WorldWideScience

Sample records for disabilities education act

  1. Teaching Students with Disabilities: A Review of Music Education Research as It Relates to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara K.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores trends in research since the 1975 passage of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), notes gaps in the literature, and offers suggestions for future directions music education researchers could take in exploring the needs and experiences of music teachers…

  2. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: An Overview. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) authorizes several programs to support and improve the education of children with disabilities. The grants to States, preschool, and infants and toddlers programs are formula grant programs that fund special education services. The discretionary grant programs fund research, demonstrations,…

  3. The Educator's Guide to the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Patricia A.

    This guide was written to acquaint educators with their legal responsibility in providing all individuals with disabilities--whether they be students, job applicants, employees, parents, or members of the community--with the same access and opportunities that are available to others. The guide explains legal requirements under the Americans with…

  4. The Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for Children With Special Educational Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, Paul H; Okamoto, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The pediatric health care provider has a critical role in supporting the health and well-being of children and adolescents in all settings, including early intervention (EI), preschool, and school environments. It is estimated that 15% of children in the United States have a disability. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act entitles every affected child in the United States from infancy to young adulthood to a free appropriate public education through EI and special education services. These services bolster development and learning of children with various disabilities. This clinical report provides the pediatric health care provider with a summary of key components of the most recent version of this law. Guidance is also provided to ensure that every child in need receives the EI and special education services to which he or she is entitled. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Individuals with Disabilities Education Act: Reauthorization Overview. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This report provides a review of programs authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and an overview of potential reauthorization issues, as the second session of the 103rd Congress considers revisions to these programs. The Infants and Toddlers Program (Part H of IDEA) provides formula grants to participating States…

  6. "No Child Left Behind," the "Individuals with Disabilities Education Act" and Functional Curricula: A Conflict of Interest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.

    2009-01-01

    Is a functional curriculum aligned with the federal education policies of No Child Left Behind (2002) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 2004)? This article analyzes the alignment, or lack thereof, between this approach to educating secondary students with mild mental impairment and the two main federal education laws…

  7. Free Appropriate Public Education for Students with Disabilities: Requirements under Section 504 of the "Rehabilitation Act of 1973." Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Section 504 of the "Rehabilitation Act of 1973" protects the rights of individuals with disabilities in programs and activities that receive federal funds. The Section 504 regulation requires a school district to provide a "free appropriate public education" (FAPE) to each qualified person with a disability who is in the school…

  8. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesberg, Mary Ann; Murray, Kenneth T.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a 35-item checklist of practical activities for school district compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The checklist is based on ADA statutes, other civil rights legislation and litigation, as well as pertinent regulations and the legislative history of the act contained in the Congressional Record. (MLF)

  9. Title I--improving the academic achievement of the disadvantaged; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)--assistance to states for the education of children with disabilities. Final regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-09

    The Secretary amends the regulations governing programs administered under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) (referred to in these regulations as the Title I program) and the regulations governing programs under Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (referred to in these regulations as the IDEA program). These regulations provide States with additional flexibility regarding State, local educational agency (LEA), and school accountability for the achievement of a small group of students with disabilities whose progress is such that, even after receiving appropriate instruction, including special education and related services designed to address the students' individual needs, the students' individualized education program (IEP) teams (IEP Teams) are reasonably certain that the students will not achieve grade-level proficiency within the year covered by the students' IEPs.

  10. A case law review of the individuals with disabilities education act for children with hearing loss or auditory processing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisman, Brian M; John, Andrew B

    2010-01-01

    In 1975, Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act (Public Law 94-142), and it has been revised and modified several times. At the time of this writing, this law was most recently amended by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (Pub. L. No. 108-446, 118 Stat. 2647, December 3, 2004), which took effect on July 1, 2005. Colloquially the law is still referred to as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Children with hearing loss or auditory processing disorder (APD) may qualify for services under IDEA. However, a review of the literature found no review of case law for such children. This article provides a comprehensive review of case law involving the IDEA and children with hearing loss or APD from the U.S. Supreme Court and U.S. courts of appeals. We conducted a systematic review of case law. A LexisNexis search for cases involving IDEA and children with hearing loss or APDs was conducted. For the purpose of the present case review, all appellate decisions (cases accepted by the U.S. courts of appeals or the U.S. Supreme Court) were included if they found that the child had hearing loss or APD, regardless of the reason for the appeal under IDEA. In the instance of multiple cases that involved the same two parties, these cases are summarized together to provide the legal context. Brief explanations of IDEA and the federal judicial process as it pertains to IDEA disputes are presented. Following these explanations, a chronological review of IDEA appellate cases concerning students with hearing loss or APD is provided. The IDEA cases reviewed focus on three main issues: placement of the child, methodology of teaching, and the provision of services. This case law review provides a helpful summary of higher court cases for educational audiologists and parents of children with hearing loss or APDs, as well as educators, individualized education program team members, school administrators, and legal

  11. Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) for Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families Annual Performance Report, Year IV (1990-1992).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Brian A.; And Others

    This report on the fourth year of Colorado's participation in Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act describes major accomplishments in preparing for full implementation of Part H in Year 5. Accomplishments in the following areas are discussed: state definition of developmental delay, central directory, timetables for serving…

  12. The No Child Left Behind and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Acts: The Uneven Impact of Partially Funded Federal Mandates on Education of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Donald F.

    2005-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 is having a major impact on the education of deaf and hard of hearing children, and in many ways has taken on an importance far in excess of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which has been evolving since 1975. Congress has appropriated less money for both laws than their…

  13. 76 FR 38129 - Applications for New Awards; Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network Knowledge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network Knowledge Translation Center (ADA KT Center) AGENCY: Office of Special Education and... Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP)--The ADA National Network Knowledge...

  14. 76 FR 38124 - Applications for New Awards; Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network Regional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) National Network Regional Centers and ADA National Network Collaborative Research Projects AGENCY: Office... Rehabilitation Research Projects and Centers Program--Disability Rehabilitation Research Projects (DRRP)--ADA...

  15. Educating Students with Learning Disabilities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2011-01-01

    In East Asia, Taiwan is one of only a few countries that has a clear definition of learning disabilities (LD) as well as operational criteria for the identification of LD. In Taiwan, special education services for students with LD are mandated in the Special Education Act of 1984. According to the official statistics from the Taiwanese Special…

  16. Americans with Disabilities Act Scavenger Hunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Ursula

    2018-01-01

    This article describes a scavenger hunt for Business Law students. Specifically, students compete in this scavenger hunt to identify accessible design features on campus to undergird their study of Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Title III of the ADA prohibits public accommodations from discriminating on the basis of…

  17. Disability and the Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Laudan; Loprest, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited. In this article, Laudan Aron and Pamela Loprest assess how well the nation's education system is serving students with disabilities. Aron and Loprest trace the evolution of the special education system…

  18. 77 FR 45235 - Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... our country, tearing down the barriers that kept persons with disabilities from securing their fullest... included in our national life. Because every American deserves access to a world-class education, we have... Education implemented new standards for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act that will help...

  19. Disability Studies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    As a topic of study, disability is not new at institutions of higher education. Psychological and intellectual disabilities have been of interest in psychiatry and psychology at least since the late 1800s and early 1900s. The post-World War II era, in particular, witnessed the rapid expansion of academic programs in special education, vocational…

  20. The Disability Discrimination Act in the UK : Helping or Hindering Employment Amongst the Disabled?

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, David N.F.; Heitmüller, Axel

    2005-01-01

    The enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990 triggered a substantial academic debate about its consequences on employment rates of disabled people. In contrast, the employment provision of the 1996 Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) in Britain has received little attention. This paper provides robust evidence that, similar to the ADA in the US, the DDA has had no impact on the employment rate of disabled people or possibly worsened it. Possible reasons for this are low ...

  1. The Disability Discrimination Act in the UK: helping or hindering employment among the disabled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, David; Heitmueller, Axel

    2009-03-01

    The enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990 triggered a substantial academic debate about its consequences on employment rates of disabled people. In contrast, the employment provision of the 1996 Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) in Britain has received little attention. Exploiting both pooled and longitudinal data, this paper provides robust evidence that, similar to the ADA in the USA, the DDA has had no impact on the employment rate of disabled people or possibly worsened it. Possible reasons for this are higher uncertainty around litigation costs, low levels of general awareness about the Act among disabled people and employers, and a lack of financial support.

  2. Disability and the education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Laudan; Loprest, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited. In this article, Laudan Aron and Pamela Loprest assess how well the nation's education system is serving students with disabilities. Aron and Loprest trace the evolution of the special education system in the United States from its origins in the civil rights movement of the mid-twentieth century. They note the dual character of federal legislation, which both guarantees eligible children with disabilities the right to a "free, appropriate public education in the least restrictive setting" and establishes a federal funding program to help meet this goal. They then review the types of services and accommodations these children receive from infancy through young adulthood. The special education system has given children with disabilities much greater access to public education, established an infrastructure for educating them, helped with the earlier identification of disabilities, and promoted greater inclusion of these children alongside their nondisabled peers. Despite these advances, many problems remain, including the over- and underidentification of certain subgroups of students, delays in identifying and serving students, and bureaucratic, regulatory, and financial barriers that complicate the program for everyone involved. More important, the authors show that special education students still lag behind their nondisabled peers in educational achievements, are often held to lower expectations, are less likely to take the full academic curriculum in high school, and are more likely to drop out of school. Only limited evidence is available on the effectiveness of specific special education services or on how to improve student achievement for this important subgroup of students. Improving the system will require better ways of understanding and measuring both ends of the special education continuum, namely, what

  3. Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Employees Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education DHSS State of Alaska Home ; Governor's Council on Disabilities and Special Education Page Content Untitled Document Patrick Reinhart : follow GCDSE to 40404 The Governor's Council on Disabilities & Special Education is pleased to award

  4. The Americans With Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008: implications for the forensic psychiatrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Charles L

    2010-01-01

    The Americans With Disabilities Act Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA) significantly modifies the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act. As a result of this legislation, more Americans are likely to qualify as disabled and to be further protected from discrimination under the ADA. The ADAAA also effectively overturns key rulings in the U.S. Supreme Court cases of Sutton v. United Air Lines, Inc. and Toyota Motor Manufacturing v. Williams. This article summarizes important changes resulting from the ADAAA legislation that psychiatrists and psychologists must understand when evaluating ADA disability claims.

  5. Nurse Educator Attitudes Toward People With Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Lori; Houser, Rick

    As educators strongly influence the attitudes of their students, the purpose of this study was to determine nurse educator attitudes toward people with disabilities. Inadequate education of health professionals is a known barrier to care for people with disability. Continuing calls for improved education of health professionals compel an assessment of nurse educator attitudes. This was a cross-sectional, correlational web-based survey of nurse educators (n = 126). Nurse educator attitudes were analyzed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. Nurse educators held discriminatory attitudes toward people with disabilities, though most preferred a biopsychosocial model of disability. Forty-four percent lacked knowledge of disability-related aims, objectives, or outcomes within the curriculum. To advance equity in health care, nurse educators must confront personal bias and teach competent care of people with disabilities.

  6. The Americans with Disabilities Act: prescription for tax relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, E D; Judice, A K; Hazelwood, A C

    1996-01-01

    As employers, healthcare organizations must comply with Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990-Employment Discrimination by Private Entities-which covers virtually all aspects of employment and prohibits employers from discriminating against otherwise qualified job applicants and workers who have disabilities or who become disabled. Further, healthcare organizations must comply with the provisions of Title III of the act-Nondiscrimination on the Basis of Disability by Public Accommodations and in Commercial Facilities-which requires places of public accommodations and commercial facilities to be designed, constructed, and altered in compliance with the accessibility standards of the act. While compliance with the ADA can be costly, four specific sections of the Internal Revenue Code offer tax relief to organizations that meet the guidelines of Titles I and III.

  7. Disability and Equity in Higher Education Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphin, Henry C., Jr., Ed.; Lavine, Jennie, Ed.; Chan, Roy Y., Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Education is the foundation to almost all successful lives. It is vital that learning opportunities are available on a global scale, regardless of individual disabilities or differences, and to create more inclusive educational practices. "Disability and Equity in Higher Education Accessibility" is a comprehensive reference source for…

  8. 77 FR 36231 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...-0004] RIN 3014-AA39 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA... (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Guidelines to specifically address emergency... ensure that newly constructed and altered emergency transportable housing units covered by the ADA or ABA...

  9. Reimagining Disability and Inclusive Education Through Universal Design for Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Doolittle Wilson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1975, Congress enacted a law eventually known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, which ensures that children with disabilities receive a free, appropriate, public education. Since then, scholarly and popular debates about the effectiveness of inclusive education have proliferated and typically focus on the ability or inability of students with disabilities to succeed in so-called regular classrooms. These debates reflect widespread assumptions that the regular classroom is rightly the province of nondisabled students and a neutral, value-free space that students with disabilities invade and disrupt via their very presence and their costly needs for adaptation. But as many scholars in the field of Disability Studies in Education (DSE have argued, these discussions often fail to recognize that the space of the regular classroom, far from neutral, is constructed for a nondisabled, neurotypical, white, male, middle-class "norm" that neither reflects nor accommodates the wide range of diverse learners within it, regardless of whether these learners have been diagnosed with a disability. A DSE perspective sees the educational environment, not students with disabilities, as the "problem" and calls for a Universal Design for Learning approach to education, or the design of instructional materials and activities that allows the learning goals to be achievable by individuals with wide differences in their abilities and backgrounds. Agreeing with this DSE perspective, this article uses an autoethnographic approach to reexamine inclusive education and to consider how university classrooms, pedagogy, and curricular materials can be improved in order to accommodate all students, not just those with disabilities. Ultimately, the article argues that Universal Design for Learning has the potential to radically transform the meaning of inclusive education and the very concept of disability.

  10. Stigma as a barrier to employment: mental disability and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Teresa L

    2005-01-01

    In a controversial expansion of workplace civil rights, the 1990 Americans with Disability Act (ADA) extended anti-discrimination protection to individuals with "mental impairments." One of the most critical barriers to the employment of individuals with mental disabilities is the degree of social stigma such disabilities incur, and there is compelling evidence that employers have stigmatizing attitudes and have discriminated against those with mental disabilities. This study examines the role played by stigma in employers' response to the 1990 Americans with Disability Act (ADA). A stratified sample of one hundred ninety employers were surveyed in 1996-1997 in a major Southern metropolitan area. Telephone interviews were completed with one hundred seventeen employers (response rate of 61.6%). The article describes employers' experiences with employees with mental disabilities and accommodations, specific employment practices, and attitudes towards those with mental disabilities. Stigma played an important role in conformity to the ADA (operationalized as either hiring or having specific recruiting policies for hiring individuals with mental disabilities). Furthermore, employers expressing coercive (fear of a lawsuit) as opposed to normative (belief that it is the right thing to do) rationales for compliance were more likely to hold stigmatized attitudes. Employers' beliefs about mental disability form a crucial foundation for truly supportive work environments (those that value difference and diversity), and further research is needed to determine if over time the ADA is successful in changing attitudes as well as behavior.

  11. Postsecondary Education and Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; Whelley, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Legislation in recent years, including the ADA , IDEA, and the Olmstead Act, has vastly affected the accessibility of postsecondary education for persons with disabilities. This paper presents an overview of that legislation and considers how the resultant supports and services have become more flexible and increasingly tailored to the…

  12. An Analysis Of The UK Disability Discrimination Act And The Inadequacy Of Its Definitions Of Disability And Disabled Person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Alzughaibi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract My research will focus on some of the more pertinent changes that need to take place on a societal level in order to better serve disabled people and allow them to participate in all facets of community life. I will argue that three of the most significant changes that must take place include educating society on disabilities and disabled persons creating and enforcing better laws that truly help disabled persons and expanding the definitions of disability and disabled person to include a broader spectrum of ailments inflictions and handicaps. The changes which I support will be presented in a research-driven paper. I will highlight the current UK disability laws in place and point out some of their shortcomings. Then I will explore the worldview of society as a whole as it pertains to disabled peoples and suggest changes that need to take place and how educators can help facilitate these changes. Finally I will explain the shortcomings of the most common definitions used for disability and disabled persons and offer alternatives that incorporate a broader range of people and ailments. My audience will be any citizen whose political jurisdiction is under the UK disability mandate although anyone from any society would benefit from reading my paper due to the universality of this topic.

  13. 24 CFR 570.614 - Architectural Barriers Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with disabilities. Further, the ADA requires the removal of architectural barriers and communication... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Architectural Barriers Act and the... GRANTS Other Program Requirements § 570.614 Architectural Barriers Act and the Americans with...

  14. Inclusion of Students with an Intellectual Disability in the General Education Classroom with the Use of Response Cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura S.; Haydon, Todd; Bauer, Anne; Epperly, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    The passage of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act and the No Child Left Behind Act has highlighted the importance of all students having access to the general education curriculum. Because students with disabilities are being included in the general education classroom in greater numbers, teachers need to implement…

  15. Congenital Disabilities (Civil Liability) Act 1976 of 22 July 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Installations Act 1965 has been amended to enable children born disabled in consequence of a breach of duty under the 1965 Act to claim compensation. Although the latter Act is therefore amended, it is provided that the general rules now laid down do not, in themselves, affect operation of the special liability regime provided by the 1965 Act. An injury, for the purposes of the 1965 Act, means that the persons concerned will be able to recover compensation for that injury under that Act from the operator of the nuclear installation concerned, if they can establish that they have been affected in this way and that the cause was a nuclear occurrence or an emission of ionizing radiation for which the operator is liable under the 1965 Act. A woman involved in such an occurrence while she is pregnant with the result that her child is born disabled will be regarded as having been injured, even if she herself has suffered no physical or mental injury. Compensation may be reduced by reason of the fault of the claimant only to the extent that the cause of the injury is attributable to an act of the claimant committed with intent to cause harm or wantonly. (N.E.A.) [fr

  16. Knowledge about persons with disability act (1995) among health care professionals dealing with persons affected by disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, B S; Devapitchai, K S; Raju, M S

    2009-01-01

    To assess the level of awareness about the different provisions of the persons with Disability Act (1995) among the health care professionals, 201 health care professionals dealing with the disabled persons from different parts of India were interviewed using structured interview checklist. The data were analysed through statistical package of social sciences software. Chi-square test were applied on the variables and the Pvalues were ascertained. The results show that 48.3% knew about administration hierarchy, 53.7% of respondents were aware of the free education available for the disabled, 68.5% were aware of the employment scheme, 62.7% about poverty alleviation schemes, 59.2% know about the traveling benefits, 56.2% of professionals were aware of the benefits for people with low vision. Only 29.9% of respondents knew about provisions to overcome architectural barriers. 43.8% of them knew about the least disability percentage whereas only 28.4% were aware of research and manpower schemes. Regarding affirmative action, 32.17% told correctly and 52.7% of the professionals responded correctly with respectto non- discrimination schemes. The level of awareness among the professionals working in rural regions is lower with regard to administration hierarchy and poverty alleviation schemes. Informations regarding disabled friendly environments and research and manpower development were found to be low among respondents of all professions which need to be effectively intervened. Gender did not show any influence with respect to the components of the act. The study showed that there is an ample need for educational interventions among the health care professionals in all socio-demography. Inclusion of PWD Act in the curriculum of medical schools as a topic in conferences and workshops for health care professionals are suggested.

  17. The Education Act (Ontario) 1980: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario has provided special education legislation through the Education Amendment Act, 1980. Issues related to teacher preparation for special education and program planning and implementation are reviewed. (DF)

  18. Workplace Discrimination and Visual Impairment: A Comparison of Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Charges and Resolutions under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Callie M.; Thacker, Leroy R.; Gary, Kelli W.; Pawluk, Dianne T. V.; Copolillo, Al

    2017-01-01

    To guarantee equal opportunities and treatment in employment for individuals with disabilities, Congress enacted Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1992. This law states, "No covered entity shall discriminate against a qualified individual on the basis of disability in regard to job application procedures, the hiring,…

  19. Education's Enduring Prejudices: Disability at the Door

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeo, A.

    2009-01-01

    Ontario's current education system is struggling with the task of fully including children with disabilities in the regular classrooms of their neighbourhood school. While many educators understand that it is wrong to deny admission to publicly funded schools because the child may be Black or female, they nonetheless feel that segregation of…

  20. Leisure Education Programs for the Severely Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleien, Stuart J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The importance of leisure education for severely disabled students is emphasized as a means of enabling them to purposefully use leisure time and to expand social and motor skills that facilitate independent daily living. Sample activities for inclusion in physical education programs are included. (DG)

  1. Inclusive Education for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki Balakrishnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces briefly the evolution of Inclusive Education for students with special education needs (SEN and discusses some significant challenges in its implementation. While the aim of Inclusive Education is to include all children with SEN in mainstream schools, there are many challenges that have to be overcome for their education to be meaningful. This paper focuses primarily on the inclusion of students with intellectual disability, since they are likely to be the largest number with special education needs in ‘inclusive’ schools. It offers the outline of a curriculum that may be derived from the mainstream one in use, and suggests a model that emphasises the replacement of age / grade placement, as is the present practice, with experience and maturity underpinning learning in persons with intellectual disability. The proposed model needs, of course, to be field-tested.doi 10.5463/DCID.v23i2.111

  2. Changing Systems to Provide Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Olivia; Hayward, Katharine; Francis, Wilbert; Campisi, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, institutions of higher education (IHE) have been addressing the need for postsecondary education (PSE) for students with intellectual disabilities (ID). These efforts have increased significantly since 2008 with passage of the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA). The law includes a defined set of services and activities…

  3. Inclusive Educative Technologies, for people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echenique, AM; Graffigna, JP; Pérez, E.; López, N.; Piccinini, D.; Fernández, H.; Garcés, A.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional educational environment imposes barriers to education for people with disabilities, limiting their rights, which is a non-discriminative education. In turn, hampers their access to other rights and creates huge obstacles to realize their potential and participate effectively in their communities. In this sense Assistive Technology provides alternative solutions, in order to compensate for a lost or diminished ability. Thus the necessary assistance is provided to perform tasks, including those related to education, improving the inclusion. In this paper some researches had been made in the Gabinete de TecnologiaMedica, in the Facultad de Ingenieria of the Universidad Nacional de San Juan in order to solve this problem. The researchers are classified by type of disability; sensory (visual and auditory) or motor. They have been designed, developed and experienced through various prototypes that have given satisfactory results. It had been published in national and international congresses of high relevance.

  4. Tobacco industry attempts to frame smoking as a 'disability' under the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Eijk, Yvette; Glantz, Stanton A

    2017-01-01

    Using the Truth Tobacco Industry Documents Library and Congressional records, we examined the tobacco industry's involvement with the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). During legislative drafting of the ADA (1989-1990), the Tobacco Institute, the tobacco industry's lobbying and public relations arm at the time, worked with industry lawyers and civil rights groups to include smoking in the ADA's definition of "disability." Focus was on smoking as a perceived rather than actual disability so that tobacco companies could maintain that smoking is not addictive. Language that would have explicitly excluded smoking from ADA coverage was weakened or omitted. Tobacco Institute lawyers did not think the argument that smokers are "disabled" would convince the courts, so in the two years after the ADA was signed into law, the Tobacco Institute paid a lawyer to conduct media tours, seminars, and write articles to convince employers that hiring only non-smokers would violate the ADA. The ultimate goal of these activities was to deter employers from promoting a healthy, tobacco-free workforce and, more broadly, to promote the social acceptability of smoking. Employers and policy makers need to be aware that tobacco use is not protected by the ADA and should not be misled by tobacco industry efforts to insinuate otherwise.

  5. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emong, Paul; Eron, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at all levels of education. Despite Uganda's robust disability legal and policy framework on education, there is evidence of exclusion and discrimination of students with disabilities in the higher education institutions. The main objective of this article is to explore the status of disability inclusion in higher education and strategies for its realisation, using evidence from Emong's study, workshop proceedings where the authors facilitated and additional individual interviews with four students with disabilities by the authors. The results show that there are discrimination and exclusion tendencies in matters related to admissions, access to lectures, assessment and examinations, access to library services, halls of residence and other disability support services. The article recommends that institutional policies and guidelines on support services for students with disabilities and special needs in higher education be developed, data on students with disabilities collected to help planning, collaboration between Disabled Peoples Organisations (DPO's) strengthened to ensure disability inclusion and the establishment of disability support centres.

  6. 78 FR 67303 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ... ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1191 RIN 3014-AA22 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities; Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Guidelines; Correction AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers...

  7. Mental Health Services, Free Appropriate Public Education, and Students with Disabilities: Legal Considerations in Identifying, Evaluating, and Providing Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yell, Mitchell; Smith, Carl; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Losinski, Mickey

    2018-01-01

    In the past few years, the provision of mental health services in public schools has received considerable attention. When students with disabilities are eligible for special education and related services under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), mental health services are required if such services are needed to provide…

  8. Investigating Visually Disabled Students' Attitudes about Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ibrahim; Gürkan, Alper C.; Yigit, Sih Mehmet; Kargun, Mehmet; Hazar, Gürkan; Dorak, Feridun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate visually disabled students', who study in the level of primary education, high school, university, attitudes about physical education and sport in terms of different variables. Totally 100 visually disabled students who are individual and team athletes and study in Izmir, (8 visually disabled athletes study in…

  9. [Disability as a restriction on social participation: challenges in evaluation since the Brazilian Inclusion of People with Disabilities Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wederson

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the main advances and challenges for understanding and evaluating disability as a restriction for social participation. This new understanding has its origins in the 2006 WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health - ICF, the 2001 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and more recently, the July 2015 Brazilian Inclusion of People with Disabilities Act (IPDA), also known as the Statute on Persons with Disabilities. The change in the understanding of disability from a merely biomedical perspective, to an understanding that is based on oppression and social inequality reinforces the idea that disability is not an individual attribute, but the result of a society that is not prepared for human diversity. Based on a legislative analysis of the many documents on policies regarding persons with disabilities, notably the IPDA and the evaluations of disability that the ICF already uses in Brazil, the main contention proposed is that classifying and valuing disability is challenging for professional evaluators as well as for Brazilian public policy. This is mainly due to the challenges of recognizing the barriers and environmental factors that hamper the full participation in society of people with disabilities.

  10. Inclusive Education for Students with Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaniah Ikhfi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies and discusses major issues and trends in special education in Indonesia, including implications of trends for the future developments. Trends are discussed for the following areas: (1 inclusion and integration, issues will remain unresolved in the near future; (2 early childhood and postsecondary education with disability students, special education will be viewed as lifespan schooling; (3 transitions and life skills, these will receive greater emphasis; and (4 consultation and collaboration, more emphasis but problems remain. Moreover, the participant of the study in this paper was an autism student of twelve years old who lived at Maguwoharjo, Yogyakarta. This study was qualitative with case study as an approach of the research. The researchers conclude the autism that has good academic, communication and emotional skill are able to go to integrated school accompanied by guidance teacher. But in practice, inclusive education in Indonesia is inseparable from stakeholders ranging from government and institutions such as schools, educators, school environment, community and parents to support the goal of inclusive education itself. Adequate infrastructure also needs to be given to the school that organizes inclusive education for an efficient and effective students understanding learning-oriented of inclusive education. In short, every child has the same opportunity in education, yet for special education which is aimed at student with special educational needs.

  11. Disability inclusion in higher education in Uganda: Status and strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Emong; Lawrence Eron

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uganda has embraced inclusive education and evidently committed itself to bringing about disability inclusion at every level of education. Both legal and non-legal frameworks have been adopted and arguably are in line with the intent of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) on education. The CRPD, in Article 24, requires states to attain a right to education for persons with disabilities without discrimination and on the basis of equal opportunities at a...

  12. Equal Protection of the Law: The Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities Act, 2014, Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette Bain

    2016-10-01

    This analysis of the Persons with Disabilities (Equal Opportunities Act, 2014, examines the nature and scope of equal rights and whether the Act provides adequate enforcement. The aim of the provisions is to restrict discrimination against persons with disabilities by providing opportunities on an equal basis and to require persons having dealings with the disabled to accommodate their needs. It is questionable whether the Act fulfils its purpose and whether penalties for failure to comply with the Act are adequate, as there is a lacuna or gap in the law, which hinders purposeful rights.

  13. Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, P.L. 101-476: A Summary. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This summary of the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-476, identifies how these Amendments extend and expand special education research, demonstration, and training programs of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA authorizes three state formula grant programs and several discretionary grant…

  14. Challenges Persist Under Americans With Disabilities Act Amendments Act: How Can Oncology Providers Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Gehrke, Amanda K; McMahon, Brian T; McMahon, Megan C

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether the Amendments to the hallmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA; effective January 2009), which provide increased access to the antidiscrimination laws for many with chronic illness, are related to changes in workplace discrimination allegations in individuals with a history of cancer. Information collected by the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission was used to compare allegations of discrimination and their merit before (2001 to 2008) and after (2009 to 2011) implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to terms of employment (eg, promotions, wages) were more likely to be filed (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.61) and determined to have merit (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.77) after implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to workplace relations (eg, harassment, discipline, discharge) were also more likely to be filed post Amendments Act (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.78), although the merit of this complaint remained stable. Filing of all other allegations of discrimination (ie, hiring, reasonable accommodation, and termination) and their merit remained unchanged post Amendments Act. Despite the implementation of the Amendments Act, discrimination allegations in those with a history of cancer persisted or in certain areas increased. Although prevention of workplace discrimination rests primarily with employers, the oncology care team is uniquely qualified to provide information related to residual symptoms and function that can facilitate more personalized solutions to workplace discrimination, such as successful workplace accommodations. Information is provided that can assist the oncology team in their efforts to improve work outcomes.

  15. The Brazilian education system. Students with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Dainese

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian education system provides a specific form of organization for the inclusive education of students with disabilities. Law No. 9394 dated December 20, 1996, “Lei de diretrizes e bases da educação nacional”, presents in Chapter V the “educação especial" as a form of organization offered to students "portadores de Necessidades especiais”. Admission of students with disabilities in the Brazilian schools was characterized by several phases: the welfarist phase, the integration phase and the inclusion phase, which is the most recent one and now being debated. The presence of a special device fosters the differences, even when everybody enters the classbecause a separation perspective damps down all the procedural and design efforts towards a true integration, holding back collaboration and action sharing among teachers. We consider however effective an action that accompanies the gradual learning evolution mediating between the student with disabilities and peers, between him and the teachers, between him and the learning tools designed.

  16. Assessment of Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia; McAllister, Carolyn; Neely-Barnes, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred members of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) responded to a survey regarding the inclusion of disability content in social work courses and supports needed to increase disability content. Although respondents generally agreed that disability content is important in social work education, its inclusion is inconsistent, with most frequent inclusion in courses on diversity and least frequent inclusion in courses on research. Respondents identified barriers to increasing disability content, including lack of resources for teaching, lack of relevant faculty expertise, and an overcrowded curriculum. Strategies and resources for infusing disability content into social work education are discussed.

  17. Perceptions of a disability sport unit in general physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle; Collins, Karen; Wright, Steven; Kearns, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to assess the effectiveness of a disability sport unit in shaping perceptions of disability. Data from interviews, observations, and documents were collected on 87 elementary-aged students, one physical education teacher, and one teaching intern. Comparisons were drawn between fifth graders engaged in a five-week disability sport unit to fourth graders participating in their standard physical education curriculum. Findings revealed differences in the way fourth and fifth graders came to view individuals with disabilities. The results support an analysis of curriculum development that underscores the significance of the social model in positively impacting constructions of disability. Recommendations include the use of disability sports in physical education as an effective strategy for educating students in game play, knowledge of the Paralympics, and the inclusion of individuals with disabilities in a variety of sporting venues.

  18. Situating Disability within Comparative Education: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alisha M. B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an inquiry into where the topic of disability falls within the vast field of comparative education research. It explores the extent to which disability is present in comparative education literature, and in what ways it is represented. A review of literature across the core comparative education peer-reviewed journals was conducted.…

  19. Inclusive Higher Education for Students with Disabilities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hua-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was intended to present the current status of inclusive higher education for students with disabilities in Taiwan. Literature review, documentary analysis, and field observation were used to collect the needed information. The history for educating students with disabilities in higher education institutions in Taiwan has…

  20. Learning Disabilities and Achieving High-Quality Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartland, Debi; Strosnider, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    This is an official document of the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (NJCLD), of which Council for Learning Disabilities is a long-standing, active member. With this position paper, NJCLD advocates for the implementation of high-quality education standards (HQES) for students with learning disabilities (LD) and outlines the…

  1. Inclusive Education and Training in South African Higher Education: Mapping the Experiences of a Student with Physical Disability at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntombela, Sithabile

    2013-01-01

    The South African Constitution upholds and entrenches the human right of all citizens. Similarly, the Higher Education Act of 1997 promotes equality of access for all, especially for those previously marginalised or excluded. The study reported in this article explored challenges experienced by students with disabilities at his university. Using…

  2. Disparities in Disability by Educational Attainment Across US States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montez, Jennifer Karas; Zajacova, Anna; Hayward, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    To examine how disparities in adult disability by educational attainment vary across US states. We used the nationally representative data of more than 6 million adults aged 45 to 89 years in the 2010-2014 American Community Survey. We defined disability as difficulty with activities of daily living. We categorized education as low (less than high school), mid (high school or some college), or high (bachelor's or higher). We estimated age-standardized disability prevalence by educational attainment and state. We assessed whether the variation in disability across states occurs primarily among low-educated adults and whether it reflects the socioeconomic resources of low-educated adults and their surrounding contexts. Disparities in disability by education vary markedly across states-from a 20 percentage point disparity in Massachusetts to a 12-point disparity in Wyoming. Disparities vary across states mainly because the prevalence of disability among low-educated adults varies across states. Personal and contextual socioeconomic resources of low-educated adults account for 29% of the variation. Efforts to reduce disparities in disability by education should consider state and local strategies that reduce poverty among low-educated adults and their surrounding contexts.

  3. Recovery Act: States Could Provide More Information on Education Programs to Enhance the Public's Understanding of Fund Use. Report to the Republican Leader, U.S. Senate. GAO-10-807

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2010-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provides $70.3 billion for three education programs--the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF), Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (Title I), and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Act requires recipients to be accountable for how these funds…

  4. Pedagogical guidelines for educational accompaniment for grieving to adults with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo RODRÍGUEZ HERRERO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available It is needed a foundation and some orientations to act in loss and grief situations with adults with intellectual disabilities. In this article, through a relevant literature review, we based the educational accompaniment as a pedagogic methodology of support with three principal elements: a The conception of grief from its formative potential, b The prevention of disorders associated to grief complications, c The pedagogic intervention preferably from the tutorship or from the actuation of educators or professionals near to intellectual disabilities people. The educational accompaniment model is a proposal that can be placed on humanist models of grief since it considers both the characteristics of the grieving process and the formative possibilities of its elaboration. The article’s conclusions present some of the benefits of the educational accompaniment for adults with intellectual disabilities.

