayleigh waves caused by earthquakes occurring at transform faults in the Central Atlantic Ocean. Earthquakes were recorded either by a network of wide-band (up to 60 s) ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°N or at the Global Seismic Network (GSN) Station ASCN on Ascension Island. Surface waves sampling young Atlantic lithosphere indicate systematic age-dependent changes of group velocities and dispersion of Rayleigh waves. With increasing plate age maximum group velocity increases (as a function of period), indicating cooling and thickening of the lithosphere. Shear wave velocity is derived inverting the observed dispersion of Rayleigh waves. Further, models derived from the OBS records were refined using waveform modelling of vertical component broadband data at periods of 15 to 40 seconds, constraining the velocity structure of the uppermost 100 km and hence in the depth interval of the mantle where lithospheric cooling is most evident. Waveform modelling supports that the thickness of lithosphere increases with age and that velocities in the lithosphere increase, too.

  17. Modelling of the reactive sputtering process with non-uniform discharge current density and different temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašina, P; Hytková, T; Eliáš, M

    2009-05-01

    The majority of current models of the reactive magnetron sputtering assume a uniform shape of the discharge current density and the same temperature near the target and the substrate. However, in the real experimental set-up, the presence of the magnetic field causes high density plasma to form in front of the cathode in the shape of a toroid. Consequently, the discharge current density is laterally non-uniform. In addition to this, the heating of the background gas by sputtered particles, which is usually referred to as the gas rarefaction, plays an important role. This paper presents an extended model of the reactive magnetron sputtering that assumes the non-uniform discharge current density and which accommodates the gas rarefaction effect. It is devoted mainly to the study of the behaviour of the reactive sputtering rather that to the prediction of the coating properties. Outputs of this model are compared with those that assume uniform discharge current density and uniform temperature profile in the deposition chamber. Particular attention is paid to the modelling of the radial variation of the target composition near transitions from the metallic to the compound mode and vice versa. A study of the target utilization in the metallic and compound mode is performed for two different discharge current density profiles corresponding to typical two pole and multipole magnetics available on the market now. Different shapes of the discharge current density were tested. Finally, hysteresis curves are plotted for various temperature conditions in the reactor.

  18. Site-response Estimation by 1D Heterogeneous Velocity Model using Borehole Log and its Relationship to Damping Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In the Niigata area, which suffered from several large earthquakes such as the 2007 Chuetsu-oki earthquake, geographical observation that elucidates the S-wave structure of the underground is advancing. Modeling of S-wave velocity structure in the subsurface is underway to enable simulation of long-period ground motion. The one-dimensional velocity model by inverse analysis of micro-tremors is sufficiently appropriate for long-period site response but not for short-period, which is important for ground motion evaluation at NPP sites. The high-frequency site responses may be controlled by the strength of heterogeneity of underground structure because the heterogeneity of the 1D model plays an important role in estimating high-frequency site responses and is strongly related to the damping factor of the 1D layered velocity model. (author)

  19. Downscaling climate projections for the Peruvian coastal Chancay-Huaral Basin to support river discharge modeling with WEAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taru Olsson

    2017-10-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: On average, GCMs indicate increased annual mean temperatures by 3.1 °C (RCP4.5 and by 4.3 °C (RCP8.5 and precipitation sum by 20% (RCP4.5 and by 28% (RCP8.5. With increasing total precipitation, river discharges are also found to increase, but the variability among the GCMs is considerable. The largest increases in monthly discharge are projected to occur in the wet season (November − April − with up to 31% increase of December multi-model mean. Despite the larger annual discharge for the mean multi-model result, discharges in the dry season may decrease according to some GCMs, showing the need for an adapted future water management.

  20. Experimental study and modelling of X-ray photo-triggering of a discharge for exciplex laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvet, Yolande

    1986-01-01

    As the excitation of the laser medium by using a photo-triggered discharge revealed to be more reliable that an excitation by pre-ionised discharge, this research thesis reports the use of such an excitation and the study of initiation mechanisms for discharges photo-triggered by X rays. The author first recalls the main characteristics of excimer and exciplex systems, and presents the principle of discharge photo-triggering. He presents the experimental set-up, and reports the use of an original method to characterise the X radiation. This method uses theoretical data related to Bremsstrahlung emission, and results are validated by experimental tests. Realistic data regarding X ray properties are introduced into the theoretical model which also takes X-ray-induced ionisation reactions and photo-electron energetic degradation into account. By using this model, the author determines the electron distribution function produced by the X pre-ionisation, and the resulting thermalized electron density [fr

  1. OEDGE modeling of DIII-D density scan discharges leading to detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, J. D.; Stangeby, P. C.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N.; Leonard, A. W.; McLean, A. G.; Unterberg, E. A.; Watkins, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    The OEDGE code is used to model the outer divertor plasma for discharges from a density scan experiment on DIII-D with the objective of assessing EIRENE and ADAS hydrogenic emission atomic physics data for Dα, Dβ and Dγ for values of Te and ne characteristic of the range of divertor plasma conditions from attached to weakly detached. Confidence in these values is essential to spectroscopic interpretation of any experiment or modeling effort. Good agreement between experiment and calculated emissions is found for both EIRENE and ADAS calculated emission profiles, confirming their reliability for plasma conditions down to ∼1 eV. For the cold dense plasma conditions characteristic of detachment, it is found that the calculated emissions are especially sensitive to Te.

  2. OEDGE modeling of DIII-D density scan discharges leading to detachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J. D. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Stangeby, P. C. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Bray, B. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Brooks, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); McLean, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Unterberg, Ezekial A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Here, we study the OEDGE code that is used to model the outer divertor plasma for discharges from a density scan experiment on DIII-D with the objective of assessing EIRENE and ADAS hydrogenic emission atomic physics data for Dα, Dβ and Dγ for values of Te and ne characteristic of the range of divertor plasma conditions from attached to weakly detached. Confidence in these values is essential to spectroscopic interpretation of any experiment or modeling effort. Good agreement between experiment and calculated emissions is found for both EIRENE and ADAS calculated emission profiles, confirming their reliability for plasma conditions down to ~1 eV. Lastly, for the cold dense plasma conditions characteristic of detachment, it is found that the calculated emissions are especially sensitive to Te.

  3. OEDGE modeling of DIII-D density scan discharges leading to detachment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J.D., E-mail: david@starfire.utias.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto M3H 5T6 (Canada); Stangeby, P.C. [University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies, Toronto M3H 5T6 (Canada); General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Bray, B.D. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Brooks, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Leonard, A.W. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); McLean, A.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Unterberg, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratories, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The OEDGE code is used to model the outer divertor plasma for discharges from a density scan experiment on DIII-D with the objective of assessing EIRENE and ADAS hydrogenic emission atomic physics data for D{sub α}, D{sub β} and D{sub γ} for values of T{sub e} and n{sub e} characteristic of the range of divertor plasma conditions from attached to weakly detached. Confidence in these values is essential to spectroscopic interpretation of any experiment or modeling effort. Good agreement between experiment and calculated emissions is found for both EIRENE and ADAS calculated emission profiles, confirming their reliability for plasma conditions down to ∼1 eV. For the cold dense plasma conditions characteristic of detachment, it is found that the calculated emissions are especially sensitive to T{sub e}.

  4. Velocity Models of the Upper Mantle Beneath the MER, Somali Platform, and Ethiopian Highlands from Body Wave Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, A.; Keranen, K. M.; Alemayehu, S.; Ayele, A.; Bastow, I. D.; Eilon, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) presents a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of an active continental rift. Here we use body wave tomography to generate compressional and shear wave velocity models of the region beneath the rift. The models help us understand the rifting process over the broader region around the MER, extending the geographic region beyond that captured in past studies. We use differential arrival times of body waves from teleseismic earthquakes and multi-channel cross correlation to generate travel time residuals relative to the global IASP91 1-d velocity model. The events used for the tomographic velocity model include 200 teleseismic earthquakes with moment magnitudes greater than 5.5 from our recent 2014-2016 deployment in combination with 200 earthquakes from the earlier EBSE and EAGLE deployments (Bastow et al. 2008). We use the finite-frequency tomography analysis of Schmandt et al. (2010), which uses a first Fresnel zone paraxial approximation to the Born theoretical kernel with spatial smoothing and model norm damping in an iterative LSQR algorithm. Results show a broad, slow region beneath the rift with a distinct low-velocity anomaly beneath the northwest shoulder. This robust and well-resolved low-velocity anomaly is visible at a range of depths beneath the Ethiopian plateau, within the footprint of Oligocene flood basalts, and near surface expressions of diking. We interpret this anomaly as a possible plume conduit, or a low-velocity finger rising from a deeper, larger plume. Within the rift, results are consistent with previous work, exhibiting rift segmentation and low-velocities beneath the rift valley.

  5. Modeling of discharge-triggered electric field redistribution on the interior components of a satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, L.; Horvath, E.B.

    1999-01-01

    This work examines an electrostatic charging/discharging cycle of a populated circuit board inside an equipment housing of a satellite at GEO. Component potentials and electric field strengths are examined before and after a common ground discharge event. Field reversal after the discharge suggests that favourable conditions exist for charge dissipation from dielectrics. (authors)

  6. Calculation of mass discharge of the Greenland ice sheet in the Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Rybak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass discharge calculation is a challenging task for the ice sheet modeling aimed at evaluation of their contribution to the global sea level rise during past interglacials, as well as one of the consequences of future climate change. In Greenland, ablation is the major source of fresh water runoff. It is approximately equal to the dynamical discharge (iceberg calving. Its share might have still larger during the past interglacials when the margins of the GrIS retreated inland. Refreezing of the melted water and its retention are two poorly known processes playing as a counterpart of melting and, thus, exerting influence on the run off. Interaction of ice sheets and climate is driven by energy and mass exchange processes and is complicated by numerous feed-backs. To study the complex of these processes, coupling of an ice sheet model and a climate model (i.e. models of the atmosphere and the ocean in one model is required, which is often called the Earth System Model (ESM. Formalization of processes of interaction between the ice sheets and climate within the ESM requires elaboration of special techniques to deal with dramatic differences in spatial and temporal variability scales within each of three ESM’s blocks. In this paper, we focus on the method of coupling of a Greenland ice sheet model (GrISM with the climate model INMCM having been developed in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of Russian Academy of Sciences. Our coupling approach consists in applying of a special buffer model, which serves as an interface between GrISM and INMCM. A simple energy and water exchange model (EWBM-G allows realistic description of surface air temperature and precipitation fields adjusted to a relief of elevation of the GrIS surface. In a series of diagnostic numerical experiments with the present-day GrIS geometry and the modeled climate we studied sensitivity of the modeled surface mass balance and run off to the key EWBM-G parameters and compared

  7. ON MODELLING RECRYSTALLIZATION PROCESSES WITH RANDOM GROWTH VELOCITIES OF THE GRAINS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Villa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous transformations (or reactions  may be defined as those transformations in which there is a sharp moving boundary between the transformed and untransformed region. In Materials Science such transformations are normally called nucleation and growth transformations, whereas birth-and-growth processes is the preferred denomination in Mathematics. Recently, the present authors in a series of papers have derived new analytical expressions for nucleation and growth transformations with the help of stochastic geometry methods. Those papers focused mainly on the role of nuclei location in space, described by point processes, on transformation kinetics.  In this work we focus on the effect that a random velocity of the moving boundaries of the grains has in the overall kinetics. One example of a practical situation in which such a model may be useful is that of recrystallization.  Juul Jensen and Godiksen reviewed recent 3-d experimental results  on recrystallization kinetics and concluded that there is compelling evidence  that  every  grain has its own distinct growth rate. Motivated by this practical application we present here new general kinetics expressions for various situations of practical interest, in which a random distribution of growth velocities is assumed. In order to do this, we  make use of tools from Stochastic Geometry and Geometric Measure Theory. Previously known results follow here as particular cases. Although the motivation for this paper was recrystallization the expressions derived here may be applied to nucleation and growth reactions in general.

  8. P-wave velocity changes in freezing hard low-porosity rocks: a laboratory-based time-average model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Draebing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available P-wave refraction seismics is a key method in permafrost research but its applicability to low-porosity rocks, which constitute alpine rock walls, has been denied in prior studies. These studies explain p-wave velocity changes in freezing rocks exclusively due to changing velocities of pore infill, i.e. water, air and ice. In existing models, no significant velocity increase is expected for low-porosity bedrock. We postulate, that mixing laws apply for high-porosity rocks, but freezing in confined space in low-porosity bedrock also alters physical rock matrix properties. In the laboratory, we measured p-wave velocities of 22 decimetre-large low-porosity (< 10% metamorphic, magmatic and sedimentary rock samples from permafrost sites with a natural texture (> 100 micro-fissures from 25 °C to −15 °C in 0.3 °C increments close to the freezing point. When freezing, p-wave velocity increases by 11–166% perpendicular to cleavage/bedding and equivalent to a matrix velocity increase from 11–200% coincident to an anisotropy decrease in most samples. The expansion of rigid bedrock upon freezing is restricted and ice pressure will increase matrix velocity and decrease anisotropy while changing velocities of the pore infill are insignificant. Here, we present a modified Timur's two-phase-equation implementing changes in matrix velocity dependent on lithology and demonstrate the general applicability of refraction seismics to differentiate frozen and unfrozen low-porosity bedrock.

  9. Modelling the average velocity of propagation of the flame front in a gasoline engine with hydrogen additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenskaya, N. M.; Smolenskii, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents models for calculating the average velocity of propagation of the flame front, obtained from the results of experimental studies. Experimental studies were carried out on a single-cylinder gasoline engine UIT-85 with hydrogen additives up to 6% of the mass of fuel. The article shows the influence of hydrogen addition on the average velocity propagation of the flame front in the main combustion phase. The dependences of the turbulent propagation velocity of the flame front in the second combustion phase on the composition of the mixture and operating modes. The article shows the influence of the normal combustion rate on the average flame propagation velocity in the third combustion phase.

  10. Account of nonlocal ionization by fast electrons in the fluid models of a direct current glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafatov, I. [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Bogdanov, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, A. A. [Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We developed and tested a simple hybrid model for a glow discharge, which incorporates nonlocal ionization by fast electrons into the 'simple' and 'extended' fluid frameworks. Calculations have been performed for an argon gas. Comparison with the experimental data as well as with the hybrid (particle) and fluid modelling results demonstated good applicability of the proposed model.

  11. Kinetic model of vibrational relaxation in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The effect of humidity on the vibrational relaxation of O 2 (v) and N 2 (v) in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge is studied using a kinetic model. We previously showed that humidity markedly increases the vibration-to-translation (V-T) rate of molecules in a humid-air pulsed corona discharge by measuring O 2 (v) density (Ono et al 2010 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 19 015009). In this paper, we numerically calculate the vibrational kinetics of O 2 , N 2 and H 2 O to study the reason behind the acceleration of V-T in the presence of humidity. The calculation closely reproduces the measured acceleration of V-T due to humidity, and shows that the increase in the V-T rate is caused by the fast vibration-to-vibration (V-V) processes of O 2 -H 2 O and N 2 -H 2 O and the subsequent rapid V-T process of H 2 O-H 2 O. In addition, it is shown that O atom density is also important in the vibrational kinetics owing to the rapid V-T process of O 2 -O.

  12. COREDIV modelling of JET ILW discharges with different impurity seeding: nitrogen, neon, argon and krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanova-Stanik Irena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulations with the COREDIV code of JET H-mode discharges with 25 MW of auxiliary heating in the ITER-like wall (ILW configuration with different impurity seedings – nitrogen (N, neon (Ne, argon (Ar and krypton (Kr – are presented. All simulations have been performed with the same transport model and input discharge parameters like auxiliary heating, volume average plasma density, confinement factor. Only the seeded impurity puff rate was changed in the calculations. It appears that for the considered heating power of 25 MW and relatively low volume electron average density = 6.2 × 1019 m−3, impurity seeding is necessary. It has been found that for every gas at the maximum level of the seeding rate, allowed by the code convergence, the power to the plate is reduced up to 2–4 MW, with electron temperature at the plate of about 2 eV, indicating semi-detached conditions in the divertor region. It should be noted, however, that in cases with low and medium Z impurity (N, Ne and Ar, tungsten radiation is a significant part of radiation losses and stays above 22–32% of the total energy losses, but for high Z impurity (Kr it is reduced up to 10% of the total losses. The maximum of the Kr radiation is between the pedestal region and separatrix, showing that radiative mantle can be created, which might have a strong influence on the plasma parameters in the pedestal region.

  13. Observed and modeled tsunami current velocities in Humboldt Bay and Crescent City Harbor, northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admire, A. R.; Dengler, L.; Crawford, G. B.; uslu, B. U.; Montoya, J.

    2012-12-01

    Crescent City were compared to calculated velocities from the Method of Splitting Tsunamis (MOST) numerical model. For Humboldt Bay, the 2010 model tsunami frequencies matched the actual values for the first two hours after the initial arrival however the amplitudes were underestimated by approximately 65%. MOST replicated the first four hours of the 2011 tsunami signal in Humboldt Bay quite well although the peak flood currents were underestimated by about 50%. MOST predicted attenuation of the signal after four hours but the actual signal persisted at a nearly constant level for more than 48 hours. In Crescent City, the model prediction of the 2011 frequency agreed quite well with the observed signal for the first two and a half hours after the initial arrival with a 50% underestimation of the peak amplitude. The results from this project demonstrate that ADCPs can effectively record tsunami currents for small to moderate events and can be used to calibrate and validate models (i.e. MOST) in order to better predict hazardous tsunami conditions and improve planned responses to protect lives and property, especially within harbors. An ADCP will be installed in Crescent City Harbor and four additional ADCPs are being deployed in Humboldt Bay during the fall of 2012.

  14. Application of one-dimensional model to calculate water velocity distributions over elastic elements simulating Canadian waterweed plants (Elodea Canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubrak, Elżbieta; Kubrak, Janusz; Rowiński, Paweł

    2013-02-01

    One-dimensional model for vertical profiles of longitudinal velocities in open-channel flows is verified against laboratory data obtained in an open channel with artificial plants. Those plants simulate Canadian waterweed which in nature usually forms dense stands that reach all the way to the water surface. The model works particularly well for densely spaced plants.

  15. A Model for Determining the Effect of the Wind Velocity on 100 M Sprinting Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janjic Natasa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an equation for determining instantaneous and final velocity of a sprinter in a 100 m run completed with a wind resistance ranging from 0.1 to 4.5 m/s. The validity of the equation was verified using the data of three world class sprinters: Carl Lewis, Maurice Green, and Usain Bolt. For the given constant wind velocity with the values + 0.9 and + 1.1 m/s, the wind contribution to the change of sprinter velocity was the same for the maximum as well as for the final velocity. This study assessed how the effect of the wind velocity influenced the change of sprinting velocity. The analysis led to the conclusion that the official limit of safely neglecting the wind influence could be chosen as 1 m/s instead of 2 m/s, if the velocity were presented using three, instead of two decimal digits. This implies that wind velocity should be rounded off to two decimal places instead of the present practice of one decimal place. In particular, the results indicated that the influence of wind on the change of sprinting velocity in the range of up to 2 m/s and was of order of magnitude of 10-3 m/s. This proves that the IAAF Competition Rules correctly neglect the influence of the wind with regard to such velocities. However, for the wind velocity over 2 m/s, the wind influence is of order 10-2 m/s and cannot be neglected.

  16. A method for extending stage-discharge relationships using a hydrodynamic model and quantifying the associated uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Quanxi; Dutta, Dushmanta; Karim, Fazlul; Petheram, Cuan

    2018-01-01

    Streamflow discharge is a fundamental dataset required to effectively manage water and land resources. However, developing robust stage - discharge relationships called rating curves, from which streamflow discharge is derived, is time consuming and costly, particularly in remote areas and especially at high stage levels. As a result stage - discharge relationships are often heavily extrapolated. Hydrodynamic (HD) models are physically based models used to simulate the flow of water along river channels and over adjacent floodplains. In this paper we demonstrate a method by which a HD model can be used to generate a 'synthetic' stage - discharge relationship at high stages. The method uses a both-side Box-Cox transformation to calibrate the synthetic rating curve such that the regression residuals are as close to the normal distribution as possible. By doing this both-side transformation, the statistical uncertainty in the synthetically derived stage - discharge relationship can be calculated. This enables people trying to make decisions to determine whether the uncertainty in the synthetically generated rating curve at high stage levels is acceptable for their decision. The proposed method is demonstrated in two streamflow gauging stations in north Queensland, Australia.

  17. Simulating extreme low-discharge events for the Rhine using a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macian-Sorribes, Hector; Mens, Marjolein; Schasfoort, Femke; Diermanse, Ferdinand; Pulido-Velazquez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The specific features of hydrological droughts make them more difficult to be analysed than other water-related phenomena: longer time scales (months to several years) so less historical events are available, and the drought severity and associate damage depends on a combination of variables with no clear prevalence (e.g., total water deficit, maximum deficit and duration). As part of drought risk analysis, which aims to provide insight into the variability of hydrological conditions and associated socio-economic impacts, long synthetic time series should therefore be developed. In this contribution, we increase the length of the available inflow time series using stochastic autoregressive modelling. This enhancement could improve the characterization of the extreme range and can define extreme droughts with similar periods of return but different patterns that can lead to distinctly different damages. The methodology consists of: 1) fitting an autoregressive model (AR, ARMA…) to the available records; 2) generating extended time series (thousands of years); 3) performing a frequency analysis with different characteristic variables (total, deficit, maximum deficit and so on); and 4) selecting extreme drought events associated with different characteristic variables and return periods. The methodology was applied to the Rhine river discharge at location Lobith, where the Rhine enters The Netherlands. A monthly ARMA(1,1) autoregressive model with seasonally varying parameters was fitted and successfully validated to the historical records available since year 1901. The maximum monthly deficit with respect to a threshold value of 1800 m3/s and the average discharge for a given time span in m3/s were chosen as indicators to identify drought periods. A synthetic series of 10,000 years of discharges was generated using the validated ARMA model. Two time spans were considered in the analysis: the whole calendar year and the half-year period between April and September

  18. The Effect of Discharge Ratio and Confluence Angle on Local Scouring at 60 Degree Erodible Open Channel with SSIIM1 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghobadian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Flow and sediment transport has an important role in entrance deformation of open channel junctions. As water moved through a drainage network, it forced to converge at confluence. Due to increasing of water discharge and collision of converging flows, a complex three-dimensional and most highly turbulent location were occurred in the vicinity of the junction. Therefore a deep scour hole and point bar has developed in this area that caused the change in rivers morphology. Despite the large amount of research carried out on flow patterns in river confluences, only a few researches have focused on sediment transport. Materials and methods: In this research three dimensional model (SSIIM1 was used to study of flow pattern and sediment and erosion pattern at 60 degree Junction .the Navier-Stockes equation of turbulent flow in a general three-dimensional geometry are solved to obtain the water velocity: , (1 Where U is average velocity, ρ is density of water, is pressure, the Kronecker delta, which is 1 if i is equal to j and 0 otherwise and general space dimension. The last term is Reynolds stress, often modeled with the following equation: (2 Where and k are eddy viscosity and turbulent kinetic energy respectively. Van Rijn's relations were used to calculate sediment suspended and bed load transport. Dirichlet and zero gradients boundary conditions were used at inflow and outflow boundary respectively. fixed-lid approach was used to computed free surface by using zero gradient for all variables. The wall law for rough boundaries was also used as a boundary condition for bed and wall. In equilibrium situation, The sediment concentration for the cell closet to the bed was specified as the bed boundary condition. Specified value was used for sediment concentration of other boundary conditions at upstream boundary and zero gradients for the water surface, outlet, and the sides. the only simulation of local scouring and sedimentation at

  19. One-dimensional Numerical Model of Transient Discharges in Air of a Spatial Plasma Ignition Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saceleanu, Florin N.

    This thesis examines the modes of discharge of a plasma ignition device. Oscilloscope data of the discharge voltage and current are analyzed for various pressures in air at ambient temperature. It is determined that the discharge operates in 2 modes: a glow discharge and a postulated streamer discharge. Subsequently, a 1-dimensional fluid simulation of plasma using the finite volume method (FVM) is developed to gain insight into the particle kinetics. Transient results of the simulation agree with theories of electric discharges; however, quasi-steady state results were not reached due to high diffusion time of ions in air. Next, an ordinary differential equation (ODE) is derived to understand the discharge transition. Simulated results were used to estimate the voltage waveform, which describes the ODE's forcing function; additional simulated results were used to estimate the discharge current and the ODE's non-linearity. It is found that the ODE's non-linearity increases exponentially for capacitive discharges. It is postulated that the non-linearity defines the mode transition observed experimentally. The research is motivated by Spatial Plasma Discharge Ignition (SPDI), an innovative ignition system postulated to increase combustion efficiency in automobile engines for up to 9%. The research thus far can only hypothesize SPDI's benefits on combustion, based on the literature review and the modes of discharge.

  20. Multi-Model Assessment of Global Hydropower and Cooling Water Discharge Potential Under Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, M. T. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Eisener, S.; Wada, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, 98% of total electricity is currently produced by thermoelectric power and hydropower. Climate change is expected to directly impact electricity supply, in terms of both water availability for hydropower generation and cooling water usage for thermoelectric power. Improved understanding of how climate change may impact the availability and temperature of water resources is therefore of major importance. Here we use a multi-model ensemble to show the potential impacts of climate change on global hydropower and cooling water discharge potential. For the first time, combined projections of streamflow and water temperature were produced with three global hydrological models (GHMs) to account for uncertainties in the structure and parametrization of these GHMs in both water availability and water temperature. The GHMs were forced with bias-corrected output of five general circulation models (GCMs) for both the lowest and highest representative concentration pathways (RCP2.6 and RCP8.5). The ensemble projections of streamflow and water temperature were then used to quantify impacts on gross hydropower potential and cooling water discharge capacity of rivers worldwide. We show that global gross hydropower potential is expected to increase between +2.4% (GCM-GHM ensemble mean for RCP 2.6) and +6.3% (RCP 8.5) for the 2080s compared to 1971-2000. The strongest increases in hydropower potential are expected for Central Africa, India, central Asia and the northern high-latitudes, with 18-33% of the world population living in these areas by the 2080s. Global mean cooling water discharge capacity is projected to decrease by 4.5-15% (2080s). The largest reductions are found for the United States, Europe, eastern Asia, and southern parts of South America, Africa and Australia, where strong water temperature increases are projected combined with reductions in mean annual streamflow. These regions are expected to affect 11-14% (for RCP2.6 and the shared socioeconomic

  1. Two-phase modeling of DDT: Structure of the velocity-relaxation zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapila, A.K.; Son, S.F.; Bdzil, J.B.; Menikoff, R.; Stewart, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of the velocity relaxation zone in a hyperbolic, nonconservative, two-phase model is examined in the limit of large drag, and in the context of the problem of deflagration-to-detonation transition in a granular explosive. The primary motivation for the study is the desire to relate the end states across the relaxation zone, which can then be treated as a discontinuity in a reduced, equivelocity model, that is computationally more efficient than its parent. In contrast to a conservative system, where end states across thin zones of rapid variation are determined principally by algebraic statements of conservation, the nonconservative character of the present system requires an explicit consideration of the structure. Starting with the minimum admissible wave speed, the structure is mapped out as the wave speed increases. Several critical wave speeds corresponding to changes in the structure are identified. The archetypal structure is partly dispersed, monotonic, and involves conventional hydrodynamic shocks in one or both phases. The picture is reminiscent of, but more complex than, what is observed in such (simpler) two-phase media as a dusty gas. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. PREDICTION OF BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY AND LEAFLET DEFORMATION VIA 2D MITRAL VALVE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.H. Mohd Adib

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the mitral valve, regional variations in structure and material properties combine to affect the biomechanics of the entire valve. From previous studies, we know that the mitral valve leaflet tissue is highly extensible. A two-dimensional model of the mitral valve was generated using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE mesh. A simple approximation of the heart geometry was used and the valve dimensions were based on actual measurements made. Valve opening and closure was simulated using contact equations. The objective of this study was to investigate and predict flow and leaflet phenomena via a simple 2D mitral valve model based on the critical parameter of blood. Two stages of mitral valves analysis were investigated: the systolic and diastolic stages. The results show a linear correlation between the mitral valve leaflet rigidity and the volume of backflow. Additionally, the simulation predicted mitral valve leaflet displacement during closure, which agreed with the results of our previous data analysis and the results for blood flow velocity during systole condition through the mitral valve outlet, as reported in the medical literature. In conclusion, these computational techniques are very useful in the study of both degenerative valve disease and failure of prostheses and will be further developed to investigate heart valve failure and subsequent surgical repair.

  3. Comparison of modelled runoff with observed proglacial discharge across the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A.; van As, D.; Overeem, I.; Tedesco, M.; Mote, T. L.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Hagedorn, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Mikkelsen, A. B.; Hasholt, B.; Hall, D. K.; Fettweis, X.; Pitcher, L. H.; Hubbard, A.

    2017-12-01

    Greenland ice sheet surface ablation now dominates its total mass loss contributions to sea-level rise. Despite the increasing importance of Greenland's sea-level contribution, a quantitative inter-comparison between modeled and measured melt, runoff and discharge across multiple drainage basins is conspicuously lacking. Here we investigate the accuracy of model discharge estimates from the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR v3.5.2) regional climate model by comparison with in situ proglacial river discharge measurements at three West Greenland drainage basins - North River (Thule), Watson River (Kangerlussuaq), and Naujat Kuat River (Nuuk). At each target catchment, we: 1) determine optimal drainage basin delineations; 2) assess primary drivers of melt; 3) evaluate MAR at daily, 5-, 10- and 20-day time scales; and 4) identify potential sources for model-observation discrepancies. Our results reveal that MAR resolves daily discharge variability poorly in the Nuuk and Thule basins (r2 = 0.4-0.5), but does capture variability over 5-, 10-, and 20-day means (r2 > 0.7). Model agreement with river flow data, though, is reduced during periods of peak discharge, particularly for the exceptional melt and discharge events of July 2012. Daily discharge is best captured by MAR across the Watson River basin, whilst there is lower correspondence between modeled and observed discharge at the Thule and Naujat Kuat River basins. We link the main source of model error to an underestimation of cloud cover, overestimation of surface albedo, and apparent warm bias in near-surface air temperatures. For future inter-comparison, we recommend using observations from catchments that have a self-contained and well-defined drainage area and an accurate discharge record over variable years coincident with a reliable automatic weather station record. Our study highlights the importance of improving MAR modeled surface albedo, cloud cover representation, and delay functions to reduce model

  4. Mathematical modeling and multi-criteria optimization of rotary electrical discharge machining process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrinivas Balraj, U.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, mathematical modeling of three performance characteristics namely material removal rate, surface roughness and electrode wear rate in rotary electrical discharge machining RENE80 nickel super alloy is done using regression approach. The parameters considered are peak current, pulse on time, pulse off time and electrode rotational speed. The regression approach is very much effective in mathematical modeling when the performance characteristic is influenced by many variables. The modeling of these characteristics is helpful in predicting the performance under a given set of combination of input process parameters. The adequacy of developed models is tested by correlation coefficient and Analysis of Variance. It is observed that the developed models are adequate in establishing the relationship between input parameters and performance characteristics. Further, multi-criteria optimization of process parameter levels is carried using grey based Taguchi method. The experiments are planned based on Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array. The proposed method employs single grey relational grade as a performance index to obtain optimum levels of parameters. It is found that peak current and electrode rotational speed are influential on these characteristics. Confirmation experiments are conducted to validate optimal parameters and it reveals the improvements in material removal rate, surface roughness and electrode wear rate as 13.84%, 12.91% and 19.42% respectively.

  5. Regional parametrisation of a monthly hydrological model for estimating discharges in ungaued catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavcova, K.; Szolgay, J.; Kohnova, S.; Kalas, M.

    2003-04-01

    In the case of the absence of measured runoff optimisation techniques cannot be used to estimate the parameters of monthly rainfall-runoff models. In such a case usually empirical regression methods were used for relating the model parameters to the catchment characteristics in a given region. In the paper a different method for the regional calibration of a monthly water balance model, which can be used for planning purposes, is proposed. Instead of using the regional regression approach a method is proposed, which involves the calibration of a monthly water balance model to gauged sites in the given region simultaneously. A regional objective function was constructed and for the calibration a genetic programming algorithm was employed. It is expected, that the regionally calibrated model parameters can be used in ungauged basins with similar physiographic conditions. The comparison of the performance of such a regional calibration scheme was compared with two single site calibration methods in a region of West Slovakia. The results are based on a study that aimed at computing surface water inflow into a lowland area with valuable groundwater resources. Monthly discharge time series had to be estimated in small ungauged rivers entering the study area.

  6. A mathematical model for surface roughness of fluidic channels produced by grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining (G-ECDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeesh V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Grinding aided electrochemical discharge machining is a hybrid technique, which combines the grinding action of an abrasive tool and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges to remove material from the workpiece for producing complex contours. The present study focuses on developing fluidic channels on borosilicate glass using G-ECDM and attempts to develop a mathematical model for surface roughness of the machined channel. Preliminary experiments are conducted to study the effect of machining parameters on surface roughness. Voltage, duty factor, frequency and tool feed rate are identified as the significant factors for controlling surface roughness of the channels produced by G-ECDM. A mathematical model was developed for surface roughness by considering the grinding action and thermal effects of electrochemical discharges in material removal. Experiments are conducted to validate the model and the results obtained are in good agreement with that predicted by the model.

  7. Coupling hydrologic and hydraulic models to take into consideration retention effects on extreme peak discharges in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Guido; Zischg, Andreas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Estimating peak discharges with very low probabilities is still accompanied by large uncertainties. Common estimation methods are usually based on extreme value statistics applied to observed time series or to hydrological model outputs. However, such methods assume the system to be stationary and do not specifically consider non-stationary effects. Observed time series may exclude events where peak discharge is damped by retention effects, as this process does not occur until specific thresholds, possibly beyond those of the highest measured event, are exceeded. Hydrological models can be complemented and parameterized with non-linear functions. However, in such cases calibration depends on observed data and non-stationary behaviour is not deterministically calculated. Our study discusses the option of considering retention effects on extreme peak discharges by coupling hydrological and hydraulic models. This possibility is tested by forcing the semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model PREVAH with randomly generated, physically plausible extreme precipitation patterns. The resulting hydrographs are then used to force the hydraulic model BASEMENT-ETH (riverbed in 1D, potential inundation areas in 2D). The procedure ensures that the estimated extreme peak discharge does not exceed the physical limit given by the riverbed capacity and that the dampening effect of inundation processes on peak discharge is considered.

  8. [Digital signal processing of a novel neuron discharge model stimulation strategy for cochlear implants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiwei; Xu, Yuejin; Miu, Jichang; Zhou, Linghong; Xiao, Zhongju

    2012-10-01

    To apply the classic leakage integrate-and-fire models, based on the mechanism of the generation of physiological auditory stimulation, in the information processing coding of cochlear implants to improve the auditory result. The results of algorithm simulation in digital signal processor (DSP) were imported into Matlab for a comparative analysis. Compared with CIS coding, the algorithm of membrane potential integrate-and-fire (MPIF) allowed more natural pulse discharge in a pseudo-random manner to better fit the physiological structures. The MPIF algorithm can effectively solve the problem of the dynamic structure of the delivered auditory information sequence issued in the auditory center and allowed integration of the stimulating pulses and time coding to ensure the coherence and relevance of the stimulating pulse time.

  9. Estimates of Climate Change Impact on River Discharge in Japan Based on a Super-High-Resolution Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of climate change on river discharge was assessed by hydrological simulations for several major river basins in Japan using the latest version of a super-high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM with a horizontal resolution of about 20 km. Projections were made using two different datasets, one representing the present climate (1980 - 1999 and the other representing the end of the 21st century (2080 - 2099 assuming the SRES A1B scenario. River discharge was estimated by a distributed hydrological model calibrated against observed river discharge in advance. The results showed that even if the amount of precipitation does not change much in the future, river discharge will change significantly because of the increase in rainfall, decrease in snowmelt, and increase in evapotranspiration with higher air temperature. The impact of climate change on river discharge will be more significant in the northern part of Japan, especially in the Tohoku and Hokuriku regions. In these regions, the monthly average river discharge at the end of the 21st century was projected to be more than 200% higher in February and approximately 50 - 60% lower in May compared with the present flow. These results imply that the increase in air temperature has important consequences for the hydrological cycle, particularly in regions where the water supply is currently dominated by snowmelt.

  10. Modeling PECVD of photovoltaic silicon layers from hydrogen diluted silane ccrf discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluhm, Dirk; Danko, Stephan; Schmidt, Oliver; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    The dynamic photovoltaic market (especially for thin film technologies) demands massive cost reduction and efficiency increase. Plasma processes play a crucial role in various solar cell technologies. Desired high quality silicon films must be deposited fast and under stable process conditions. We use a commercial fluid model (CFD-ACE+)footnotetextCFD-ACE+ User Manual, v2010.0, ESI Group, http://www.esi-cfd.com to obtain spatiotemporal species densities and reaction rates. The chemical data set comprises of around 20 species and 80 chemical reactions. Densities obtained with a fast volume-averaged chemical model show good agreement with bulk densities from the fluid model. Care must be taken not to oversimplify chemical reaction mechanisms at pressures above 200 Pa, when polymerization processes become increasingly important. We study deposition regimes over a wide range of parameters, varying the pressure between 50 and 1000 Pa and allowing for high frequencies up to 95 MHz. Different heating mechanisms can be distinguished, leading to a different localization of radical generation. This is particularly relevant for asymmetric discharges. Process dependent radical composition and ion bombardment are analyzed, leading to design rules. Investigation of the ion bombardment by modeling the plasma sheath independently will be a subject of further research.