  5. The Americans with Disabilities Act: A Decision Tree for Social Services Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Gerald V.; Ellegood, Christina

    2005-01-01

    The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act has had a profound influence on social workers and social services administrators in virtually all work settings. Because of the multiple elements of the act, however, assessing the validity of claims can be a somewhat arduous and complicated task. This article provides a "decision tree" for…

  6. Rights, Equality, Educational Provisions and Facilities for Students with Disabilities in Thailand: Legal and Practical Perspectives over the Past Decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomanad Cheausuwantavee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to critically examine the present status of educational provisions and facilities for students with disabilities in Thailand, in accordance with the enforcement of various laws over the past decade (1992-2008. The legal essence of laws such as the Constitution of The Kingdom of Thailand 1997, the Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons Act 1991, and the National Education Act 1999, was typologically compared to actual situations, in terms of educational provisions and facilities, by reviewing a total of 25 research papers.The findings showed that there had been no further educational provisions and facilities for students with disabilities, despite indications within the laws. There are discrepancies between legislations and practices due to the ineffectiveness of law enforcement, and the negative attitudes of service providers and society towards students with disabilities. Therefore, positive attitudes of stakeholders have to be promoted, alongside the new laws.

  7. (dis)Ability and Music Education: Paralympian Patrick Anderson and the Experience of Disability in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Adam Patrick

    2017-01-01

    What does it mean to experience disability in music? Based on interviews with Patrick Anderson--arguably the greatest wheelchair basketball player of all time--this article presents insights into the complexities of the experience of disability in sports and music. Contrasted with music education's tendency to adhere to a medicalized model of…

  8. Permanent Injury and the Disability-Mitigating Effects of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Cater; Sohee Kang; Byron Lew; Marco Pollanen

    2013-01-01

    Using data from Ontario, we study the extent to which education mitigates the realized work-disabling effects of permanent occupational injury. Focusing first on the rates of post-injury employment, our results suggest that education has a strong disability-mitigating effect in cases of knee and shoulder injuries, but a smaller effect where workers have experienced permanent back or wrist/finger injuries. A comparison of pre- and post-injury occupations then reveals that education mitigates d...

  9. Occupational burdens in special educators working with intellectually disabled students

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Plichta

    2014-01-01

    Background: The article presents the results of psychosocial burdens in special educators (specialists in the field of oligophrenopedagogy) with intellectually disabled students. In theoretical part, specific context of occupational stress in special educators was introduced. Additionally, the need of broader research context regarding occupational stress and the risk of burnout in special educators working with intellectually disabled individuals were included. Material and Methods: The resu...

  10. Provision of educationally related services for children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, J Daniel

    2007-06-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions often need educationally related services. As medical home providers, physicians and other health care professionals can assist children, adolescents, and their families with the complex federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems associated with these services. Expanded roles for physicians and other health care professionals in individualized family service plan, individualized education plan, and Section 504 plan development and implementation are recommended. Recent updates to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act will also affect these services. Funding for these services by private and nonprivate sources also continue to affect the availability of these educationally related services. The complex range of federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems for special education and related services for children and adolescents in public schools is beyond the scope of this statement. Readers are referred to the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement "The Pediatrician's Role in Development and Implementation of an Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or an Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP)" for additional background materials. The focus of this statement is the role that health care professionals have in determining and managing educationally related services in the school setting. This policy statement is a revision of a previous statement, "Provision of Educationally Related Services for Children and Adolescents With Chronic Diseases and Disabling Conditions," published in February 2000 by the Committee on Children With Disabilities (http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/pediatrics;105/2/448).

  11. Marking-Out Normalcy and Disability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriaga, Manuel; Hanson, Katie; Kay, Helen; Walker, Ann

    2011-01-01

    This article advocates for socially just pedagogies in higher education to challenge senses of normalcy that perpetuate elitist academic attitudes towards the inclusion of disabled students. Normalcy is equated here with an everyday eugenics, which heralds a non-disabled person without "defects", or impairments, as the ideal norm. This…

  12. Right to Inclusive Education for Students with Disabilities in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Brent C.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the current inclusive education system in Kenya, and how those practices relate to Article 24 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Local laws and international instruments are presented to shed light on the extent to which students with disabilities have a right to inclusive…

  13. Music Therapy and the Education of Students with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Music therapists regard music therapy as a valuable intervention for students with moderate to severe intellectual disability or multiple disabilities, but many special educators would regard it as a controversial practice, unsupported by empirical research. This paper reviews the goals and strategies used by music therapists working with students…

  14. The Sociology of Disability and the Struggle for Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This article charts the emergence of the sociology of disability and examines the areas of contestation. These have involved a series of erasures and absences--the removal of the body from debates on the social model of disability; the disappearance of the Other from educational policies and practices; and the absence of academics from political…

  15. Derechos Educacionales de los Padres: Una Explicacion de los Procedimientos de Seguridad para los Padres de Ninos con Discapacidades. Bajo la Clausula del Acta de Educacion para Individuos con Discapacidades (IDEA) y las Reglas para la Administracion del Acta de Educacion para Ninos Excepcionales (Educational Rights of Parents: An Explanation of Procedural Safeguards Available to Parents of Children with Disabilities. Under Provisions of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the Rules for the Administration of the Exceptional Children's Educational Act [ECEA]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center, Des Moines, IA.

    This pamphlet, in Spanish, describes Colorado parents' educational rights under federal and state special education rules and regulations. It addresses: (1) free appropriate public education and termination of services; (2) required prior notice to parents if there is a proposed change or refusal to change a child's special education program; (3)…

  16. Measuring Athletic Facility Managers’ Knowledge Of Access And The Americans With Disabilities Act: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua R. Pate; Steven N. Waller

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory research was measuring facility managers’ knowledge of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and it may assist in decreasing the gap in knowledge between facility managers and the needs of people with physical disabilities. An existing survey examining ADA knowledge was slightly modified and used for this study. Four athletic facility managers from universities in a large Bowl Championship Series conference participated in the study. Results provided a pre...

  17. "Challenging Disabling Attitudes, Building an Inclusive Society": Considering the Role of Education in Encouraging Non-Disabled Children to Develop Positive Attitudes towards Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Angharad E.

    2009-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, the introduction of the Disability Equality Duty 2006 has provided a new window of opportunity to promote the idea that education has a role to play in changing non-disabled children/young people's attitudes towards disabled people. This article explores the issues raised by the application of the Disability Equality Duty to…

  18. Processing Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    This Article argues that the practice of holding so many adjudicative proceedings related to disability in private settings (e.g., guardianship, special education due process, civil commitment, and social security) relative to our strong normative presumption of public access to adjudication may cultivate and perpetuate stigma in contravention of the goals of inclusion and enhanced agency set forth in antidiscrimination laws. Descriptively, the law has a complicated history with disability--initially rendering disability invisible; later, underwriting particular narratives of disability synonymous with incapacity; and, in recent history, promoting the full socio-economic visibility of people with disabilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the marquee civil rights legislation for people with disabilities (about to enter its twenty-fifth year), expresses a national approach to disability that recognizes the role of society in its construction, maintenance, and potential remedy. However, the ADA’s mission is incomplete. It has not generated the types of interactions between people with disabilities and nondisabled people empirically shown to deconstruct deeply entrenched social stigma. Prescriptively, procedural design can act as an "ntistigma agent"to resist and mitigate disability stigma. This Article focuses on one element of institutional design--public access to adjudication--as a potential tool to construct and disseminate counter-narratives of disability. The unique substantive focus in disability adjudication on questions of agency provides a potential public space for the negotiation of nuanced definitions of disability and capacity more reflective of the human condition.

  19. Disability in physical education textbooks: an analysis of image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Táboas-Pais, María Inés; Rey-Cao, Ana

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how images of disability are portrayed in physical education textbooks for secondary schools in Spain. The sample was composed of 3,316 images published in 36 textbooks by 10 publishing houses. A content analysis was carried out using a coding scheme based on categories employed in other similar studies and adapted to the requirements of this study with additional categories. The variables were camera angle, gender, type of physical activity, field of practice, space, and level. Univariate and bivariate descriptive analyses were also carried out. The Pearson chi-square statistic was used to identify associations between the variables. Results showed a noticeable imbalance between people with disabilities and people without disabilities, and women with disabilities were less frequently represented than men with disabilities. People with disabilities were depicted as participating in a very limited variety of segregated, competitive, and elite sports activities.

  20. Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in South African Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanga, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Globally, few students with disabilities progress to higher education. This is mostly due to avoidable barriers they face as they navigate different educational structures from lower levels. Even for those few students who make it to higher education, they continue to face challenges. A qualitative study was carried out at the University of the…

  1. Social Justice, Disability, and Rehabilitation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Daniel; Smart, Julie F.

    2012-01-01

    The academic field and the professional practice of rehabilitation counseling focuses on one aspect of social justice, assisting individuals with disabilities to attain full community inclusion. Nonetheless, social justice focuses on many marginalized groups and in the related fields of counseling and psychology, those with disabilities are rarely…

  2. Moral Philosophy, Disability, and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, E. Frank

    2009-01-01

    Disability and dependence are integral to the human experience and yet have been largely marginalized or denigrated within Western philosophy. Joining a growing counter narrative from the disability studies movement, several mainstream moral philosophers are helping to redress this error. In this essay, the author discusses ideas from four such…

  3. Youth with Disabilities in the Corrections System: Prevalence Rates and Identification Issues. Monograph Series on Education, Disability and Juvenile Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Robert B., Jr.; Bullis, Michael; Anderson, Cindy Wheeler; Griller-Clark, Heather M.

    This monograph, one of a series on youth with disabilities and the juvenile justice system, reviews current data on disabilities requiring special education and related supports. Statistics on the prevalence of juvenile crime are followed by statistics on the prevalence of special education disabilities in the system, specifically specific…

  4. Americans with Disabilities Act: physician-shareholder practice groups and ADA compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odem, Nathan; Blanck, Peter

    2003-02-01

    This article examines the application of Americans with Disabilities Act requirements to professional associations like physician practice groups. In general, employers with 15 or more full-time employees must comply with the Act. However, the definition of an employee is sometimes unclear, especially as applied to business entities commonly used by physician practice groups. A recent case decided by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that physician-shareholders of a professional corporation are employees for Americans with Disabilities Act coverage purposes. Analogous cases in other federal circuits have held differently, likening the "owners" of professional corporations to partners in a partnership, who are not considered employees. Similar questions arise for popular business entities, such as Limited Liability Companies and Limited Liability Partnerships. This article discusses the nature of the business forms commonly used by physician practice groups and how their characteristics impact employee status for Americans with Disabilities Act coverage. It then suggests that examination is useful beyond business formation characteristics to the purpose of the Americans with Disabilities Act and other employment antidiscrimination statutes.

  5. Does education buffer the impact of disability on psychological distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandemakers, Jornt J; Monden, Christiaan W S

    2010-07-01

    This paper investigates whether education buffers the impact of physical disability on psychological distress. It further investigates what makes education helpful, by examining whether cognitive ability and occupational class can explain the buffering effect of education. Two waves of the 1958 British National Child Development Study are used to test the hypothesis that the onset of a physical disability in early adulthood (age 23 to 33) has a smaller effect on psychological distress among higher educated people. In total 423 respondents (4.6%) experienced the onset of a physical disability between the ages of 23 and 33. We find that a higher educational level cushions the psychology impact of disability. Cognitive ability and occupational class protect against the effect of a disability too. The education buffer arises in part because individuals with a higher level of education have more cognitive abilities, but the better social position of those with higher levels of education appears to be of greater importance. Implications of these findings for the social gradient in health are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Education Empowerment Model for the Disabled Learners: A Case Study at Cicendo School for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, Mustofa; Shantini, Yanti; Sardin

    2015-01-01

    This paper originates from a study conducted to examine the challenges faced by the Schools for Special Education (SLB) in their effort to empower people living with disabilities. The study aimed: 1) to describe the stages involved in the education for empowerment of the disabled groups through schools for special education, 2) to present an…

  7. Mainstreaming disability in education beyond 2015

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-02-14

    Feb 14, 2015 ... business owners in sustainable development activities could serve as an anchor for mainstreaming disability beyond .... includes the story of Hephaestus, a Greek god with .... advancement of technology, especially in remote.

  8. ACTS for distance education in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, A.; Ventre, G.

    1995-08-01

    The need for electrical energy supply in the rural communities of developing countries has been well documented. Equally well known is the potential for photovoltaic in cost effectively meeting this need. A major impediment to fulfilling the need is the lack of indigenous personnel with a knowledgeof photovoltaic systems, and the associated infrastructure required to implement project. Various delivery schemes for providing the needed training to developing countries personnel have been investigated. Various train methods and programs that have been employed to remedy the problem have had significant drawbacks in terms of cost, consistency, impact, reach, and sustainability. The hypothesis to be tested in this project posits that satellite-based distance education using ACTS technologies can overcome these impediments. The purpose of the project is to investigate the applicability of the ACTS satellite in providing distance education in photovoltaic systems to developing countries and rural communities. An evaluation of the cost effectiveness of using ACTS unique technologies to overcome identified problems shall be done. The limitations of ACTS in surmounting distance education problems in developing countries shall be investigated. This project will, furthermore, provide training to Savannah State College faculty in photovoltaic (PV) systems and in distance education configurations and models. It will also produce training materials adequate for use in PV training programs via distance education. Savannah State College will, as a consequence become well equipped to play a leading role in the training of minority populations in photovoltaic systems and other renewables through its Center for Advanced Water Technology and Energy Systems. This communication provides the project outline including the specific issues that will be investigated during the project. Also presented i the project design which covers the participations of the various components of a network

  9. Disability in the Classroom: Current Trends and Impacts on Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramo, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article covers current trends in disability rights and raises questions about how society's views of disability influence the music education of students in need of special education services. Brief overviews of the disability-rights movement in the United States and of federal laws pertaining to disabilities and education are included. Next,…

  10. Americans with Disabilities Act and the Supreme Court: Implications for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Yell, Mitchell L.

    2002-01-01

    This article first reviews the primary requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), then examines four recent U.S. Supreme Court cases that helped clarify who is entitled to its protection. The cases are Murphy vs. United Parcel Services, Inc.; Albertsons, Inc. vs. Kirkingburg (1999); Olmstead, Georgia Department of Human Resources…

  11. 77 FR 60170 - Americans With Disabilities Act: Proposed Circular Chapter, Vehicle Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-02

    ... specifications in Part 38 by vehicle type. The section begins by emphasizing that an accessible bus or rail car... With Disabilities Act: Proposed Circular Chapter, Vehicle Acquisition AGENCY: Federal Transit... buses and rail cars they acquire meet the requirements of the U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT...

  12. 49 CFR 27.19 - Compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act requirements and FTA policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements and FTA policy. 27.19 Section 27.19 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... General § 27.19 Compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act requirements and FTA policy. (a... subpart F of this part. (b) Consistent with FTA policy, any recipient of Federal financial assistance from...

  13. 77 FR 50068 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1192 [Docket No. ATBCB 2010-0004] RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of public...

  14. 77 FR 56590 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1192 [Docket No. ATBCB 2010-0004] RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of information...

  15. 75 FR 54543 - Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD 36 CFR Part 1192 [Docket No. ATBCB 2010-0004] RIN 3014-AA38 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Transportation Vehicles AGENCY: Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board. ACTION: Notice of public...

  16. Identifying the effects of education on the ability to cope with a disability among individuals with disabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Steen; Gupta, Nabanita Datta

    2017-01-01

    The literature on disability has suggested that an educated individual with a disability is more likely to better cope with her/his disability than those without education. However, few published studies explore whether the relationship between education and ability to cope with a disability...... is anything more than an association. Using data on disability and accommodation from a large Danish survey from 2012–13 and exploiting a major Danish schooling reform as a natural experiment, we identified a potential causal effect of education on both economic (holding a job) as well as social (cultural...... with a disability indeed had higher levels of both economic and social coping. To some extent, having more knowledge of public support systems and higher motivation explained the better coping among the group of individuals with disabilities who were educated. Our results indicated, however, that a large part...

  17. The Care Manager's Dilemma: Balancing Human Rights with Risk Management under the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prebble, Kate; Diesfeld, Kate; Frey, Rosemary; Sutton, Daniel; Honey, Michelle; Vickery, Russell; McKenna, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In New Zealand, the Intellectual Disability (Compulsory Care and Rehabilitation) Act 2003 provides diversion for persons with an intellectual disability who have been charged with, or convicted of, a criminal offence. This unique Act moves the responsibility for such "care recipients" from the criminal justice system to a disability…

  18. Administrative Challenge or Ethical Dilemma? Responding Justly when a Student with a Disability Engages in a Violent or Disruptive Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faircloth, Susan C.; Ritter, Suzanne T.; Wilson, Felicia R.

    2007-01-01

    This case study involves an 8-year-old American Indian student with a disability, who was videotaped assaulting another student as they exited the school bus. Although acts of school violence are common on campuses across the nation, this incident is particularly complex, given the disability status of the student committing this act. This case…

  19. Can people with disabilities gain from education? Similarities and differences between occupational attainment among persons with and without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Tomas; Kjellberg, Anders; Danermark, Berth; Boman, Eva

    2014-01-01

    More knowledge is needed of occupational attainment of persons with disabilities, i.e., the relationship between their educational level and their profession, and factors of importance for this relationship. To compare occupational attainment among persons with and without a disability. 3396 informants with disabilities and 19,004 non-disabled informants participated (control group) in a survey study by Statistics Sweden.The informants with disabilities were divided into six groups. Occupational attainment did not differ between the disability groups, neither between persons with and without a disability. Follow-up analysis showed that men with disabilities with primary or secondary school had an occupation above their educational level to a significantly larger extent than women with disabilities. This pattern was even clearer in comparison with the control group. Persons without disabilities, with secondary or higher education, were more successful in the labor market than persons with disabilities. Occupational attainment increased with age in both groups. Young women with disabilities who only have primary or secondary education run a higher risk of having a job that is below their educational level than men at the same educational level. This indicates discriminating mechanisms in the society related to gender and ability.

  20. Pedagogical guidelines for educational accompaniment for grieving to adults with intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Pablo RODRÍGUEZ HERRERO; Agustín DE LA HERRÁN GASCÓN; Dolores IZUZQUIZA GASSET

    2013-01-01

    It is needed a foundation and some orientations to act in loss and grief situations with adults with intellectual disabilities. In this article, through a relevant literature review, we based the educational accompaniment as a pedagogic methodology of support with three principal elements: a) The conception of grief from its formative potential, b) The prevention of disorders associated to grief complications, c) The pedagogic intervention preferably from the tutorship or from the actuation o...

  1. PARENTS ATTITUDE: INCLUSIVE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Blagoj Dimitrova-Radojicic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of a study designed to investigate the attitudes of parents of “normal” developing children toward the inclusion of children with disabilities into mainstream education in Macedonia. Specifically, the study was aimed to explore the similarities and differences in the attitudes of two groups of parents: a group of parents of preschool children and a group of parents of school age children. Participants included 88 parents. Generally, many of the parents accept inclusive education, but most of them still think the special school is better place for education of children with disability.

  2. Educational Outcomes for Secondary Students with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.

    2017-01-01

    Attention to the educational programming of secondary students with mild intellectual disability has declined in recent decades, although the need for the attention has not, particularly when considering the postschool outcomes of this population. This paper discusses the current state postschool outcomes and secondary education services for…

  3. The History of Disability Services in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaus, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, Brinckerhoff, McGuire, and Shaw observed that the field of postsecondary education and disability services had "moved through its adolescence and was embarking on adulthood" (xiii). Indeed, the field had undergone rapid expansion nationwide in the prior 30 years and grew into a full-fledged profession within higher education (Jarrow…

  4. Problems in Educating Abused and Neglected Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Lois A.

    1997-01-01

    Interviews and review of case files investigated reasons for the common failure to meet the educational needs of abused and neglected children with disabilities in foster care. Agency dysfunctions which negatively affected appropriate educational provisions were identified in such categories as eligibility, timeline violation, inappropriate…

  5. Community-Level Responses to Disability and Education in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karangwa, Evariste; Miles, Susie; Lewis, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of community and perceptions of disability in Rwanda, as revealed through a community-based ethnographic study. This study took place in Rwanda in an educational policy context driven by international rhetoric about human rights, inclusion and the arguably unachievable Education for All targets. We argue that the…

  6. Religious and Spiritual Education in Disability Situations in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Valeria; Caldin, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In this short article, the authors focus on religious and spiritual education's potential to offer social and spiritual inclusion for students with a disability. They take the view that the religious and spiritual education teacher in such situations is positioned better when seeing such teaching as a special vocation. They use Italy as the case…

  7. Mainstreaming disability in education beyond 2015

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    2015-02-14

    Feb 14, 2015 ... This article presents an exemplary case study of an Independent Business Owner (IBO) from multiple case studies on narratives of differently abled persons. The aim of this article is to illustrate mainstreaming disability through an exemplary case of the IBO. The article is informed by the imperatives of ...

  8. Perceptions of Disability and Special Education Services: The Perspectives of Korean-American Parents of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nari; Ostendorf, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Parents' perception of disabilities and special education services can impact the way they interact with professionals providing services for their children with disabilities. In addition, the cultural background of parents plays an important role in their perception of disabilities, as well as how they communicate with professionals. Thus, it is…

  9. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Disabilities: Case Law Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydosz, Ann; Maydosz, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that disability has been recognized as "a natural part of the human experience" (Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000) and that the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 and its later reauthorizations as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) should have served…

  10. Special education for intellectual disability: current trends and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M; Hung, Li-Yu

    2009-09-01

    To inform readers of current issues in special education for individuals with intellectual disabilities and summarize recent research and opinion. Two issues dominate special education for students with intellectual disabilities in the early 21st century. First, what should be taught to such students and who should teach them? Second, where should such students be taught - in 'inclusive' settings alongside normal peers or in special settings dedicated to their special needs? Research on teaching reading, arithmetic, and functional daily living skills to students with disabilities suggests the superiority of direct, systematic instruction. Universal design is often seen as supportive of inclusion. Inclusion has been seen as the central issue in special education but is gradually giving way to concern for what students learn. Direct, systematic instruction in reading, arithmetic, and daily living skills is the most effective approach to teaching students with intellectual disabilities. Basic concepts and logic suggest that special and general education cannot be equivalent. We conclude that what students are taught should be put ahead of where they are taught. Our fundamental concern is that students with intellectual disabilities be respected and be taught all they can learn.

  11. Automated Discovery of Speech Act Categories in Educational Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Vasile; Moldovan, Cristian; Niraula, Nobal; Graesser, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the important task of automated discovery of speech act categories in dialogue-based, multi-party educational games. Speech acts are important in dialogue-based educational systems because they help infer the student speaker's intentions (the task of speech act classification) which in turn is crucial to providing adequate…

  12. 34 CFR 300.4 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 300.4 Section 300.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES... Definitions Used in This Part § 300.4 Act. Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as...

  13. 78 FR 46243 - Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... making the Federal Government a model employer by recruiting, hiring, and retaining more workers with... education system that works for them. We must ensure lessons are inclusive, assessments are fair, and..., promote disability rights at home and abroad, and make America a place that values the contributions of...

  14. 75 FR 44877 - Anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... anniversary of this historic legislation, we renew our commitment to ensuring that everyone with disabilities can live free from the weight of discrimination and pursue the American dream. Across our country... law, science to business, education to technology. Through steadfast determination, they have worked...

  15. A quality implementation of Title I of the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybski, D

    1992-05-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 (Public Law 101-336) will have a major effect on private sector employers. Employers with 25 or more employees must provide qualified persons with disabilities equal access to employment with or without reasonable accommodations by July 1992. Employers with 15 to 24 employees must comply with the law by July 1994. Occupational therapy managers must understand the employment provisions of the law and develop strategies for implementation in order to comply with its regulations. This paper suggests the use of a total quality management approach, as espoused by W. E. Deming (1986), as a framework for an implementation plan. This approach focuses on quality improvement in the organization, respect of all workers for their abilities, replacement of fear of persons with disabilities with respect, and the building of partnerships between employers and employees with disabilities. A summary of the provisions of Title I as well as a checklist of measures and a sample job description that adheres to the regulations of Title I is presented to prepare an organization to become compliant. Occupational therapists are seen as uniquely skilled professionals who can contribute greatly in their own organizations as well as act as consultants to other managers in implementing Title I of the ADA using a total quality approach.

  16. [Occupational burdens in special educators working with intellectually disabled students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plichta, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results of psychosocial burdens in special educators (specialists in the field of oligophrenopedagogy) with intellectually disabled students. In theoretical part, specific context of occupational stress in special educators was introduced. Additionally, the need of broader research context regarding occupational stress and the risk of burnout in special educators working with intellectually disabled individuals were included. The results were obtained using Plichta and Pyzalski's Questionnaire of Occupational Burdens in Teaching (QOBT). The presented results are based on a research sample (N = 100) of special educators (female) teaching intellectually disabled students attending special schools in the city of Lódz. The obtained results were compared with the results coming from a large random sample of public school teachers working with non-intellectually disabled children from the Lodi voivodeship (N = 429) and referred to the norms of QOBT. The results show significant percentage of respondents obtaining high level of occupational burdens (conflict situations - 45%, organizational burdens - 31%, lack of work sense - 40%, global score - 40%). Seniority is not related to the level of burdens. Some significant differences concerning the level of occupational burdens between both groups of teachers were found. The study showed e.g. the strong need for supporting special educators in the workplace context and the need of implementing preventive and remedial measures at both individual and organizational levels (especially in terms of improving personal relationships in a workplace). Generally, the results show similarity of the stressors' ranking in special educators and school teachers working with non-intellectually disabled children.

  17. Occupational burdens in special educators working with intellectually disabled students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Plichta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The article presents the results of psychosocial burdens in special educators (specialists in the field of oligophrenopedagogy with intellectually disabled students. In theoretical part, specific context of occupational stress in special educators was introduced. Additionally, the need of broader research context regarding occupational stress and the risk of burnout in special educators working with intellectually disabled individuals were included. Material and Methods: The results were obtained using Plichta and Pyżalski's Questionnaire of Occupational Burdens in Teaching (QOBT. The presented results are based on a research sample (N = 100 of special educators (female teaching intellectually disabled students attending special schools in the city of Łódź. The obtained results were compared with the results coming from a large random sample of public school teachers working with non-intellectually disabled children from the Łodź voivodeship (N = 429 and referred to the norms of QOBT. Results: The results show significant percentage of respondents obtaining high level of occupational burdens (conflict situations - 45%, organizational burdens - 31%, lack of work sense - 40%, global score - 40%. Seniority is not related to the level of burdens. Some significant differences concerning the level of occupational burdens between both groups of teachers were found. Conclusions: The study showed e.g. the strong need for supporting special educators in the workplace context and the need of implementing preventive and remedial measures at both individual and organizational levels (especially in terms of improving personal relationships in a workplace. Generally, the results show similarity of the stressors' ranking in special educators and school teachers working with non-intellectually disabled children. Med Pr 2014;65(2:239–250

  18. Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilham, Christopher M.; Tompkins, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two teacher educators describe and explain how they are reconceptualizing a pre-service teacher education course on inclusion using disability studies in education (DSE) scholarship. The DSE approach better connects the oft-separated field of diversity and inclusion, and builds on the program's overall focus on equity education.…

  19. Investigating Access to Educational Assessment for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Parkinson, Gill; Lewis, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Many countries have established systems for identifying, and providing for, the range of students with disabilities during their formal educational assessments. Most systems include the provision of variously termed "special access arrangements" (SAAs), such as the provision of extra time or practical assistance with some aspect of an…

  20. Higher Education and Disability: Past and Future of Underrepresented Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, David W.; Stodden, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past half century higher education in the United States has been challenged to develop and implement policies and practices that effectively promote the access, retention, and graduation of diverse underrepresented populations. One of these populations is comprised of individuals with disabilities, whose equal access to higher education…

  1. Hearing the Voices of Disabled Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickerman, Philip; Blundell, Milly

    2010-01-01

    Since the return of the Labour government to power in the UK in 1997 issues of social inclusion have risen up the political and statutory agenda within higher education (HE). This study reports the findings of disabled students lived experiences and views of transition from induction through to employability within one HE institution. The study…

  2. Provision of equal education for students with disabilities at tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the extent to which students with disabilities were coping with the inclusive educational setting at one university in Zimbabwe. In particular, it aimed at tracing these students' perceptions towards their mainstream peers and lecturers, as well as determining the extent to which the university ...

  3. Art Education and Disability Studies Perspectives on Mental Illness Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derby, John K.

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation critically examines mental illness discourses through the intersecting disciplinary lenses of art education and disability studies. Research from multiple disciplines is compared and theorized to uncover the ways in which discourses, or language systems, have oppressively constructed and represented "mental illness." To establish…

  4. Including Students with Severe Disabilities in General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Lech; Alper, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents five systematic phases for bringing about successful regular education inclusion of students with severe disabilities. Phases include develop networks within the community, assess school and community resources, review strategies for integration, install strategies that lead to integration, and develop a system of feedback and…

  5. Inclusive Special Education: Development of a New Theory for the Education of Children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive education and special education are based on different philosophies and provide alternative views of education for children with special educational needs and disabilities. They are increasingly regarded as diametrically opposed in their approaches. This article presents a theory of "inclusive special education" that comprises…

  6. Americans with Disabilities Act considerations for the practice of occupational medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, Steven; Shults, Theodore

    1993-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), although developed in the context of civil rights legislation, is likely to have notable impact on the practice of occupational medicine. The ADA contains provisions limiting the use of preplacement examinations to determinations of the capability to perform the essential functions of the job and of direct threat to the health and safety of the job applicant and others. The Title 1 employment provisions of the ADA established definitions and requirements similar to those found in section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended; leading cases that have been litigated under the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, are described. The limitations of available scientific and medical information related to determinations of job capability and direct threat and ramifications of the ADA on the practice of occupational medicine are discussed.

  7. Access Constraints Experienced by Physically Disabled Students at a South African Higher Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, L.; de Beer, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Current developments in government law and policies have created the hope that people living with a disability will enjoy the same rights and privileges as the non-disabled. Unfortunately, only 2.8% of disabled persons have access to higher education. The aim of this study was to determine if a group of students, living with a physical disability,…

  8. Disability, labour market participation and the effect of educational level : compared to what?

    OpenAIRE

    Bliksvær, Trond

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the article is to discuss the relationship between disability, educational level and employment, and to scrutinize how disability and education interact to impact employment – a link that has been observed in several studies. The article uses analyses of EU-SILC data to illustrate that conclusions about whether higher education reduces labour-market inequalities between disabled and non-disabled, depends in part on the analytical strategies used, which in turn are guided by implici...

  9. Special Education Teachers Attitudes toward Teaching Sex Education to Students with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Carolann

    2017-01-01

    The attitudes and opinions of special education teachers may potentially reveal insight as to how and why teachers choose to include sex education in their curriculum for self-contained special education classrooms designed to serve students with developmental disabilities. The main objective in developing this study was to gather information…

  10. Sexual Harassment among Students with Educational Disabilities: Perspectives of Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ellie L.; Heath, Melissa Allen; Ashbaker, Betty Y.; Smith, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of special education teachers about the prevalence and characteristics of sexual harassment among students identified with educational disabilities. Utah special education teachers (250) were randomly selected from the state's database. Fifty-two percent (n = 129) of the surveys were returned. Approximately…

  11. An Empirical Research on Returns to Education of Disabled People during the Process of Modernization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Education is one of the most important ways to form human capital. Individual can get profit from investment in human capital. Although education situation of the disabled is getting better slowly during the process of modernization, the study of return to education of disabled has been largely ignored for many years. Furthermore, there are still a number of challenges need to pay more attention. This paper based on CHNS data in the economic transition period using Mincer Equation to study the returns to education in the disabled people in China. The results show that the education level has significant positive relationship with the rate of return to education; Return to education of the disabled is lower than non-disabled and male higher than female. The paper suggested more special education supply are required, female disabled people should be pay more attention especially on their education.

  12. The Role of Senior High School Experiences in Shaping a Life Project Linked to Higher Education for Students With Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Cruz-Vadillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to approach the school experiences of 13 students with disabilities. It corresponds to a cross, synchronous and non experimental study, whose scope is mainly descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a semi-structured interview and transcribed from audio recordings to make a category analysis. The main results showed that in the case of students who were born with disabilities, the fact that an institution was inclusive turned out essential for them to have adequate transit through the educational system and thus become apt for higher education. The combination disability-inclusion-right to education-higher education is what this paper aimed to weave, trying to follow as thread or anchor, the previous school experiences of students with disabilities. We recognize that an adequate, inclusive, positive experience besides a subjective construction of the body and disability by family members, become important conditions to access schooling. Education is a right, therefore it can not be seen as an act of charity; it should be required as a quality practice.

  13. The Role of Sexuality and Sex Equity in the Education of Disabled Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Katherine; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This article tackles the broad issue of the intersection of sexuality, disability, and sex education. Myths and stereotypes about the nonsexual disabled woman are examined, as are issues of identity, dating and other loving relationships, sexual abuse, sex education, sexuality related services, and inclusion of disabled students in curriculum and…

  14. Exploring Predictors of Social Actions by General Education Students towards Peers with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpareke, Alicia Wyche; Salisbury, Christine L.

    2018-01-01

    This study deepens the field's understanding about factors that contribute to positive social engagement between students without disabilities and their peers with mild disabilities in general education classrooms. A sample of 68 seventh grade students with and without disabilities was drawn from general education classrooms in a suburban, Midwest…

  15. Postsecondary STEM Education for Students with Disabilities: Lessons Learned from a Decade of NSF Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Linda P.; Shuman, Cindy; Middendorf, B. Jan; Johnson, Cassandra

    2017-01-01

    The Research in Disabilities Education Synthesis Project (RDE-SP), a four-year mixed methods research project, assessed a decade of funded projects (2001-2011) under the National Science Foundation's Research in Disabilities Education program which is aimed at increasing participation and retention of students with disabilities (SWD) in Science,…

  16. Special Needs: Scholastic Disability Accommodations from K-12 and Transitions to Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vivien

    2016-02-01

    The number of students entering post-secondary education with already diagnosed disabilities is on the rise and mirrors the percentage of children in primary and secondary public schools with registered disabilities. Requirements governed by civil rights laws fundamentally change when comparing the support schools have to provide to students during primary and secondary school with disability access in postsecondary higher education. Psychiatrists may be asked to assist with scholastic disability at any stage of education and need to know about available supports and the parameters of disability in schools. Specifically, special attention should to be made in preparation for transition to postsecondary education when prior accommodations exist.