  11. Discharge Forecast Modeling project FY87 progress report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borders, D.M.; Hyndman, D.W.; Railsback, S.F.

    1987-10-19

    This project originated as a result of the Strontium-90 Action Plan, a response to the abnormal release of radionuclides that occurred from White Oak Creek (WOC) during late November and early December 1985. Several notable problems became obvious during ORNL's response to this release: (1) no predetermined criteria existed for the operation of White Oak Dam (WOD) in response to spills, (2) the hydrodynamics of contaminant transport and dispersion within the WOC watershed and downstream were not adequately understood to support requests for modified reservoir releases, and (3) real-time data on streamflow, precipitation, and water quality within the watershed were not readily available in sufficient quantity and usable format. The modeling study was initiated to help address these problems. This report describes FY 87 accomplishments, including: improvements in data acquisition and evaluation; implementation and calibration of a model to forecast discharges of water and contaminants from the WOC watershed; implementation, documentation, and checking of a model to forecast concentrations of contaminants from WOC in the Clinch River; and three field studies that provide essential calibration data. Data from the field studies and user documentation of the Clinch River model are included as appendices to this report.

  12. Anatomy of a caldera: seismic velocity and attenuation models of the Campi Flegrei (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calò, Marco; Tramelli, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Campi Flegrei is an active Caldera marked by strong vertical deformations of the soil called bradyseisms. The mechanisms proposed to explain this phenomenon are essentially three i) the presence of a shallow magmatic chamber that pushes the lid and consequently producing periodic variation of the soil level, ii) a thermic expansion of the geothermal aquifer due to the periodic increase of heat flux coming from a near magmatic chamber or deep fluids or iii) a combination of both phenomena. To solve the paradox, several models have been proposed to describe the nature and the geometry of the bodies responsible of the bradyseisms. Seismological tools allowed a rough description of the main features in terms of seismic velocities and attenuation parameters and till now were not able to resolve the smallest structures (water saturated reservoir from regions with low Vp, low Vp/Vs and low Qp possibly related to the gas saturated part of the reservoir. At deeper depth (2-3.5 km) bodies with high Vp and Vp/Vs and low Qp can be associated with magmatic intrusions. The results of this project have been obtained in the framework of the PIPIIT program (IA100416).

  13. Defect evolution in cosmology and condensed matter quantitative analysis with the velocity-dependent one-scale model

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, C J A P

    2016-01-01

    This book sheds new light on topological defects in widely differing systems, using the Velocity-Dependent One-Scale Model to better understand their evolution. Topological defects – cosmic strings, monopoles, domain walls or others - necessarily form at cosmological (and condensed matter) phase transitions. If they are stable and long-lived they will be fossil relics of higher-energy physics. Understanding their behaviour and consequences is a key part of any serious attempt to understand the universe, and this requires modelling their evolution. The velocity-dependent one-scale model is the only fully quantitative model of defect network evolution, and the canonical model in the field. This book provides a review of the model, explaining its physical content and describing its broad range of applicability.

  14. a Global Shear Velocity Model of the Upper Mantle from New Fundamental and Higher Rayleigh Mode Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debayle, E.; Ricard, Y. R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a global SV-wave tomographic model of the upper mantle, built from a new dataset of fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms. We use an extension of the automated waveform inversion approach of Debayle (1999) designed to improve the extraction of fundamental and higher mode information from a single surface wave seismogram. The improvement is shown to be significant in the transition zone structure which is constrained by the higher modes. The new approach is fully automated and can be run on a Beowulf computer to process massive surface wave dataset. It has been used to match successfully over 350 000 fundamental and higher mode Rayleigh waveforms, corresponding to about 20 millions of new measurements extracted from the seismograms. For each seismogram, we obtain a path average shear velocity and quality factor model, and a set of fundamental and higher mode dispersion and attenuation curves compatible with the recorded waveform. The set of dispersion curves provides a global database for future finite frequency inversion. Our new 3D SV-wave tomographic model takes into account the effect of azimuthal anisotropy and is constrained with a lateral resolution of several hundred kilometers and a vertical resolution of a few tens of kilometers. In the uppermost 200 km, our model shows a very strong correlation with surface tectonics. The slow velocity signature of mid-oceanic ridges extend down to ~100 km depth while the high velocity signature of cratons vanishes below 200 km depth. At depth greater than 400 km, the pattern of seismic velocities appear relatively homogeneous at large scale, except for high velocity slabs which produce broad high velocity regions within the transition zone. Although resolution is still good, the region between 200 and 400 km is associated with a complex pattern of seismic heterogeneities showing no simple correlation with the shallower or deeper structure.

  15. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon in hillslope discharge: Modeling and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Sanda, Martin; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub

    2017-03-01

    Reliable quantitative prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances - specifically organic carbon - at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are recognized to determine the balance of DOC in soils. So far, only few studies utilized stable water isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of 18O/16O ratios in the water molecules (expressed as δ18O) and DOC were analyzed using a physically-based modeling approach. A one-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest hillslope soil over a period of 2.5 years. The model was applied to describe the transformation of input signals of δ18O and DOC into output signals observed in the hillslope stormflow. To quantify uncertainty associated with the model parameterization, Monte Carlo analysis in conjunction with Latin hypercube sampling was applied. δ18O variations in hillslope discharge and in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Despite the complex nature of microbial transformations that caused uncertainty in model parameters and subsequent prediction of DOC transport, the simulated temporal patterns of DOC concentration in stormflow showed similar behavior to that reflected in the observed DOC fluxes. Due to preferential flow, the contribution of the hillslope DOC export was higher than the amounts that are usually found in the available literature.

  16. Proof of Concept: Model Based Bionic Muscle with Hyperbolic Force-Velocity Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. B. Haeufle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the hyperbolic Hill-type force-velocity relation was derived from basic physical components. It was shown that a contractile element CE consisting of a mechanical energy source (active element AE, a parallel damper element (PDE, and a serial element (SE exhibits operating points with hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. In this paper, a technical proof of this concept was presented. AE and PDE were implemented as electric motors, SE as a mechanical spring. The force-velocity relation of this artificial CE was determined in quick release experiments. The CE exhibited hyperbolic force-velocity dependency. This proof of concept can be seen as a well-founded starting point for the development of Hill-type artificial muscles.

  17. Horizontal and vertical velocities derived from the IDS contribution to ITRF2014, and comparisons with geophysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreaux, G.; Lemoine, F. G.; Argus, D. F.; Santamaría-Gómez, A.; Willis, P.; Soudarin, L.; Gravelle, M.; Ferrage, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the context of the 2014 realization of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame, the International DORIS (Doppler Orbitography Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) Service (IDS) has delivered to the IERS a set of 1140 weekly SINEX files including station coordinates and Earth orientation parameters, covering the time period from 1993.0 to 2015.0. From this set of weekly SINEX files, the IDS combination centre estimated a cumulative DORIS position and velocity solution to obtain mean horizontal and vertical motion of 160 stations at 71 DORIS sites. The main objective of this study is to validate the velocities of the DORIS sites by comparison with external models or time-series. Horizontal velocities are compared with two recent global plate models (GEODVEL 2010 and NNR-MORVEL56). Prior to the comparisons, DORIS horizontal velocities were corrected for Global Isostatic Adjustment from the ICE-6G (VM5a) model. For more than half of the sites, the DORIS horizontal velocities differ from the global plate models by less than 2-3 mm yr-1. For five of the sites (Arequipa, Dionysos/Gavdos, Manila and Santiago) with horizontal velocity differences with respect to these models larger than 10 mm yr-1, comparisons with GNSS estimates show the veracity of the DORIS motions. Vertical motions from the DORIS cumulative solution are compared with the vertical velocities derived from the latest GPS cumulative solution over the time span 1995.0-2014.0 from the University of La Rochelle solution at 31 co-located DORIS-GPS sites. These two sets of vertical velocities show a correlation coefficient of 0.83. Vertical differences are larger than 2 mm yr-1 at 23 percent of the sites. At Thule, the disagreement is explained by fine-tuned DORIS discontinuities in line with the mass variations of outlet glaciers. Furthermore, the time evolution of the vertical time-series from the DORIS station in Thule show similar trends to the GRACE equivalent water height.

  18. Telemonitoring after discharge from hospital with heart failure: cost-effectiveness modelling of alternative service designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Baalbaki, Hassan; Brennan, Alan; Pandor, Abdullah; Stevens, John W; Gomersall, Tim; Wang, Jenny; Bakhai, Ameet; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Cleland, John; Cowie, Martin R; Wong, Ruth

    2013-09-18

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of remote monitoring strategies versus usual care for adults recently discharged after a heart failure (HF) exacerbation. Decision analysis modelling of cost-effectiveness using secondary data sources. Acute hospitals in the UK. Patients recently discharged (within 28 days) after a HF exacerbation. Structured telephone support (STS) via human to machine (STS HM) interface, (2) STS via human to human (STS HH) contact and (3) home telemonitoring (TM), compared with (4) usual care. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained by each strategy compared to the next most effective alternative and the probability of each strategy being cost-effective at varying willingness to pay per QALY gained. TM was the most cost-effective strategy in the scenario using these base case costs. Compared with usual care, TM had an estimated incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £11 873/QALY, whereas STS HH had an ICER of £228 035/QALY against TM. STS HM was dominated by usual care. Threshold analysis suggested that the monthly cost of TM has to be higher than £390 to have an ICER greater than £20 000/QALY against STS HH. Scenario analyses performed using higher costs of usual care, higher costs of STS HH and lower costs of TM do not substantially change the conclusions. Cost-effectiveness analyses suggest that TM was an optimal strategy in most scenarios, but there is considerable uncertainty in relation to clear descriptions of the interventions and robust estimation of costs.

  19. Dynamic linear models to explore time-varying suspended sediment-discharge rating curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kuk-Hyun; Yellen, Brian; Steinschneider, Scott

    2017-06-01

    This study presents a new method to examine long-term dynamics in sediment yield using time-varying sediment-discharge rating curves. Dynamic linear models (DLMs) are introduced as a time series filter that can assess how the relationship between streamflow and sediment concentration or load changes over time in response to a wide variety of natural and anthropogenic watershed disturbances or long-term changes. The filter operates by updating parameter values using a recursive Bayesian design that responds to 1 day-ahead forecast errors while also accounting for observational noise. The estimated time series of rating curve parameters can then be used to diagnose multiscale (daily-decadal) variability in sediment yield after accounting for fluctuations in streamflow. The technique is applied in a case study examining changes in turbidity load, a proxy for sediment load, in the Esopus Creek watershed, part of the New York City drinking water supply system. The results show that turbidity load exhibits a complex array of variability across time scales. The DLM highlights flood event-driven positive hysteresis, where turbidity load remained elevated for months after large flood events, as a major component of dynamic behavior in the rating curve relationship. The DLM also produces more accurate 1 day-ahead loading forecasts compared to other static and time-varying rating curve methods. The results suggest that DLMs provide a useful tool for diagnosing changes in sediment-discharge relationships over time and may help identify variability in sediment concentrations and loads that can be used to inform dynamic water quality management.

  20. Coastal groundwater discharge for the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts calculated with three-dimensional groundwater flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, K. M.; Kroeger, K. D.; Smith, C. G.; Swarzenski, P. W.

    2017-12-01

    Fresh groundwater discharge to coastal environments contribute to the physical and chemical conditions of coastal waters. At regional scales, groundwater fluxes remain poorly constrained, representing uncertainty in both water and chemical budgets that have implications for downstream ecosystem health and for how human activities alter coastal hydrologic processes. Coastal groundwater discharges remain widely unconstrained due to the interconnectedness of highly heterogeneous hydrogeologic frameworks and hydrologic conditions. We use regional-scale, three-dimensional groundwater flow models with the best available hydrostratigraphic framework data to calculate the magnitude of groundwater discharging from coastal aquifers to coastal waterbodies along the eastern U.S. In addition, we constrain the inland areas that contribute to coastal groundwater discharges using particle tracking. We find that 27 km3/yr of groundwater enters coastal waters of the eastern U.S. and Gulf of Mexico and was over 175,000 km2. The contributing areas to coastal groundwater discharge extended kilometers inland and often were supplied by recharge occurring tens of kilometers inland. These results suggest that coastal groundwater discharges rely on larger contributing areas and potentially transport more dissolved constituents than previously calculated, which are important factors for constraining the role of groundwater in coastal chemical budgets and its impacts on coastal ecosystems.

  1. Transport simulation of EAST long-pulse H-mode discharge with integrated modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. Q.; Li, G. Q.; Chen, J. L.; Du, H. F.; Gao, X.; Ren, Q. L.; Li, K.; Chan, Vincent; Pan, C. K.; Ding, S. Y.; Jian, X.; Zhu, X.; Lian, H.; Qian, J. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Zang, Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Liu, H. Q.; Lyu, B.

    2018-04-01

    In the 2017 EAST experimental campaign, a steady-state long-pulse H-mode discharge lasting longer than 100 s has been obtained using only radio frequency heating and current drive, and the confinement quality is slightly better than standard H-mode, H98y2 ~ 1.1, with stationary peaked electron temperature profiles. Integrated modeling of one long-pulse H-mode discharge in the 2016 EAST experimental campaign has been performed with equilibrium code EFIT, and transport codes TGYRO and ONETWO under integrated modeling framework OMFIT. The plasma current is fully-noninductively driven with a combination of ~2.2 MW LHW, ~0.3 MW ECH and ~1.1 MW ICRF. Time evolution of the predicted electron and ion temperature profiles through integrated modeling agree closely with that from measurements. The plasma current (I p ~ 0.45 MA) and electron density are kept constantly. A steady-state is achieved using integrated modeling, and the bootstrap current fraction is ~28%, the RF drive current fraction is ~72%. The predicted current density profile matches the experimental one well. Analysis shows that electron cyclotron heating (ECH) makes large contribution to the plasma confinement when heating in the core region while heating in large radius does smaller improvement, also a more peaked LHW driven current profile is got when heating in the core. Linear analysis shows that the high-k modes instability (electron temperature gradient driven modes) is suppressed in the core region where exists weak electron internal transport barriers. The trapped electron modes dominates in the low-k region, which is mainly responsible for driving the electron energy flux. It is found that the ECH heating effect is very local and not the main cause to sustained the good confinement, the peaked current density profile has the most important effect on plasma confinement improvement. Transport analysis of the long-pulse H-mode experiments on EAST will be helpful to build future experiments.

  2. Kinetic model of a low-pressure N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} flowing glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordiets, B.F.; Ferreira, C.M.; Guerra, V.L.; Loureiro, J.M.A.H. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica; Nahorny, J.; Pagnon, D.; Touzeau, M.; Vialle, M. [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)

    1995-08-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model is developed to study dc flowing glow discharges in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures. This model includes the calculation of electron energy distribution functions and electron rate coefficients coupled with detailed vibrational kinetics of N{sub 2} molecules, chemical kinetics taking into account a large set of neutral, excited and charged species, interaction of N and O atoms at the discharge tube wall, and the thermal balance of the discharge. The results of this model agree reasonable well with the measurements of the electronic density, the gas temperature, the reduced electric field, the vibrational temperature of N{sub 2}, and the concentration of O, N atoms, NO molecules, N{sub 2}(C), N{sub 2}{sup +}(B), and NO({gamma}) excited states. The comparison was performed in a N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} discharge at pressure p + 2 Torr, for discharge currents I = 15, 30, and 80 mA, a flow rate Q = 100 sccm, and O{sub 2} percentages ranging from 0 up to 100%. The kinetic processes occurring in low-temperature plasmas of the atmospheric gases N{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and their mixtures are presently the subject of many investigation due to their importance in atmospheric and ionospheric physics, and in plasma chemistry in general.

  3. Analytical solutions of jam pattern formation on a ring for a class of optimal velocity traffic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Berkemer, Rainer; Caputo, Jean Guy

    2009-01-01

    are found analytically. Their velocity and amplitude are determined from a perturbation approach based on collective coordinates with the discrete modified Korteweg-de Vries equation as the zero order equation. This contains the standard OV model as a special case. The analytical results are in excellent...

  4. Forecasting monthly inflow discharge of the Iffezheim reservoir using data-driven models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Aljoumani, Basem; Hillebrand, Gudrun; Hoffmann, Thomas; Hinkelmann, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    River stream flow is an essential element in hydrology study fields, especially for reservoir management, since it defines input into reservoirs. Forecasting this stream flow plays an important role in short or long-term planning and management in the reservoir, e.g. optimized reservoir and hydroelectric operation or agricultural irrigation. Highly accurate flow forecasting can significantly reduce economic losses and is always pursued by reservoir operators. Therefore, hydrologic time series forecasting has received tremendous attention of researchers. Many models have been proposed to improve the hydrological forecasting. Due to the fact that most natural phenomena occurring in environmental systems appear to behave in random or probabilistic ways, different cases may need a different methods to forecast the inflow and even a unique treatment to improve the forecast accuracy. The purpose of this study is to determine an appropriate model for forecasting monthly inflow to the Iffezheim reservoir in Germany, which is the last of the barrages in the Upper Rhine. Monthly time series of discharges, measured from 1946 to 2001 at the Plittersdorf station, which is located 6 km downstream of the Iffezheim reservoir, were applied. The accuracies of the used stochastic models - Fiering model and Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average models (ARIMA) are compared with Artificial Intelligence (AI) models - single Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Wavelet ANN models (WANN). The Fiering model is a linear stochastic model and used for generating synthetic monthly data. The basic idea in modeling time series using ARIMA is to identify a simple model with as few model parameters as possible in order to provide a good statistical fit to the data. To identify and fit the ARIMA models, four phase approaches were used: identification, parameter estimation, diagnostic checking, and forecasting. An automatic selection criterion, such as the Akaike information criterion, is utilized

  5. Reactive transport modeling of biogeochemical dynamics in subterranean estuaries: Implications for submarine groundwater discharge of nutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiteri, C.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of groundwater, in particular in coastal areas, is increasingly deteriorating due to the input of nutrients (NO3-, NH4+ and PO4) from septic systems and agricultural leaching. The discharge of groundwater to coastal waters, termed submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), is now recognized

  6. Modeling nucleation and growth of zinc oxide during discharge of primary zinc-air batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Johannes; Varzi, Alberto; Latz, Arnulf; Horstmann, Birger

    2017-08-01

    Metal-air batteries are among the most promising next-generation energy storage devices. Relying on abundant materials and offering high energy densities, potential applications lie in the fields of electro-mobility, portable electronics, and stationary grid applications. Now, research on secondary zinc-air batteries is revived, which are commercialized as primary hearing aid batteries. One of the main obstacles for making zinc-air batteries rechargeable is their poor lifetime due to the degradation of alkaline electrolyte in contact with atmospheric carbon dioxide. In this article, we present a continuum theory of a commercial Varta PowerOne button cell. Our model contains dissolution of zinc and nucleation and growth of zinc oxide in the anode, thermodynamically consistent electrolyte transport in porous media, and multi-phase coexistance in the gas diffusion electrode. We perform electrochemical measurements and validate our model. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is found and novel insights into the role of zinc oxide nucleation and growth and carbon dioxide dissolution for discharge and lifetime is presented. We demonstrate the implications of our work for the development of rechargeable zinc-air batteries.