  17. Supporting Disability Education through a Combination of Special Schools and Disability-Inclusive Schools in the Pacific Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tones, Megan; Pillay, Hitendra; Carrington, Suzanne; Chandra, Subhas; Duke, Jennifer; Joseph, Rukh Mani

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a multi-method study of the ways in which special and mainstream schools support the educational needs of children with disabilities in Fiji. The aims of the study were: (1) to identify capacity and functions of special schools to support inclusive mainstream schools for children with disabilities; and (2) to explore the…

  18. Cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability in special education settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Vermeulen, A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.B.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the types, prevalence and associated variables of cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability attending special education settings. Methods: Students (n = 114) with intellectual and developmental disability who were between 12–19 years of age

  19. Cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability in special education settings.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, R.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Korzilius, H.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Vermeulen, A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the types, prevalence and associated variables of cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability attending special education settings. METHODS: Students (n = 114) with intellectual and developmental disability who were between 12-19 years of age

  20. Cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability in special education settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, R.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Moor, J.M.H. de; Vermeulen, A.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lang, R.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the types, prevalence and associated variables of cyberbullying among students with intellectual and developmental disability attending special education settings. METHODS: Students (n = 114) with intellectual and developmental disability who were between 12-19 years of age

  1. Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Educational institutions continually work to balance between providing students with access to data and protecting copyright owner's exclusive rights. The Copyright Act of 1976, effective in 1978, provided exemptions for live and distance education. As digital technology grew in capability, its capabilities were incorporated in distance education,…

  2. Problems in educating abused and neglected children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, L A

    1997-09-01

    This study considers whether Goerge and colleagues' (1992) thesis is correct--that the reason the special education needs of abused or neglected children in foster care are not being met appropriately is that the services provided to them revolve around their need for protection. A case study was done of 12 children with disabilities who were removed from the homes of their parents because of abuse or neglect. The primary data were the legal interventions made on the children's behalf with various agencies serving them by a legal services office. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and a review of the children's case files. The number of dysfunctions identified in the various agencies serving the children that negatively affected the children's ability to receive an appropriate education were in the following categories: search and serve (3); eligibility (1); timeline violation (8); IEP violation (11); inappropriate program (17); inadequate resources (4); lack of knowledge (3); parent advocacy problem (3); lack of coordination (7); dependent status (8); mobility delay (9). In those instances where the child welfare agency did not take into account a child's educational needs when placing that child, but simply considered the appropriateness of the living situation to protect and care for the child, then the thesis appears to be borne out. However, some-dysfunctions appear to be part of routine lack of compliance with certain areas of special education law, and would seem to affect any child with similar disabilities and educational needs in the offending school districts.

  3. A Social Constructionist Approach to Disability: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of a social model of disability derive their arguments from social constructionism. They combine different disabling conditions under one term: disability. Subsequently, they apply the specific viewpoint of the disability rights social movement of people with physical disabilities to other conditions such as intellectual disabilities,…

  4. 34 CFR 303.6 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 303.6 Section 303.6 Education Regulations of the..., Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.6 Act. As used in this part, Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1400) ...

  5. Addressing the General Education Curriculum in General Education Settings with Students with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah L.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2017-01-01

    This systematic literature review examined research on stakeholders' beliefs about addressing the general education curriculum in general education classrooms with students with severe disabilities (SD). The investigation was limited to studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 1997 and 2015. Ten articles were identified and then…

  6. Disciplining Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Kevin P.

    This report discusses disciplining children with disabilities in schools, in the context of the legal requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Practical concepts are explained in terms of the school's responsibility to: (1) maintain a safe environment; (2) teach a code of discipline to all students; (3) use the…

  7. Una Nueva IDEA: Una Guia para Padres acerca de los Cambios en la Ley de Educacion Especial para Ninos con Incapacidades (A New IDEA: A Parent's Guide to the Changes in Social Education Law for Children with Disabilities).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Tammy

    This guide for parents, in Spanish, explains the changes in the federal special education law resulting from the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Changes related to the parent's role in decisions about the child's education and in how schools can discipline special education students are highlighted. A…

  8. User Experience for Disabled Users in Open Educational Resources Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Navarrete

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Open Educational Resources (OER are digital materials for teaching-learning purpose released under an open license that are available through websites. In the last decade, some governments have encouraged the development and using of OER in order to contribute to the achievement of the right to education for everyone, a fundamental right included in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Besides, inclusion of people with disabilities is a global concern that need to be addressed in all living aspects including education.In this research we address the user experience in OER websites —considering the perspective of users with disabilities— in order to recognize possible barriers in web design. The conformance criteria considered for this reviewing are mandatory aspects of user experience in relation to Web accessibility and Web usability.

  9. User Experience for Disabled Users in Open Educational Resources Websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Navarrete

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Open Educational Resources (OER are digital materials for teaching-learning purpose released under an open license that are available through websites. In the last decade, some governments have encouraged the development and using of OER in order to contribute to the achievement of the right to education for everyone, a fundamental right included in The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Besides, inclusion of people with disabilities is a global concern that need to be addressed in all living aspects including education. In this research we address the user experience in OER websites —considering the perspective of users with disabilities— in order to recognize possible barriers in web design. The conformance criteria considered for this reviewing are mandatory aspects of user experience in relation to Web accessibility and Web usability.

  10. Postsecondary Students With Psychiatric Disabilities Identify Core Services and Key Ingredients to Supporting Education Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, Kathleen; Mizrahi, Raphael; Ringeisen, Heather

    2017-10-26

    Accessing and successfully completing postsecondary educational opportunities may be challenging for those living with psychiatric disabilities. This exploratory study highlights the experiences of individuals with psychiatric disabilities participating in postsecondary educational support initiatives. Investigators conducted case studies with 3 education support initiatives across the United States. Focus groups revealed what concrete supported education services were helpful and key ingredients in delivering education supports. Access to specialists, mindfulness techniques, help with time management and procrastination, and facilitating classroom accommodations were identified as critical. Developing authentic relationships with supported education staff, flexibility in service delivery and access to student peers living with psychiatric disabilities were noted as key ingredients in service delivery. Incorporating the voice of students with psychiatric disabilities into supported education services can increase access, involvement, and retention, therein providing more supports to students with psychiatric disabilities achieving their postsecondary education goals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. "Delivering" Education; Maintaining Inequality. The Case of Children with Disabilities in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trani, Jean-Francois; Bakhshi, Parul; Nandipati, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Education for children with disabilities in Afghanistan, particularly disabled girls, continues to lag behind despite laudable efforts of the Ministry of Education to promote universal access for all. The opportunity for education constitutes not just a means of achieving learning outcomes but also a space for social interaction, individual…

  12. A Case Study of Culturally Informed Disability-Inclusive Education Policy Development in the Solomon Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Suzanne; Pillay, Hitendra; Tones, Megan; Nickerson, Julie; Duke, Jennifer; Esibaea, Benedict; Malefoasi, Ambrose; Fa'asala, Casper Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Inclusive education in general, and disability-inclusive education in particular, is a high-level priority for development work in aid-supported countries. This paper presents a bottom-up process of developing disability-inclusive education policy in one country--the Solomon Islands. It is well understood that the promotion of quality in…

  13. Let's Talk about Sex: Recommendations for Educating Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minch, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with developmental disabilities are vulnerable to sexual abuse, and are often denied access to sexuality education. Public schools have vague curricula regarding sexuality education for general education students, curricula to which adolescents with developmental disabilities do not have access. The current study sought to determine…

  14. Disability differentials in educational attainment in England: primary and secondary effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzitheochari, Stella; Platt, Lucinda

    2018-04-17

    Childhood disability has been largely overlooked in social stratification and life course research. As a result, we know remarkably little about mechanisms behind well-documented disability differentials in educational outcomes. This study investigates educational transitions of disabled youth using data from the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England. We draw on social stratification literature on primary and secondary effects as well as that on stigma and labelling in order to explain disabled young people's educational outcomes. We find that disability differentials in transition rates to full-time academic upper secondary education and to university are largely the result of primary effects, reflected in differences in school performance between disabled and non-disabled young people. However, we also find evidence for secondary effects, with similarly achieving disabled young people less likely to pursue full-time academic upper secondary education compared to their non-disabled peers. We examine the extent to which these effects can be explained by disabled youth's suppressed educational expectations as well as their experiences of being bullied at school, which we link to the stigma experienced by disabled young people and their families. We find that educational expectations play an important role at crucial transitions in the English school system, while the effect of bullying is considerably smaller. By drawing attention to different social processes contributing to disability differentials in attainment, our study moves beyond medical models that implicitly assume a naturalized association of disability with poor educational outcomes, and demonstrates the parallels of disability with other ascriptive inequalities. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2018.

  15. Disability as Cultural Difference: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2012-01-01

    This article critiques the treatment of disability as cultural difference by the theorists of the "social model" and "minority group model" of disability. Both models include all of the various disabling conditions under one term--disability--and fail to distinguish disabilities from cultural differences (e.g., race, ethnicity, or gender…

  16. The Disability Studies in Education Annual Conference: Explorations of Working Within, and Against, Special Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Connor

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the Disability Studies in Education (DSE conference as an example of expanding disability studies (DS. First, the origins, purpose, and history of the DSE conference are described as a valid alternative discipline to special education. Second, the following three questions are posed in relation to DSE scholars: (1 To what degree can we transgress within existing structures of teacher education and doctoral programs without being provided lip-service, coopted, or dismissed as ideological versus practical? (2 To what degree can we engage (and critique the field of special education within its journals and conferences—and provide a greater plurality of perspectives within them? And, (3 how can we strategize to widely circulate ideas within DSE throughout education and its related fields? Presentations from the 2012 DSE conference are analyzed, described, and used as a collective response to help answer these questions. Fourth, DSE scholars share post-conference thoughts on the future of DSE. Finally, the deep debt of DSE to DS is acknowledged, along with speculation about possible ways in which DSE may help inform the growth of DS.  Keywords: disability studies in education, critical special educators, teacher education, research in education, ideology

  17. Inclusion of Disability Issues in Teaching and Research in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohajunwa, Chioma; Mckenzie, Judith; Hardy, Anneli; Lorenzo, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the lack of inclusion of disability issues in the curricula of higher education institutions may result in the perpetuation of practices that discriminate against disabled people in the broader society. In light of this claim, this article investigates whether and how disability issues are included in the teaching and…

  18. Prevalence of Physical Disability and Accommodation Needs among Students in Physical Therapy Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Martha R.; Peterson, Cathryn A.; Gibbs, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Most research on graduate students with disabilities (SWDs) has focused on medical education. The purposes of this study were to: (1) estimate the prevalence of students with physical disabilities (SWPDs) in physical therapy programs, (2) identify common types of physical disabilities, (3) document the types of accommodations requested by SWPDs,…

  19. Six Acts of Miscognition: Implications for Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavin, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Employing Lacanian theory as a necessary supplement to contemporary approaches in art education, this article provides a critique and response to art education discourse around "cognition." This response unfolds in six acts: (1) Unknown knowledge, (2) Unmeant knowledge, (3) Missing metaphors, (4) Stupidity, (5) Symptoms and sinthomes, and (6)…

  20. Needed: Reincarnation of National Defense Education Act of 1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary M.; Miller, James R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the historical and current response of the United States to threats to its world leadership in scientific endeavors, with particular attention to the National Defense Education Act of 1958. The current status of the United States in mathematics, science, and engineering education is reviewed with respect to K-12 student…

  1. Representations of the Americans with Disabilities Act Employment-Related Issues in the Wall Street Journal (1990-2008): A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, Michal; Rimmerman, Arie

    2012-01-01

    This feasibility study examines the coverage of employment-related issues related to people with disabilities in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The study is a first in a series of future studies focusing on disability issues in the international economic media. A survey of 39 newspaper articles published in the "Wall Street…

  2. Intersectionality Dis/ability Research: How Dis/ability Research in Education Engages Intersectionality to Uncover the Multidimensional Construction of Dis/abled Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saca, David I.; Gutmann Kahn, Laurie; Cannon, Mercedes A.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to systematically review the research within the field of education that explicitly examined how various social constructions of identity intersect with dis/ability to qualitatively affect young adults' experiences by asking the following question: What are the key findings in education research focusing on youth and…

  3. Modern technology of physical education of disabled students in conditions of inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Adyrkhaev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem of physical education of disabled students during period of their study in higher educational establishments. Insufficiency of this problem’s studying conditioned fulfillment of research of perfection of physical education and sports system. Purpose: substantiation of physical education pedagogic technology for disabled students. Material: in experiment students with following nosologies participated: hearing, eyesight, muscular-skeletal apparatus, after effects of cerebral palsy, somatic diseases and diabetes. In total 664 students of 18-24 years’ age took part in experiment. They were 337 boys and 307 girls. Results: we have worked out organizational-methodic algorithm, which permits to combine theoretical, scientific-methodic and practical training. Its basis is current information about students’ psychic-physiological condition. We determined levels of health and physical condition, physical workability and physical fitness as well as psychic state of students. Demand in optimization of students’ motor functioning during all period of study was substantiated as well as effective means of physical education and pulse regimes, considering peculiarities of nosologies. Students’ orientation on sport style of life was formed. Conclusions: implementation of physical education pedagogic technology for students with different nosologies in the process of their studying stipulates solution of training, health-related and educational tasks. It is possible through creation of conditions for motor actions’ training and intensification of motor functioning during all period of study. Practical application of the technology and received results points at integration of disabled students in students’ medium.

  4. Importance of social attitudes towards people with disabilities in the realization of educational inclusion in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoski Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the social attitude towards persons with disabilities and the importance of this relationship for the implementation of educational inclusion in Serbia. The society attitude is discussed through the attitudes towards persons with disabilities, and attitudes towards educational inclusion. Persons with disabilities occupy a marginalized position that is a multiple determined. Education of this group have a significant impact on the process of marginalization - poor education deepens, quality education helps to overcome marginalized social positions. Attitude towards persons with disabilities are characterized by the presence of bias, lack of information and rare contacts. Research in our community do not give consistent results, and there is also tendency of respondents to give socially acceptable answers. Assessment of attitudes and work on the development of more tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities is are essential in creating the conditions for the implementation of educational inclusion. Educational inclusion, embedded in the philosophy of social model of disability, implies environment that adapts to persons with disabilities. These environmental preparations lacked during the process of introducing inclusive education in our country. In the implementation of educational inclusion is necessary to work on the conditions for adequate reception of such children to regular school system, which includes work on the development of tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities.

  5. The Association between Education and Mortality for Adults with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Scott D

    2017-03-01

    Although the relationship between education and mortality is well documented in the general population, it has not been examined for adults with intellectual disability. Informed by fundamental cause theory, I explore the association between education and mortality in a sample of 4,241 adults with intellectual disability from the 1986-2009 National Health Interview Survey with Linked Mortality Files through 2011. Cox regression models were utilized to analyze the predictive effect of education on mortality risk while taking into account birth cohort differences. Increased education was associated with lower mortality risk for adults with intellectual disability, and this relationship strengthened in later birth cohorts who had greater access to the public education system. Comparison with a sample of 21,205 adults without intellectual disability demonstrates that the association between education and mortality risk was not as robust for adults with intellectual disability and highlights the ongoing socioeconomic challenges faced by this population.

  6. 78 FR 13298 - Notice of Retrospective Review of the Americans With Disabilities Act Regulations for Over-the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... accessible OTRB service. An OTRB is defined as ``a bus characterized by an elevated passenger deck located...] Notice of Retrospective Review of the Americans With Disabilities Act Regulations for Over-the-Road Bus... bus (OTRB) operators. The DOT will review regulations specified in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  7. Reducing Employee Health Insurance Benefits: The Effect of McGann and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Frank H.

    1994-01-01

    The impact of a court decision (McGann vs. H&H Music) concerning reduction of employee health insurance benefits in a case of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act on college decisions regarding reduction of benefits is examined. Recommendations for college are offered. (MSE)

  8. Analysis of the recent international documents toward inclusive education of children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaie Minou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of various international documents clearly suggests that international documents have provided a significantmotivation to efforts undertaken at the national level about education of children with disabilities. UN Convention on theRights of the Child imposed a requirement for radical changes to traditional approaches to provision made for children withdisabilities. One year later, the 1990 World Conference on Education for all focused attention on a much broader range ofchildren with disabilities who may be excluded from or marginalized within education systems. Its development has involveda series of stages during which education systems have explored different ways of responding to children with disabilities andothers who experience difficulties in learning. This conference declared the inclusive education is regarded as the only meansto achieve the goal of "Education for All". This trend was reaffirmed by next international documents. And finally, accordingto the article 24 of the Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities, disabled persons should be able to accessgeneral tertiary education, vocational training, adult education and lifelong learning without discrimination and on an equalbasis with others through reasonable accommodation of their disabilities. All of these documents played an important role inbringing the attention on to children with disabilities, especially on education as a vehicle for integration and empowerment.This research examines the new international trends occurring regarding the education of children with disabilities and finallyresults that the new trends show a movement from special education to inclusive education and moving from seclusion toinclusion and provide that solutions must focus on prevention, cure and steps to make these children as normal as possible.In this regard, States must ensure the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all disabled people,on an

  9. Risk and Safety in Physical Education for Children with Disabilities: Adapted Physical Education Textbook Review and Primer for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Patricia Paulsen; Ramos, Nilo; Mwarumba, Njoki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Much of the information physical educators learn about children with disabilities occurs in an introduction to adapted physical education course. Because disabilities often have concomitant medical conditions, it is critical that PE teachers are knowledgeable about risks and safety measures for children with special needs. The purpose of…

  10. The ADA and IDEA Basics: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motwani, Mona

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The ADA is a federal civil rights law that was passed in 1990 with the aim of securing equal rights for persons with disabilities in the employment, housing, government, transportation, and public accommodation contexts. It…

  11. Those Who Can't, Teach: The Disabling History of American Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousmaniere, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This essay is an exploratory history of American educators as viewed through the lens of disability studies. By this the author means that she is looking at the history of school teachers with disability as the primary marker of social relations, in much the same way that she and others have looked at the history of education through the primary…

  12. Supporting Elementary Age Students with Significant Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Personal Perspectives on Inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coots, Jennifer J.; Bishop, Kathryn D.; Grenot-Scheyer, Marquita

    1998-01-01

    Findings of a study in which four elementary general-education teachers commented on the inclusion of students with significant disabilities within general-education classrooms indicated that children with disabilities were described and observed as full classroom members. Difficulties were related to designing and implementing appropriate and…

  13. Australian Higher Education Policy and Inclusion of People with Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Written from the perspective of a disability practitioner and equity manager working in the Australian tertiary education sector for over twenty-five years, this paper reviews some of the significant social, equity, and education policy developments and associated legislation, which have influenced the inclusion of people with disabilities in…

  14. Hybridising Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the impact of the combination of two pedagogical models, Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility, for learners with disabilities experiencing a contactless kickboxing learning unit. Twelve secondary education students agreed to participate. Five had disabilities (intellectual and…

  15. Access Denied: Ending the Exclusion of Disabled Students from Media Production Courses in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubbage, Jayne

    2017-01-01

    As the acceptance of media literacy increases among educators, media producers and consumers, one group is often missing from the dialogue--persons with disabilities. This absence is witnessed in the marginalized media depictions of the disabled. To gain entry into the media professions, some form of higher education is required. Using muted group…

  16. Tackling the Barriers to Disabled Parents' Involvement in Their Children's Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalker, Kirsten Ogilvie; Brunner, Richard; Maguire, Roseann; Mitchell, June

    2011-01-01

    Promoting parental participation plays a significant role in education policies across Britain. Previous research has identified various barriers to involving disabled parents. This paper reports findings from part of a study examining disabled parents' engagement in their children's education, which focused on good practice. Twenty-four case…

  17. Marginalization of Published Scholarship on Students with Disabilities in Higher Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    While numbers of students with disabilities continue to rise in postsecondary education, little is known about the extent to which the scholarship on this student population has kept pace. A critical content analysis was conducted to review articles on students with disabilities published in top-tier journals of higher education between 1990 and…

  18. Gender Inequality and Disabled Inclusivity in Accounting Higher Education and the Accounting Profession during Financial Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Suman; Nandy, Monomita

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors find that, during financial crises, the wage gap between female and male accounting professionals declines and gender inequality in higher education is affected. In addition, less support and lower wages for disabled accounting professionals demotivate disabled students in accounting higher education. Because of budget…

  19. Re-Envisioning Religious Education in Light of Persons with "Disabilities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    The lived experience of persons with disabilities necessarily challenges our understandings of religious education. In this article, the author reviews how the marginalized lives of persons with disabilities might lead us to re-envision how religious education is defined and embodied in Western Christian communities. Based on this, suggestions are…

  20. Inclusive Post-Secondary Education in Canada: Transition to Somewhere for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, M. Lynn; Bruce, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Inclusive Education is not a new concept in Canada, however in contrast to the dominant approach to post-secondary disability access that narrowly focuses on the legal obligation to accommodate student learning, we consider Inclusive Post-secondary Education (IPSE) for students with intellectual disabilities within a broader framework of inclusive…

  1. Factors Influencing the Accessibility of Education for Children with Disabilities in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Vishwas Limaye

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Central and State governments in India have formulated programs and policies over the years for children with disabilities in order to help them to enter mainstream society. However, despite these policies, children with disabilities are amongst the most disadvantaged in terms of access to schooling and completion of elementary education, as their needs are not met effectively. Based on my personal experiences, research, and communication with different stakeholders involved in the field of education for children with disabilities over the last 30 years, this paper explores the broader challenges in the current education system with respect to issues of quality of education and drop-out rates of primary students with disabilities. A number of factors that influence the accessibility of education for children with disabilities are presented including: perceptions of parents of children with disabilities and their difficulties in helping their children with disabilities, the general attitude of society, government officials, school staff and infrastructure, inadequate levels of training of key stakeholders, invisibility of disability in community, poverty, lack of acceptance, lack of interest, gender discrimination, lack of awareness, poor physical access, availability of various support systems, and government policies focusing on the education of children with disabilities in specific.

  2. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre

  3. Acting and Teacher Education: Being Model for Identity Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Sinan Özmen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study follows three pre-service teachers during three academic semesters in which they took an acting course for teachers and participated in practicum with a special focus on rehearsing and developing their teacher identities. In order to create the necessary context for them, an acting course for pre-service teacher education was designed in parallel with a model which is based on an influential acting theory. This model, namely the BEING (Believe, Experiment, Invent, Navigate, Generate, was also designed by the researcher. The incentive behind designing a model grounded on acting literature was that the relevant literature does not provide trainers with a universal model which can be referred as a manual for running and monitoring acting courses for teachers. In this case study, this model was also tested in terms of its applicability and functionality in practice. Based on analyses of audio taped interviews, session journals and reflections, the five stages of the BEING Model was found to be highly applicable and functional in terms of reflecting the natural development process of teacher identity development. Pre-service teachers displayed a significant development in communication skills and professional identities. Therefore, the BEING model provides a perspective and a philosophy of benefiting from acting literature for teacher educators with little or no knowledge on acting and theatre.

  4. Lessons of physical education and inclusion: a case study with physical disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Erina Palma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the participation of a student with physical disability in physical education classes of a 2nd year elementary school in a regular school. We observed seven physical education classes, the information was recorded on an observation form and later was applied an interview with pre-established guidelines to disabled student. The datas were analyzed from two categories: a Students with Disabilities and Participation in Physical Education classes and b the relationship between student with Disabilities and Colleagues. From the data, it was observed that most of the activities proposed by the teacher in physical education classes, favored the inclusion of the students who had physical disabilities, in addition to that, there was an interaction between him and his classmates. Thus, we can affirm that inclusion is being accomplished in the classroom and in physical education classes surveyed.

  5. Happiness Disabled: Sensory Disabilities, Happiness and the Rise of Educational Expertise in the Nineteenth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Pieter; Söderfeldt, Yva

    2014-01-01

    To date, the historical entanglement of disability and happiness has not been considered an object worth of historical inquiry. Nor has the intersection of disability and emotions been used as a lens to examine the history of disability. Our paper aims at filling this academic void by analysing a wide range of philosophical, anthropological,…

  6. Construction Safety, Health and Education Improvement Act of 1989. Hearing before the Committee on Labor and Human Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, First Session on S. 930 To Establish a Clear and Comprehensive Prohibition of Discrimination on the Basis of Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    This document reports the oral and written testimony of senators and representatives, administration officials, union officials, contractors' associations, engineers' associations, and construction and consulting companies concerning S. 930, a provision of the Construction Safety, Health and Education Improvement Act of 1989. This provision would…

  7. The Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education: An Examination of Infused and Dedicated Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Faye Bean

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disability content has been slowly integrated into social work curricula despite the large proportion of social workers supporting people with disabilities and its requirement in social work education by the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Schools of social work offer disability content to their students in three ways: infused, dedicated (specialization, or a combination of both. A content analysis of 1620 course titles and descriptions from the top schools of social work was conducted to assess the integration of disability content into social work curricula. Eighty percent of the schools included disability content in their curriculum. Disability content was more likely to be integrated using the infused rather than the dedicated model.

  8. IDEA and Disciplining Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Sherry L.

    1999-01-01

    The 1997 Individuals with Disabilities Education Act amendments offered a welcome shield for disabled students who found themselves unfairly disciplined within their school placements. Highlights the disagreements that continue over the bill's interpretation, and the fight by advocates for the disabled to limit unreasonable suspensions and…

  9. Dress codes and appearance policies: challenges under federal legislation, part 3: Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the National Labor Relations Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S; Koen, Clifford M; Darden, Stephen M

    2014-01-01

    As more and more individuals express themselves with tattoos and body piercings and push the envelope on what is deemed appropriate in the workplace, employers have an increased need for creation and enforcement of reasonable dress codes and appearance policies. As with any employment policy or practice, an appearance policy must be implemented and enforced without regard to an individual's race, color, sex, national origin, religion, disability, age, or any other protected status. A policy governing dress and appearance based on the business needs of an employer that is applied fairly and consistently and does not have a disproportionate effect on any protected class will generally be upheld if challenged in court. By examining some of the more common legal challenges to dress codes and how courts have resolved the disputes, health care managers can avoid many potential problems. This article, the third part of a 3-part examination of dress codes and appearance policies, focuses on the issues of race and national origin under the Civil Rights Act, disability under the Americans With Disabilities Act, and employees' rights to engage in concerted activities under the National Labor Relations Act. Pertinent court cases that provide guidance for employers are addressed.

  10. 76 FR 40713 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION..., authorized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Through this notice, we are adding a...

  11. What about a Disability Rights Act for Canada?: Practices and lessons from America, Australia, and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The Harper government and most national political parties are committed to a federal act for dealing with accessibility rights for persons with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to identify progressive lessons from countries with similar legislation for consideration by Canadian authorities. Countries surveyed are the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom. While disability rights legislation is widely accepted to be a necessary policy initiative in light of ongoing barriers and exclusion, experience suggests that such laws are far from a sufficient response to promote access. Other policy instruments required include supportive employment programs, tax incentives, and the direct provision of basic supports.

  12. Implementing Nunavut Education Act: Compulsory School Attendance Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, E. Fredua

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of Nunavut compulsory school attendance policy as part of the Nunavut Education Act (2002). Using a bottom-up approach to policy implementation in the literature and the author's six years teaching experience in Nunavut, the paper argues that the compulsory school attendance policy may not achieve its…

  13. An Application of the Equal Pay Act to Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Debra H.

    1981-01-01

    The applicability of legal principles governing equal pay and sex discrimination in university settings is discussed. The most objective mechanism that a university can utilize to achieve compliance with the Equal Pay Act would be implementation of a salary system that relies on experience, formal education, and time in grade. (MLW)

  14. Implications of the Employment Equity Act for the higher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is argued that these crucial challenges B specialized higher education legislation and policy developments, the "pool" issue, funding and rationalization, universities as a unique workplace, and the individual legacies of universities B define the space in which the Employment Equity Act may be interpreted in the higher ...

  15. The Education Act and Excluded Children. Policy Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Rachel

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the negative assumptions and outcomes of provisions in Britain's Education Act of 1997 dealing with expulsion of students. Presents some statistics on excluded children; discusses likely outcomes such as increased delinquency, parent-school acrimony, and disparity in schools. Describes the role of teachers' unions in drafting the bill…

  16. Educating Tomorrow's Science Teachers: STEM ACT Conference Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternheim, Morton M.; Feldman, Allan; Berger, Joseph B.; Zhao, Yijie

    2008-01-01

    This document reports on the findings of an NSF-funded conference (STEM ACT) on the alternative certification of science teachers. The conference explored the issues that have arisen in science education as a result of the proliferation of alternative certification programs in the United States, and to identify the research that needs to be done…

  17. Career and Technical Education, Inclusion, and Postsecondary Outcomes for Students With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Roddy J; Goldhaber, Dan D; Gratz, Trevor M; Holden, Kristian L

    2018-05-01

    We used longitudinal data from Washington State to investigate the relationships among career and technical education (CTE) enrollment, inclusion in general education, and high school and postsecondary outcomes for students with learning disabilities. We replicated earlier findings that students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in a "concentration" of CTE courses had higher rates of employment after graduation than observably similar students with learning disabilities who were enrolled in fewer CTE courses. We also found that students with learning disabilities who spent more time in general education classrooms in high school had higher rates of on-time graduation, college attendance, and employment than observably similar students with learning disabilities who spent less time in general education classrooms in these grades.

  18. As Capable as Other Students: Tanzanian Women with Disabilities in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Margaret Trotta; Lehtomäki, Elina; Matonya, Magreth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, persons with disabilities are underrepresented in higher education. In sub-Saharan Africa, where opportunities for higher education are especially limited, women are unlikely to continue their education. This research investigates women in Tanzanian higher education with the double marginalisation of being a woman and having…

  19. Educating Students with Disabilities in Inclusive Schools: Results from Two Schools in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Reginard Milinga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The quest for equal access, participation and success in education for persons with disabilities is paramount in today’s global education context, and Tanzania is no exception. Since the ages of “denial” to “full inclusion”, educating students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms has had been responded differently by teachers and students alike across countries. Confronted by different challenges in their education, students with disabilities are to devise mechanisms to excel in such restrictive learning environments. Informed by interpretive research traditions with 59 purposefully selected participants, this paper explores challenges that students with disabilities are faced with and coping strategies used by these students in their schooling in two inclusive secondary schools in Tanzania. The findings indicate that, students with disabilities are faced with challenges which are teacher and environment-related. Consequently, the students with disabilities use complaints, assistance seeking, self-initiatives, isolation and despair, and assertiveness to cope with the challenges. The study concludes that; educational stakeholders should work collaboratively in order to lessen the impact of the restrictive nature of learning environments for students with disabilities. The paper recommends on improved teacher preparation and continued professional development in order to cater for the learning needs of students with disabilities in inclusive schools.

  20. Inclusive education in higher education institutions: narratives of students with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Cotán Fernández

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the partial results of a doctoral thesis linked to a research project financed by the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, which aims at divulging the enablers and significant obstacles that students with disabilities encountered during their stay in institutions of higher education. Using a biographical narrative the points of view of the students with disabilities is exposed identifying and explaining the barriers and aids these young people experienced at the University. For the collection of information, various instruments such as biographical interviews, photographs and lifelines were used. Specifically, the results achieved of this work focuses to know on the main barriers and help that this group identified at the institutional level at the University. The main conclusions highlight that quality education is not guaranteed by the current legislation and that support services for guidance and advice during their careers or, for example, the administration and service are of great importance as they serve as resilient factor.

  1. Special education as a trap: Detours and mazes in ensuring the right to inclusive education for persons with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Correa Montoya

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a critical analysis of the judicial precedent of the Colombian Constitutional Court when protecting the Right to Education of persons with disabilities. After contrasting the Human Rights standards enshrined in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities with the main decisions of the Court, we conclude that it has promoted special and segregated education and therefore it has fostered discrimination on the basis of disability and the violation of other constitutional rights. The article closes identifying the main challenges that judges may face in the future for effectively protect the Right to Inclusive education.

  2. Parental Choices and Ethical Dilemmas Involving Disabilities: Special Education and the Problem of Deliberately Chosen Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, James M.; Hallahan, Daniel P.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues regarding children with disabilities have long involved their treatment after they are born. These issues remain important, but children may be deliberately created with or without characteristics that are usually thought of as disabilities. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and related technologies that involve human…

  3. Social Anxiety among Arab Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities in Various Educational Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to examine differences in social anxiety between learning disabled (LD) and non-learning disabled (non-LD) students, taking into account educational placement. The present research is the first to consider the above relations among Christian Arab adolescents living in Israel as an Eastern collectivist minority. On…

  4. Inclusive Education and Students with Intellectual Disabilities (IDs) in the State of Kuwait: Are We Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshemari, Hawaa

    2016-01-01

    Policies regarding inclusion that have been adopted by Kuwait emphasize the rights of individuals with disabilities to be integrated into society and learn beside students without disabilities (Al-Kandari & Salih, 2008). Of particular concern in this study was the lack of research regarding the topic of inclusive education in the State of…

  5. Access and Perceived ICT Usability among Students with Disabilities Attending Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Tali; Fichten, Catherine S.; Olenik-Shemesh, Dorit; Keshet, Noam S.; Jorgensen, Mary

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of students with disabilities are attending higher education. These students might face various difficulties coping with academic skills and with learning methods compared to students without disabilities. Integrating information and communication technologies (ICTs) in academic studies may be effective and constructive for…

  6. Children's Beliefs toward Cooperative Playing with Peers with Disabilities in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrusnikova, Iva; Block, Martin E.; Dillon, Suzanna

    2010-01-01

    Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) was used to elicit salient behavioral, normative, and control beliefs of children without disabilities toward playing with a hypothetical peer with a disability in general physical education. Participants were 350 elementary and middle school students who completed two questionnaires. Questionnaires were…

  7. Strengthening the School-to-Work Transition for Students with Disabilities. A Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Career Options Inst., Latham, NY.

    This resource guide provides practical advice, materials, and strategies designed to overcome the barriers that have interfered with successful placement of persons with disabilities in the workplace, especially women and girls. It is designed for use by educators interested in improving career preparation of students with disabilities. Section 1…

  8. The pros and cons of inclusive education for children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, Sanne; de Boer, Anke; van der Putten, Annette; Minnaert, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Although children with disabilities have the right to be included into the school system, children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities (PIMD) are often not included. The aim of this study is to gather knowledge about inclusive education for children with PIMD by identifying

  9. Measuring Self-Advocacy Skills among Student Veterans with Disabilities: Implications for Success in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Adam R.; Eakman, Aaron M.

    2017-01-01

    Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn enrolled in postsecondary education may experience disabilities that impact their successful participation in the academic environment. Accommodations are made available to college students with disabilities to provide opportunities for success in this…

  10. Perceptions of Academic Quality and Approaches to Studying among Disabled and Nondisabled Students in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelfs, Anne; Richardson, John T. E.