  7. Hypocenter relocation along the Sunda arc in Indonesia, using a 3D seismic velocity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Shiddiqi, Hasbi A.; Widiyantoro, Sri; Thurber, Clifford H.; Pesicek, Jeremy D.; Zhang, Haijiang; Wiyono, Samsul H.; Ramadhan, Mohamad; Wandano,; Irsyam, Mahsyur

    2018-01-01

    The tectonics of the Sunda arc region is characterized by the junction of the Eurasian and Indo‐Australian tectonic plates, causing complex dynamics to take place. High‐seismicity rates in the Indonesian region occur due to the interaction between these tectonic plates. The availability of a denser network of seismometers after the earthquakes of Mw">Mw 9.1 in 2004 and  Mw">Mw 8.6 in 2005 supports various seismic studies, one of which regards the precise relocation of the hypocenters. In this study, hypocenter relocation was performed using a teleseismic double‐difference (DD) relocation method (teletomoDD) combining arrival times of P and S waves from stations at local, regional, and teleseismic distances. The catalog data were taken from the Agency of Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics (BMKG) of Indonesia, and the International Seismological Centre (ISC) for the time period of April 2009 to May 2015. The 3D seismic‐wave velocity model with a grid size 1°×1°">1°×1° was used in the travel‐time calculations. Relocation results show a reduction in travel‐time residuals compared with the initial locations. The relocation results better illuminate subducted slabs and active faults in the region such as the Mentawai back thrust and the outer rise in the subduction zone south of Java. Focal mechanisms from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog are analyzed in conjunction with the relocation results, and our synthesis of the results provides further insight into seismogenesis in the region.

  8. Blind test of methods for obtaining 2-D near-surface seismic velocity models from first-arrival traveltimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelt, Colin A.; Haines, Seth; Powers, Michael H.; Sheehan, Jacob; Rohdewald, Siegfried; Link, Curtis; Hayashi, Koichi; Zhao, Don; Zhou, Hua-wei; Burton, Bethany L.; Petersen, Uni K.; Bonal, Nedra D.; Doll, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic refraction methods are used in environmental and engineering studies to image the shallow subsurface. We present a blind test of inversion and tomographic refraction analysis methods using a synthetic first-arrival-time dataset that was made available to the community in 2010. The data are realistic in terms of the near-surface velocity model, shot-receiver geometry and the data's frequency and added noise. Fourteen estimated models were determined by ten participants using eight different inversion algorithms, with the true model unknown to the participants until it was revealed at a session at the 2011 SAGEEP meeting. The estimated models are generally consistent in terms of their large-scale features, demonstrating the robustness of refraction data inversion in general, and the eight inversion algorithms in particular. When compared to the true model, all of the estimated models contain a smooth expression of its two main features: a large offset in the bedrock and the top of a steeply dipping low-velocity fault zone. The estimated models do not contain a subtle low-velocity zone and other fine-scale features, in accord with conventional wisdom. Together, the results support confidence in the reliability and robustness of modern refraction inversion and tomographic methods.

  9. An analysis of Cattaneo-Christov double-diffusion model for Sisko fluid flow with velocity slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Malik

    Full Text Available The present frame work examines the characteristics of Cattaneo-Christov double-diffusion model to the Sisko fluid flow over a flat stretching sheet with velocity slip and thermal radiation. Instead of using classical Fourier's law and Fick's law the inclusion of thermal and concentration relaxation times lead us to the Cattaneo-Christov double-diffusion model. Utilization of the suitable transformations makes it convenient to transform our governing partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. Further, the numerical solutions to these normalized ordinary differential equations are obtained by adopting the shooting technique along with Runge-Kutta fourth order method. The results are then plotted for various values of the pertinent parameters and discussed deliberately. Also, a comparison of the present results with the previously reported results as well as analytic results obtained through the homotopy analysis method (HAM helps to ensure their validity. This investigation leads us to the fact that the velocity diminishes with the velocity slip parameter. Also, in temperature and concentration profiles a decline can obviously be verdict with the larger relaxation times. Keywords: Cattaneo-Christov double-diffusion model, Sisko fluid, Velocity slip, Thermal radiation

  10. Three dimensional thermal pollution models. Volume 3: Free surface models. [waste heat discharge from power plants and effects on ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.

    1978-01-01

    Two sets of programs, named Nasum 2 and Nasum 3 are presented in detail. Nasum 2 is a far field formulation and is used without including the plant thermal discharge. Nasum 3 uses horizontal stretching to provide higher resolution at thermal discharge joints; and includes far field influences such as varying tides and ambient currents far from point of discharge.

  11. Diagnostic of capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma from electrical discharge characteristics: comparison with optical emission spectroscopy and fluid model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, HE; Chong, LIU; Yachun, ZHANG; Jianping, CHEN; Yudong, CHEN; Xiaojun, ZENG; Bingyan, CHEN; Jiaxin, PANG; Yibing, WANG

    2018-02-01

    The capacitively coupled radio frequency (CCRF) plasma has been widely used in various fields. In some cases, it requires us to estimate the range of key plasma parameters simpler and quicker in order to understand the behavior in plasma. In this paper, a glass vacuum chamber and a pair of plate electrodes were designed and fabricated, using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge technology to ionize the working gas of Ar. This discharge was mathematically described with equivalent circuit model. The discharge voltage and current of the plasma were measured at different pressures and different powers. Based on the capacitively coupled homogeneous discharge model, the equivalent circuit and the analytical formula were established. The plasma density and temperature were calculated by using the equivalent impedance principle and energy balance equation. The experimental results show that when RF discharge power is 50–300 W and pressure is 25–250 Pa, the average electron temperature is about 1.7–2.1 eV and the average electron density is about 0.5 × 1017–3.6 × 1017 m‑3. Agreement was found when the results were compared to those given by optical emission spectroscopy and COMSOL simulation.

  12. Comparison of Large Eddy Simulations and κ-ε Modelling of Fluid Velocity and Tracer Concentration in Impinging Jet Mixers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojtas Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of turbulent mixing in two types of jet mixers were carried out using two CFD models, large eddy simulation and κ-ε model. Modelling approaches were compared with experimental data obtained by the application of particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence methods. Measured local microstructures of fluid velocity and inert tracer concentration can be used for direct validation of numerical simulations. Presented results show that for higher tested values of jet Reynolds number both models are in good agreement with the experiments. Differences between models were observed for lower Reynolds numbers when the effects of large scale inhomogeneity are important.

  13. Importance of including small-scale tile drain discharge in the calibration of a coupled groundwater-surface water catchment model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun

    2013-01-01

    the catchment. In this study, a coupled groundwater-surface water model based on the MIKE SHE code was developed for the 4.7 km2 Lillebæk catchment in Denmark, where tile drain flow is a major contributor to the stream discharge. The catchment model was calibrated in several steps by incrementally including...... the observation data into the calibration to see the effect on model performance of including diverse data types, especially tile drain discharge. For the Lillebæk catchment, measurements of hydraulic head, daily stream discharge, and daily tile drain discharge from five small (1–4 ha) drainage areas exist....... The results showed that including tile drain data in the calibration of the catchment model improved its general performance for hydraulic heads and stream discharges. However, the model failed to correctly describe the local-scale dynamics of the tile drain discharges, and, furthermore, including the drain...

  14. Crustal Deformation in the Northern Andes - New GPS Velocity Field and "Broken Indentor" Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, J. N.; Mora-Páez, H.; Freymueller, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new precise velocity field for northwestern South America and the southwest Caribbean based on GPS CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Stations) in Panama (ACP and COCONet) and Colombia (GeoRED) with a minimum of 2.5 years of observations. This paper presents the first comprehensive model of North Andean block (NAB) motion. We estimate that the NAB is moving to the northeast at a rate of 8.6 mm/yr. The NAB vector can be resolved into a margin-parallel (035°) component of 8.1 mm/yr rigid "escape" and a margin-normal (125°) component of 4.3 mm/yr. The margin-normal shortening of only 4.3 mm/yr in the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia is surprising in view of paleobotanical, fission-track, and seismic reflection data that suggest rapid uplift (7 km) and shortening (120 km) in the last 10 Ma. We present a "broken indenter" model for the Panama-Choco arc, in which the Choco arc has been recently accreted to the NAB, resulting in a rapid decrease in shortening in the Eastern Cordillera. The Panama arc is colliding eastward with the NAB at approximately 16-17 mm/yr, and the Panama-Choco collision may have been responsible for much of the uplift of the Eastern Cordillera. The present on-going collision poses a major earthquake hazard from the Panama-Colombia border to Medellin, Colombia. Since the northeastward margin-parallel "escape" rate is now greater than the rate of shortening in the Eastern Cordillera, northeast trending right-lateral strike-slip faulting is the primary seismic hazard for the 8 million inhabitants of the city of Bogota. There continues to be a high risk of a great mega-subduction zone earthquake in southern Colombia from the Ecuador-Colombia trench. Trench earthquakes have only released a fraction of the energy accumulated in the trench since the great 1906 earthquake, and interseismic strain is accumulating rapidly as far north as Tumaco.

  15. Electro-Hydrodynamics and Kinetic Modeling of Dry and Humid Air Flows Activated by Corona Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Sarrette, J.; Eichwald, O.; Marchal, F.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work is devoted to the 2D simulation of a point-to-plane Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) powered by a DC high voltage supply. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The study compares the results obtained in dry air and in air mixed with a small amount of water vapour (humid air). The simulation involves the electro-dynamics, chemical kinetics and neutral gas hydrodynamics phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge lasts about one hundred of a nanosecond while the post-discharge occurring between two successive discharges lasts one hundred of a microsecond. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral dry or humid air flow initially polluted with 400 ppm of NO. After 5 ms, the time corresponding to the occurrence of 50 successive discharge/post-discharge phases, a higher NO removal rate and a lower ozone production rate are found in humid air. This change is due to the presence of the HO2 species formed from the H primary radical in the discharge zone.

  16. Filament Discharge Phenomena in Fingerprint Acquisition by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng Ming; Xu Weijun; Liu Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the dielectric barrier discharge fingerprint acquisition technique is introduced. The filament discharge phenomena were observed in the process of fingerprint acquisition. The filament discharge reduced the quality of fingerprint images. Obviously, it was necessary to eliminate streamer discharges in order to get good fingerprint images. The streamer discharge was considered to be the cause of the filament discharge in the experiment. The relationship between the critical electric field and the discharge gap was calculated with the Raether's model of streamer discharge. The calculated results and our experiment proved that it would be difficult for the streamer discharge to occur when the discharge gap was narrow. With a narrow discharge gap, the discharge was homogeneous, and the fingerprint images were clear and large in area. The images obtained in the experiment are very suitable for fingerprint identification as they contain more information

  17. Improving catchment discharge predictions by inferring flow route contributions from a nested-scale monitoring and model setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. van der Velde

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying effective measures to reduce nutrient loads of headwaters in lowland catchments requires a thorough understanding of flow routes of water and nutrients. In this paper we assess the value of nested-scale discharge and groundwater level measurements for the estimation of flow route volumes and for predictions of catchment discharge. In order to relate field-site measurements to the catchment-scale an upscaling approach is introduced that assumes that scale differences in flow route fluxes originate from differences in the relationship between groundwater storage and the spatial structure of the groundwater table. This relationship is characterized by the Groundwater Depth Distribution (GDD curve that relates spatial variation in groundwater depths to the average groundwater depth. The GDD-curve was measured for a single field site (0.009 km2 and simple process descriptions were applied to relate groundwater levels to flow route discharges. This parsimonious model could accurately describe observed storage, tube drain discharge, overland flow and groundwater flow simultaneously with Nash-Sutcliff coefficients exceeding 0.8. A probabilistic Monte Carlo approach was applied to upscale field-site measurements to catchment scales by inferring scale-specific GDD-curves from the hydrographs of two nested catchments (0.4 and 6.5 km2. The estimated contribution of tube drain effluent (a dominant source for nitrates decreased with increasing scale from 76–79% at the field-site to 34–61% and 25–50% for both catchment scales. These results were validated by demonstrating that a model conditioned on nested-scale measurements improves simulations of nitrate loads and predictions of extreme discharges during validation periods compared to a model that was conditioned on catchment discharge only.

  18. Response surface modelling of tool electrode wear rate and material removal rate in micro electrical discharge machining of Inconel 718

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puthumana, Govindan

    2017-01-01

    conductivity and high strength causing it extremely difficult tomachine. Micro-Electrical Discharge Machining (Micro-EDM) is a non-conventional method that has a potential toovercome these restrictions for machining of Inconel 718. Response Surface Method (RSM) was used for modelling thetool Electrode Wear...

  19. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  20. A one-dimensional model to describe flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to super critical impact velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Romero, A.; Rodríguez-Martínez, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate flow localization in viscoplastic slender bars subjected to dynamic tension. We explore loading rates above the critical impact velocity: the wave initiated in the impacted end by the applied velocity is the trigger for the localization of plastic deformation. The problem has been addressed using two kinds of numerical simulations: (1) one-dimensional finite difference calculations and (2) axisymmetric finite element computations. The latter calculations have been used to validate the capacity of the finite difference model to describe plastic flow localization at high impact velocities. The finite difference model, which highlights due to its simplicity, allows to obtain insights into the role played by the strain rate and temperature sensitivities of the material in the process of dynamic flow localization. Specifically, we have shown that viscosity can stabilize the material behavior to the point of preventing the appearance of the critical impact velocity. This is a key outcome of our investigation, which, to the best of the authors' knowledge, has not been previously reported in the literature.

  1. Dynamical system with plastic self-organized velocity field as an alternative conceptual model of a cognitive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Natalia B; Marsden, Christopher J

    2017-12-05

    It is well known that architecturally the brain is a neural network, i.e. a collection of many relatively simple units coupled flexibly. However, it has been unclear how the possession of this architecture enables higher-level cognitive functions, which are unique to the brain. Here, we consider the brain from the viewpoint of dynamical systems theory and hypothesize that the unique feature of the brain, the self-organized plasticity of its architecture, could represent the means of enabling the self-organized plasticity of its velocity vector field. We propose that, conceptually, the principle of cognition could amount to the existence of appropriate rules governing self-organization of the velocity field of a dynamical system with an appropriate account of stimuli. To support this hypothesis, we propose a simple non-neuromorphic mathematical model with a plastic self-organized velocity field, which has no prototype in physical world. This system is shown to be capable of basic cognition, which is illustrated numerically and with musical data. Our conceptual model could provide an additional insight into the working principles of the brain. Moreover, hardware implementations of plastic velocity fields self-organizing according to various rules could pave the way to creating artificial intelligence of a novel type.

  2. Axial mercury segregation in direct current operated low-pressure argon-mercury gas discharge: Part II. Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gielen, John W A M; Groot, Simon de; Dijk, Jan van; Mullen, Joost J A M van der

    2004-01-01

    In a previous paper we had presented experimental results on mercury segregation due to cataphoresis in direct current operated low-pressure argon-mercury gas discharges. In this paper, we present our model to describe cataphoretic segregation in argon (or another noble gas)-mercury discharges. The model is based on the balance equations for mass and momentum and includes electrophoresis effects of electrons on mercury. Good agreement is found between the experimental results and model calculations. The model confirms our experimental observation that the mercury vapour pressure gradient depends on the local mercury vapour pressure. Furthermore, the model predicts the reversal of the direction of the transport of mercury under certain conditions (the phenomenon known as retrograde cataphoresis)

  3. A novel model and behavior analysis for a swarm of multi-agent systems with finite velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liang-Shun; Wu Zhi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the fact that in most existing swarm models of multi-agent systems the velocity of an agent can be infinite, which is not in accordance with the real applications, we propose a novel swarm model of multi-agent systems where the velocity of an agent is finite. The Lyapunov function method and LaSalle's invariance principle are employed to show that by using the proposed model all of the agents eventually enter into a bounded region around the swarm center and finally tend to a stationary state. Numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  4. Vp and Vs velocity models from the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary across the Gloria Fault, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luis; Hübscher, Christian; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Afilhado, Alexandra; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The oceanic crustal and uppermost lithospheric mantle structure across the Gloria Fault transcurrent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia in the Northeast Atlantic is investigated based on seismic reflection, seismic refraction and wide angle reflection data. This experiment used 18 ocean bottom stations along a N-S 150 km long traverse together with coincident acquisition of a multichannel seismic reflection profile. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the reflection profile shows that Neogene to recent tectonic deformation on this segment of the plate boundary concentrated on the southern side of the Gloria Fault, i.e. the Africa plate. Modeling of P and S seismic waves and gravimetric anomalies allowed estimation of velocities, density, Poisson's ratio and proposal of a compositional model. A five layer model is proposed in which layers 1 to 3 correspond to normal sediments and typical oceanic crust layers 2 and 3, respectively. Layer 5 yielded mantle velocities above 7.9 km/s. Layer 4 with 4 km of thickness has Vp velocities between 7.1 and 7.4 km/s. Layer 4 velocities can be found at the base of the lower crust and at the uppermost hydrated lithospheric mantle as reported from various authors from other parts of the Earth. Enrichment in olivine at the base of the lower crust, as a result of underplating, could explain Layer 4 velocities; however, there are no morphologic evidences associated to plume activity. On the other hand, morphologic, geologic and seismicity generated along the Gloria Fault (M>7-8.4) indicates that the Gloria Fault has accumulated ductile and brittle deformation from the upper mantle through the surface. It is here argued that pathways for fluid migration through seismic pumping mechanisms have provided the conditions for partial serpentinization of the peridotite mantle rocks, which probably make up the bulk of Layer 4. Publication supported by FCT- project UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz

  5. Comparison of an empirical S-wave velocity model and a calculated stress-strain model for a rock mass disturbed by mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Krzysztof; Czarny, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In the article a comparison analysis is presented between a numerical model of the stress and deformation state in a rock mass and an S-wave velocity model obtained as a result of in situ measurement. The research was conducted using data from the Jastrzębie and Moszczenica coal mines. The part of the rock mass examined was strongly disturbed by multi-seam exploitation of coal. To obtain the S-wave velocity model 6 hours of ambient seismic noise data were recorded using 11 seismometers. The propagation of the Rayleigh surface wave between the seismometers was reconstructed utilising the seismic interferometry and the cross correlation technique. Estimation of a two dimensional model of the Swave velocity field was performed on the basis of dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The stress and deformation field were calculated assuming a plane state of stress with the use of the elastic-plastic Coulomb-Mohr strength criterion. Images of the vertical stress, horizontal stress, vertical strain and horizontal strain as well as the subsidence profile on the model surface were obtained as a result of the calculation. Analysis of the results shows correlation between the field of S-wave velocity and the modelled field of stress and strain.

  6. Shear velocity model for the westernmost Mediterranean from ambient noise and ballistic finite-frequency Rayleigh wave tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Villasenor, A.; Thurner, S.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Harnafi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The westernmost Mediterranean comprises the Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, resulting from Iberia-Eurasia collision; the Iberian Massif, which has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes), resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back; and the Atlas Mountains. We analyzed data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations in the area (IberArray and Siberia arrays, the PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km. We calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise (periods 4 to 40 s) and teleseismic events (periods 20 to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. Our results correlate well with the surface expression of the main structural units with higher crustal velocity for the Iberian Massif than for the Alpine Iberia and Atlas Mountains. The Gibraltar Arc has lower crustal shear velocities than the regional average at all crustal depths. It also shows an arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas.

  7. Atomic oxygen dynamics in an air dielectric barrier discharge: a combined diagnostic and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Sabrina; Schröder, Daniel; Bibinov, Nikita; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker; Awakowicz, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas are a promising alternative therapy for treatment of chronic wounds, as they have already shown in clinical trials. In this study an air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) developed for therapeutic use in dermatology is characterized with respect to the plasma produced reactive oxygen species, namely atomic oxygen and ozone, which are known to be of great importance to wound healing. To understand the plasma chemistry of the applied DBD, xenon-calibrated two-photon laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and optical absorption spectroscopy are applied. The measured spatial distributions are shown and compared to each other. A model of the afterglow chemistry based on optical emission spectroscopy is developed to cross-check the measurement results and obtain insight into the dynamics of the considered reactive oxygen species. The atomic oxygen density is found to be located mostly between the electrodes with a maximum density of {{n}\\text{O}}=6× {{10}16} cm-3 . Time resolved measurements reveal a constant atomic oxygen density between two high voltage pulses. The ozone is measured up to 3 mm outside the active plasma volume, reaching a maximum value of {{n}{{\\text{O}3}}}=3× {{10}16} cm-3 between the electrodes.

  8. Predicting the peak growth velocity in the individual child: validation of a new growth model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, I.; Kingma, I.; Bruin, R.; Wapstra, F.H.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Veldhuizen, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the peak growth velocity in an individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is essential or determining the prognosis of the disorder and timing of the (surgical) treatment. Until the present time, no accurate method has been found to predict the timing and magnitude of the

  9. Predicting the peak growth velocity in the individual child : validation of a new growth model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Iris; Kingma, Idsart; de Bruin, Rob; Wapstra, Frits Hein; Verkerke, Gijsvertus J.; Veldhuizen, Albert G.

    Predicting the peak growth velocity in an individual patient with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is essential or determining the prognosis of the disorder and timing of the (surgical) treatment. Until the present time, no accurate method has been found to predict the timing and magnitude of the

  10. Modeling temperature and moisture state effects on acoustic velocity in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan Gao; X. Wang; L. Wang; R.B. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has proved the concept of acoustic wave propagation methods for evaluating wood quality of trees and logs during forest operations. As commercial acoustic equipment is implemented in field for various purposes, one has to consider the influence of operating temperature on acoustic velocity — a key parameter for wood property prediction. Our field...

  11. A stochastic model of reactive solute transport with time-varying velocity in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Z. J.; Sposito, Garrison

    1991-03-01

    The cumulant expansion method, used previously by Sposito and Barry (1987) to derive an ensemble average transport equation for a tracer moving in a heterogeneous aquifer, is generalized to the case of a reactive solute that can adsorb linearly and undergo first-order decay. In the process we also generalize the Van Kampen (1987) result for the cumulant expansion of a multiplicative stochastic differential equation containing a time-dependent sure matrix. The resulting partial differential equation exhibits terms with field-scale coefficients that are analogous to those in the corresponding nonstochastic local-scale transport equation. There are also new terms in the third- and fourth-order spatial derivatives of the ensemble average concentration. It is demonstrated that the effective solute velocity for the aqueous concentration, not that for the total concentration (aqueous plus sorbed), is relevant for a field-scale description of solute transport. The field-scale effective solute velocity, dispersion coefficient, retardation factor, and first-order decay parameters, unlike their local-scale counterparts, are time-dependent because of autocorrelations and cross correlations among the random local solute velocity, retardation factor, and first-order decay constant. It is shown also that negative cross correlations between the random tracer solute velocity and the inverse of the local retardation factor may produce both enhanced dispersion and a temporal growth in the field-scale retardation factor. These effects are possible in any heterogeneous aquifer for which a stochastic description of aquifer spatial variability is appropriate.

  12. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of acetaldehyde in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klett, C; Touchard, S; Vega-Gonzalez, A; Redolfi, M; Bonnin, X; Hassouni, K; Duten, X

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results obtained for the degradation of acetaldehyde by an atmospheric plasma corona discharge working in a pulsed regime. It was shown that a few hundred ppm of acetaldehyde diluted in a pure N 2 gas flow can be removed up to 80% by a discharge fed with an electric power lower than 1 W. Under the same conditions, adding up to 5% of O 2 allowed the removal of up to 95% of the initial acetaldehyde. The main identified end products were CO 2 , CO and methanol. A quasi-homogeneous zero-dimensional chemical model was developed to investigate the respective efficiency of the discharge and post-discharge periods in the global removal of the pollutant. The identified main pathways of acetaldehyde degradation were quenching of N 2 metastable states during plasma pulses and oxidation by O and OH radicals during the post-discharge. This latter contribution increased with input power because of ozone accumulation in the gas mixture acting as an additional oxygen reservoir. (paper)

  13. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of acetaldehyde in an atmospheric-pressure pulsed corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klett, C.; Touchard, S.; Vega-Gonzalez, A.; Redolfi, M.; Bonnin, X.; Hassouni, K.; Duten, X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports the results obtained for the degradation of acetaldehyde by an atmospheric plasma corona discharge working in a pulsed regime. It was shown that a few hundred ppm of acetaldehyde diluted in a pure N2 gas flow can be removed up to 80% by a discharge fed with an electric power lower than 1 W. Under the same conditions, adding up to 5% of O2 allowed the removal of up to 95% of the initial acetaldehyde. The main identified end products were CO2, CO and methanol. A quasi-homogeneous zero-dimensional chemical model was developed to investigate the respective efficiency of the discharge and post-discharge periods in the global removal of the pollutant. The identified main pathways of acetaldehyde degradation were quenching of N2 metastable states during plasma pulses and oxidation by O and OH radicals during the post-discharge. This latter contribution increased with input power because of ozone accumulation in the gas mixture acting as an additional oxygen reservoir.

  14. Dynamic Model Of Suspended Sediment Concentration River Discharge And Rainfall Intensity At Padang Watershed North Sumatra Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemala Sari Lubis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sediment transport has relationship with hydrologic input primarily river discharge and rainfall intensity. Fluctuation of river discharge and rainfall intensity have great effect on suspended sediment concentration. Bayesian Dynamic Linear Model DLMs is used to study relation of input hydrology and basin response variables. Response variables were taken from suspended sediment concentration and river discharge from a year July 2012 to June 2013 at two outlets at Padang sub-watershed upstream and Padang Hilir sub-watershed downstream of Padang watershed North Sumatra. Datas were analyzed by regression analysis of Suspended Sediment Concentration SSC as a dependent variables while river discharge and rainfall intensity as independent variables. The results showed that river discharge value are the highest on July 2012 and October 2012 at upstream and downstream of Padang watershed respectively. The SSC value are the highest on July 2012 and April 2013 at upstream and downstream of Padang watershed respectively. There is a weak correlation r2 0.002 between SSC and rainfall intensity at source points of outlet at upstream of Padang watershed. There is decreasing of forest paddy and plantation areas but increasing of bush and farming areas from 2012 to 2015 at upstream of Padang watershed. Meanwhile at downstream of Padang watershed were increasing of plantation areas since 2012 to 2015

  15. Modeling of plasma chemical processes in the artificial ionized layer in the upper atmosphere by the nanosecond corona discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikharev, A. L.; Gorbachev, A. M.; Ivanov, O. A.; Kolisko, A. L.; Litvak, A. G.

    1993-08-01

    The plasma chemical processes in the corona discharge formed in air by a series of high voltage pulses of nanosecond duration are investigated experimentally. The experimental conditions (reduced electric field, duration and repetition frequency of the pulses, gas pressure in the chamber) modeled the regime of creation of the artificial ionized layer (AIL) in the upper atmosphere by a nanosecond microwave discharge. It was found that in a nanosecond microwave discharge predominantly generation of ozone occurs, and that the production of nitrogen dioxide is not large. The energy expenditures for the generation of one O 3 molecule were about 15 eV. On the basis of the experimental results the prognosis of the efficiency of ozone generation in AIL was made.

  16. Symmetry breaking by electric discharges in water and formation of light magnetic monopoles in an extended standard model. Pt. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, Harald [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Theoretical Physics

    2011-03-15

    By Lochak (theory) and Urutskoev (experiment) the hypothesis has been suggested that during electric discharges in water (fluids) light magnetic monopoles can be created which according to Lochak should be considered as a kind of excited neutrinos. Based on a quantum field theoretic development of de Broglie's and Heisenberg's fusion ideas and the results of preceding papers a transparent proof is given that such magnetic monopoles can occur during discharges. In the theoretical description these circumstances are formulated within the scope of an extended (effective) Standard Model and the monopoles with vanishing electric charge arise from neutrinos whose states are modified by the symmetry breaking caused by the discharge. In the introduction some technical implications are referred to. The article is divided into two parts. (orig.)

  17. Electromechanical wave imaging and electromechanical wave velocity estimation in a large animal model of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costet, Alexandre; Melki, Lea; Sayseng, Vincent; Hamid, Nadira; Nakanishi, Koki; Wan, Elaine; Hahn, Rebecca; Homma, Shunichi; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    Echocardiography is often used in the clinic for detection and characterization of myocardial infarction. Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive ultrasound-based imaging technique based on time-domain incremental motion and strain estimation that can evaluate changes in contractility in the heart. In this study, electromechanical activation is assessed in infarcted heart to determine whether EWI is capable of detecting and monitoring infarct formation. Additionally, methods for estimating electromechanical wave (EW) velocity are presented, and changes in the EW propagation velocity after infarct formation are studied. Five (n  =  5) adult mongrels were used in this study. Successful infarct formation was achieved in three animals by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Dogs were survived for a few days after LAD ligation and monitored daily with EWI. At the end of the survival period, dogs were sacrificed and TTC (tetrazolium chloride) staining confirmed the formation and location of the infarct. In all three dogs, as soon as day 1 EWI was capable of detecting late-activated and non-activated regions, which grew over the next few days. On final day images, the extent of these regions corresponded to the location of infarct as confirmed by staining. EW velocities in border zones of infarct were significantly lower post-infarct formation when compared to baseline, whereas velocities in healthy tissues were not. These results indicate that EWI and EW velocity might help with the detection of infarcts and their border zones, which may be useful for characterizing arrhythmogenic substrate.

  18. Vel-IO 3D: A tool for 3D velocity model construction, optimization and time-depth conversion in 3D geological modeling workflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesano, Francesco E.; D'Ambrogi, Chiara

    2017-02-01

    We present Vel-IO 3D, a tool for 3D velocity model creation and time-depth conversion, as part of a workflow for 3D model building. The workflow addresses the management of large subsurface dataset, mainly seismic lines and well logs, and the construction of a 3D velocity model able to describe the variation of the velocity parameters related to strong facies and thickness variability and to high structural complexity. Although it is applicable in many geological contexts (e.g. foreland basins, large intermountain basins), it is particularly suitable in wide flat regions, where subsurface structures have no surface expression. The Vel-IO 3D tool is composed by three scripts, written in Python 2.7.11, that automate i) the 3D instantaneous velocity model building, ii) the velocity model optimization, iii) the time-depth conversion. They determine a 3D geological model that is consistent with the primary geological constraints (e.g. depth of the markers on wells). The proposed workflow and the Vel-IO 3D tool have been tested, during the EU funded Project GeoMol, by the construction of the 3D geological model of a flat region, 5700 km2 in area, located in the central part of the Po Plain. The final 3D model showed the efficiency of the workflow and Vel-IO 3D tool in the management of large amount of data both in time and depth domain. A 4 layer-cake velocity model has been applied to a several thousand (5000-13,000 m) thick succession, with 15 horizons from Triassic up to Pleistocene, complicated by a Mesozoic extensional tectonics and by buried thrusts related to Southern Alps and Northern Apennines.

  19. Mass discharge estimation from contaminated sites: Multi-model solutions for assessment of conceptual uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Nanna Isbak; Troldborg, Mads; McKnight, Ursula S.; Binning, Philip John; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup

    2012-01-01

    Mass discharge estimates are increasingly being used in the management of contaminated sites. Such estimates have proven useful for supporting decisions related to the prioritization of contaminated sites in a groundwater catchment. Potential management options can be categorised as follows: (1) leave as is, (2) clean up, or (3) further investigation needed. However, mass discharge estimates are often very uncertain, which may hamper the management decisions. If option 1 is incorrectly chosen...

  20. Feedback model of secondary electron emission in DC gas discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, ARUMUGAM; Prince, ALEX; Suraj, Kumar SINHA

    2018-01-01

    Feedback is said to exist in any amplifier when the fraction of output power in fed back as an input. Similarly, in gaseous discharge ions that incident on the cathode act as a natural feedback element to stabilize and self sustain the discharge. The present investigation is intended to emphasize the feedback nature of ions that emits secondary electrons (SEs) from the cathode surface in DC gas discharges. The average number of SEs emitted per incident ion and non ionic species (energetic neutrals, metastables and photons) which results from ion is defined as effective secondary electron emission coefficient (ESEEC,{γ }{{E}}). In this study, we derive an analytic expression that corroborates the relation between {γ }{{E}} and power influx by ion to the cathode based on the feedback theory of an amplifier. In addition, experimentally, we confirmed the typical positive feedback nature of SEE from the cathode in argon DC glow discharges. The experiment is done for three different cathode material of same dimension (tungsten (W), copper (Cu) and brass) under identical discharge conditions (pressure: 0.45 mbar, cathode bias: ‑600 V, discharge gab: 15 cm and operating gas: argon). Further, we found that the {γ }{{E}} value of these cathode material controls the amount of feedback power given by ions. The difference in feedback leads different final output i.e the power carried by ion at cathode ({P}{{i}}{\\prime }{| }{{C}}). The experimentally obtained value of {P}{{i}}{\\prime }{| }{{C}} is 4.28 W, 6.87 W and 9.26 W respectively for W, Cu and brass. In addition, the present investigation reveals that the amount of feedback power in a DC gas discharges not only affect the fraction of power fed back to the cathode but also the entire characteristics of the discharge.

  1. Reference methodologies for radioactive controlled discharges an activity within the IAEA's Program Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety II (EMRAS II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocki, T.J.; Bergman, L.; Tellería, D.M.; Proehl, G.; Amado, V.; Curti, A.; Bonchuk, I.; Boyer, P.; Mourlon, C.; Chyly, P.; Heling, R.; Sági, L.; Kliaus, V.; Krajewski, P.; Latouche, G.; Lauria, D.C.; Newsome, L.; Smith, J.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2009, the IAEA EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety II) program was launched. The goal of the program is to develop, compare and test models for the assessment of radiological impacts to the public and the environment due to radionuclides being released or already existing in the environment; to help countries build and harmonize their capabilities; and to model the movement of radionuclides in the environment. Within EMRAS II, nine working groups are active; this paper will focus on the activities of Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases. Within this working group environmental transfer and dose assessment models are tested under different scenarios by participating countries and the results compared. This process allows each participating country to identify characteristics of their models that need to be refined. The goal of this working group is to identify reference methodologies for the assessment of exposures to the public due to routine discharges of radionuclides to the terrestrial and aquatic environments. Several different models are being applied to estimate the transfer of radionuclides in the environment for various scenarios. The first phase of the project involves a scenario of nuclear power reactor with a coastal location which routinely (continuously) discharges 60Co, 85Kr, 131I, and 137Cs to the atmosphere and 60Co, 137Cs, and 90Sr to the marine environment. In this scenario many of the parameters and characteristics of the representative group were given to the modelers and cannot be altered. Various models have been used by the different participants in this inter-comparison (PC-CREAM, CROM, IMPACT, CLRP POSEIDON, SYMBIOSE and others). This first scenario is to enable a comparison of the radionuclide transport and dose modelling. These scenarios will facilitate the development of reference methodologies for controlled discharges. (authors)

  2. Computerized prediction of intensive care unit discharge after cardiac surgery: development and validation of a Gaussian processes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyfroidt, Geert; Güiza, Fabian; Cottem, Dominiek; De Becker, Wilfried; Van Loon, Kristien; Aerts, Jean-Marie; Berckmans, Daniël; Ramon, Jan; Bruynooghe, Maurice; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2011-10-25

    The intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) of patients undergoing cardiac surgery may vary considerably, and is often difficult to predict within the first hours after admission. The early clinical evolution of a cardiac surgery patient might be predictive for his LOS. The purpose of the present study was to develop a predictive model for ICU discharge after non-emergency cardiac surgery, by analyzing the first 4 hours of data in the computerized medical record of these patients with Gaussian processes (GP), a machine learning technique. Non-interventional study. Predictive modeling, separate development (n = 461) and validation (n = 499) cohort. GP models were developed to predict the probability of ICU discharge the day after surgery (classification task), and to predict the day of ICU discharge as a discrete variable (regression task). GP predictions were compared with predictions by EuroSCORE, nurses and physicians. The classification task was evaluated using aROC for discrimination, and Brier Score, Brier Score Scaled, and Hosmer-Lemeshow test for calibration. The regression task was evaluated by comparing median actual and predicted discharge, loss penalty function (LPF) ((actual-predicted)/actual) and calculating root mean squared relative errors (RMSRE). Median (P25-P75) ICU length of stay was 3 (2-5) days. For classification, the GP model showed an aROC of 0.758 which was significantly higher than the predictions by nurses, but not better than EuroSCORE and physicians. The GP had the best calibration, with a Brier Score of 0.179 and Hosmer-Lemeshow p-value of 0.382. For regression, GP had the highest proportion of patients with a correctly predicted day of discharge (40%), which was significantly better than the EuroSCORE (p < 0.001) and nurses (p = 0.044) but equivalent to physicians. GP had the lowest RMSRE (0.408) of all predictive models. A GP model that uses PDMS data of the first 4 hours after admission in the ICU of scheduled adult cardiac

  3. Relation between velocity and curvature in movement: equivalence and divergence between a power law and a minimum-jerk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wann, J; Nimmo-Smith, I; Wing, A M

    1988-11-01

    Unconstrained hand movements typically display a decrease in hand speed around highly curved sections of a trajectory. It has been suggested that this relation between tangential velocity and radius of curvature conforms to a one-third power law. We demonstrate that a one-third power law can be explained by models taking account of trajectory costs such as a minimum-jerk model. Data were analyzed from 6 subjects performing elliptical drawing movements of varying eccentricities. Conformity to the one-third power law in the average was obtained but is shown to be artifactual. It is demonstrated that asymmetric velocity profiles may result in consistent departures from a one-third power law but that such differences may be masked by inappropriate analysis procedures. We introduce a modification to the original minimum-jerk model by replacing the assumption of a Newtonian point-mass with a visco-elastic body. Simulations with the modified model identify a basis for asymmetry of velocity profiles and thereby predict departures from a one-third law commensurate with the empirical findings.