    2010-01-01

    There is little systematic evidence on the experience of disabled students in higher education. In this study, equal numbers of disabled and nondisabled students taking courses with the UK Open University were surveyed with regard to their approaches to studying and perceptions of the academic quality of their courses. Students with dyslexia or…

  11. Enabling the Classroom and the Curriculum: Higher Education, Literary Studies and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, David

    2017-01-01

    In this article the tripartite model of disability is applied to the lived experience of twenty-first-century higher education. The tripartite model facilitates a complex understanding of disability that recognises assumptions and discrimination but not at the cost of valued identity. This being so, not only the normative positivisms and…

  12. Disability as an Equal Opportunity Issue within Nurse Education in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullion, Philip

    2000-01-01

    Nursing education does not adequately address discrimination experienced by people with disabilities in health services. The nursing profession should promote social justice by influencing perceptions of disability, including it in equal opportunity policies, and ensuring its place in the nursing curriculum. (SK)

  13. International Conference on Higher Education and Disabilities--Innsbruck, Austria: A Brief History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangla, Ken; Moore, Naomi; Hurst, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Access to higher education for people with disabilities has been a concern and motivation for change internationally. Collaborative discussions about the attitudes and policies addressing these issues began many years ago with several organizations and agencies representing the interest of people with disabilities. There were international…

  14. Impact of Self-Concept of Disabled Learners on Inclusive Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammed Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the conceptual foundations of self-concept, self-esteem and the self as they relate to disabled students in the context of physical education. Disable school children experience severe discriminations in society and within the school system, especially if the school is the mainstream type. With increasing emphasis on…

  15. Sharing Power with Parents: Improving Educational Decision Making for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David J.; Cavendish, Wendy

    2018-01-01

    In this closing commentary to the special edition of "Learning Disability Quarterly" ("LDQ") on parent voice in educational decision making for students with learning disabilities, we briefly survey main topics from each article, illuminating important findings from the authors, along with several questions they raise, and…

  16. 76 FR 45163 - Anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... day, people living with disabilities make immeasurable contributions to the diversity and vitality of... agencies. Through the ADA, America was the first country in the world to comprehensively declare equality... Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. At its core, this Convention promotes equality. It...

  17. Education for Liberal Democracy: Fred Clarke and the 1944 Education Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Hsiao-Yuh

    2013-01-01

    Fred Clarke (1880-1952), an English educationist, emerged as a leading figure with his liberal approach alongside such key figures as R. H. Tawney and Cyril Norwood in the reform leading to the 1944 Education Act. Many of his reform proposals, which were provided by the new Act, reflected his ideals of liberal democracy. Nevertheless, his…

  18. Disparities in Insurance Coverage, Health Services Use, and Access Following Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: A Comparison of Disabled and Nondisabled Working-Age Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Jae; Wood, Elizabeth Geneva; Frieden, Lex

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess trends in health insurance coverage, health service utilization, and health care access among working-age adults with and without disabilities before and after full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and to identify current disability-based disparities following full implementation of the ACA. The ACA was expected to have a disproportionate impact on working-age adults with disabilities, because of their high health care usage as well as...

  19. Considering the culture of disability in cultural competence education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddey, Gary E; Robey, Kenneth L

    2005-07-01

    Cultural competence extends beyond understanding those values, beliefs, and needs that are associated with patients' age or gender or with their racial, ethnic, or religious backgrounds. People hold many simultaneous cultural associations, and each have implications for the care process. The "culture of disability" is a pan-ethnic culture for which a set of physician competencies are required to ensure appropriate, culturally sensitive care to persons with congenital or acquired disabilities. Such competencies include communicating with patients who have deficits in verbal communication and avoidance of infantilizing speech; understanding the values and needs of persons with disabilities; the ability to encourage self-advocacy skills of patients and families; acknowledging the core values of disability culture including the emphasis on interdependence rather than independence; and feeling comfortable with patients with complex disabilities. Medical schools have developed programs to increase students' exposure to persons with disabilities and it is suggested that such programs are most effective when they are the result of collaboration with community-based facilities or organizations that serve persons with disabilities in the natural environment. Combining lecture-based instruction and structured experiences with the opportunity for students to interact with patients in their natural environments may facilitate development of competencies with respect to patients with disabilities. The culture of disability should be included as one of the many cultures addressed in cultural competence initiatives in medical school and residency curricula.

  20. Dutch special education schools for children with learning disabilities in the interwar period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drenth, Annemieke; van Essen, Mineke

    2011-01-01

    In this article Copeland's model of visualising the classification of children with learning disabilities is applied in examining the development of special education schools in the Netherlands during the interwar period. Central are three intertwined social practices: the teacher's professionalism

  1. Undergraduate physiotherapy education in Malawi--the views of students on disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosun, S; Kambalametore, S; Maart, S; Ferguson, G

    2013-06-01

    The College of Medicine in Malawi offers an undergraduate physiotherapy programme which started in 2010. The programme aims at training competent physiotherapists who can address the needs of people with disabilities. Therefore it is important to ensure that the perceptions of physiotherapy students towards disability are appropriate. The study explored the views of the first cohort of physiotherapy students (n=19) in the pre-medical class in the College of Medicine, University of Malawi, on disability. An audit of the views of premedical physiotherapy students was carried out in 2010 using the Q methodology. Two independent factors emerged which captured the views of 19 students on disability. Most of the views expressed suggest that the students empathised with people with disabilities. Participants perceived that people with disabilities can have a good quality of life like everyone else, and are as intelligent as people without disabilities. However, some participants also expressed some discomfort when around people with disabilities. While there was consensus on some positive views, the negative viewpoints have the potential to act as a barrier to the rehabilitation of people with disabilities. The curriculum should ensure that the positive views are reinforced throughout the training programme, while the negative viewpoints are reversed.

  2. Sexuality education and adolescents with developmental disabilities: assessment, policy, and advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Carolyn J; Hall, Diane M Harnek

    2008-01-01

    People with disabilities are sexual beings who, like all of us, benefit from sexuality education that examines relationship skills and knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and values that promote healthy sexuality within those relationships. This article provides an overview of landmark policies relevant to persons with disabilities, defines the strengths perspective in the context of curriculum development, and describes a survey built on this perspective that evaluates sexuality education curricula on the strengths rather than the deficits of people.

  3. The construction of under-representation in UK and Swedish higher education:Implications for disabled students

    OpenAIRE

    Weedon, Elisabet

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the inclusion of disabled students in the UK and Swedish higher education systems. In the UK, performance indicators focus on the participation rate of disabled students in comparison with those of non-disabled students, while in Sweden there are no specific performance indicators relating to disabled students. The paper notes that in both countries there is a dearth of inter-sectional data, recognising the heterogeneity of the disabled student population. It is argued t...

  4. The Intersection of Race, Culture, Language, and Disability: Implications for Urban Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchett, Wanda J.; Klingner, Janette K.; Harry, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To date, few researchers have sought to examine the effect of issues of race, culture, language, and disability, let alone to look specifically at the intersection of these issues, as it relates to special education identification, special education service delivery, and students of color's access to an equitable education. Thus, this article will…

  5. Postsecondary Education Supports for Students with Disabilities: A Review and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review identified the impact of postsecondary completion on employment, the education and employment rates of people with disabilities, barriers to postsecondary education, and support and self-advocacy. Results were used to compile a research agenda for the National Center for the Study of Postsecondary Education Supports. (Contains…

  6. Implicit Assumptions in Special Education Policy: Promoting Full Inclusion for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Moira

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Everyday millions of students in the United States receive special education services. Special education is an institution shaped by societal norms. Inherent in these norms are implicit assumptions regarding disability and the nature of special education services. The two dominant implicit assumptions evident in the American…

  7. High School Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebolt, Kevin M.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze high school physical education teachers' beliefs about teaching students with disabilities in inclusive physical education. The participants (3 men, 2 women) were certified physical education teachers at four suburban high schools. The research method was descriptive-qualitative using a case study approach…

  8. Barriers and Facilitators of Physical Education Participation for Students with Disabilities: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin; Zhu, Xihe; Davis, Summer

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the barriers and facilitators to participation in physical education (PE) for students with disabilities (SWD) from the perspectives of in-service physical educators. A convenience sample of 168 physical educators (72% female, 94% Caucasian) from the United States completed a short questionnaire. After data…

  9. Education of Women with Disabilities in Pakistan: Enhanced Agency, Unfulfilled Aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Tehmina; Singal, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which the capability approach captures the complexity of the lives of young women with disabilities in Pakistan, particularly in relation to their education. Focusing on their educational experiences and outcomes, we examine the ways in which education shaped what these young women were able to achieve--what they…

  10. Educational Opportunities for Students with Disabilities: The Experience of a University Student in Brunei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Serajul Haq

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brunei, increased numbers of children with disabilities have been given educational opportunities in appropriate programs in schools. Students with disabilities have also succeeded in qualifying for higher studies on completing secondary education. However, there is a need for local university and colleges to cater to the specific needs of students with disabilities. This paper describes the experiences of a student with visual disabilities in Universiti Brunei Darussalam. The student emphasised his use of compensatory learning strategies, the accommodation available on campus, peer relationships and self-advocacy to communicate his needs. The support given to the student facilitated his academic success. The student is fully aware of his capabilities and his positive self-esteem has helped to overcome various setbacks. It is hoped that the information provided in this article will foster improvement in providing facilities for students with disabilities to learn in comfort and for the future enrollment of more students with special needs.

  11. IMPACT OF SELF-CONCEPT OF DISABLED LEARNERS ON INCLUSIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed ALI,

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the conceptual foundations of self-concept, self-esteem and the self as they relate to disabled students in the context of physical education. Disable school children experience severe discriminations in society and within the school system, especially if the school is the mainstream type. With increasing emphasis on inclusiveness in school to different groups of excluded children, the need to thoroughly examine the psychological frame of mind of these children is now more important than ever before. Consequently, this paper sought to uncover the fundamental tenets of self-concept of disabled learners and highlight the key characteristics of disabled children. The paper concludes by with an analysis of the major impacts that disabled learners self-concept has on participation in physical education activities.

  12. Inclusion through Infusion: Disability Awareness Training for Elementary Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, Amanda Rose

    2017-01-01

    Evidence consistently reveals that taking part in an inclusion classroom does not guarantee that children with disabilities will be accepted, valued, or included (Lindsay & Edwards, 2012; Rillota & Nettelbeck, 2007; Ison et al., 2010). Children with disabilities have been reported to have significantly less friendships and overall social…

  13. Disability, Music Education and the Epistemology of Interdisciplinarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubet, Alex

    2009-01-01

    A fully realized disability studies (DS) of music is interdisciplinary, qualitative and accessible through common discourse, without jargon, disciplinary codes, or numerology. It embraces DS's social model theory, where "disability" is the social construction of "impairment," analogous to the relationship between "gender" and "sex." The…

  14. Visual Supports for the Learning Disabled: A Handbook for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, Leighan

    2013-01-01

    A large percent of the population is affected by learning disabilities, which significantly impacts individuals and families. Much research has been done to identify effective ways to best help the students with learning disabilities. One of the more promising strategies is the use of visual supports to enhance these students' understanding…

  15. Disability and stigma: how Japanese educators help parents accept their children's differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayama, Misa; Haight, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this report, part of a larger ethnographic study, the authors examined the support Japanese elementary school educators provide to parents of children with relatively mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities, such as learning disabilities, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorders, and high-functioning autism. Conditions that affect children's learning and behaviors are widespread, but cultures vary in responses to children with such difficulties and their families. In many cultures, disability remains a sensitive issue due to lingering stigma. Japan's recent implementation of special education services for children with mild cognitive and behavioral disabilities provided a unique context in which to examine otherwise taken-for-granted beliefs and practices related to disability. Participant observations in a Japanese elementary school and individual interviews with educators and parents suggest that parents' sensitivity to other people's "eyes," or stigma, can be an obstacle to their acceptance of their children's need for special education, permission for their children to receive services, and collaboration with educators. Educators supported parents through a steadfast focus on emotional support, communication, relationship building, and partnerships. Japanese practices and adults' reflections on stigma provide a broader context for international, school, and other social workers to reflect on their own beliefs and practices with families of children with disabilities.

  16. Development of self-report measures of social attitudes that act as environmental barriers and facilitators for people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sofia F; Hahn, Elizabeth A; Magasi, Susan; Lai, Jin-Shei; Semik, Patrick; Hammel, Joy; Heinemann, Allen W

    2015-04-01

    To describe the development of new self-report measures of social attitudes that act as environmental facilitators or barriers to the participation of people with disabilities in society. A mixed-methods approach included a literature review; item classification, selection, and writing; cognitive interviews and field testing of participants with spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), or stroke; and rating scale analysis to evaluate initial psychometric properties. General community. Individuals with SCI, TBI, or stroke participated in cognitive interviews (n=9); community residents with those same conditions participated in field testing (n=305). None. Self-report item pool of social attitudes that act as facilitators or barriers to people with disabilities participating in society. An interdisciplinary team of experts classified 710 existing social environment items into content areas and wrote 32 new items. Additional qualitative item review included item refinement and winnowing of the pool prior to cognitive interviews and field testing of 82 items. Field test data indicated that the pool satisfies a 1-parameter item response theory measurement model and would be appropriate for development into a calibrated item bank. Our qualitative item review process supported a social environment conceptual framework that includes both social support and social attitudes. We developed a new social attitudes self-report item pool. Calibration testing of that pool is underway with a larger sample to develop a social attitudes item bank for persons with disabilities. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 76 FR 16977 - Regulations To Implement the Equal Employment Provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ..., walking, standing, sitting, reaching, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading..., neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, cardiovascular, endocrine, hemic, lymphatic, musculoskeletal... of disability, unless the impairment is both ``transitory and minor''; --Provided that actions based...

  18. Education Reform: Ten Years after the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Driscoll, Joseph B. Berger, Ronald K. Hambleton, Lisa A. Keller, Robert W. Maloy, David Hart, Paul Oh, Victoria Getis, Susan Bowles, Francis L. Gougeon, Kathryn A. McDermott, Andrew Churchill

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 1993, Governor William Weld signed into law the Massachusetts Education Reform Act (MERA. MERA greatly increased the state role both in funding public education and in guiding the local educational process. The state’s role changed to incorporate setting curriculum frameworks and holding schools accountable for student performance. Because MERA was designed to be a systemic reform of education, all of the various state activities and policies needed to fit together into a coherent whole based on state educational standards.

  19. A Time to Define: Making the Specific Learning Disability Definition Prescribe Specific Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavale, Kenneth A.; Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Beam, Andrea P.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike other special education categories defined in U.S. law (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), the definition of specific learning disability (SLD) has not changed since first proposed in 1968. Thus, although the operational definition of SLD has responded to new knowledge and understanding about the construct, the formal definition…

  20. Beneficence vs. obligation: challenges of the Americans with Disabilities Act for consumer employment in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Linda E; Colson, Paul W; Mizzi, Pamela

    2002-04-01

    Involvement of mental health service consumers in the provision of mental health services is a growing model in community mental health. It is, however, a complicated issue, made ever more so by the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In this ethnographic case study, we seek to explore the changes one social services agency has made to adjust to the requirements of the ADA and the impact of these changes on their consumer employees. Our results indicate potential for positive progress as a result of the ADA, but also unexpected pitfalls as organizational cultures change as well.

  1. Influence of level of education on disability free life expectancy by sex: the ILSA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicuci, N; Noale, M

    2005-12-01

    To assess the effect of education on Disability Free Life Expectancy among older Italians, using a hierarchical model as indicator of disability, with estimates based on the multistate life table method and IMaCh software. Data were obtained from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging which considered a random sample of 5632 individuals. Total life expectancy ranged from 16.5 years for men aged 65 years to 6 years for men aged 80. The age range for women was 19.6 and 8.4 years, respectively. For both sexes, increasing age was associated with a lower probability of recovery from a mild state of disability, with a greater probability of worsening for all individuals presenting an independent state at baseline, and with a greater probability of dying except for women from a mild state of disability. A medium/high educational level was associated with a greater probability of recovery only in men with a mild state of disability at baseline, and with a lower probability of worsening in both sexes, except for men with a mild state of disability at baseline. The positive effects of high education are well established in most research work and, being a modifiable factor, strategies focused on increasing level of education and, hence strengthening access to information and use of health services would produce significant benefits.

  2. Bilingual Education Act: Background and Reauthorization Issues. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    The Bilingual Education Act (BEA) title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), is the federal program intended to help children who are limited English proficient (LEP) learn English. BEA activities focus on transitional bilingual education; developmental bilingual education; special alternative instruction (such as English as…

  3. A Follow-Up Study of Graduates with Learning Disabilities from a College of Education: Impact of the Disability on Personal and Professional Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russak, Susie; Daniel Hellwing, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined three issues connected to the experiences of graduates with learning disabilities (LD) from a college of education (N = 45): support services that had been most beneficial during studies, positive and negative effects of the disability on personal, and professional life. Additionally, demographic data were collected. A…

  4. Hmong Parents’ Perceptions on Instructional Strategies for Educating their Children with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halee Vang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports how Hmong parents were involved in an educational research study to examine their views on a structured reading instruction protocol developed in English and then translated into Hmong for Hmong children identified with disabilities. Six Hmong female parents were interviewed using a semi-structured interview. The responses from the interviews revealed that Hmong parents of disabled children are not only very concerned about seeking education equity, but that they need more communication and knowledge about their children’s education. The research methodology revealed a process to engage Hmong parents in discussing their perceptions about schools and their relationships with schools as well as classroom instruction.

  5. PSYCHOLOGICAL- PEDAGOGICAL CONDITIONS OF PROVIDING OF THE AVAILABLE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Ivanovich Shutenko

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article describes psychological and pedagogical bases for carrying out successful integration of children with disabilities in general education system. Relying on the principle of a complementarity, authors develop the model of such integration in the form of the adaptive educational environment, represent the leading components of the organization of such environment (valeological, personal- focused, axiological, hermeneutical, interindividual, and also a number of the important pedagogical and psychological principles of its functioning in logic of fruitful socialization of children with disabilities in educational process.

  6. Supporting Youth with Disabilities To Access and Succeed in Postsecondary Education: Essentials for Educators in Secondary Schools. Issue Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert A.; Conway, Megan A.

    This information brief on the successful transition of students with disabilities to postsecondary educational settings focuses on the importance of the student's full participation in the Individualized Education Program (IEP) process during secondary school and the student's developing understanding of differences between secondary and…

  7. Sexual Health Education for Young People with Disabilities: Research and Resources for Educators. From Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydlowski, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    All young people need access to and can benefit from sexual health information. Young people with disabilities have the same right to this education as their peers. However, considerations must be made in order to modify the program to allow for information to be understood and learned in a way that is meaningful to them. Educators are in the…

  8. Educators' evaluations of children's ideas on the social exclusion of classmates with intellectual and learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Elizabeth A; Brown, Jason D; Dare, Lynn

    2018-01-01

    Reasons underlying the social exclusion of children with intellectual or learning disabilities are not entirely understood. Although it is important to heed the voices of children on this issue, it is also important to consider the degree to which these ideas are informed. The present authors invited educators to evaluate the content of children's ideas on the causes of social exclusion. Educators thematically sorted and rated children's ideas on why classmates with intellectual or learning disabilities are socially excluded. Sorted data were analysed with multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. Six thematic clusters were identified differing in content to those provided by children in an earlier study. Educators generally rated children's ideas as showing somewhat uninformed ideas about why social exclusion occurs. Educators indicated that children need to be better informed about intellectual and learning disabilities. Limitations and implications are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Experiences of Students without Disabilities in Inclusive Physical Education Classrooms: A Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitti, Robert Joseph; Thomas, Scott Gordon; Bentley, Danielle Christine

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to analyse studies of the experiences of students without disabilities (SWOD) in inclusive physical education (PE) classes. The literature published from 1975 to 2015 was compiled from three online databases (PsycInfo, Physical Education Index and ERIC). Included literature met inclusion criteria focussed…

  10. Canada's Implementation of the Right to Education for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Seema

    2010-01-01

    This article analyses the content and legal implementation of the right to education as a human right in Canada. It seeks to expose the extent to which Canadian legislative mechanisms have succeeded in protecting the right to education of students with disabilities by using students with epilepsy as a test case. To that end, the article examines…

  11. Collaborating to Plan and Implement a Sex Education Curriculum for Individuals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Kahn, Laurie G.; Rowe, Dawn A.; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Hirano, Kara A.; Knowles, Christen

    2017-01-01

    Sex education is not only a necessary component of public school curriculum, but it is also an important opportunity for students with and without disabilities to learn about their own development as emerging adults. Although comprehensive sex education is not federally mandated, many states and districts choose to offer some form of sex education…

  12. Predictors of Access to Sex Education for Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard-Brak, Lucy; Schmidt, Marcelo; Chesnut, Steven; Wei, Tianlan; Richman, David

    2014-01-01

    Data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (SRI International, 2002) were analyzed to identify variables that predicted whether individuals with intellectual disability (ID) received sex education in public schools across the United States. Results suggested that individuals receiving special education services without ID were only…

  13. Conceptualisations of Disability and Inclusion: Perspectives of Educators of Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Colleen; Underwood, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This grounded theory study explores beliefs about disability and inclusion from the perspectives of educators of young children in their respective roles as elementary school teachers and early childhood educators, in Ontario, Canada. The social relational model described by Reindal is used as a theoretical framework for interviews with four…

  14. A Diversity of Voices: Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Inclusion and Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Samuel; Ammah, Jonathan O. A.; Casebolt, Kevin M.; LaMaster, Kathryn; Hersman, Bethany; Samalot-Rivera, Amaury; Sato, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the beliefs about inclusion and teaching students with disabilities of physical education teachers from various countries and cultures. The participants were 29 physical education teachers from Ghana (Africa), Japan, the US and Puerto Rico. The research method was explanatory multiple-case study situated in…

  15. Museum Education for Children with Disabilities: Development of the Nature Senses Traveling Trunk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyojung; Jolley, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Since museums are cultural, educational, and social institutions, providing access to people with disabilities has increased in recent decades. This research examines the need and development process of the educational program, the Nature Senses Traveling Trunk, to serve children with Autism Spectrum disorders and visual impairments at the Lubbock…

  16. Paradigm and Paradox: Education for All and the Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanpur, Maya

    2011-01-01

    In keeping with international guidelines and to meet the target of Education for All (EFA) by 2015, the Cambodian government, with assistance from non-government and aid organisations, has instituted several initiatives towards including children with disabilities in the educational mainstream. This paper examines these efforts within the context…

  17. Strategies for Overcoming Barriers to Training and Education for Canadians with Disabilities. Lessons in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Council on Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    If stronger skills and more education are key to greater labour force participation, then it is important to identify critical barriers to education and training for Canadians with disabilities. In 2008, the Canadian Council on Learning's Adult Learning Knowledge Centre funded a "Community Outreach Initiative for Learner's with…

  18. Brazilian Physical Education Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Haegele, Justin; Gutierres Filho, Paulo; Rizzi Lopes, Gleides

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse Brazilian physical education teachers' beliefs about their experiences teaching students with disabilities. Participants were six physical education teachers from schools located in the city of Brasília, Brazil. The research paradigm was descriptive-qualitative situated in the theory of planned behaviour.…

  19. Educators' Perceptions of Teaching Grade-Level Content to Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Christina V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to address a gap in the research literature by describing the perceptions of Special Education teachers of students with intellectual disabilities (ID), regarding the paradigm shift required in their teaching practices as they strove to implement current educational reform legislation. Knowledge of the lived…

  20. Performing Disability in Music Teacher Education: Moving beyond Inclusion through Expanded Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laes, Tuulikki; Westerlund, Heidi

    2018-01-01

    Disability is a neglected field of diversity within music education scholarship and practices. The study reported in this article sought alternatives for the hierarchical practice-model and ableist discourses that have thus far pervaded music teacher education, through a reconceptualization of expertise. The focus is on a Finnish university…

  1. Reframing the Racialization of Disabilities in Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramarczuk Voulgarides, Catherine; Tefera, Adai

    2017-01-01

    Racial disproportionality in special education is a deep seated and complex educational inequity plaguing the United States educational system. In this article we outline how the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, although a civil rights based legislation, cannot sufficiently address racially disproportionate outcomes in special…

  2. TRANSITION OF YOUTH WITH DISABILITIES FROM EDUCATION TO LABOUR MARKET IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Tabaj

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to present the transition of youth with disabilities from education to labour market in Slovenia. The article introduces the European Social Fund project “Transition”, provided by the partnership of Racio, University Rehabilitation Institute and Auris, operated from 2010 to 2013. The Transition project was intended for two target groups: youth with disabilities in the education process, with the aim to achieve their integration from education to the labour market, and for professionals who provide the transition. Young people in Europe have been facing increasing uncertainty in the labour market. The labour market transition for youth, and especially for youth with disabilities, is a very demanding question. Policymakers and experts in the European Union have therefore developed programs for social inclusion, improved access, achievement and integration of young people with disabilities into the labour market. Youth unemployment during economic crises has increased in all parts of the world, with the impact of prolonging the duration of unemployment. The transition of young people with disabilities from school to the labour market in Slovenia is not integrally and adequately organised. A support system should be introduced to monitor young people with disabilities while they are still at school and prepare them for entering the labour market. After finishing school, a model of transition from school to work is proposed to prevent unemployment.

  3. Production-orientated education and training of the mentally disabled in sheltered employment (PIONIER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicker, A; Schneider, S

    2000-03-10

    The development and realization of a production-orientated education and training system for mentally disabled people in sheltered employment in the course of the project PIONIER. It focuses on the metal and electronic branches of a workshop with a mentally disabled workforce in Alsdorf, Germany. For the development of the modules an assessment tool called MELBA was used to determine the abilities of the disabled people and the requirements of the tasks. Methods for the collection of this information was: observation, questionnaires and documents. Three months after the introduction of educational measures the improvements of the capacity for learning and education of disabled persons was visible. In the same way the development of their self-reliance and social abilities was recorded. The metal working branch was capable of fulfilling every task with respect to quality issues and within set delivery times. The electro working branch was accomplished enough to create new workplaces and to get orders from the computer industry. By the use of a qualification system like PIONIER the tasks of the disabled employees have been enlarged and enriched. In order to cope with the increase competition sheltered workshops have to realize new ways of vocational training for mentally disabled employees.

  4. Inclusive Education of Students with Disabilities in the Regional Multidisciplinary University: The Experience of Cherepovets State University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisova O.A.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the regional experience of teaching students with disabilities in a multidisciplinary university. Analysis of resources and algorithms of educational support provided at the university creates the opportunity to share this experience and to evaluate its significance for the development of higher inclusive education, as well as to assess the perspectives for its application in similar educational environments. Consulting, education, coordination and rehabilitation services are the main forms of assistance to students and teachers at all stages of education and socialization of people with disabilities. The university has a department that provides support to students with disabilities and their teachers. The analysis of the successes and challenges of higher education of persons with disabilities shows that there is an objective need to unite the efforts of the university with the regional non-governmental organizations and the authorities of the region, with health care, education and social services in order to support young people with disabilities.

  5. Economic Hardship and Educational Differentials in Disability in 26 European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambois, Emmanuelle; Solé-Auró, Aïda; Robine, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this article is to study to what extent European variations in differentials in disability by education level are associated to variation in poverty. Using the European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for 26 countries, we measure the prevalence of activity limitation (AL) and the rate of economic hardship (EH) by level of education. We measure the increased AL prevalence (disadvantage) of the low-educated relative to the middle-educated and the reduced AL prevalence (advantage) of the high-educated groups, controlling or not for EH. The rate of EH and the extent of the AL-advantage/disadvantage vary substantially across Europe. EH contributes to the AL-advantage/disadvantage but to different extent depending on its level across educational groups. Associations between poverty, education, and disability are complex. In general, large EH goes along with increased disability differentials. Actions to reduce poverty are needed in Europe to reduce the levels and differentials in disability. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Assistive Technology for Students with Disabilities: A Legal Analysis of Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etscheidt, Susan Larson

    2016-01-01

    Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams are required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider a student's need for assistive technology (AT). Despite this legal requirement, AT supports are often not available to students with disabilities. Many students with disabilities and their families have addressed the…

  7. Recovery Act - Sustainable Transportation: Advanced Electric Drive Vehicle Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caille, Gary

    2013-12-13

    The collective goals of this effort include: 1) reach all facets of this society with education regarding electric vehicles (EV) and plug–in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV), 2) prepare a workforce to service these advanced vehicles, 3) create web–based learning at an unparalleled level, 4) educate secondary school students to prepare for their future and 5) train the next generation of professional engineers regarding electric vehicles. The Team provided an integrated approach combining secondary schools, community colleges, four–year colleges and community outreach to provide a consistent message (Figure 1). Colorado State University Ventures (CSUV), as the prime contractor, plays a key program management and co–ordination role. CSUV is an affiliate of Colorado State University (CSU) and is a separate 501(c)(3) company. The Team consists of CSUV acting as the prime contractor subcontracted to Arapahoe Community College (ACC), CSU, Motion Reality Inc. (MRI), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) and Ricardo. Collaborators are Douglas County Educational Foundation/School District and Gooru (www.goorulearning.org), a nonprofit web–based learning resource and Google spin–off.

  8. A higher level of education amplifies the inverse association between income and disability in the Spanish elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, Antonio; Rodríguez-Laso, Ángel; Pujol, Rogelio; Barrios, Laura

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to estimate if the education level modifies the association of income with disability prevalence in the elderly. Education can have a confounding effect on income or interact with it as a health determinant. It is important to analyze the relationship between socio-economic status and disability in older people, because it helps to better understand health inequalities and organize appropriate social policies. The study is based on the Survey on Disability, Personal Autonomy and Dependency Situations (Spanish National Statistics Institute). Binary logistic regression models are adjusted (bivariate, adjusted for gender and age, with all variables and with the interaction between income and education levels). A bad adjustment of the model is detected and a scobit link is added, which helps to differentiate disabled and non-disabled individuals better. People with difficulty in carrying out activities of daily living are much older, frequently women and with low education and income levels. The significant interaction between education level and income means that the odds of being disabled is 43% less in people of high income compared with people of low income if they are well educated, while it is only 21%, among those with low education. A higher education level amplifies significantly the inverse association between income and disability in the Spanish elderly, what suggests that those with higher education will profit more than those with lower education from universal economic benefits policies aimed at the disabled, increasing health inequalities between groups.

  9. Gender, parental education, and experiences of bullying victimization by Australian adolescents with and without a disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, A; Priest, N; Emerson, E; Milner, A; King, T

    2018-03-01

    This study sought to compare the prevalence of bullying victimization between adolescents with and without a disability and between adolescents with and without borderline intellectual functioning or intellectual disability (BIF/ID). We also sought to assess whether the relationships between either disability or BIF/ID and bullying victimization vary by gender and parental education. The sample included 3,956 12- to 13-year-old adolescents who participated in Wave 5 of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. Three indicators of bullying were used: physical bullying victimization, social bullying victimization, and "any bullying victimization." We used Poisson regression to obtain the prevalence risk ratios (PRR) of bullying by disability status adjusting for potential confounders. In adjusted models, we found evidence that social bullying victimization was more prevalent among adolescents with a disability than those without a disability (PRR 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.42) and between adolescents with BIF/ID than those without (PRR 1.24, 95% CI 1.07-1.44). Adolescents with BIF/ID were also more likely to experience "any bullying victimization"(PRR 1.10, 95% CI 1.00-1.22). Having a disability and living in a family with low parental education were associated with an elevated risk of social bullying victimization BIF/ID. Adolescents with disabilities and BIF/ID are at elevated risk of social bullying victimization. School-based antibullying initiatives should concentrate on enhancing the inclusion of adolescents with disabilities, with an emphasis on adolescents from disadvantaged backgrounds. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Critical Disability Studies and Socially Just Change in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasidou, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Social justice is an ambiguous and contested term that is evoked in order to address issues of enhancing participation and eliminating discrimination across various markers of difference linked to race, social class, and so on. Historically, disability has been excluded from these analyses because it has been cast in the sphere of abnormality and…

  11. Inclusive Education: Mobile Serious Games for People with Cognitive Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Jaramillo-Alcázar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the use of mobile devices is increasingly frequent. In many occasions they are used as a means of entertainment for people through video games. Serious games is a category of video games used as teaching methods in different environments. They use fun as a strategy for the learning process. However, the vast majority do not focus on vulnerable groups such as people with cognitive disabilities, because they do not consider accessibility parameters in their design. Some video games development companies have proposed general guidelines for the implementation of accessible video games, but they have not been formalized as good practices or standards. This article presents a compilation and analysis of different accessibility guidelines for the development of mobile serious games for people with cognitive disabilities. It also proposes a model to evaluate the access of serious games for people with cognitive disabilities and applies it in a case study. Finally, an evaluation tool is proposed for mobile serious games developers focused on people with cognitive disabilities.

  12. Disability Rights, Music and the Case for Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubet, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Participation in music is both a human right and a disability right. Music is a human need in the Darwinian (not Social Darwinian) evolutionary sense. Similarly, inclusion is an evolved capacity, beneficial to human perpetuation. The policing of music resembles authoritarian regulation of other forms of allegedly pleasurable but actually vital…

  13. Mainstreaming disability in education beyond 2015 | Sefotho | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents an exemplary case study of an Independent Business Owner (IBO) from multiple case studies on narratives of differently abled persons. The aim of this article is to illustrate mainstreaming disability through an exemplary case of the IBO. The article is informed by the imperatives of critical theory to ...

  14. Teachers' Educational Beliefs about Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Andrew James

    2017-01-01

    Past research indicates that teachers' beliefs are influential in their decisions and behaviors in the classroom. Teachers are also influenced by the socioeconomic status of their students. The present study on beliefs and evaluation of knowledge about working with students with learning disabilities included kindergarten through 12th grade…

  15. 77 FR 58111 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Postsecondary Education; Higher Education Act (HEA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ...; Higher Education Act (HEA) Title II Report Cards on State Teacher Credentialing and Preparation SUMMARY: The Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA) calls for annual reports from states and institutions of higher education (IHEs) on the quality of teacher preparation and state teacher certification...

  16. Lights, camera, education! The potentials of forum theatre in a learning disability nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClimens, Alex; Scott, Rachel

    2007-04-01

    Learning disability nurse education, with a current emphasis on inclusive practice and a history of listening to the person with the disability, is well placed to take advantage of more 'experimental' forms of classroom teaching. In this article we argue for the use of forum theatre as a method of addressing topics from practice within an educational setting. Based on our emergent and exploratory work with students we detail at length the theoretical background that supports such an approach and contextualise the issues with reference to a short piece of drama we have used successfully with different student groups. We feel that the success of this method is due to the involvement of students in directing their own education as well as the inclusion of individuals labelled with learning disability as an integral part of the process.

  17. Education, employment, absenteeism, and work disability in women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekblom-Kullberg, S; Kautiainen, H; Alha, P; Leirisalo-Repo, M; Julkunen, H

    2015-01-01

    To study education, employment, absenteeism, and work disability (WD) in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared to population controls. The study included 181 women of working age with SLE (mean age 44.0 years, disease duration 12.7 years) and 549 female population controls matched for age living in the same metropolitan area of Helsinki. Data regarding education, employment, absenteeism, and WD in patients and controls were obtained by questionnaire and personal interview. Basic education, vocational, or academic degrees and occupational categories in patients with SLE were similar to those in controls. In total, 62% of the patients were employed, compared to 77% of the controls (p Absenteeism and work disability are, however, 2-3 times more common than in controls. Less than half of the patients were on permanent disability pension due to SLE 20 years after diagnosis of the disease.

  18. Pupils with sensory disabilities in physical education classes: Attitudes and preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Kurková

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The key factor that affects the success of shaping positive attitudes towards regular life-long performance of physical activity (PA is the pupils' level of inner motivation. This is influenced, among other things, by their family background, the educational institution that they attend and the educator's competencies. Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse the attitudes among pupils with sensory disabilities in physical education (PE classes. A partial objective was to compare the preferences for various PA by pupils with sensory disabilities in PE classes. Method: A non-standardized questionnaire was used to collect the data. The sample was based on the following features: a a participant had to be deaf or hard of hearing, b a participant had to have a visual disability, and c had to have been educated in special educational settings. The data were quantified on the percentage basis. To carry out cross-group statistical testing of differences, a ratio analysis with the help of the Chi-square test was applied. The level of statistical significance was set to p < .05. We analysed the data of 70 pupils attending the second stage of two elementary schools in Slovakia: a 37 pupils (22 boys and 15 girls, age 13.3 ± 1.45 years from a school for the deaf, and b 33 pupils (14 boys and 19 girls, age 13.4 ± 1.41 years from a school for the blind. Results: The differences in the preferences for various PA during PE classes in the cross-group comparison of pupils with sensory disabilities were discovered. A comparison of the opinions of pupils with sensory disabilities pointed out a difference consisting in a higher percentage of positive attitudes among pupils with visual disabilities in indicators of popularity, importance, the pupils' efforts and feelings towards education. A statistically significant difference was discovered only in feelings during PE classes. This result may be considered

  19. Equality of What? The Capability Approach and the Right to Education for Persons with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Broderick

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The right to education is indispensable in unlocking other substantive human rights and in ensuring full and equal participation of persons with disabilities in mainstream society. The cornerstone of Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities seeks to ensure access to inclusive education for persons with disabilities on an equal basis with others as well as the full development of human potential. Since the adoption of the Convention, there has been much theorising about inclusive education; however, there has been little focus on the meaning of equality in the context of the right to education for persons with disabilities. The capability approach, developed by Amartya Sen and further refined by Martha Nussbaum, focuses on ensuring equality and developing human potential. It is often viewed as a tool that can be used to overcome the limitations of traditional equality assessments in the educational sphere, which only measure resources and outcomes. This article explores whether the capability approach can offer new insights into the vision of educational equality contained in the Convention and how that vision can be implemented at the national level.

  20. The Logic of Deferral: Educational Aims and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    The educational aims described by educational philosophers rarely embrace the full range of differences in intellectual ability, adaptive behavior, or communication that children exhibit. Because envisioned educational aims have significant consequences for how educational practices, pedagogy, and curricula are conceptualized, the failure to…

  1. Towards new educational potentialities: Review and commentary of the Preliminary draft Act on higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madžar Ljubomir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Higher Education Act is a long-awaited legal act. A number of uncompleted attempts to prepare it have been undertaken in the course of the last three years. So far without success. Having been and still being a matter of highest social priority, the renewed effort to create and subsequently to enact this act is welcome as a worthwhile and a highly productive endeavor. Welcome also are the main innovations offered by this act, particularly its conspicuous consistency with the Bologna Declaration and other internationally launched and accepted documents. The draft act follows the international documents tracing down the paths of the future development of the educational systems of the European countries and providing for their mutual compatibility. A number of other positive contributions of the draft act are singled out, such as introducing clear and rigorous criteria and procedures for accreditation and quality control, introducing a wide coverage of arts and sciences as a precondition for an institution of higher education to qualify as a university, flexibility in the regime of studying including the domestic and international mobility of the students and requirement for the schools of higher education to have large cores of permanently employed teaching staff. A much larger part of the paper is, however, devoted to critical commentaries. To begin with, the draft is produced without any participation of the private universities, which is seen as a form of discrimination. The organizational pattern of a university is laid out with insufficient clarity and the status of departments (faculties is particularly short of precision and even contradictory. The draft seems to be laden with the old bias towards excessive and potentially disastrous centralization, drastically reducing the decision making capacity of the system. The treatment of the property of the departments (faculties is found inconsistent and legally unfounded. Inconsistency is

  2. Supporting Extracurricular Involvement for Youth with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.; Swedeen, Beth; Moss, Colleen K.

    2009-01-01

    Trying out for the school play. Performing in the band. Joining a sports team or club. These experiences are memorable parts of middle and high school life. For many students with disabilities, however, these everyday school experiences remain elusive. Although the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) clearly states that IEP teams…

  3. Nurses with disabilities: can changing our educational system keep them in nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal-Boylan, Leslie J; Guillett, Sharron E

    2008-01-01

    A recent qualitative study revealed that registered nurses with physical disabilities experience discrimination in the workplace and frequently leave their jobs and the profession. In light of these findings, it is vital that nursing faculty begin to inculcate students with an appreciation for collegial support before they enter the workplace as registered nurses. The familiar refrain "nurses eat their young" is apparently also true of nurses who have physical limitations. This article will discuss the findings from a qualitative study and offer recommendations for how nurse educators can educate students to help prevent the loss of nurses with disabilities from the profession.

  4. The inclusion of disabled and/or special educational need students from the ecuadorian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Roxana Cortés-Guerrero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of science and technology has created auxiliary, rehabilitation services and support devices to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities. This work aims to reflect on the potential of contemporary science and technology to promote the inclusion of students with disabilities and/or special educational needs in Ecuadorian society, taking into account the training of teachers becomes a challenge that must be addressed from educational research. The analysis-synthesis methods are used to make assessments and historical and logical to know as time moved on the topics discussed.

  5. A systematic review of mentorship programs to facilitate transition to post-secondary education and employment for youth and young adults with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; R Hartman, Laura; Fellin, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    Youth with disabilities experience barriers in transitioning to Post-Secondary Education (PSE) and employment. Mentorship programs provide a promising approach to supporting youth through those transitions. This paper aims to identify the effective components of mentorship programs and describe participants' experiences. We undertook a systematic review of mentorship interventions for youth and young adults with disabilities. We searched seven electronic databases for peer-reviewed articles published in English between 1980 and 2014. We included articles that examined mentorship interventions focused on PSE or employment outcomes among youth, aged thirty or younger, with physical, developmental, or cognitive disabilities. Of the 5068 articles identified, 22 met the inclusion criteria. For seven mentorship interventions, at least one significant improvement was reported in school- or work-related outcomes. Mentorship programs with significant outcomes were often structured, delivered in group-based or mixed formats, and longer in duration (>6 months). Mentors acted as role models, offered advice, and provided mentees with social and emotional support. Evidence suggests that mentorship programs may be effective for helping youth with disabilities transition to PSE or employment. More rigorously designed studies are needed to document the impact of mentorship programs on school and vocational outcomes for youth with disabilities. Implications for Rehabilitation Mentorship interventions have the potential to effectively support youth with disabilities as they transition to post-secondary education and employment. Youth should consider participating in formal mentorship interventions, and clinicians and educators should encourage them to do so, to enhance social, educational, and vocational outcomes. When developing interventions, clinicians should consider incorporating the effective components (i.e. duration, content, format) of mentorship interventions identified in

  6. STUDY OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CORRELATES OF PHYSICAL DISABILITY AMONG STUDENTS OF AN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUE OF KANPUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Singh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the epidemiological correlates of physical disability among students in an educational institute of Kanpur. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Study Setting: Dr. Ambedkar Institute of technology for Handicapped, UP., Kanpur. Study Subjects : Physically disabled diploma students in the age group 15 years and above of Dr. Ambedkar Institute of Technology for Handicapped UP, Kanpur were taken as study subjects. Data was collected on pre-designed and pre-tested questionnaire. StatisticalAnalysis : Analysis was done using percentages. Results: Physically disabled students predominantly belonged to age-group of 18-20 years (47.62%, birth order third (28.10%, Hindu religion (95.24%, OBC Caste (47.14% and social class V (51.90%. Poliomyelitis was the most common probable cause of disability in majority of students (77. 14% and right lower limb was the most common site (36.67% affected.

  7. The Social Networks of Children With and Without Disabilities in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Justice, Laura; Sawyer, Brook

    2017-09-01

    Interaction with peers is an important contributor to young children's social and cognitive development. Yet, little is known about the nature of social networks within preschool inclusive classrooms. The current study applied a social network analysis to characterize children's peer interactions in inclusive classrooms and their relations with children's disability status. The participants were 485 preschoolers from 64 early childhood special education (ECSE) inclusive classrooms. Results from teachers' report of children's social networks showed that children with disabilities formed smaller play networks compared to their typically developing peers in the classroom, but no evidence indicated that children with disabilities engaged in more conflict networks than their counterparts. Children's play and conflict networks were segregated by children's disability status.

  8. Inclusive Education: Mobile Serious Games for People with Cognitive Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Angel Jaramillo-Alcázar; Sergio Luján-Mora; Luis Salvador-Ullauri

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of mobile devices is increasingly frequent. In many occasions they are used as a means of entertainment for people through video games. Serious games is a category of video games used as teaching methods in different environments. They use fun as a strategy for the learning process. However, the vast majority do not focus on vulnerable groups such as people with cognitive disabilities, because they do not consider accessibility parameters in their design. Some video games de...

  9. 34 CFR 460.1 - What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sufficient basic education to enable them to benefit from job training and retraining programs and obtain and... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Adult Education Act? 460.1 Section 460.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF...

  10. Implementing Inclusion and Collaborative Teaming in a Model Program of Postsecondary Education for Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Eric D. R.; Yamamoto, Kathryn K.; Stodden, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Department of Education announced an initiative to improve transitioning to postsecondary education (PSE) for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) by funding the model comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (TPSID) program. The TPSID provides for grants to create…

  11. A Socio-Cultural Reframing of Science and Dis/ability in Education: Past Problems, Current Concerns, and Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-01-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four…

  12. The Contribution of Specific Diseases to Educational Disparities in Disability-Free Life Expectancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusselder, Wilma J.; Looman, Caspar W.N.; Mackenbach, Johan P.; Huisman, Martijn; van Oyen, Herman; Deboosere, Patrick; Gadeyne, Sylvie; Kunst, Anton E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the contribution that specific diseases, as causes of both death and disability, make to educational disparities in disability-free life expectancy (DFLE). Methods. We used disability data from the Belgian Health Interview Survey (1997) and mortality data from the National Mortality Follow-Up Study (1991–1996) to assess education-related disparities in DFLE and to partition these differences into additive contributions of specific diseases. Results. The DFLE advantage of higher-educated compared with lower-educated persons was 8.0 years for men and 5.9 years for women. Arthritis (men, 1.3 years; women, 2.2 years), back complaints (men, 2.1 years), heart disease/stroke (men, 1.5 years; women, 1.6 years), asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (men, 1.2 years; women, 1.5 years), and “other diseases” (men, 2.4 years) contributed the most to this difference. Conclusions. Disabling diseases, such as arthritis, back complaints, and asthma/COPD, contribute substantially to differences in DFLE by education. Public health policy aiming to reduce existing disparities in the DFLE and to improve population health should not only focus on fatal diseases but also on these nonfatal diseases. PMID:16195519

  13. EDUCATIONAL POLICIES AND PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY IN REPUBLIC OF MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Karovska Ristovska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Educational policy for children with intellectual disability in Republic of Macedonia is not always consistent with the practical implications. The subject of this research was to gain an insight into the current condition of the persons with intellectual disabilities in Macedonia, before all an insight into the barriers that they are facing in their attempts to access educational information and services. This was done through conducting a qualitative (desk-top analyses of the national legislations; semi-structured interviews with parents of persons with intellectual disabilities and focus groups with relevant stakeholders and a quantitative research (quality of life research for the disabled persons. In the research a total number of 213 examinees were included. As in many other cases, and in many other countries, policy and practice are not always coherent. Legislation in the area of education in our country has to be modified and accommodated to the needs of the persons with disabilities and their parents or care-givers. The final conclusion from our research is that the persons with ID are still on the margins of society, and they lead everyday battles to prove that their needs must be taken into consideration in context of their human rights. Although awareness for the importance of the rightful treatment of this problem is not on a satisfactory level, still we can notice a shift in perception and liberation of prejudice.

  14. Education and Health: a necessary dialogue policies of comprehensive care for people with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelma Alves Marques Pintor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to reflect on the importance of dialogue between education and health, basic thought of as public policy in the context of comprehensive care to people with disabilities. These findings emphasize the difficulty faced by these areas to establish a dialogue that results in convergent planning intersectoral action for health promotion, quality of life and social and educational inclusion of disabled people, especially the mentally handicapped. Based on studies of Brazilian authors seek to clarify some facts that underscore the need for dialogue and do not justify the perpetuation of the gap between these fields of knowledge. Presents the partial results of an experience of intersectionality between these areas in the municipal schools of Niterói (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with students with disabilities, which stresses the absence of a culture of popular participation in local public policies.

  15. An Analysis of Specific Learning Disability Exclusionary Clause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybarger, Pamela A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) is to protect the rights of students with disabilities and to assure that all students receive equitable access to a free and appropriate public education; yet there are explicit exclusions written in the law for students who may have experienced environmental,…

  16. People with Intellectual Disabilities Talk About Sexuality: Implications for the Development of Sex Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, D; Kok, G; Stoffelen, J M T; Curfs, L M G

    2017-01-01

    Existing sex education programmes have failed in involving people with intellectual disabilities in the development of these programmes. Not involving the target population decreases the likelihood that the sex education programme will be effective. This study was conducted to assess the perspectives of people with intellectual disabilities on several sexuality-related topics. Semi-structured interviews were held with 20 people with intellectual disabilities covering topics such as: sex education, relationships, sex, social media, parenthood and support. The reported frequency of sex education the participants receive is low. Their knowledge regarding sex education is mainly limited to topics such as safe sex, contraception and STI's and tends to be superficial. Additionally, knowledge on safe sex does not always translate to safe sex behaviour. Finally, relationships are important for most participants; mainly because they don't want to be alone. Findings from both this study and literature shows that there seems to be a need for high quality sex education. Topics to consider to include are: online relationships, social media and parenthood. It would also be beneficial to focus on sexuality-related skills. Finally, to increase the effectiveness of a sex education programme, it is advisable that a theory-and evidence-based framework, such as Intervention Mapping, is used for its development.

  17. K--12 science educator perception of instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday-Cashwell, Janet Rose

    2000-10-01

    Selected K--12 public school science educators in 14 eastern North Carolina counties were surveyed to examine their perceptions of their undergraduate preparation programs with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in the regular classroom. A quantitative study, this research examined science educator preparedness in instructing students with learning disabilities by evaluating educator perception in regard to mainstrearned and inclusive educational settings. Specifically, two null hypotheses were tested. Null hypothesis I stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' perceptions of their undergraduate teacher education preparation programs and their perceptions of their abilities to instruct students needing accommodations on behalf of their learning disabilities in mainstrearned or inclusive settings. Participants' responses to perception as well as value statements regarding opinions, adaptations, and undergraduate training with respect to mainstreaming and inclusion were evaluated through t-test analyses of 22 Likert-scale items. Null hypothesis 1 was not accepted because a statistically significant difference did exist between the educators' perceptions of their undergraduate training and their perceived abilities to instruct students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive settings. Null hypothesis 2 stated a significant difference does not exist between selected North Carolina K--12 science educators' attained educational level; grade level currently taught, supervised or chaired; and years of experience in teaching science, supervising science education, and/or chairing science departments in selected North Carolina public schools and their opinions of their undergraduate teacher education program with regard to instructing students with learning disabilities in mainstreamed or inclusive educational settings. Null hypothesis 2 was evaluated through an analysis of

  18. Education Creates Comfort and Challenges Stigma towards Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M.; Aston, Megan; MacLeod, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are frequent users of the healthcare system, yet nurses report they receive little education regarding specialized medical, social and relational needs of this population. Therefore, parents take on a greater burden of care while their child is in hospital than do parents of typically developing…

  19. Knowledge Citizens? Intellectual Disability and the Production of Social Meanings within Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    Intellectual disability may appear to many as a barrier to participation in or the production of educational research. Indeed, a common perception of individuals seen as having cognitive impairments, and especially those with minimal or no verbal communication, is that they are incapable of the reasoning or lack the deliberative capacities…

  20. Perspectives of Students with Disabilities toward Physical Education: A Qualitative Inquiry Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A.; Sutherland, Sue

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review published qualitative inquiries that examine the perspective of students with disabilities toward experiences in physical education. Keyword searches were used to identify articles from electronic databases published from 1995 to 2014. Thirteen articles met all inclusion criteria, and findings were…

  1. Students with Learning Disabilities within the Context of Inclusive Education: Issues of Identification and School Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakiz, Halis

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports findings of a case study carried out in two elementary mainstream schools in Turkey. The main aim of the study was to investigate the role of identification and school management within the process of educating students with learning disabilities in mainstream schools. Interviews with stakeholders, observations and documentary…

  2. Quality of Individualised Education Programme Goals and Objectives for Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakap, Salih

    2015-01-01

    Individualised education programmes (IEPs) are the road maps for individualising services for children with disabilities, specifically through the development of high-quality child goals/objectives. High-quality IEP goals/objectives that are developed based on a comprehensive assessment of child functioning and directly connected to intervention…

  3. Nutrition Education and Support Program for Community-Dwelling Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Kathleen; Traci, Meg Ann; Seekins, Tom

    2008-01-01

    To test the efficacy, acceptability, and appropriateness of a nutrition education and support program, 4 community-based group homes for adults with intellectual or developmental disabilities participated in a pilot intervention with extended baseline period and pre--post-test design. Adults (N = 32) with intellectual or developmental…

  4. Attending Behavior: Commonalities and Differences Among Educable Retarded, Learning Disabled, and Emotionally Handicapped Juvenile Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nancy C.; And Others

    The study investigated three variables--juvenile delinquency, academic achievement, and attention span--with 77 incarcerated juveniles [18 emotionally handicapped (EH), 20 learning disabled (LD), 19 educable mentally retarded (EMR), and 20 nonidentified]. The Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude were used for testing in the areas of visual and…

  5. Differentiating Instruction for Students with Learning Disabilities: Best Teaching Practices for General and Special Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, William N.

    This book provides classroom-proven strategies designed to empower the teacher to target instructional modifications to the content, process, and products for students with learning disabilities in the general and special education classrooms. Chapter 1 presents the concept of differentiated instruction and how that concept translates into…

  6. Transition of Youth with Disabilities to Postsecondary Education. DADD Prism Series. Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodden, Robert, Ed.; Zucker, Stanley, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This volume presents an organized collection of peer-reviewed articles focused upon issues faced by young persons with intellectual disabilities and those who support them as they prepare for and transition to postsecondary education and other life-long learning activities. The reader is provided with an overview of this field of work, a range of…

  7. The Attitudes of Different Partners Involved in Higher Education towards Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo Sánchez, M. Tamara; Fernández-Jiménez, Carolina; Fernández Cabezas, María

    2018-01-01

    In this article we analyse the inclusion of students with disabilities in the field of university attendance, emphasising the importance of attitudes of teachers as well as the rest of the university community as a whole for inclusion to be successful. The effect of variables of gender, education and training and contact with students with…

  8. Examining Calculator Use among Students with and without Disabilities Educated with Different Mathematical Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.; Joshi, Gauri S.; Johnson, Linley

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed if students with and without disabilities used calculators (fourfunction, scientific, or graphing) to solve mathematics assessment problems and whether using calculators improved their performance. Participants were sixth and seventh-grade students educated with either National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded or traditional…

  9. Explicit Memory among Individuals with Mild and Moderate Intellectual Disability: Educational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz, Hefziba; Shtein, Sarit; Weiss, Itzhak; Svisrsky, Naama

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported a meta-analysis of explicit memory studies in populations with intellectual disability (ID). The current study discusses the educational implications of this meta-analysis. The main factors at the core of these implications can be divided into two categories: those related to task characteristics (e.g., depth of processing,…

  10. Determining the Most Appropriate Physical Education Placement for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columna, Luis; Davis, Timothy; Lieberman, Lauren; Lytle, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Adapted physical education (APE) is designed to meet the unique needs of children with disabilities within the least restrictive environment. Placement in the right environment can help the child succeed, but the wrong environment can create a very negative experience. This article presents a systematic approach to making decisions when…

  11. Students with Self-Identified Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (Si-SEND): Flourishing or Languishing!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypiec, Grace; Askell-Williams, Helen; Slee, Phillip; Rudzinski, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Students' wellbeing is an essential component of their ability to function well, not only at school but also in all life domains. Many studies have investigated student wellbeing. However, empirical studies about the wellbeing of students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) are scarce. Furthermore, many studies have adopted a…

  12. Policies for including disabled people in education. obstacles and facilitating factors for their implementation: Bucaramanga, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Serrano R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to explore the factors enabling or hindering the implementation of inclusive education policies for the disabled population of Bucaramanga. Methodology: a descriptive study, involving representatives from governmental agencies (EG, members of the faculty boards of educational institutions (DIE and guardians of disabled individuals (APSD. Physical, social, and political obstacles and facilitating factors that could potentially determine the implementation of these policies were analyzed. Data was collected through interviews. Results: there was a total of 2, 32, and 34 participants from the EG, DIE, and APSD groups respectively. Identified obstacles included: lack of strategies to support educational institutions, poor or limited teacher training, high tuition fees, and negative attitude towards disability. The facilitating factors included: availability of places, inclusion of this issue in the political agenda, and desire of the disabled individuals’ families to provide them with education. Discussion: These findings provide useful information for further research on this issue and show how action has been taken, as well as how urgent it is to establish a direct relationship between academia and the public sector to propose strategies for assessing and modifying these policies.

  13. Inclusive Education and Intellectual Disability: A Sociological Engagement with Martha Nussbaum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Chrissie

    2013-01-01

    As a result of exclusionary tactics, social, cultural or economic disadvantage or disability, vast numbers of pupils have poor educational experiences and are either marginalised or demonised due to "difficult differences". In the context of Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach, where she suggests that we ought to be who we want to…

  14. Thai Preschool Teachers' Views about Inclusive Education for Young Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukbunpant, Sasipin; Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Dempsey, Ian

    2013-01-01

    It is generally assumed that preschool teachers play a crucial daily role in the inclusion of young children with a disability in education settings. In many countries, however, there are little available data to inform such a view. Part of a larger project with 528 preschool teachers from northern Thailand, the aim of the study reported here was…

  15. Acquired Severe Disabilities and Complex Health Care Needs: Access to Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Sarah L.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2016-01-01

    This case study examined one high school student's access to inclusive education and experiences in an inclusive English class after he acquired severe disabilities and complex health care needs from a nontraumatic brain injury. Multiple sources of data (i.e., interviews, field notes, and documents) were collected and analyzed to formulate…

  16. Implementation of a Self-Management System for Students with Disabilities in General Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that self-management procedures have a robust literature base attesting to their efficacy with students with disabilities, the use of these strategies in general education settings remains limited. This mixed methods study examined the implementation of self-management procedures using both quantitative and qualitative methods.…

  17. Self-Management of Social Initiations by Kindergarten Students with Disabilities in the General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brooke M.; Gast, David L.; Luscre, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of a self-management intervention on social interaction behaviors was evaluated for students with disabilities and social deficits. Four students enrolled in a general education kindergarten classroom were taught to self-monitor social initiations during nonstructured social time via a digital wrist counter. The number of social…

  18. Developing an Education Intervention for Staff Supporting Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; McCarron, Mary; Connaire, Kevin; McCallion, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Generally, staff working in settings that provide care for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not received specific education with respect to extended care for terminal illnesses or late-stage dementia. Equally, staff working in specialist palliative care often are not familiar with the unique issues of supporting persons with…

  19. Optimization of physical education and sports of students with disabilities throughout the entire period of study at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Adyrkhaev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Considered personal and proactive approach to physical education students with different nosologies and ensure close connection processes of personal training and physical development. In the experiment involved 644 students, with 2 and 3 of disability. The level of physical performance determined using the indexes. Identified organizational and methodological priorities of physical education and sports of students. Using the model of physical education allows full integration into the student environment. Students feel more comfortable. Students changing attitude toward themselves, manifested in the appropriate perception, finding camouflage disabilities struggle with her self-presentation. The effectiveness of didactic technology of physical education of students with disabilities in the pedagogical process.

  20. Involving people with learning disabilities in nurse education: towards an inclusive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollard, Martin; Lahiff, John; Parkes, Neville

    2012-02-01

    There is limited evidence that explores how to effectively include people with learning disabilities in nurse education in the U.K. The majority of reported work relates to mental health nursing and social work training (Morgan and Jones, 2009). This paper specifically reports on the processes and activities undertaken by the authors with people with learning disabilities in the development of a new BSc learning disability nursing programme, a specific branch of nursing in the U.K. In doing so, findings and discussion from two separate projects involving students and people with learning disabilities will be integrated into the paper. EPICURE (Engagement, Processing, Interpretation, Critique, Usefulness, Relevance and Ethics (Stige et al. 2009) is adopted as a qualitative framework throughout the paper to evaluate the reported work that took place between September 2006 and October 2010. Suggestions are therefore made regarding the benefits and challenges of striving towards an inclusive approach to user involvement in nurse education, with particular reference to learning disability. The work presented in the paper demonstrates how through careful involvement of this population, deeper learning opportunities for all nursing students can be created. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The predictors of students' attitude towards inclusion of children with disabilities in physical education classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlić Ana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Positive attitude towards inclusion of children with disabilities in Physical Education (PE classes is one quite important factor for successful implementation of inclusive education. The aim of this study was to examine the predictors of attitude of the students as future PE teachers towards inclusion in PE. In this study, the predictors in the field of personality, professional competences for working with children with disabilities and certain personal characteristics (gender were included. The sample included 221 students of the final year of studies at the Faculty of Sport and Physical Education in Belgrade, Niš and Novi Sad. In order to measure the attitude towards inclusion in PE, the instrument of Attitude Toward Inclusive Physical Education was used. In the field of personality, a trait of openness to experience was examined, which was measured using the HEXACO PI-R instrument. An additional questionnaire was also designed by which the students were asked to indicate their gender and professional competences for working with children with disabilities: their average mark during the studies, subjective assessment of the level of knowledge and skills required for working with children with disabilities acquired in the course of their studies (self-assessment of professional competence and experience in working with children with disabilities during their professional practice. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that openness to experience, self-assessment of professional competence and gender were significant predictors. The results indicate that, during the training for teaching profession, it is necessary to develop students' specific competences required for the work in inclusive education as well as to create the teaching atmosphere which will enhance inquisitiveness and creativity as significant determinants of the trait of openness to experience.

  2. Education of the Deaf Act: Background and Reauthorization Issues. CRS Report for Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Steven R.

    This summary of the Education of the Deaf Act (Public Law 99-371) discusses the special institutions funded under the act and other issues related to the Act's reauthorization. The National Technical Institute for the Deaf (Rochester, New York) and Gallaudet University (District of Columbia) provide postsecondary training for deaf individuals.…

  3. Reclaiming Self-Determination from the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the way the term "self-determination" is used in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975. Its main thesis is that the Act does not in fact offer tribal governments self-determination, but instead reaffirms old power configurations that go back to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934.…

  4. 78 FR 29652 - Institutional Eligibility Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, as Amended; Delay of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 600 RIN 1840-AD02 Institutional Eligibility Under the Higher Education Act of 1965, as Amended; Delay of Implementation Date AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Final regulations; delay of implementation date. SUMMARY: This document...

  5. Assessment of ADHD Documentation from Candidates Requesting Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accommodations for the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners COMLEX Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Javed A.; Julius, Rose J.; Akter, Rashida; Baron, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Every year increasing numbers of candidates request special accommodations for high-stakes medical licensing examinations, due to ADHD, on the basis of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This poses significant challenges for both the applicant and the medical boards and has significant financial, legal, and ethical implications.…

  6. When the Americans with Disabilities Act Goes Online: Application of the ADA to the Internet and the Worldwide Web. Position Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, Washington, DC.

    This paper addresses the issue of how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to commercial and other private sector Web sites. Beginning with a brief discussion of the role electronic communication plays in our lives, the paper then considers the placement of the ADA in the context of current technology and of computer usage in the…

  7. Divided by Loyalty: The Debate Regarding Loyalty Provisions in the National Defense Education Act of 1958

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Brent D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Defense Education Act (NDEA) of 1958 was the first federal investment in low-interest student loans and became a precedent for expansion of student loans in the Higher Education Act of 1965. In its controversial loyalty provisions, the NDEA required loan recipients to affirm loyalty to the U.S. government. Between 1958 and 1962,…

  8. Need-Based Educational Aid Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-44)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Congress, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Need-Based Educational Aid Act of 2015 (Public Law 114-44) was put in place to improve and reauthorize provisions relating to the application of the antitrust laws to the award of need-based educational aid. The contents for this Act is as follows: (1) Short Title; and (2) Extension Relating to the Application of the Antitrust Laws to the…

  9. Guia del Proceso del IFSP de Colorado: Conexiones para la Ninez Temprana, Iniciativa Infantil de Colorado Parte C del Acta de Educacion para Individuos con Desabilidades (Colorado Guidelines for the IFSP Process: Early Childhood Connections, Colorado's Infant/Toddler Initiative for Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jerri; Petersen, Sandy

    This booklet for Spanish-speaking parents of young children with disabilities describes Colorado's Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) process. It explains guidelines, shares family stories and reflections for families and care providers, and the describes the values that drive the IFSP process in Colorado. Information is provided on…

  10. Does more education mean less disability in people with dementia? A large cross-sectional study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chi, Wen-Chou; Yen, Chia-Feng; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Liao, Hua-Fang; Escorpizo, Reuben; Chang, Feng-Hang; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2017-05-04

    WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is a feasible tool for assessing functional disability and analysing the risk of institutionalisation among elderly patients with dementia. However, the data for the effect of education on disability status in patients with dementia is lacking. The aim of this large-scale, population-based study was to analyse the effect of education on the disability status of elderly Taiwanese patients with dementia by using WHODAS 2.0. From the Taiwan Data Bank of Persons with Disability, we enrolled 7698 disabled elderly (older than 65 years) patients diagnosed with dementia between July 2012 and January 2014. According to their education status, we categorised these patients with and without formal education (3849 patients each). We controlled for the demographic variables through propensity score matching. The standardised scores of these patients in the six domains of WHODAS 2.0 were evaluated by certified interviewers. Student's t - test was used for comparing the WHODAS 2.0 scores of patients with dementia in the two aforementioned groups. Poisson regression was applied for analysing the association among all the investigated variables. Patients with formal education had low disability status in the domains of getting along and social participation than did patients without formal education. Poisson regression revealed that standardised scores in all domains of WHODAS 2.0-except self-care-were associated with education status. This study revealed lower disability status in the WHODAS 2.0 domains of getting along and social participation for patients with dementia with formal education compared with those without formal education. For patients with disability and dementia without formal education, community intervention of social participation should be implemented to maintain better social interaction ability. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  11. Deconstructing barriers: perceptions of students labeled with learning disabilities in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Hazel

    2008-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated barriers to higher education faced by 11 college students labeled with learning disabilities (LD) using their voice as the primary data. Data were analyzed and interpreted through a disability theory perspective revealing barriers stemmed largely from external social causes rather than individual pathology. Barriers included being misunderstood by faculty, being reluctant to request accommodations for fear of invoking stigma, and having to work considerably longer hours than nonlabeled peers. Findings indicated barriers could be overcome through raising faculty awareness about LD issues, engaging the assistance of the college LD specialist, and participation in a LD democratic empowerment community on campus.

  12. Rational-Emotive Education with Learning Disabled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, William; McKeever, Cynthia

    1977-01-01

    Rational-emotive education provides a positive, constructive approach for helping young children with learning problems who have psychogenic overlays to cope with worries and troubles effectively and to accept themselves affirmatively. (Author/SBH)

  13. Legislation for higher education disabled students in Brazil and Portugal: some reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ricardo Lins Vieira de Melo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to make a critical analysis of legislation regulating the inclusion of disabled students in higher education in Brazil and Portugal. Based on a documentary study, conducted between September and November 2015, the legal standards in recent decades have been analyzed. The results point out different stages of construction of the inclusion policy in the researched countries. It is emphasized that there is a significant variety of norms in the Brazilian context to ensure that these students have equal opportunities, and a scarcity of regulations in Portugal. The legislation has been referred to as an important factor for the development of inclusive education; however it is noteworthy that the existence of legislation does not necessarily imply it is actually complied. Besides legislation, removing barriers for the full participation and learning of disabled students involves awareness, investment in resources, public policy makers and managers’ scientific knowledge to ensure a quality education throughout life for all people.

  14. Training School Psychologists to Identify Specific Learning Disabilities: A Content Analysis of Syllabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Courtenay A.; Cottrell, Joseph M.; Newman, Daniel S.; Pierce, Benjamin G.; Anderson, Alisha

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 2.4 million children receive special education services for specific learning disabilities (SLDs), and school psychologists are key contributors to the SLD eligibility decision-making process. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) enabled local education agencies to use response to intervention (RTI) instead of the…

  15. INCLUSIVE HIGHER EDUCATION AS A PART OF THE LIFE TRAJECTORY: THE EXPERIENCE OF NSU GRADUATES WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolova T. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The increase of “friendliness” of the education system towards individuals with disabilities (people with health limitations, especially the development of inclusive education, is a relatively recent humanistic trend that has been set by the most economically developed societies and in which our country has been responsibly integrating for the last two decades. The article summarizes the results of the survey that was conducted in 2017 among NSU graduates with disabilities. The study was aimed at describing how higher education promotes acquisition of the social and physical space by individuals with disabilities, which means ensuring the social inclusion.

  16. Provision of educational service with the use of distance technologies for disabled persons (case study: the state of Alaska and Nothern regions of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lipatov

    2016-01-01

    increased accessibility of education is occurring in some places, it is not unique to the North. Rather, it is a refl ection of changes that have occurred in urbanized areas around the world, where population growth, increased living standards, modernity, and technology have been transforming schools for the past fi fty years (AHDR I, Arctic Human Development Report I. The basis of researches consists of research works and conferences on distance training for disabled persons in the Arctic; the legal acts created by the international organizations, the American and Russian departments; the websites with information on the Russian and American universities. The international, Russian and American legislation, statistical sources, mass media concerning educational policy for disabled persons.