  4. Lithospheric structure of the westernmost Mediterranean inferred from finite frequency Rayleigh wave tomography S-velocity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, Imma; Villasenor, Antonio; Thurner, Sally; Levander, Alan; Gallart, Josep; Harnafi, Mimoun

    2016-04-01

    The Iberian Peninsula and Morocco, separated by the Alboran Sea and the Algerian Basin, constitute the westernmost Mediterranean. From north to south this region consists of the Pyrenees, the result of interaction between the Iberian and Eurasian plates; the Iberian Massif, a region that has been undeformed since the end of the Paleozoic; the Central System and Iberian Chain, regions with intracontinental Oligocene-Miocene deformation; the Gibraltar Arc (Betics, Rif and Alboran terranes) and the Atlas Mountains, resulting from post-Oligocene subduction roll-back and Eurasian-Nubian plate convergence. In this study we analyze data from recent broad-band array deployments and permanent stations on the Iberian Peninsula and in Morocco (Spanish IberArray and Siberia arrays, the US PICASSO array, the University of Munster array, and the Spanish, Portuguese, and Moroccan National Networks) to characterize its lithospheric structure. The combined array of 350 stations has an average interstation spacing of ~60 km, comparable to USArray. We have calculated the Rayleigh waves phase velocities from ambient noise for short periods (4 s to 40 s) and teleseismic events for longer periods (20 s to 167 s). We inverted the phase velocities to obtain a shear velocity model for the lithosphere to ~200 km depth. The model shows differences in the crust for the different areas, where the highest shear velocities are mapped in the Iberian Massif crust. The crustal thickness is highly variable ranging from ~25 km beneath the eastern Betics to ~55km beneath the Gibraltar Strait, Internal Betics and Internal Rif. Beneath this region a unique arc shaped anomaly with high upper mantle velocities (>4.6 km/s) at shallow depths (volcanic fields in Iberia and Morocco, indicative of high temperatures at relatively shallow depths, and suggesting that the lithosphere has been removed beneath these areas

  5. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  6. Estimation of particle velocity in moving beds based on a flow model for bulk solids. Ryudo model ni motozuita idoso no ryushi sokudo no suisan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H. (Muroran Inst. of Tech., Hokkaido (Japan)); Honda, Y. (Snow Brand Milk Products Co. Ltd., Sapporo (Japan))

    1992-11-10

    Based on a particle flow model (stress-shear strain velocity relational expression) which takes account of the bulk volume expansion effect during shearing deformation of particles, a new estimation method for particle velocity distribution and stress distribution is proposed. The method is applied to a crossflow moving bed and to a moving bed for comparison with the experimental values to examine its validity. The method is further extended to predict the velocity profile and stress profile of moving beds in a vertical tube (countercurrent and concurrent) accompanying gas flow. It is indicated that the bulk volume expansion effect differs according to dimensions. The velocity distribution and the stress distribution of flows in a vertical tube are greatly influenced by the nature of the flow, i.e. whether it is a counterflow or a concurrent flow, and the frictional force of solids on a wall surface increases markedly in a concurrent flow, which induces considerable lag of particle velocity. The parameter which is contained in the model and indicates the bulk volume expansion effect is a function of the particle velocity, and it is almost unaffected by the flow rate of gas moving. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  7. An ensemble-based dynamic Bayesian averaging approach for discharge simulations using multiple global precipitation products and hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Junguo; Yang, Hong; Sweetapple, Chris

    2018-03-01

    Global precipitation products are very important datasets in flow simulations, especially in poorly gauged regions. Uncertainties resulting from precipitation products, hydrological models and their combinations vary with time and data magnitude, and undermine their application to flow simulations. However, previous studies have not quantified these uncertainties individually and explicitly. This study developed an ensemble-based dynamic Bayesian averaging approach (e-Bay) for deterministic discharge simulations using multiple global precipitation products and hydrological models. In this approach, the joint probability of precipitation products and hydrological models being correct is quantified based on uncertainties in maximum and mean estimation, posterior probability is quantified as functions of the magnitude and timing of discharges, and the law of total probability is implemented to calculate expected discharges. Six global fine-resolution precipitation products and two hydrological models of different complexities are included in an illustrative application. e-Bay can effectively quantify uncertainties and therefore generate better deterministic discharges than traditional approaches (weighted average methods with equal and varying weights and maximum likelihood approach). The mean Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values of e-Bay are up to 0.97 and 0.85 in training and validation periods respectively, which are at least 0.06 and 0.13 higher than traditional approaches. In addition, with increased training data, assessment criteria values of e-Bay show smaller fluctuations than traditional approaches and its performance becomes outstanding. The proposed e-Bay approach bridges the gap between global precipitation products and their pragmatic applications to discharge simulations, and is beneficial to water resources management in ungauged or poorly gauged regions across the world.

  8. Final Report - Spacially-Resolved Diagnostics and Modeling of Micro-Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2012-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy measurements were performed with added trace probe gases in an atmospheric pressure direct current (DC) helium microplasma. Spatially resolved measurements (resolution ∼ 6 (micro)m) were taken across a 200 (micro)m slot-type discharge. Stark splitting of the hydrogen Balmer-line was used to investigate the electric field distribution in the cathode sheath region. Electron densities were evaluated from the analysis of the spectral line broadenings of H-β emission. The electron density in the bulk plasma was in the range 3-8 x 1013 cm-3. The electric field peaked at the cathode (∼60 kV/cm) and decayed to small values over a distance of ∼ 50 (micro)m (sheath edge) from the cathode. These experimental data were in good agreement with a self-consistent one-dimensional model of the discharge. The dependence of gas temperature on gas flow through the slot-type, atmospheric pressure microplasma in helium or argon was investigated by a combination of experiments and modeling. Spatially-resolved gas temperature profiles across the gap between the two electrodes were obtained from rotational analysis of N 2 (C 3 II u → B 3 II g ) emission spectra, with small amounts of N 2 added as actinometer gas. Under the same input power of 20 kW/cm 3 , the peak gas temperature in helium (∼650 K) was significantly lower than that in argon (over 1200 K). This reflects the much higher thermal conductivity of helium gas. The gas temperature decreased with increasing gas flow rate, more so in argon compared to helium. This was consistent with the fact that conductive heat losses dominate in helium microplasmas, while convective heat losses play a major role in argon microplasmas. A plasma-gas flow simulation of the microdischarge, including a chemistry set, a compressible Navier-Stokes (and mass continuity) equation, and a convective heat transport equation, was also performed. Experimental measurements were in good agreement with simulation

  9. Absolute earthquake locations using 3-D versus 1-D velocity models below a local seismic network: example from the Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, T.; Chevrot, S.; Sylvander, M.; Monteiller, V.; Calvet, M.; Villaseñor, A.; Benahmed, S.; Pauchet, H.; Grimaud, F.

    2018-03-01

    Local seismic networks are usually designed so that earthquakes are located inside them (primary azimuthal gap 180° and distance to the first station higher than 15 km). Errors on velocity models and accuracy of absolute earthquake locations are assessed based on a reference data set made of active seismic, quarry blasts and passive temporary experiments. Solutions and uncertainties are estimated using the probabilistic approach of the NonLinLoc (NLLoc) software based on Equal Differential Time. Some updates have been added to NLLoc to better focus on the final solution (outlier exclusion, multiscale grid search, S-phases weighting). Errors in the probabilistic approach are defined to take into account errors on velocity models and on arrival times. The seismicity in the final 3-D catalogue is located with a horizontal uncertainty of about 2.0 ± 1.9 km and a vertical uncertainty of about 3.0 ± 2.0 km.

  10. Computerized prediction of intensive care unit discharge after cardiac surgery: development and validation of a Gaussian processes model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyfroidt Geert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intensive care unit (ICU length of stay (LOS of patients undergoing cardiac surgery may vary considerably, and is often difficult to predict within the first hours after admission. The early clinical evolution of a cardiac surgery patient might be predictive for his LOS. The purpose of the present study was to develop a predictive model for ICU discharge after non-emergency cardiac surgery, by analyzing the first 4 hours of data in the computerized medical record of these patients with Gaussian processes (GP, a machine learning technique. Methods Non-interventional study. Predictive modeling, separate development (n = 461 and validation (n = 499 cohort. GP models were developed to predict the probability of ICU discharge the day after surgery (classification task, and to predict the day of ICU discharge as a discrete variable (regression task. GP predictions were compared with predictions by EuroSCORE, nurses and physicians. The classification task was evaluated using aROC for discrimination, and Brier Score, Brier Score Scaled, and Hosmer-Lemeshow test for calibration. The regression task was evaluated by comparing median actual and predicted discharge, loss penalty function (LPF ((actual-predicted/actual and calculating root mean squared relative errors (RMSRE. Results Median (P25-P75 ICU length of stay was 3 (2-5 days. For classification, the GP model showed an aROC of 0.758 which was significantly higher than the predictions by nurses, but not better than EuroSCORE and physicians. The GP had the best calibration, with a Brier Score of 0.179 and Hosmer-Lemeshow p-value of 0.382. For regression, GP had the highest proportion of patients with a correctly predicted day of discharge (40%, which was significantly better than the EuroSCORE (p Conclusions A GP model that uses PDMS data of the first 4 hours after admission in the ICU of scheduled adult cardiac surgery patients was able to predict discharge from the ICU as a

  11. Predicting tile drainage discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Petersen, Rasmus Jes

    More than 50 % of Danish agricultural areas are expected to be artificial tile drained. Transport of water and nutrients through the tile drain system to the aquatic environment is expected to be significant. For different mitigation strategies such as constructed wetlands an exact knowledge...... of the water load coming from the tile drainage system is therefore essential. This work aims at predicting tile drainage discharge using dynamic as well as a statistical predictive models. A large dataset of historical tile drain discharge data, daily discharge values as well as yearly average values were...... used in the analysis. For the dynamic modelling, a simple linear reservoir model was used where different outlets in the model represented tile drain as well as groundwater discharge outputs. This modelling was based on daily measured tile drain discharge values. The statistical predictive model...

  12. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabtaji, Agung; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-01

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  13. 1-D seismic velocity model and hypocenter relocation using double difference method around West Papua region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabtaji, Agung, E-mail: sabtaji.agung@gmail.com, E-mail: agung.sabtaji@bmkg.go.id [Study Program of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciencies and Technology, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia’s Agency for Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysics Region V, Jayapura 1572 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    West Papua region has fairly high of seismicity activities due to tectonic setting and many inland faults. In addition, the region has a unique and complex tectonic conditions and this situation lead to high potency of seismic hazard in the region. The precise earthquake hypocenter location is very important, which could provide high quality of earthquake parameter information and the subsurface structure in this region to the society. We conducted 1-D P-wave velocity using earthquake data catalog from BMKG for April, 2009 up to March, 2014 around West Papua region. The obtained 1-D seismic velocity then was used as input for improving hypocenter location using double-difference method. The relocated hypocenter location shows fairly clearly the pattern of intraslab earthquake beneath New Guinea Trench (NGT). The relocated hypocenters related to the inland fault are also observed more focus in location around the fault.

  14. Response of explosive HMX to low-velocity impact: modeling by the crystal plasticity finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilnitsky, Denis; Inogamov, Nail; Zhakhovsky, Vasily

    2017-12-01

    Crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) is a powerful tool for modeling the various deformation problems, which takes into account the different plasticity mechanisms at microscale of grain sizes and contribution of anisotropic behavior of each grain to macroscopic deformation pattern. Using this method we simulated deformation and plasticity of high explosive HMX produced by relatively low velocity impact. It was found that such plastic deformations of grains cause local heating which is sufficient to induce chemical reactions.

  15. Computer modelling of a short-pulse excited dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp (lambda approx 172 nm)

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, R J

    2003-01-01

    A detailed rate-equation analysis has been used to simulate the plasma kinetics in a pulsed-excited dielectric barrier discharge in xenon, under operating conditions where the discharge structure is spatially homogeneous. The one-dimensional model, incorporating 14 species and 70 reaction processes, predicts results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical characteristics, and optical (vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and visible) pulse shapes. The model reveals that electrical breakdown of the discharge gap occurs via a fast-moving ionization/excitation wavefront that starts close to the anode dielectric and propagates towards the cathode at approx 3x10 sup 5 m s sup - sup 1. The wavefront appears as a result of successive avalanches of electrons that propagate across the discharge gap after release from the cathode dielectric. During breakdown, the mean electron energy in the bulk plasma is close to optimum for preferential excitation of the Xe* 1s sub 4 sub , sub 5 states that fe...

  16. 1D layered velocity models and microseismic event locations: synthetic examples for a case with a single linear receiver array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Jubran; Eaton, David W.

    2017-10-01

    We discuss various aspects of 1D velocity-model building for application to microseismic data analysis. We generate simple synthetic example data using a widely used single linear array geometry. The synthetic data contain 30 sources with known locations for a reference model based on previous studies of the Barnett shale. We investigate several key factors that should be considered, including selection of the calibration technique, inclusion of a priori information such as lateral heterogeneity and parameter ranges, and choice of algorithm for travel time computations. For the source-receiver geometry considered here, hypocenter location errors (±6 m in X and ±12 m in Z) can result from differently calibrated models only and without including the errors in picked arrival times and polarization estimates. We find that the errors in hypocenter locations are reduced (±3 m in X and ±6 m in Z) when a model calibrated with multiple shots simultaneously is used. Using four different models (vertical fault, dipping layers, channels, and these effects combined), we demonstrate that systematic errors in hypocenter locations can result when a 1D layered model is used in lieu of a laterally heterogeneous subsurface. Finally, we show that event locations from a velocity model calibrated using direct-arrival times are more stable than from a model calibrated with first-arrival times.

  17. Modeling sediment concentration and discharge variations in a small Ethiopian watershed with contributions from an unpaved road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzman Christian D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drainage of paved and unpaved roads has been implicated as a major contributor of overland flow and erosion in mountainous landscapes. Despite this, few watershed models include or have tested for the effect roads have on discharge and sediment loads. Though having a model is an important step, its proper application and attention to distinct landscape features is even more important. This study focuses on developing a module for drainage from a road and tests it on a nested watershed (Shanko Bahir within a larger previously studied site (Debre Mawi that receives overland flow contributions from a highly compacted layer of soil on an unpaved road surface. Shanko Bahir experiences a sub-humid monsoonal climate and was assessed for the rainy seasons of 2010, 2011, and 2012. The model chosen is the Parameter Efficient Distributed (PED model, previously used where saturation-excess overland flow heavily influences discharge and sediment concentration variation, though infiltration-excess occasionally occurs. Since overland flow on unpaved surfaces emulates Hortonian flow, an adjustment to the PED model (the developed module advances possible incorporation of both flow regimes. The modification resulted in similar modeling performance as previous studies in the Blue Nile Basin on a daily basis (NSE = 0.67 for discharge and 0.71 for sediment concentrations. Furthermore, the road while occupying a small proportion of the sub-watershed (11% contributed importantly to the early discharge and sediment transport events demonstrating the effect of roads especially on sediment concentrations. Considerations for the dynamic erodibility of the road improved sediment concentration simulation further (NSE = 0.75. The results show that this PED modeling framework can be adjusted to include unpaved compacted surfaces to give reasonable results, but more work is needed to account for contributions from gullies, which can cause high influxes of sediment.

  18. Thermal Pollution Mathematical Model. Volume 3: User's Manual for One-Dimensional Numerical Model for the Seasonal Thermocline. [environment impact of thermal discharges from power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. S.; Sengupta, S.; Nwadike, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    A user's manual for a one dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature profiles of a deep body of water for any number of annual cycles is presented. The model is essentially a set of partial differential equations which are solved by finite difference methods using a high speed digital computer. The model features the effects of area change with depth, nonlinear interaction of wind generated turbulence and buoyancy, adsorption of radiative heat flux below the surface, thermal discharges, and the effects of vertical convection caused by discharge. The main assumption in the formulation is horizontal homogeneity. The environmental impact of thermal discharges from power plants is emphasized. Although the model is applicable to most lakes, a specific site (Lake Keowee, S.C.) application is described in detail. The programs are written in FORTRAN 5.

  19. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones

  20. A global plasma model for reactive deposition of compound films by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, B. C.; Wu, Z. L.; Wu, B.; Li, Y. G.; Lei, M. K.

    2017-05-01

    A spatially averaged, time-dependent global plasma model has been developed to describe the reactive deposition of a TiAlSiN thin film by modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) discharges in Ar/N2 mixture gas, based on the particle balance and the energy balance in the ionization region, and considering the formation and erosion of the compound at the target surface. The modeling results show that, with increasing the N2 partial pressure from 0% to 40% at a constant working pressure of 0.3 Pa, the electron temperature during the strongly ionized period increases from 4 to 7 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient, which represents the power fraction that effectively heats the electrons and maintains the discharge, increases from about 4% to 7%; with increasing the working pressure from 0.1 to 0.7 Pa at a constant N2 partial pressure of 25%, the electron temperature decreases from 10 to 4 eV and the effective power transfer coefficient decreases from 8% to 5%. Using the modeled plasma parameters to evaluate the kinetic energy of arriving ions, the ion-to-neutral flux ratio of deposited species, and the substrate heating, the variations of process parameters that increase these values lead to an enhanced adatom mobility at the target surface and an increased input energy to the substrate, corresponding to the experimental observation of surface roughness reduction, the microstructure transition from the columnar structure to the dense featureless structure, and the enhancement of phase separation. At higher N2 partial pressure or lower working pressure, the modeling results demonstrate an increase in electron temperature, which shifts the discharge balance of Ti species from Ti+ to Ti2+ and results in a higher return fraction of Ti species, corresponding to the higher Al/Ti ratio of deposited films at these conditions. The modeling results are well correlated with the experimental observation of the composition variation and the microstructure

  1. Vertical Rise Velocity of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles Estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar Observations and High-Resolution Bubble Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T.; Ajith, K. K.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-12-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) is a well-known phenomenon in the equatorial ionospheric F region. As it causes severe scintillation in the amplitude and phase of radio signals, it is important to understand and forecast the occurrence of EPBs from a space weather point of view. The development of EPBs is presently believed as an evolution of the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We have already developed a 3D high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with a grid spacing of as small as 1 km and presented nonlinear growth of EPBs which shows very turbulent internal structures such as bifurcation and pinching. As EPBs have field-aligned structures, the latitude range that is affected by EPBs depends on the apex altitude of EPBs over the dip equator. However, it was not easy to observe the apex altitude and vertical rise velocity of EPBs. Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) in Indonesia is capable of steering radar beams quickly so that the growth phase of EPBs can be captured clearly. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller compared to those observed in postsunset hours. Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The HIRB model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model.

  2. Depression storage and infiltration effects on overland flow depth-velocity-friction at desert conditions: field plot results and model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Rossi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Water infiltration and overland flow are relevant in considering water partition among plant life forms, the sustainability of vegetation and the design of sustainable hydrological models and management. In arid and semi-arid regions, these processes present characteristic trends imposed by the prevailing physical conditions of the upper soil as evolved under water-limited climate. A set of plot-scale field experiments at the semi-arid Patagonian Monte (Argentina were performed in order to estimate the effect of depression storage areas and infiltration rates on depths, velocities and friction of overland flows. The micro-relief of undisturbed field plots was characterized at z-scale 1 mm through close-range stereo-photogrammetry and geo-statistical tools. The overland flow areas produced by controlled water inflows were video-recorded and the flow velocities were measured with image processing software. Antecedent and post-inflow moisture were measured, and texture, bulk density and physical properties of the upper soil were estimated based on soil core analyses. Field data were used to calibrate a physically-based, mass balanced, time explicit model of infiltration and overland flows. Modelling results reproduced the time series of observed flow areas, velocities and infiltration depths. Estimates of hydrodynamic parameters of overland flow (Reynolds-Froude numbers are informed. To our knowledge, the study here presented is novel in combining several aspects that previous studies do not address simultaneously: (1 overland flow and infiltration parameters were obtained in undisturbed field conditions; (2 field measurements of overland flow movement were coupled to a detailed analysis of soil microtopography at 1 mm depth scale; (3 the effect of depression storage areas in infiltration rates and depth-velocity friction of overland flows is addressed. Relevance of the results to other similar desert areas is justified by the accompanying

  3. Elaboration of a velocity model of the Bogota basin (Colombia) based on microtremors arrays measurements, gravity data, and geological information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido Hernandez, N. E.; Senna, S.; Garcia, H. Mr; Montejo, S.; Reyes, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Bogotá, a megacity with almost 8 million inhabitants is prone to a significant earthquake hazard due to nearby active faults as well as subduction megathrust earthquakes. The city has been severely affected by many historical earthquakes in the last 500 years, reaching MM intensities of 8 or more in Bogotá. The city is also located at a large lacustrine basin composed of extremely soft soils which may strongly amplify the ground shaking from earthquakes. The basin extends approximately 40 km from North to South, is bounded by the Andes range to the East and South, and sharply deepens towards the West of Bogotá. The city has been the subject of multiple microzonations studies which have contributed to gain a good knowledge on the geotechnical zonation of the city and tectonic setting of the region. To improve our knowledge on the seismic risk of the city as one of the topics, we started a 5 years project sponsored by SATREPS (a joint program of JICA and JST), entitled "Application of state of the art technologies to strengthen research and response to seismic, volcanic and tsunami events and enhance risk management in Colombia (2015-2019)". In this paper we will show our results for the elaboration of a velocity model of the city. To construct a velocity model of the basin we conducted multi-sized microtremors arrays measurements (radius from 60 cm up to 1000 m) at 41 sites within the city. We calculated dispersion curves and inferred velocity profiles at all the sites. We combine these results with gravity measurements as well as geological information to obtain the initial velocity model of the basin. Ackowledgments This research is funded by SATREPS (a joint program of JICA and JST).

  4. Homogenization and implementation of a 3D regional velocity model in Mexico for its application in moment tensor inversion of intermediate-magnitude earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Caló, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Moment tensor inversions for intermediate and small earthquakes (M. < 4.5) are challenging as they principally excite relatively short period seismic waves that interact strongly with local heterogeneities. Incorporating detailed regional 3D velocity models permits obtaining realistic synthetic seismograms and recover the seismic source parameters these smaller events. Two 3D regional velocity models have recently been developed for Mexico, using surface waves and seismic noise tomography (Spica et al., 2016; Gaite et al., 2015), which could be used to model the waveforms of intermediate magnitud earthquakes in this region. Such models are parameterized as layered velocity profiles and for some of the profiles, the velocity difference between two layers are considerable. The "jump" in velocities between two layers is inconvenient for some methods and algorithms that calculate synthetic waveforms, in particular for the method that we are using, the spectral element method (SPECFEM3D GLOBE, Komatitsch y Tromp, 2000), when the mesh does not follow the layer boundaries. In order to make the velocity models more easily implementec in SPECFEM3D GLOBE it is neccesary to apply a homogenization algorithm (Capdeville et al., 2015) such that the (now anisotropic) layer velocities are smoothly varying with depth. In this work, we apply a homogenization algorithm to the regional velocity models in México for implementing them in SPECFEM3D GLOBE, calculate synthetic waveforms for intermediate-magnitude earthquakes in México and invert them for the seismic moment tensor.

  5. Line Shape Modeling for the Diagnostic of the Electron Density in a Corona Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Rosato

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of spectra observed in a corona discharge designed for the study of dielectrics in electrical engineering. The medium is a gas of helium and the discharge was performed at the vicinity of a tip electrode under high voltage. The shape of helium lines is dominated by the Stark broadening due to the plasma microfield. Using a computer simulation method, we examine the sensitivity of the He 492 nm line shape to the electron density. Our results indicate the possibility of a density diagnostic based on passive spectroscopy. The influence of collisional broadening due to interactions between the emitters and neutrals is discussed.

  6. Three-dimensional lithospheric S wave velocity model of the NE Tibetan Plateau and western North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingchen; Li, Yonghua; Ding, Zhifeng; Zhu, Lupei; Wang, Chunyong; Bao, Xuewei; Wu, Yan

    2017-08-01

    We present a new 3-D lithospheric Vs model for the NE Tibetan Plateau (NETP) and the western North China Craton (NCC). First, high-frequency receiver functions (RFs) were inverted using the neighborhood algorithm to estimate the sedimentary structure beneath each station. Then a 3D Vs model with unprecedented resolution was constructed by jointly inverting RFs and Rayleigh wave dispersions. A low-velocity sedimentary layer with thicknesses varying from 2 to 10 km is present in the Yinchuan-Hetao graben, Ordos block, and western Alxa block. Velocities from the middle-lower crust to the uppermost mantle are generally high in the Ordos block and low in the Alxa block, indicating that the Alxa block is not part of the NCC. The thickened crust in southwestern Ordos block and western Alxa block suggests that they have been modified. Two crustal low-velocity zones (LVZs) were detected beneath the Kunlun Fault (KF) zone and western Qilian Terrane (QLT). The origin of the LVZ beneath the KF zone may be the combined effect of shear heating, localized asthenosphere upwelling, and crustal radioactivity. The LVZ in the western QLT, representing an early stage of the LVZ that has developed in the KF zone, acts as a decollement to decouple the deformation between the upper and lower crust and plays a key role in seismogenesis. We propose that the crustal deformation beneath the NETP is accommodated by a combination of shear motion, thickening of the upper-middle crust, and removal of lower crust.

  7. Observing and Modeling Temporal Variations of Seismic Velocities at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Tsai, V. C.; Taira, T.

    2016-12-01

    Perturbations in subsurface elastic parameters induce changes in seismic velocity. To understand the stress perturbations due to geothermal operation, we apply seismic noise interferometry to examine the temporal variations of seismic velocity (dv/v) at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California. Our observations show a strong positive correlation between dv/v and net production (steam production minus fluid injection), and a strong negative correlation between dv/v and fluid injection. Notably, there is little time lag (less than a month) between dv/v and fluid injection in the SE region of the field, suggesting a rapid response in elastic properties in this highly saturated region. The influx of fluid decreases the effective shear modulus, which in turn decreases the velocities. A number of hypotheses have been suggested to cause stress perturbations in the field, including poroelastic-induced stresses, direct elastic loading and thermoelastic-induced stresses. We perform a 1-D hydrological simulation to calculate the expected variations in dv/v due to different stresses by considering Murnaghan's theory of finite deformations and the third-order terms in the strain energy function. The synthetic dv/v measurements are spatially averaged based on computed sensitivity kernels, allowing for direct comparison with both the amplitude and phase of dv/v observations. We show the order-of-magnitude effect that each of the stresses have on the dv/v measurement, and explore the possibility of using dv/v to constrain important hydrological and elastic properties such as hydraulic conductivity in the field.

  8. Modeling of hand function by mapping the motion of individual muscle voxels with MR imaging velocity tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drace, J.; Pele, N.; Herfkens, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a method to correlate the three-dimensional (3D) motion of the fingers with the complex motion of the intrinsic, flexor, and extensor muscles. A better understanding of hand function is important to the medical, surgical, and rehabilitation treatment of patients with arthritic, neurogenic, and mechanical hand dysfunctions. Static, high-resolution MR volumetric imaging defines the 3D shape of each individual bone in the hands of three subjects and three patients. Single-section velocity-tagging sequences (VIGOR) are performed through the hand and forearm, while the actual 3D motion of the hand is computed from the MR model and readings of fiber-optic goniometers attached to each finger. The accuracy of the velocity tagging is also tested with a motion phantom

  9. Prediction of velocity distributions in rod bundle axial flow, with a statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, H.C. da.

    1978-12-01

    Reactor fuel elements generally consist of rod bundles with the coolant flowing axially through the region between the rods. The confiability of the thermohydraulic design of such elements is related to a detailed description of the velocity field. A two-equation statistical model (K-epsilon) of turbulence is applied to compute main and secondary flow fields, wall shear stress distributions and friction factors of steady, fully developed turbulent flows, with incompressible, temperature independent fluid flowing axially through triangular or square arrays of rod bundles. The numerical procedure uses the vorticity and the stream function to describe the velocity field. Comparison with experimental and analytical data of several investigators is presented. Results are in good agreement. (Author) [pt

  10. Evaluation of Porosity and Saturation Degree by Laboratory Joint Measurements of Velocity and Resistivity: A Model Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, E.; Mazzacca, A.; Pece, R.; Roberti, N.; Vanorio, T.

    This paper illustrates the laboratory procedures and experiments carried out on samples with different lithologies and reconstructed samples in order to test and implement an electroseismic model (Carrara et al., 1994) which allows the evaluation of porosity and the saturation degree of rocks. The testing was conducted by comparing porosity (Φ) and saturation degree (Sw ) values, obtained from measured resistivity (ρ) and elastic wave velocity (VP ) by means of appropriate formulations, with the values of Φ and Sw previously calculated by geotechnics and employed as standards. The experimental results have led to a good definition of the model to be proposed as an application method in the field of hydrogeology.

  11. A stochastic model for estimating groundwater and contaminant discharges from fractured rock passive flux meter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Özlem; Klammler, Harald; Hatfield, Kirk; Newman, Mark A.; Annable, Michael D.; Cho, Jaehyun; Parker, Beth L.; Cherry, John A.; Pehme, Pete; Quinn, Patryk; Kroeker, Ryan

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of water and contaminant discharges is an important hydrological problem. Fractured rock aquifers are recognized as highly complex flow and transport systems, and the fractured rock passive flux meter (FRPFM) is a recently tested device to simultaneously measure cumulative water and contaminant mass fluxes in fractures intersecting an observation well (boring). Furthermore, the FRPFM is capable of indicating orientations and directions of flow in hydraulically active ("flowing") fractures. The present work develops a discharge estimator for when FRPFM measurements of fracture fluxes in the direction perpendicular to a transect (control plane) along one or more observation wells are available. In addition, estimation uncertainty in terms of a coefficient of variation is assessed based on a Monte Carlo approach under normalized conditions. Sources of uncertainty considered are spatially random fracture trace locations, random trace lengths, and orientations as well as variability of trace average fluxes (including smooth spatial trends), variability of local fluxes within traces, and flux measurement errors. Knowledge about the trace length distribution, which is commonly not available from borehole surveys, is not required for discharge estimation. However, it does affect the uncertainty assessment, and equations for upper uncertainty bounds are given as an alternative. In agreement with general statistical inference, it is found that discharge uncertainty decreases proportionally with the number of fluxes measured. Results are validated, and an example problem illustrates practical application and performance.

  12. Depletion velocities for atmospheric pollutants oriented To improve the simplified regional dispersion modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Gacita, Madeleine; Turtos Carbonell, Leonor; Rivero Oliva, Jose de Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to improve externalities assessment using Simplified Methodologies, through the obtaining of depletion velocities for primary pollutants SO 2 , NO X and TSP (Total Suspended Particles) and for sulfate and nitrate aerosols, the secondary pollutants created from the first ones. The main goal proposed was to estimate these values for different cases, in order to have an ensemble of values for the geographic area, among which the most representative could be selected for using it in future studies that appeal to a simplified methodology for the regional dispersion assessment, taking into account the requirements of data, qualified manpower and time for a detailed approach. The results where obtained using detailed studies of the regional dispersion that were conduced for six power facilities, three from Cuba (at the localities of Mariel, Santa Cruz and Tallapiedra) and three from Mexico (at the localities of Tuxpan, Tula and Manzanillo). The depletion velocity for SO 2 was similar for all cases. Results obtained for Tallapiedra, Santa Cruz, Mariel and Manzanillo were similar. For Tula and Tuxpan a high uncertainty was found

  13. Bayesian estimation of analytical conduit-flow model parameters from magma discharge rate observed during explosive eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyaguchi, T.; Anderson, K. R.; Kozono, T.

    2017-12-01

    Recent development of conduit-flow models has revealed that the evolution of a volcanic eruption (e.g., changes in magma discharge rate and chamber pressure) is sensitively dependent on model parameters related to geological and petrological conditions (such as properties of the magma and the volume and depth of the magma chamber). On the other hand, time-varying observations of ground deformation and magma discharge rate are now increasingly available, which allows us to estimate the model parameters through a Bayesian inverse analysis of those observations (Anderson and Segall, 2013); however, this approach has not yet been applied to explosive eruptions because of mathematical and computational difficulties in the conduit-flow models. Here, we perform a Bayesian inverse to estimate the conduit-flow model parameters of explosive eruptions utilizing an approximate time-dependent eruption model. This model is based on the analytical solutions of a steady conduit-flow model (Koyaguchi, 2005; Kozono and Koyaguchi, 2009) coupled to a simple elastic magma chamber. It reproduces diverse features of evolutions of magma discharge rate and chamber pressure during explosive eruptions, and also allows us to analytically derive the mathematical relationships describing those evolutions. The derived relationships show that the mass flow rate just before the cessation of explosive eruptions is expressed by a simple function of dimensionless magma viscosity and dimensionless gas-permeability in magma. We are also able to derive a relationship between dimensionless viscosity and mass flow rate, which may be available from field data. Consequently, the posterior probability density functions of the conduit-flow model parameters of explosive eruptions (e.g., the radius of conduit) are constrained by the intersection of these two relationships. The validity of the present analytical method was tested by a numerical method using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. We also

  14. Simulation of pre-breakdown phase of electrical discharge in reinforced concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    The application of an electrical discharge technology for destructive recycling of the reinforced concrete is considered. Its main advantages, in comparison with the mechanical methods, are that the electrical discharge channel acting as a rock-breaking tool has an unlimited service life, and a lifetime of the electrode systems is much higher. The physical and mathematical model of the discharge development is described. The simulation results have shown that the discharge channel propagation velocity and the trajectory depend on the reinforcement locality and the voltage amplitude. The voltage affects the average speed of the discharge structure development which can reach the value of up to υ=5·103 m/s. It is also shown that the reinforcing elements located between the electrodes attract the growing discharge structure. The lower the distance between the vertical axis of the high voltage electrode and the metal reinforcement position, the more probability of the discharge channel orientation towards this element.

  15. A rate-equation model for polarized laser-induced fluorescence to measure electric field in glow discharge He plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiyama, K.; Watanabe, M.; Oda, T.

    1998-01-01

    Possibility of applying polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy for measuring the electric field in a plasma with a large collisional depolarization has been investigated. A rate equation model including the depolarization process was employed to analyze the time evolution of LIF polarization components. The polarized LIF pulse shapes observed in the sheath of a He glow discharge plasma were successfully reproduced, and the electric field distribution was obtained with high accuracy. (author)

  16. Modelling of the Flow of Streams of Cohesionless and Cohesive Bulk Materials in a Conveyor Discharge Point with a Flat Conveyor Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyganiuk, J. A.; Kuryło, P.

    2018-02-01

    The paper presents the analysis of flow conditions of cohesive and cohesionless bulk materials in a conveyor discharge point of a flat conveyor belt. The analysis was carried out for stationary flows at high velocities. It presents mathematical methods for the description of the velocity of a material leaving a throwing point of a flat conveyor belt as well as final equations which enable the determination of velocity of the material after it has left the throwing point (with the accuracy sufficient for practical use). Next, the velocity calculated for the proposed mathematical description (for selected material groups) has been compared with the velocity obtained from mathematical relations commonly used by engineers. The proposed equations for determining the velocity of the material beyond the point have proved useful, since they enable excluding the indirect equations. Finally, the difference between the values of the velocity obtained with the proposed and indirect equations have been determined and the relative error for the proposed method has been calculated.