  17. The predictors of absenteeism due to psychological disability: a longitudinal study in the education sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Alessia; Perron, Jacques; Corbière, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Being absent from work because of a psychological disability is costly for both individuals and organizations and frequent in employees working in the field of education. Absenteeism from work has been mostly studied as an organizational withdrawal behavior related to negative factors. The purpose of this longitudinal study is to define the predictors of absenteeism due to psychological disability by taking into account resources, such as Self-determined work motivation and Subjective well-being, as well as symptoms of Psychological distress. The sample consisted of 261 employees from a Canadian public school organization. Independent sample t-tests were conducted to compare the mean scores of participants who were not absent from work and participants who were absent due to psychological disability. Logistic regression analyses were computed for the dependent variable to assess the contribution of the three independent variables. Participants who were absent from work due to psychological disability in the year following the data collection scored significantly lower on resources, and higher on symptoms than those participants who were not absent. The three-predictor model was found to be significant. However, only Self-determined work motivation and Psychological distress significantly predicted absenteeism due to psychological disability. Results are discussed in terms of psychological processes regulating the relationships between the work-related factors (i.e., work motivation) and life-related factors (i.e., psychological distress and subjective well-being) of personal adjustment and accomplishment.

  18. Increasing access into higher education: Insights from the 2011 African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability Symposium – Education Commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lyner-Cleophas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides some insights into the challenges regarding inclusion in higher education of students with disabilities. It does this by elucidating aspects of the proceedings of the Education Commission at the African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability (AfriNEAD Symposium, which took place in Zimbabwe in November 2011. The presentations specifically focused on the education of people with disabilities from early childhood through to higher education. This article, however, is informed by presentations focusing on increasing access to higher education. The article is focused on the implementation of evidence in practice, research and policies stemming from rigorous debate and scientific foundations, whilst taking into account the dynamic realities of the higher education context. Themes such as the systemic approach needed for inclusion to be successful, increasing access and the dynamic role of students with disabilities are highlighted.

  19. Increasing access into higher education: Insights from the 2011 African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability Symposium – Education Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swart, Estelle; Chataika, Tsitsi; Bell, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This article provides some insights into the challenges regarding inclusion in higher education of students with disabilities. It does this by elucidating aspects of the proceedings of the Education Commission at the African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability (AfriNEAD) Symposium, which took place in Zimbabwe in November 2011. The presentations specifically focused on the education of people with disabilities from early childhood through to higher education. This article, however, is informed by presentations focusing on increasing access to higher education. The article is focused on the implementation of evidence in practice, research and policies stemming from rigorous debate and scientific foundations, whilst taking into account the dynamic realities of the higher education context. Themes such as the systemic approach needed for inclusion to be successful, increasing access and the dynamic role of students with disabilities are highlighted. PMID:28730011

  20. Increasing access into higher education: Insights from the 2011 African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability Symposium - Education Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyner-Cleophas, Marcia; Swart, Estelle; Chataika, Tsitsi; Bell, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This article provides some insights into the challenges regarding inclusion in higher education of students with disabilities. It does this by elucidating aspects of the proceedings of the Education Commission at the African Network on Evidence-to-Action on Disability (AfriNEAD) Symposium, which took place in Zimbabwe in November 2011. The presentations specifically focused on the education of people with disabilities from early childhood through to higher education. This article, however, is informed by presentations focusing on increasing access to higher education. The article is focused on the implementation of evidence in practice, research and policies stemming from rigorous debate and scientific foundations, whilst taking into account the dynamic realities of the higher education context. Themes such as the systemic approach needed for inclusion to be successful, increasing access and the dynamic role of students with disabilities are highlighted.

  1. The effect of cognitive education on the performance of students with neurological developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Ruthanne H; VonThaden, Karen

    2002-01-01

    A cognitive education program was developed to facilitate acquisition of cognitive skills and address the learning deficits of adolescent students with neurological, developmental disabilities, and autism. This study examined the outcomes of incorporating mediated cognitive education into special education classrooms. Cognitive education provided cognitive training utilizing REHABIT materials through mediated teaching. Following a matched pair model, forty-six students were assigned to either a treatment or a control group. All students received weekly instruction in Individual Educational Program (IEP) goals. Curriculum areas included IEP objectives in reading, math, social skills, health, science and social studies. Students in the control group received regular classroom instruction. Students in the treatment group participated in cognitive educated one hour per week replacing thirty minutes of reading and thirty minutes of math. Pre and posttest comparisons on measures of intelligence, achievement and adaptive behavior showed those students in the treatment group attained higher scores across measures.

  2. End-of-Year 2010-11 Progress Report to the Legislature: Implementation and Impact of the Workforce Investment Act, Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    CASAS - Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment Systems (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Title II: Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) provides funding for states and territories to provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), Adult Basic Education (ABE), and Adult Secondary Education (ASE) to adults in need of these literacy services. California State Budget Act…

  3. 29 CFR Appendix to Part 1630 - Interpretive Guidance on Title I of the Americans With Disabilities Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... require preferences favoring individuals with disabilities over those without disabilities. However, while... desire of the Committee to use the most current terminology. It reflects the preference of persons with... vocational rehabilitation agency, or if Federal, State or local tax deductions...

  4. Robot ZORA in rehabilitation and special education for children with severe physical disabilities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Renée J F; Lexis, Monique A S; de Witte, Luc P

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potential of ZORA robot-based interventions in rehabilitation and special education for children with severe physical disabilities. A two-centre explorative pilot study was carried out over a 2.5-month period involving children with severe physical disabilities with a developmental age ranging from 2 to 8 years. Children participated in six sessions with the ZORA robot in individual or in group sessions. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data on aspects of feasibility, usability, barriers and facilitators for the child as well as for the therapist and to obtain an indication of the effects on playfulness and the achievement of goals. In total, 17 children and seven professionals participated in the study. The results of this study show a positive contribution of ZORA in achieving therapy and educational goals. Moreover, sessions with ZORA were indicated as playful. Three main domains were indicated to be the most promising for the application of ZORA: movement skills, communication skills and cognitive skills. Furthermore, ZORA can contribute towards eliciting motivation, concentration, taking initiative and improving attention span of the children. On the basis of the results of the study, it can be concluded that ZORA has potential in therapy and education for children with severe physical disabilities. More research is needed to gain insight into how ZORA can be applied best in rehabilitation and special education.

  5. Neoliberal Values and Disability: Critical Approach to Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romstein, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Neoliberalism is a global phenomenon which has various forms. It is an ideology, as well as a package of political actions. Although it is an economic concept, nowadays it is present in all areas of social life, including education. Explicitly, neoliberalism facilitates cooperation between diverse social factors. However, its implicit purposes are…

  6. To Gain, Retain and Retrain: The Role of Post-School Education for People with a Disability. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidano, Cain; Vu, Ha

    2011-01-01

    This study extends previous work of Cain Polidano and Kostas Mavromaras (2010) which showed that vocational education and training (VET) qualifications had a positive effect on the chances of finding work for people with a disability. It teases out this earlier result by looking at whether, for those who already have a disability, completing a VET…

  7. Predicting Student Engagement by Disability Type at Four-Year Baccalaureate Higher Education Institutions Using Self-Reported Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziswiler, Korrin M.

    2014-01-01

    The number of students with disabilities accessing higher education continues to increase, yet persistence and graduation rates for this population of students are considerably lower than those of students without disabilities. Previous research suggests that a key factor in improving post-secondary outcomes is increasing the level with which…

  8. Educating in the Design and Construction of Built Environments Accessible to Disabled People: The Leonardo da Vinci AWARD Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattari, Antonio; Dalpra, Michela; Bernardi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    An interdisciplinary partnership within an European Leonardo da Vinci project has developed a new approach aimed at educating secondary school students in the creation of built environments accessible to disabled people and at sensitizing them towards the inclusion of people with disabilities in all realms of social life. The AWARD (Accessible…

  9. Rights Discourses in Relation to Education of People with Intellectual Disability: Towards an Ethics of Care that Enables Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, Judith Anne; Macleod, Catriona Ida

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we argue that human rights approaches for intellectually disabled people have failed to recognise the complexity of rights claims made by and on behalf of this group. Drawing on a research project into discourses of education for intellectually disabled people in the Eastern Cape, South Africa we discern three rights discourses;…

  10. Perceptions of Disability and Special Education among East Asian Parents: U.S. Immigrants and Non-Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min-Chi; Kim, Sunyoung; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Wilkerson, Kimber L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current literature review is to understand how East Asian American (EAA) parents of students with disabilities perceive disabilities and special education. These parental perspectives are compared to those of their East Asian (EA) parents to better understand whether EAA parents adjust their perceptions in the U.S. Findings from…

  11. Exploring the Development of Existing Sex Education Programmes for People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Intervention Mapping Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Dilana; Stoffelen, Joke M. T.; Kok, Gerjo; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities face barriers that affect their sexual health. Sex education programmes have been developed by professionals working in the field of intellectual disabilities with the aim to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to explore the development of these programmes. Methods: Sex education…

  12. Testing Students with Disabilities: Practical Strategies for Complying with District and State Requirements. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, Martha L.; Elliott, Judy L.; Ysseldyke, James E.

    This book is intended to facilitate the meaningful inclusion of students with disabilities in district and state assessments as required by the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. First, an introductory chapter offers reasons for including students with disabilities in district and statewide accountability systems.…

  13. Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions on Procedures to Identify and Assess Children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities: The Case of Tutors of Colleges of Education in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyimah, Emmanuel Kofi; Amoako, R.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed at exploring the perceptions tutors in Colleges of Education have on how the Colleges of Education Curriculum adequately prepare pre-service teachers to enable them to identify and assess children with special educational needs and disabilities for effective inclusive education in Ghana. A descriptive survey design was adopted and…

  14. Disparities in Insurance Coverage, Health Services Use, and Access Following Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: A Comparison of Disabled and Nondisabled Working-Age Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jae; Wood, Elizabeth Geneva; Frieden, Lex

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess trends in health insurance coverage, health service utilization, and health care access among working-age adults with and without disabilities before and after full implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), and to identify current disability-based disparities following full implementation of the ACA. The ACA was expected to have a disproportionate impact on working-age adults with disabilities, because of their high health care usage as well as their previously limited insurance options. However, most published research on this population does not systematically look at effects before and after full implementation of the ACA. As the US Congress considers new health policy reforms, current and accurate data on this vulnerable population are essential. Weighted estimates, trend analyses and analytic models were conducted using the 1998-2016 National Health Interview Surveys (NHIS) and the 2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Compared with working-age adults without disabilities, those with disabilities are less likely to work, more likely to earn below the federal poverty level, and more likely to use public insurance. Average health costs for this population are 3 to 7 times higher, and access problems are far more common. Repeal of key features of the ACA, like Medicaid expansion and marketplace subsidies, would likely diminish health care access for working-age adults with disabilities.

  15. Education of children with disabilities in New Delhi: When does exclusion occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babulal, Ganesh M.; Trani, Jean-Francois

    2017-01-01

    Background In the new Sustainable Development Goal 4, quality of education defined as equity and inclusion alongside traditional learning outcomes, has replaced the narrow goal of access to primary education stipulated in the Millennium Development Goal 2. Since 2000, considerable progress has been made towards improving access to school for children in India, yet questions remain regarding not just children with disabilities’ access and acquisition of basic learning skills, but also completion of learning cycles. Methods and findings Between November, 2, 2011 and June 20th 2012, we interviewed 1294 households about activity limitations and functioning difficulties associated with a health problem among all family members using a validated screening instruments, as well as questions about access, retention and barriers to education. We found that vulnerable children, particularly children with disabilities are less likely to start school and more likely to drop out of school earlier and before completing their high school education than non-disabled children, showing that the learning process is not inclusive in practice. The gap is wider for girls, economically deprived children, or children from households where the head is uneducated. Conclusions Firstly, in order to fill the existing knowledge gap on education of children with disabilities in line with SDG4, not only is there a necessity for relevant data with regards to learning outcomes, but also an urgent requirement for more innovative information pertaining to relational aspects of learning that reflect inclusion. Secondly, a stronger understanding of the implications of early assessment would further promote equity in education. Finally, research should tackle learning as a complex and dynamic phenomenon. Education needs to fulfil its instrumental value, but must also re-claim its intrinsic value that often gets watered down in the journey from policies to implementation. PMID:28877203

  16. Exploring the meaning of parental involvement in physical education for students with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihoun; Hodge, Samuel R

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological inquiry was to explore the experiences and meaning of parental involvement in physical education from the perspectives of the parents of students with developmental disabilities. The stories of four mothers of elementary aged children (3 boys, 1 girl), two mothers and one couple (mother and father) of secondary-aged youth (1 girl, 2 boys) with developmental disabilities, were gathered by using interviews, photographs, school documents, and the researcher's journal. Bronfenbrenner's (2005) ecological system theory provided a conceptual framework to interpret the findings of this inquiry. Three themes emerged from thematic analysis: being an advocate for my child, understanding the big picture, and collaborative partnerships undeveloped in GPE. The findings lend additional support to the need for establishing collaborative partnerships in physical education between home and school environments (An & Goodwin, 2007; Tekin, 2011).

  17. 77 FR 34942 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Annual State Application Under Part B of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act SUMMARY: In accordance with Part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) (20 U.S.C...

  18. Towards a Low Cost Adaptation of Educational Games for People with Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Torrente, Javier; Del Blanco, Angel; Serrano-Laguna, Angel; Vallejo-Pinto, Jose Angel; Moreno-Ger, Pablo; Fernandez-Manjon, Baltasar

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze how to increase the level of accessibility in videogames by adding support for it in game authoring software. This approach can reduce the effort required to make a game accessible for people with disabilities, resulting in significant savings. A case study is presented to support the approach based on the eAdventure educational game authoring platform, which allows semi-automatic adaptation of the games. The game, "My First Day At Work", was made accessible for stude...

  19. Impact of an education program on parental knowledge of specific learning disability

    OpenAIRE

    Karande Sunil; Mehta Vishal; Kulkarni Madhuri

    2007-01-01

    Background :A supportive home environment is one of the factors that can favorably determine the outcome of specific learning disability (SpLD) in a school-going child. However, there is no reliable information available on parental knowledge about SpLD. Aims :To investigate parental knowledge of SpLD and to evaluate the impact of an educational intervention on it. Settings and Design : Prospective questionnaire-based study conducted in our clinic. Materials and Methods : From April to Novemb...

  20. How to Do Things with Words: Speech Acts in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparatou, Renia

    2018-01-01

    Originating from philosophy and science, many different ideas have made their way into educational policies. Educational policies often take such ideas completely out of context, and enforce them as general norms to every aspect of education; even opposing ideals make their way into school's curricula, teaching techniques, assignments, and…

  1. Widening Participation in Higher Education: A Play in Five Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Policies and programs to address higher education disadvantage reveal four distinct approaches, each revealing certain assumptions about the nature of educational disadvantage. These are: creating mass higher education systems; redistributing or allocating certain places to disadvantaged students; changing the cultural practices of institutions;…

  2. Acting and Reacting: Youth's Behavior in Corrupt Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabic-El-Rayess, Amra

    2014-01-01

    With its broader employability to the issues of underperformance that may emerge in educational systems internationally, this empirical study redefines and expands Albert Hirschman's theory of voice, exit, and loyalty within higher education. The article formulates a new education-embedded theoretical framework that explains reactionary behaviors…

  3. Shaping Up? Three Acts of Education Studies as Textual Critique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Julian; Walker, Stephen; Kendall, Alex

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of dominant educational discourses through textual critique and argues that such an approach enables education studies to preserve an important distinction from teacher training. The texts deconstructed here are specific to English education, but the discourses at work have international relevance as the rhetorics of…

  4. Harvesting Social Change: A Peace Education Program in Three Acts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Colette N.

    2012-01-01

    This article narrates the story of how a peace education program, over the course of a year, shifts from a more traditional form of peace education as conflict resolution skill building to a critical form of peace education. The path of this journey was neither straight nor direct; rather it meandered through an iteration of itself that actually…

  5. Children's moral judgments and moral emotions following exclusion of children with disabilities: relations with inclusive education, age, and contact intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina; Buholzer, Alois

    2013-03-01

    We investigated relations between children's moral judgments and moral emotions following disability-based exclusion and inclusive education, age, and contact intensity. Nine- and 12-year-old Swiss children (N=351) from inclusive and noninclusive classrooms provided moral judgments and moral emotion attributions following six vignettes about social exclusion of children with disabilities. Children also reported on their level of sympathy towards children with disabilities and their contact intensity with children with disabilities. Overall, children condemned disability-based exclusion, attributed few positive emotions to excluder targets, and expressed high sympathy for children with disabilities, independent of age and educational setting. However, younger children from inclusive classrooms exhibited more moral judgments and moral emotions than younger children from noninclusive classrooms. Moreover, children who expressed high sympathy towards children with disabilities were more likely to report frequent contact with children with disabilities. The findings extend existing research on social exclusion by examining disability-based exclusion and are discussed with respect to developmental research on social and moral judgments and emotions following children's inclusion and exclusion decisions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Home literacy experiences and early childhood disability: a descriptive study using the National Household Education Surveys (NHES) program database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit-Smith, Allison; Cabell, Sonia Q; Justice, Laura M

    2010-01-01

    The present article illustrates how the National Household Education Surveys (NHES; U.S. Department of Education, 2009) database might be used to address questions of relevance to researchers who are concerned with literacy development among young children. Following a general description of the NHES database, a study is provided that examines the extent to which parent-reported home literacy activities and child emergent literacy skills differ for children with (a) developmental disabilities versus those who are developing typically, (b) single disability versus multiple disabilities, and (c) speech-language disability only versus other types of disabilities. Four hundred and seventy-eight preschool-age children with disabilities and a typically developing matched sample (based on parent report) were identified in the 2005 administration of the Early Childhood Program Participation (ECPP) Survey in the NHES database. Parent responses to survey items were then compared between groups. After controlling for age and socioeconomic status, no significant differences were found in the frequency of home literacy activities for children with and without disabilities. Parents reported higher levels of emergent literacy skills for typically developing children relative to children with disabilities. These findings suggest the importance of considering the home literacy experiences and emergent literacy skills of young children with disabilities when making clinical recommendations.

  7. Educational achievement and chronic pain disability: mediating role of pain-related cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Randy S; Geisser, Michael E

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relation between level of educational achievement (LOE) and the clinical morbidity associated with chronic pain. a multidisciplinary pain rehabilitation program located within a university hospital. Two hundred ninety-nine consecutive patients with chronic spinal pain, average age 39.6 years (SD = 10.7) and with an average duration of pain of 41.9 months (SD = 51.6). Age, duration of pain, sex, and compensation and litigation status were controlled for in the statistical analysis because each was found to be significantly associated with LOE. Pain intensity was assessed by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Affective distress was assessed by the Global Severity Index from the Brief Symptom Inventory. Severity of depressive symptoms was derived from scores from the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale. Pain beliefs and pain coping strategies were assessed by the Survey of Pain Attitudes and the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, respectively. Finally, self-report of pain-related disability was assessed by the Pain Disability Index. After controlling for relevant covariates, LOE was unrelated to pain intensity, severity of depressive symptoms, or affective distress, but was inversely related to self-reported disability. Persons with lower LOEs possessed a greater belief that pain is a "signal of harm," unrelated to emotional experience, disabling and uncontrollable. They also endorsed more passive and maladaptive coping strategies, including a tendency to catastrophize about their pain. Path analysis indicated that, after controlling for the influence of both the belief that pain is a "signal of harm" and catastrophizing on the association between LOE and disability, this relation loses statistical significance. These results suggest that pain-related cognitions mediate the relation between LOE and pain disability and that persons with lower LOEs are more likely to develop maladaptive pain beliefs and coping strategies.

  8. Choice of Professional and Educational Route in High School Students with Disabilities: University Education in the Context of Motivation and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantor V.Z.

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a questionnaire survey in the context of the idea of continuity of school and university education of persons with disabilities. 90 senior students with visual, hearing and motor impairments were the respondents of the survey. The purpose of the survey was to study the motives, preferences and needs of school graduates among disabled people, which determine the choice of their vocational and educational route. The survey reveals features of motivation for professional choice of various categories of enrollees with disabilities and its informational support; assesses the level of these enrollees needs in helping by career counselors; identifies the preferred forms of higher education by persons with disabilities; characterizes the needs of people with disabilities in special equipment and services in obtaining higher education, as well as in adaptation of educational programs in the university. The resulting practical-oriented conclusions concern both purpose and content of the work with disabled enrollees from among school graduates as well as approaches to the organization of higher education for persons with disabilities.

  9. Attitudes of preservice physical educators toward individuals with disabilities at University Parthenope of Napoli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Nardo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inclusion refers to the notion that all students, regardless of disability (mild or severe, will be taught in regular education classes even if special resources are needed. Attitudes about inclusion are extremely complex and vary from country to country and school to school. One of the factors influencing the effective implementation of inclusion is the teacher's attitudes. The latest results from literature show that attitudes toward people with disabilities are changing in a positive direction over the last few decades. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an undergraduate adapted physical education course on the attitudes of pre-service physical educators toward individuals with disabilities. Methods: The Attitudes Towards Individuals with Physical Disabilities in Physical Education (ATIPDPE instrument, based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991 was used to measure the attitudes of pre-service teachers within three groups of students of the Department of Sport Science at the Università Degli Studi di Napoli "Parthenope" (Italy enrolled in the 1st and 3rd year of Bachelor's studies in the Department of Sport Science, and students enrolled in the last year of a Master degree in Motor Activities and Preventive for Health. The software package SPSS 19.0 was used to analyze results via a Mann-Whitney U test and multiple regression analysis. Results: Although no significant differences between the groups were found in relation to group year or subject major, results found positive attitudes of pre-service teachers towards inclusion (Physical Education (PE 1st year attitude (ATT mean = 58.93; PE 3rd year ATT mean = 61.11; Postgraduate 2nd year mean = 59.80, as well as very high intentions. Attitudes were found to account for 30% of variance of intentions (R2 = .30. Conclusion: This research concluded that it is necessary to further improve and develop attitudes and intentions

  10. Assessment of students with disabilities in physical education: a quantitative research on students in upper secondary schools in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Mong, Hanne Herigstad

    2014-01-01

    Masteroppgave - Norges idrettshøgskole, 2014 The purpose of this master thesis was to write a research article concerning assessment of students with a disability in physical education. Part I in this thesis is the supplementary theory and method being used, and part II is the research article. The main goal for this master thesis was to understand how students with a disability were assessed, and how they perceive the assessment process in physical education. It was also of...

  11. Secondary General Education Teachers' Attitudes toward Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Valerie A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, educators have struggled with including students with disabilities in the general education classroom with their nondisabled peers. The inclusion educational model was utilized in this study to explore secondary teachers' attitudes toward inclusive educational…

  12. The Voice of Jordanian Parents of Young Children with Disabilities on Involvement in Their Children's Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyassat, Mizyed A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the literature in the field of special education supports the argument that involving parents in the educational process is more likely to positively influence children's educational outcomes, this research aims at exploring the position of Jordanian parents of young children with disabilities in terms of their involvement. A qualitative…

  13. A Canada-Ukraine Collaborative Initiative for Introducing Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities in Ukraine: Participant Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreman, Tim; McGhie-Richmond, Donna; Kolopayvea, Alla; Tarenchenko, Oksana; Mazin, Dymtro; Crocker, Cheryl; Petryshyn, Roman

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the experiences of Canadian and Ukrainian educators who collaborated on a 5-year Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) funded project to develop local capacity to implement inclusive education for children with disabilities in Ukraine. Ukrainian and Canadian educators and project coordinators engage in reflective…

  14. Psychometric Characteristics of a Sexuality Education Survey for Teachers of Secondary School Students with Learning Disabilities in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Chai Tin; Lee, Lay Wah

    2017-01-01

    Delivery of sexuality education to secondary school students in Malaysia started since 1989. However, this area of education was neglected for secondary students with learning disabilities. Therefore, in order to explore their needs for sexuality education, society's perceptions especially teachers' towards this matter should be considered. To…

  15. Study on safety educations against individual causal factors of unsafe acts and specification of target trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Ayako; Takeda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Many accidents and incidents are caused by unsafe acts. It is important to reduce these unsafe acts for preventing the accidents. The countermeasures for each causal factor behind unsafe acts are needed, however, comparing with improvement of facilities, workers-oriented measures such as safety educations are not sufficient. Then the purposes of this study are as follows: 1) to investigate the individual factors which have great impact of unsafe acts and the existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors, 2) to specify the target trainees to perform these safety educations. To identify common factors that affect unsafe act significantly, a web survey was conducted to 500 workers who have regularly carried out accident prediction training (i.e. Kiken-Yochi training). They were asked the situation which they were apt to act unsafely by free description. As the result, the following three main factors were extracted: impatience, overconfidence, and bothersome. Also, it was found that there were few existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors except for overconfidence. To specify the target trainees to perform safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these three factors, another web survey was conducted to 200 personnel in charge of safety at the workplace. They were asked the features of workers who tended to act unsafely by age group. The relationship between the factor that need to mitigate and the trainee who need to receive the education were clarified from the survey. (author)

  16. Unequal Treatment or Uneven Consequence: A Content Analysis of Americans with Disabilities Act Title I Disparate Impact Cases from 1992 – 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara P. Johnston

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study identified patterns and trends of litigation in all reported U.S. Appellate Court ADA cases charged under the theory of disparate impact (unintentional discrimination from 1992 through 2012. The results produced four themes: accommodation(s; workplace culture, norms, and policies; judicial process; and policy space; and three relationships: gap-filling, weighing and balancing, and maintaining status quo versus effecting social change. The results may provide information about the types of workplace policies and procedures that are most frequently litigated. Disability scholars, advocates, and practitioners may be able to use the information to develop education and outreach strategies for employers on best practices for hiring, accommodating, and promoting employees with disabilities. The results may also be used to educate and inform advocates about the process of litigation. A greater understanding of how judges make decisions in a subset of ADA cases may increase employees with disabilities' ability to self-advocate in the workplace.

  17. Why Educators Support Self-Determination for Students with Disabilities [and] Why Families Support Self-Determination for Students with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Inst. on Community Integration.

    Two brief papers provide reasons to support self-determination for students with disabilities, with one paper written from the perspective of educators and one written from the parents' perspective. Each paper discusses 11 benefits of self-determination, including: (1) personal control, (2) motivation, (3) prosocial behaviors, (4) self-awareness,…

  18. "It's Just a Disability" or Is It?: Stigma, Psychological Needs, and Educational Outcomes in African American Adolescents with Learning-Related Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizzie, Karmen Tamika

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation project was to examine the extent to which the special education context, riddled with labeling and teasing, affected the motivation, academic self-concept, grades, and academic achievement of African American adolescents with learning-related disabilities. This dissertation research is situated within two…

  19. Abuse and Young Children with Disabilities: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Catherine; Santos, Rosa Milagros

    2017-01-01

    Legislation in the United States, such as the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act, mandates service system collaboration to meet the complex needs of young children with disabilities who have experienced abuse. This literature review examines extant literature related to young…

  20. Educational differentials in disability vary across and within welfare regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambois, Emmanuelle; Solé-Auró, Aïda; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    -band), but was large in the Czech Republic (eg, 1.9 (1.7-2.2)), Denmark, Belgium, Italy and Hungary. The high-educated groups had a small relative AL-advantage in Denmark (eg, 0.9 (0.8-1.1)), but a large AL-advantage in Lithuania (eg, 0.5 (0.4-0.6)), half of the Baltic and Eastern European countries, Norway...... health-related activity limitation (AL) in the 2009 European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) across 26 countries classified into four welfare regime groups. Logistic models adjusted by country, age and sex (in all 30-79 years and in three age-bands) measured the country-specific ORs...... social differentials in health....

  1. 20 CFR 627.220 - Coordination with programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. 627.220 Section 627.220 Employees' Benefits... of the Higher Education Act including the Pell grant program. (a) Coordination. Financial assistance programs under title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (HEA) (the Pell Grant program, the...

  2. Tablet Technology to Monitor Physical Education IEP Goals and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavay, Barry; Sakai, Joyce; Ortiz, Cris; Roth, Kristi

    2015-01-01

    The Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that all children who are eligible for special education services receive an individualized education program (IEP). Adapted physical education (APE) professionals who teach physical education to children with disabilities are challenged with how to best collect and monitor student…

  3. The impact of a faculty training program on inclusive education and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriña, Anabel; Carballo, Rafael

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the knowledge gained by 20 faculty members following their participation in a training program on inclusive education and disability. The study, which was conducted at an university in Spain, aimed to design, implement and evaluate a program for training faculty members to respond in an inclusive manner to the needs of students with disabilities. An initial, formative and summative qualitative evaluation was carried out and four instruments were used for collecting the data: group and individual interviews, written open-ended questionnaires and observations. The data were analyzed inductively, using a category and code system. The results reveal that, after the training program, faculty considered what they had learned to be useful for their professional practice and highlighted that they felt better-informed and better-trained in relation to disability and were more aware of the needs of students with disabilities. Finally, in the conclusions section, the paper discusses the results in relation to those reported by other studies, and offers some recommendations for universities planning to implement training policies designed to build more inclusive learning environments. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The Cost of Acting "Girly": Gender Stereotypes and Educational Choices

    OpenAIRE

    Favara, Marta

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at horizontal sex segregation in education as a factor contributing to gender segregation in the labor market. Economic theories fail to explain why women with the same years of schooling and educational attainment as men are under-represented in many technical degrees, which typically lead to better paid occupations. Following Akerlof and Kranton (2000), I research whether gender identity affects boys' and girls' educational choices and when the gendered pattern appears firs...

  5. Kant and education. Reflections regarding the act of teaching.

    OpenAIRE

    William Fernando Hernández Buitrago,

    2013-01-01

    This article is a reflection on Kant 's work and its implications for education. At first there is a distinction between subjectivism and subjectivity to explain what the dogmatism of reality. The conception of the educational as an exercise from which should enable the understanding of reality and the adequacy of maximum objective laws allows , in youth , training in autonomy. This leads to the idea that the student must become the architects of their training process . Educating is, in this...

  6. ReACT!: An Interactive Educational Tool for AI Planning for Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogmus, Zeynep; Erdem, Esra; Patogulu, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ReAct!, an interactive educational tool for artificial intelligence (AI) planning for robotics. ReAct! enables students to describe robots' actions and change in dynamic domains without first having to know about the syntactic and semantic details of the underlying formalism, and to solve planning problems using…

  7. Education creates comfort and challenges stigma towards children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M; Aston, Megan; MacLeod, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Children with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are frequent users of the healthcare system, yet nurses report they receive little education regarding specialized medical, social and relational needs of this population. Therefore, parents take on a greater burden of care while their child is in hospital than do parents of typically developing children. This article reports findings from a qualitative study that used feminist poststructuralism to examine the hospital experiences of eight children with IDs, 17 mothers and 12 nurses. Nurses and mothers reported a lack of knowledge and education regarding the healthcare of children with ID and identified a need for more education. Participants noted that physical care of children with ID was prioritized as more important than communication and relationships. This unintentional prioritization was socially and institutionally constructed through stigma and stereotypes about people with IDs. Nurses and parents offered suggestions to access and increase ID education for healthcare professionals.

  8. Elusive Sex Acts: Pleasure and Politics in Norwegian Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Stine H. Bang

    2012-01-01

    While there is little political opposition towards sex education as such in Norway, recent attempts at reforming the subject reveal underlying heteronormative presumptions that seem resistant to reform. While a focus on homosexuality is included in the national curriculum at all levels of compulsory education, the sexual practices involved in…

  9. Mathematics education and students with learning disabilities: introduction to the special series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, D P

    1997-01-01

    The prevalence of students with mathematics learning disabilities has triggered an interest among special education researchers and practitioners in developing an understanding of the needs of this group of students, and in identifying effective instructional programming to foster their mathematical performance during the school years and into adulthood. Research into the characteristics of students with mathematics learning disabilities is being approached from different perspectives, including developmental, neurological and neuropsychological, and educational. This diversity helps us develop a broader understanding of students' learning needs and difficulties. Special education assessment practices encompass a variety of approaches, including norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and nonstandardized procedures, depending on the specific assessment questions professionals seek to answer. Students' mathematical knowledge and conceptual understanding must be examined to determine their strengths and weaknesses, curriculum-based progress, and use of cognitive strategies to arrive at mathematical solutions. Research findings have identified empirically validated interventions for teaching mathematics curricula to students with mathematics learning disabilities. Research studies have been grounded in behavioral theory and cognitive psychology, with an emergent interest in the constructivist approach. Although research studies have focused primarily on computational performance, more work is being conducted in the areas of story-problem solving and technology. These areas as well as other math curricular skills require further study. Additionally, the needs of adults with math LD have spurred educators to examine the elementary and secondary math curricula and determine ways to infuse them with life skills instruction accordingly. As the field of mathematics special education continues to evolve, special educators must remain cognizant of the developments in and

  10. Illinois State Plan: Adult Education and Family Literacy. Under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Adult Education and Family Literacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community College Board, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document contains Illinois' State Plan for Adult Education and Family Literacy under Title II of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 for July 1, 1999, through June 30, 2015. The plan is comprised of the following sections: (1) Eligible agency certifications and assurances; (2) Description of the steps to ensure direct and equitable access;…

  11. Institutions of Higher Education Under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Standards Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Wage and Hour Div.

    The Fair Labor Standards Act contains provisions and standards concerning minimum wages, equal pay, maximum hours and overtime pay, recordkeeping, and child labor. These basic requirements apply to employees engaged in interstate commerce or in the production of goods for interstate commerce and also to employees in certain enterprises that are so…

  12. The Equal Pay Act: Higher Education and the Court's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Paul S.; Swanson, Austin D.

    1994-01-01

    Effects of the Equal Pay Act of 1963 for college and university employees are reviewed through an examination of trends in court decisions and legal treatment of the issues. It is concluded that case law has been evolutionary, with concepts of "equal,""work," and others not altered drastically by the courts in recent years.…

  13. A socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education: past problems, current concerns, and future possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, David J.; Valle, Jan W.

    2015-12-01

    In this article we assert the value of a socio-cultural reframing of science and dis/ability in education. We begin by problematizing current issues in education pertaining to the often-unquestioned concept of dis/ability and the impact that has upon research, theory, practice, and policy. As our topic is broad, we have chosen to focus upon four interconnected areas: (1) the historical mistrust of science and pseudo-science by people with dis/abilities; (2) the pervasive use of pseudo-science within the contemporary field of special education; (3) the use of dis/ability studies in education (DSE) to provide a contrast between a traditional positivist framing and a socio-cultural framing of dis/ability, and; (4) a brief exploration of what a DSE/socio-cultural grounding looks like for both schools and classroom teachers. In sum, our intention is to engage science educators to reject deficit-notions of dis/ability in favor of understanding it as part of human variation, and consider the personal and professional benefits of this shift.

  14. Special Education and Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Dyslexia Special Education and Research Past Issues / Winter 2016 Table of Contents Special Education Services The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act ( ...

  15. An Investigation of the Attitudes Held by General Education Teachers toward Students with Disabilities in a Pilot Inclusive Education Program in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mngo, Agnes Y.

    2017-01-01

    Problem Statement: The literature from Cameroon depicts that the implementation of inclusive education is not only in its embryonic stage but faces resistance from educators who are still not accepting of the presence of students with disabilities in general education classrooms. This resistance has been attributed to several factors ranging from…

  16. Public Policy and the Shaping of Disability: Incidence Growth in Educational Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lee Baker

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Autism has gained the attention of policy makers and public administrators in recent years. The surge in prevalence, in tandem with a growing social preference for community inclusion of individuals with disabilities, strains a variety of policy infrastructures. Autism and related disorders, which were first described in 1943, were originally thought to be extremely low incidence and usually coincident with mental retardation. In accordance with the disability policy paradigm of the era, public services for autism were provided predominantly in institutional settings. Since then, however, autism and related disorders have come to be understood as more common than was originally thought and more rarely associated with mental retardation. In this article, shift-share analysis is used to gain insight into how the growth in autism incidence is being differentially experienced and recorded within a single arena of policy across the United States. The challenges associated with a sudden growth in supply (that is the number of children with autism, while unique to autism in some respects, include aspects that are similar for other disabilities and in policy challenges in other arenas. Especially since the implementation of the Government Performance Results Act of 1996, there is increased pressure to create public policy infrastructures that are anchored by clearly cut categorical service delivery. If the categories themselves leave significant room for interpretation and their use actually has a shaping effect on the target population, then it is important to administration and policy evaluation to understand how the effect is playing out.

  17. Attachment to employment and education before work disability pension due to a mental disorder among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila-Holappa, Pauliina; Joensuu, Matti; Ahola, Kirsi; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna

    2016-05-13

    We examined attachment to employment and education among young adults before they were granted a fixed-term work disability pension due to psychiatric diagnosis, and the factors associated with this attachment. The data comprised all persons aged 18-34 who received a new-onset fixed-term disability pension compensation due to a mental disorder in Finland in 2008 (N = 1163). The data were derived from pension applications and the enclosed medical records, and were linked to employment records from a period of three years before the disability pension. We analysed the factors associated with attachment to employment or education with log-binomial regression analysis. Fifty percent of the participants were attached to employment or education before work disability pension. The attached were more often women; had higher basic and vocational education; had mood disorder rather than psychosis diagnosis as a primary diagnosis; and had no record of harmful alcohol use or drug use, or recorded symptoms of mental disorders already at school-age. The level of attachment to employment or education before work disability pension is low among young adults with mental disorders and several risk factors predict poor attachment; severe or comorbid mental disorder, early-life psychiatric morbidity, substance use, male sex, low basic education, and lacking vocational education.

  18. The role of special education teachers in facilitating peer relationships among students with mild intellectual disabilities in lower secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigstad, Hanne Marie Høybråten

    2017-01-01

    Students with intellectual disabilities may lack sufficiently developed skills to initiate qualitatively good social interactions; thus, they might be in need of assistance. This study examined special education teachers' role in facilitating peer relationships among students with mild intellectual disabilities in a mainstream school context. The study was based on qualitative semi-structured interviews with nine special education teachers who belong to special education groups in lower secondary schools. A thematic structural analysis was used to identify themes. The teachers made substantial efforts to promote social competence and ensure optimal conditions to foster peer interactions. An "academic-oriented" education, divergent attitudes, challenges in teacher collaboration, and organizational constraints may be barriers. In a mainstream school, the role of special education teachers appears to be dependent on the basic values of the school management in terms of real opportunities to foster peer relationships among students with mild intellectual disabilities.

  19. Accessing the Common Core Standards for Students with Learning Disabilities: Strategies for Writing Standards-Based IEP Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    Since the reauthorization of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2004, standards-based individualized education plans (IEPs) have been an expectation for serving students with disabilities in the K-12 public school setting. Nearly a decade after the mandates calling for standards-based IEPs, special educators still struggle…

  20. How to educate professionals for the professional meeting with adults with intellectual disabilities/impairments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Britta

    My ph.d.-work in general reflects aspects from disability research, research on professions, ethics, a socio-political context and modernization. This article just reflects minor parts of the work. How are you as an adult with intellectual disabilities recognized and seen? From a traditional point.......g. public management and modernization? On one hand the meeting or encounter represents essential values and ethical aspects according to professional traditions and standards as part of the welfare system in Denmark. On the other hand people with intellectual impairments in our welfare society often...... of view the professional work would be characterized by care, support and development, communication, ethics, recognition and respect. Are these values at risk in our contemporary welfare system? And how do we make these values part of a professional education which itself is under pressure from e...

  1. Applying an ecological framework to understand transition pathways to post-secondary education for youth with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; Duncanson, Michelle; Niles-Campbell, Nadia; McDougall, Carolyn; Diederichs, Sara; Menna-Dack, Dolly

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of youth with physical disabilities and clinicians who support them in their transition to post-secondary education (PSE). Most research on transition to PSE has focused on youth with intellectual disabilities while there is a lack of research on youth with physical disabilities. This study drew on 30 interviews with 20 youth with disabilities and 10 clinicians. We used Bronfrenbrenner's ecological framework to inform our analysis. Our results showed that there are several important individual skills that youth need to be successful in transitioning to PSE. Youth with disabilities experienced supports from peers and family that influence their transition to PSE. Several disability-specific issues (e.g., coping, self-care, disclosure, and accommodations) were often a barrier to transitioning to PSE. Clinicians and youth both reported that improved inter-professional collaboration and inter-agency partnerships were needed to enhance the transition experience. Societal attitudes (stigma and discrimination), policies, and the timing of transitions also influence youth's transition. Applying an ecological approach helped to provide a more holistic perspective of the PSE transitions and emphasizes the need to consider more than just preparing individuals but also where they are transitioned. Implications for rehabilitation Clinicians and educators should continue to promote the development of relevant life skills (e.g., self-advocacy, disclosure, and navigating public transportation) that youth need to succeed in post-secondary education. Clinicians should continue to educate and support youth regarding the process for disclosing their condition and how to request and set up accommodations in PSE. Clinicians should connect youth with disabilities to appropriate resources that can support them and continue to help them to set career goals and develop career plans. There is a critical need for improved inter

  2. Kant and education. Reflections regarding the act of teaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fernando Hernández Buitrago,

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection on Kant 's work and its implications for education. At first there is a distinction between subjectivism and subjectivity to explain what the dogmatism of reality. The conception of the educational as an exercise from which should enable the understanding of reality and the adequacy of maximum objective laws allows , in youth , training in autonomy. This leads to the idea that the student must become the architects of their training process . Educating is, in this sense , constantly and relentlessly assume our human condition as a " to be " , but mostly as a "must " . When we fulfill requirements , we mark our behaviors and actions that have nothing to do with the ends we seek . So the adoption of attitudes and doctrines with assimilation not make unrelated indoctrination and education as a process of manipulation instruction and dehumanize humans.

  3. 3 CFR 8398 - Proclamation 8398 of July 24, 2009. Anniversary of the Americans With Disabilities Act, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... once again poised to make history for people with disabilities. I am proud to announce that the United... and look toward a brighter future, we recognize that our country has made great progress. More than... improving the lives of people with disabilities. I encourage States, localities, and communities across the...

  4. Original article University students with learning disabilities at the Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kucharská

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The paper deals with learning disabilities (LD of university students in the Czech Republic. The first part describes most common trends in professional care of students with LD in historical context, the second part analyses contemporary situation of support of students with LD during their university studies. Pivotal part of the text describes the situation at Faculty of Education, Charles University in Prague, from the perspective of state LD students, their difficulties and means of possible support. PARTICIPANTS AND PROCEDURE Qualitative analysis of functional diagnostics took place in the frame of evidence of 15 students with learning disabilities. Focal point of the functional diagnostics is a structured interview in which an identification of needed modification for studying with specific educational needs of students with LD takes place. RESULTS From our analyses it can be stated, that students with LD apply for registration basing on their experience with high school status of a student with SD, or that their decision is influenced by their current study problems or the fact that they went through a modified entrance exam. We have also discovered the fact, that except for the difficulties which result from the type and degree of the disability and which can be compensated by specific approaches, students also need an emotional and social support. Learning disability is not, however, perceived only as a disadvantage, many students have stated that it has motivated them in their further development. CONCLUSIONS Achieved results point to general specifics to the perceived difficulties, to the specifics of the concrete degrees and to the further personal (emotional, social characteristics of LD students and they support recommended modification for successful studies.

  5. The effect of neuroscience education on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Butler, David S; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of neuroscience education (NE) for pain, disability, anxiety, and stress in chronic musculoskeletal (MSK) pain. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All experimental studies including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), nonrandomized clinical trials, and case series evaluating the effect of NE on pain, disability, anxiety, and stress for chronic MSK pain were considered for inclusion. Additional limitations: studies published in English, published within the last 10 years, and patients older than 18 years. No limitations were set on specific outcome measures of pain, disability, anxiety, and stress. Data were extracted using the participants, interventions, comparison, and outcomes (PICO) approach. Methodological quality was assessed by 2 reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. This review includes 8 studies comprising 6 high-quality RCTs, 1 pseudo-RCT, and 1 comparative study involving 401 subjects. Most articles were of good quality, with no studies rated as poor or fair. Heterogeneity across the studies with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, established compelling evidence that NE may be effective in reducing pain ratings, increasing function, addressing catastrophization, and improving movement in chronic MSK pain. For chronic MSK pain disorders, there is compelling evidence that an educational strategy addressing neurophysiology and neurobiology of pain can have a positive effect on pain, disability, catastrophization, and

  6. 77 FR 3455 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records-Migrant Education Bypass Program Student Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records--Migrant Education Bypass Program... (Privacy Act), the Department of Education (Department) publishes this notice of a new system of records... called a ``system of records.'' The Migrant Education Program (MEP) is authorized under Title I, Part C...

  7. Realizing the Educational Rights of Children with Disabilities: An Overview of Inclusive Education in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Lynn; Hashemi, Goli; Noumi, Christian; Ritchie, Allison; Skead, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    All children deserve access to education, including those in low income countries. Educators and teachers share a desire to promote inclusive education, and can came together, such as the current group of authors did, to educate themselves about current developments. This paper examines published research relevant to inclusive education in…

  8. Promoting Prosocial Beliefs And Behavior Toward People With Disabilities In Nepal Through A Children’s Entertainment-Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J Brown

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThis quasi-experimental field study examines the prosocial influences of a children's entertainment-education television programme, Khushi Ko Sansar, on children’s beliefs and intended behaviour towards people with disabilities in Nepal.MethodPre-test and post-test survey data were gathered from 357 Nepali children from nine communities that took part in the study. The children were shown two television episodes in which the star of the programmes, a dog named Khush, befriends and visits people with disabilities.ResultsPost-test results show that children developed strong identification with Khush and adopted his prosocial beliefs and behaviour towards people with disabilities.ConclusionsThe authors conclude that the entertainment-education television programme, Khushi Ko Sansar, provided a positive role model for children who encounter people with disabilities. Implications of these findings suggest that entertainment-education media can improve the treatment of people with disabilities and can promote beneficial health beliefs and practices.Key words: Children’s television, entertainment-education, Nepal, people with disabilities, role modelsdoi 10.5463/DCID.v22i2.33 

  9. The Every Student Succeeds Act: Strengthening the Focus on Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michelle D.; Winn, Kathleen M.; Reedy, Marcy A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article offers (a) an overview of the attention federal policy has invested in educational leadership with a primary focus on the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), (b) a summary of the critical role school leaders play in achieving the goals set forth within federal educational policy, and (c) examples of how states are using the…

  10. “You’re such a good friend”: A woven autoethnographic narrative discussion of disability and friendship in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Anthony Castrodale

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors discuss friendship as a method of qualitative inquiry. After defining friendship and positing it as a kind of fieldwork, the methodological foundations of friendship as method are established (Tillmann-Healy, 2003. The purpose of this narrative woven autoethnographic study is to examine the role of friendship in describing disabling physical and attitudinal access barriers in a university setting. Friendship represents a critical analytic lens through which disabled/nondisabled individuals alike may examine their positions, understandings, regimes of practices, and particular knowledges. Friends —Mark and Dan — discuss their experiences of disablement and reflections on dis/ability. The authors draw from their experiences of friendship and disability in higher education and their allied identities to discuss and examine questions of access, disclosure, and inclusion.

  11. Teachers' Knowledge of Special Education Policies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) greatly improved the educational opportunities for students with disabilities. Teachers require knowledge of the law to deliver necessary and appropriate services to students with disabilities. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine teachers' knowledge of special education…

  12. Guidelines for Successful Parent Involvement: Working with Parents of Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Kelli E.; Diliberto, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    According to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA), school systems must ensure that the individualized education program (IEP) team includes the parent of the child with a disability. Teachers often report the challenges of getting parents to attend IEP meetings often assuming parents' lack of interest with involvement…

  13. Increases in knowledge following a course of sex education for people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, W R; Bellshaw, E; Culross, G; Staines, C; Michie, A

    1992-12-01

    Although sex education programmes are thought to be useful in teaching people with intellectual disabilities, there is very little evidence that the material taught is retained by clients. This paper reports data which has been collected routinely on a sex education programme. Forty-six subjects were assessed on their level of sexual knowledge in seven areas: parts of the body, masturbation, male puberty, female puberty, intercourse, pregnancy and childbirth, and birth control and venereal disease. They were retested after a 9-month sex education programme and tested again at a 3-month follow-up. A control group of 14 subjects were tested on two occasions, 4 months apart. There were significant and substantial increases in sexual knowledge on all areas for the experimental group. The control group showed no corresponding increases in knowledge.

  14. Education related to the field of (intellectual) disability - we have to do better!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Britta Kusk

    that this is the result. My findings show different perspectives in this field that are very rarely in focus of any research. Structural barriers are quite important. Among others educational gaps - in general - but also more specific on e.g. ethics and knowledge of legislation. Adults with intellectual disability...... to secure suitable education to ensure that the intentions in the conventions can be fulfilled and to raise a general awareness. Looking into educational orders in Denmark for professional bachelors in this area it seems not at all evident, that this is going to happen. For all programs it relates...... as Emmanuel Lévinas, Axel Honneth and Jürgen Habermas, but also Løgstrup, Buber and Foucault contribute. How can we – in spite of structural, governmental and economic barriers – work with ethical aspects and values as recognition and understanding. My main methodology has been a phenomenological approach...

  15. Developing and Implementing a Postsecondary Education Program for Young Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Processes and Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Grace L.; Gordon, Sarah; Kliethermes, Andrew J.; Regester, April; Baldini, Deborah; Grant, Amber

    2018-01-01

    Postsecondary education programs (PSEs) for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in colleges and universities expand opportunities for these young adults and result in positive outcomes, including employment and improved social networks. Although participating in postsecondary education results in numerous benefits for…

  16. A Review and Analysis of the History of Special Education and Disability Advocacy in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Pratt, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Most reviews of the history of special education in the United States survey reforms from the 1960s to the1970s, thus inferring the field is fairly young and progress is quite recent. However, this recent era of reform is not unprecedented. The history of disability advocacy and the development of special education in the United States began a…

  17. Perceptions of Disability and Access to Inclusive Education in West Africa: A Comparative Case Study in Dakar, Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drame, Elizabeth R.; Kamphoff, Kaytie

    2014-01-01

    Educating students with disabilities in an inclusive general education setting has been shown to increase academic achievement, increase peer acceptance, increase self esteem, create a richer friendship network, and have positive lifetime benefits (higher salaried jobs, independent living). In addition, inclusion can have benefits for students…

  18. Sexuality Education and Implications for Quality of Care for Individuals with Adult Onset Disability: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglseder, Kate; Webb, Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the need for sexuality education for individuals with adult onset physical disabilities as it relates to quality of life and to identify current trends in the provision of sexuality education by health care providers relating to quality of care. Data Sources: Literature review from January 1986 to December 2016. Study…

  19. A Natural Variation Study of Engagement and Confidence among Parents of Learners with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Alexandra; Humphrey, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Parents' involvement in their children's education is known to be an important predictor of a range of adaptive outcomes. For learners with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), lack of parental engagement and confidence has been highlighted as a problematic issue. Given this, the objectives of the current study were to: (i) determine…

  20. The Role of Schools in Constructing Self-Perceptions of Sport and Physical Education in Relation to People with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Relatively little work has been carried out upon the effect of educational environment upon the sporting involvement of children with disabilities. This paper is concerned with the educational experiences of a group of athletes who competed in the Sydney 2000 Paralympic Games. It highlights the major influence that the impact of the educational…

  1. Disability and Adult Life: Dependence on Social Security among Former Students with Special Educational Needs in Their Late Twenties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, Jon Olav

    2013-01-01

    This article, by Jon Olav Myklebust from Volda University, Norway, presents analyses of social security dependence among students with special educational needs in Norway who at the start of upper secondary school had various disabilities--of a somatic, psychological and/or social nature. They were all educated in ordinary schools, in special or…

  2. Secondary Engineering Design Graphics Educator Service Load of Students with Identified Categorical Disabilities and Limited English Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Li, Songze; Williams, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    The ever-changing student population of engineering design graphics students necessitates broader sets of instructor adeptness. Specifically, preparedness to educate and provide adequate educational access to content for students with identified categorical disabilities and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) is now an essential readiness skill for…

  3. The Benefits of High School Career and Technical Education (CTE) for Youth With Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Mary M; Newman, Lynn A; Javitz, Harold S

    2016-11-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2), this study examines the career and technical education (CTE) course taking of high school students with learning disabilities (LD) in the context of the national movement toward higher standards for determining whether students leave high school "college and career ready." Descriptive analyses document the extent of general education CTE course taking overall by students with LD and their engagement in a concentrated program of occupationally specific general education CTE, a level of course taking early research has linked to improved post-high school employment outcomes. Propensity score modeling was used to determine whether either type of CTE course taking is related to higher odds of full-time employment after high school and whether results differ with the length of time youth were out of high school. Results show no benefits of CTE course taking overall, but demonstrate a significant positive effect for participating in a concentration of occupationally specific CTE in the first 2 post-high school years; effects are nonsignificant for later years. The implications for high school programming and transition planning for students with LD are discussed. © Hammill Institute on Disabilities 2015.

  4. MEANS OF ORIENTEERING IN EDUCATION OF JUNIOR SCHOOLCHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Mayorkina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the adapted methods of basic training in orienteering (BTIO on the correction of physical fitness and mental development of junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability (ID.Methods. The following methods were used: theoretical analysis of literature, generalization, «forming» experiment, mathematical statistics, testing of physical qualities, psychological testing and pedagogical observation.Results and scientific novelty. The conditions of basic training in orienteering for junior schoolchildren with intellectual disability are determined wherein the correction of physical fitness and mental functions through the means of orienteering will be the most effective. Methods of basic training were substantiated and adapted for the capabilities of junior schoolchildren with ID. The author has defined the effect of orienteering exercises on the development of speed-andstrength qualities, overall endurance, movement speed, coordination; fine motor skills; stability, volume and switching of attention, volume of picturesque and verbal memory, representational thought and verbal-logical thinking; volitional qualities.The study has revealed wholesome influence of orienteering on correction of physical fitness and mental functions of schoolchildren of 9–10 years with intellectual disability.Practical significance. The results could be used for education of junior schoolchildren with ID during extra classes in special (correctional schools of Type-7 and during remedial classes (remedial and developing teaching in schools of general education. The results could also be applied for training of teachers of additional education. The adapted methods of BTIO for junior schoolchildren with ID could be used for normally developing children of younger age. Practical recommendations on the organization and conditions of orienteering exercises for junior schoolchildren with ID, games and intellectual

  5. Educational Psychologists' Report-Writing: Acts of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Sunaina; Mercieca, Daniela; Mercieca, Duncan P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the major tasks of educational psychologists is the writing of reports. Often, all involvement, assessment and intervention culminate in the production of a report. This paper explores critically the tensions involved in writing reports which are closed down in their conformity to requirements of different bodies, while looking for…

  6. The Politics of Elementary and Secondary Education Act Waivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrabel, Stephani L.; Saultz, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; McEachin, Andrew; Duque, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Executive leadership of the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) initiated a flexibility offering from No Child Left Behind. Our work explores specific design decisions made in these state-specific accountability systems as associated with state political environments, resources, and demographic characteristics. Our analysis, focused on 42 states…

  7. Right to education: the school enrollment of people with intellectual disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alberto David Araujo

    2015-12-01

    by the Brazilian Constitution, that has in equality one of its core values. From a newspaper report, denouncing the difficulty of people with disabilities to actualize their enrollment in the regular school system, this article analyzes the current constitutional configuration of rights to inclusion and education of that vulnerable group, pointing out the ways offered by the Brazilian legal system to guarantee and actualize these rights. Any damage caused by the refusal of the school enrollment, diffuse or individual, moral or material, are liable to repairing.

  8. Haunted by Math: The Impact of Policy and Practice on Students with Math Learning Disabilities in the Transition to Post-Secondary Education in Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Melinda S.

    2016-01-01

    Only six states in India currently identify learning disabilities as a category of disability. This article highlights the challenges students with math learning disabilities face in their transition from secondary school to higher secondary education and Bachelor of Commerce degree programs in the state of Maharashtra. While the current…

  9. Agriculture Teachers' Perception and Practice for Teaching Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Justin Lee

    2011-01-01

    Federal legislation mandates that appropriate education be provided for all students in US public schools (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004; No Child Left Behind, 2001). The use of evidence-based instructional practices for special education, such as Direct Instruction and Strategy Instruction, is one example of mandated…

  10. A Review of Research on the Educational Benefits of the Inclusive Model of Education for Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks-Monroe, Sherry L.

    2011-01-01

    The practice of inclusion is not a new idea to the educational setting; it is a newer term. Before No Child Left Behind, during the 1970s students with disabilities were mainstreamed into the general education population under Public Law 94-142. Public law 94-142, which was renamed to Individuals with Disabilities Educational Act (IDEA), required…

  11. Arthritis self-management education programs: a meta-analysis of the effect on pain and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsi, Asra; LaValley, Michael P; Wang, Philip S; Avorn, Jerry; Solomon, Daniel H

    2003-08-01

    Some reports suggest that education programs help arthritis patients better manage their symptoms and improve function. This review of the published literature was undertaken to assess the effect of such programs on pain and disability. Medline and HealthSTAR were searched for the period 1964-1998. The references of each article were then hand-searched for further publications. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if the intervention contained a self-management education component, a concurrent control group was included, and pain and/or disability were assessed as end points. Two authors reviewed each study. The methodologic attributes and efficacy of the interventions were assessed using a standardized abstraction tool, and the magnitude of the results was converted to a common measure, the effect size. Summary effect sizes were calculated separately for pain and disability. The search strategy yielded 35 studies, of which 17 met inclusion criteria. The mean age of study participants was 61 years, and 69% were female. On average, 19% of patients did not complete followup (range 0-53%). The summary effect size was 0.12 for pain (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.00, 0.24) and 0.07 for disability (95% CI 0.00, 0.15). Funnel plots indicated no significant evidence of bias toward the publication of studies with findings that showed reductions in pain or disability. The summary effect sizes suggest that arthritis self-management education programs result in small reductions in pain and disability.

  12. Psychometrics and utility of Psycho-Educational Profile-Revised as a developmental quotient measure among children with the dual disability of intellectual disability and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwinesh, Merlin Thanka Jemi; Joseph, Rachel Beulah Jansirani; Daniel, Anna; Abel, Julie Sandra; Shankar, Satya Raj; Mammen, Priya; Russell, Sushila; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar

    2012-09-01

    There is no agreement about the measure to quantify the intellectual/developmental level in children with the dual disability of intellectual disability and autism. Therefore, we studied the psychometric properties and utility of Psycho-Educational Profile-Revised (PEP-R) as a developmental test in this population. We identified 116 children with dual disability from the day care and inpatient database of a specialised Autism Clinic. Scale and domain level scores of PEP-R were collected and analyzed. We examined the internal consistency, domain-total correlation of PEP-R and concurrent validity of PEP-R against Gesell's Developmental Schedule, inter-rater and test-retest reliability and utility of PEP-R among children with dual disability in different ages, functional level and severity of autism. Besides the adequate face and content validity, PEP-R demonstrates a good internal consistency (Cronbach's α ranging from 0.91 to 0.93) and domain-total correlation (ranging from 0.75 to 0.90). The inter-rater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.96) and test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.87) for PEP-R is good. There is moderate-to-high concurrent validity with GDS (r ranging from 0.61 to 0.82; all Ps = 0.001). The utility of PEP-R as a developmental measure was good with infants, toddlers, pre-school and primary school children. The ability of PEP-R to measure the developmental age was good, irrespective of the severity of autism but was better with high-functioning children. The PEP-R as an intellectual/developmental test has strong psychometric properties in children with dual disability. It could be used in children with different age groups and severity of autism. PEP-R should be used with caution as a developmental test in children with dual disability who are low functioning.

  13. The educational orientation for modes of acting of students of the preschool race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirtha García-Pérez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The science like a professional institutionalized activity involves: Prolonged education, internalization of moral values, development of styles of thought and acting. From there his impact in the formation of the professional entrusted with offering the children of the babyhood according to the requests of the society, educational integral attention. It is observed in the educational reality than the behavior of the students of the race, not always you love one another with the social requirements presented to this professional in the making, that leads to the need of an educational orientation; With emphasis in the attention to the modes of professional acting of the students of the race bachelor's degree in Preschool Education, for his performance in the different spheres where they interact.

  14. Islam - Science Integration Approach in Developing Chemistry Individualized Education Program (IEP for Students with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Suprihatiningrum

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper is based on a research which tries to explore, explain and describe Islam - science integration approach to develop an Individualized Education Program (IEP for students with disabilities in chemistry lesson. As a qualitative case study, this paper is aimed at investigating how Islam - science integration approach can be underpinned for developing the IEP for Chemistry. Participants were recruited purposively and data were collected by interviews; documents’ analysis; and experts’ assessment (i.e. material experts, inclusive education experts, media experts, chemistry teachers and support teachers, then analyzed using content-analysis. The result shows Islam - science integration approach can be a foundation to develop the chemistry IEP by seeking support for the verses of the Qur'an and corresponding hadiths. Even although almost all the subject matter in chemistry can be integrated with Islamic values, this study only developed two contents, namely Periodic System of Elements and Reaction Rate.

  15. Agency and Advocacy: Disabled Students in Higher Education in Ghana and Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Louise; Croft, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Between 10% and 15% of the world's population are thought to be disabled. The 2006 United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is an example of emerging global policy architecture for human rights for disabled people. Article 24 states that disabled people should receive the support required to facilitate their effective…

  16. DSS and Accommodations in Higher Education: Perceptions of Students with Psychological Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Kathleen F.

    2013-01-01

    The number of individuals with psychological disabilities attending colleges and universities has increased steadily over the last decade. However, students with psychological disabilities are less likely to complete their college programs than their non-disabled peers and peers with other types of disabilities. This qualitative study explored how…

  17. Do working conditions explain the increased risks of disability pension among men and women with low education? A follow-up of Swedish cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkstedt, Daniel; Backhans, Mona; Lundin, Andreas; Allebeck, Peter; Hemmingsson, Tomas

    2014-09-01

    Rates of disability pension are greatly increased among people with low education. This study examines the extent to which associations between education and disability pensions might be explained by differences in working conditions. Information on individuals at age 13 years was used to assess confounding of associations. Two nationally representative samples of men and women born in 1948 and 1953 in Sweden (22 889 participants in total) were linked to information from social insurance records on cause (musculoskeletal, psychiatric, and other) and date (from 1986-2008) of disability pension. Education data were obtained from administrative records. Occupation data were used for measurement of physical strain at work and job control. Data on paternal education, ambition to study, and intellectual performance were collected in school. Women were found to have higher rates of disability pension than men, regardless of diagnosis, whereas men had a steeper increase in disability pension by declining educational level. Adjustment of associations for paternal education, ambition to study, and intellectual performance at age 13 had a considerable attenuating effect, also when disability pension with a musculoskeletal diagnosis was the outcome. Despite this, high physical strain at work and low job control both contributed to explain the associations between low education and disability pensions in multivariable models. Working conditions seem to partly explain the increased rate of disability pension among men and women with lower education even though this association does reflect considerable selection effects based on factors already present in late childhood.

  18. Disabilities Inclusive Education Systems and Policies Guide for Low- and Middle-Income Countries. Occasional Paper. RTI Press Publication OP-0043-1707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Anne M.; Bulat, Jennae

    2017-01-01

    Having a disability can be one of the most marginalizing factors in a child's life. In education, finding ways to meet the learning needs of students with disabilities can be challenging, especially in schools, districts, regions, and countries with severely limited resources. Inclusive education--which fully engages all students, including…

  19. Disabling and Enabling Technologies for Learning in Higher Education for All: Issues and Challenges for Whom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Bagga-Gupta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Integration, inclusion, and equity constitute fundamental dimensions of democracy in post-World War II societies and their institutions. The study presented here reports upon the ways in which individuals and institutions both use and account for the roles that technologies, including ICT, play in disabling and enabling access for learning in higher education for all. Technological innovations during the 20th and 21st centuries, including ICT, have been heralded as holding significant promise for revolutionizing issues of access in societal institutions like schools, healthcare services, etc. (at least in the global North. Taking a socially oriented perspective, the study presented in this paper focuses on an ethnographically framed analysis of two datasets that critically explores the role that technologies, including ICT, play in higher education for individuals who are “differently abled” and who constitute a variation on a continuum of capabilities. Functionality as a dimension of everyday life in higher education in the 21st century is explored through the analysis of (i case studies of two “differently abled” students in Sweden and (ii current support services at universities in Sweden. The findings make visible the work that institutions and their members do through analyses of the organization of time and space and the use of technologies in institutional settings against the backdrop of individuals’ accountings and life trajectories. This study also highlights the relevance of multi-scale data analyses for revisiting the ways in which identity positions become framed or understood within higher education.

  20. Implementation of the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) in the Portuguese educational system: Attitudes and training needs of special education teachers’.

    OpenAIRE

    Saragoça, M.; Candeias, A. A.; Rosário, A.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - ICF (WHO, 2001) is the framework of reference in the assessment and intervention process with students with SEN, in the Portuguese educational system. As a consequence special education teachers’ training needs emerged from it. In this study, we characterize the received training and the special education teachers’ attitudes and training needs towards ICF. The sample consisted of 913 Portuguese special educat...

  1. Collaborating with Communities and Higher Education to Address the Health-care Needs of Individuals with Disabilities in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna J. Cech

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with disabilities experience inequities in access to health care, education, employment, and social inclusion. Causes for Change International (CCI, a non-governmental Organization (NGO, using a community-based rehabilitation approach has worked for 20 years to build self-sufficiency, improve health-care services, and education for women, children, and persons with disabilities in Ecuador. CCI initially addressed health; advocacy for individuals with disabilities; and promoted educational opportunities for children with disabilities, starting in one rural community. CCI’s outreach has expanded through Ecuador’s coastal provinces, Andean provinces, and Galapagos Islands. CCI also focused on local health-care workforce development, developing employment skills for individuals with disabilities and social inclusion for this population. CCI collaborated with local organizations, government, and universities to provide resources, managed by local leadership. Key program elements of the CCI approach include (1 develop trust between CCI, local communities, local agencies, and government; (2 empower local groups to assume leadership and sustain programs; (3 support communities and groups invested in developing self-sufficiency; and (4 strengthen collaborations and partnerships between local and international organizations, universities, and government agencies. Key lessons learned by CCI are to be supportive of cultural differences; understand that limited financial and material resources may limit the program development; recognize that it is difficult not to foster dependent relationships with communities and appreciate the importance of working with and within the host country’s governmental systems. CCI is expanding its service base to other regions of Ecuador and is focusing on development of the Ecuadorian health-care workforce and social inclusion opportunities for individuals with disability. The efforts of a small NGO have

  2. Collaborating with Communities and Higher Education to Address the Health-care Needs of Individuals with Disabilities in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Donna J; Alvarado, Zully J

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities experience inequities in access to health care, education, employment, and social inclusion. Causes for Change International (CCI), a non-governmental Organization (NGO), using a community-based rehabilitation approach has worked for 20 years to build self-sufficiency, improve health-care services, and education for women, children, and persons with disabilities in Ecuador. CCI initially addressed health; advocacy for individuals with disabilities; and promoted educational opportunities for children with disabilities, starting in one rural community. CCI's outreach has expanded through Ecuador's coastal provinces, Andean provinces, and Galapagos Islands. CCI also focused on local health-care workforce development, developing employment skills for individuals with disabilities and social inclusion for this population. CCI collaborated with local organizations, government, and universities to provide resources, managed by local leadership. Key program elements of the CCI approach include (1) develop trust between CCI, local communities, local agencies, and government; (2) empower local groups to assume leadership and sustain programs; (3) support communities and groups invested in developing self-sufficiency; and (4) strengthen collaborations and partnerships between local and international organizations, universities, and government agencies. Key lessons learned by CCI are to be supportive of cultural differences; understand that limited financial and material resources may limit the program development; recognize that it is difficult not to foster dependent relationships with communities and appreciate the importance of working with and within the host country's governmental systems. CCI is expanding its service base to other regions of Ecuador and is focusing on development of the Ecuadorian health-care workforce and social inclusion opportunities for individuals with disability. The efforts of a small NGO have helped build

  3. Interactive Apps Promote Learning of Basic Mathematics in Children With Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Pitchford

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactive apps delivered on touch-screen tablets can be effective at supporting the acquisition of basic skills in mainstream primary school children. This technology may also be beneficial for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND as it can promote high levels of engagement with the learning task and an inclusive learning environment. However, few studies have measured extent of learning for SEND pupils when using interactive apps, so it has yet to be determined if this technology is effective at raising attainment for these pupils. We report the first observational study of a group of 33 pupils with SEND from two primary schools in Malawi that are implementing a new digital technology intervention which uses touch-screen tablets to deliver interactive apps designed to teach basic mathematical skills. The apps contain topics that align to the national curriculum. To assess learning gains, rate of progress (minutes per topic for each pupil was determined by calculating the average time taken to complete a topic. Progress rate was then correlated with teacher ratings of extent of disability and independent ratings of pupil engagement with the apps. Results showed SEND pupils could interact with the apps and all pupils passed at least one topic. Average progress rate for SEND pupils was twice as long as mainstream peers. Stepwise regression revealed extent of disability significantly predicted progress rate. Further exploratory correlations revealed pupils with moderate to severe difficulties with hearing and/or language made slower progress through the apps than those with greater functionality in these two domains because the use of verbal instructions within the apps limited their capacity to learn. This original quantitative analysis demonstrates that interactive apps can raise learning standards in pupils with SEND but may have limited utility for pupils with severe difficulties. Software modifications are needed to

  4. Interactive Apps Promote Learning of Basic Mathematics in Children With Special Educational Needs and Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Nicola J; Kamchedzera, Elizabeth; Hubber, Paula J; Chigeda, Antonie L

    2018-01-01

    Interactive apps delivered on touch-screen tablets can be effective at supporting the acquisition of basic skills in mainstream primary school children. This technology may also be beneficial for children with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) as it can promote high levels of engagement with the learning task and an inclusive learning environment. However, few studies have measured extent of learning for SEND pupils when using interactive apps, so it has yet to be determined if this technology is effective at raising attainment for these pupils. We report the first observational study of a group of 33 pupils with SEND from two primary schools in Malawi that are implementing a new digital technology intervention which uses touch-screen tablets to deliver interactive apps designed to teach basic mathematical skills. The apps contain topics that align to the national curriculum. To assess learning gains, rate of progress (minutes per topic) for each pupil was determined by calculating the average time taken to complete a topic. Progress rate was then correlated with teacher ratings of extent of disability and independent ratings of pupil engagement with the apps. Results showed SEND pupils could interact with the apps and all pupils passed at least one topic. Average progress rate for SEND pupils was twice as long as mainstream peers. Stepwise regression revealed extent of disability significantly predicted progress rate. Further exploratory correlations revealed pupils with moderate to severe difficulties with hearing and/or language made slower progress through the apps than those with greater functionality in these two domains because the use of verbal instructions within the apps limited their capacity to learn. This original quantitative analysis demonstrates that interactive apps can raise learning standards in pupils with SEND but may have limited utility for pupils with severe difficulties. Software modifications are needed to address specific

  5. “It’ll Grow Organically and Naturally": The Reciprocal Relationship between Student Groups and Disability Studies on College Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Allegra Stout; Ariel Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Although few colleges and universities offer undergraduate disability studies curricula, our own experiences suggest that higher education settings provide opportunities for students to engage with and act upon disability studies theories and concepts. To learn more about the interactions between undergraduate student groups and disability studies, we interviewed students and faculty on three campuses. We found that students not only access disability studies theory through both formal and in...