  17. Dose related risk and effect assessment model (DREAM) -- A more realistic approach to risk assessment of offshore discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, S.; Furuholt, E.

    1995-01-01

    Risk assessment of discharges from offshore oil and gas production to the marine environment features determination of potential environmental concentration (PEC) levels and no observed effect concentration (NOEC) levels. The PEC values are normally based on dilution of chemical components in the actual discharge source in the recipient, while the NOEC values are determined by applying a safety factor to acute toxic effects from laboratory tests. The DREAM concept focuses on realistic exposure doses as function of contact time and dilution, rather than fixed exposure concentrations of chemicals in long time exposure regimes. In its present state, the DREAM model is based on a number of assumptions with respect to the link between real life exposure doses and effects observed in laboratory tests. A research project has recently been initiated to develop the concept further, with special focus on chronic effects of different chemical compounds on the marine ecosystem. One of the questions that will be addressed is the link between exposure time, dose, concentration and effect. Validation of the safety factors applied for transforming acute toxic data into NOEC values will also be included. The DREAM model has been used by Statoil for risk assessment of discharges from new and existing offshore oil and gas production fields, and has been found to give a much more realistic results than conventional risk assessment tools. The presentation outlines the background for the DREAM approach, describes the model in its present state, discusses further developments and applications, and shows a number of examples on the performance of DREAM

  18. 2.5D seismic velocity modelling in the south-eastern Romanian Carpathians Orogen and its foreland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocin, Andrei; Stephenson, Randell; Tryggvason, Ari; Panea, Ionelia; Mocanu, Victor; Hauser, Franz; Matenco, Liviu

    2005-12-01

    The DACIA-PLAN (Danube and Carpathian Integrated Action on Processes in the Lithosphere and Neotectonics) deep seismic reflection survey was performed in August-September 2001, with the objective of obtaining new information on the deep structure of the external Carpathians nappe system and the architecture of the Tertiary/Quaternary basins developed within and adjacent to the Vrancea zone, including the rapidly subsiding Focsani Basin. The DACIA-PLAN profile is about 140 km long, having a roughly WNW-ESE direction, from near the southeast Transylvanian Basin, across the mountainous south-eastern Carpathians and their foreland to near the Danube River. A high resolution 2.5D velocity model of the upper crust along the seismic profile has been determined from a tomographic inversion of the DACIA-PLAN first arrival data. The results show that the data fairly accurately resolve the transition from sediment to crystalline basement beneath the Focsani Basin, where industry seismic data are available for correlation, at depths up to about 10 km. Beneath the external Carpathians nappes, apparent basement (material with velocities above 5.8 km/s) lies at depths as shallow as 3-4 km, which is less than previously surmised on the basis of geological observations. The first arrival travel-time data suggest that there is significant lateral structural heterogeneity on the apparent basement surface in this area, suggesting that the high velocity material may be involved in Carpathian thrusting.

  19. Three-dimensional flow of a nanofluid over a permeable stretching/shrinking surface with velocity slip: A revised model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusoh, R.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2018-03-01

    A reformulation of the three-dimensional flow of a nanofluid by employing Buongiorno's model is presented. A new boundary condition is implemented in this study with the assumption of nanoparticle mass flux at the surface is zero. This condition is practically more realistic since the nanoparticle fraction at the boundary is latently controlled. This study is devoted to investigate the impact of the velocity slip and suction to the flow and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum, energy, and concentration are reduced to the ordinary differential equations by utilizing the appropriate transformation. Numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations are obtained by using the built-in bvp4c function in Matlab. Graphical illustrations displaying the physical influence of the several nanofluid parameters on the flow velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle volume fraction profiles, as well as the skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are provided. The present study discovers the existence of dual solutions at a certain range of parameters. Surprisingly, both of the solutions merge at the stretching sheet indicating that the presence of the velocity slip affects the skin friction coefficients. Stability analysis is carried out to determine the stability and reliability of the solutions. It is found that the first solution is stable while the second solution is not stable.

  20. Towards a new tool to develop a 3-D shear-wave velocity model from converted waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavitti, Leonardo; Hetényi, György

    2017-04-01

    The main target of this work is to develop a new method in which we exploit converted waves to construct a fully 3-D shear-wave velocity model of the crust. A reliable 3-D model is very important in Earth sciences because geological structures may vary significantly in their lateral dimension. In particular, shear-waves provide valuable complementary information with respect to P-waves because they usually guarantee a much better correlation in terms of rock density and mechanical properties, reducing the interpretation ambiguities. Therefore, it is fundamental to develop a new technique to improve structural images and to describe different lithologies in the crust. In this study we start from the analysis of receiver functions (RF, Langston, 1977), which are nowadays largely used for structural investigations based on passive seismic experiments, to map Earth discontinuities at depth. The RF technique is also commonly used to invert for velocity structure beneath single stations. Here, we plan to combine two strengths of RF method: shear-wave velocity inversion and dense arrays. Starting from a simple 3-D forward model, synthetic RFs are obtained extracting the structure along a ray to match observed data. During the inversion, thanks to a dense stations network, we aim to build and develop a multi-layer crustal model for shear-wave velocity. The initial model should be chosen simple to make sure that the inversion process is not influenced by the constraints in terms of depth and velocity posed at the beginning. The RFs inversion represents a complex problem because the amplitude and the arrival time of different phases depend in a non-linear way on the depth of interfaces and the characteristics of the velocity structure. The solution we envisage to manage the inversion problem is the stochastic Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA, Sambridge, 1999a, b), whose goal is to find an ensemble of models that sample the good data-fitting regions of a multidimensional parameter

  1. A prototype of an electric-discharge gas flow oxygen−iodine laser: I. Modeling of the processes of singlet oxygen generation in a transverse cryogenic slab RF discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    The existing kinetic model describing self-sustained and electroionization discharges in mixtures enriched with singlet oxygen has been modified to calculate the characteristics of a flow RF discharge in molecular oxygen and its mixtures with helium. The simulations were performed in the gas plug-flow approximation, i.e., the evolution of the plasma components during their motion along the channel was represented as their evolution in time. The calculations were carried out for the O 2 : He = 1: 0, 1: 1, 1: 2, and 1: 3 mixtures at an oxygen partial pressure of 7.5 Torr. It is shown that, under these conditions, volumetric gas heating in a discharge in pure molecular oxygen prevails over gas cooling via heat conduction even at an electrode temperature as low as ~100 K. When molecular oxygen is diluted with helium, the behavior of the gas temperature changes substantially: heat removal begins to prevail over volumetric gas heating, and the gas temperature at the outlet of the discharge zone drops to ~220–230 K at room gas temperature at the inlet, which is very important in the context of achieving the generation threshold in an electric-discharge oxygen−iodine laser based on a slab cryogenic RF discharge.

  2. Uppermost mantle (Pn) velocity model for the Afar region, Ethiopia: an insight into rifting processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, A. L.; Stuart, G. W.; Henderson, C. M.; Keir, D.; Hammond, J. O. S.

    2013-04-01

    The Afar Depression, Ethiopia, offers unique opportunities to study the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading because the process is occurring onland. Using traveltime tomography and data from a temporary seismic deployment, we describe the first regional study of uppermost mantle P-wave velocities (VPn). We find two separate low VPn zones (as low as 7.2 km s-1) beneath regions of localized thinned crust in northern Afar, indicating the existence of high temperatures and, potentially, partial melt. The zones are beneath and off-axis from, contemporary crustal magma intrusions in active magmatic segments, the Dabbahu-Manda-Hararo and Erta'Ale segments. This suggests that these intrusions can be fed by off-axis delivery of melt in the uppermost mantle and that discrete areas of mantle upwelling and partial melting, thought to characterize segmentation of the uppermost mantle at seafloor spreading centres, are initiated during the final stages of break-up.

  3. An Integrated Method 3D Velocity Model and Fuzzy Clustering for Fracture Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Erlangga Ibrahim; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Sule, Rachmat

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced Geothermal system assessment conducted to have a better understanding of characteristics of fracture caused by a fluid injection in the geothermal reservoir. Fluid injection may cause microseismic occur. These events allow us to map and characterize fractures in the geothermal system. Fractures play important role at the geothermal system due to its ability to increase permeability for fluid movement within the reservoir. In this study, we combined tomographic inversion method and fuzzy clustering to identify fracture characteristics at the EIF Geothermal Field. Tomography helped in delineating fluid-filled fractures with high permeability area which shown by lower velocity Vs anomaly than Vp and higher Vp/Vs ratio. Fuzzy clustering allowed us to map microseismic movement and estimate suitable locations for the future well injections or productions.

  4. Crustal structure and velocity model of the Moroccan Atlas from refraction/wide angle data. Implications for its tectonic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Teixell, A.; Martí, D.; Kchikach, A.; Harnafi, M.; Palomeras, I.; Levander, A.; Gallart, J.; Arboleya, M.; Ouraini, F.; Charroud, M.; Amrhar, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Atlas Mountain Range is an intra-continental Cenozoic orogenic belt located at the southern edge of the diffuse plate boundary zone separating Africa and Europe. Its western part, the Moroccan Atlas, has long been under the scope of scientist regarding the origin of its high topographies, locally exceeding 4000 m. Geological studies indicate that this mountain belt has experienced low to moderate shortening. Furthermore, the later decreases as topography increases towards the west. These observations rise the question about the origin of the Atlas Mountains topography. Potential field studies indicate that an astenospheric upwelling supports the Atlas high elevations. However, these models depend strongly on the Moho topography and depth. Refraction/wide angle experiments carried out in the 80's suggested that the crust is thin and the Moho relatively flat. However, the proposed crustal structure and velocity inversions are not in agreement with the present models of this mountain belt. With the goal of improving the knowledge of the Moho boundary geometry and the velocity structure of the crust, a refraction/wide angle experiment was carried out in spring 2010 by an international team: the SIMA (Seismic Imaging of the Moroccan Atlas) experiment. A ~700 km long profile, going from Tanger to the Sahara Desert, south of Merzouga, recorded, every 400-1000 m, the energy of 6, 1 tn shots. Even with a low signal/noise ratio, the data allows the identification of crustal phases (Ps, Pg and PiP) and Moho reflected/refracted phases (PmP and Pn). Very weak subcrustal energy appers in some shot gathers. Forward modeling pictures a 3 layers crust and shows the Moho as an asymmetric feature that locally defines a crustal root, suggesting that the crust is imbricated. The crust-mantle boundary is modeled at relatively shallow depths that are in accordance with the results of other geophysical data, thus supporting the idea of a 'mantle plume' as main contributor to the Atlas

  5. Spectroscopic diagnostics and modeling of Ar/H2/CH4 microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, G.; Hassouni, K.; Benedic, F.; Mohasseb, F.; Roepcke, J.; Gicquel, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper Ar/H 2 /CH 4 microwave discharges used for nanocrystalline diamond chemical vapor deposition in a bell-jar cavity reactor were characterized by both experimental and modeling investigations. Discharges containing 1% CH 4 and H 2 percentages ranging between 2% and 7% were analyzed as a function of the input microwave power under a pressure of 200 mbar. Emission spectroscopy and broadband absorption spectroscopy were carried out in the UV-visible spectral range in order to estimate the gas temperature and the C 2 density within the plasma. Infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy was achieved in order to measure the mole fractions of carbon-containing species such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , and C 2 H 6 . A thermochemical model was developed and used in order to estimate the discharge composition, the gas temperature, and the average electron energy in the frame of a quasihomogeneous plasma assumption. Experiments and calculations yielded consistent results with respect to plasma temperature and composition. A relatively high gas temperature ranging between 3000 and 4000 K is found for the investigated discharge conditions. The C 2 density estimated from both experiments and modeling are quite high compared with what is generally reported in the literature for the same kind of plasma system. It ranges between 10 13 and 10 14 cm -3 in the investigated power range. Infrared absorption measurements and model predictions indicate quite low densities of methane and acetylene, while the atomic carbon density calculated by the model ranges between 10 13 and 10 15 cm -3 . The methane and hydrogen introduced in the feed gas are subject to a strong dissociation, which results in a surprisingly high H-atom population with mole fraction ranging between 0.04 and 0.16. Result analysis shows that the power coupling efficiency would range between 70% and 90%, which may at least explain the relatively high values obtained, as compared with those reported in the

  6. Development of a numerical model for calculating exposure to toxic and nontoxic stressors in the water column and sediment from drilling discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rye, H.; Reed, M.; Frost, T.K.; Smit, M.G.D.; Durgut, S.

    2008-01-01

    Drilling discharges are complex mixtures of chemical components and particles which might lead to toxic and nontoxic stress in the environment. In order to be able to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of such discharges in the water column and in sediments, a numerical model was

  7. Discharge estimation in a backwater affected meandering river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hidayat

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Variable effects of backwaters complicate the development of rating curves at hydrometric measurement stations. In areas influenced by backwater, single-parameter rating curve techniques are often inapplicable. To overcome this, several authors have advocated the use of an additional downstream level gauge to estimate the longitudinal surface level gradient, but this is cumbersome in a lowland meandering river with considerable transverse surface level gradients. Recent developments allow river flow to be continuously monitored through velocity measurements with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP, deployed horizontally at a river bank. This approach was adopted to obtain continuous discharge estimates at a cross-section in the River Mahakam at a station located about 300 km upstream of the river mouth in the Mahakam delta. The discharge station represents an area influenced by variable backwater effects from lakes, tributaries and floodplain ponds, and by tides. We applied both the standard index velocity method and a recently developed methodology to obtain a continuous time-series of discharge from the H-ADCP data. Measurements with a boat-mounted ADCP were used for calibration and validation of the model to translate H-ADCP velocity to discharge. As a comparison with conventional discharge estimation techniques, a stage-discharge relation using Jones formula was developed. The discharge rate at the station exceeded 3250 m3 s−1. Discharge series from a traditional stage-discharge relation did not capture the overall discharge dynamics, as inferred from H-ADCP data. For a specific river stage, the discharge range could be as high as 2000 m3 s−1, which is far beyond what could be explained from kinematic wave dynamics. Backwater effects from lakes were shown to be significant, whereas interaction of the river flow with tides may impact discharge variation in the fortnightly frequency band

  8. Modelling of a Nitrogen X-ray Laser pumped by Capillary Discharge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrba, Pavel; Vrbová, M.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 4 (2005), s. 564-580 ISSN 1644-3608 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04LA235 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : MHD simulations * Z-pinch * Ion kinetics * Recombination Pumping * X-Ray laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2005

  9. The FOCON model to assess doses due to the atmospheric radioactive discharges of nuclear facilities during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rommens, C.; Morin, A.; Merle-Szeremeta, A.

    1999-01-01

    The FOCON model to assess doses due to the atmospheric radioactive discharges of nuclear facilities during normal operation. To assess the dosimetric impact to the public due to atmospheric radioactive discharges of nuclear facilities during normal operation, the Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety has developed the FOCON96 code. FOCON96 calculates the dispersion of gases and aerosols into the environment (atmosphere contamination and ground deposition), their transfer in the biosphere (soils, plants and animals) and their impact to a member of the public (individual effective and equivalent doses, external exposure to the plume and to the deposits, internal exposure by inhalation and ingestion). FOCON96 uses ergonomic windows and proposes many capabilities (modular architecture, default values, choice of libraries, access to all the parameters of the models, listing or results, management of result files, calculations made directly, etc.). In the European context, and intercomparison with the PC-CREAM code, developed by the National Radiological Protection Board, has shown the coherence of the results of the two codes. A comparison of the windows and capabilities has shown that FOCON96 was easier to use. FOCON96 is not adapted to calculate the doses received during one particular year that are due to the discharges of a facility in operation for a long period of time. An evolution of the software will be considered if this kind of assessment is generalized. (authors)

  10. Study of the sputtered Cu atoms and Cu+ ions in a hollow cathode glow discharge using a hybrid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baguer, N.; Bogaerts, A.

    2005-01-01

    The role of the Cu atoms sputtered from the cathode material in a cylindrical hollow cathode discharge (HCD) and the corresponding Cu + ions are studied with a self-consistent model based on the principle of Monte Carlo (MC) and fluid simulations. In order to obtain a more realistic view of the discharge processes, this model is coupled with other submodels, which describe the behavior of electrons, fast Ar atoms, Ar + ions, and Ar metastable atoms, also based on the principles of MC and fluid simulations. Typical results are, among others, the thermalization profile of the Cu atoms, the fast Cu atom, the thermal Cu atom and Cu + ion fluxes and densities, and the energy distribution of the Cu + ions. It was found that the contribution of the Ar + ions to the sputtering was the most significant, followed by the fast Ar atoms. At the cathode bottom, there was no net sputtered flux but a net amount of redeposition. Throughout the discharge volume, at all the conditions investigated, the largest concentration of Cu atoms was found in the lower half of the HCD, close to the bottom. Penning ionization was found the main ionization mechanism for the Cu atoms. The ionization degree of copper atoms was found to be in the same order as for the argon atoms (10 -4 )

  11. Research on the discharge characteristics for water tree in crosslinked polyethylene cable based on plasma-chemical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang; Qi, Yang; Bing, Gao; Rong, Xia; Yanjie, Le; Iroegbu, Paul Ikechukwu

    2018-03-01

    Water tree is the predominant defect in high-voltage crosslinked polyethylene cables. The microscopic mechanism in the discharge process is not fully understood; hence, a drawback is created towards an effective method to evaluate the insulation status. In order to investigate the growth of water tree, a plasma-chemical model is developed. The dynamic characteristics of the discharge process including voltage waveform, current waveform, electron density, electric potential, and electric field intensity are analyzed. Our results show that the distorted electric field is the predominant contributing factor of electron avalanche formation, which inevitably leads to the formation of pulse current. In addition, it is found that characteristic parameters such as the pulse width and pulse number have a great relevance to the length of water tree. Accordingly, the growth of water tree can be divided into the initial stage, development stage, and pre-breakdown stage, which provides a reference for evaluating the deteriorated stages of crosslinked polyethylene cables.

  12. Hydro-Environmental Modeling of Sewage and Riverine Discharges into a Coastal Area: Comparison of Depth-averaged and Three-Dimensional Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bedri, Zeinab; O'Sullivan, John; Corkery, Aisling; Deering, Louise; Demeter, Katalin; Meijer, Wim; O'Hare, Gregory; Masterson, Bartholomew

    2014-01-01

    This study applies and compares two hydrodynamic and water quality models; a depth-averaged (TELEMAC-2D) and a three-dimensional model (TELEMAC-3D) on their performance in simulating the transport and fate of Escherichia coli (a main microbial bathing water quality indicator) in the coastal waters of Bray, Ireland subjected to sewage discharges and freshwater inflows from the River Dargle. The models first calibrated and validated against hydrodynamic and water quality data, were used to simu...

  13. Kinematic