  6. Curricular Critique of an Environmental Education Policy Framework: Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D. Karrow

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The following paper is a curricular critique of an environmental education policy framework called Acting Today, Shaping Tomorrow (2009. It is founded upon: (a an examination of the conventional argument for integrated curriculum models and its relevance to K-12 environmental education; and (b utilization of a typology of integrated curriculum models to analyze an environmental education policy framework within the jurisdiction of Ontario, Canada. In conclusion, Ontario’s environmental education policy framework tends toward an integrated curriculum model referred to as ‘selective infusion.’  The implications for integrated curricular practice are identified, with recommendations for improving the policy framework from an integrated curricular perspective.     Key Words: environmental education, integrated curriculum, curriculum critique, education policy.

  7. Physical education teachers' attitudes towards children with intellectual disability: the impact of time in service, gender, and previous acquaintance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, D; Nalbant, S; Aǧlamıș, E; Baran, F; Kaya Samut, P; Aktop, A; Hutzler, Y

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated attitudes towards teaching students with intellectual disability (ID) within a representative sample of secondary school physical education (PE) teachers, and to determine the effects of age, gender, teaching experience, and having acquaintance with ID and students with ID on their attitudes. Participants were 729 secondary school PE teachers who worked in 81 major cities of Turkey. The Teachers Attitudes towards Children with Intellectual Disability Scale was administered. The statistical analysis revealed that there was no significant effect on factors and total attitudes scores of gender and having students with ID. Significant effects on factors and total attitudes score were found in teaching experiences and having acquaintance with ID. It is encouraged to maintain and further develop in-service education programmes of adapted physical activity for PE teachers. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  8. The Quality Teacher and Education Act in San Francisco: Lessons Learned. Policy Brief 09-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Heather J.

    2009-01-01

    This policy brief reviews the recent experience of the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD) with the development and approval of Proposition A. Proposition A (also known as the Quality Teacher and Education Act, or QTEA) included a parcel tax mainly dedicated to increasing teachers' salaries, along with a variety of measures introducing…

  9. Education Issues Raised by S.744: The Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Garrett

    2014-01-01

    This brief report summarizes the requirements for undocumented immigrants set forth by the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act (S.744). Assuming that S.744 will move forward in Congress, the report also examines issues having to do with certain language, civics and government, and education/training provisions…

  10. Jump-Starting Educational Reform. Implementing British Columbia's Comprehensive School Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Paul

    An educational reform effort to implement a comprehensive school act in British Columbia (Canada) is analyzed with a focus on some sociotechnical and political aspects. An overview of the content, background, and implementation of the reform effort is followed by identification of seven contradictions inherent in the plan. Contradictions are as…

  11. Educational Malpractice: Breach of Statutory Duty and Affirmative Acts of Negligence by a School District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    A cause of action for educational malpractice may well receive initial judicial recognition through successfully harmonizing allegations of breach of a statutory duty of care and acts of negligence of a type and magnitude that would distinguish a student-plaintiff's injuries from others for whose benefit the statutory duty was created. (Author)

  12. Implementation of inclusive education for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities in African countries: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyere, Christiana; Aldersey, Heather Michelle; Lysaght, Rosemary; Sulaiman, Surajo Kamilu

    2018-04-25

    To advance understanding of practices that support inclusion of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities in inclusive education classrooms in Africa by conducting a review of the extant literature. Five academic databases were searched supplemented by a hand search of key journals and references of included studies. Two authors independently screened studies via a reference manager (Covidence) which allowed for blinding. A third author was consulted in cases of conflict. Thirty articles that provided empirical evidence of inclusive education implementation were included. Eight articles highlighted practices that support inclusion of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Using Bronfenbrenner's bioecological framework, findings revealed that inclusive education implementation is influenced by factors on the bio level, micro level, meso level, and macro level. Recommendations for promoting inclusive education implementation are provided. Inclusion goes beyond teachers and requires strong commitment of other stakeholders such as families and governments. To guarantee the smooth inclusion of children with special education needs and particularly with intellectual and developmental disabilities, a set of practices validated through rigorous research as supportive and unique and that can be universal to Africa is wise. Implications for rehabilitation A number of strategies were identified that can improve the classroom inclusion of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Development of policies that support such strategies could improve implementation. Inclusion goes beyond teachers. Rehabilitation professionals (i.e. occupational therapists) and educational professionals should partner to identify practical solutions to the challenges of creating inclusive environments for children with special education needs. Committing more resources and time towards the development and implementation of special education

  13. Inclusive design in architectural practice: Experiential learning of disability in architectural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kerry; Calder, Allyson; Mulligan, Hilda

    2018-04-01

    The built environment can facilitate or impede an individual's ability to participate in society. This is particularly so for people with disability. Architects are well placed to be advocates for design that enhances societal equality. This qualitative study explored architectural design students' perceptions of inclusive design, their reflections resulting from an experiential learning module and the subsequent influence of these on their design practice. Twenty four architectural design students participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Data were analyzed thematically. Three themes were evident: 1) Inclusive design was perceived as challenging, 2) Appreciation for the opportunity to learn about the perspectives of people with disabilities, and 3) Change of attitude toward inclusive design. Experiential learning had fostered reflection, changes in attitude and the realization that inclusive design, should begin at the start of the design process. For equitable access for all people to become reality, experiential learning, coupled with positive examples of inclusive design should be embedded in architectural education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 11565 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings Type: Quarterly Meeting. Dates and Times.... Agenda: Public Comment Sessions; Emergency Management; Developmental Disabilities and Bill of Rights Act, International Development, National Summit on Disability Policy 2010, United States Marine Corps Research...

  15. Provision of educationally-related services for children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    Children and adolescents with chronic diseases and disabling conditions often need related services. As medical home professionals, pediatricians can assist children, adolescents, and their families with the complex federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems associated with these services. Expanded roles for pediatricians in Individual Family Service Plan, Individualized Education Plan, and 504 Plan development and implementation are recommended. The complex range of federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and systems for special education and related services for children and adolescents in public schools is beyond the scope of this statement. Readers are referred to the policy statement "The Pediatrician's Role in Development and Implementation of an Individual Education Plan (IEP) and/or an Individual Family Services Plan"(1) by the American Academy of Pediatrics for additional background materials.

  16. Postpartum Depression and the Affordable Care Act: Recommendations for Social Work Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Keefe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA mandates ongoing research on postpartum depression; however, very little research has been published in social work journals and in advanced-level textbooks on this topic. This article describes the problem of postpartum depression and argues that social work educators and researchers must pay greater attention to this issue in light of the ACA mandates, so that social workers can provide effective services to postpartum mothers and their children. The Council on Social Work Education’s recently published Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards are considered while making curriculum recommendations on postpartum depression for social work educators.

  17. Education and social inclusion of people with disabilities in five countries in West Africa: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Emma; Lynch, Paul; Virendrakumar, Bhavisha; Rowe, Stacy; Schmidt, Elena

    2017-07-14

    An estimated 1 billion people worldwide live with some form of disability. With the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals and the "Leave no one behind" agenda, there is a global momentum to ensure that disadvantaged groups, not least people with disabilities, are included and accounted for, in mainstream development efforts. However, in many low-income settings little is known about disability and the policies and programs in place to improve the lives of those affected. This literature review describes the extent and quality of published and unpublished literature on education and social inclusion of people with disabilities in five West African countries: Cameroon, Liberia, Mali, Sierra Leone and Senegal. Fifty-four unique documents met inclusion criteria of the review and described related policy and legislation; national and international stakeholders; intervention programs and primary research related to disability and inclusion. The majority of documents were from Sierra Leone (19); and four described more than one country. Primary research included mainly qualitative studies and cross-sectional surveys; 33 sources were critically appraised with the majority being attributed unclear risk of bias (20). The findings call for (i) standardized tools for monitoring the implementation of programs and policies at national level; (ii) improved stakeholder coordination mechanisms; (iii) development and adoption of coordinated approaches to measuring disability and social exclusion; (iv) rigorous evaluations of the effectiveness of disability programs and (v) disaggregation of routine data by disability. Implication for Rehabilitation There is a need for standardized tools for monitoring the implementation of programs and policies at national level. Countries that have not yet ratified the UNCRPD or the protocol should be supported to do so. Stakeholder coordination mechanisms need to be improved. Improved coordination between stakeholders involved in

  18. Collaboration in Transition Assessment: School Psychologists and Special Educators Working Together to Improve Outcomes for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Springer, Ben; Wilkins, Melinda K.; Anderson, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The ultimate goal for school psychologists, special education practitioners, and other professionals who work with adolescents with disabilities is to help students plan and prepare to transition from school to adult life with the skills and knowledge to live happy, productive, and fulfilling lives. This article describes how school psychologists…

  19. The Prevalence and Determinants of Overweight and Obesity among French Youths and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Attending Special Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begarie, Jerome; Maiano, Christophe; Leconte, Pascale; Ninot, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of overweight and obesity and a panel of potential determinants among French youths and adults with an intellectual disability (ID). The sample used consisted of 1120 youths and adults with an ID, from 5 to 28 years old, attending a French special education school. The results indicated that 19.8% of the…

  20. Causal Effects of Career-Technical Education on Postsecondary Work Outcomes of Individuals with High-Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heok In; Rojewski, Jay W.; Gregg, Noel

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2, a propensity score analysis revealed significant causal effects for a secondary career and technical education (CTE) concentration on the postsecondary work outcomes of adolescents with high-incidence disabilities. High school students identified as CTE concentrators (three or more high…

  1. Effects of Leisure Education Programme Including Sportive Activities on Perceived Freedom in Leisure of Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuzun, Ezgi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to determine the effect of leisure education programme including sportive activities on the perceived freedom in leisure of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities. The research was designed with an experimental group (n = 37) and a control group (n = 34), and was conducted among a total of 71…

  2. Increasing Access to Learning for the Adult Basic Education Learner with Learning Disabilities: Evidence-Based Accommodation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Noel

    2012-01-01

    Accommodating adult basic education (ABE) learners with learning disabilities (LD) is common practice across many instructional, testing, and work settings. However, the results from this literature search indicate that very few empirically based studies are available to support or reject the effectiveness of a great deal of accommodation…

  3. Applying Universal Design for Learning and the Inclusion Spectrum for Students with Severe Disabilities in General Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Michelle; Miller, Nancy; Black, Ken

    2017-01-01

    General physical education (GPE) affords many opportunities for students with and without disabilities to interact and develop positive peer relationships. This case study describes one teacher's use of collaborative practices, universal design for learning (UDL), and the inclusion spectrum to create an accessible learning environment in which the…

  4. Children's Moral Judgments and Moral Emotions Following Exclusion of Children with Disabilities: Relations with Inclusive Education, Age, and Contact Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina; Buholzer, Alois

    2013-01-01

    We investigated relations between children's moral judgments and moral emotions following disability-based exclusion and inclusive education, age, and contact intensity. Nine- and 12-year-old Swiss children (N = 351) from inclusive and noninclusive classrooms provided moral judgments and moral emotion attributions following six vignettes about…

  5. Distortions and Dichotomies in Inclusive Education for Children with Disabilities in Cambodia in the Context of Globalisation and International Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyanpur, Maya

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the consequences of transferring technical information on disability and inclusive education from the North to the South within the context of international development. Based on data from the author's experiences as a US-trained Indian international consultant in Cambodia, it analyses how problems with translation and…

  6. Factors Related to Teachers' Attitudes towards the Inclusive Education of Students with Severe Intellectual Disabilities in Riyadh, Saudi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquraini, Turki A.

    2012-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the majority of students with severe intellectual disabilities are still educated in special schools that do not meet their unique needs for interaction with their typically developing peers in public schools settings where they could improve social, communication and academic skills. One of the most significant obstacles to…

  7. The Impact of Inclusive Education (IE) on the Rights of Children with Intellectual Disabilities (IDs) in Chegutu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapuranga, Barbra; Dumba, Oswald; Musodza, Blessing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of Inclusive Education (IE) on the rights of children with Intellectual Disabilities in schools around Chegutu. The qualitative case study method was used for the research. Questionnaires and interviews were used to collect data from schools around Chegutu. Random sampling was used to choose the sample group from…

  8. Psycho-Educational Assessment of Specific Learning Disabilities: Views and Practices of Australian Psychologists and Guidance Counsellors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteyard, John D.; Gilmore, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of the views and practices of 203 Australian psychologists and guidance counsellors with respect to psycho-educational assessment of students with specific learning disabilities (SLDs). Results from an online survey indicated that practitioners draw upon a wide range of theoretical perspectives when…

  9. Development and Evaluation of a Curriculum to Improve Educational and Career Outcomes for High School Girls with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doren, Bonnie; Lombardi, Allison; Lindstrom, Lauren; Gau, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Despite the national focus on improving transition services and post-school outcomes, many young women with disabilities still face significant barriers in obtaining meaningful employment and pursuing postsecondary education or training. Although recent reports indicate that the gender gap in employment rates may be diminishing, in this same…

  10. A Synthesis of Instructional Strategies in Geoscience Education Literature That Address Barriers to Inclusion for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabajal, Ivan G.; Marshall, Anita M.; Atchison, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    People with disabilities make up the largest minority population in the U.S. yet remain sorely underrepresented in scientific disciplines that require components of field-based training such as the geosciences. This paper provides a critical analysis of broadening participation within geoscience education literature through the use of accessible…

  11. Agency in the Darkness: 'Fear of the Unknown', Learning Disability and Teacher Education for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Deborah; Goodey, Chris

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes inclusion phobia as a sharper and more operative definition of the 'fear of the unknown' often cited as an explanation for resistance to inclusive education. Using 'severe and profound learning disability' as the paradigm case, we situate the phobia surrounding this label in its social and historical context. Our hypothesis is…

  12. Effect of Spark Motor Program on the development of gross motor skills in intellectually disabled educable boys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Faal Moganloo

    2013-11-01

    Results: Spark Program caused significant changes in all the variables of the study, except speed and agility, in the experimental group after 24 sessions. The changes included: agility and speed (P=0.731, balance (P=0, strength (P=0.002, and bilateral coordination (P=0. Conclusion: Spark Motor Program can improve gross motor skills in intellectually disabled educable students.

  13. Sexual Health Education for Young People with Disabilities: Research and Resources for Parents/Guardians. From Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydlowski, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    All young people need access to and can benefit from sexual health information. Young people with disabilities have the same right to this education as their peers. However, considerations must be made in order to modify the program to allow for information to be understood and learned in a way that is meaningful to them. Parents/guardians might…

  14. A Theoretical Analysis of the Performance of Learning Disabled Students on the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Mark; And Others

    Two studies were conducted to (1) analyze the subtest characteristics of the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery, and (2) apply those results to an analysis of 50 fourth grade learning disabled (LD) students' performance on the Battery. Analyses indicated that the poorer performance of LD students on the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive…

  15. Can Intelligence Testing Inform Educational Intervention for Children with Reading Disability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian G. Elliott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the value of intelligence testing for the purpose of informing us how best to intervene with children with reading disability. While the original function of IQ testing was to ascertain whether a child was capable of profiting from schooling, there are many who now claim that cognitive assessment offers a range of diagnostic and prescriptive functions which can help teachers in delivering effective educational programs. This paper interrogates such assertions in relation to the assessment of IQ, cognitive strengths and weaknesses, executive functions, and the use of dynamic testing/assessment. The paper concludes that current evidence indicates that cognitive measures have limited relevance for instructional planning, and cognitive training programs have yet to show sufficient academic gains. For these reasons, it is recommended that our energies should be directed to the continuing development of powerful forms of academic skills-based instruction operating within a response to intervention framework.

  16. PARTICULARITIES OF EDUCATIONAL OBJECTS IN COMPUTER-ASSISTED LEARNING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa ISĂILĂ

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The current trend in computer-assisted learning is the creation of reusable learning objects. They can be used independently or can be coupled to make lessons that best fit the users' learning needs. From this perspective, the specific of learning objects for people with disabilities is to ensure accessibility and usability. Using standards in the process of creating learning objects provide flexibility in achieving lessons, thus being helpful for educational content creators (teachers. Metadata have an essential role in achieving interoperability and provide standardized information about the learning objects, allowing the searching, accessing and their finding. The compliance of eLearning standards ensures the compatibility and portability of materials from one system to another, which reduces the time and cost of development.

  17. Disability and inclusive education in an Italian Region: analysis of the data for the school year 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzarini, Evamaria; Parmeggiani, Antonia

    2017-02-17

    In Italy, pupils with disabilities enroll in mainstream schools and attend the ordinary classes at all educational levels. For the past twelve years, the Region Emilia Romagna has witnessed an increase in the number of children who are in need of special support. The aim of the study was to identify the causes of disability in children attending public schools during the school year 2012-2013. The study was designed as a cross-sectional survey. Data were obtained from the Regional Education Department, and divided into categories based on clinical diagnoses. Statistical analyses were performed to analyze the distribution of the diagnostic categories among Provinces and school grades. The most recurrent combinations of illnesses were identified. Intellectual disability was the most common cause of impairment (38,5%), often associated with epilepsy and autism. Hyperkinetic disorder associated with specific disorders of scholastic skills was the most recurrent combination of diagnoses. Rare diseases were diagnosed in 4,1%, whereas 5,0% of cases were affected by Psychopathological disorders. Our study is the first in Italy for its focus on the causes of children's disabilities in an Italian region. Being familiar with the causes of disability affecting the children of a territory is important to allocate the available resources efficiently, and to ensure all children's effective social integration.

  18. Service user perspectives on palliative care education for health and social care professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorry; Barr, Owen; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McConkey, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from European and American studies indicates limited referrals of people with learning (intellectual) disabilities to palliative care services. Although professionals' perceptions of their training needs in this area have been studied, the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and family carers are not known. This study aimed to elicit the views of people with learning disabilities, and their family carers concerning palliative care, to inform healthcare professional education and training. A qualitative, exploratory design was used. A total of 17 people with learning disabilities were recruited to two focus groups which took place within an advocacy network. Additionally, three family carers of someone with a learning disability, requiring palliative care, and two family carers who had been bereaved recently were also interviewed. Combined data identified the perceived learning needs for healthcare professionals. Three subthemes emerged: 'information and preparation', 'provision of care' and 'family-centred care'. This study shows that people with learning disabilities can have conversations about death and dying, and their preferred end-of-life care, but require information that they can understand. They also need to have people around familiar to them and with them. Healthcare professionals require skills and knowledge to effectively provide palliative care for people with learning disabilities and should also work in partnership with their family carers who have expertise from their long-term caring role. These findings have implications for educators and clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Principal-Identified Challenges, Needs, and Recommendations for Instructional Leadership in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Rose A. Liddell

    2016-01-01

    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, added instructional responsibilities for school principals specific to students with disabilities. However, these laws did not require additional training in special education policy or instruction for principals, despite the existence of…

  20. Weighing the Benefits of Anchored Math Instruction for Students with Disabilities in General Education Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottge, Brian A.; Heinrichs, Mary; Mehta, Zara Dee; Hung, Ya-Hui

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the effectiveness of enhanced anchor instruction and traditional problem instruction in improving the problem-solving performance of 42 seventh-graders with and without disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Students without disabilities profited from contextualized instruction, but benefits for the students with disabilities were…

  1. Examining National Trends in Educational Placements for Students with Significant Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mary E.; Kurth, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Paul E.

    2017-01-01

    Using the least restrictive environments (LRE) data from annual "Reports to Congress," this study examined national trends in placement between 2000 and 2014 for school-aged students considered to have significant disabilities from among the categories of autism (ASD), intellectual disability (ID), multiple disabilities (MD), and…

  2. Disability, Capability, and Special Education: Towards a Capability-Based Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the article was to investigate the claim that the capability approach fares better with an understanding of disability as presented by the World Health Organization's "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health" (ICF) than by the social model, which has been promoted within disability studies. Scholars…

  3. The Use of Technology to Improve Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepo, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is to ensure free appropriate public education for individuals with disabilities in the least restrictive environment. The statute also mandates student's access and services for students' access to devices and technology as part of the individual education…

  4. Awareness-Raising, Legitimation or Backlash? Effects of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities on Education Systems in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Justin J. W.; Edelstein, Benjamin; Blanck, Jonna M.

    2016-01-01

    Global discourse about human rights, education for all, and inclusive education has altered social norms relating to dis/ability and schooling, especially through awareness-raising, by legitimating advocates' positions and by facilitating policy reforms. Affected by societal and educational change, special education systems and their participants…

  5. The Legal Meaning of Specific Learning Disability for IDEA Eligibility: The Latest Case Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific learning disability (SLD), although moderately declining in recent years, continues to be the largest of the eligibility classifications under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA; NCES, 2012). The recognition of response to intervention (RTI) in the 2004 amendments of the IDEA as an approach for identifying students with…

  6. Educational and sex differentials in life expectancies and disability-free life expectancies in São Paulo, Brazil, and urban areas in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram; Andrade, Flávia Cristina Drumond

    2013-08-01

    To estimate transition probabilities between disability states, total life expectancy, and the latter's decomposition into years spent disabled and disability-free by age, sex, and education among older adults in São Paulo, Brazil, and urban areas in Mexico. Applied a micro-simulation method (Interpolative Markov Chains) using longitudinal data. We found large between-country educational differences in incidence of and recovery from disability with higher rates in Mexico than in São Paulo, but no differences in mortality. Older adults in Mexico spent longer time being disability-free than in São Paulo for both levels of education. Males and females in São Paulo spent a larger fraction of their remaining life disabled at every age than their counterparts in urban areas in Mexico. There were educational differences in the prevalence of disability in São Paulo and urban areas in Mexico, and significant educational differences in disability incidence and recovery across sites.

  7. Disability Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Disability & Health Home Disability Overview Disability Inclusion Barriers to Inclusion Inclusion Strategies Inclusion in Programs & Activities Resources Healthy Living Disability & Physical Activity Disability & Obesity Disability & Smoking Disability & Breast ...

  8. Using a flipped classroom and the perspective of families to teach medical students about children with disabilities and special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Mary E; Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy; Kaari, Jacqueline M; Ajumobi, Taiwo T

    2017-10-01

    The need to teach medical students to care for children with disabilities, work effectively with these patients' families, and collaborate with schools has been well established. Yet, what is not clear is the exact nature of the content to be taught and how medical schools develop the systems and enabling structures required to ensure medical education responds to the needs of children with disabilities and their families. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the efficacy of an educational intervention designed to introduce the topics of special education law and practices and working with parents of children with disabilities into an undergraduate medical education pediatrics course. A new curricular element based upon the flipped classroom that included an on-line module followed by participation in a panel discussion comprised of parents of children with disabilities, and concluding with an on-line discussion was implemented. Medical students completed a pre- and post-assessment that evaluated their knowledge of special education law and practices. Students demonstrated increased understanding of special education laws and practices. Qualitative findings showed that students recognized the importance and value of learning the content to support their patients and their patients' families. Based upon study findings, the flipped classroom method improved student knowledge of the topic and students reported they valued the content. This addition to the undergraduate medical curriculum provided students with an effective introductory overview and demonstrated one viable option for incorporating necessary topics into the undergraduate medical curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Portugal's special education law: implementing the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches-Ferreira, Manuela; Simeonsson, Rune J; Silveira-Maia, Mónica; Alves, Sílvia; Tavares, Ana; Pinheiro, Sara

    2013-05-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was introduced in Portuguese education law as the compulsory system to guide eligibility policy and practice in special education. This paper describes the implementation of the ICF and its utility in the assessment process and eligibility determination of students for special education. A study to evaluate the utility of the ICF was commissioned by the Portuguese Ministry of Education and carried out by an external evaluation team. A document analysis was made of the assessment and eligibility processes of 237 students, selected from a nationally representative sample. The results provided support for the use of the ICF in student assessment and in the multidimensional approach of generating student functioning profiles as the basis for determining eligibility. The use of the ICF contributed to the differentiation of eligible and non eligible students based on their functioning profiles. The findings demonstrate the applicability of the ICF framework and classification system for determining eligibility for special education services on the basis of student functioning rather than medical or psychological diagnose. The use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework in special education policy is as follows: • The functional perspective of the ICF offers a more comprehensive, holistic assessment of student needs than medical diagnoses. • ICF-based assessment of the nature and severity of functioning can serve as the basis for determining eligibility for special education and habilitation. • Profiles of functioning can support decision making in designing appropriate educational interventions for students.

  10. The experience affects the message : A reception analysis of how employees within the care of disabled perceive educational movies

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Film is a medium which is mainly used for entertainment. It is a medium that is constantly expanding, and beside from it being a relaxing activity it can also be used for educational purposes. This is an aspect of film that should be valued, since it has the possibility to engage, educate and move its viewers. This is a study which aim is to analyze how employees within the care of disabled in Umeå have perceived educational movies. The movies that the staff has watched are a part of a basic ...

  11. Citizenship Education through an Ability Expectation and “Ableism” Lens: The Challenge of Science and Technology and Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Citizenship education has been debated for some time and has faced various challenges over time. This paper introduces the lens of “ableism” and ability expectations to the citizenship education discourse. The author contends that the cultural dynamic of ability expectations and ableism (not only expecting certain abilities, but also perceiving certain abilities as essential was one factor that has and will continue to shape citizenship and citizenship education. It focuses on three areas of citizenship education: (a active citizenship; (b citizenship education for a diverse population; and (c global citizenship. It covers two ability-related challenges, namely: disabled people, who are often seen as lacking expected species-typical body abilities, and, advances of science and technology that generate new abilities. The author contends that the impact of ability expectations and ableism on citizenship and citizenship education, locally and in a globalized world, is an important and under-researched area.

  12. Against the Standards: Analyzing Expectations and Discourse of Educators regarding Students with Disabilities in a Kindergarten Classroom

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    Fernanda T. Orsati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-year ethnographic case study critically examines the language educators use to describe students with disabilities who are considered to present challenging behaviors in one classroom. Focusing on the language and practices used by one special education teacher and three teaching assistants, this paper explores how educators respond to students’ behaviors by analyzing educators’ utterances and the implication of such use for the education of the students. Using critical discourse analysis, this paper highlights how educators’ language in the classroom reflects a discourse of expectations that is based on various social standards and pressures that educators have to juggle. Educators expressed academic and behavioral standards by comparing students’ performance to the expected norm as well as through comparisons between students. Based on such comparisons, some students were constructed as always lacking and ultimately defined by the adjectives originally used to describe them. Students were perceived to embody defiance or smartness, the characteristics by which they were defined.

  13. [Comparing students in inclusive education to those in special schools: the view of parents of children with learning disabilities].

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    Klicpera, Christian; Klicpera, Barbara Gasteiger

    2004-12-01

    The paper presents the results of a survey of 755 parents of learning disabled children with certified special needs who either attended classes within regular education or special schools. All parents were involved in the decision on the school placement of their children. The experiences of 547 parents of learning disabled students in inclusive classes were contrasted with those of 207 parents of children in special schools. Besides a rather high satisfaction with previous school experiences of their children a number of differences between the two groups of parents could be observed. Parents of students in special schools viewed their children as rather little challenged by their educational requirements whereas those in inclusive education found their children to be overtaxed. The social development of the students in inclusive education was judged as more positive and, generally, a higher rate of parents of learning disabled students in inclusive classes were satisfied with their choice of the educational setting. Although the requirements for parental support concerning studying were higher in inclusive classes this cannot solely explain the differences of experiences with school. In a second step, satisfied parents were compared to dissatisfied parents. It could be found that the group of dissatisfied parents had to make their choice on the educational setting of their children under less favourable conditions and many could not accept that their child had been classified as having special needs. This applied to parents of students in inclusive education as well as to parents of children in special schools. Additionally, parents of students with German as a second language reported to be discontented more frequently. No significant discrepancies could be found between different grades or federal states with different quotas of inclusive education.

  14. Education Policy as an Act of White Supremacy: Whiteness, Critical Race Theory and Education Reform

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    Gillborn, David

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents an empirical analysis of education policy in England that is informed by recent developments in US critical theory. In particular, I draw on 'whiteness studies' and the application of critical race theory (CRT). These perspectives offer a new and radical way of conceptualizing the role of racism in education. Although the US…

  15. Assessing the Social Skills and Problem Behaviors of Adolescents With Severe Disabilities Enrolled in General Education Classes.

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    Lyons, Gregory L; Huber, Heartley B; Carter, Erik W; Chen, Rui; Asmus, Jennifer M

    2016-07-01

    Although enhancing the social competence of students with severe disabilities has long remained a prominent focus of school-based intervention efforts, relatively little attention has focused on identifying the most critical social and behavioral needs of students during high school. We examined the social skills and problem behaviors of 137 adolescents with severe disabilities from the vantage point of both special educators and parents. We sought to identify areas of potential intervention need, explore factors associated with social skill and problem behavior ratings, and examine the extent to which teachers and parents converged in their assessments of these needs. Our findings indicate teachers and parents of high school students with severe disabilities rated social skills as considerably below average and problem behaviors as above average. In addition, lower social skills ratings were evident for students with greater support needs, lower levels of overall adaptive behavior, and a special education label of autism. We found moderate consistency in the degree to which teachers and parents aligned in their assessments of both social skills and problem behavior. We offer recommendations for assessment and intervention focused on strengthening the social competence of adolescents with severe disabilities within secondary school classrooms, as well as promising avenues for future research.

  16. Brief report: Exploring the benefits of a peer-tutored physical education programme among high school students with intellectual disability.

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    Gobbi, Erica; Greguol, Márcia; Carraro, Attilio

    2018-01-29

    The purpose of this study was to explore possible benefits of a peer-tutored physical education programme (PTPE) in comparison with school physical education (SPE) in high school students with intellectual disability. Nineteen students with intellectual disabilities (15 boys, mean age 17.4 ± 1.7 years) were monitored during three PTPE and three SPE classes. A factorial RM-ANOVA was used to test differences on objective measured physical activity (PA), enjoyment and exertion during the two conditions, considering participants' weight condition as independent factor. During PTPE, participants reported higher light intensity PA, enjoyment and exertion than during SPE. Participants with overweight showed less inactive time and higher light intensity PA during PTPE than during SPE. The peer-tutored programme was beneficial for adolescents with intellectual disability, particularly for those in overweight condition. The higher enjoyment found during PTPE may encourage exercise participation of students with intellectual disability. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Progress and Impact. A Report of Programs Funded for 1995-96 by the Comprehensive Health Education Act of 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Jerry L.; Connell, Karen

    During the 1995-96 school year, the Colorado Department of Education supported Comprehensive Health Education Programs as authorized by the Comprehensive Health Education Act of 1990. This report summarizes the projects funded under that grant along with additional observations and recommendations regarding the operation of such grants. Grant…

  18. Social support for students with disabilities in the System of Higher Education in Poland

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    Palagnyuk Yuliana Viktorivna

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The question of social support for students with disabilities is becoming increasingly important for many countries, because despite the adopted legislation many areas of public life remain inaccessible for young people with disabilities. In this connection this article is devoted to the study of Polish experience in social support for students with disabilities in order to develop practical recommendations for improvement of this sector in other countries dealing with this issue.

  19. Influence of farmers educational level on comprehending, acting-upon and sharing of agro advisories

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    M. J. Chandre Gowda

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although short messaging service (SMS through mobile phones has quickly gained popularity among most other sectors in India, its potential is not fully realised in the agriculture sector as a cost effective service to reach farmers and elicit desirable action. Despite the cost effectiveness, mobile messaging has remained a challenge in the farming sector in terms of its end use and action as far as extension systems are concerned. While there could be many influencing factors affecting the utility of mobile messages, this study assumed that educational level of farmers could be a major factor. A telephone survey was conducted to ascertain the influence of farmers’ education on the level of utilisation of mobile-based advisories. Farmers with higher education level showed better comprehension of advisories, acted-upon the advisories more promptly and shared the information with fellow farmers more often than those with lower education level. There was a significant association between comprehending, sharing and acting upon advisories. This has implications to achieve enhanced extension reach with higher efficiency in terms of cost and time.

  20. Creating a Suitable Physical Environment at the Institutions of Higher Education Considering the Needs of Students with Disabilities

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    Dalė Pilipavičiūtė

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work is to develop a model for meas­uring the suitability of a physical environment at the institu­tions of higher education considering the needs of students with disabilities. The article examines the progress in this field under regulations made by the system of indicators and carried out expert survey employing the ranking method. To establish the significance of the developed programs, the importance of calculated indicators and their groups has been determined thus making a model for evaluating the physical environment suitable for the needs of students with disabilities at any institution of higher education in Lithuania.Article in Lithuanian